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Sample records for by-products anaerobic digestion

  1. Anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejnfelt, Anette; Angelidaki, Irini

    2009-01-01

    giving the best results. High concentrations of long-chain fatty acids and ammonia in the by-products were found to inhibit the biogas process at concentrations higher than 5 g lipids dm(-3) and 7 gN dm(-3) respectively. Pretreatment (pasteurization: 70 degrees C, sterilization: 133 degrees C, and alkali...

  2. Anaerobic digestion of organic by-products from meat-processing industry. The effect of pre-treatments and co-digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luste, S.

    2011-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a multi-beneficial biological treatment during which micro-organisms degrade organic material producing biogas (i.e. methane) and stabilised end-product (i.e. digestate). Methane is a versatile renewable energy source and digestate can be used as an organic fertiliser and/or soil improver. Because of the increasing consumption and tightening environment and health legislation, production of organic wastes suitable for anaerobic digestion increases. Animal by-products (ABP) from the meat-processing industry are often rendered (contaminated material), used as feedstock (in fur breeding), or composted. However, ABPs studied could not be utilised in fodder or in animal food production and have currently been rendered or directed to composting, despite being mostly considered unsuitable for composting. Many ABPs are energy-rich, wet and pasty materials and suitable for the anaerobic digestion process. Moreover, suitable pre-treatment to hydrolyse solid materials and/or co-digestion of two or several materials may improve the anaerobic digestion with ultimate goal to increase the methane production, stabilisation and reusability of digestate. The case chosen for more detailed research was that of a middle-sized Finnish meat-processing industry. The aim of the thesis was to evaluate the feasibility of different ABPs presently available for treatment as raw material for anaerobic digestion. Another objective was to enhance the anaerobic digestion process via specific pre-treatments and co-digestion cases with the ultimate aim to increase the methane production and the quality of the digestate. The general goal was to observe the overall process from the perspective of real-circumstances in Finland to rise to needs in practice and to produce exploitable information for adopting sustainable development locally and case-specifically into practice via versatile anaerobic digestion technology. The ABPs studied were highly bio-degradable and especially

  3. Anaerobic Digestion: Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Batstone, Damien J.

    2011-01-01

    with very little dry matter may also be called a digest. The digest should not be termed compost unless it specifically has been composted in an aerated step. This chapter describes the basic processes of anaerobic digestion. Chapter 9.5 describes the anaerobic treatment technologies, and Chapter 9.......6 addresses the mass balances and environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion....

  4. The use of cobs, a by-product of maize grain, for energy production in anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Blandino

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the rising energy demand and the conflict between food, feed and energy crops for agricultural land, there is a growing need for alternative biomasses for energy purposes. New developments in harvesting technology have created the possibility of harvesting cobs as a by-product of maize grain harvesting. The aim of the present work has been to evaluate the potential and limitations of maize cob utilisation in an anaerobic digestion chain, considering the main agronomic, productive and qualitative traits. Maize grain and cob yields as well as the moisture content of samples collected from 1044 (farm fields (located in North West Italy have been determined over the 2012 growing season. Moreover, 27 representative fields were harvested using a modified combine-harvester that is able to collect maize grains and threshed cobs separately. The chemical composition and biochemical methane potential (BMP of the cobs have been analysed. The relative potential yield of maize cobs was established as 18.7% of the grain mass, while the wet cob yield recorded in the field after mechanical harvesting was 1.6 t ha–1. The total solid content was 60%. Fibre fractions represented over 85% of the dry cob matter, lignin content was about 16%, while the protein, ash, lipids and macro-elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium contents were very low compared to the whole-plant maize used for silage. The average BMP of wet threshed cob was 250±20 Nm3 t VS–1. Collected data have underlined that maize cobs could be used as a sustainable feedstock for anaerobic digestion processes.

  5. Anaerobic co-digestion of agricultural by-products with manure, for enhanced biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Marie M.; Fotidis, Ioannis; Kovalovszki, Adam;

    2015-01-01

    potential (BMP) of six agricultural organic byproducts were tested. Consecutively, the byproduct with the highest BMP was used as a co-digestion substrate with manure, in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Meadow grass had the highest BMP value [388 ± 30 NmL of CH4 g–1 of volatile solids (VS)] among......-digestion of 34 g L–1 raw meadow grass with manure increased the methane production rate of the CSTR reactor by 114% compared to the manure alone....

  6. Anaerobic co-digestion of by-products from sugar production with cow manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Cheng; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    Sugar beet leaves (SBL), sugar beet top (SBT), sugar beet pulp (SBP) and desugared molasses (DM) are by-products from the sugar production. In the present study we investigated the potential of SBL, SBT and SBP as feedstock for biogas production. The maximum methane potential of SBL, SBT and SBP...

  7. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  8. Anaerobic co-digestion of meat-processing by-products and sewage sludge - effect of hygienization and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luste, Sami; Luostarinen, Sari

    2010-04-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of a mixture of animal by-products (ABP) from meat-processing industry and of sewage sludge was studied at 35 degrees Celsius for co-digesting such by-products in digesters at wastewater treatment plants. The three reactors were fed with ABP mixture and sewage sludge (1) in a ratio of 1:7 (v/v), (2) in the same ratio but with hygienization (70 degrees Celsius, 60 min) and (3) in a ratio of 1:3 (v/v). Hydraulic retention time (HRT) was decreased from 25 to 20 days and finally to 14 days, while organic loading rates (OLR) ranged from 1.8 to 4.0 kg VS/m(3) day. The highest specific methane yields were achieved with 20-days-HRT (1) 400 + or - 30, (2) 430 + or - 40, (3) 410 + or - 30 m(3) CH(4)/t VS. Hygienization improved methane production to a level above the highest OLR applied (feed ratio 1:3 (3)), while the quality of the digestate remained similar to the other reactors.

  9. Anaerobic Digestion Foaming Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ganidi, Nafsika

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming has been encountered in several sewage treatment plants in the UK. Foaming has raised major concerns for the water utilities due to significant impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. Several foaming causes have been suggested over the past few years by researchers. However, the supporting experimental information is limited and in some cases site specific. The present report aimed to provide a better understanding of the anaerobic di...

  10. Pilot-scale anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge with agro-industrial by-products for increased biogas production of existing digesters at wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragkaki, A E; Fountoulakis, M; Gypakis, A; Kyriakou, A; Lasaridi, K; Manios, T

    2017-01-01

    Due to low degradability of dry solids, most of the digesters at wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) operate at low loading rates resulting in poor biogas yields. In this study, co-digestion of sewage sludge (SS) with olive mill wastewater (OMW), cheese whey (CW) and crude glycerol (CG) was studied in an attempt to improve biogas production of existing digesters at WWTPs. The effect of agro-industrial by-products in biogas production was investigated using a 220L pilot-scale (180L working volume) digester under mesophilic conditions (35°C) with a total feeding volume of 7.5L daily and a 24-day hydraulic retention time. The initial feed was sewage sludge and the bioreactor was operated using this feed for 40days. Each agro-industrial by-product was then added to the feed so that the reactor was fed continuously with 95% sewage sludge and 5% (v/v) of each examined agro-industrial by-product. The experiments showed that a 5% (v/v) addition of OMW, CG or CW to sewage sludge significantly increased biogas production by nearly 220%, 350% and 86% as values of 34.8±3.2L/d, 185.7±15.3L/d and 45.9±3.6L/d respectively, compared to that with sewage sludge alone (375ml daily, 5% v/v in the feed). The average removal of dissolved chemical oxygen demand (d-COD) ranged between 72 and 99% for organic loading rates between 0.9 and 1.5kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Reduction in the volatile solids ranged between 25 and 40%. This work suggests that methane can be produced very efficiently by adding a small concentration (5%) of agro-industrial by-products and especially CG in the inlet of digesters treating sewage sludge.

  11. The anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Boone, D.R. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  12. Anaerobic digestion without biogas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleerebezem, R.; Joosse, B.; Rozendaal, R.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion for the production of methane containing biogas is the classic example of a resource recovery process that combines stabilization of particulate organic matter or wastewater treatment with the production of a valuable end-product. Attractive features of the process include the pr

  13. Mitigation strategies in the agro-food sector: The anaerobic digestion of tomato purée by-products. An Italian case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacenetti, Jacopo, E-mail: jacopo.bacenetti@unimi.it [Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Production, Landscape, Agroenergy, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via G. Celoria 2, 20133 Milan (Italy); Duca, Daniele [Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche 10, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Negri, Marco [Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Production, Landscape, Agroenergy, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via G. Celoria 2, 20133 Milan (Italy); Fusi, Alessandra [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The Mill, Sackville Street, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Fiala, Marco [Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Production, Landscape, Agroenergy, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via G. Celoria 2, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-01

    Tomato processing involves a significant production of residues, mainly constituted by discarded tomatoes, skins, seeds and pulp. Often, these residues are not valorized and represent an added cost for manufacturing companies because of disposal processes, with environmental issues due to the difficult management. The exploitation of these residual materials results complex as their availability is mainly concentrated in few months. A possible solution is the production of biogas employed in a Combine Heat and Power engine for energy production, in line with the 2020 targets of European Union in terms of promotion of energy from renewable resources and greenhouse gas emission reduction. The tomato by-product utilization for energy production as a strategy to reduce the environmental load of tomato purée was evaluated by means of Life Cycle Assessment. Two scenarios were considered: Baseline Scenario — tomato by-products are sent back to the tomato fields as organic fertilizers; Alternative Scenario — tomato by-products are employed in a nearby biogas plant for energy production. Methane production of tomato by-products was assessed by means of specific laboratory tests. The comparison between the two scenarios highlighted reductions for all the impact categories with the Alternative Scenario. The most important reductions are related to particulate matter (− 5.3%), climate change (− 6.4%) and ozone depletion (− 13.4%). Although small, the reduction of the environmental impact cannot be neglected; for example for climate change, the anaerobic digestion of by-products allows a saving of GHG emissions that, over the whole year, is equal to 1.567 tons of CO{sub 2} eq. The results of this study could be up-scaled to the food industries with high heat demand producing considerable amounts of fermentable by-products employable as feedstock for biogas production. - Highlights: • Tomato processing generates byproducts, whose residual mass is 2–5%.

  14. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  15. Anaerobic digestion of solid material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavilin, V.A.; Lokshina, L.Y.; Flotats, X.

    2007-01-01

    A new multidimensional (3 and 2D) anaerobic digestion model for cylindrical reactor with non-uniform influent concentration distributions was developed to study the way in which mixing intensity affects the efficiency of continuous-flow anaerobic digestion. Batch experiments reported and simulate...

  16. Anaerobic digestion in sustainable biomass chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pabon Pereira, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the potential contribution of anaerobic digestion (AD) to the sustainability of biomass chains. Results provide insights in the technological potential to recover energy and valuable by-products from energy crops and residues, and evaluate biomass cascades involving AD technolo

  17. Anaerobic Digestion of Piggery Waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsen, van A.F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes an

  18. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...... requirements. In fact, most advances were achieved during the last three decades, when high-rate reactor systems were developed and a profound insight was obtained in the microbiology of the anaerobic communities. This insight led to a better understanding of anaerobic treatment and, subsequently, to a broader...

  19. Evaluation of methane generation and process stability from anaerobic co-digestion of sugar beet by-product and cow manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboudi, Kaoutar; Álvarez-Gallego, Carlos José; Romero-García, Luis Isidoro

    2016-05-01

    The effect of mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of dried pellets of exhausted sugar beet cossettes (ESBC-DP) and cow manure (CM) on the enhancement of methane generation and process stability were studied with the aim to select the best substrate mixture ratio. A series of batch experiments was conducted using the following five mixture ratios of ESBC-DP:CM: 0:100; 25:75; 50:50; 75:25 and 100:0. Best results were obtained from mixture ratios with ESBC-DP proportions in the range of 25-50%. Mixture ratio of 50:50 showed a specific methane production (SMP) increase of 81.4% and 25.5%, respectively, in comparison with mono-digestion of ESBC-DP and CM. Evolution of the indirect parameter named acidogenic substrate as carbon (ASC) could be used to provide more insight about the process stability of anaerobic digestion. ASC accumulation was observed in reactors with higher ESBC-DP proportions leading to a delay in VFAs consumption and conversion into methane.

  20. [Anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass with animal digestion mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Zhang, Pan-Yue; Guo, Jian-Bin; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2013-02-01

    Lignocellulosic material is the most abundant renewable resource in the earth. Herbivores and wood-eating insects are highly effective in the digestion of plant cellulose, while anaerobic digestion process simulating animal alimentary tract still remains inefficient. The digestion mechanisms of herbivores and wood-eating insects and the development of anaerobic digestion processes of lignocellulose were reviewed for better understanding of animal digestion mechanisms and their application in design and operation of the anaerobic digestion reactor. Highly effective digestion of lignocellulosic materials in animal digestive system results from the synergistic effect of various digestive enzymes and a series of physical and biochemical reactions. Microbial fermentation system is strongly supported by powerful pretreatment, such as rumination of ruminants, cellulase catalysis and alkali treatment in digestive tract of wood-eating insects. Oxygen concentration gradient along the digestive tract may stimulate the hydrolytic activity of some microorganisms. In addition, the excellent arrangement of solid retention time, digesta flow and end product discharge enhance the animal digestion of wood cellulose. Although anaerobic digestion processes inoculated with rumen microorganisms based rumen digestion mechanisms were developed to treat lignocellulose, the fermentation was more greatly limited by the environmental conditions in the anaerobic digestion reactors than that in rumen or hindgut. Therefore, the anaerobic digestion processes simulating animal digestion mechanisms can effectively enhance the degradation of wood cellulose and other organic solid wastes.

  1. Anaerobic digestion and co-digestion of slaughterhouse wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Castellucci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of renewable energy is becoming increasingly necessary in order to address the global warming problem and, as a consequence, has become an high priority for many countries. Biomass is a clean and renewable energy source with growing potential to replace conventional fossil fuels. Among biomass, residual and waste ones represent a great resource for energy generation since they permit both to eliminate a possible waste and to produce energy. In the present work, the case of slaughterhouse wastes (SHWs has been investigated. Anaerobic digestion is nowadays considered as one of the most important and sustainable conversion technology exploiting organic matter and biodegradable wastes. Biogas results from this bio-chemical process and mainly consists of methane and carbon dioxide, leading to produce thermal energy and/or electricity. In this paper, the European Regulations on animal by-products (ABPs are described, and some previous study on anaerobic digestion and co-digestion of ABPs - more precisely SHWs - are considered and compared in order to fix a starting point for future tests on their co-digestion in a micro-scale pilot digester. This is to define optimal feed ratio values which ensure an increasing content of methane in the outgoing biogas.

  2. Prospects of Anaerobic Digestion Technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As the world's largest developing country, China must face the problem of managing municipal solid waste, and the challenge of organic waste disposal is even more serious. Considering the characteristics of traditional waste disposal technologies and the subsequent secondary pollution, anaerobic digestion has various advantages such as reduction in the land needed for disposal and preservation of environmental quality. In light of the energy crisis, this paper focuses on the potential production of biogas from biowaste through anaerobic digestion processes, the problems incurred by the waste collection system, and the efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process. Use of biogas in a combined heat and power cogeneration system is also discussed. Finally, the advantages of anaerobic digestion technology for the Chinese market are summarized. The anaerobic digestion is suggested to be a promising treating technology for the organic wastes in China.

  3. Toxicants inhibiting anaerobic digestion: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ortiz, Raphael; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being used to treat wastes from many sources because of its manifold advantages over aerobic treatment, e.g. low sludge production and low energy requirements. However, anaerobic digestion is sensitive to toxicants, and a wide range of compounds can inhibit the process and cause upset or failure. Substantial research has been carried out over the years to identify specific inhibitors/toxicants, and their mechanism of toxicity in anaerobic digestion. In this review we present a detailed and critical summary of research on the inhibition of anaerobic processes by specific organic toxicants (e.g., chlorophenols, halogenated aliphatics and long chain fatty acids), inorganic toxicants (e.g., ammonia, sulfide and heavy metals) and in particular, nanomaterials, focusing on the mechanism of their inhibition/toxicity. A better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms behind inhibition/toxicity will enhance the wider application of anaerobic digestion.

  4. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  5. Anaerobic digestion foaming causes – A review

    OpenAIRE

    Ganidi, Nafsika; Tyrrel, Sean F.; Cartmell, Elise

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming has been encountered in several sewage treatment plants in the UK. Foaming has raised major concerns for the water companies due to significant impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. Several foaming causes have been identified over the past few years by researchers. However, the supporting experimental information is limited and in some cases absent. The present report aims to provide a detailed review of the current anaerobic digestion foaming proble...

  6. Oxygen Effects in Anaerobic Digestion - II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshai Botheju

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Standard models describing bio-gasification using anaerobic digestion do not include necessary processes to describe digester dynamics under the conditions of oxygen presence. Limited oxygenation in anaerobic digestion can sometimes be beneficial. The oxygen effects included anaerobic digestion model, ADM 1-Ox, was simulated against experimental data obtained from laboratory scale anaerobic digesters operated under different oxygenation conditions. ADM 1-Ox predictions are generally in good agreement with the trends of the experimental data. ADM 1-Ox simulations suggest the existence of an optimum oxygenation level corresponding to a peak methane yield. The positive impact of oxygenation on methane yield is more pronounced at conditions characterized by low hydrolysis rate coefficients (slowly degradable feed and low biomass concentrations. The optimum oxygenation point moves towards zero when the hydrolysis rate coefficient and the biomass concentration increase. Accordingly, the impact of oxygenation on methane yield can either be positive or negative depending on the digestion system characteristics. The developed ADM 1-Ox model can therefore be a valuable tool for recognizing suitable operating conditions for achieving the maximum benefits from partial aeration in anaerobic digestion.

  7. Robust regulation of anaerobic digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailleret, L; Bernard, O; Steyer, J P

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of controlling anaerobic digestion processes. A two-step (i.e. acidogenesis-methanization) mass balance model is considered for a 1 m3 fixed bed digester treating industrial wine distillery wastewater. The control law aims at regulating the organic pollution level while avoiding washout of biomass. To this end, a simple output feedback controller is considered which regulates a variable strongly related to the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). Numerical simulations assuming noisy measurements first illustrate the robustness of this control procedure. Then, the regulating procedure is implemented on the considered anaerobic digestion process in order to validate and demonstrate its efficiency in real life experiments.

  8. Multivariate monitoring of anaerobic co-digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Michael; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    Anaerobic digestion processes for production of renewable energy in the form of biogas, and in the future hydrogen, are becoming increasingly important worldwide. Sustainable solutions for renewable energy production systems are given high political priority, amongst other things due to global...... warming and environmental concerns. Anaerobic digestion applied in agriculture can simultaneously convert heterogeneous biomasses and wastes from the primary agricultural sector and from the bio processing industries, for instance food processing, pharma, and biofuel production, into valuable organic...... fertiliser and renewable energy. Meanwhile, in order for the biogas sector to become a significant player in the energy supply chain, the anaerobic digestion process has to be controlled to a greater extent than what is implemented as state-of-the-art today. Through application of the philosophy behind...

  9. Anaerobic hydrolysis during digestion of complex substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, W.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Complex waste(water) such as, raw sewage, dairy wastewater, slaughterhouse wastewater, fish processing wastewater, primary sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste have been proven to be degradable under anaerobic conditions. However, during the digestion process the conversion of th

  10. Anaerobic Digestion in a Flooded Densified Leachbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chynoweth, David P.; Teixeira, Arthur A.; Owens, John M.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the adaptation of a patented biomass-digesting process, denoted sequential batch anaerobic composting (SEBAC), to recycling of wastes aboard a spacecraft. In SEBAC, high-solids-content biomass wastes are converted into methane, carbon dioxide, and compost.

  11. Kinetics and modeling of anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion modeling started in the early 1970s when the need for design and efficient operation of anaerobic systems became evident. At that time not only was the knowledge about the complex process of anaerobic digestion inadequate but also there were computational limitations. Thus......, the first models were very simple and consisted of a limited number of equations. During the past thirty years much research has been conducted on the peculiarities of the process and on the factors that influence it on the one hand while an enormous progress took place in computer science on the other....... The combination of both parameters resulted in the development of more and more concise and complex models. In this chapter the most important models found in the literature are described starting from the simplest and oldest to the more recent and complex ones....

  12. Horse manure as feedstock for anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadin, Sa; Eriksson, Ola

    2016-10-01

    Horse keeping is of great economic, social and environmental benefit for society, but causes environmental impacts throughout the whole chain from feed production to manure treatment. According to national statistics, the number of horses in Sweden is continually increasing and is currently approximately 360,000. This in turn leads to increasing amounts of horse manure that have to be managed and treated. Current practices could cause local and global environmental impacts due to poor performance or lack of proper management. Horse manure with its content of nutrients and organic material can however contribute to fertilisation of arable land and recovery of renewable energy following anaerobic digestion. At present anaerobic digestion of horse manure is not a common treatment. In this paper the potential for producing biogas and biofertiliser from horse manure is analysed based on a thorough literature review in combination with mathematical modelling and simulations. Anaerobic digestion was chosen as it has a high degree of resource conservation, both in terms of energy (biogas) and nutrients (digestate). Important factors regarding manure characteristics and operating factors in the biogas plant are identified. Two crucial factors are the type and amount of bedding material used, which has strong implications for feedstock characteristics, and the type of digestion method applied (dry or wet process). Straw and waste paper are identified as the best materials in an energy point of view. While the specific methane yield decreases with a high amount of bedding, the bedding material still makes a positive contribution to the energy balance. Thermophilic digestion increases the methane generation rate and yield, compared with mesophilic digestion, but the total effect is negligible.

  13. Improvement of anaerobic digestion of sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohanyos, Michael; Zabranska, Jana; Kutil, Josef; Jenicek, Pavel

    2003-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion improvement can be accomplished by different methods. Besides optimization of process conditions is frequently used pretreatment of input sludge and increase of process temperature. Thermophilic process brings a higher solids reduction and biogas production, the high resistance to foaming, no problems with odour, the higher effect of destroying pathogens and the improvement of the energy balance of the whole treatment plant. Disintegration of excess activated sludge in lysate centrifuge was proved in full-scale conditions causing increase of biogas production. The rapid thermal conditioning of digested sludge is acceptable method of particulate matter disintegration and solubilization. (author)

  14. Instrumentation and Control in Anaerobic Digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    has been lack of process control handles, instruments, and developed control algorithms. This has improved dramatically in the past 10 years, and all of these areas have now been addressed. The main gap in instrumentation technology has been a rapid intermediate sensor to detect overload conditions...... benchmark. There has therefore been, overall, a quantum advance in application and sophistication of instrumentation and control in anaerobic digestion, and it is an effective option for improved process loading rate and conversion efficiency....

  15. Anaerobic co-digestion of organic wastes

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica Anaerobic digestion is an already established process but the increasing need of bio‐waste recovery has determined the emergence of new substrates, revamping the research in this field. Contrary to some other European countries, in Portugal this technology is still scarcely in use. Nonetheless, the current legislation endorses this application as a waste management and as an energy recovery process. The rapid growth of the ...

  16. Enhancing post anaerobic digestion of full-scale anaerobically digested sludge using free nitrous acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Qilin; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-05-01

    In some wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), the ever increasing production of sludge with the expanding population overloaded the anaerobic digestion which compromises the sludge reduction efficiency. Post anaerobic digestion of anaerobically digested sludge (ADS) has been applied to enhance sludge reduction, however, to a very limited extent. This study verified the effectiveness of free nitrous acid (FNA i.e. HNO2) pre-treatment on enhancing full-scale ADS degradation in post anaerobic digestion. The ADS collected from a full-scale WWTP was subject to FNA treatment at concentrations of 0.77, 1.54, 2.31, 3.08, and 3.85 mg N/L for 24 h followed by biochemical methane potential tests. The FNA treatment at all concentrations resulted in an increase (from 1.5-3.1 % compared to the control) in sludge reduction with the highest improvement achieved at 0.77 mg HNO2-N/L. The FNA treatment at this concentration also resulted in the highest increase in methane production (40 %) compared to the control. The economic analysis indicates that FNA treatment is economically attractive for enhancing post anaerobic digestion of full-scale ADS.

  17. Anaerobic sludge digestion with a biocatalytic additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Fedde, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of a lactobacillus additive an anaerobic sludge digestion under normal, variable, and overload operating conditions. The additive was a whey fermentation product of an acid-tolerant strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus fortified with CaCO/sub 3/, (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/, ferrous lactate, and lactic acid. The lactobacillus additive is multifunctional in nature and provides growth factors, metabolic intermediates, and enzymes needed for substrate degradation and cellular synthesis. The experimental work consisted of several pairs of parallel mesophilic (35/sup 0/C) digestion runs (control and test) conducted in five experimental phases. Baseline runs without the additive showed that the two experimental digesters had the same methane content, gas production rate (GPR), and ethane yield. The effect of the additive was to increase methane yield and GPR by about 5% (which was statistically significant) during digester operation at a loading rate (LR) of 3.2 kg VS/m/sup 3/-day and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 14 days. Data collected from the various experimental phases showed that the biochemical additive increased methane yield, gas production rate, and VS reduction, and decreased volatile acids accumulation. In addition, it enhanced digester buffer capacity and improved the fertilizer value and dewatering characteristics of the digested residue.

  18. Digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkari, Saman; Taghizadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was carried out to determine the digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products. Grapefruit pulp (GP), lemon pulp (LE), lime pulp (LI) and orange pulp (OP) were the test feed. Digestion kinetic of whole citrus by-products and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) fraction and acid detergent fiber (ADF) fractions of citrus by-products were measured using the in vitro gas production technique. Fermentation kinetics of the neutral detergent soluble carbohydrates (NDSC) fraction and hemicelluloses were calculated using a curve subtraction. The fermentation rate of whole was the highest for the LE (p fractions. There was no significant difference among potential gas production (A) volumes of whole test feeds (p fractions of citrus by-products have high potential for degradability. It could also be concluded that carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products have remarkable difference in digestion kinetics and digestive behavior.

  19. Balancing hygienization and anaerobic digestion of raw sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astals, S; Venegas, C; Peces, M; Jofre, J; Lucena, F; Mata-Alvarez, J

    2012-12-01

    The anaerobic digestion of raw sewage sludge was evaluated in terms of process efficiency and sludge hygienization. Four different scenarios were analyzed, i.e. mesophilic anaerobic digestion, thermophilic anaerobic digestion and mesophilic anaerobic digestion followed by a 60 °C or by an 80 °C hygienization treatment. Digester performance (organic matter removal, process stability and biogas yield) and the hygienization efficiency (reduction of Escherichia coli, somatic coliphages and F-specific RNA phages) were the main examined factors. Moreover, a preliminary economical feasibility study of each option was carried out throughout an energy balance (heat and electricity). The obtained results showed that both thermophilic anaerobic digestion and mesophilic anaerobic digestion followed by a hygienization step were able to produce an effluent sludge that fulfills the American and the European legislation for land application. However, higher removal efficiencies of indicators were obtained when a hygienization post-treatment was present. Regarding the energy balance, it should be noted that all scenarios have a significant energy surplus. Particularly, positive heat balances will be obtained for the thermophilic anaerobic digestion and for the mesophilic anaerobic digestion followed by 60 °C hygienization post-treatment if an additional fresh-sludge/digested sludge heat exchanger is installed for energy recovery.

  20. Anaerobic digestion of pot-ale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, F.E.

    1990-12-01

    In the production of whisky, the fermented wash is distilled twice and each bushel of grain yields about 15.5 gallons of pot-ale, 6.0 gallons of spent lees and 2.7 gallons of proof spirit. Disposal of pot-ale, the strong residue from the first distillation, containing all the non-volatile and unfermented components of the wash, will always be difficult. Anaerobic digestion provides a possible option. By destroying most of the biodegradable solids and converting them to biogas, it provides an intermediate effluent which conventional treatment technology can purify to river discharge standards. Pilot-scale trials confirm that pot-ale can be treated by anaerobic digestion. The most severe problems are the high purification efficiencies required to achieve UK river discharge standards and the quality and settling properties of the biological sludges produced. To achieved these standards, the design and operation of the entire treatment chain is dominated by the need to capture and concentrate suspended solids (SS) produced by the biological fermentations. Overall performance targets are 99.95% removal of biological oxygen demand (BOD), 99% removal of ammonia and a surplus sludge production of less than 20% of the incoming flow. (author).

  1. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  2. A fuzzy logic approach to control anaerobic digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domnanovich, A.M.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Pfeiffer, B.; Karlovits, M.; Zani, L.; Braun, R.; Holubar, P.

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of the EU-Project AMONCO (Advanced Prediction, Monitoring and Controlling of Anaerobic Digestion Process Behaviour towards Biogas Usage in Fuel Cells) is to create a control tool for the anaerobic digestion process, which predicts the volumetric organic loading rate (Bv) for the nex

  3. Winery and distillery wastewater treatment by anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moletta, R

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is widely used for wastewater treatment, especially in the food industries. Generally after the anaerobic treatment there is an aerobic post-treatment in order to return the treated water to nature. Several technologies are applied for winery wastewater treatment. They are using free cells or flocs (anaerobic contact digesters, anaerobic sequencing batch reactors and anaerobic lagoons), anaerobic granules (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket--UASB), or biofilms on fixed support (anaerobic filter) or on mobile support as with the fluidised bed. Some technologies include two strategies, e.g. a sludge bed with anaerobic filter as in the hybrid digester. With winery wastewaters (as for vinasses from distilleries) the removal yield for anaerobic digestion is very high, up to 90-95% COD removal. The organic loads are between 5 and 15 kgCOD/m3 of digester/day. The biogas production is between 400 and 600 L per kg COD removed with 60 to 70% methane content. For anaerobic and aerobic post-treatment of vinasses in the Cognac region, REVICO company has 99.7% COD removal and the cost is 0.52 Euro/m3 of vinasses.

  4. Application of Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 for simulating anaerobic mesophilic sludge digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Carlos, E-mail: carllosmendez@gmail.com; Esquerre, Karla, E-mail: karlaesquerre@ufba.br; Matos Queiroz, Luciano, E-mail: lmqueiroz@ufba.br

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The behavior of a anaerobic reactor was evaluated through modeling. • Parametric sensitivity analysis was used to select most sensitive of the ADM1. • The results indicate that the ADM1 was able to predict the experimental results. • Organic load rate above of 35 kg/m{sup 3} day affects the performance of the process. - Abstract: Improving anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge by monitoring common indicators such as volatile fatty acids (VFAs), gas composition and pH is a suitable solution for better sludge management. Modeling is an important tool to assess and to predict process performance. The present study focuses on the application of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to simulate the dynamic behavior of a reactor fed with sewage sludge under mesophilic conditions. Parametric sensitivity analysis is used to select the most sensitive ADM1 parameters for estimation using a numerical procedure while other parameters are applied without any modification to the original values presented in the ADM1 report. The results indicate that the ADM1 model after parameter estimation was able to predict the experimental results of effluent acetate, propionate, composites and biogas flows and pH with reasonable accuracy. The simulation of the effect of organic shock loading clearly showed that an organic shock loading rate above of 35 kg/m{sup 3} day affects the performance of the reactor. The results demonstrate that simulations can be helpful to support decisions on predicting the anaerobic digestion process of sewage sludge.

  5. Anaerobic Digestion Modeling: from One to Several Bacterial Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván D. Ramírez-Rivas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion systems are complex processes that unfortunately often suffer from instability causing digester failure. In order to be able to design, optimizing and operate efficiently anaerobic digestion systems, appropriate control strategies need to be designed. Such strategies require, in general, the development of mathematical models. The anaerobic digestion process comprises a complex network of sequential and parallel reactions of biochemical and physicochemical nature. Usually, such reactions contain a particular step, the so called rate-limiting step which, being the slowest, limits the reaction rate of the overall process. The first attempts for modeling anaerobic digestion led to models describing only the limiting step. However, over a wide range of operating conditions, the limiting step is not always the same. It may depend on wastewater characteristics, hydraulic loading, temperature, etc. It is apparent that the "limiting step hypothesis" leads to simple and readily usable models. Such models, however, do not describe very well the digester behavior, especially under transient operating conditions. This work reviews the current state-of-the-art in anaerobic digestion modeling. We give a brief description of the key anaerobic digestion models that have been developed so far for describing biomass growth systems, including the International Water Association’s Anaerobic Digestion Model 1 (ADM1 and we identify the areas that require further research endeavors.

  6. Foaming phenomenon in bench-scale anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebels, Amanda M; Long, Sharon C

    2013-04-01

    The Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District (The District) in Madison, Wisconsin has been experiencing seasonal foaming in their anaerobic biosolids digesters, which has occurred from mid-November to late June for the past few years. The exact cause(s) of foaming is unknown. Previous research findings are unclear as to whether applications of advanced anaerobic digestion processes reduce the foaming potential of digesters. The object of this study was to investigate how configurations of thermophilic and acid phase-thermophilic anaerobic digestion would affect foaming at the bench-scale level compared to single stage mesophilic digestion for The District. Bench-scale anaerobic digesters were fed with a 4 to 4.5% by dry weight of solids content blend of waste activated sludge (WAS) and primary sludge from The District. Foaming potential was monitored using Alka-Seltzer and aeration foaming tests. The bench-scale acid phase-thermophilic digester had a higher foaming potential than the bench-scale mesophilic digester. These results indicate that higher temperatures increase the foaming potential of the bench-scale anaerobic digesters. The bench-scale acid phase-thermophilic digesters had a greater percent (approximately 5 to 10%) volatile solids destruction and a greater percent (approximately 5 to 10%) total solids destruction when compared to the bench-scale mesophilic digester. Overall, for the full-scale foaming experienced by The District, it appears that adding an acid phase or switching to thermophilic digestion would not alleviate The District's foaming issues.

  7. Anaerobic biodegradability of Category 2 animal by-products: methane potential and inoculum source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdniakova, Tatiana A; Costa, José C; Santos, Ricardo J; Alves, M M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2012-11-01

    Category 2 animal by-products that need to be sterilized with steam pressure according Regulation (EC) 1774/2002 are studied. In this work, 2 sets of experiments were performed in mesophilic conditions: (i) biomethane potential determination testing 0.5%, 2.0% and 5.0% total solids (TS), using sludge from the anaerobic digester of a wastewater treatment plant as inoculum; (ii) biodegradability tests at a constant TS concentration of 2.0% and different inoculum sources (digested sludge from a wastewater treatment plant; granular sludge from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor; leachate from a municipal solid waste landfill; and sludge from the slaughterhouse wastewater treatment anaerobic lagoon) to select the more adapted inoculum to the substrate in study. The higher specific methane production was of 317 mL CH(4)g(-1) VS(substrate) for 2.0% TS. The digested sludge from the wastewater treatment plant led to the lowest lag-phase period and higher methane potential rate.

  8. INCREASING ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PERFORMANCE OF WASTEWATER WITH CO-DIGESTION USING DECANTER CAKE

    OpenAIRE

    Thaniya Kaosol; Narumol Sohgrathok

    2014-01-01

    Low biogas production in the frozen seafood wastewater anaerobic digestion is observed due to the low organic and Total Solids (TS) contents in the wastewater. In this research the decanter cake will be used in the anaerobic co-digestion process to improve the biogas production rate. The effect of co-digestion and Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) will be investigated using the continuously stirred tank reactors under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, the study determines the biogas production pot...

  9. Anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Surendra, K C; Takara, Devin; Oechsner, Hans; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of lignocellulosic biomass provides an excellent opportunity to convert abundant bioresources into renewable energy. Rumen microorganisms, in contrast to conventional microorganisms, are an effective inoculum for digesting lignocellulosic biomass due to their intrinsic ability to degrade substrate rich in cellulosic fiber. However, there are still several challenges that must be overcome for the efficient digestion of lignocellulosic biomass. Anaerobic biorefinery is an emerging concept that not only generates bioenergy, but also high-value biochemical/products from the same feedstock. This review paper highlights the current status of lignocellulosic biomass digestion and discusses its challenges. The paper also discusses the future research needs of lignocellulosic biomass digestion.

  10. Comparison of digestate from solid anaerobic digesters and dewatered effluent from liquid anaerobic digesters as inocula for solid state anaerobic digestion of yard trimmings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fuqing; Wang, Feng; Lin, Long; Li, Yebo

    2016-01-01

    To select a proper inoculum for the solid state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) of yard trimmings, digestate from solid anaerobic digesters and dewatered effluent from liquid anaerobic digesters were compared at substrate-to-inoculum (S/I) ratios from 0.2 to 2 (dry basis), and total solids (TS) contents from 20% to 35%. The highest methane yield of around 244L/kg VSfeed was obtained at an S/I ratio of 0.2 and TS content of 20% for both types of inoculum. The highest volumetric methane productivity was obtained with dewatered effluent at an S/I ratio of 0.6 and TS content of 24%. The two types of inoculum were found comparable regarding methane yields and volumetric methane productivities at each S/I ratio, while using dewatered effluent as inoculum reduced the startup time. An S/I ratio of 1 was determined to be a critical level and should be set as the upper limit for mesophilic SS-AD of yard trimmings.

  11. Applications of the anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Ellegaard, L.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    and incineration of organic waste has become less desirable, and legislation, both in Europe and elsewhere, tends to favor biological treatment as a way of recycling minerals and nutrients of organic wastes from society back to the food production and supply chain. Removing the relatively wet organic waste from......At the start of the new millennium waste management has become a political priority in many countries. One of the main problems today is to cope with an increasing amount of primary waste in an environmentally acceptable way. Biowastes, i.e., municipal, agricultural or industrial organic waste...... and resource/energy recovery have been developed. Treatment of biowastes by anaerobic digestion processes is in many cases the optimal way to convert organic waste into useful products such as energy (in the form of biogas) and a fertilizer product. Other waste management options, such as land filling...

  12. Inactivation of dairy manure-borne pathogens by anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Anaerobic digestion of animal manure has the potential to inactivate enteric pathogens, thereby reducing exposures to livestock and humans when the products of digestion are disposed by land-spreading or irrigation or returned to livestock uses such as bedding. Data on digester effectiv...

  13. Fate of pathogens and micro-pollutants during organic wastes and by-products anaerobic digestion - a review; Etat des connaissances sur le devenir des germes pathogenes et des micropolluants au cours de la methanisation des dechets et sous-produits organiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couturier, Ch.; Galtier, L.

    1998-09-01

    Based on 300 scientific papers, the following bibliographical research deals with the fate of micro-pollutants (pathogens, heavy metals, organic pollutants) during anaerobic digestion. Different biological and chemical mechanisms allow organic compounds elimination, except from some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals which are fixed to the solid biomass, permitting water contamination risks attenuation. Unlike mesophilic digestion, thermophilic digestion is a 'sanitation' process regarding pathogens elimination. However, mesophilic digestion offers an important reliability compared with competitive or complementary processes. In particular, energy recovery from anaerobic digestion allows temperature control and makes easier further sanitation heat treatments. In general, anaerobic digestion represents a tool which can be included in an organic waste treatment line assuming waste selection and good agricultural practices. Otherwise, sanitation problem is still badly handled by waste operators and constructors which have been consulted. Research orientations seem especially interesting in improving knowledge of real industrial processes performances. (author)

  14. INCREASING ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PERFORMANCE OF WASTEWATER WITH CO-DIGESTION USING DECANTER CAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaniya Kaosol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low biogas production in the frozen seafood wastewater anaerobic digestion is observed due to the low organic and Total Solids (TS contents in the wastewater. In this research the decanter cake will be used in the anaerobic co-digestion process to improve the biogas production rate. The effect of co-digestion and Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT will be investigated using the continuously stirred tank reactors under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, the study determines the biogas production potential of different HRTs and that of wastewater digestion alone. The anaerobic co-digestion is operated in continuous with continuously stirred reactors at HRT of 10, 20 and 30 days. The mechanical stirring units of all reactors are operated automatically. The stirring action occurred continuously during the experiments. The anaerobic co-digestion results show that the anaerobic co-digestion provides higher biogas production rate and higher methane yield than that of the wastewater digestion alone. The optimum HRT of the anaerobic co-digestion is 20 days. This reactor produces 2.88 L day-1, with 64.5% of methane and the maximum methane production rate of 1.87 L day-1 and the methane yield of 0.321 l CH4/g CODremoved. The anaerobic co-digestion of wastewater with decanter cake provides the higher methane yield potential production than that provided by the wastewater digestion alone at the ambient temperature. The best HRT is 20 days for anaerobic co-digestion between the wastewater and decanter cake. The experimental results reveal that HRT and co-digestion are the parameters that can affect the biogas production and methane yield.

  15. The alternatives for pot-ale disposal. [Evaporation by waste heat recovery and anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, S. (UKAEA Harwell Lab. (UK). Energy Technology Div.)

    1990-01-01

    Pot-ale is a by-product of whisky distilling and when concentrated by evaporation can be sold as cattle feed. Examples of energy savings achieved by recovering waste heat from distilleries and using this waste heat to evaporate the water from the pot-ale are described. Another option for pot-ale disposal is anaerobic digestion to biogas. (UK).

  16. Tar water digestion in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skibsted Mogensen, A.; Angelidaki, I.; Schmidt, J.E.; Ahring, B.K. [Technical Univ., Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1998-08-01

    The water from the gasification and wet oxidised tar water has been digested anaerobically in UASB reactors and were digested in respectively 10 and 50% in batches. Though the tar water show inhibition at very low concentrations to aerobic microorganisms, the granular sludge used in UASB reactors degrades tar water in concentrations that reveal total inhibition of e.g. bacteria conducting the nitrification process. The value of waste waters are determined, showing that the tar water produces more biogas in the anaerobic digestion. A wide range of xenobiotics, especially phenolic compounds can be transformed in the anaerobic digestion process. Seven phenolic are followed in batch experiments and UASB reactor experiments, and their particular fate in the anaerobic systems embody large differences in the transformation pattern. (au) 24 refs.

  17. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion versus mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sludges from WTP; Digestion anaerobic termofilica versus digestion anaerobia mesofilica de lodos del EDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubia de la Romero, M. A.; Perez Garcia, M.; Romero Garcia, L. I.; Sales Marquez, D.

    2001-07-01

    A literature search revealed that successful thermophilic digestion operation was achieved at several Sewage Treatment Plant: Hyperon Treatment Plant of the city of Los Angeles, operations at 49 degree centigree resulted in significant improvements in sludge handling characteristics; West-Southwest Sewage Treatment Works, Chicago, Illinois a stable thermophilic digester was established at a 8 day detention time; Lions Gate Wastewater Treatment Plant of Vancouver pathogen destruction was the primary goal of this evaluation. Several other investigators have also conducted laboratory as well as pilot scale studied and reported several potential advantages of operating anaerobic digesters in the thermophilic range, rather than the conventional mesophilic range. Increased destruction of pathogenic organisms, increased rate of volatile solids destruction and improved destruction of organics are some advantages reported by all authors. (Author) 16 refs.

  18. The future of anaerobic digestion and biogas utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Nielsen, J.B.; Al Seadi, T.; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    , representing a considerable pollution threat for the environment in these areas. Avoiding over-fertilization is not only important for environmental protection reasons but also for economical reasons. Intensive animal production areas need therefore suitable manure management, aiming to export......One of the common tendencies of animal production activities in Europe and in developed countries in general is to intensify the animal production and to increase the size of the animal production units. High livestock density is always accompanied by production of a surplus of animal manure...... and to redistribute the excess of nutrients from manure and to optimize their recycling. Anaerobic digestion of animal manure and slurries offers several benefits by improving their fertilizer qualities, reducing odors and pathogens and producing a renewable fuel – the biogas. The EU policies concerning renewable...

  19. Modeling flow inside an anaerobic digester by CFD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Alexandra Martinez; Jimenez, P. Amparo Lopez [Departmento do Ingenieria Hidralica y Medio Ambiente, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera S/N 46022 (Spain); Martinez, Tatiana Montoya; Monanana, Vincente Fajardo [Grupo Aquas de Valencia. Avenida Marques del Turia 19 46005 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    Anaerobic processes are used to treat high strength organic wastewater as well as for the treatment of primary and secondary sludge from conventional wastewater treatment plants. In these processes, heterotrophic microorganisms convert biodegradable organic matter to methane and carbon dioxide in the absence of dissolved oxygen and nitrate. Some of the most important aspects of the design of anaerobic digesters are related to hydraulic considerations. In spite of its important role in performance, hydraulics of flow inside digesters has not been quantified or adequately characterized. In this contribution a three-dimensional steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation has been performed for a particular anaerobic digester, in order to visualize the flow patterns. Flow and velocities profiles have been represented inside the digester to identify possible dead zones or stratifications. The geometry of a real digester installed in Valencia Waste Water Treatment Plant (located in Quart-Benager, Valencia, Spain) has been used in order to consider the proposed methodology.

  20. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, F.E. [VFA Services Ltd., Herts (United Kingdom)

    1996-01-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion within the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  1. Microbiology of anaerobic digestion; Microbiologia da digestao anaerobica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Rosana Filomena Vazoller [CETESB, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1988-12-31

    Considerations was made about the microorganisms involved in the anaerobic digestion of wastes. Are also presented, the main results on this subject obtained, until now, in the studies carried on the group of anaerobic microbiology researchers from the Sanitary Company of Sao Paulo State, Brazil. (author) 23 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Using contaminated plants involved in phytoremediation for anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zewei; Wang, Shengxiao; Wang, Ting; Chang, Zhizhou; Shen, Zhenguo; Chen, Yahua

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the anaerobic digestion capability of five plants and the effects of copper (Cu) and S,S'-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS, a chelator widely used in chelant-assisted phytoremediation) on biogas production to determine a feasible disposal method for plants used in remediation. The results showed that in addition to Phytolacca americana L., plants such as Zea mays L., Brassica napus L., Elsholtzia splendens Nakai ex F. Maekawa, and Oenothera biennis L. performed well in biogas production. Among these, O. biennis required the shortest period to finish anaerobic digestion. Compared to normal plants with low Cu content, the plants used in remediation with increased Cu levels (100 mg kg(-1)) not only promoted anaerobic digestion and required a shorter anaerobic digestion time, but also increased the methane content in biogas. When the Cu content in plants increased to 500, 1000, and 5000 mg kg(-1), the cumulative biogas production decreased by 12.3%, 14.6%, and 41.2%, respectively. Studies also found that EDDS conspicuously restrained biogas production from anaerobic digestion. The results suggest that anaerobic digestion has great potential for the disposal of contaminated plants and may provide a solution for the resource utilization of plants used in remediation.

  3. Inhibition of the anaerobic digestion process by linear alkylbenzene sulfonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2002-01-01

    Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonates (LAS) are the most widely used synthetic anionic surfactants. They are anthropogenic, toxic compounds and are found in the primary sludge generated in municipal wastewater treatment plants. Primary sludge is usually stabilized anaerobically and therefore...... of the anaerobic digestion process should be seriously taken into consideration when wastewater from a surfactant producing industry is to be treated biologically or enter a municipal wastewater treatment plant that employs anaerobic technology. The upper allowable biomass specific LAS concentration should be 14...

  4. Thermal pretreatment of algae for anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolek, Michael D; Kendall, Elizabeth; Thompson, Phillip L; Shuman, Teodora Rutar

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the benefit of thermal pretreatment on biogas yield from microalgae-fed anaerobic digester mesocosms. Replicate Nanochloropsis oculata cultures were heated for 4h at 30, 60, and 90°C, as well as at a constant temperature of 90°C for 1, 3.5, and 12h. Net biogas production increased from 0.28L biogas/g volatile solids added (VSa) for the control to 0.39 L biogas/g VSa (p<0.01) when heated at 90°C, but there was no improvement at 30 or 60°C. Increased biogas production correlated with increased soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD). Net biogas production increased as a function of heating time, from 0.32 L biogas/g VSa for the control, to 0.41, 0.43, and 0.44 L biogas/g VSa (p<0.05 for all combinations vs. control) when preheated at 90°C for 1, 3.5, and 12h, respectively. However, despite enhanced biogas production the energy balance is negative for thermal pretreatment.

  5. Trace metal speciation and bioavailability in anaerobic digestion: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Pham Minh; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Yan, Zhou; Stuckey, David

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, however, in practice they are often added to anaerobic digesters in excessive amounts, which can lead to inhibition. The concept of bioavailability of metals in anaerobic digestion has been poorly understood in the past, and a lack of deep understanding of the relationship between trace metal speciation and bioavailability can result in ineffective metal dosing strategies for anaerobic digesters. Sequential extraction schemes are useful for fractionating trace metals into their different forms, and metal sulfides can serve as a store and source for trace metals during anaerobic digestion, while natural/synthetic chelating agents (soluble microbial products-SMPs, extracellular polysaccharides-EPS, and EDTA/NTA) are capable of controlling trace metal bioavailability. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: investigate the speciation and bioavailability of Ca, Mg, Mn, W, and Se; compare the bioavailability of different forms of trace metals e.g. carbonates, sulfides, phosphates to different anaerobic trophic groups; determine what factors influence metal sulfide dissolution; investigate whether chelating agents can increase trace metal bioavailability; develop and adapt specialized analytical techniques, and; determine how trace metal dynamics change in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR).

  6. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koker, John [Univ. of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI (United States); Lizotte, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI (United States)

    2017-02-08

    The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility is a demonstration project that supported the first commercial-scale use in the United States of high solids, static pile technology for anaerobic digestion of organic waste to generate biogas for use in generating electricity and heat. The research adds to the understanding of startup, operation and supply chain issues for anaerobic digester technology. Issues and performance were documented for equipment installation and modifications, feedstock availability and quality, weekly loading and unloading of digestion chambers, chemical composition of biogas produced, and energy production. This facility also demonstrated an urban industrial ecology approach to siting such facilities near sewage treatment plants (to capture and use excess biogas generated by the plants) and organic yard waste collection sites (a source of feedstock).

  7. Modified anaerobic digestion elutriated phased treatment for the anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and food wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Kyung; Lee, Wonbae; Kim, Moonil

    2017-02-01

    A modified anaerobic digestion elutriated phased treatment (MADEPT) process was developed for investigating anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and food wastewater. The anaerobic digestion elutriated phased treatment (ADEPT) process is similar to a two-phase system, however, in which the effluent from a methanogenic reactor recycles into an acidogenic reactor to elutriate mainly dissolved organics. Although ADEPT could reduce reactor volume significantly, the unsolubilized solids should be wasted from the system. The MADEPT process combines thermo-alkali solubilization with ADEPT to improve anaerobic performance and to minimize the sludge disposal. It was determined that the optimal volume mixing ratio of sewage sludge and food wastewater was 4 : 1 for the anaerobic co-digestion. The removal efficiencies of total chemical oxygen demand, volatile solids, and volatile suspended solids in the MADEPT process were 73%, 70%, and 64%, respectively. However, those in the ADEPT process were only 48%, 37%, and 40%, respectively, at the same hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 7 days. The gas production of MADEPT was two times higher than that of ADEPT. The thermo-alkali solubilization increased the concentration of dissolved organics so that they could be effectively degraded in a short HRT, implying that MADEPT could improve the performance of ADEPT in anaerobic co-digestion.

  8. Application of Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 for describing anaerobic digestion of grass, maize, green weed silage, and industrial glycerine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernacki, Piotr; Steinigeweg, Sven; Borchert, Axel; Uhlenhut, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of organic waste plays an important role for the development of sustainable energy supply based on renewable resources. For further process optimization of anaerobic digestion, biogas production with the commonly used substrates, grass, maize, and green weed silage, together with industrial glycerine, were analyzed by the Weender analysis/van Soest method, and a simulation study was performed, based on the International Water Association's (IWA) Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). The simplex algorithm was applied to optimize kinetic constants for disintegration and hydrolysis steps for all examined substrates. Consequently, new parameters were determined for each evaluated substrate, tested against experimental cumulative biogas production results, and assessed against ADM1 default values for disintegration and hydrolysis kinetic constants, where the ADM1 values for mesophilic high rate and ADM1 values for solids were used. Results of the optimization lead to a precise prediction of the kinetics of anaerobic degradation of complex substrates.

  9. Anaerobic Co-Digestion of the Microalgae Scenedesmus Sp.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos-Suarez, J. L.; Carreras, N.

    2011-06-07

    Microalgae biomass has been widely studied for biogas production over the last years and results show that anaerobic digestion is often limited by the low C/N ratio of this type of biomass. Therefore, codigestion with substrates of high C/N ratio is necessary. The objectives of this study are to set up an experimental method that ease reproducibility and control of anaerobic digestion processes in laboratory conditions and to determine the biodegradability and biogas production potential of the co-digestion process of microalgae Scenedesmus sp. and energy crop Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Miller. Results obtained showed that higher C/N ratios are preferred in order to maximize methane production. Highest methane yield obtained was 0.252m3CH4/Kg VS and degradability expressed as percentage COD reduced is around 30% for the ideal mixture found, made up of 75% O. ficus-indica and 25% Scenedesmus sp. in VS basis. A laboratory setup using MicroOxymax respirometer, after its adaptation to work under anaerobic conditions, can be used for the monitoring of anaerobic digestion processes. Scenedesmus sp. as sole substrate for anaerobic digestion does not give good results due to low C/N ratio. However, when codigesting it with O. ficus-indica methane production is satisfactory. Best mixture was made up of 75% O. ficus-indica and 25% Scenedesmus sp. in VS basis. (Author)

  10. Testing low cost anaerobic digestion (AD) systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the potential for low technology and low cost digesters for small dairies, BARC and researchers from the University of Maryland installed six modified Taiwanese-model field-scale (FS) digesters near the original dairy manure digester. The FS units receive the same post-separated liquid ...

  11. Anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadanaparthi, Sai Krishna Reddy

    Dairy and potato are two important agricultural commodities in Idaho. Both the dairy and potato processing industries produce a huge amount of waste which could cause environmental pollution. To minimize the impact of potential pollution associated with dairy manure (DM) and potato waste (PW), anaerobic co-digestion has been considered as one of the best treatment process. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste in terms of process stability, biogas generation, construction and operating costs, and potential revenue. For this purpose, I conducted 1) a literature review, 2) a lab study on anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste at three different temperature ranges (ambient (20-25°C), mesophilic (35-37°C) and thermophilic (55-57°C) with five mixing ratios (DM:PW-100:0, 90:10, 80:20, 60:40, 40:60), and 3) a financial analysis for anaerobic digesters based on assumed different capital costs and the results from the lab co-digestion study. The literature review indicates that several types of organic waste were co-digested with DM. Dairy manure is a suitable base matter for the co-digestion process in terms of digestion process stability and methane (CH4) production (Chapter 2). The lab tests showed that co-digestion of DM with PW was better than digestion of DM alone in terms of biogas and CH4 productions (Chapter 3). The financial analysis reveals DM and PW can be used as substrate for full size anaerobic digesters to generate positive cash flow within a ten year time period. Based on this research, the following conclusions and recommendations were made: ▸ The ratio of DM:PW-80:20 is recommended at thermophilic temperatures and the ratio of DM:PW-90:10 was recommended at mesophilic temperatures for optimum biogas and CH4 productions. ▸ In cases of anaerobic digesters operated with electricity generation equipment (generators), low cost plug flow digesters (capital cost of 600/cow

  12. Model selection, identification and validation in anaerobic digestion: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso-Bravo, Andres; Mailier, Johan; Martin, Cristina; Rodríguez, Jorge; Aceves-Lara, César Arturo; Vande Wouwer, Alain

    2011-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion enables waste (water) treatment and energy production in the form of biogas. The successful implementation of this process has lead to an increasing interest worldwide. However, anaerobic digestion is a complex biological process, where hundreds of microbial populations are involved, and whose start-up and operation are delicate issues. In order to better understand the process dynamics and to optimize the operating conditions, the availability of dynamic models is of paramount importance. Such models have to be inferred from prior knowledge and experimental data collected from real plants. Modeling and parameter identification are vast subjects, offering a realm of approaches and methods, which can be difficult to fully understand by scientists and engineers dedicated to the plant operation and improvements. This review article discusses existing modeling frameworks and methodologies for parameter estimation and model validation in the field of anaerobic digestion processes. The point of view is pragmatic, intentionally focusing on simple but efficient methods.

  13. Effect of digestion time on anaerobic digestion with high ammonia concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktavitri, Nur Indradewi; Purnobasuki, Hery; Kuncoro, Eko Prasetyo; Purnamasari, Indah; Semma Hadinnata, P.

    2016-03-01

    Anaerobic digestion was developed to treat high concentration organic compound efficiently in certain Digestion Time (DT). High ammonia concentration could influenced removal organic compound in digestion. This bench scale study investigated the effect of digestion time on anaerobic batch reactor with high ammonia concentration. Total Ammonia Nitrogen (TAN) concentration was adjusted 4000 and 5000 mg/1, Digestion time was ranged from 0-26 d, operation temperature was ranged from 28-29°C, inoculum was collected from slaughter house sludge. The degradation of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) correlated with digestion time. The concentration of TAN from synthetic wastewater contain 5000 mg/1 of TAN more fluctuated than those use 4000 mg/1 of TAN. However, the biogas production from wastewater contained 4000 mg/1 of TAN gradually increased until 24 d of DT. The reactor contain 5000 mg/1 of TAN only growth until 12 d and steady state at over 12 d of digestion time.

  14. Biogas by semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cunsheng; Su, Haijia; Wang, Zhenbin; Tan, Tianwei; Qin, Peiyong

    2015-04-01

    The semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of food waste was investigated in 1-L and 20-L continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs), to identify the optimum operation condition and the methane production of the semi-continuous anaerobic process. Results from a 1-L digester indicated that the optimum organic loading rate (OLR) for semi-continuous digestion is 8 g VS/L/day. The corresponding methane yield and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction were 385 mL/g VS and 80.2 %, respectively. Anaerobic digestion was inhibited at high OLRs (12 and 16 g VS/L/day), due to volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation. Results from a 20-L digester indicated that a higher methane yield of 423 mL/g VS was obtained at this larger scale. The analysis showed that the methane production at the optimum OLR fitted well with the determined kinetics equation. An obvious decrease on the methane content was observed at the initial of digestion. The increased metabolization of microbes and the activity decrease of methanogen caused by VFA accumulation explained the lower methane content at the initial of digestion.

  15. Modeling flow inside an anaerobic digester by CFD techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic processes are used to treat high strength organic wastewater as well as for the treatment of primary and secondary sludge from conventional wastewater treatment plants. In these processes, heterotrophic microorganisms convert biodegradable organic matter to methane and carbon dioxide in the absence of dissolved oxygen and nitrate. Some of the most important aspects of the design of anaerobic digesters are related to hydraulic considerations. In spite of its impor...

  16. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejean Samson; Anh LeDuy

    1982-08-01

    Spirulina maxima algal biomass could be used as the sole nutrient for the production of biogas by anaerobic digestion process. It is relatively simple to adapt the municipal sewage sludge to this new substrate. The adapted sludge is very stable. Under nonoptimal conditions, the methane yield and productivity obtained were 0.26 m/sup 3//(kg VS added day) and 0.26 m/sup 3//(kg VS added day), respectively, with the semicontinuous, daily fed, anaerobic digestion having loading rate of 0.97 kg VS/(m/sup 3/ day), retention time of 33 days and temperature of 30/sup 0/C.

  17. Anaerobic digestion: technology transfer, engineering performance and efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchi, F.; Traverso, P.G.; Ganapini, W.

    1987-10-01

    The chemical, technological and process aspects of anaerobic digestion process are analysed on the basis of the Authors' experience and of scientific literature. Emphasis is put on the necessity of integrating the presentation of experimental data and some suggestions are common to those of the EEC to improve the knowledge of the process. An analysis of the types of full-scale digesters used in Europe and in the USA is supplied and suggestions are proposed on the future development of anaerobic technology with the aim of improving performance and efficiency.

  18. Animal and industrial waste anaerobic digestion: USA status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusk, P.D. [Resource Development Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Pollutants from unmanaged animal and bio-based industrial wastes can degrade the environment, and methane emitted from decomposing wastes may contribute to global climate change. One waste management system prevents pollution and converts a disposal problem into a new profit center. Case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of animal and industrial wastes is a commercially available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable coproducts, including a cost-effective renewable fuel. Growth and concentration of the livestock industry create opportunities to properly dispose of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. Beyond the farm, extension of the anaerobic digestion process to recover methane has considerable potential for certain classified industries - with a waste stream characterization similar to livestock manures. More than 35 example industries have been identified, and include processors of chemicals, fiber, food, meat, milk, and pharmaceuticals. Some of these industries already recover methane for energy. This status report examines some current opportunities for recovering methane from the anaerobic digestion of animal and industrial wastes in the US. Case studies of operating digesters, including project and maintenance histories, and the operator`s {open_quotes}lessons learned,{close_quotes} are included as a reality check. Factors necessary for successful projects, as well as a list of reasons explaining why some anaerobic digestion projects fail, are provided. The role of management is key; not only must digesters be well engineered and built with high-quality components, they must also be sited at facilities willing to incorporate the uncertainties of a new technology. Anaerobic digestion can provide monetary benefits and mitigate possible pollution problems, thereby sustaining development while maintaining environmental quality.

  19. Interests of membrane processes in liquid digestate post-treatment and by-product valorisation

    OpenAIRE

    Carretier, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    Intense spreading of livestock wastes are recognized to be detrimental to the environment due to their content of organic matter and mineral fraction. Then, it would appear to be necessary to promote greens treatments processes. In fact, anaerobic digestion allows the production of biogas (extremely useful source of renewable energy), whilst digestate should be a highly valuable biofertilizer This work enters in this approach by proposing to complete anaerobic digestion steps by the use of pe...

  20. Design considerations and operational performance of Anaerobic Digester: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffar Ahmad Mir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the decline in fossil fuel reservoirs, the researchers emphasized more on the production of biogas from organic waste. Producing the renewable energy from biodegradable waste helps to overcome the energy crisis and solid waste management, done by anaerobic digestion. Anaerobic digestion is controlled breakdown of organic matter into methane gas (60%, carbon dioxide (40%, trace components along with digested used as soil conditioner. However there is vast dearth of literature regarding the design considerations. The batch digestion system yields a cost-effective and economically viable means for conversion of the food waste to useful energy. It is therefore recommended that such process can be increasingly employed in order to get and simultaneously protect the environment .This paper aims to draw key analysis and concern about the design considerations, analysis of gas production, substrates and inoculums utilization, uses and impacts of biogas.

  1. Anaerobic digester for treatment of organic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, V. K. [Indian Insitute of Technology, Delhi (India)]|[ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Matera (Italy); Fortuna, F.; Canditelli, M.; Cornacchia, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Matera (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Farina, R. [ENEA, centro Ricerche ``Ezio Clementel``, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1997-09-01

    The essential features of both new and more efficient reactor systems and their appropriate applications for various organic waste management situations, description of several working plants are discussed in the present communication. It is hoped that significant development reported here would be useful in opening a new vista to the application of anaerobic biotechnology for the waste treatment of both low/high organic strength and specialized treatment for toxic substances, using appropriate anaerobic methods.

  2. Anaerobic sludge digestion with a biocatalytic additive. [Lactobacillus acidophilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Fedde, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    Aimed at improving the process operating characteristics of anaerobic digestion for sludge stabilization and SNG production, this study evaluates the effects of a lactobacillus additive under normal, variable, and overload conditions. This whey fermentation product of an acid-tolerant strain of L. acidophilus fortified with CoCO/sub 3/, (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/, ferrous lactate, and lactic acid provides growth factors, metabolic intermediates, and enzymes needed for substrate degradation and cellular synthesis. Data indicate that the biochemical additive increases methane yield, gas production rate, and volatile solids reduction; decreases volatile acids accumulation; enhances the digester buffer capacity; and improves the fertilizer value and dewatering characteristics of the digested residue. Digester capacities could be potentially doubled when the feed is so treated. Results of field tests with six full-scale digesters confirm observations made with bench-scale digesters.

  3. Methane production during storage of anaerobically digested municipal organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Trine Lund; Sommer, Svend G; Gabriel, Søren; Christensen, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of source-separated municipal organic waste is considered feasible in Denmark. The limited hydraulic retention in the biogas reactor (typically 15 d) does not allow full degradation of the organic waste. Storage of anaerobically digested municipal organic waste can therefore be a source of methane (CH4) emission that may contribute significantly to the potential global warming impact from the waste treatment system. This study provides a model for quantifying the CH4 production from stored co-digested municipal organic waste and estimates the production under typical Danish climatic conditions, thus quantifying the potential global warming impact from storage of the digested municipal organic waste before its use on agricultural land. Laboratory batch tests on CH4 production as well as temperature measurements in eight full-scale storage tanks provided data for developing a model estimating the CH4 production in storage tanks containing digested municipal organic waste. The temperatures measured in separate storage tanks on farms receiving digested slurry were linearly correlated with air temperature. In storage tanks receiving slurry directly from biogas reactors, significantly higher temperatures were measured due to the high temperatures of the effluent from the reactor. Storage tanks on Danish farms are typically emptied in April and have a constant inflow of digested material. During the warmest months the content of digested material is therefore low, which limits the yearly CH4 production from storage.

  4. Agro-industrial anaerobic digestion cost benefits: Technology utilization in distillery; Aspetti economici della digestione anaerobica nell`agroindustria: Applicazione di una nuova tecnologia in una distilleria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Poli, F.; Mela, E.; Pasqualini, S.

    1991-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion, followed by aerobic post treatment, is widely used as a treatment technology of distillery wastes. An economic comparison between two different treatment processes; a traditional concentration unit and the termophilic hybrid anaerobic digester, was done. The costs/benefits balance shows the strong advantage of the anaerobic process, even if the value of by-products from the concentrator is higher than the ones from the digester; the operation costs (mainly labour and energy) of the concentrator are strongly higher, and the balance becomes negative. The NPV of the two plants shows always negative values for the concentrator, while the digester can become convenient under some conditions.

  5. Relationship between microbial activity and microbial community structure in six full-scale anaerobic digesters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regueiro, L.; Veiga, P.; Figueroa, M.; Alonso-Gutierrez, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lema, J.M.; Carballa, M.

    2012-01-01

    High activity levels and balanced anaerobic microbial communities are necessary to attain proper anaerobic digestion performance. Therefore, this work was focused on the kinetic performance and the microbial community structure of six full-scale anaerobic digesters and one lab-scale co-digester. Hyd

  6. Wet and Dry Anaerobic Digestion of Biowaste and of Co-substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chaoran

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of municipal solid waste by anaerobic digestion can solve the environmental problems caused by this organic solid waste and also supply biogas as renewable energy for a sustainable development. In this study the improvement of wet anaerobic digestion by addition of co-substrates and the effect of moisture on dry anaerobic digestion were investigated.

  7. Modelling of two-stage anaerobic digestion using the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumensaat, F; Keller, J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study presented was to implement a process model to simulate the dynamic behaviour of a pilot-scale process for anaerobic two-stage digestion of sewage sludge. The model implemented was initiated to support experimental investigations of the anaerobic two-stage digestion process. The model concept implemented in the simulation software package MATLAB/Simulink is a derivative of the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 (ADM1) that has been developed by the IWA task group for mathematical modelling of anaerobic processes. In the present study the original model concept has been adapted and applied to replicate a two-stage digestion process. Testing procedures, including balance checks and 'benchmarking' tests were carried out to verify the accuracy of the implementation. These combined measures ensured a faultless model implementation without numerical inconsistencies. Parameters for both, the thermophilic and the mesophilic process stage, have been estimated successfully using data from lab-scale experiments described in literature. Due to the high number of parameters in the structured model, it was necessary to develop a customised procedure that limited the range of parameters to be estimated. The accuracy of the optimised parameter sets has been assessed against experimental data from pilot-scale experiments. Under these conditions, the model predicted reasonably well the dynamic behaviour of a two-stage digestion process in pilot scale.

  8. ANIMAL MANURE – REDUCED QUALITY BY ANAEROBIC DIGESTION?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løes, Anne-Kristin; Johansen, Anders; Pommeresche, Reidun;

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion may reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, but we know little about its impact on soil fertility. Reduced concentrations of easily degradable C in the manure may imply less food for the soil fauna and microflora. A field experiment to study its effect on crop yields and soil...

  9. Toxicity of nonylphenol diethoxylate in lab-scale anaerobic digesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozkurt, Hande; Sanin, F. Dilek

    2014-01-01

    diethoxylate (NP2EO), for anaerobic digestion of sludge was determined. The test bottles were dosed with NP2EO in acetone, with concentrations ranging from 1mgL-1 to 30mgL-1. During the tests, gas productions and compositions in terms of methane and carbon dioxide were monitored. To be able to judge about...

  10. Phosphorus uptake by potato from fertilizers recovered from anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field experiments were conducted in the Columbia Basin of South Central Washington to assess the yield of potato (Solanum tuberosum) in response to application of phosphorus enriched materials recovered from anaerobic digestion of manure. The treatments were comprised of four rates (0, 56, 112 and ...

  11. Identifying anaerobic digestion models using simultaneous batch experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flotats, X.; Palatsi, J.; Fernandez, B.; Colomer, M. A.; Illa, J.

    2009-07-01

    As in other wastewater treatment processes, anaerobic digestion models have become a valuable tool to increase the understanding of complex biodegradation processes, to teach and to communicate using a common language, to optimize design plants and operating strategies and for trying operators and process engineers. Models require accurate and significant parameter values for being useful. (Author) 2 refs.

  12. INCREASE OF INDICATOR ORGANISMS FOLLOWING ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND CENTRIFUGE DEWATERING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) recently published a report titled “Examination of Reactivation and Regrowth of Fecal Coliforms in Anaerobically Digested Sludges”. Seven full-scale publicly owned treatment facilities were sampled several times to determine if bac...

  13. Anaerobic Digestion. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This instructor's guide contains materials needed to teach a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. These materials include: (1) unit overview; (2) lesson plans; (3) lecture outlines; (4) student worksheets for each lesson (with answers); and (5) two copies of a final quiz (with and without answers). Lesson 1 is a review of the theory of…

  14. Biogas energy production from tropical biomass wastes by anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an attractive technology in tropical regions for converting locally abundant biomass wastes into biogas which can be used to produce heat, electricity, and transportation fuels. However, investigations on AD of tropical forestry wastes, such as albizia biomass, and food w...

  15. Anaerobic Digestion Analysis. Training Module 5.120.2.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with alkalinity, volatile acids and carbon dioxide determinations for an anaerobic sludge digester. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers total and bicarbonate…

  16. Anaerobic digestion for sustainable development: a natural approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gijzen, H.J.

    2002-07-01

    After the discovery of methane gas by Alessandro Volta in 1776, it took about 100 years before anaerobic processes for the treatment of wastewater and sludges were introduced. The development of high rate anaerobic digesters for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastewater took until the nineteen-seventies and for solid waste even till the nineteen-eighties. All digesters have in common that they apply natural anaerobic consortia of microorganisms for degradation and transformation processes. In view of this, it could be rewarding to evaluate the efficiency of natural ecosystems for their possible application. Examples of high rate anaerobic natural systems include the forestomach of ruminants and the hindgut of certain insects, such as termites and cockroaches. These ''natural reactors'' exhibit volumetric methane production rates as high as 35 l/l.d. The development of anaerobic reactors based on such natural anaerobic systems could produce eco-technologies for the effective management of a wide variety of solid wastes and industrial wastewater. Important limitations of anaerobic treatment of domestic sewage relate to the absence of nutrient and pathogen removal. A combination of anaerobic pre-treatment followed by photosynthetic post-treatment is proposed for the effective recovery of energy and nutrients from sewage. This eco-technology approach is based on the recognition that the main nutrient assimilating capacity is housed in photosynthetic plants. The proposed anaerobic-photosynthetic process is energy efficient, cost effective and applicable under a wide variety of rural and urban conditions. In conclusion: a natural systems approach towards waste management could generate affordable eco-technologies for effective treatment and resource recovery. (author)

  17. Inactivation of Selected Bacterial Pathogens in Dairy Cattle Manure by Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion (Balloon Type Digester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy E. Manyi-Loh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion of animal manure in biogas digesters has shown promise as a technology in reducing the microbial load to safe and recommended levels. We sought to treat dairy manure obtained from the Fort Hare Dairy Farm by investigating the survival rates of bacterial pathogens, through a total viable plate count method, before, during and after mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Different microbiological media were inoculated with different serial dilutions of manure samples that were withdrawn from the biogas digester at 3, 7 and 14 day intervals to determine the viable cells. Data obtained indicated that the pathogens of public health importance were 90%–99% reduced in the order: Campylobacter sp. (18 days < Escherichia coli sp. (62 days < Salmonella sp. (133 days from a viable count of 10.1 × 103, 3.6 × 105, 7.4 × 103 to concentrations below the detection limit (DL = 102 cfu/g manure, respectively. This disparity in survival rates may be influenced by the inherent characteristics of these bacteria, available nutrients as well as the stages of the anaerobic digestion process. In addition, the highest p-value i.e., 0.957 for E. coli showed the statistical significance of its model and the strongest correlation between its reductions with days of digestion. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that the specific bacterial pathogens in manure can be considerably reduced through anaerobic digestion after 133 days.

  18. Inactivation of selected bacterial pathogens in dairy cattle manure by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (balloon type digester).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E; Mamphweli, Sampson N; Meyer, Edson L; Okoh, Anthony I; Makaka, Golden; Simon, Michael

    2014-07-14

    Anaerobic digestion of animal manure in biogas digesters has shown promise as a technology in reducing the microbial load to safe and recommended levels. We sought to treat dairy manure obtained from the Fort Hare Dairy Farm by investigating the survival rates of bacterial pathogens, through a total viable plate count method, before, during and after mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Different microbiological media were inoculated with different serial dilutions of manure samples that were withdrawn from the biogas digester at 3, 7 and 14 day intervals to determine the viable cells. Data obtained indicated that the pathogens of public health importance were 90%-99% reduced in the order: Campylobacter sp. (18 days) count of 10.1 × 103, 3.6 × 105, 7.4 × 103 to concentrations below the detection limit (DL = 102 cfu/g manure), respectively. This disparity in survival rates may be influenced by the inherent characteristics of these bacteria, available nutrients as well as the stages of the anaerobic digestion process. In addition, the highest p-value i.e., 0.957 for E. coli showed the statistical significance of its model and the strongest correlation between its reductions with days of digestion. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that the specific bacterial pathogens in manure can be considerably reduced through anaerobic digestion after 133 days.

  19. Anaerobic digestion of cassava starch factory effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manilal, V B; Narayanan, C S; Balagopalan, C

    1990-06-01

    Biomethanation of cassava starch factory effluent in a batch digester produced 130 l biogas/kg dry matter with an average melthane content of 59%. About 63% COD was removed during 60 days. In semicontinuous digesters, gas production was 3251/kg dry matter with a retention time of 33,3 days giving a COD reduction of 50%. Size of starter inoculum was important for good biogasification of the effluent.

  20. Community Anaerobic Digester: Powered by Students and Driving Practical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond Hall, Joan [Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund, Montpelier, VT (United States); O' Leary, Mary [Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund, Montpelier, VT (United States)

    2016-03-23

    The Vermont Tech Community Anaerobic Digester (VTCAD) was conceived and funded by a partnership of educational, agricultural, waste management and environmental groups to create a living laboratory demonstrating the value of recycling nutrients, renewable energy and agricultural co-products from organic wastes. VTCAD was constructed on the Randolph Center, Vermont campus of Vermont Tech, a public college offering engineering technology, agricultural, renewable energy education and workforce training. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Vermont State Colleges and others, construction was completed in early 2014 and the facility has been operational since April 2014. At full power, VTCAD uses 16,000 gallons of manure and organic residuals to produce 8,880 kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity per day, ‘waste’ heat that will be used to heat four campus buildings, bedding material for the college dairy herds and recycled nutrients used as crop fertilizer. VTCAD uses a mixture of manure from co-managed farms and organic residuals collected from the community. Feedstock materials include brewery residuals, the glycerol by-product of biodiesel production from waste cooking oil, grease trap waste, and waste paper and, soon, locally collected pre- and post-consumer food residuals.

  1. The future of anaerobic digestion and biogas utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm-Nielsen, J B; Al Seadi, T; Oleskowicz-Popiel, P

    2009-11-01

    One of the common tendencies of animal production activities in Europe and in developed countries in general is to intensify the animal production and to increase the size of the animal production units. High livestock density is always accompanied by production of a surplus of animal manure, representing a considerable pollution threat for the environment in these areas. Avoiding over-fertilization is not only important for environmental protection reasons but also for economical reasons. Intensive animal production areas need therefore suitable manure management, aiming to export and to redistribute the excess of nutrients from manure and to optimize their recycling. Anaerobic digestion of animal manure and slurries offers several benefits by improving their fertilizer qualities, reducing odors and pathogens and producing a renewable fuel - the biogas. The EU policies concerning renewable energy systems (RES) have set forward a fixed goal of supplying 20% of the European energy demands from RES by year 2020. A major part of the renewable energy will originate from European farming and forestry. At least 25% of all bioenergy in the future can originate from biogas, produced from wet organic materials such as: animal manure, whole crop silages, wet food and feed wastes, etc.

  2. Effect of ultrasonication on anaerobic degradability of solid waste digestate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, M R; D'Amato, E; Polettini, A; Pomi, R; Rossi, A

    2016-02-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of ultrasonication on anaerobic biodegradability of lignocellulosic residues. While ultrasonication has been commonly applied as a pre-treatment of the feed substrate, in the present study a non-conventional process configuration based on recirculation of sonicated digestate to the biological reactor was evaluated at the lab-scale. Sonication tests were carried out at different applied energies ranging between 500 and 50,000kJ/kg TS. Batch anaerobic digestion tests were performed on samples prepared by mixing sonicated and untreated substrate at two different ratios (25:75 and 75:25 w/w). The results showed that when applied as a post-treatment of digestate, ultrasonication can positively affect the yield of anaerobic digestion, mainly due to the dissolution effect of complex organic molecules that have not been hydrolyzed by biological degradation. A good correlation was found between the CH4 production yield and the amount of soluble organic matter at the start of digestion tests. The maximum gain in biogas production was 30% compared to that attained with the unsonicated substrate, which was tentatively related to the type and concentration of the metabolic products.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of yard waste with hydrothermal pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangliang; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Zhikai; Xu, Guangwen

    2014-03-01

    The digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass is limited by its high content of refractory components. The objective of this study is to investigate hydrothermal pretreatment and its effects on anaerobic digestion of sorted organic waste with submerged fermentation. Hydrothermal pretreatment (HT) was performed prior to anaerobic digestion, and three agents were examined for the HT: hot compressed water, alkaline solution, and acidic solution. The concentrations of glucose and xylose were the highest in the sample pretreated in acidic solution. Compared with that of the untreated sample, the biogas yields from digesting the samples pretreated in alkaline solution, acidic solution, and hot water increased by 364, 107, and 79%, respectively. The decrease of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in liquid phase followed the same order as for the biogas yield. The initial ammonia content of the treated samples followed the order sample treated in acidic solution > sample treated in alkaline solution > sample treated in hot water. The concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were low, indicating that the anaerobic digestion process was running at continuously stable conditions.

  4. Ultrasonic treatment to improve anaerobic digestibility of dairy waste streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmowski, L; Simons, L; Brooks, R

    2006-01-01

    The dairy-processing industry generates various types of organic wastes, which are utilised as stock feed, for anaerobic digestion, spread on land or alternatively land-filled at high costs. Owing to the generation of renewable energy, anaerobic digestion is an attractive option for many factories. To enhance the biological degradation process, a mechanical disintegration of various waste dairy streams was undertaken. While the successful application of ultrasonic treatment has been reported for various municipal waste streams, limited information was available for dairy industry applications. The results of this study showed that ultrasonic treatment can improve the digestibility of the more problematic dairy waste streams, such as sludges, by breaking down micro-organisms' cell walls and releasing soluble cell compounds. For more soluble streams, such as dairy factory effluent, an increased gas production was observed and attributed to the reduced particle size of the fat globules.

  5. Anaerobic Digestion I. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasmith, E. E.

    This lesson is the first of a two-part series on anaerobic digestion. Topics discussed include the five basic functions of an anaerobic digester, basic theory of the biological processes involved, basic equipment necessary for digestion, and the products of digestion. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The instructor's…

  6. A bio-electrochemical system for removing inhibitors of anaerobic digestion processes from anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of anaerobic digestion process by high level of ammonia (NH4 +/I\\IH3) is the most serious problem existing in biogas plants. No viable/applicable method to overcome this problem has been found up to now. This invention proposes an innovative submersible bio-electrochemical membrane...... reactor to recover ammonia from anaerobic digestion reactor, and thereby alleviate or counteract ammonia inhibition and enhance the conversion of ammonia-rich wastes to biogas. The invention may further reduce overall cost, giving synergistic advantages for both ammonia recycling and biogas plants...

  7. Anaerobic digestion as final step of a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2010-01-01

    In order to lower the costs for second generation bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass anaerobic digestion of the effluent from ethanol fermentation was implemented using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system in a pilot-scale biorefinery plant. Both thermophilic (538C...... were, however, higher under mesophilic conditions compared to thermophilic conditions. The conversion of dissolved organic matter (VSdiss) was between 68% and 91%. The effluent from the ethanol fermentation showed no signs of toxicity to the anaerobic microorganisms. However, a high content...... of suspended matter reduced the degradation efficiency. The retention time of the anaerobic system could be reduced from 70 to 7 h by additional removal of suspended matter by clarification. Implementation of the biogas production from the fermentation effluent accounted for about 30% higher carbon utilization...

  8. Extracellular polymeric substances and dewaterability of waste activated sludge during anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fenxia; Liu, Xinwen; Li, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge was conducted to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying change in sludge dewaterability during its anaerobic digestion. Unexpectedly, the results indicated that sludge dewatering properties measured by capillary suction time only deteriorated after 10 days of anaerobic digestion, after which dewaterability recovered and remained stable. The loosely bound extracellular polymeric substance (LB-EPS) content increased three-fold after 20 days of anaerobic digestion, and did not change significantly during the remaining 30 days. The tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) content reduced slightly after 20 days of anaerobic digestion, and stabilized during the last 30 days. Polysaccharides (PS) and proteins (PN) content in LB-EPS increased after 10 days of anaerobic digestion. However, PS and PN contents in TB-EPS decreased slightly. The relationship analysis showed that only LB-EPS correlated with dewaterability of the sludge during anaerobic digestion.

  9. The role of anaerobic digestion in the emerging energy economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batstone, Damien John; Virdis, Bernardino

    2014-06-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the default process for biological conversion of residue organics to renewable energy and biofuel in the form of methane. However, its scope of application is expanding, due to availability of new technologies, and the emerging drivers of energy and nutrient conservation and recovery. Here, we outline two of these new application areas, namely wastewater nutrient and energy recovery, and generation of value added chemicals through mixed culture biotechnology. There exist two options for nutrient and energy recovery from domestic wastewater: low energy mainline and partition-release-recovery. Both are heavily dependent on anaerobic digestion as an energy generating and nutrient release step, and have been enabled by new technologies such as low emission anaerobic membrane processes. The area of mixed culture biotechnology has been previously identified as a key industrial opportunity, but is now moving closer to application due application of existing and new technologies. As well as acting as a core technology option in bioproduction, anaerobic digestion has a key role in residual waste valorization and generation of energy for downstream processing. These new application areas and technologies are emerging simultaneously with substantial advances in knowledge of underlying mechanisms such as electron transfer, understanding of which is critical to development of the new application areas.

  10. Large eddy simulation of mechanical mixing in anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binxin

    2012-03-01

    A comprehensive study of anaerobic digestion requires an advanced turbulence model technique to accurately predict mixing flow patterns because the digestion process that involves mass transfer between anaerobes and their substrates is primarily dependent on detailed information about the fine structure of turbulence in the digesters. This study presents a large eddy simulation (LES) of mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in anaerobic digesters, in which the sliding mesh method is used to characterize the impeller rotation. The three subgrid scale (SGS) models investigated are: (i) Smagorinsky-Lilly model, (ii) wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity model, and (iii) kinetic energy transport (KET) model. The simulation results show that the three SGS models produce very similar flow fields. A comparison of the simulated and measured axial velocities indicates that the LES profile shapes are in general agreement with the experimental data but they differ markedly in velocity magnitudes. A check of impeller power and flow numbers demonstrates that all the SGS models give excellent predictions, with the KET model performing the best. Moreover, the performance of six Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models are assessed and compared with the LES results.

  11. Anaerobic digestion of pulp and paper mill wastewater and sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Torsten; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-15

    Pulp and paper mills generate large amounts of waste organic matter that may be converted to renewable energy in form of methane. The anaerobic treatment of mill wastewater is widely accepted however, usually only applied to few selected streams. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates in full-scale reactors range between 30 and 90%, and methane yields are 0.30-0.40 m(3) kg(-1) COD removed. Highest COD removal rates are achieved with condensate streams from chemical pulping (75-90%) and paper mill effluents (60-80%). Numerous laboratory and pilot-scale studies have shown that, contrary to common perception, most other mill effluents are also to some extent anaerobically treatable. Even for difficult-to-digest streams such as bleaching effluents COD removal rates range between 15 and 90%, depending on the extent of dilution prior to anaerobic treatment, and the applied experimental setting. Co-digestion of different streams containing diverse substrate can level out and diminish toxicity, and may lead to a more robust microbial community. Furthermore, the microbial population has the ability to become acclimated and adapted to adverse conditions. Stress situations such as toxic shock loads or temporary organic overloading may be tolerated by an adapted community, whereas they could lead to process disturbance with an un-adapted community. Therefore, anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing elevated levels of inhibitors or toxicants should be initiated by an acclimation/adaptation period that can last between a few weeks and several months. In order to gain more insight into the underlying processes of microbial acclimation/adaptation and co-digestion, future research should focus on the relationship between wastewater composition, reactor operation and microbial community dynamics. The potential for engineering and managing the microbial resource is still largely untapped. Unlike in wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of mill biosludge (waste activated

  12. Anaerobic digestion in mesophilic and room temperature conditions: Digestion performance and soil-borne pathogen survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Le; Jian, Shanshan; Bi, Jinhua; Li, Yunlong; Chang, Zhizhou; He, Jian; Ye, Xiaomei

    2016-05-01

    Tomato plant waste (TPW) was used as the feedstock of a batch anaerobic reactor to evaluate the effect of anaerobic digestion on Ralstonia solanacearum and Phytophthora capsici survival. Batch experiments were carried out for TS (total solid) concentrations of 2%, 4% and 6% respectively, at mesophilic (37±1°C) and room (20-25°C) temperatures. Results showed that higher digestion performance was achieved under mesophilic digestion temperature and lower TS concentration conditions. The biogas production ranged from 71 to 416L/kg VS (volatile solids). The inactivation of anaerobic digestion tended to increase as digestion performance improved. The maximum log copies reduction of R. solanacearum and P. capsici detected by quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) were 3.80 and 4.08 respectively in reactors with 4% TS concentration at mesophilic temperatures. However, both in mesophilic and room temperature conditions, the lowest reduction of R. solanacearum was found in the reactors with 6% TS concentration, which possessed the highest VFA (volatile fatty acid) concentration. These findings indicated that simple accumulation of VFAs failed to restrain R. solanacearum effectively, although the VFAs were considered poisonous. P. capsici was nearly completely dead under all conditions. Based on the digestion performance and the pathogen survival rate, a model was established to evaluate the digestate biosafety.

  13. Influence of steam explosion pretreatment on the anaerobic digestion of vinegar residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiayu; Zhang, Jiyu; Zhang, Jiafu; He, Yanfeng; Zhang, Ruihong; Liu, Guangqing; Chen, Chang

    2016-07-01

    Vinegar residue is the by-product in the vinegar production process. The large amount of vinegar residue has caused a serious environmental problem owing to its acidity and corrosiveness. Anaerobic digestion is an effective way to convert agricultural waste into bioenergy, and a previous study showed that vinegar residue could be treated by anaerobic digestion but still had room to improve digestion efficiency. In this study, steam explosion at pressure of 0.8, 1.2, and 1.5 MPa and residence time of 5, 10, 15, and 20 min were used to pretreat vinegar residue to improve methane production, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses were applied to validate structural changes of vinegar residue after steam explosion. Results showed that steam explosion pretreatment could destroy the structure of lignocellulose by removing the hemicellulose and lignin, and improve the methane yield effectively. Steam explosion-treated vinegar residue at 0.8 MPa for 5 min produced the highest methane yield of 153.58 mL gVS (-1), which was 27.65% (significant, α steam explosion did not influence the stability of anaerobic digestion. This study suggested that steam explosion pretreatment on vinegar residue might be a promising approach and it is worth further study to improve the efficiency of vinegar residue waste utilisation.

  14. Anaerobic digestion of pig manure and glycerol from biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakamas Chetpattananondh, Sumate Chaiprapat, Chaisri Suksaroj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing biodiesel production causes a surplus of glycerol. This work aims to investigate the crude glycerol pretreatment method and then apply the glycerol as a co-substrate with pig manure for anaerobic digestion. The optimum crude glycerol pretreatment method was acidification with 6% of H2SO4 that highest glycerol recovery was obtained with lowest cost. Co-digestions of glycerol and pig manure enhanced biogas and methane productions compared with mono-digestions. Biogas and methane productions in semi-continuous digestions were highly effected by OLR. The optimum OLR was 3.06 kg SCOD/m3 that biogas production was maintained at 3 L/d with methane composition of 72% and SCOD removal higher than 80%.

  15. Electrolysis-enhanced anaerobic digestion of wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, B; Mehta, P; Bourque, J-S; Guiot, S R

    2011-05-01

    This study demonstrates enhanced methane production from wastewater in laboratory-scale anaerobic reactors equipped with electrodes for water electrolysis. The electrodes were installed in the reactor sludge bed and a voltage of 2.8-3.5 V was applied resulting in a continuous supply of oxygen and hydrogen. The oxygen created micro-aerobic conditions, which facilitated hydrolysis of synthetic wastewater and reduced the release of hydrogen sulfide to the biogas. A portion of the hydrogen produced electrolytically escaped to the biogas improving its combustion properties, while another part was converted to methane by hydrogenotrophic methanogens, increasing the net methane production. The presence of oxygen in the biogas was minimized by limiting the applied voltage. At a volumetric energy consumption of 0.2-0.3 Wh/L(R), successful treatment of both low and high strength synthetic wastewaters was demonstrated. Methane production was increased by 10-25% and reactor stability was improved in comparison to a conventional anaerobic reactor.

  16. Microbial electrochemical monitoring of volatile fatty acids during anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Jin, Xiangdan; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Due to increasing environmental concerns of using fossil fuels and decreasing in their reserves, the promotion of renewable energy technologies is crucial. Anaerobic digestion (AD), a well-developed technology converting organic waste into biogas, is gaining increased attention in recent years...... desalination cell, MDC) was built to realize the on-line measuring the concentration of volatile fatty acid (VFA). The correlation between current densities of the biosensor and VFA concentrations was firstly evaluated with synthetic digestate. Two linear relationships were observed between current densities...

  17. Microbial electrochemical monitoring of volatile fatty acids during anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Xiangdan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration is known as an important indicator to control and optimize anaerobic digestion (AD) process. In this study, an innovative VFA biosensor was developed based on the principle of a microbial desalination cell. The correlation between current densities and VFA...... concentrations was firstly evaluated with synthetic digestate. Two linear relationships were observed between current densities and VFA levels from 1 to 30 mM (0.04 to 8.50 mA/m2, R2=0.97) and then from 30 to 200 mM (8.50 to 10.80 mA/m2, R2=0.95). The detection range was much broader than that of other existing...... and reliable measurement of VFA levels during AD and other anaerobic processes....

  18. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, R.; LeDuy, A.

    1982-08-01

    The photosynthetic spectrum of solar energy could be exploited for the production of chemical energy of methane through the combined algal-bacterial process. In this process, the algae are mass produced from light and from carbon in the first step. The algal biomass is then used as a nutrient for feeding the anaerobic digester, in the second step, for the production of methane by anaerobic bacteria. The carbon source for the production of algal biomass could be either organic carbon from wastewaters (for eucaryotic algae), or carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or from the combustion exhaust gases (for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae). The technical feasibility data on the anaerobic digestion of algal biomass have been reported for many species of algae including macroscopic algae and microscopic algae. Research being conducted in the authors' laboratory consists of using the semimicroscopic blue-green alga Spirulina maxima as the sole substrate for this combined algal-bacterial process. This species of alga is very attractive for the process because of its capability of using the atmospheric carbon dioxide as carbon source and its simple harvesting methods. Furthermore, it appeared that the fermentability of S. maxima is significantly higher than other microscopic algae. This communication presents the results on the anaerobic inoculum development by the adaptation technique. This inoculum was then used for the semicontinuous anaerobic digestion of S. maxima algal biomass. The evolutions of biogas production and composition, biogas yield, total volatile fatty acids, alkalinity, ammonia nitrogen, pH, and electrode potential were followed.

  19. CFD simulation of anaerobic digester with variable sewage sludge rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, K J; Nieuwoudt, M N; Niemand, L J

    2013-09-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that evaluates mechanical mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester was developed to investigate the influence of sewage sludge rheology on the steady-state digester performance. Mechanical mixing is provided through an impeller located in a draft tube. Use is made of the Multiple Reference Frame model to incorporate the rotating impeller. The non-Newtonian sludge is modeled using the Hershel-Bulkley law because of the yield stress present in the fluid. Water is also used as modeling fluid to illustrate the significant non-Newtonian effects of sewage sludge on mixing patterns. The variation of the sewage sludge rheology as a result of the digestion process is considered to determine its influence on both the required impeller torque and digester mixing patterns. It was found that when modeling the fluid with the Hershel-Bulkley law, the high slope of the sewage stress-strain curve at high shear rates causes significant viscous torque on the impeller surface. Although the overall fluid shear stress property is reduced during digestion, this slope is increased with sludge age, causing an increase in impeller torque for digested sludge due to the high strain rates caused by the pumping impeller. Consideration should be given to using the Bingham law to deal with high strain rates. The overall mixing flow patterns of the digested sludge do however improve slightly.

  20. Fault detection filter design for an anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubrun, C.; Garnier, O. [Univ. Henri Poincare - Nancy 1, Vandoeuvre (France); Harmand, J.; Steyer, J.P. [LBE-INRA, Narbonne (France)

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, a Fault Detection and Isolation observer based method has been applied to biological wastewater treatment process. The method is designed with a dynamic model and the observer is determined using the eigenstructure assignment approach. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated for both detection and isolation of an actuator and a sensor failure using experimental data from a pilot scale anaerobic digestion process for the treatment of an industrial wine distillery vinasses. (orig.)

  1. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND THE DENITRIFICATION IN UASB REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tavares de Sousa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental conditions in Brazil have been contributing to the development of anaerobic systems in the treatment of wastewaters, especially UASB - Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The classic biological process for removal of nutrients uses three reactors - Bardenpho System, therefore, this work intends an alternative system, where the anaerobic digestion and the denitrification happen in the same reactor reducing the number of reactors for two. The experimental system was constituted by two units: first one was a nitrification reactor with 35 L volume and 15 d of sludge age. This system was fed with raw sanitary waste. Second unit was an UASB, with 7.8 L and 6 h of hydraulic detention time, fed with ¾ of effluent nitrification reactor and ¼ of raw sanitary waste. This work had as objective to evaluate the performance of the UASB reactor. In terms of removal efficiency, of bath COD and nitrogen, it was verified that the anaerobic digestion process was not affected. The removal efficiency of organic material expressed in COD was 71%, performance already expected for a reactor of this type. It was also observed that the denitrification process happened; the removal nitrate efficiency was 90%. Therefore, the denitrification process in reactor UASB is viable.

  2. Modelling sodium inhibition on the anaerobic digestion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierholtzer, A; Akunna, J C

    2012-01-01

    Sodium is a known process inhibitor in anaerobic systems and impacts on methanogens through an increase of osmotic pressure or complete dehydration of microorganisms. In this study, a combination of experimental and modelling approaches has been employed to determine and simulate sodium inhibition on the anaerobic digestion process. The ADM1, which has been successfully used in modelling anaerobic processes, has been modified to include an extra inhibition function that considers the effect of sodium on acetoclastic methanogens and the impact on biogas production and composition. A non-competitive inhibition function was added to the rate of acetate uptake for the model to take into account sodium toxicity. Experimental studies consisted of both batch and reactor tests to obtain parameters for model calibration and validation. The calibrated model was used to predict the effect of ammonia nitrogen on sodium toxicity. It was found that relatively low sodium levels can bring about significant levels of process inhibition in the presence of high levels of ammonia. On the other hand, where the concentration of ammonia is relatively low, the tolerance threshold for sodium ions increases. Hence, care must be taken in the use of sodium hydroxide for pH adjustment during anaerobic digestion of protein-rich substrates.

  3. [Agroindustrial wastes methanization and bacterial composition in anaerobic digestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, María E; Pérez-Fabiel, Sergio; Wong-Villarreal, Arnoldo; Bello-Mendoza, Ricardo; Yañez-Ocampo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    The tons of organic waste that are annually generated by agro-industry, can be used as raw material for methane production. For this reason, it is important to previously perform biodegradability tests to organic wastes for their full scale methanization. This paper addresses biodegradability, methane production and the behavior of populations of eubacteria and archaeabacteria during anaerobic digestion of banana, mango and papaya agroindustrial wastes. Mango and banana wastes had higher organic matter content than papaya in terms of their volatile solids and total solid rate (94 and 75% respectively). After 63 days of treatment, the highest methane production was observed in banana waste anaerobic digestion: 63.89ml CH4/per gram of chemical oxygen demand of the waste. In the PCR-DGGE molecular analysis, different genomic footprints with oligonucleotides for eubacteria and archeobacteria were found. Biochemical methane potential results proved that banana wastes have the best potential to be used as raw material for methane production. The result of a PCR- DGGE analysis using specific oligonucleotides enabled to identify the behavior of populations of eubacteria and archaeabacteria present during the anaerobic digestion of agroindustrial wastes throughout the process.

  4. Treatment of melanoidin wastewater by anaerobic digestion and coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimi, Milton M; Zhang, Yongjun; Götz, Gesine; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Melanoidins are dark-coloured recalcitrant pollutants found in many industrial wastewaters including coffee-manufacturing effluent, molasses distillery wastewater (MDWW) and other wastewater with molasses as the raw material. The wastewaters are mostly treated with anaerobic digestion after some dilution to minimize the inhibition effect. However, the dark colour and recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mainly caused by melanoidin are not effectively removed. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of colour and remnant DOC by different coagulants from anaerobically digested MDWW. From the six coagulants tested, ferric chloride had the highest melanoidin (48%), colour (92.7%) and DOC (63.3%) removal at pH 5 and a dosage of 1.6 g/l. Both polymer and inorganic salt coagulants tested had optimal colour, melanoidin and DOC removal at acidic pH. The molecular size distribution of synthetic melanoidins by liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection indicated a preferential removal of high-molecular-weight melanoidins over low weight melanoidins by the coagulation. Further studies should focus on how to improve biodegradability of the treated effluent for it to be reused as dilution water for anaerobic digestion.

  5. Nitrogen in the Process of Waste Activated Sludge Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suschka Jan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary or secondary sewage sludge in medium and large WWTP are most often processed by anaerobic digestion, as a method of conditioning, sludge quantity minimization and biogas production. With the aim to achieve the best results of sludge processing several modifications of technologies were suggested, investigated and introduced in the full technical scale. Various sludge pretreatment technologies before anaerobic treatment have been widely investigated and partially introduced. Obviously, there are always some limitations and some negative side effects. Selected aspects have been presented and discussed. The problem of nitrogen has been highlighted on the basis of the carried out investigations. The single and two step - mesophilic and thermophilic - anaerobic waste activated sludge digestion processes, preceded by preliminary hydrolysis were investigated. The aim of lab-scale experiments was pre-treatment of the sludge by means of low intensive alkaline and hydrodynamic disintegration. Depending on the pretreatment technologies and the digestion temperature large ammonia concentrations, up to 1800 mg NH4/dm3 have been measured. Return of the sludge liquor to the main sewage treatment line means additional nitrogen removal costs. Possible solutions are discussed.

  6. Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Meghanath S; Mutnuri, Srikanth

    2016-04-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of organic matter improves digester operating characteristics and its performance. In the present work, food waste was collected from the institute cafeteria. Two types of sludge (before centrifuge and after centrifuge) were collected from the fluidised bed reactor of the institute treating sewage wastewater. Food waste and sludge were studied for their physico-chemical characteristics, such as pH, chemical oxygen demand, total solids, volatile solids, ammoniacal nitrogen, and total nitrogen. A biomethane potential assay was carried out to find out the optimum mixing ratio of food waste and sludge for anaerobic co-digestion. Results indicated that food waste mixed with sludge in the ratio of 1:2 produced the maximum biogas of 823 ml gVS(-1)(21 days) with an average methane content of 60%. Batch studies were conducted in 5 L lab-glass reactors at a mesophilic temperature. The effect of different substrate loading rates on biogas production was investigated. The mixing ratio of food waste and sludge was 1:2. A loading rate of 1 gVS L d(-1)gave the maximum biogas production of 742 ml g(-1)VS L d(-1)with a methane content of 50%, followed by 2 gVS L d(-1)with biogas of 539 ml g(-1)VS L d(-1) Microbial diversity of the reactor during fed batch studies was investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. A pilot-scale co-digestion of food waste and sludge (before centrifuge) indicated the process stability of anaerobic digestion.

  7. Optimization of solid state anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW by digestate recirculation: A new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michele, Pognani, E-mail: michele.pognani@unimi.it [Gruppo Ricicla – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Soil and Env. Lab, Via Celoria, 2, 20133 Milano (Italy); Giuliana, D’Imporzano, E-mail: giuliana.dimporzano@unimi.it [Gruppo Ricicla – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Soil and Env. Lab, Via Celoria, 2, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gruppo Ricicla - DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Biomass and Bioenergy Lab., Parco Tecnologico Padano, Via Einstein, Loc. C.na Codazza, 26900 Lodi (Italy); Carlo, Minetti, E-mail: carlo.minetti@a2a.eu [Ecodeco, a2a Group, Cascina Darsena 1, 27010 Giussago, Pavia (Italy); Sergio, Scotti, E-mail: sergio.scotti@a2a.eu [Ecodeco, a2a Group, Cascina Darsena 1, 27010 Giussago, Pavia (Italy); Fabrizio, Adani, E-mail: farbrizio.adani@unimi.it [Gruppo Ricicla – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Soil and Env. Lab, Via Celoria, 2, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gruppo Ricicla - DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Biomass and Bioenergy Lab., Parco Tecnologico Padano, Via Einstein, Loc. C.na Codazza, 26900 Lodi (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Solid State Anaerobic Digestion (SSAD) of OFMSW can be optimized by irrigation with digestate. • Digestate spreading allows keeping optimal process parameters and high hydrolysis rate. • The 18.4% of CH{sub 4} was produced in the reactor, leaving the 49.7% in the percolate. • Successive CSTR feed with percolate shows a biogas enriched in methane (more than 80%). • The proposed process allow producing the 68% of OFMSW potential CH{sub 4}, getting high quality organic amendment. - Abstract: Dry anaerobic digestion (AD) of OFMSW was optimized in order to produce biogas avoiding the use of solid inoculum. Doing so the dry AD was performed irrigating the solid waste with liquid digestate (flow rate of 1:1.18–1:0.9 w/w waste/digestate; 21 d of hydraulic retention time – HRT) in order to remove fermentation products inhibiting AD process. Results indicated that a high hydrolysis rate of organic matter (OM) and partial biogas production were obtained directly during the dry AD. Hydrolysate OM was removed from digester by the percolate flow and it was subsequently used to feed a liquid anaerobic digester. During dry AD a total loss of 36.9% of total solids was recorded. Methane balance indicated that 18.4% of potential methane can be produced during dry AD and 49.7% by the percolate. Nevertheless results obtained for liquid AD digestion indicated that only 20.4% and 25.7% of potential producible methane was generated by adopting 15 and 20 days of HRT, probably due to the AD inhibition due to high presence of toxic ammonia forms in the liquid medium.

  8. Instrumentation and control of anaerobic digestion processes: A review and some research challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jimenez, J.; Latrille, E.; Harmand, J.; Robles, A.; Ferrer, J.; Gaida, D.; Wolf, C.; Mairet, F.; Bernard, O.; Alcaraz-Gonzalez, V.; Mendez-Acosta, H.; Zitomer, D.; Totzke, D.; Spanjers, H.; Jacobi, F.; Guwy, A.; Dinsdale, R.; Premier, G.; Mazhegrane, S.; Ruiz-Filippi, G.; Seco, A.; Ribeiro, T.; Pauss, A.; Steyer, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance energy production from methane or resource recovery from digestate, anaerobic digestion processes require advanced instrumentation and control tools. Over the years, research on these topics has evolved and followed the main fields of application of anaerobic digestion processes: from mun

  9. The Effect of Enzyme Addition on Anaerobic Digestion of Jose Tall Wheat Grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of the addition of enzyme products containing cellulase, hemicellulase, and Beta-glucosidase to anaerobic digestion systems were studied. Anaerobic digestion tests were performed using batch reactors operated at 35°C. The application of enzyme products in three digestion configurations w...

  10. Autogenerative high pressure digestion: anaerobic digestion and biogas upgrading in a single step reactor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, R.E.F.; Fermoso, F.G.; Weijma, J.; Zagt, K.; Lier, van J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional anaerobic digestion is a widely applied technology to produce biogas from organic wastes and residues. The biogas calorific value depends on the CH4 content which generally ranges between 55 and 65%. Biogas upgrading to so-called ‘green gas’, with natural gas quality, generally proceeds

  11. Hygiene tests in the anaerobic digestion of household refuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, H.; Philipp, W.; Wekerle, J.; Strauch, D.

    In a pilot plant the disinfecting effect of composting the effluent of an anaerobic mesophilic digestion process of the organic fraction of household refuse was investigated. The dewatered effluent was mixed with straw as bulking material, put in not aerated windrows and aerobically composted. It was further investigated whether the influent of the digester could be disinfected with lime milk prior to the anaerobic mesophilic digestion process. For the evaluation of the disinfection salmonellas, enterococci, klebsiellas, parvo-, polio- and rotavirus were used as test agents. Temperature, total aerobic germ count, enterobacteriaceae and coliforms were also considered. The effect of lime milk in the influent on the digestion process, survival of the test bacteria and gas production was also studied. Both treatments can result in a hygienically safe product. But composting under the conditions given should not be operated during the winter period. Lime treatment of the influent results in a disinfection of the effluent which immediately can be utilized as liquid sludge in agriculture. (orig.)

  12. Influence of phenylacetic acid pulses on anaerobic digestion performance and archaeal community structure in WWTP sewage sludge digesters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrol, L.; Urra, J.; Rosenkranz, F.; Kroff, P.A.; Plugge, C.M.; Lesty, Y.; Chamy, R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phenylacetic acid (PAA) pulses on anaerobic digestion (AD) performance and archaeal community structure was evaluated in anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Four pilot-scale continuous stirred tank reactors were set up at a full-scale mu

  13. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, R.; LeDuy, A.

    1982-08-01

    The semimicroscopic blue-green alga Spirulina maxima makes an ideal substrate for anaerobic digestion because it is easy to harvest, it can use carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as its carbon source, and its fermentability is higher than that of other small algae. Digestion experiments demonstrated that S. maxima can serve as the sole nutrient for biogas production and that municipal sewage sludge, when adapted to this new substrate, is very stable. During semicontinuous daily-fed trials under non-optimal conditions at an 0.06 lb volatile solids (VS)/ft/sup 3/ (0.97 kg VS/m/sup 3/) loading rate, 33-day retention time, and 86/sup 0/F (30/sup 0/C) digestion temperature, the daily methane yield was 4.2 CF/lb (0.26 m/sup 3//kg) VS added, which represents 47% of the maximum theoretical yield. Studies on optimizing the process are underway.

  14. A methane production feasibility model for central anaerobic digesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, J.L. (Western Ontario University, London, Canada); Peters, N. (Fundacao de Tecnologia Industrial, Botafogo, Brazil)

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for prediction of the practicability of building and operating large centrally located anaerobic digesters for producing methane gas from animal manure. The assumptions were that the manure would be collected from the feedlots and that the product gas would be supplied to an existing pipeline. The model takes account of the farm locations and calculates transportation costs for various numbers of digesters. Digester sizes for each distribution and installation and operating costs are computed. Revenue was then determined on the basis of methane production and fertilizer value recovery. The utility of the model is shown through a study of farms in southwestern Ontario where many small feedlots exist. The results of the study indicate a gas production cost of roughly $0.18/cu m.

  15. Digesters and demographics: identifying support for anaerobic digesters on dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, D J; Roberts, M C; Ernst, S C; Thraen, C S

    2010-11-01

    The dairy industry in the United States is amidst a long-running trend toward fewer, larger dairy farms. This development has created a backlash in some communities over concerns such as odor, waste management, and environmental degradation. Separately, anaerobic digestion has advanced as a waste management technology that potentially offers solutions to some of these issues, providing odor control and a combustible biogas among other things. These digesters require significant capital investments. Voluntary consumer premiums for the renewable energy produced have been used in some instances as a means to move adoption of such systems toward financial feasibility. This project employed a survey to measure Ohio consumers' willingness to pay a premium for renewable energy produced by anaerobic digesters on dairy farms. Cluster analysis was used to segment consumers by willingness to pay, age, education, income, self-identified political inclination, and a composite variable that served as a proxy for respondents' environmental stewardship. Four distinctive groups emerged from the data. Older, less educated respondents were found to have the least amount of support for digesters on dairy farms, whereas politically liberal, environmentally proactive respondents demonstrated the strongest support. Well-educated, affluent respondents and young respondents fell between these 2 groups. Most large dairy farms are generally met with fairly negative responses from their local communities; in contrast, this research finds some popular support for anaerobic digestion technology. Going forward, establishing a positive link between support for anaerobic digesters and for their use on large dairies could open up a new route for less-contested large dairy farm developments. Evaluation of community demographics could become an important part of finding an optimal location for a large dairy farm.

  16. Biogas recovery from microwave heated sludge by anaerobic digestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Biogas generated from sewage sludge,livestock waste,and food waste by anaerobic digestion is a valuable renewable energy resource.However,conventional anaerobic digestion is not an efficient process.A long hydraulic retention time and low biogas recovery rate hinder the applications of those resources.An effective pretreatment method to destroy sludge microbial cells has been one of the major concerns regarding improvement of the biogas production.This article focuses on the effects of microwave heating on sludge anaerobic digestion.Volatile suspended solid(VSS) and chemical organic demand solubilization of heated sludge were investigated.Microwave heating was found to be a rapid and efficient process for releasing organic substrates from sludge.The increase of organic dissolution ratio was not obvious when holding time was over 5 min with microwave heating.The effect of the VSS solubilization was primarily dependent on heating temperature.The highest value of VSS dissolving ratio,36.4%,was obtained at 170°C for 30 min.The COD dissolving ratio was about 25% at 170°C.Total organic carbon of treated sludge liquor was 1.98 and 2.73 g/L at 150°C and 170°C for 5 min,respectively.A biochemical methane potential(BMP) test of excess sludge and a mixture of primary and excess sludge demonstrated an increase in biogas production.The total biogas from microwave treated mixture sludge increased by 12.9% to 20.2% over control after 30 days of digestion.Biogas production was 11.1% to 25.9% higher for excess sludge than for untreated sludge.The VS removal ratios of mixture sludge and excess sludge were 12% and 11% higher,respectively,compared to the untreated sludge.

  17. Anaerobic digestion as a key technology in bio-energy production: Current achievements and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Dewil, Raf; Appels, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been applied for many decades for the treatment of organic wastes like manure, wastewater sludge and crop residues. Whereas these streams were considered as a nuisance in the past, nowadays, emphasis lies on resource recovery. These wastes are, indeed, providing an important source of renewable energy. Therefore, there is a renewed interest in anaerobic digestion as a technology for sustainable renewable energy production. Also, anaerobic digestion plays a central role...

  18. Nutrient recovery and improvement of anaerobic digestion process by low grade magnesium oxide application

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Güiza, Maycoll Stiven

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a worldwide technology to treat organic waste streams, primarily due to its capacity to produce methane as renewable energy. However, there is an increasing interest on nutrient recovery (N and P), which from both environmental and economic reasons have been identified as key feature in anaerobic digestion plants. Controlled struvite formation has been attracting increasing attention as a near mature technology to recover nutrients from anaerobic digestion. However, str...

  19. Growth and anaerobic digestion characteristics of microalgae cultivated using various types of sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Taira; Inoue, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Tsumori, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Microalgal cultivation combined with anaerobic digestion at wastewater treatment plants is promising to recover energy. This study investigated the growth and anaerobic digestion characteristics of microalgae cultivated using nutrients in sewage. Microalgae were cultivated using primary effluent, secondary effluent, and dewatering filtrate. Microscopic observation indicated that Chlorella was cultivated using dewatering filtrate of anaerobic digestion without controlling the type of species. Batch anaerobic digestion experiments with digested sludge showed that the methane conversion ratio of the cultivated mixture was approximately 40-65%. Different cultivation time did not affect the microalgal contents. Methane recovery mass was 0.13NL-methane/L-cultivation liquor. The C/N ratio of the cultivated mixture was approximately 3-5, but the apparent ammonia release ratio was smaller than that of sewage sludge during digestion. These results proved the applicability of methane recovery from microalgae cultivated using nutrients included in anaerobically digested sludge.

  20. [Anaerobic co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-yin; Zheng, Zheng; Zou, Xing-xing; Fang, Cai-xia; Luo, Yan

    2010-02-01

    The characteristics of corn stalk digested alone at different total solid (TS) loading rates and co-digestion of various proportions of corn stalk and vermicompost were investigated by batch model at 35 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C. The organic loading rates (OLRs) studied were in the range of 1.2%-6.0% TS and increasing proportions of vermicompost from 20% to 80% TS. A maximum methane yield of corn stalk digested alone was 217.60 mL/g obtained at the TS loading rate of 4.8%. However, when the TS loading rate was 6.0%, the anaerobic system was acidified and the lowest pH value was 5.10 obtained on day 4 and the biogas productivity decreased. Furthermore, co-digestion of vermicompost and corn stalk in varying proportions were investigated at constant of 6.0% TS. Co-digestion with vermicompost improved the biodegradability of corn stalk and the methane yield was improved by 4.42%-58.61%, and led to higher pH values, higher volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration and lower alkalinity content compared with corn stalk digested alone. The maximum biogas yield and methane yield of 410.30 mL/g and 259. 35 mL/g were obtained for 40% vermicompost and 60% corn stalk respectively. Compared with corn stalk digested alone, co-digested with vermicompost didn' t affect methane content and the fermentation type, but promoted the destruction of crystalline of cellulose and the highest destruction rate was 29.36% for 40% vermicompost and 60% corn stalk. Therefore, adding vermicompost was beneficial for the decomposition and increasing the biotransformation rate of corn stalk.

  1. Anaerobic digestion of solid biomass and biowaste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Within the International Trade Fair for Biogas Plant Technology from 23rd to 24th February, 2012 in Berlin, the following lectures were held: (1) Presentation and results of the EU project 24biomass'' (Claudia Lutsyuk); (2) The Polish biogas market (Tomasz Surowiec); (3) Presence and future of the biogas sector in Poland - EBE project (Eugeniusz Jedrysik); (4) Modern biogas generation in Poland - Case studies of the company Poldanor (Jens Bo Holm-Nielsen); (5) Low space requirement - The challenge in the integration of biogas plants in existing composting facilities - examples from real life (Michael Oertig); (6) Integration of biogas plants in composting facilities by partial-flow fermentation (Bruno Mattheeuws); (7) The significance of an efficient removal of foreign matter from biomass before fermentation in a waste incinerator for municipal wastes (Stephan Schulte); (8) Sustainable enhancement of the anaerobic degradation and increase of the biogas production by means of ultrasonic treatment - examples from real life (Silvana Velten); (9) Cultivation of energy plants on sandy soils in the northeastern part of Germany (Gunter Ebel); (10) Topinambur, a new sustainable energy crop for biogas generation (Vito Pignatelli); (11) Potential of biogas generation from reed (Vilis Dubrovskis); (12) Biogas generation from maize straw - a new procedure of harvesting and processing (Thomas Amon); (13) Generation of biogas by cofermentation of pig manure and grass silage: a pilot study (Ximmin Zhan); (14) Thermophilic dry fermentation of poultry litter and energy crops for the generation of biogas, organic fertilizer and protection of water resources from environmental damages in the Mid-Atlantic region of the USA (John Intersoll); (15) Energetic utilisation of horse manure (Saskia Oldenburg); (16) Realization of the greatest and most modern Hungarian biogas plant in Szarvas (Ludwig Dinkloh); (16) Biogas in Russia - The investment program of the cooperation &apos

  2. Microbial Ecology of Anaerobic Digesters: The Key Players of Anaerobiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Shah, Fayyaz; Mahmood, Qaisar; Maroof Shah, Mohammad; Pervez, Arshid; Ahmad Asad, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the method of wastes treatment aimed at a reduction of their hazardous effects on the biosphere. The mutualistic behavior of various anaerobic microorganisms results in the decomposition of complex organic substances into simple, chemically stabilized compounds, mainly methane and CO2. The conversions of complex organic compounds to CH4 and CO2 are possible due to the cooperation of four different groups of microorganisms, that is, fermentative, syntrophic, acetogenic, and methanogenic bacteria. Microbes adopt various pathways to evade from the unfavorable conditions in the anaerobic digester like competition between sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and methane forming bacteria for the same substrate. Methanosarcina are able to use both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic pathways for methane production. This review highlights the cellulosic microorganisms, structure of cellulose, inoculum to substrate ratio, and source of inoculum and its effect on methanogenesis. The molecular techniques such as DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) utilized for dynamic changes in microbial communities and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) that deal with taxonomy and interaction and distribution of tropic groups used are also discussed. PMID:24701142

  3. Microbial Ecology of Anaerobic Digesters: The Key Players of Anaerobiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayyaz Ali Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is the method of wastes treatment aimed at a reduction of their hazardous effects on the biosphere. The mutualistic behavior of various anaerobic microorganisms results in the decomposition of complex organic substances into simple, chemically stabilized compounds, mainly methane and CO2. The conversions of complex organic compounds to CH4 and CO2 are possible due to the cooperation of four different groups of microorganisms, that is, fermentative, syntrophic, acetogenic, and methanogenic bacteria. Microbes adopt various pathways to evade from the unfavorable conditions in the anaerobic digester like competition between sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB and methane forming bacteria for the same substrate. Methanosarcina are able to use both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic pathways for methane production. This review highlights the cellulosic microorganisms, structure of cellulose, inoculum to substrate ratio, and source of inoculum and its effect on methanogenesis. The molecular techniques such as DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis utilized for dynamic changes in microbial communities and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization that deal with taxonomy and interaction and distribution of tropic groups used are also discussed.

  4. Anaerobic digestion of nitrophilic algal biomass from the Venice Lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigoni-Stern, S.; Rismondo, R. (Technital S.p.A., Verona (IT)); Szpyrkowicz, L.; Zilio-Grandi, F. (Venice Univ. (Italy)); Vigato, P.A. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Padua (Italy). Lab. di Chimica e Tecnologia dei Radioelementi)

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of producing biogas by anaerobic digestion of a nitrophilic algae biomass obtained from the highly eutrophicated Venice Lagoon has been investigated. Methods for harvesting algal biomass have been examined in detail and different pretreatments used prior to analysis and digestion of the algae described. Results obtained from three pilot plant digesters over a period of 12 months using Ulva rigida and Gracilaria as feed material gave no indication of inhibition of the process by either high salinity or high metals content resulting from pollutants discharged into the lagoon. Sulphides were formed during digestion as a consequence of the high sulphate content of the interstitial water as well as the level of sulphur present in the algae. However, the sulphides did not appear to cause inhibition or result in a reduction in gas yield. A maximum biogas production rate of 0.347 m{sup 3} kg VS{sup -1} day{sup -1} was obtained during digestion at a retention time of 20 days with an organic loading rate of 1 kg VS m{sup -3} day{sup -1}. (author).

  5. Anaerobic digestion of solid wastes of cane sugar industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, A.

    1983-01-01

    The cane sugar manufacturing industry generates large quantities of lignocellulosic solid wastes, namely bagasse and cachaza. Bagasse is the fibrous residue of the cane after extracting the juice. Cachaza is the filter cake of the precipitated insoluble sugars. This research investigates the feasibility of anaerobic digestion of a mixture of bagasse and cachaza to produce methane. Two rations of bagasse-cachaza mix as substrates were investigated. The first one was 8:1 which represents the average ratio of bagasse and cachaza produced in a raw sugar mill. The second ratio investigated was 2.4:1 which represents the proportion of bagasse and cachaza wastes after 70% of the bagasse is burned in sugar mill boilers. An acclimated microbial culture for this substrate was developed. Organic Loading-Detention Time relationships were established for an optimum system. Pre-treatment techniques of the substrate were investigated as a means of enhancing the digestibility of the cellulosic substrate. Recirculation of the filtrate was evaluated as a method for increasing solids retention time without increasing hydraulic detention time. The kinetics of the digestion process for bagasse-cachaza mixed substrate was investigated and growth constants were determined. The bionutritional characteristics of the substrate used for the digestion were evaluated. Based on the results obtained, mass balances and preliminary economic analysis of the digestion system were developed.

  6. Treatment of separated piggery anaerobic digestate liquid using woodchip biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, K N; Rodgers, M; Lawlor, P G; Zhan, X

    2013-01-01

    The Irish nitrates directive restricts the land area suitable for landspreading of pig manure, so anaerobic digestion warrants consideration. In this study, six identical Lodgepole pine woodchip biofilters were set up to treat the separated liquid fraction of digestate after anaerobic digestion of pig manure. Two hydraulic loading rates were examined: 5 L/m2/d (LLR) and 10 L/m2/d (HLR). Following a start-up period of 70 days, an average of 90% and 71% of NH4(+)-N was removed at LLR and HLR, respectively. LLR resulted in higher total nitrogen removals than HLR (p biofilter effluent. A batch experiment testing the capacity of saturated woodchips in removing total oxidized nitrogen (TON) from the effluent of the woodchip biofilters showed that TON was reduced by 323 mg/L from 663 mg/L in 360 h, indicating that the aerobic woodchip biofilters should incorporate a saturated layer ofwoodchips at the base ofthe biofilters to enhance nitrogen removal.

  7. Behaviour of emerging contaminants in sewage sludge after anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, C; Ibáñez, M; Fabregat-Safont, D; Morales, E; Pastor, L; Sancho, J V; Sánchez-Ramírez, J E; Hernández, F

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, there is an increasing concern over the presence of contaminants in the aquatic environment, where they can be introduced from wastewater after their incomplete removal in the treatment plants. In this work, degradation of selected emerging pollutants in the aqueous and solid phases of sewage sludge has been investigated after anaerobic digestion using two different digesters: mesophilic and thermophilic. Initially, sludge samples were screened by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF MS) for identification of emerging contaminants in the samples. In a second step, a target quantitative method based on LC coupled to tandem MS was applied for selected pollutants identified in the previous screening. The behaviour of the compounds under anaerobic conditions was studied estimating the degradation efficiency and distribution of compounds between both sludge phases. Irbesartan and benzoylecgonine seemed to be notably degraded in both phases of the sludge. Venlafaxine showed a significant concentration decrease in the aqueous phase in parallel to an increase in the solid phase. The majority of the compounds showed an increase of their concentrations in both phases after the digestion. Concentrations in the solid phase were commonly higher than in the aqueous for most contaminants, indicating that they were preferentially adsorbed onto the solid particles.

  8. Hydrolytic activity of alpha-amylase in anaerobic digested sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Y; Ohashi, A; Imachi, H; Harada, H

    2005-01-01

    Hydrolysis is usually considered to be a rate-limiting step in anaerobic digestion. For improving anaerobic solid waste treatments, it is essential to elucidate the mechanism of hydrolysis. In this study, alpha-amylase, one of the hydrolytic enzymes, was investigated for the elucidation of more precise mechanism of hydrolysis. Alpha-amylase activity of solid starch-degrading bacteria (SDB) was estimated through batch experiments with several different substrates and with distinction between cell-bound and cell-free alpha-amylase. Monitoring of newly isolated strains of SDB was done by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results indicated that cell-bound alpha-amylase is chiefly responsible for the hydrolysis in the digested sludge, providing very useful information that the contact between microbial cells and solids is significantly important. The activity of alpha-amylase of the digested sludge remained quite low when not required, but increased as they recognized appropriate substrates. Several-fold higher activity was obtained for starch or maltose as compared to glucose only.

  9. Anaerobic Digestion of Buffalo Dung: Simulation of Process Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Razaque Sahito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of kinetic of AD (Anaerobic Digestion is a beneficial practice to forecast the performance of the process. It is helpful in the design of AD vessels, substrate feeding and digestate exit systems. The aim of this work was to assess the kinetics of anaerobically digested buffalo dung at different quantities of water added. It comprises the assessment of the specific methane production on the basis of VS (Volatile Solids added in each reactor by using three first order models, i.e. the modified Gompertz model, the Cone model and the Exponential Curve Factor model. The analysis was tested by using the three statistical parameters, i.e. the coefficient of multiple determinations, the standard deviation of residuals and the Akaike?s Information Criteria. The result reveals that the Exponential Curve Factor model was the best model that described the experimental data well. Moreover, there was not a direct or indirect relation between the kinetic coefficients of the AD process with the varying total or volatile solid content

  10. Improvement of anaerobic digestion control from urban sludges; Mejora del control de la digestion anaerobia de fangos urbanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez Gabina, R.

    2002-07-01

    Due to its many advantages, the anaerobic digestion is a widespread choice in our water treatment plants. Furthermore, the companies demand an optimization of the control of the process. Until today, the practice of the operation has been made modifying the conditions of the digester by controlling the outlet parameters of the digestion, so that a delay in the application of the corrections is enough to decrease the performance. The investigation concludes that the most secure way to drive an anaerobic digester is to mange a strict control of the inlet parameters into digestion process. (Author)

  11. Biomass stabilization in the anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaiz, C. [Universidad de Sevilla, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Ambiental, Sevilla (Spain); Gutierrez, J.C. [Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Dept. de Ciencias Ambientales, Sevilla (Spain); Lebrato, J. [Universidad de Sevilla, Grupo Tratamiento de Aguas Residuales, Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Sludge stabilization processes include both volatile solid destruction and biomass stabilization. Traditionally, both processes have been considered together, in such a way that, when volatile solid destruction is achieved, the biomass is considered stabilized. In this study, volatile solids reduction and biomass stabilization in the anaerobic digestion of primary, secondary and mixed sludges from municipal wastewater treatment plants were researched in batch cultures by measurements of suspended solids and suspended lipid-phosphate. The estimated kinetic constants were higher in all sludge types tested for the biomass stabilization process, indicating that volatile solids destruction and biomass stabilization are not parallel processes, since the latter one is reached before the former. (Author)

  12. Biomass stabilization in the anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaiz, C. [Universidad de Sevilla (Spain). Escuela Universitaria Politecnica. Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Ambiental; Gutierrez, J.C. [Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla (Spain). Departamento de Ciencias Ambientales; Lebrato, J. [Universidad de Sevilla (Spain). Escuela Universitaria Politecnica

    2006-07-15

    Sludge stabilization processes include both volatile solid destruction and biomass stabilization. Traditionally, both processes have been considered together, in such a way that, when volatile solid destruction is achieved, the biomass is considered stabilized. In this study, volatile solids reduction and biomass stabilization in the anaerobic digestion of primary, secondary and mixed sludges from municipal wastewater treatment plants were researched in batch cultures by measurements of suspended solids and suspended lipid-phosphate. The estimated kinetic constants were higher in all sludge types tested for the biomass stabilization process, indicating that volatile solids destruction and biomass stabilization are not parallel processes, since the latter one is reached before the former. (author)

  13. Status on Science and Application of Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1994-01-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic processes are often regarded as less stable than mesophilic processes. In the paper this postulate is examined and disproved based on real operational data from of full-scale mesophilic and thermophilic biogas plants. The start-up produce for the thermophilic plants was......, however, found to be crucial for determining the period needed before full capacity of the thermophilic plant could be achived. The importance of balanced loading, determined by the concentration of active biomass, is discussed. Finally, data will be shown on the optimal and maximal temperature...... for thermophilic digestion along with the implications for the methanogenic bacteria active at these temperatures....

  14. Stability Analysis of Some Nonlinear Anaerobic Digestion Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Simeonov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The paper deals with local asymptotic stability analysis of some mass balance dynamic models (based on one and on two-stage reaction schemes of the anaerobic digestion (AD in CSTR. The equilibrium states for models based on one (with Monod, Contois and Haldane shapes for the specific growth rate and on two-stage (only with Monod shapes for both the specific growth rate of acidogenic and methanogenic bacterial populations reaction schemes have been determined solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations using Maples. Their stability has been analyzed systematically, which provides insight and guidance for AD bioreactors design, operation and control.

  15. Anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste: Technical developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The anaerobic biogasification of organic wastes generates two useful products: a medium-Btu fuel gas and a compost-quality organic residue. Although commercial-scale digestion systems are used to treat municipal sewage wastes, the disposal of solid organic wastes, including municipal solid wastes (MSW), requires a more cost-efficient process. Modern biogasification systems employ high-rate, high-solids fermentation methods to improve process efficiency and reduce capital costs. The design criteria and development stages are discussed. These systems are also compared with conventional low-solids fermentation technology.

  16. Deploying anaerobic digesters: Current status and future possibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusk, P. [International Energy Agency, Paris (France); Wheeler, P. [ETSU (United Kingdom); Rivard, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Unmanaged pollutants from putrescible farm, industrial, and municipal wastes degrade in the environment, and methane emitted from their decomposition may contribute to global climate change. Under modern environmental regulations, these wastes are becoming difficult to dispose of using traditional means. One waste management system, anaerobic digestion or AD, not only provides pollution prevention but can also convert a disposal problem into a new profit center. This report is drawn from a special session of the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. The future of anaerobic digestion and biogas utilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Al Seadi, Teodorita; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    , representing a considerable pollution threat for the environment in these areas. Avoiding over-fertilization is not only important for environmental protection reasons but also for economical reasons. Intensive animal production areas need therefore suitable manure management, aiming to export...... and to redistribute the excess of nutrients from manure and to optimize their recycling. Anaerobic digestion of animal manure and slurries offers several benefits by improving their fertilizer qualities, reducing odors and pathogens and producing a renewable fuel - the biogas. The EU policies concerning renewable...

  18. Startup and stability of thermophilic anaerobic digestion of OFMSW

    KAUST Repository

    El-Fadel, Mutasem E.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is promoted as an energy source and more recently as a greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation measure. In this context, AD systems operating at thermophilic temperatures (55-60°C)-compared to mesophilic temperatures (35-40°C)-have the unique feature of producing hygienic soil conditioners with greater process efficiency, higher energy yield, and more GHG savings. Startup of AD systems is often constrained by the lack of acclimated seeds, leading to process instability and failure. The authors focus on strategies to startup thermophilic digesters treating OFMSW in the absence of acclimated seeds and examines constraints associated with process stability and ways to overcome them. Relevant gaps in the literature and future research needs are delineated. © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  19. Composting of solids separated from anaerobically digested animal manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chowdhury, Md Albarune; de Neergaard, Andreas; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of bulking agents (BA) and mixing ratios on greenhouse gas (GHG) and NH3 emissions from composting digested solids (DS), separated from anaerobically digested manure and other bio-wastes, in small-scale laboratory composters. BA evaluated were plastic tube pieces (PT......), woodchips (WC), bio-char (BC), barley straw (BS) and lupin residues (LR) and were included at a DS:BA of 3:1 or 6:1, resulting in nine treatments: CTDS (control, DS only), PT3:1, PT6:1, WC3:1, WC6:1, BC3:1, BC6:1, BS3:1 and LR3:1. Depending on treatment, C losses via CO2 and CH4 emissions accounted for 41...

  20. Reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from vinasse through anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moraes, Bruna S.; Petersen, Søren O.; Zaiat, Marcelo;

    2017-01-01

    Vinasse is a residue from bioethanol production that is produced in large quantities in Brazil and Europe and is applied to fields as a source of plant nutrients (fertirrigation). A side effect of this use is greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during storage and transport in open channels to fields......, and from fertirrigated soils. This study assessed GHG emissions in experiments simulating this vinasse management system, and the potential for reducing emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from vinasse via anaerobic digestion (AD) in biogas plants. During 21 days’ storage of untreated...... with digestate, ranging from 0.173 to 0.193 kg CO2eq m−2 in the former and from 0.045 to 0.100 kg CO2eq m−2 in the latter. Extrapolation of the results to a Brazilian case indicated that AD treatment prior to storage/transport and field application could reduce GHG emissions from the vinasse management chain...

  1. Treatment of urban residential organic waste through anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Granzotto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The amount of waste generated nowadays is a reflection of population growth and consumerism, many times, unnecessary by people. Organic waste is the most part of the solid waste generated. This waste need to be treated adequately to avoid environmental problems and health problems in people. The objective was to treat urban residential organic waste and to verify the efficiency of the transformation into biogas and bio fertilizers. A digester of the Indian type was used in Nova Palma, Rio Grande do Sul. The research was developed in the period of three years with a daily monitoring. The average biogas production was higher in the summer for three years and it was more stable in the third year in different seasons. There were no reagents to coliforms. The study found that anaerobic digestion has potential in treating organic waste.

  2. Anaerobic digestion of macroalgae: methane potentials, pre-treatment, inhibition and co-digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Heiske, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    for Chaetomorpha linum and 340 ml g VS1 for Saccharina latissima following 34 days of incubation. With an organic content of 21.1% (1.5–2.8 times higher than the other algae) S. latissima seems very suitable for anaerobic digestion. However, the methane yields of U. lactuca, G. vermiculophylla and C. linum could...... be increased with 68%, 11% and 17%, respectively, by pretreatment with maceration. U. lactuca is often observed during ‘green tides’ in Europe and has a high cultivation potential at Nordic conditions. Therefore, U. lactuca was selected for further investigation and co-digested with cattle manure in a lab...

  3. Investigation of Poultry Waste for Anaerobic Digestion: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Christopher R.

    Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is a biological conversion technology which is being used to produce bioenergy all over the world. This energy is created from biological feedstocks, and can often use waste products from various food and agricultural processors. Biogas from AD can be used as a fuel for heating or for co-generation of electricity and heat and is a renewable substitute to using fossil fuels. Nutrient recycling and waste reduction are additional benefits, creating a final product that can be used as a fertilizer in addition to energy benefits. This project was conducted to investigate the viability of three turkey production wastes as AD feedstock: two turkey litters and a material separated from the turkey processing wastewater using dissolved air flotation (DAF) process. The DAF waste contained greases, oils and other non-commodity portions of the turkey. Using a variety of different process methods, types of bacteria, loading rates and food-to-microorganism ratios, optimal loading rates for the digestion of these three materials were obtained. In addition, the co-digestion of these materials revealed additional energy benefits. In this study, batch digestion tests were carried out to treat these three feedstocks, using mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria, using loading rates of 3 and 6 gVS/L They were tested separately and also as a mixture for co-digestion. The batch reactor used in this study had total and working volumes of 1130 mL and 500 mL, respectively. The initial organic loading was set to be 3 gVS/L, and the food to microorganism ratio was either 0.6 or 1.0 for different treatments based on the characteristics of each material. Only thermophilic (50 +/- 2ºC) temperatures were tested for the litter and DAF wastes in continuous digestion, but mesophilic and thermophilic batch digestion experiments were conducted. The optimum digestion time for all experiments was 14 days. The biogas yields of top litter, mixed litter, and DAF waste under

  4. ADM1-based modeling of anaerobic digestion of swine manure fibers pretreated with aqueous ammonia soaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado, Esperanza; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    that the AAS had on the efficiency of the anaerobic digestion of manure. Kinetic parameters were estimated by fitting of the model to data from manure fed digesters. The model was able to satisfactorily simulate the behaviour of digesters fed with manure. However, the model predictions were poorer...... fibers. In the present study, mesophilic anaerobic digestion of AAS pretreated manure fibers was tested in CSTR-type digesters fed with swine manure and/or a mixture of swine manure and AAS pretreated manure fibers. The Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 (ADM1) was used for the prediction of the effect......Anaerobic digestion of manure fibers present challenges due to their low biodegradability. Aqueous ammonia soaking (AAS) and subsequent ammonia removal has been tested as a simple and cheap method to disrupt the lignocellulose and increase the methane potential and the biogas productivity of manure...

  5. Optimisation and inhibition of anaerobic digestion of livestock manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutaryo, S.

    2012-11-15

    The optimisation process during this PhD study focused on mixed enzyme (ME) addition, thermal pre-treatment and co-digestion of raw manure with solid fractions of acidified manure, while for inhibition processes, ammonia and sulphide inhibition were studied. ME addition increased methane yield of both dairy cow manure (DCM) and solid fractions of DCM (by 4.44% and 4.15% respectively, compared to the control) when ME was added to manure and incubated prior to anaerobic digestion (AD). However, no positive effect was found when ME was added to manure and fed immediately to either mesophilic (35 deg. C) or thermophilic (50 deg. C) digesters. Low-temperature pre-treatment (65 deg. C to 80 deg. C for 20 h) followed by batch assays increased the methane yield of pig manure in the range from 9.5% to 26.4% at 11 d incubation. These treatments also increased the methane yield of solid-fractions pig manure in the range from 6.1% to 25.3% at 11 d of the digestion test. However, at 90 d the increase in methane yield of pig manure was only significant at the 65 deg. C treatment, thus low-temperature thermal pre-treatment increased the rate of gas production, but did not increase the ultimate yield (B{sub o}). High-temperature pre-treatment (100 deg. C to 225 deg. C for 15 min.) increased the methane yield of DCM by 13% and 21% for treatments at 175 deg. C and 200 deg. C, respectively, at 27 d of batch assays. For pig manure, methane yield was increased by 29% following 200 deg. C treatment and 27 d of a batch digestion test. No positive effect was found of high-temperature pre-treatment on the methane yield of chicken manure. At the end of the experiment (90 d), high-temperature thermal pre-treatment was significantly increasing the B{sub 0} of pig manure and DCM. Acidification of animal manure using sulphuric acid is a well-known technology to reduce ammonia emission of animal manure. AD of acidified manure showed sulphide inhibition and consequently methane production was 45

  6. Towards environmentally sustainable aquaculture: Exploiting fermentation products from anaerobic sludge digestion for fueling nitrate removal in RAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2011-01-01

    being the final cleaning component of the MTF set-up. No specific denitrification filter has so far been implemented in Danish MTFs. An in-situ study was conducted at a commercial MTF (1000 ton/year) for evaluating the potential of using the fermentation products from anaerobic digestion in the sludge...... and low C/N ratio rendered a relatively lower nitrate-N removal rate but significantly higher ammonia-N reduction, which could indicate anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) activity. A controlled laboratory anaerobic MTF sludge digestion experiment showed that app. 40% additional nitrate-N reduction...... is by production in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). In Denmark, more than 50 % of total fresh-water rainbow trout production is made in semi-intensive RAS, called ModelTroutFarms (MTF). MTF efficiently removes organic matter (93%), phosphorous (76%), and nitrogen (50%) (Svendsen et al., 2008). This makes...

  7. State estimation for anaerobic digesters using the ADM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, D; Wolf, C; Meyer, C; Stuhlsatz, A; Lippel, J; Bäck, T; Bongards, M; McLoone, S

    2012-01-01

    The optimization of full-scale biogas plant operation is of great importance to make biomass a competitive source of renewable energy. The implementation of innovative control and optimization algorithms, such as Nonlinear Model Predictive Control, requires an online estimation of operating states of biogas plants. This state estimation allows for optimal control and operating decisions according to the actual state of a plant. In this paper such a state estimator is developed using a calibrated simulation model of a full-scale biogas plant, which is based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1. The use of advanced pattern recognition methods shows that model states can be predicted from basic online measurements such as biogas production, CH4 and CO2 content in the biogas, pH value and substrate feed volume of known substrates. The machine learning methods used are trained and evaluated using synthetic data created with the biogas plant model simulating over a wide range of possible plant operating regions. Results show that the operating state vector of the modelled anaerobic digestion process can be predicted with an overall accuracy of about 90%. This facilitates the application of state-based optimization and control algorithms on full-scale biogas plants and therefore fosters the production of eco-friendly energy from biomass.

  8. Industrial symbiosis: corn ethanol fermentation, hydrothermal carbonization, and anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brandon M; Jader, Lindsey R; Schendel, Frederick J; Hahn, Nicholas J; Valentas, Kenneth J; McNamara, Patrick J; Novak, Paige M; Heilmann, Steven M

    2013-10-01

    The production of dry-grind corn ethanol results in the generation of intermediate products, thin and whole stillage, which require energy-intensive downstream processing for conversion into commercial animal feed products. Hydrothermal carbonization of thin and whole stillage coupled with anaerobic digestion was investigated as alternative processing methods that could benefit the industry. By substantially eliminating evaporation of water, reductions in downstream energy consumption from 65% to 73% were achieved while generating hydrochar, fatty acids, treated process water, and biogas co-products providing new opportunities for the industry. Processing whole stillage in this manner produced the four co-products, eliminated centrifugation and evaporation, and substantially reduced drying. With thin stillage, all four co-products were again produced, as well as a high quality animal feed. Anaerobic digestion of the aqueous product stream from the hydrothermal carbonization of thin stillage reduced chemical oxygen demand (COD) by more than 90% and converted 83% of the initial COD to methane. Internal use of this biogas could entirely fuel the HTC process and reduce overall natural gas usage.

  9. Repeated pulse feeding induces functional stability in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vrieze, Jo; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2013-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an environmental key technology in the future bio-based economy. To achieve functional stability, a minimal microbial community diversity is required. This microbial community should also have a certain 'elasticity', i.e. the ability to rapidly adapt to suboptimal conditions or stress. In this study it was evaluated whether a higher degree of functional stability could be achieved by changing the feeding pattern, which can change the evenness, dynamics and richness of the bacterial community. The first reactor (CSTR stable ) was fed on daily basis, whereas the second reactor (CSTR dynamic ) was fed every 2 days. Average biogas production was 0.30 l CH4 l(-1) day(-1) in both reactors, although daily variation was up to four times higher in the CSTR dynamic compared with the CSTR stable during the first 50 days. Bacterial analysis revealed that this CSTR dynamic had a two times higher degree of bacterial community dynamics. The CSTR dynamic also appeared to be more tolerant to an organic shock load of 8 g COD l(-1) and ammonium levels up to 8000 mg TAN l(-1). These results suggest that the regular application of a limited pulse of organic material and/or a variation in the substrate composition might promote higher functional stability in anaerobic digestion.

  10. Thermochemical Pretreatment for Anaerobic Digestion of Sorted Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, W.; Hongtao, W.

    2008-02-01

    The effect of alkaline hydrothermal pre-treatment for anaerobic digestion of mechanically-sorted municipal solid waste (MSW) and source-sorted waste was studied. Waste was hydrothermally pre-treated in dilute alkali solution. Hydrolysis product was incubated in 500 ml saline bottle to determine methane potential (MP) under mesospheric anaerobic conditions. Optimum reaction condition obtained in the study is 170 °C at the dose of 4 g NaOH/100 g solid for one hour. Soluble COD was 13936 mg/L and methane yield was 164 ml/g VS for 6 days incubation at optimum conditions. More than 50% biogas increase was achieved over the control, and methane conversion ratio on carbon basis was enhanced to 30.6%. The digestion period was less than 6 days when pre-treatment temperature was above 130 °C. The organic part of sorted waste is mainly constituted of kitchen garbage and leaf. Model kitchen garbage was completely liquidized at 130 °C for one hour and the methane yield was 276 ml/g VS. Addition of alkali enhance hydroxylation rate and methane yield slightly. The biogas potential of leaf could be observed by pre-treatment above 150 °C under alkaline condition.

  11. Dry anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brummeler, E.

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an attractive technology for solid waste management. This thesis describes the technological potentials of dry anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) using batch systems. In 1985 a research programme was started to develop the so- called BIO

  12. Dynamic real-time substrate feed optimization of anaerobic co-digestion plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaida, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In anaerobic co-digestion plants a mix of organic materials is converted to biogas using the anaerobic digestion process. These organic materials, called substrates, can be crops, sludge, manure, organic wastes and many more. They are fed on a daily basis and significantly affect the biogas producti

  13. Effects of anaerobic digestion and aerobic treatment on gaseous emissions from dairy manure storages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of anaerobic digestion and aerobic treatment on the reduction of gaseous emissions from dairy manure storages were evaluated in this study. Screened dairy manure containing 3.5% volatile solids (VS) was either anaerobically digested or aerobically treated prior to storage in air-tight vessel...

  14. Whole farm impact of anaerobic digestion and biogas use on a New York dairy farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion of manure for biogas production is one of many options for reducing the carbon footprint of milk production. This process reduces greenhouse gas emissions but increases the potential nitrogen and phosphorus losses from the farm. An anaerobic digester component was added to the In...

  15. Evaluation of biogas production by dry anaerobic digestion of switchgrass-animal manure mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological method used to convert organic wastes into a stable product for land application without adverse environmental effects. The biogas produced can be used as an alternative renewable energy source. Dry anaerobic digestion (> 15% TS; total solid) has an advantage ov...

  16. Speciation modeling of ammonia and other major solutes in anaerobic digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion of high-nitrogen wastes can be inhibited by high concentrations of un-ionized ammonia, NH**3 (aq). Understanding the toxicity of NH**3 (aq) to anaerobic digestion requires an understanding of the mechanisms controlling its concentration. Previous work on ammonia toxicity in an...

  17. [Municipal biowaste thermal-hydrolysis and ASBR anaerobic digestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hua-hua; Wang, Wei; Hu, Song; Xu, Yi-xian

    2010-02-01

    Thermal-hydrolysis can remarkably improve the solid organics dissolving efficiency of urban biomass waste, and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) was used to improve the efficiency of urban biomass waste anaerobic digestion. The optimum thermal-hydrolysis temperature and holding time was 175 degrees C and 60 min, the volatile suspended solid (VSS) dissolving ratio of kitchen waste, fruit-and-vegetable waste and sludge were 31.3%, 31.9% and 49.7%, respectively. Two ASBR and one continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were started at hydraulic retention time (HRT) = 20 d, COD organic loading rate (OLR) = 3.2-3.6 kg/(m3 x d). The biogas production volumes were 5656 mL/d(A1), 6335 mL/d(A2) and 3 103 mL/d(CSTR), respectively; VSS degradation ratios were 45.3% (A1), 50.87% (A2), 20.81% (CSTR), and the total COD (TCOD) removal rates were 88.1% (A1), 90% (A2), 72.6% (CSTR). In ASBR, organic solid and anaerobic microorganism were remained in the reactor during settling period. When HRT was 20 d, the solid retention time (SRT) was over 130 d, which made ASBR higher efficiency than CSTR.

  18. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) during anaerobic digestion with recirculation of ozonated digested sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal-Martinez, Arodi; Patureau, Dominique; Delgenes, Jean-Philippe [INRA, UR 050, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l' Environnement, Avenue des Etangs, Narbonne F11100 (France); Carrere, Helene [INRA, UR 050, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l' Environnement, Avenue des Etangs, Narbonne F11100 (France)], E-mail: carrere@supagro.inra.fr

    2009-03-15

    PAH are particularly monitored because of their carcinogenic properties and their ubiquity in the environment. Their presence in municipal sewage sludge is a major problem due to the environmental risks associated with the sludge spreading on agricultural soils. The objective of this work was to asses the removal of PAH naturally present in sludge by continuous anaerobic digestion with recirculation of ozonated sludge. Recirculation of ozonated digested sludge allowed to enhance PAH removals, the highest efficiency was obtained with the highest ozone dose (0.11 g O{sub 3}/g{sub TS}). In order to study the effect of recirculation, a reactor was operated without recirculation but was fed with a mixture of raw and ozonated digested sludge. This process led to the best performances in terms of PAH and solid removals. This pointed out some accumulation of nonbiodegradable or recalcitrant compounds during recirculation assay. Smallest and most soluble compounds presented the highest biodegradation efficiencies.

  19. Anaerobic Digestion Scale Levels and Their Energy Yields. A comparison of energy yields of different manure-and co-digestion scale levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konneman, Bram

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process whereby, in the absence of oxygen, organic matter is converted into biogas and digestate. In recent years anaerobic digestion has received re-newed attention in the Dutch agricultural sector. Co-digestion, in wh

  20. Biogas energy production from tropical biomass wastes by anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xumeng; Matsumoto, Tracie; Keith, Lisa; Li, Yebo

    2014-10-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an attractive technology in tropical regions for converting locally abundant biomass wastes into biogas which can be used to produce heat, electricity, and transportation fuels. However, investigations on AD of tropical forestry wastes, such as albizia biomass and food wastes, such as taro, papaya, and sweet potato, are limited. In this study, these tropical biomass wastes were evaluated for biogas production by liquid AD (L-AD) and/or solid-state AD (SS-AD), depending on feedstock characteristics. When albizia leaves and chips were used as feedstocks, L-AD had greater methane yields (161 and 113 L kg(-1)VS, respectively) than SS-AD (156.8 and 59.6 L kg(-1)VS, respectively), while SS-AD achieved 5-fold higher volumetric methane productivity than L-AD. Mono-digestion and co-digestion of taro skin, taro flesh, papaya, and sweet potato achieved methane yields from 345 to 411 L kg(-1)VS, indicating the robustness of AD technology.

  1. Dry anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic and protein residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam M Kabir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Utilisation of wheat straw and wool textile waste in dry anaerobic digestion (AD process was investigated. Dry-AD of the individual substrates as well as co-digestion of those were evaluated using different total solid (TS contents ranging between 6 to 30%. Additionally, the effects of the addition of nutrients and cellulose- or protein-degrading enzymes on the performance of the AD process were also investigated. Dry-AD of the wheat straw resulted in methane yields of 0.081 – 0.200 Nm3CH4/kgVS with the lowest and highest values obtained at 30 and 21% TS, respectively. The addition of the cellulolytic enzymes could significantly increase the yield in the reactor containing 13% TS (0.231 Nm3CH4/kg VS. Likewise, degradation of wool textile waste was enhanced significantly at TS of 13% with the addition of the protein-degrading enzyme (0.131 Nm3CH4/kg VS. Furthermore, the co-digestion of these two substrates showed higher methane yields compared with the methane potentials calculated for the individual fractions at all the investigated TS contents due to synergetic effects and better nutritional balance.

  2. Anaerobic digestion in the treatment of waste and wastewater effluent; Digestion anaerobia en el tratamiento de efluentes y lodos residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraza, X.; Galimary, F.; Torres, R.

    2003-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is one of the processes most commonly employed at the present time in treating effluent and wastewater containing a large proportion of organic matter. This article describes the process involved and its applications in the environmental engineering field. It also discusses the physical, chemical and biological factors influencing anaerobic digestion and which therefore have a bearing on whether to implements this process and how it is actually applied from a technological point of view. (Author) 125 refs.

  3. Effects of dairy manure and corn stover co-digestion on anaerobic microbes and corresponding digestion performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zhengbo; Chen, Rui; Yang, Fan; MacLellan, James; Marsh, Terence; Liu, Yan; Liao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of corn stover as a supplemental feed on anaerobic digestion of dairy manure under different hydraulic retention times (HRT). The results elucidated that both HRT and corn stover supplement significantly influenced microbial community and corresponding anaerobic digestion performance. The highest biogas production of 497 mL per gram total solid loading per day was observed at a HRT of 40 days from digestion of manure supplemented with corn stover. Biogas production was closely correlated with the populations of Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and methanogens. Composition of the solid digestate (AD fiber) from the co-digestion of corn stover and dairy manure was similar to the digestion of dairy manure. However, the hydrolysis of AD fiber was significantly (P < 0.05) different among the different digestions. Both HRT and feed composition influenced the hydrolyzability of AD fiber via shifting the composition of microbial community.

  4. Developing a nutrient recovery process for recovering nutrients in anaerobic digestate in low income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that 2.7 billion people worldwide are served by on-site sanitation facilities that require faecal sludge management. Anaerobic digestion is a treatment mechanism that can provide faecal sludge management, methane production and an effluent digestate rich in nutrients. However, there is a paucity of information regarding the composition of the input faecal sludge which hinders the advancement of anaerobic digestion treatment and downstream nutrient recovery to...

  5. Study of the Process of Hydraulic Mixing in Anaerobic Digester of Biogas Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaeva Julia V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two systems of hydraulic mixing in a vertical cylindrical anaerobic digester: standard and modernised are discussed in the paper. Numerical investigations that were carried out are focused on a study of hydrodynamic processes in an aerobic digester using two various systems of hydraulic mixing as well as on analysis of the efficiency of methane fermentation process accomplished under different geometric parameters of an anaerobic digester and systems of hydraulic mixing.

  6. Batch anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge and microalgae (Chlorella sorokiniana) at mesophilic temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Carolina; Jeison, David; Fermoso, Fernando G; Borja, Rafael

    2016-08-23

    The microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana are used as co-substrate for waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic digestion. The specific objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of improving methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS in co-digestion with this microalga, based on an optimized mixture percentage. Thus, the anaerobic co-digestion of both substrates aims to overcome the drawbacks of the anaerobic digestion of single WAS, simultaneously improving its management. Different co-digestion mixtures (0% WAS-100% microalgae; 25% WAS-75% microalgae; 50% WAS-50% microalgae; 75% WAS-25% microalgae; 100% WAS-0% microalgae) were studied. The highest methane yield (442 mL CH4/g VS) was obtained for the mixture with 75% WAS and 25% microalgae. This value was 22% and 39% higher than that obtained in the anaerobic digestion of the sole substrates WAS and microalgae, respectively, as well as 16% and 25% higher than those obtained for the co-digestion mixtures with 25% WAS and 75% microalgae and 50% WAS and 50% microalgae, respectively. The kinetic constant of the process increased 42%, 42% and 12%, respectively, for the mixtures with 25%, 50% and 75% of WAS compared to the substrate without WAS. Anaerobic digestion of WAS, together with C. sorokiniana, has been clearly improved by ensuring its viability, suitability and efficiency.

  7. Anaerobic digestion of autoclaved and untreated food waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tampio, Elina, E-mail: elina.tampio@mtt.fi [Bioenergy and Environment, MTT Agrifood Research Finland, FI-31600 Jokioinen (Finland); Ervasti, Satu; Paavola, Teija [Bioenergy and Environment, MTT Agrifood Research Finland, FI-31600 Jokioinen (Finland); Heaven, Sonia; Banks, Charles [University of Southampton, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Rintala, Jukka [Bioenergy and Environment, MTT Agrifood Research Finland, FI-31600 Jokioinen (Finland)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Autoclaving decreased the formation of NH4-N and H{sub 2}S during food waste digestion. • Stable digestion was achieved with untreated and autoclaved FW at OLR 6 kg VS/m{sup 3}day. • Use of acclimated inoculum allowed very rapid increases in OLR. • Highest CH{sub 4} yields were observed at OLR 3 kg VS/m{sup 3}day with untreated FW. • Autoclaved FW produced highest CH{sub 4} yields during OLR 4 kgVS/m{sup 3}day. - Abstract: Anaerobic digestion of autoclaved (160 °C, 6.2 bar) and untreated source segregated food waste (FW) was compared over 473 days in semi-continuously fed mesophilic reactors with trace elements supplementation, at organic loading rates (OLRs) of 2, 3, 4 and 6 kg volatile solids (VS)/m{sup 3} d. Methane yields at all OLR were 5–10% higher for untreated FW (maximum 0.483 ± 0.013 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS at 3 kg VS/m{sup 3} d) than autoclaved FW (maximum 0.439 ± 0.020 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS at 4 kg VS/m{sup 3} d). The residual methane potential of both digestates at all OLRs was less than 0.110 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS, indicating efficient methanation in all cases. Use of acclimated inoculum allowed very rapid increases in OLR. Reactors fed on autoclaved FW showed lower ammonium and hydrogen sulphide concentrations, probably due to reduced protein hydrolysis as a result of formation of Maillard compounds. In the current study this reduced biodegradability appears to outweigh any benefit due to thermal hydrolysis of ligno-cellulosic components.

  8. Effect of temperature and pH on the anaerobic digestion of grass silage

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The operating temperature and pH level in the digester during anaerobic digestion and the retention period are among the major factors that affect the rate of biogas production. Therefore, this paper evaluates the effects of temperature and pH in anaerobic digestion of grass silage. Grass silage was digested in 1000ml at different temperatures (35 ○C, 40 ○C, 45 ○C and 50 ○C) and pH (6.5, 6.8 &7.2). The digesters were shaken everyday to prevent the formation of surface crust which may prevent ...

  9. Anaerobic co-digestion of animal waste: swine manure and tuna fish waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otero, L.; Alvarez, J. A.; Lema, J. M.

    2009-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion has become an established and proven technology for the treatment of solid wastes. Co-digestion offers several possible ecological, technology and economical advantages. Anaerobic co-digestion can increase CH{sub 4} production of manure diesters in a 50-200% according to the operation conditions and the co-substrates used. Last September 2007, PROBIOGAS project started up with the objective of improving the production and use of biogas from co-digestion of farming, agricultural and industrial waste. Our research group takes part in the study of co-digestion of swine manure firstly with tuna fish waste and secondly with glycerine (bio diesel production waste). (Author)

  10. Rheology evolution of sludge through high-solid anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaohu; Gai, Xin; Dong, Bin

    2014-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the rheology evolution of sludge through high-solid anaerobic digestion (AD) and its dependency on sludge retention time (SRT) and temperature of AD reactor. The operation performance of high-solid AD reactors were also studied. The results showed that sludge became much more flowable after high-solid AD. It was found that the sludge from reactors with long SRT exhibited low levels of shear stress, viscosity, yield stress, consistency index, and high value of flow behaviour index. While the flowability of sludge from thermophilic AD reactors were better than that of sludge from mesophilic AD reactors though the solid content of the formers were higher than that of the latters, which could be attributed to the fact that the formers had more amount of free and interstitial moisture. It might be feasible to use sludge rheology as an AD process controlling parameter.

  11. Survival of human and plant pathogens during anaerobic mesophilic digestion of vegetable, fruit, and garden waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termorshuizen, A.J.; Volker, D.; Blok, W.J.; Brummeler, ten E.; Hartog, B.J.; Janse, J.D.; Knol, W.; Wenneker, M.

    2003-01-01

    Five pathogens were added to vegetable, fruit and garden waste and their survival was studied during mesophilic (maximum temperature 40 degreesC) anaerobic digestion. Digestion during 6 weeks took. place with a 50/50% (v/v) ratio of digested and fresh, tem undigested material, respectively. Survival

  12. Effect of temperature on methane production from field-scale anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperature is a critical factor affecting anaerobic digestion because it influences both system heating requirements and methane production. Temperatures of 35-37°C are typically suggested for manure digestion, yet in temperate climate digesters, require a considerable amount of additional heat en...

  13. On the effect of aqueous ammonia soaking pretreatment on batch and continuous anaerobic digestion of digested swine manure fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirtsou Xanthopoulou, Chrysoula; Jurado, Esperanza; Skiadas, Ioannis;

    2012-01-01

    to enhance their methane productivity in batch experiments. In the present study, continuous experiments at a mesophilic (38°C) CSTR-type anaerobic digester fed with swine manure first and a mixture of manure with AAS-treated digested fibers in the sequel, were performed. The methane yield of AAS...

  14. Anaerobic co-digestion in the Netherlands. A system analysis on greenhouse gas emissions from Dutch co-digesters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewold, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Summary Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process whereby, in the absence of oxygen, organic matter is transformed into biogas and digestate. In recent years AD has received new attention in the Dutch agricultural sector by introducing the co-dige

  15. Evaluation on direct interspecies electron transfer in anaerobic sludge digestion of microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zisheng; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Increase of methanogenesis in methane-producing microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) is frequently believed as a result of cathodic reduction of CO2. Recent studies indicated that this electromethanogenesis only accounted for a little part of methane production during anaerobic sludge digestion. Instead, direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) possibly plays an important role in methane production. In this study, anaerobic digestion of sludge were investigated in a single-chamber MEC reactor, a carbon-felt supplemented reactor and a common anaerobic reactor to evaluate the effects of DIET on the sludge digestion. The results showed that adding carbon felt into the reactor increased 12.9% of methane production and 17.2% of sludge reduction. Imposing a voltage on the carbon felt further improved the digestion. Current calculation showed that the cathodic reduction only contributed to 27.5% of increased methane production. Microbial analysis indicated that DIET played an important role in the anaerobic sludge digestion in the MEC.

  16. Effects of Oxytetracycline on Methane Production and the Microbial Communities During Anaerobic Digestion of Cow Manure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Xin; WANG Chun-yong; LI Run-dong; ZHANG Yun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC) on the dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion (37°C) of cow manure were investigated. Before anaerobic digestion, OTC was added to digesters at concentrations of 20, 50, and 80 mg L-1, respectively. Compared with no-antibiotic control, all methane productions underwent different levels of inhibition at different concentrations of OTC. Changes in the bacterial and archaeal communities were discussed by using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Results showed that OTC affected the richness and diversity of bacterial and archaeal communities. The bacterial genus Flavobacterium and an uncultured bacterium (JN256083.1) were detected throughout the entire process of anaerobic digestion and seemed to be the functional bacteria. Methanobrevibacter boviskoreani and an uncultured archaeon (FJ230982.1) dominated the archaeal communities during anaerobic digestion. These microorganisms may have high resistance to OTC and may play vital roles in methane production.

  17. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of biologically pretreated abattoir wastewaters in an upflow anaerobic filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannoun, H; Bouallagui, H; Okbi, A; Sayadi, S; Hamdi, M

    2009-10-15

    The hydrolysis pretreatment of abattoir wastewaters (AW), rich in organic suspended solids (fats and protein) was studied in static and stirred batch reactors without aeration in the presence of natural microbial population acclimated in a storage tank of AW. Microbial analysis showed that the major populations which contribute to the pretreatment of AW belong to the genera Bacillus. Contrary to the static pretreatment, the stirred conditions favoured the hydrolysis and solubilization of 80% of suspended matter into soluble pollution. The pretreated AW, in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 days, was fed to an upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) at an HRT of 2 days. The performance of anaerobic digestion of biologically pretreated AW was examined under mesophilic (37 degrees C) and thermophilic (55 degrees C) conditions. The shifting from a mesophilic to a thermophilic environment in the UAF was carried out with a short start-up of thermophilic condition. The UAF ran at organic loading rates (OLRs) ranging from 0.9 to 6g COD/Ld in mesophilic conditions and at OLRs from 0.9 to 9 g COD/Ld in thermophilic conditions. COD removal efficiencies of 80-90% were achieved for OLRs up to 4.5 g COD/Ld in mesophilic conditions, while the highest OLRs i.e. 9 g COD/Ld led to efficiencies of 70-72% in thermophilic conditions. The biogas yield in thermophilic conditions was about 0.32-0.45 L biogas/g of COD removed for OLRs up to 4.5 g COD/Ld. For similar OLR, the UAF in mesophilic conditions showed lower percentage of methanization. Mesophilic anaerobic digestion has been shown to destroy pathogens partially, whereas the thermophilic process was more efficient in the removal of indicator microorganisms and pathogenic bacteria at different organic loading rates.

  18. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of biologically pretreated abattoir wastewaters in an upflow anaerobic filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gannoun, H.; Bouallagui, H.; Okbi, A. [Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology, B.P. 676, 1080 Tunis (Tunisia); Sayadi, S. [Laboratory of bioprocesses, Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax, Sfax (Tunisia); Hamdi, M., E-mail: moktar.hamdi@insat.rnu.tn [Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology, B.P. 676, 1080 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2009-10-15

    The hydrolysis pretreatment of abattoir wastewaters (AW), rich in organic suspended solids (fats and protein) was studied in static and stirred batch reactors without aeration in the presence of natural microbial population acclimated in a storage tank of AW. Microbial analysis showed that the major populations which contribute to the pretreatment of AW belong to the genera Bacillus. Contrary to the static pretreatment, the stirred conditions favoured the hydrolysis and solubilization of 80% of suspended matter into soluble pollution. The pretreated AW, in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 days, was fed to an upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) at an HRT of 2 days. The performance of anaerobic digestion of biologically pretreated AW was examined under mesophilic (37 deg. C) and thermophilic (55 deg. C) conditions. The shifting from a mesophilic to a thermophilic environment in the UAF was carried out with a short start-up of thermophilic condition. The UAF ran at organic loading rates (OLRs) ranging from 0.9 to 6 g COD/L d in mesophilic conditions and at OLRs from 0.9 to 9 g COD/L d in thermophilic conditions. COD removal efficiencies of 80-90% were achieved for OLRs up to 4.5 g COD/L d in mesophilic conditions, while the highest OLRs i.e. 9 g COD/L d led to efficiencies of 70-72% in thermophilic conditions. The biogas yield in thermophilic conditions was about 0.32-0.45 L biogas/g of COD removed for OLRs up to 4.5 g COD/L d. For similar OLR, the UAF in mesophilic conditions showed lower percentage of methanization. Mesophilic anaerobic digestion has been shown to destroy pathogens partially, whereas the thermophilic process was more efficient in the removal of indicator microorganisms and pathogenic bacteria at different organic loading rates.

  19. Anaerobic digestion of pig farm sewage; Digestion Anaerobia de aguas residuales de granjas porcicolas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Borges, E.; Mendez Novelo, R.; Magana Pietra, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan. Departamento de Ingenieria Ambiental, Yucatan, Mexico (Mexico)

    1997-04-01

    The 534 litre anaerobic digester, composed of a UASB reactor at the bottom and a high-rate sedimentator at the top, was fed with pig and ruminants sewage. The formation of volatile fatty acids (VFA) was monitored as VFA concentration is usually decisive in controlling fermentation during the non-methanogenic stage. The results obtained with different retention times show the presence of different VFA concentrations, the highest concentration corresponding to a retention time of one day. The process was also found to be extremely elastic. (Author) 12 refs.

  20. Anaerobic digestion of autoclaved and untreated food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampio, Elina; Ervasti, Satu; Paavola, Teija; Heaven, Sonia; Banks, Charles; Rintala, Jukka

    2014-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion of autoclaved (160°C, 6.2 bar) and untreated source segregated food waste (FW) was compared over 473 days in semi-continuously fed mesophilic reactors with trace elements supplementation, at organic loading rates (OLRs) of 2, 3, 4 and 6 kg volatile solids(VS)/m(3)d. Methane yields at all OLR were 5-10% higher for untreated FW (maximum 0.483±0.013 m(3) CH4/kg VS at 3 kg VS/m(3) d) than autoclaved FW (maximum 0.439±0.020 m(3) CH4/kg VS at 4 kg VS/m(3) d). The residual methane potential of both digestates at all OLRs was less than 0.110 m(3) CH4/kg VS, indicating efficient methanation in all cases. Use of acclimated inoculum allowed very rapid increases in OLR. Reactors fed on autoclaved FW showed lower ammonium and hydrogen sulphide concentrations, probably due to reduced protein hydrolysis as a result of formation of Maillard compounds. In the current study this reduced biodegradability appears to outweigh any benefit due to thermal hydrolysis of ligno-cellulosic components.

  1. Modeling temperature variations in a pilot plant thermophilic anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Guadarrama, Salvador; Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; López-Cruz, Irineo L; Domaschko, Max

    2011-05-01

    A model that predicts temperature changes in a pilot plant thermophilic anaerobic digester was developed based on fundamental thermodynamic laws. The methodology utilized two simulation strategies. In the first, model equations were solved through a searching routine based on a minimal square optimization criterion, from which the overall heat transfer coefficient values, for both biodigester and heat exchanger, were determined. In the second, the simulation was performed with variable values of these overall coefficients. The prediction with both strategies allowed reproducing experimental data within 5% of the temperature span permitted in the equipment by the system control, which validated the model. The temperature variation was affected by the heterogeneity of the feeding and extraction processes, by the heterogeneity of the digestate recirculation through the heating system and by the lack of a perfect mixing inside the biodigester tank. The use of variable overall heat transfer coefficients improved the temperature change prediction and reduced the effect of a non-ideal performance of the pilot plant modeled.

  2. Assessing solid digestate from anaerobic digestion as feedstock for ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teater, Charles; Yue, Zhengbo; MacLellan, James; Liu, Yan; Liao, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol production using solid digestate (AD fiber) from a completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digester was assessed comparing to an energy crop of switchgrass, and an agricultural residue of corn stover. A complete random design was fulfilled to optimize the reaction conditions of dilute alkali pretreatment. The most effective dilute alkali pretreatment conditions for raw CSTR AD fiber were 2% sodium hydroxide, 130 °C, and 3 h. Under these pretreatment conditions, the cellulose concentration of the AD fiber was increased from 34% to 48%. Enzymatic hydrolysis of 10% (dry basis) pretreated AD fiber produced 49.8 g/L glucose, while utilizing 62.6% of the raw cellulose in the AD fiber. The ethanol fermentation on the hydrolysate had an 80.3% ethanol yield. The cellulose utilization efficiencies determined that the CSTR AD fiber was a suitable biorefining feedstock compared to switchgrass and corn stover.

  3. Continuous mesophilic anaerobic digestion of manure and rape oilcake - Experimental and modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłoński, Sławomir J; Biernacki, Piotr; Steinigeweg, Sven; Łukaszewicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Rape oilcake is a by-product formed after the removal of oil from rapeseed. Due to the high content of organic matter rape oilcake seems a good substrate for anaerobic digestion when it cannot be used as fodder. The aim of this work was to optimise the parameters used in a mathematical model of anaerobic digestion for rapeseed oilcake and cattle manure. The composition of these substrates was determined in order to estimate model inputs. Optimised kinetic constants of hydrolysis and decomposition for oilcake (Kdis=0.77, KhydCH=0.55, khydPr=0.57, khydLi=0.30) were estimated based on batch fermentation. The accuracy of the model with improved input parameters was confirmed by continuous fermentation. The average concentration of methane in biogas was about 50%. The biogas production efficiency from organic matter (defined as volatile solids) was 0.42m(3)kg(-1) with an organic substrate loading rate equal to 3.18 kgm(-3)d(-1). The fermentation process demonstrated good stability and efficiency. The accuracy of the optimised model seems sufficient for use in modelling of a full scale process.

  4. Determination of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Formation Rate Constants for Semi-Continuously Fed Anaerobic Digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Moestedt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize commercial-scale biogas production, it is important to evaluate the performance of each microbial step in the anaerobic process. Hydrolysis and methanogenesis are usually the rate-limiting steps during digestion of organic waste and by-products. By measuring biogas production and methane concentrations on-line in a semi-continuously fed reactor, gas kinetics can be evaluated. In this study, the rate constants of the fermentative hydrolysis step (kc and the methanogenesis step (km were determined and evaluated in a continuously stirred tank laboratory-scale reactor treating food and slaughterhouse waste and glycerin. A process additive containing Fe2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ was supplied until day 89, after which Ni2+ was omitted. The omission resulted in a rapid decline in the methanogenesis rate constant (km to 70% of the level observed when Ni2+ was present, while kc remained unaffected. This suggests that Ni2+ mainly affects the methanogenic rather than the hydrolytic microorganisms in the system. However, no effect was initially observed when using conventional process monitoring parameters such as biogas yield and volatile fatty acid concentration. Hence, formation rate constants can reveal additional information on process performance and km can be used as a complement to conventional process monitoring tools for semi-continuously fed anaerobic digesters.

  5. State-of-the-art of anaerobic digestion technology for industrial wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeshwari, K.V.; Balakrishnan, M.; Kansal, A.; Kusum Lata; Kishore, V.V.N. [Tata Energy Research Institute, New Delhi (India). Darbari Seth Block

    2000-06-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the most suitable option for the treatment of high strength organic effluents. The presence of biodegradable components in the effluents coupled with the advantages of anaerobic process over other treatment methods makes it an attractive option. This paper reviews the suitability and the status of development of anaerobic reactors for the digestion of selected organic effluents from sugar and distillery, pulp and paper, slaughterhouse and dairy units. In addition, modifications in the existing reactor designs for improving the efficiency of digestion has also been suggested. (author)

  6. Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank J. Hartz

    2011-12-30

    One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

  7. Effect of temperature on methane production from field-scale anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Osman A; Mulbry, Walter; Lansing, Stephanie

    2015-09-01

    Temperature is a critical factor affecting anaerobic digestion because it influences both system heating requirements and methane production. Temperatures of 35-37°C are typically suggested for manure digestion. In temperate climates, digesters require a considerable amount of additional heat energy to maintain temperatures at these levels. In this study, the effects of lower digestion temperatures (22 and 28°C), on the methane production from dairy digesters were evaluated and compared with 35°C using duplicate replicates of field-scale (FS) digesters with a 17-day hydraulic retention time. After acclimation, the FS digesters were operated for 12weeks using solids-separated manure at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.4kgVSm(-3)d(-1) and then for 8weeks using separated manure amended with manure solids at an OLR of 2.6kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Methane production values of the FS digesters at 22 and 28°C were about 70% and 87%, respectively, of the values from FS digesters at 35°C. The results suggest that anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure at 28°C were nearly as efficient as digesters operated at 35°C, with 70% of total methane achievable at 22°C. These results are relevant to small farms interested in anaerobic digestion for methane reduction without heat recovery from generators or for methane recovery from covered lagoon digesters.

  8. Carbon dynamics and retention in soil after anaerobic digestion of dairy cattle feed and faeces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Olesen, Jørgen E; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Animal manure and plant biomass are increasingly used for methane production. While minerals may be conserved during gas generation, the composition of the biogenic material is changed and less carbon (C) is returned to the soil in the digested residue. We evaluated the fate of C in ruminant feed....... When C lost during the pre-treatments was included, the long-term C retention in soil accounted for 12–14% of the C initially present in the feed. We conclude that soil microbial activity is reduced when residues are anaerobically digested for biogas before being applied to soil. However, the retention...... treated differently before added to soil: no treatment (feed), anaerobic digestion (digested feed), consumed by cattle (faeces), consumed by cattle and anaerobic digestion (digested faeces). The materials were incubated for 245 days at 20 °C. The net CO2 release was determined and fitted to a kinetic C...

  9. Co-digestion of tobacco waste with different agricultural biomass feedstocks and the inhibition of tobacco viruses by anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Dong, Jianxin; Liu, Gangjin; Yang, Hongnan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Lan; Kong, Chuixue; Zheng, Dan; Yang, Jinguang; Deng, Liangwei; Wang, Shusheng

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco is widely planted across the world especially in China, which means that a large amount of tobacco waste needs to be treated. This study investigated the biogas fermentation of tobacco stalks co-digested with different biomass feedstocks and the inactivation of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) by anaerobic digestion. Results showed that the maximum methane yield of tobacco stalks at 35 °C was 0.163 m(3) CH4 ⋅ kg VS(-1), which was from the co-digestion of tobacco stalks, wheat stalks and pig manure. The largest VS removal rate of tobacco stalks was 59.10%. Proven by indicator paper stripe, half-leaf lesion and RT-PCR, CMV could be inactivated by mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion, whereas TMV could be only inactivated by thermophilic anaerobic digestion over 20 days. These results suggested that using tobacco stalks as feedstock for anaerobic digestion and applying the digested residue and slurry to Solanaceae crop land are feasible.

  10. Influence of fluid dynamics on anaerobic digestion of food waste for biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengping; Zhang, Cunsheng; Huo, Shuhao

    2016-08-17

    To enhance the stability and efficiency of an anaerobic process, the influences of fluid dynamics on the performance of anaerobic digestion and sludge granulation were investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Four different propeller speeds (20, 60, 100, 140 r/min) were adopted for anaerobic digestion of food waste in a 30 L continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Experimental results indicated that the methane yield increased with increasing the propeller speed within the experimental range. Results from CFD simulation and sludge granulation showed that the optimum propeller speed for anaerobic digestion was 100 r/min. Lower propeller speed (20 r/min) inhibited mass transfer and resulted in the failure of anaerobic digestion, while higher propeller speed (140 r/min) would lead to higher energy loss and system instability. Under this condition, anaerobic digestion could work effectively with higher efficiency of mass transfer which facilitated sludge granulation and biogas production. The corresponding mean liquid velocity and shear strain rate were 0.082 m/s and 10.48 s(-1), respectively. Moreover, compact granular sludge could be formed, with lower energy consumption. CFD was successfully used to study the influence of fluid dynamics on the anaerobic digestion process. The key parameters of the optimum mixing condition for anaerobic digestion of food waste in a 30 L CSTR including liquid velocity and shear strain rate were obtained using CFD, which were of paramount significance for the scale-up of the bioreactor. This study provided a new way for the optimization and scale-up of the anaerobic digestion process in CSTR based on the fluid dynamics analysis.

  11. Comparison of solid-state anaerobic digestion and composting of yard trimmings with effluent from liquid anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Long; Yang, Liangcheng; Xu, Fuqing; Michel, Frederick C; Li, Yebo

    2014-10-01

    Solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) and composting of yard trimmings with effluent from liquid AD were compared under thermophilic condition. Total solids (TS) contents of 22%, 25%, and 30% were studied for SS-AD, and 35%, 45%, and 55% for composting. Feedstock/effluent (F/E) ratios of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 were tested. In composting, the greatest carbon loss was obtained at 35% TS, which was 2-3 times of that at 55% TS and was up to 50% higher than that in SS-AD. In SS-AD, over half of the degraded carbon was converted to methane with the greatest methane yield of 121 L/kg VS(feedstock). Methane production from SS-AD was low at F/E ratios of 2 and 3, likely due to the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen (up to 5.6g/kg). The N-P-K values were similar for SS-AD digestate and compost with different dominant nitrogen forms.

  12. Use of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor for parameter estimation in modelling of anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batstone, D J; Torrijos, M; Ruiz, C; Schmidt, J E

    2004-01-01

    The model structure in anaerobic digestion has been clarified following publication of the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). However, parameter values are not well known, and uncertainty and variability in the parameter values given is almost unknown. Additionally, platforms for identification of parameters, namely continuous-flow laboratory digesters, and batch tests suffer from disadvantages such as long run times, and difficulty in defining initial conditions, respectively. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs) are sequenced into fill-react-settle-decant phases, and offer promising possibilities for estimation of parameters, as they are by nature, dynamic in behaviour, and allow repeatable behaviour to establish initial conditions, and evaluate parameters. In this study, we estimated parameters describing winery wastewater (most COD as ethanol) degradation using data from sequencing operation, and validated these parameters using unsequenced pulses of ethanol and acetate. The model used was the ADM1, with an extension for ethanol degradation. Parameter confidence spaces were found by non-linear, correlated analysis of the two main Monod parameters; maximum uptake rate (k(m)), and half saturation concentration (K(S)). These parameters could be estimated together using only the measured acetate concentration (20 points per cycle). From interpolating the single cycle acetate data to multiple cycles, we estimate that a practical "optimal" identifiability could be achieved after two cycles for the acetate parameters, and three cycles for the ethanol parameters. The parameters found performed well in the short term, and represented the pulses of acetate and ethanol (within 4 days of the winery-fed cycles) very well. The main discrepancy was poor prediction of pH dynamics, which could be due to an unidentified buffer with an overall influence the same as a weak base (possibly CaCO3). Based on this work, ASBR systems are effective for parameter

  13. Recovery of energy from Taro (Colocasia esculenta) with solid-feed anaerobic digesters (SOFADs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindu, T; Ramasamy, E V

    2008-01-01

    We present studies on solid-feed anaerobic digesters (SOFADs) in which chopped Colocasia esculenta was fed without any other pretreatment, in an attempt to develop an efficient means of utilizing the semi-aquatic weed that is otherwise an environmental nuisance. Two types of SOFADs were studied. The first type had a single vessel with two compartments. The lower portion of the digester, 25% of the total volume, was separated from the upper by a perforated PVC disk. The weed was charged from the top and inoculated with anaerobically digested cow dung-water slurry. The fermentation of the weed in the digester led to the formation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) plus some biogas. The bioleachate, rich in the VFAs, passed through the perforated PVC disk and was collected in the lower compartment of the digester. The other type of digesters, referred to as anaerobic multi-phase high-solids digesters (AMHDs), had the same type of compartmentalized digester unit as the first type and an additional methaniser unit. Up-flow anaerobic filters (UAFs) were used as methaniser units, which converted the bioleachate into combustible biogas consisting of approximately 60% methane. All SOFADs developed a consistent performance in terms of biogas yield within 20 weeks from the start. Among the two types of digesters studied, the AMHDs were found to perform better with a twofold increase in biogas yield compared to the first type of digesters.

  14. Significance of vivianite precipitation on the mobility of iron in anaerobically digested sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Roussel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion requires a balanced availability of micro-nutrients with ideal growth conditions to reach optimal organic degradation and biogas production. Iron is the most abundant of the essential metals in an anaerobic digester and its mobility has a strong impact on microorganisms through its own bioavailability, but also through its influence on the bioavailability of other metals. Most previous research on iron mobility in anaerobic digestion has focused on sulfide as the controlling anion because digesters traditionally are sulfide rich and phosphate poor. However, chemical phosphorus removal (CPR at wastewater treatment works (WWTW can elevate phosphate concentrations in the digester 10-fold or more. The goal of this research was hence to examine the accepted wisdom of iron-sulfide dominance prevailing in all anaerobic digesters and by evaluating the potential for iron phosphate formation in municipal digesters treating CPR sludge. To fulfil this aim, iron compounds were identified experimentally from full-scale digesters at WWTW with CPR and the most likely iron species identified through modelling according to their thermodynamic probability of formation under the specific environmental conditions experienced in each anaerobic digester. Experimental and modelling data were then combined to identify the main chemical reactions controlling iron mobility in those anaerobic digesters.Results show that speciation of iron in the sampled anaerobic digesters was controlled by the solid phase through a primary reaction (sulfide precipitation to form pyrite and ferrous sulfide and secondary reaction (phosphate precipitation to form vivianite. However, iron-sulfide precipitates represented only 10-30% of the total iron in the sampled digesters, while iron-phosphate precipitates represented more than 70%. The significance of the high quantity of vivianite in these digesters is that phosphate-rich anaerobic digesters will be more iron

  15. Decentralized biogas technology of anaerobic digestion and farm ecosystem: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junye eWang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term economic and environmental concerns have resulted in a great amount of research on renewable sources of biomass and bioenergy to replace fossil fuels in the past decades. Decentralized biogas technology is one of the most potential technologies of biomass and bioenergy by using agricultural waste materials (e.g., animal manure, crop straw and by-products from food industries as feedstocks. By-products from biogas production, called digestate, are nutrient rich which could potentially be reused as green fertilizers in agriculture, thereby providing a sustainable substitute for synthetic fertilizers for ecosystem farm. Thus, the biogas production of anaerobic digestion (AD is win-win option for livestock and crop producers to address issues of waste management and energy supply, and to avoid contamination of surface and ground waters and emissions of odors and greenhouse gases. In this paper, we review biogas production technology and then evaluate environmental effects of digestate used as fertilizer. Finally, we discuss issues of deployment of decentralized biogas technology for ecosystem farms. Economic and technological barriers still exist for large scale deployment of biogas technology. Two national scale deployments in China and Nepal showed that the operational status of biogas digesters is not optimal and up to 50% of plants are non-functional after a short operation period regardless of the social and economic factors. Main barriers are a wide variation of feedstocks and environmental conditions (e.g., temperature over space and time. It becomes clear that the experimental conditions of the pilot plants need to be adjusted and calibrated to the local feedstocks and climate. Also, more research needs to be done in cold fermentation technology.

  16. A simplified stoichiometric kinetic model for estimating the concentration of reaction products in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moonil; Cui, Fenghao

    2016-12-29

    Modelling the anaerobic digestion process is often complex and needs to consider many input parameters. This study simplified the modelling procedure by developing an idealized stoichiometric kinetic model that simulates the anaerobic digestion process with only a few parameters: composition coefficients (α and β), maximum substrate utilization rate (qmax), endogenous-decay coefficient (b), biodegradable fraction (fd), and temperature coefficient (Ф). We validated the model with the operating results of a pilot two-phase anaerobic digester for food wastewater disposal and calculated using the MATLAB programing software. The comparison between the experimental and model simulation results demonstrated a good agreement. The developed model correctly simulated the fate of chemicals in the anaerobic digestion process.

  17. Carbohydrate-enriched cyanobacterial biomass as feedstock for bio-methane production through anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markou, Giorgos; Angelidaki, Irini; Georgakakis, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion performance using carbohydrate-enriched biomass of Arthrospira platensis was studied. The carbohydrate enrichment was achieved after the cultivation of A. platensis under phosphorus limitation conditions. Three biomass compositions (60%, 40% and 20% carbohydrates content) ...

  18. Anaerobic co-digestion of water hyacinth and cow dung for biogas production

    OpenAIRE

    OROKA FRANK OKE; AKHIHIERO THELMA

    2015-01-01

    Co-digestion of water hyacinth and cow dung under anaerobic condition was studied. Results indicate a progressive increase in biogas yield with increased cow dung in the co-ferment mixture of water hyacinth: cow dung

  19. Anaerobic digestion of selected Italian agricultural and industrial residues (grape seeds and leather dust): combined methane production and digestate characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramiello, C; Lancellotti, I; Righi, F; Tatàno, F; Taurino, R; Barbieri, L

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental evaluation of methane production (obtained by anaerobic digestion) and detailed digestate characterization (with physical-chemical, thermo-gravimetric and mineralogical approaches) was conducted on two organic substrates, which are specific to Italy (at regional and national levels). One of the substrates was grape seeds, which have an agricultural origin, whereas the other substrate was vegetable-tanned leather dust, which has an industrial origin. Under the assumed experimental conditions of the performed lab-scale test series, the grape seed substrate exhibited a resulting net methane production of 175.0 NmL g volatile solids (VS)(-1); hence, it can be considered as a potential energy source via anaerobic digestion. Conversely, the net methane production obtained from the anaerobic digestion of the vegetable-tanned leather dust substrate was limited to 16.1 NmL gVS(-1). A detailed characterization of the obtained digestates showed that there were both nitrogen-containing compounds and complex organic compounds present in the digestate that was obtained from the mixture of leather dust and inoculum. As a general perspective of this experimental study, the application of diversified characterization analyzes could facilitate (1) a better understanding of the main properties of the obtained digestates to evaluate their potential valorization, and (2) a combination of the digestate characteristics with the corresponding methane productions to comprehensively evaluate the bioconversion process.

  20. Trace elements induce predominance among methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babett Wintsche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trace elements play an essential role in all organisms due to their functions in enzyme complexes. In anaerobic digesters, control and supplementation of trace elements lead to stable and more efficient methane production processes while trace element deficits cause process imbalances. However, the underlying metabolic mechanisms and the adaptation of the affected microbial communities to such deficits are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the microbial community dynamics and resulting process changes induced by trace element deprivation. Two identical lab-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with distiller’s grains and supplemented with trace elements (cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, tungsten and a commercial iron additive were operated in parallel. After 72 weeks of identical operation, the feeding regime of one reactor was changed by omitting trace element supplements and reducing the amount of iron additive. Both reactors were operated for further 21 weeks. Various process parameters (biogas production and composition, total solids and volatile solids, trace element concentration, volatile fatty acids, total ammonium nitrogen, total organic acids/alkalinity ratio, and pH and the composition and activity of the microbial communities were monitored over the total experimental time. While the methane yield remained stable, the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, total ammonia nitrogen, and acetate increased in the trace element-depleted reactor compared to the well-supplied control reactor. Methanosarcina and Methanoculleus dominated the methanogenic communities in both reactors. However, the activity ratio of these two genera was shown to depend on trace element supplementation explainable by different trace element requirements of their energy conservation systems. Methanosarcina dominated the well-supplied anaerobic digester, pointing to acetoclastic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway. Under trace element

  1. Biodegradability of wastewater and activated sludge organics in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikumi, D S; Harding, T H; Ekama, G A

    2014-06-01

    The investigation provides experimental evidence that the unbiodegradable particulate organics fractions of primary sludge and waste activated sludge calculated from activated sludge models remain essentially unbiodegradable in anaerobic digestion. This was tested by feeding the waste activated sludge (WAS) from three different laboratory activated sludge (AS) systems to three separate anaerobic digesters (AD). Two of the AS systems were Modified Ludzack - Ettinger (MLE) nitrification-denitrification (ND) systems and the third was a membrane University of Cape Town (UCT) ND and enhanced biological P removal system. One of the MLE systems and the UCT system were fed the same real settled wastewater. The other MLE system was fed raw wastewater which was made by adding a measured constant flux (gCOD/d) of macerated primary sludge (PS) to the real settled wastewater. This PS was also fed to a fourth AD and a blend of PS and WAS from settled wastewater MLE system was fed to a fifth AD. The five ADs were each operated at five different sludge ages (10-60d). From the measured performance results of the AS systems, the unbiodegradable particulate organic (UPO) COD fractions of the raw and settled wastewaters, the PS and the WAS from the three AS systems were calculated with AS models. These AS model based UPO fractions of the PS and WAS were compared with the UPO fractions calculated from the performance results of the ADs fed these sludges. For the PS, the UPO fraction calculated from the AS and AD models matched closely, i.e. 0.30 and 0.31. Provided the UPO of heterotrophic (OHO, fE_OHO) and phosphorus accumulating (PAO, fE_PAO) biomass were accepted to be those associated with the death regeneration model of organism "decay", the UPO of the WAS calculated from the AS and AD models also matched well - if the steady state AS model fE_OHO = 0.20 and fE_PAO = 0.25 values were used, then the UPO fraction of the WAS calculated from the AS models deviated significantly

  2. Anaerobic co-digestion of cork based oil sorbent and cow manure or sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaleiro, A. J.; Neves, T. M.; Guedes, Ana P.; Alves, M.M.; Pinto, P.; Silva, S.P.; Sousa, D.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Cork, a material with great economic, social and environmental importance in Portugal, is also a good oil sorbent that can be used in the remediation of oil spills. The oil-impregnated cork can be easily removed, but requires further treatment. In the case of vegetable oil spills, anaerobic digestion may be a potential solution. This study aims to evaluate the effect of adding cork contaminated with sunflower oil as co-substrate in anaerobic digestion processes. Biodegradability assays were p...

  3. Modelling of the mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of olive mill wastewater with olive mill solid waste using anaerobic digestion model No. 1 (ADM1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubaker, Fezzani; Ridha, Ben Cheikh

    2008-09-01

    The anaerobic digestion model No. 1 (ADM1), conceived by the international water association (IWA) task group for mathematical modelling of anaerobic digestion processes is a structured generic model which includes multiples steps describing biochemical and physicochemical processes encountered in the anaerobic degradation of complex organic substrates and a common platform for further model enhancement and validation of dynamic simulations for a variety of anaerobic processes. In this study the ADM1 model was modified and applied to simulate the mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of olive mill wastewater (OMW) with olive mill solid waste (OMSW). The ADM1 equations were coded and implemented using the simulation software package MATLAB/Simulink. The most sensitive parameters were calibrated and validated using updated experimental data of our previous work. The results indicated that the ADM1 model could simulate with good accuracy: gas flows, methane and carbon-dioxide contents, pH and total volatile fatty acids (TVFA) concentrations of effluents for various feed concentrations digested at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) and especially at HRTs of 36 and 24 days. Furthermore, effluent alkalinity and ammonium nitrogen were successfully predicted by the model at HRTs of 12 and 24 days for some feed concentrations.

  4. Hygienization of sludge through anaerobic digestion at 35, 55 and 60 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjerstadius, H; la Cour Jansen, J; De Vrieze, J; Haghighatafshar, S; Davidsson, A

    2013-01-01

    Legislation in Sweden and the European Union concerning the use of sewage sludge in agriculture is under revision and future concentration limits for pathogens in treated sludge are likely to be expected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hygienization of Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Clostridium perfringens through continuous anaerobic digestion at 35, 55 or 60 °C, as well as to investigate process stability and methane production at 60 °C. The results indicated that digestion at 55 or 60 °C with a minimum exposure time of 2 h resulted in good reduction of Salmonella, E. coli and Enterococcus and that anaerobic digestion could thus be used to reach the concentration limits suggested for the EU, as well as Sweden. Furthermore, stable continuous anaerobic digestion of sludge was achieved at 60 °C, albeit with 10% less methane production compared to digestion at 35 and 55 °C.

  5. Microbial community dynamics in mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of mixed waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supaphol, Savaporn; Jenkins, Sasha N; Intomo, Pichamon; Waite, Ian S; O'Donnell, Anthony G

    2011-03-01

    This paper identifies key components of the microbial community involved in the mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion (AD) of mixed waste at Rayong Biogas Plant, Thailand. The AD process is separated into three stages: front end treatment (FET); feed holding tank and the main anaerobic digester. The study examines how the microbial community structure was affected by the different stages and found that seeding the waste at the beginning of the process (FET) resulted in community stability. Also, co-digestion of mixed waste supported different bacterial and methanogenic pathways. Typically, acetoclastic methanogenesis was the major pathway catalysed by Methanosaeta but hydrogenotrophs were also supported. Finally, the three-stage AD process means that hydrolysis and acidogenesis is initiated prior to entering the main digester which helps improve the bioconversion efficiency. This paper demonstrates that both resource availability (different waste streams) and environmental factors are key drivers of microbial community dynamics in mesophilic, anaerobic co-digestion.

  6. Anaerobic digestion and digestate use: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Boldrin, Alessio; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of source-separated municipal solid waste (MSW) and use of the digestate is presented from a global warming (GW) point of view by providing ranges of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that are useful for calculation of global warming factors (GWFs), i.e. the contribution to ...... highly influenced the result. In comparison with the few published GWFs for AD, the range of our data was much larger demonstrating the need to use a consistent and robust approach to GHG accounting and simultaneously accept that some key parameters are highly uncertain....... measured in CO2-equivalents per tonne of wet waste. The GHG accounting was done by distinguishing between direct contributions at the AD facility and indirect upstream or downstream contributions. GHG accounting for a generic AD facility with either biogas utilization at the facility or upgrading...... of the gas for vehicle fuel resulted in a GWF from —375 (a saving) to 111 (a load) kg CO2-eq. tonne—1 wet waste. In both cases the digestate was used for fertilizer substitution. This large range was a result of the variation found for a number of key parameters: energy substitution by biogas, N2O...

  7. Extension of anaerobic digestion model no. 1 with the processes of sulphate reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorovich, V.; Lens, P.N.L.; Kalyuzhnyi, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work, the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) for computer simulation of anaerobic processes was extended to the processes of sulfate reduction. The upgrade maintained the structure of ADM1 and included additional blocks describing sulfate-reducing processes (multiple reaction stoi

  8. FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS: CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conceptual design of a fuel cell (FC) system for operation on anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is described and its economic and environmental feasibility is projected. ADG is produced at water treatment plants during the process of treating sewage anaerobically to reduce solids....

  9. Anaerobic digestion of olive oil mill effluents together with swine manure in UASB reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Deng, H.

    2002-01-01

    Combined anaerobic digestion of olive oil mill effluent (OME) with swine manure, was investigated. In batch experiments was shown that for anaerobic degradation of OME alone nitrogen addition was needed. A COD:N ratio in the range of 65:1 to 126:1 was necessary for the optimal degradation process...

  10. Biodegradation of phthalate esters during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Alatriste-Mondragon, Felipe; Iranpour, R.

    2003-01-01

    Phthalic acid esters (PAE) are commonly found in the sludge generated in the wastewater treatment plants. Anaerobic digestion followed by land application is a common treatment and disposal practice of sludge. To date, many studies exist on the anaerobic biodegradation rates of PAE, especially...

  11. Nutritive value and nutrient digestibility of ensiled mango by-products

    OpenAIRE

    Sompong Sruamsiri

    2009-01-01

    Mango canning by-products (seed and peel) together with ensiled mango peel were subjected to analysis of dry matter (DM), ash, crude protein (CP), crude fibre (CF), ether extract (EE), nitrogen-free extract (NFE), gross energy (GE), neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and acid detergent fibre (ADF). In vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD), ADF (IVADFD) and NDF (IVNDFD) was determined after digesting the by-products in buffered rumen fluid for 24 or 48 h in an incubator. CP content in peel, seed and p...

  12. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of abattoir wastewater and fruit and vegetable waste in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouallagui, Hassib; Rachdi, Boutheina; Gannoun, Hana; Hamdi, Moktar

    2009-06-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) and abattoir wastewater (AW) was investigated using anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs). The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and temperature variations on digesters performances were examined. At both 20 and 10 days biogas production for co-digestion was greater thanks to the improved balance of nutrients. The high specific gas productions for the different digestion processes were 0.56, 0.61 and 0.85 l g(-1) total volatile solids (TVS) removal for digesters treating AW, FVW and AW + FVW, respectively. At an HRT of 20 days, biogas production rates from thermophilic digesters were higher on average than from mesophilic AW, FVW and AW + FVW digestion by 28.5, 44.5 and 25%, respectively. However, at 10 days of HRT results showed a decrease of biogas production rate for AW and AW + FVW digestion processes due to the high amount of free ammonia at high organic loading rate (OLR).

  13. Steam-explosion pretreatment for enhancing anaerobic digestion of municipal wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereix, Marcela; Parker, Wayne; Kennedy, Kevin

    2006-05-01

    This study evaluated the use of steam explosion as a pretreatment for municipal wastewater treatment sludges and biosolids as a technique for enhancing biogas generation during anaerobic digestion. Samples of dewatered anaerobic digester effluent (biosolids) and a mixture of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) and biosolids were steam-exploded under differing levels of intensity in this study. The results indicate that steam explosion can solublize components of these sludge streams. Increasing the intensity of the steam-explosion pressure and temperature resulted in increased solublization. The steam-explosion pretreatment also increased the bioavailability of sludge components under anaerobic digestion conditions. Increasing the steam-explosion intensity increased the ultimate yield of methane during anaerobic digestion. Batch anaerobic digestion tests suggested that pretreatment at 300 psi was the most optimal condition for enhanced biogas generation while minimizing energy input. Semicontinuous anaerobic digestion revealed that the results that were observed in the batch tests were sustainable in prolonged operation. Semicontinuous digestion of the TWAS/biosolids mixture that was pretreated at 300 psi generated approximately 50% more biogas than the controls. Semicontinuous digestion of the pretreated biosolids resulted in a 3-fold increase in biogas compared with the controls. Based on capillary suction test results, steam-explosion pretreatment at 300 psi improved the dewaterability of the final digested sludge by 32 and 45% for the TWAS/ biosolids mixture and biosolids, respectively, compared with controls. The energy requirements of the nonoptimized steam-explosion process were substantially higher than the additional energy produced from enhanced digestion of the pretreated sludge. Substantial improvements in energy efficiency will be required to make the process viable from an energy perspective.

  14. Anaerobic digestion of giant reed for methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liangcheng; Li, Yebo

    2014-11-01

    As a fast growing plant, giant reed has good potential to be used as a feedstock for methane production via anaerobic digestion (AD). The effect of total solids (TS) content, an AD operating parameter, was studied. Results showed that increasing TS from 8% to 38% decreased methane yield, due to the inhibition of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and total ammonia nitrogen (TAN); while the maximum volumetric methane production was obtained at 20-23% TS. Comparison of solid-state AD (SS-AD) at 20% TS and liquid AD (L-AD) at 8% TS was conducted at feedstock to effluent (F/E) ratios of 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0. The best performance was achieved at an F/E of 2.0, with methane yields of 129.7 and 150.8L-CH4/kg-VS for SS-AD and L-AD, respectively. Overall organic components were degraded by 17.7-28.5% and 24.0-26.6% in SS-AD and L-AD, respectively; among which cellulose showed the highest degradation rate and the highest contribution to methane production.

  15. Treatment of wine distillery wastewater by high rate anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamane, X L; Tandlich, R; Burgess, I E

    2007-01-01

    Wine distillery wastewaters (WDW) are acidic and have a high content of potential organic pollutants. This causes high chemical oxygen demand (COD) values. Polyphenols constitute a significant portion of this COD, and limit the efficiency of biological treatment of WDWs. WDW starting parameters were as follows: pH 3.83, 4,185 mg/l soluble COD (COD(s)) and 674.6 mg/l of phenols. During operation, amendments of CaCO3 and K2HPO4, individually or in combination, were required for buffering the digester. Volatile fatty acid concentrations were < 300 mg/l throughout the study, indicating degradation of organic acids present. Mean COD(s) removal efficiency for the 130 day study was 87%, while the mean polyphenol, removal efficiency was 63%. Addition of 50 mg/l Fe(3+) between days 86 and 92 increased the removal efficiencies of COD(s) to 97% and of polyphenols to 65%. Addition of Co(3+) improved removal efficiencies to 97% for COD(s) and 92% for polyphenols. Optimization of anaerobic treatment was achieved at 30% WDW feed strength. Removal efficiencies of 92% and 84% were recorded at increased feed strength from days 108 to 130. High removal efficiencies of COD(s) and polyphenols after day 82 were attributed to the addition of macronutrients and micronutrients that caused pH stability and thus stimulated microbial activity.

  16. Review of feedstock pretreatment strategies for improved anaerobic digestion: From lab-scale research to full-scale application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrere, Hélène; Antonopoulou, Georgia; Affes, Rim; Passos, Fabiana; Battimelli, Audrey; Lyberatos, Gerasimos; Ferrer, Ivet

    2016-01-01

    When properly designed, pretreatments may enhance the methane potential and/or anaerobic digestion rate, improving digester performance. This paper aims at providing some guidelines on the most appropriate pretreatments for the main feedstocks of biogas plants. Waste activated sludge was firstly investigated and implemented at full-scale, its thermal pretreatment with steam explosion being most recommended as it increases the methane potential and digestion rate, ensures sludge sanitation and the heat needed is produced on-site. Regarding fatty residues, saponification is preferred for enhancing their solubilisation and bioavailability. In the case of animal by-products, this pretreatment can be optimised to ensure sterilisation, solubilisation and to reduce inhibition linked to long chain fatty acids. With regards to lignocellulosic biomass, the first goal should be delignification, followed by hemicellulose and cellulose hydrolysis, alkali or biological (fungi) pretreatments being most promising. As far as microalgae are concerned, thermal pretreatment seems the most promising technique so far.

  17. Use of laboratory anaerobic digesters to simulate the increase of treatment rate in full-scale high nitrogen content sewage sludge and co-digestion biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampio, Elina; Ervasti, Satu; Paavola, Teija; Rintala, Jukka

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of increasing feedstock treatment rate on the performance of full-scale anaerobic digestion using laboratory-scale reactors with digestate and feedstock from full-scale digesters. The studied nitrogen-containing feedstocks were i) a mixture of industrial by-products and pig slurry, and ii) municipal sewage sludge, which digestion was studied at 41 and 52°C, respectively. This study showed the successful reduction of hydraulic retention times from 25 and 20days to around 15days, which increased organic loading rates from 2 to 3.5kg volatile solids (VS)/m(3)d and 4 to 6kgVS/m(3)d. As a result, the optimum retention time in terms of methane production and VS removal was 10-15% lower than the initial in the full-scale digesters. Accumulation of acids during start-up of the co-digestion reactor was suggested to be connected to the high ammonium nitrogen concentration and intermediate temperature of 41°C.

  18. Dry co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw under mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiangqian; Wu, Guangxue; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Zhen-Hu

    2015-12-01

    Dry anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge can recover biogas as energy; however, its low C/N ratio limits it as a single substrate in the anaerobic digestion. Rice straw is an abundant agricultural residue in China, which is rich in carbon and can be used as carbon source. In the present study, the performance of dry co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw was investigated under mesophilic (35 °C) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions. The operational factors impacting dry co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw such as C/N ratio, moisture content, and initial pH were explored under mesophilic conditions. The results show that low C/N ratios resulted in a higher biogas production rate, but a lower specific biogas yield; low moisture content of 65 % resulted in the instability of the digestion system and a low specific biogas yield. Initial pH ranging 7.0-9.0 did not affect the performance of the anaerobic digestion. The C/N ratio of 26-29:1, moisture content of 70-80 %, and pH 7.0-9.0 resulted in good performance in the dry mesophilic co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw. As compared with mesophilic digestion, thermophilic co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw significantly enhanced the degradation efficiency of the substrates and the specific biogas yield (p co-digestion of sewage sludge under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

  19. Economic analysis of anaerobic digestion - A case of Green power biogas plant in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebrezgabher, S.A.; Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Prins, B.A.M.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the key concerns of biogas plants is the disposal of comparatively large amounts of digestates in an economically and environmentally sustainable manner. This paper analyses the economic performance of anaerobic digestion of a given biogas plant based on net present value (NPV) and internal r

  20. Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghdam, Ehsan Fathi; Kinnunen, V.; Rintala, Jukka A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents mesophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), biowaste (BW), sewage sludge (SS), and co-digestion of BW and SS. Average methane yields of 386 ± 54, 385 ± 82, 198 ± 14, and 318 ± 59 L CH4/kg volatile solids (VS) were obtained for OFMSW...

  1. State Of The Science On Cogeneration Of Heat And Power From Anaerobic Digestion Of Municipal Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will report on work underway to inventory facilities currently utilizing biogas from anaerobic digestion and speak with practitioners to learn: techniques for preparing residuals for digestion, methods to use for cleaning biogas (e.g., of siloxane), and how gas...

  2. The potential of surplus grass production as co-substrate for anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Ane Katharina Paarup; Schleier, Caroline; Piorr, Hans Peter;

    2016-01-01

    . Furthermore, it could provide incentives for establishing new biogas plants in the region and thereby increase the share of manure being digested anaerobically, which could help extrapolate the environmental and climate related benefits documented for the use of digested animal manure as fertilizer...

  3. Anaerobic Digestion II. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasmith, E. E.

    This lesson is the second of a two-part series on anaerobic digestion. Topics discussed include classification of digester by function, roof design, and temperature range, mixing systems, gas system components, operational control basics, and general safety considerations. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The…

  4. Enhanced mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste by thermal pretreatment: Substrate versus digestate heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariunbaatar, Javkhlan; Panico, Antonio; Yeh, Daniel H; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Food waste (FW) represents a source of high potential renewable energy if properly treated with anaerobic digestion (AD). Pretreating the substrates could yield a higher biomethane production in a shorter time. In this study, the effects of thermal (heating the FW in a separate chamber) and thermophilic (heating the full reactor content containing both FW and inoculum) pretreatments at 50, 60, 70 and 80°C prior to mesophilic AD were studied through a series of batch experiments. Pretreatments at a lower temperature (50°C) and a shorter time (55°C) and longer operating times (>12h) yielded higher soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs), but had a negative effect on the methanogenic activity. The thermal pretreatments at the same conditions resulted in a lower solubilization of COD. Based on net energy calculations, the enhanced biomethane production is sufficient to heat up the FW for the thermal, but not for the thermophilic pretreatment.

  5. Increased anaerobic production of methane by co-digestion of sludge with microalgal biomass and food waste leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungmin; Kang, Chang-Min

    2015-01-01

    The co-digestion of multiple substrates is a promising method to increase methane production during anaerobic digestion. However, limited reliable data are available on the anaerobic co-digestion of food waste leachate with microalgal biomass. This report evaluated methane production by the anaerobic co-digestion of different mixtures of food waste leachate, algal biomass, and raw sludge. Co-digestion of substrate mixture containing equal amounts of three substrates had higher methane production than anaerobic digestion of individual substrates. This was possibly due to a proliferation of methanogens over the entire digestion period induced by multistage digestion of different substrates with different degrees of degradability. Thus, the co-digestion of food waste, microalgal biomass, and raw sludge appears to be a feasible and efficient method for energy conversion from waste resources.

  6. The environmental sustainability of anaerobic digestion as a biomass valorization technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meester, Steven; Demeyer, Jens; Velghe, Filip; Peene, Andy; Van Langenhove, Herman; Dewulf, Jo

    2012-10-01

    This paper studies the environmental sustainability of anaerobic digestion from three perspectives. First, reference electricity is compared to electricity production from domestic organic waste and energy crop digestion. Second, different digester feed possibilities in an agricultural context are studied. Third, the influence of applying digestate as fertilizer is investigated. Results highlight that biomass is converted at a rational exergy (energy) efficiency ranging from 15.3% (22.6) to 33.3% (36.0). From a life cycle perspective, a saving of over 90% resources is achieved in most categories when comparing biobased electricity to conventional electricity. However, operation without heat valorization results in 32% loss of this performance while using organic waste (domestic and agricultural residues) as feedstock avoids land resources. The use of digestate as a fertilizer is beneficial from a resource perspective, but causes increased nitrogen and methane emissions, which can be reduced by 50%, making anaerobic digestion an environmentally competitive bioenergy technology.

  7. Effects of ion strength and ion pairing on (plant-wide) modelling of anaerobic digestion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Solon, Kimberly;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to show the influence of ionic strength (as activity corrections) andion pairing on (plant-wide) modelling of anaerobic digestion processes in wastewater treatment plants(WWTPs). Using the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2) as a case study, this paper presents...... the effects that an improved physico-chemical description will have on the predicted effluent quality (EQI) and operational cost (OCI) indices. The acid-base equilibria implemented in the Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 (ADM1) are modified to account for non-ideal aqueous-phase chemistry. The model corrects...... processes. Results at high ionic strength demonstrate that corrections to account for non-ideal conditions lead to significant differences in predicted process performance. In addition, the paper describes: 1) how the anaerobic digester performance is affected; 2) the effect on pH and the anaerobic...

  8. Anaerobic digestion of bio-waste: A mini-review focusing on territorial and environmental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Franco; Cavinato, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Scientific and industrial experiences, together with economical and policies changes of last 30 years, bring anaerobic digestion among the most environmental friendly and economically advantageous technologies for organic waste treatment and management in Europe. In this short review, the role of anaerobic digestion of organic wastes is discussed, considering the opportunity of a territorial friendly approach, without barriers, where different organic wastes are co-treated. This objective can be achieved through two proposed strategies: one is the anaerobic digestion applied as a service for the agricultural and farming sector; the other as a service for citizen (biowaste, diapers and wastewater treatment integration). The union of these two strategies is an environmental- and territorial-friendly process that aims to produce renewable energy and fertiliser material, with a low greenhouse gas emission and nutrients recovery. The advantage of forthcoming application of anaerobic digestion of organic wastes, even for added value bioproducts production and new energy carriers, are finally discussed. Among several advantages of anaerobic digestion, the role of the environmental controller was evaluated, considering the ability of minimising the impacts exploiting the biochemical equilibrium and sensitivity as a quality assurance for digestate.

  9. Nutritive composition of soybean by-products and nutrient digestibility of soybean pod husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompong Sruamsiri

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Soybean by-products (soybean germ, soybean milk residue, soybean hull, soybean pod husk and soybean stem were subjected to proximate analysis, and in vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD, ADF (IVADFD and NDF (IVNDFD were determined after digesting the by-products in buffered rumen fluid for 24 or 48 h in 2 ANKOMII Daisy Incubators using Completely Randomised Design. Four native cattle (body weight 210 + 13.5 kg were used to determine nutrient digestibility of soybean pod husk. They were randomly assigned by Cross-over Design to receive two roughage sources, i.e. guinea grass and guinea grass + soybean pod husk (60:40 DM basis, in two experimental periods. Guinea grass was harvested on the 35th day after the first cut of the year and used as green forage. Total collection method was used to determine the digestibility coefficients and digestibility by difference was used to calculate nutrient digestibility of soybean pod husk.The nutritive composition showed that soybean germ was highest in CP content (42.27% of DM and EE content (5.07% of DM but lowest in NDF and ADF content (20.09 and 21.53% of DM respectively. The average CP content of soybean straw, soybean stem and soybean pod husk was low (4.91, 4.67 and 5.04% respectively, while ADF content was high (42.76, 38.01 and 42.08% respectively. In vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD, ADF (IVADFD and NDF (IVNDFD showed that all of them, except soybean stem, can be used as cattle feed, e.g. as supplemented feed or admixture in concentrate feed. Digestibility coefficients of guinea grass were higher in CP, CF and EE when compared to the other groups. The apparent digestibility of CP and CF were highly different (P0.05. The digestibility of nutrients (DM, OM, CP, CF, NFE, NDF and ADF of soybean pod husk were 53.81 + 4.3, 59.69 + 4.6, 42.38 + 3.8, 30.71 + 3.2, 50.74 + 4.3, 75.26 + 4.0, 45.78 + 3.7 and 30.53 + 4.2 % respectively. Soybean pod husk was higher in total digestible nutrients (TDN (51.87 + 3.3 vs

  10. Anaerobic digestion technology in livestock manure treatment for biogas production: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Ismail M. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohd Ghazi, Tinia I.; Omar, Rozita

    2012-06-15

    This article reviews the potential of anaerobic digestion (AD) for biogas production from livestock manure wastes and compares the operating and performance data for various anaerobic process configurations. It examines different kinds of manure waste treatment techniques and the influence of several parameters on biogas and methane yield. The comparison indicates that a variety of different operational conditions, various reactor configurations such as batch reactors, continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR), plug flow reactor (PFR), up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), temperature phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD), and continuous one- and two-stage systems, present a suitable technology for the AD of livestock manure waste. Main performance indicators are biogas and methane yield, degradation of volatile solids (VS), higher loading, and process stability with a short retention time. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH 8 Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. A generic and systematic procedure to derive a simplified model from the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1)

    OpenAIRE

    Ficara, E.; Leva, A.; Harmand, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    The Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 (ADM1) developed by the IWA Task Group for mathematical modelling of anaerobic digestion processes (Batstone et al. (2001) [1]) is a structural model which describes the main biochemical and physicochemical processes. For such purposes, other models have been proposed to describe anaerobic processes with a reduced set of parameters, state variables and processes. Among them, the Anaerobic Model No. 2 (AM2) proposed by Bernard et al. (2001) [2] which describe...

  12. Computer-aided design model for anaerobic-phased-solids digester system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhang, R. [University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Tiangco, V. [California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The anaerobic-phased-solids (APS) digester system is a newly developed anaerobic digestion system for converting solid wastes, such as crop residues and food wastes, into biogas for power and heat generation. A computer-aided engineering design model has been developed to design the APS-digester system and study the heat transfer from the reactors and energy production of the system. Simulation results of a case study are presented by using the model to predict the heating energy requirement and biogas energy production for anaerobic digestion of garlic waste. The important factors, such as environmental conditions, insulation properties, and characteristics of the wastes, on net energy production are also investigated. (author)

  13. Ammonia and temperature determine potential clustering in the anaerobic digestion microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vrieze, Jo; Saunders, Aaron Marc; He, Ying; Fang, Jing; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2015-05-15

    Anaerobic digestion is regarded as a key environmental technology in the present and future bio-based economy. The microbial community completing the anaerobic digestion process is considered complex, and several attempts already have been carried out to determine the key microbial populations. However, the key differences in the anaerobic digestion microbiomes, and the environmental/process parameters that drive these differences, remain poorly understood. In this research, we hypothesized that differences in operational parameters lead to a particular composition and organization of microbial communities in full-scale installations. A total of 38 samples were collected from 29 different full-scale anaerobic digestion installations, showing constant biogas production in function of time. Microbial community analysis was carried out by means of amplicon sequencing and real-time PCR. The bacterial community in all samples was dominated by representatives of the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, covering 86.1 ± 10.7% of the total bacterial community. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was dominated by Methanosaetaceae, yet, only the hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales correlated with biogas production, confirming their importance in high-rate anaerobic digestion systems. In-depth analysis of operational and environmental parameters and bacterial community structure indicated the presence of three potential clusters in anaerobic digestion. These clusters were determined by total ammonia concentration, free ammonia concentration and temperature, and characterized by an increased relative abundance of Bacteroidales, Clostridiales and Lactobacillales, respectively. None of the methanogenic populations, however, could be significantly attributed to any of the three clusters. Nonetheless, further experimental research will be required to validate the existence of these different clusters, and to which extent the presence of these clusters relates to stable or sub

  14. Biogas production from potato-juice, a by-product from potato-starch processing, in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Cheng; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the utilization of potato-juice, the organic by-product from potato-starch processing, for biogas production was investigated in batch assay and in high rate anaerobic reactors. The maximum methane potential of the potato-juice determined by batch assay was 470mL-CH4/g......VS-added. Anaerobic digestion of potato-juice in an EGSB reactor could obtain a methane yield of 380mL-CH4/gVS-added at the organic loading rate of 3.2gCOD/(L-reactor.d). In a UASB reactor, higher organic loading rate of 5.1gCOD/(L-reactor.d) could be tolerated, however, it resulted in a lower methane yield of 240m...

  15. Pb(II) biosorption using anaerobically digested sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokcaer, Emre; Yetis, Ulku

    2006-10-11

    Removal of Pb(II) by using resting cells of anaerobically digested sludge (ADS) obtained from a nearby wastewater treatment plant was examined. Firstly, sorption kinetic and equilibrium experiments were conducted using agitated, thermostated (25 degrees C) batch reactors. The maximum Pb(II) sorption capacity was found to be very high (1,750 mg/g dry ADS or 8.45 mmol/g dry ADS). At all initial Pb(II) concentrations tested, sorption resulted in neutralization with an increase in the solution pH from an initial value of 4.0-5.5 to an equilibrium value of 7.0-8.0, at which Pb(II) can precipitate as hydroxide. The removal of Pb(II) by ADS was found to involve bioprecipitation as well as biosorption. FTIR spectrometry highlighted carboxyl groups present on the surface of ADS as the major functional groups responsible for biosorption. Secondly, a three-stage semi-continuous pseudo-counter current reactor system was tested to reduce ADS requirement in comparison to a conventional single-stage batch reactor. At an initial Pb(II) concentration of about 200 mg/L, an effluent Pb(II) concentration of 1.3 mg/L was achieved in the three stage reactor, corresponding to a metal removal capacity of 682.7 mg/g dry ADS (3.30 mmol/g), in comparison to 1.9 mg/L and 644.0 mg/g dry ADS (3.10 mmol/g) for the single-stage batch reactor.

  16. The Effect of Iron Salt on Anaerobic Digestion and Phosphate Release to Sludge Liquor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Ofverstrom

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron salts are used at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs for several reasons: for removing chemical phosphorus, preventing from struvite formation and reducing the content of hydrogen sulfide (H2S in biogas. Anaerobic digestion is a common scheme for sludge treatment due to producing biogas that could be used as biofuel. Laboratory analysis has been carried out using anaerobic digestion model W8 (Armfield Ltd, UK to investigate any possible effect of adding FeCl3 on the anaerobic digestion of primary sludge (PS and waste activated sludge (WAS mixture as well as on releasing phosphates to digested sludge liquor. The obtained results showed that FeCl3 negatively impacted the anaerobic digestion process by reducing the volume of produced biogas. Fe-dosed sludge (max produced 30% less biogas. Biogas production from un-dosed and Fe-dosed sludge (min was similar to the average of 1.20 L/gVSfed. Biogas composition was not measured during the conducted experiments. Phosphorus content in sludge liquor increased at an average of 38% when digesting sludge without ferric chloride dosing. On the contrary, phosphate content in sludge liquor from digested Fe-dosed sludge decreased by approx. 80%.

  17. Phylogenetic diversity and in situ detection of eukaryotes in anaerobic sludge digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Miri; Shimada, Yusuke; Li, Yu-You; Harada, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic communities in aerobic wastewater treatment processes are well characterized, but little is known about them in anaerobic processes. In this study, abundance, diversity and morphology of eukaryotes in anaerobic sludge digesters were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), 18S rRNA gene clone library construction and catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). Samples were taken from four different anaerobic sludge digesters in Japan. Results of qPCR of rRNA genes revealed that Eukarya accounted from 0.1% to 1.4% of the total number of microbial rRNA gene copy numbers. The phylogenetic affiliations of a total of 251 clones were Fungi, Alveolata, Viridiplantae, Amoebozoa, Rhizaria, Stramenopiles and Metazoa. Eighty-five percent of the clones showed less than 97.0% sequence identity to described eukaryotes, indicating most of the eukaryotes in anaerobic sludge digesters are largely unknown. Clones belonging to the uncultured lineage LKM11 in Cryptomycota of Fungi were most abundant in anaerobic sludge, which accounted for 50% of the total clones. The most dominant OTU in each library belonged to either the LKM11 lineage or the uncultured lineage A31 in Alveolata. Principal coordinate analysis indicated that the eukaryotic and prokaryotic community structures were related. The detection of anaerobic eukaryotes, including the members of the LKM11 and A31 lineages in anaerobic sludge digesters, by CARD-FISH revealed their sizes in the range of 2–8 μm. The diverse and uncultured eukaryotes in the LKM11 and the A31 lineages are common and ecologically relevant members in anaerobic sludge digester. PMID:28264042

  18. Enhanced anaerobic digestion of food waste by thermal and ozonation pretreatment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariunbaatar, Javkhlan; Panico, Antonio; Frunzo, Luigi; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2014-12-15

    Treatment of food waste by anaerobic digestion can lead to an energy production coupled to a reduction of the volume and greenhouse gas emissions from this waste type. According to EU Regulation EC1774/2002, food waste should be pasteurized/sterilized before or after anaerobic digestion. With respect to this regulation and also considering the slow kinetics of the anaerobic digestion process, thermal and chemical pretreatments of food waste prior to mesophilic anaerobic digestion were studied. A series of batch experiments to determine the biomethane potential of untreated as well as pretreated food waste was carried out. All tested conditions of both thermal and ozonation pretreatments resulted in an enhanced biomethane production. The kinetics of the anaerobic digestion process were, however, accelerated by thermal pretreatment at lower temperatures (food waste, was obtained with thermal pretreatment at 80 °C for 1.5 h. On the basis of net energy calculations, the enhanced biomethane production could cover the energy requirement of the thermal pretreatment. In contrast, the enhanced biomethane production with ozonation pretreatment is insufficient to supply the required energy for the ozonator.

  19. Performance assessment of two-stage anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Zhang; Pin-Jing, He

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the performance of the two-phase anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes in a lab-scale setup. The semi-continuous experiment showed that the two-phase anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes had a bioconversion rate of 83%, biogas yield of 338 mL x (g chemical oxygen demand (COD))(-1) and total solid conversion of 63% when the entire two-phase anaerobic digestion process was subjected to an organic loading rate (OLR) of 10.7 g x (L d)(-1). In the hydrolysis-acidogenesis process, the efficiency of solubilization decreased from 72.6% to 41.1%, and the acidogenesis efficiency decreased from 31.8% to 17.8% with an increase in the COD loading rate. On the other hand, the performance of the subsequent methanogenic process was not susceptible to the increase in the feeding COD loading rate in the hydrolysis-acidogenesis stage. Lactic acid was one of the main fermentation products, accounting for over 40% of the total soluble COD in the fermentation liquid. The batch experiments indicated that the lactic acid was the earliest predominant fermentation product, and distributions of fermentation products were pH dependent. Results showed that increasing the feeding OLR of kitchen wastes made the two-stage anaerobic digestion process more effective. Moreover, there was a potential improvement in the performance of anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes with a corresponding improvement in the hydrolysis process.

  20. Anaerobic co-digestion of cyanide containing cassava pulp with pig manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanpracha, Naraporn; Annachhatre, Ajit P

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of cyanide-containing cassava pulp with pig manure was evaluated using laboratory scale mesophilic digester. The digester was operated in a semi-continuous mode with the mixed feedstock having C/N ratio of 35:1. Digester startup was accomplished in 60days with loading of 0.5-1kgVS/m(3)d. Subsequently, the loading to digester was increased step-wise from 2 to 9kgVS/m(3)d. Digester performance was stable at loading between 2 and 6kgVS/m(3)d with an average volatile solid removal and methane yield of 82% and 0.38m(3)/kgVSadded, respectively. However, beyond loading of 7kgVS/m(3)d, solubilization of particulate matter did not take place efficiently. Cyanide present in cassava pulp was successfully degraded indicating that anaerobic sludge in the digester was well acclimatized to cyanide. The results show that cassava pulp can be successfully digested anaerobically with pig manure as co-substrate without any inhibitory effect of cyanide present in the cassava pulp.

  1. Low-heat, mild alkaline pretreatment of switchgrass for anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guang; Bierma, Tom; Walker, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of alkaline pretreatment under mild heat conditions (100°C or 212°F) on the anaerobic co-digestion of switchgrass. The effects of alkaline concentration, types of alkaline, heating time and rinsing were evaluated. In addition to batch studies, continuous-feed studies were performed in triplicate to identify potential digester operational problems caused by switchgrass co-digestion while accounting for uncertainty due to digester variability. Few studies have examined anaerobic digestion of switchgrass or the effects of mild heating to enhance alkaline pretreatment prior to biomass digestion. Results indicate that pretreatment can significantly enhance digestion of coarse-ground (≤ 0.78 cm particle size) switchgrass. Energy conversion efficiency as high as 63% was observed, and was comparable or superior to fine-grinding as a pretreatment method. The optimal NaOH concentration was found to be 5.5% (wt/wt alkaline/biomass) with a 91.7% moisture level. No evidence of operational problems such as solids build-up, poor mixing, or floating materials were observed. These results suggest the use of waste heat from a generator could reduce the concentration of alkaline required to adequately pretreat lignocellulosic feedstock prior to anaerobic digestion.

  2. Anaerobic co-digestion of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina with energy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwede, Sebastian; Kowalczyk, Alexandra; Gerber, Mandy; Span, Roland

    2013-11-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of corn silage with the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina was investigated under batch and semi-continuous conditions. Under batch conditions process stability and biogas yields significantly increased by microalgae addition. During semi-continuous long-term experiments anaerobic digestion was stable in corn silage mono- and co-digestion with the algal biomass for more than 200 days. At higher organic loading rates (4.7 kg volatile solids m(-3)d(-1)) inhibition and finally process failure occurred in corn silage mono-digestion, whereas acid and methane formation remained balanced in co-digestion. The positive influences in co-digestion can be attributed to an adjusted carbon to nitrogen ratio, enhanced alkalinity, essential trace elements and a balanced nutrient composition. The results suggest that N. salina biomass is a suitable feedstock for anaerobic co-digestion of energy crops, especially for regions with manure scarcity. Enhanced process stability may result in higher organic loading rates or lower digester volumes.

  3. Economic and environmental analysis of four different configurations of anaerobic digestion for food waste to energy conversion using LCA for: a food service provider case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchetti, Matthew

    2013-07-15

    The US disposes of more than 34 million tons of food waste in landfills per year. As this food waste decomposes it generates methane gas and negatively contributes to global warming. Diverting theses organic food wastes from landfills and to emerging technologies will prevent these wastes and greenhouse gas emissions while at the same time generating a source renewable energy by collecting the emitted gases. From a waste prevention standpoint, instead of the food waste decomposing at local landfills, it is being converted into an energy source and the by-product may be used as a fertilizer (Fine and Hadas, 2012). The purpose of this study was to compare four different configurations of anaerobic digestion of organic waste to energy technologies from an economic, energy, and emissions standpoint using LCA via a case study at a large food services provider in Northwest Ohio, USA. The technologies studied included two-stage anaerobic digestion system using ultrasound pre-treating, two stage continuous combined thermophilic acidogenic hydrogenesis and mesophilic with recirculation of the digested sludge, long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements, and single stage anaerobic digestion. Using LCA, these scenarios were compared to landfill disposal of the food waste. The findings from the case study indicated that implementing on-site waste to energy systems will result in lower operation costs and lower environmental impacts. In addition, a standardized environmental and economic comparison of competing food waste to energy technologies is provided.

  4. Anaerobic digestion of paunch in a CSTR for renewable energy production and nutrient mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nkemka, Valentine Nkongndem; Marchbank, Douglas H.; Hao, Xiying, E-mail: xiying.hao@agr.gc.ca

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Anaerobic digestion and nutrient mineralization of paunch in a CSTR. • Low CH{sub 4} yield and high CH{sub 4} productivity was obtained at an OLR of 2.8 g VS L{sup −1} day{sup −1.} • Post-digestion of the digestate resulted in a CH{sub 4} yield of 0.067 L g{sup −1} VS. • Post-digestion is recommended for further digestate stabilization. - Abstract: A laboratory study investigated the anaerobic digestion of paunch in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the recovery of biogas and mineralization of nutrients. At an organic loading rate (OLR) of 2.8 g VS L{sup −1} day{sup −1} with a 30-day hydraulic retention time (HRT), a CH{sub 4} yield of 0.213 L g{sup −1} VS and CH{sub 4} production rate of 0.600 L L{sup −1} day{sup −1} were obtained. Post-anaerobic digestion of the effluent from the CSTR for 30 days at 40 °C recovered 0.067 L g{sup −1} VS as CH{sub 4}, which was 21% of the batch CH{sub 4} potential. Post-digestion of the effluent from the digestate obtained at this OLR is needed to meet the stable effluent criteria. Furthermore, low levels of soluble ions such as K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} were found in the liquid fraction of the digestate and the remainder could have been retained in the solid digestate fraction. This study demonstrates the potential of biogas production from paunch in providing renewable energy. In addition, recovery of plant nutrients in the digestate is important for a sustainable agricultural system.

  5. Full scale demonstration plant for anaerobic digestion of sorted municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szikriszt, G.; Koehlin, S.-E.; Kaellersjoe, L. (BIOMET AB, Sundbyberg (SE)); Frostell, B. (Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm (SE))

    1992-01-01

    A possible future alternative for the treatment of organic material inmunicipal solid waste is anaerobic digestion at a TS concentration of around 10%. The results from a successful pilot plant experiment were reported. An existing 900 m{sup 3} full scale anaerobic digester for municipal sludge was reconstructed for digestion of a mixture of sorted municipal solid waste and municipal sludge. The reconstruction of the anaerobic digester system involved the installation of a novel milling stage for size reduction of incoming waste, removal of unsuitable materials, such as glass, metals etc and preparation of a feedstock with a TS concentration of 10%. The anaerobic digester has been equipped with a mechanical mixing system. The system also comprises an internal water recirculation system, allowing a minimal production of waste water for further treatment. The retrofitted digester was started in September 1991 and the milling station and the separation system in April 1992. During the demonstration operation, the interest is focused on the following key areas: May the succesful results in a 20 m{sup 3} pilot plant be realised also on a full scale Is it possible to solve potential accumulation problems Is the reliability and durability of the milling equipment chosen In the paper, the full scale plant is presented as well as initial results of operation. (au).

  6. Influence of lactic acid on the two-phase anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bo; CAI Wei-min; HE Pin-jing

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of lactic acid on the methanogenesis, anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes was firstly conducted in a two-phase anaerobic digestion process, and performance of two digesters fed with lactic acid and glucose was subsequently compared.The results showed that the lactic acid was the main fermentation products of hydrolysis-acidification stage in the two-phase anaerobic digestion process for kitchen wastes. The lactic acid concentration constituted approximately 50% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration in the hydrolysis-acidification liquid. The maximum organic loading rate was lower in the digester fed with lactic acid than that fed with glucose. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and COD removal were deteriorated in the methanogenic reactor fed with to the high concentration of lactic acid fed. It could be concluded that avoiding the presence of the lactic acid is necessary in the hydrolysis-acidification process for the improvement of the two-phase anaerobic digestion process of kitchen wastes.

  7. Anaerobic digestion of thin stillage for energy recovery and water reuse in corn-ethanol plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan-Ozkaynak, A; Karthikeyan, K G

    2011-11-01

    Recycling of anaerobically-digested thin stillage within a corn-ethanol plant may result in the accumulation of nutrients of environmental concern in animal feed coproducts and inhibitory organic materials in the fermentation tank. Our focus is on anaerobic digestion of treated (centrifugation and lime addition) thin stillage. Suitability of digestate from anaerobic treatment for reuse as process water was also investigated. Experiments conducted at various inoculum-to-substrate ratios (ISRs) revealed that alkalinity is a critical parameter limiting digestibility of thin stillage. An ISR level of 2 appeared optimal based on high biogas production level (763 mL biogas/g volatile solids added) and organic matter removal (80.6% COD removal). The digester supernatant at this ISR level was found to contain both organic and inorganic constituents at levels that would cause no inhibition to ethanol fermentation. Anaerobic digestion of treated-thin stillage can be expected to improve the water and energy efficiencies of dry grind corn-ethanol plants.

  8. Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and landfill leachate in single-phase batch reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Shuangyan; Zhong, Delai; Zhu, Jingping, E-mail: jpzhuhust@163.com; Liao, Li, E-mail: liaoli2003@126.com

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Anaerobic co-digestion strategy for food waste treatment at OLR 41.8 g VS/L. • A certain amount of raw leachate effectively relieved acidic inhibition. • The study showed that food waste was completely degraded. - Abstract: In order to investigate the effect of raw leachate on anaerobic digestion of food waste, co-digestions of food waste with raw leachate were carried out. A series of single-phase batch mesophilic (35 ± 1 °C) anaerobic digestions were performed at a food waste concentration of 41.8 g VS/L. The results showed that inhibition of biogas production by volatile fatty acids (VFA) occurred without raw leachate addition. A certain amount of raw leachate in the reactors effectively relieved acidic inhibition caused by VFA accumulation, and the system maintained stable with methane yield of 369–466 mL/g VS. Total ammonia nitrogen introduced into the digestion systems with initial 2000–3000 mgNH{sub 4}–N/L not only replenished nitrogen for bacterial growth, but also formed a buffer system with VFA to maintain a delicate biochemical balance between the acidogenic and methanogenic microorganisms. UV spectroscopy and fluorescence excitation–emission matrix spectroscopy data showed that food waste was completely degraded. We concluded that using raw leachate for supplement water addition and pH modifier on anaerobic digestion of food waste was effective. An appropriate fraction of leachate could stimulate methanogenic activity and enhance biogas production.

  9. Evaluation of anaerobic degradation, biogas and digestate production of cereal silages using nylon-bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Marco; Bacenetti, Jacopo; Fiala, Marco; Bocchi, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the degradation efficiency and the biogas and digestate production during anaerobic digestion were evaluated for the cereal silages most used to feed biogas plants. To this purpose, silages of: maize from the whole plant, maize from the ear, triticale and wheat were digested, inside of nylon bags, in laboratory scale digesters, for 75days. Overall, the test involved 288 nylon bags. After 75days of digestion, the maize ear silage shows the highest degradation efficiency (about 98%) while wheat silage the lowest (about 83%). The biogas production ranges from 438 to 852Nm(3)/t of dry matter for wheat and ear maize silage, respectively. For all the cereal silages, the degradation as well as the biogas production are faster at the beginning of the digestion time. Digestate mass, expressed as percentage of the fresh matter, ranges from 38% to 84% for wheat and maize ear silage, respectively.

  10. Nutritive value and nutrient digestibility of ensiled mango by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompong Sruamsiri

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mango canning by-products (seed and peel together with ensiled mango peel were subjected to analysis of dry matter (DM, ash, crude protein (CP, crude fibre (CF, ether extract (EE, nitrogen-free extract (NFE, gross energy (GE, neutral detergent fibre (NDF and acid detergent fibre (ADF. In vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD, ADF (IVADFD and NDF (IVNDFD was determined after digesting the by-products in buffered rumen fluid for 24 or 48 h in an incubator. CP content in peel, seed and peel silage is 4.68, 4.19 and 5.27% respectively. As expected, mango seed has a higher fibre content than mango peel and peel silage as indicated by NDF (53.01 vs 25.87 and 27.56% respectively and ADF (31.02 vs 19.14 and 17.68% respectively. However, mango seed also has greater GE than mango peel and peel silage (4,070 vs 3,827 and 3,984 kcal/g DM respectively, probably due partly to its high fat content.Four head of male native cattle were used to determine nutrient digestibility of ensiled mango by-products by randomly allowing them to receive ensiled mango peel with rice straw (EMPR and different levels of Leucaena leaves. Treatments consisted of: 1 ensiled mango peel + rice straw (90:10; 2 ensiled mango peel + rice straw + Leucaena leaves (85:10:5; 3 ensiled mango peel + rice straw + Leucaena leaves (80:10:10; and 4 ensiled mango peel + rice straw + Leucaena leaves (75:10:15. Addition of Leucaena leaves to silage increased apparent digestibility of DM (53.84, 55.43, 59.04 and 58.69% for the four formulations above respectively, probably because of increasing amounts of CP from Leucaena leaves, resulting in greater digestibility of NDF (39.11, 44.47, 47.12 and 43.32% for the four formulations above respectively. Total digestible nutrients (TDN and digestible energy (DE showed the same trends as apparent digestibility of DM.

  11. Methane and hydrogen production from crop biomass through anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakarinen, O.

    2011-07-01

    The feasibility of methane and hydrogen production from energy crops through anaerobic digestion was evaluated in this thesis. The effects of environmental conditions, e.g. pH and temperature, as well as inoculum source on H{sub 2} yield were studied in batch assays. In addition, the effects of pre-treatments on methane and hydrogen yield as well as the feasibility of two-stage H{sub 2} + CH{sub 4} production was evaluated. Moreover, the effect of storage on methane yield of grasses was evaluated. Monodigestion of grass silage for methane production was studied, as well as shifting the methanogenic process to hydrogenic. Hydrogen production from grass silage and maize was shown to be possible with heat-treated inoculum in batch assays, with highest H{sub 2} yields of 16.0 and 9.9 ml gVS{sub added}-1 from untreated grass silage and maize, respectively. Pre-treatments (NaOH, HCl and water-extraction) showed some potential in increasing H{sub 2} yields, while methane yields were not affected. Two-stage H{sub 2} + CH{sub 4} producing process was shown to improve CH{sub 4} yields when compared to traditional one-stage CH{sub 4} process. Methane yield from grass silage monodigestion in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with organic loading rate (OLR) of 2 kgVS (m3d)-1 and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 30 days was at most 218 l kgVS{sub fed}-1. Methanogenic process was shifted to hydrogenic by increasing the OLR to 10 kgVS (m3d)-1 and shortening the HRT to 6 days. Highest H{sub 2} yield from grass silage was 42 l kgVS{sub fed}-1 with a maximum H{sub 2} content of 24 %. Energy crops can be successfully stored even for prolonged periods without decrease in methane yield. However, under sub-optimal storage conditions loss in volatile solids (VS) content and methane yield can occur. According to present results energy crops such as grass silage and maize can be converted to hydrogen or methane in AD process. Hydrogen energy yields are typically only 2-5 % of the

  12. Evaluation of systems for purification of fuel gas from anaerobic digestion. Engineering report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashare, E.; Augenstein, D. C.; Yeung, J. C.; Hossan, R. J.; Duret, G. L.

    1978-07-30

    Fuel gas obtained from the anaerobic digestion of waste materials usually needs to be treated before being transmitted in existing pipeline systems. The purification scheme involves the removal of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and moisture from the digester gas to meet pipeline specifications. Gas treatment systems for the handling of 0.1, 1.0, and 3.0 MM Scfd of raw feed gas and product delivery pressures of 125 and 1000 psia were considered in this study. From the results of an economic and technical analysis of these systems, physical absorption systems, particularly water scrubbing, were found to be the most economical system for the treatment of digester gas with the flow streams considered. The Fluor Solvent process was economically comparable with the water scrubbing process for high pressure applications, but the value presented had a large uncertainty. The commercial chemical absorption systems were less economical due to high heat requirements for solvent regeneration. Among the chemical absorption processes, the hot potassium systems were found to be more economical than the amine system. The molecular sieve adsorption process was economically similar to the chemical absorption process. The GE membrane separation process was economically comparable for both high and low pressure apllications, but this system has not been evaluated in real-life conditions. Since no kinetic and equilibrium data were available for the phosphate buffer system, estimates had to be assumed. Using what were believed to be very conservative estimates, this chemical absorption process was found to be economically competitive with the water scrubbing process for treating gas with a delivery pressure of 125 psia.The cost analyses in this study were based on the assumption of no recovery of the CO/sub 2/ by-product. It was found that credits for the recovery of the CO/sub 2/ could be significant.

  13. Rate determination of supercritical water gasification of primary sewage sludge as a replacement for anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Nikolas; Wickramathilaka, Malithi; Hendry, Doug; Miller, Andrew; Espanani, Reza; Jacoby, William

    2012-11-01

    Supercritical water gasification of primary sewage sludge sampled from a local facility was undertaken at different solids content. The performance of the process was compared with the anaerobic digestion system in use at the facility where the samples were taken. The mass and composition of the vapor products documented showed that the process generates more energy per gram of feed while rapidly destroying more volatile solids relative to the anaerobic digestion process. However, the energy input requirements are greater for supercritical water gasification. This study defines parameters for a model of the gasification reaction using the power law and Arrhenius equation. The activation energy was estimated to be 15 kJ/mol, and the reaction order was estimated to be 0.586. This model allows estimation of the size of a supercritical water reactor needed to replace the anaerobic digesters that are currently used at the wastewater treatment plant.

  14. Effects of total ammonia nitrogen concentration on solid-state anaerobic digestion of corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongjiang; Xu, Fuqing; Li, Yebo

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitive effect of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) (including NH3 and NH4(+)) on solid-state anaerobic digestion of corn stover was investigated in batch reactors at 37°C. The highest methane yield of 107.0 L/kg VS(feed) was obtained at a TAN concentration of 2.5 g/kg (based on total weight). TAN concentrations greater than 2.5 g/kg resulted in decreased methane yields, with a 50% reduction observed at a concentration of 6.0 g/kg. Reduced reaction rates and microbial activities for hydrolysis of cellulose and methanogenesis from acetate were observed at TAN concentrations higher than 4.3 g/kg. Strong ammonia stress was indicated at butyrate concentrations higher than 300 mg/kg. Result showed that the effluent of liquid anaerobic digestion can provide enough nitrogen for solid-state anaerobic digestion of corn stover.

  15. Determination of greenhouse gas emission reductions from sewage sludge anaerobic digestion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H-T; Kong, X-J; Zheng, G-D; Chen, C-C

    2016-01-01

    Sewage sludge is a considerable source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission in the field of organic solid waste treatment and disposal. In this case study, total GHG emissions from sludge anaerobic digestion, including direct and indirect emissions as well as replaceable emission reduction due to biogas being reused instead of natural gas, were quantified respectively. The results indicated that no GHG generation needed to be considered during the anaerobic digestion process. Indirect emissions were mainly from electricity and fossil fuel consumption on-site and sludge transportation. Overall, the total GHG emission owing to relative subtraction from anaerobic digestion rather than landfill, and replaceable GHG reduction caused by reuse of its product of biogas, were quantified to be 0.7214 (northern China) or 0.7384 (southern China) MgCO2 MgWS(-1) (wet sludge).

  16. Improved ADM1 model for anaerobic digestion process considering physico-chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Piccard, Sarah; Zhou, Wen

    2015-11-01

    The "Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1" (ADM1) was modified in the study by improving the bio-chemical framework and integrating a more detailed physico-chemical framework. Inorganic carbon and nitrogen balance terms were introduced to resolve the discrepancies in the original bio-chemical framework between the carbon and nitrogen contents in the degraders and substrates. More inorganic components and solids precipitation processes were included in the physico-chemical framework of ADM1. The modified ADM1 was validated with the experimental data and used to investigate the effects of calcium ions, magnesium ions, inorganic phosphorus and inorganic nitrogen on anaerobic digestion in batch reactor. It was found that the entire anaerobic digestion process might exist an optimal initial concentration of inorganic nitrogen for methane gas production in the presence of calcium ions, magnesium ions and inorganic phosphorus.

  17. Evaluating a model of anaerobic digestion of organic wastes through system identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anex, R.P.; Kiely, G.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW), on its own or co-digested with primary sewage sludge (PSS), produces high quality biogas, suitable as renewable energy. Parameter estimation and evaluation of a two-stage mathematical model of the anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of MSW and PSS are described. Measured data are from a bench scale laboratory experiment using a continuously stirred tank reactor and operated at 36 C for 115 days. The two-stage model simulates acidogenesis and methanogenesis, including ammonia inhibition. Model parameters are estimated using an output error, Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. Sensitivity of the estimated parameter values and the model outputs to non-estimated model parameters and measurement errors are evaluated. The estimated mathematical model successfully predicts the performance of the anaerobic reactor. Sensitivity results provide guidance for improving the model structure and experimental procedures.

  18. In situ volatile fatty acids influence biogas generation from kitchen wastes by anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiyang; Zhao, Mingxing; Miao, Hengfeng; Huang, Zhenxing; Gao, Shumei; Ruan, Wenquan

    2014-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is considered to be an efficient way of disposing kitchen wastes, which can not only reduce waste amounts, but also produce biogas. However, the excessive accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA) caused by high organic loads will inhibit anaerobic digestion intensively. Effects of the VFA composition on biogas generation and microbial community are still required for the investigation under various organic loads of kitchen wastes. Our results showed that the maximum specific methane production was 328.3 ml g TS(-1), and acetic acid was the main inhibitor in methanogenesis. With the increase of organic load, aceticlastic methanogenesis was more sensitive to acetic acid than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Meanwhile, methanogenic microbial community changed significantly, and few species grew well under excessive organic loads. This study provides an attempt to reveal the mechanism of VFA inhibition in anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes.

  19. Making lignin accessible for anaerobic digestion by wet-explosion pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Biswas, Rajib; Ahamed, Aftab

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is a major part of the recalcitrant fraction of lignocellulose and in nature its degradation occurs through oxidative enzymes along with microbes mediated oxidative chemical actions. Oxygen assisted wet-explosion pretreatment promotes lignin solubility and leads to an increase biodegradation...... of lignin during anaerobic digestion processes. The pretreatment of feedlot manure was performed in a 10 L reactor at 170 C for 25 min using 4 bars oxygen and the material was fed to a continuous stirred tank reactor operated at 55 C for anaerobic digestion. Methane yield of untreated and pretreated...... material was 70 ± 27 and 320 ± 36 L/kg-VS/day, respectively, or 4.5 times higher yield as a result of the pretreatment. Aliphatic acids formed during the pretreatment were utilized by microbes. 44.4% lignin in pretreated material was actually converted in the anaerobic digestion process compared to 12...

  20. Evaluation of anaerobic digestion processes for short sludge-age waste activated sludge combined with anammox treatment of digestate liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Huoqing; Batstone, Damien; Keller, Jurg

    2016-01-01

    The need to reduce energy input and enhance energy recovery from wastewater is driving renewed interest in high-rate activated sludge treatment (i.e. short hydraulic and solids retention times (HRT and SRT, respectively)). This process generates short SRT activated sludge stream, which should be highly degradable. However, the evaluation of anaerobic digestion of short SRT sludge has been limited. This paper assesses anaerobic digestion of short SRT sludge digestion derived from meat processing wastewater under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions. The thermophilic digestion system (55°C) achieved 60 and 68% volatile solids destruction at 8 day and 10 day HRT, respectively, compared with 50% in the mesophilic digestion system (35°C, 10 day HRT). The digestion effluents from the thermophilic (8-10 day HRT) and mesophilic systems were stable, as assessed by residual methane potentials. The ammonia rich sludge dewatering liquor was effectively treated by a batch anammox process, which exhibited comparable nitrogen removal rate as the tests using a control synthetic ammonia solution, indicating that the dewatering liquor did not have inhibiting/toxic effects on the anammox activity.

  1. Timeline of bio-hydrogen production by anaerobic digestion of biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Bernadette E. TELEKY; Mugur C. BĂLAN; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of biomass is a process capable to produce biohydrogen, a clean source of alternative energy. Lignocellulosic biomass from agricultural waste is considered a renewable energy source; therefore its utilization also contributes to the reduction of water, soil and air pollution. The study consists in five consecutive experiments designed to utilize anaerobic bacterial enrichment cultures originating from the Hungarian Lake, Hévíz. Wheat straw was used as com...

  2. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by pretreatment: effect of volatile to total solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Duan, Xu; Chen, Jianguang; Fang, Kuo; Feng, Leiyu; Yan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of volatile to total solids (VS/TS) on anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) pretreated by alkaline, thermal and thermal-alkaline strategies was studied. Experimental results showed that the production of methane from sludge was increased with VS/TS. When anaerobic digesters were fed with sludge pretreated by the thermal-alkaline method, the average methane yield was improved from 2.8 L/d at VS/TS 0.35 to 4.7 L/d at VS/TS 0.56. Also, the efficiency of VS reduction during sludge anaerobic digestion varied between 18.9% and 45.6%, and increased gradually with VS/TS. Mechanism investigation of VS/TS on WAS anaerobic digestion suggested that the general activities of anaerobic microorganisms, activities of key enzymes related to sludge hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis, and the ratio of Archaea to Bacteria were all increased with VS/TS, showing good agreement with methane production.

  3. Stability and Uniform Boundedness for a Class of Anaerobic Digestion Ecological Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-qi

    2004-01-01

    Stability, boundedness and persistence are three important aspects for an ecological model. In this paper, a further analysis ora class of anaerobic digestion ecological models is performed.Based on the Liupunov Method, the local stability of all equilibria in the system is got. According to the vector fields described by the system, the proof of the boundedness of the solution on the anaerobic digestion processes is completed in three steps. The method proposed in the discussion on the boundedness can be generalized to the similar problems. Results in this paper give information on how to run the ecological system well by adjusting the system parameters.

  4. Use of gamma-irradiation pretreatment for enhancement of anaerobic digestibility of sewage sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effects of y-irradiation pretreatment on anaerobic digestibility of sewage sludge was investigated in this paper.Parameters like solid components,soluble components,and biogas production of anaerobic digestion experiment for sewage sludge were measured.The values of these parameters were compared before and after y-irradiation pretreatment.Total solid (TS),volatile solid (VS),suspended solid (SS),volatile suspended solid (VSS),and average floc size of samples decreased after γ-irradiation treatment.Besides,floc size distribution of sewage sludge shifted from 80-100 μm to 0-40 μm after y-irradiation treatment at the doses from 0 to 30 kGy,which indicated the disintegration of sewage sludge.Moreover,microbe cells of sewage sludge were ruptured by γ-irradiation treatment,which resulted in the release of cytoplasm and increase of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD).Both sludge disintegration and microbe cells rupture enhanced the subsequent anaerobic digestion process,which was demonstrated by the increase of accumulated biogas production.Compared with digesters fed with none irradiated sludge,the accumulated biogas production increased 44,98,and 178 mL for digesters fed sludge irradiated at 2.48,6.51,and 11.24 kGy,respectively.The results indicated that "/-irradiation pretreatment could effectively enhance anaerobic digestibility of sewage sludge,and correspondingly,could accelerate hydrolysis process,shorten sludge retention time of sludge anaerobic digestion process.

  5. Optimizing the performance of a reactor by reducing the retention time and addition of glycerin for anaerobically digesting manure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, M.; Schuman, E.; Eekert, M.; Riel, van J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of manure is a widely accepted technology for energy production. However, only a minimal portion of the manure production in the EU is anaerobically digested and occurs predominantly in codigestion plants. There is substantial potential for biogas plants that primarily operate on

  6. Preparation of volatile fatty acid (VFA) calcium salts by anaerobic digestion of glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofen; Swan, Janis E; Nair, Giridhar R; Langdon, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Many potentially useful intermediates such as hydrogen and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are formed during the complex anaerobic digestion processes that produce methane from biomass. This study recovers VFAs from an anaerobic digester by a combination of gas stripping and absorption with calcium carbonate slurry. Glucose was used as the model substrate because it is readily available, inexpensive, and easily digested. Sludge from a meatworks anaerobic digester produced methane and carbon dioxide (and sometimes a small amount of hydrogen) when batch-fed with glucose. Conditioning the neutral anaerobic sludge to an acidic pH (below 4.8) was achieved using repeated 1 g L(-1) doses of glucose. After conditioning, mainly VFAs and hydrogen were produced. The intermediate VFAs could be stripped using headspace gas. In subsequent fed-batch digestion/stripping cycles, the pH decreased when glucose was added and then increased when the VFA was gas stripped. The predominant acids formed at low pH values were lactic, butyric, and acetic acids. Lactic acid was converted to VFAs during stripping. The VFA calcium salts recovered were 80% butyrate and 20% acetate with minor quantities of propionate and valerate.

  7. Inoculum selection is crucial to ensure operational stability in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vrieze, Jo; Gildemyn, Sylvia; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Jáuregui, Ruy; Pieper, Dietmar H; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is considered a key technology for the future bio-based economy. The microbial consortium carrying out the anaerobic digestion process is quite complex, and its exact role in terms of "elasticity", i.e., the ability to rapidly adapt to changing conditions, is still unknown. In this study, the role of the initial microbial community in terms of operational stability and stress tolerance was evaluated during a 175-day experiment. Five different inocula from stable industrial anaerobic digesters were fed a mixture of waste activated sludge and glycerol. Increasing ammonium pulses were applied to evaluate stability and stress tolerance. A different response in terms of start-up and ammonium tolerance was observed among the different inocula. Methanosaetaceae were the dominant acetoclastic methanogens, yet, Methanosarcinaceae increased in abundance at elevated ammonium concentrations. A shift from a Firmicutes to a Proteobacteria dominated bacterial community was observed in failing digesters. Methane production was strongly positively correlated with Methanosaetaceae, but also with Bacteria related to Anaerolinaceae, Clostridiales, and Alphaproteobacteria. Volatile fatty acids were strongly positively correlated with Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, yet ammonium concentration only with Bacteroidetes. Overall, these results indicate the importance of inoculum selection to ensure stable operation and stress tolerance in anaerobic digestion.

  8. CFD simulation of non-Newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binxin; Chen, Shulin

    2008-02-15

    A general mathematical model that predicts the flow fields in a mixed-flow anaerobic digester was developed. In this model, the liquid manure was assumed to be a non-Newtonian fluid, and the flow governed by the continuity, momentum, and k-epsilon standard turbulence equations, and non-Newtonian power law model. The commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, Fluent, was applied to simulate the flow fields of lab-scale, scale-up, and pilot-scale anaerobic digesters. The simulation results were validated against the experimental data from literature. The flow patterns were qualitatively compared for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids flow in a lab-scale digester. Numerical simulations were performed to predict the flow fields in scale-up and pilot-scale anaerobic digesters with different water pump power inputs and different total solid concentration (TS) in the liquid manure. The optimal power inputs were determined for the pilot-scale anaerobic digester. Some measures for reducing dead and low velocity zones were proposed based upon the CFD simulation results.

  9. Anaerobic digestion of wastewater screenings for resource recovery and waste reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wid, N.; Horan, N. J.

    2016-06-01

    Wastewater screenings are produced during the first stage of the wastewater treatment process and at present are disposed of to landfill. This material may not only cause operational failure to the treatment system, but also lead to environmental problems. In view of the high organic content of screenings, anaerobic digestion method may not only offer the potential for energy recovery, but also nutrient. In this study the, anaerobic batch digestion was performed at different dry solids concentrations of screenings to study the potential of biogas and phosphorus recovery. The tests demonstrated wastewater screenings were amenable to anaerobic digestion with methane yield was 355 m3/kg VS, which are comparable to the previous results. The digestate was high in P content and can be recovered up to 41%. This study also shows that anaerobic digestion was not only to turn this waste into useful resources, but also has a potential in reducing the organic content up to 31% for safe disposal. In this way the amount of wastewater screenings going to landfill is not only can be reduced, but also valuable products such as methane and phosphorus can also be recovered.

  10. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on anaerobic digestion and its sludge dewaterability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huacheng Xu; Pinjing He; Guanghui Yu; Liming Shao

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on anaerobic digestion and sludge dewaterability and further to probe into the influencing factors on sludge dewaterability,sludge flocs were stratified into four fractions:(1) slime; (2) loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS); (3) tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS); and (4) EPS-free pellets.The results showed that ultrasonic pretreatment increased the anaerobic digestion efficiency by 7%-8%.Anaerobic digestion without ultrasonic pretreatment deteriorated the sludge dewaterability,with the capillary suction time (CST) increased from 1.42 to 47.3 (sec.L)/g-TSS.The application of ultrasonic pretreatment firstly deteriorated the sludge dewaterability (normalized CST increased to 44.4 (sec.L)/g-TSS),while subsequent anaerobic digestion offset this effect and ultimately decreased the normalized CST to 23.2 (sec.L)/g-TSS.The dewaterability of unsonicated sludge correlated with protein (p = 0.003) and polysaccharide (p = 0.004) concentrations in the slime fraction,while that of sonicated sludge correlated with protein concentrations in the slime and LB-EPS fractions (p < 0.05).Fluorescent excitationemission matrix analysis showed that the fluorescence matters in the LB-EPS fraction significantly correlated with sludge dewaterability during anarobic digestion.

  11. A strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic hydrogen-producing culture enriched from digested household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Kotay, Shireen Meher; Trably, Eric;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to enrich, characterize and identify strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic hydrogen (H-2) producers from digested household solid wastes. A strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic H-2 producing bacterial culture was enriched from a lab-scale digester treating household was...... from digested household wastes. This study provided a culture with a potential to be applied in reactor systems for extreme thermophilic H-2 production from complex organic wastes.......The aim of this study was to enrich, characterize and identify strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic hydrogen (H-2) producers from digested household solid wastes. A strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic H-2 producing bacterial culture was enriched from a lab-scale digester treating household...... sources. Growth on glucose produced acetate, H-2 and carbon dioxide. Maximal H-2 production rate on glucose was 1.1 mmol l(-1) h(-1) with a maximum H-2 yield of 1.9 mole H-2 per mole glucose. 16S ribosomal DNA clone library analyses showed that the culture members were phylogenetically affiliated...

  12. Modeling of two-phase anaerobic process treating traditional Chinese medicine wastewater with the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaobo; Hu, Dongxue; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Ren, Nanqi; Zhu, Haibo

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the study was to implement a mathematical model to simulate two-phase anaerobic digestion (TPAD) process which consisted of an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor in series treating traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) wastewater. A model was built on the basis of Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) while considering complete mixing model for the CSTR, and axial direction discrete model and mixed series connection model for the UASB. The mathematical model was implemented with the simulation software package MATLABTM/Simulinks. System performance, in terms of COD removal, volatile fatty acids (VFA) accumulation and pH fluctuation, was simulated and compared with the measured values. The simulation results indicated that the model built was able to well predict the COD removal rate (-4.8-5.0%) and pH variation (-2.9-1.4%) of the UASB reactor, while failed to simulate the CSTR performance. Comparing to the measured results, the simulated acetic acid concentration of the CSTR effluent was underpredicted with a deviation ratios of 13.8-23.2%, resulting in an underprediction of total VFA and COD concentrations despite good estimation of propionic acid, butyric acid and valeric acid. It is presumed that ethanol present in the raw wastewater was converted into acetic acid during the acidification process, which was not considered by the model. Additionally, due to the underprediction of acetic acid the pH of CSTR effluent was overestimated.

  13. Biogas from renewable resources through dry anaerobic digestion; Biogas aus NaWaRos durch Trockenfermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiermann, M. [ATB, Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Technikbewertung und Stoffkreislaeufe; Linke, B. [ATB, Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Bioverfahrenstechnik; Kessler, U. [Agrargenossenschaft Pirow e.G. (Germany). Biogasanlage; Loock, R. [Ingenieurbuero Loock Consultants, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The functionality, performance and operational safety of anaerobic digestion using the dry-wet simultaneous technique of Loock Consultants were investigated at the biogas pilot plant in Pirow (State Brandenburg). In addition to determining process parameters and the input and output balance of the digester, chemical characterisation of the substrates and their biogas production potential were determined in the laboratory. The results reveal that a substrate mixture of 60% maize silage, 13% poultry manure and 27% digested material on a mass basis deliver a methane yield of 90 m{sup 3}t{sup -1} fresh matter, if conducted as a three-week batch process. A specific methane yield performance of 0.34 m{sup 3}kg{sup -1} VS is attained, as with dry anaerobic digestion of maize silage, with the standard wet process. (orig.)

  14. Altered antibiotic tolerance in anaerobic digesters acclimated to triclosan or triclocarban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Daniel E; McNamara, Patrick J

    2016-11-01

    Bench-scale anaerobic digesters were amended to elevated steady-state concentrations of triclosan (850 mg/kg) and triclocarban (150 mg/kg) using a synthetic feed. After more than 9 solids retention time (SRT) values of acclimatization, biomass from each digester (and a control digester that received no antimicrobials) was used to assess the toxicity of three antibiotics. Methane production rate was measured as a surrogate for activity in microcosms that received doses of antibiotics ranging from no-antibiotic to inhibitory concentrations. Biomass amended with triclocarban was more sensitive to tetracycline compared to the control indicating synergistic inhibitory effects between this antibiotic and triclocarban. In contrast, biomass amended with triclosan was able to tolerate statistically higher levels of ciprofloxacin indicating that triclosan can induce functional resistance to ciprofloxacin in an anaerobic digester community.

  15. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  16. Evidence for PAH Removal Coupled to the First Steps of Anaerobic Digestion in Sewage Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Cea-Barcia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons has been brought to the fore, but information on removal kinetics and anaerobic degrading bacteria is still lacking. In order to explore the organic micropollutants removal kinetics under anaerobic conditions in regard to the methane production kinetics, the removal rate of 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was measured in two anaerobic batch reactors series fed with a highly loaded secondary sludge as growth substrate. The results underscore that organic micropollutants removal is coupled to the initial stages of anaerobic digestion (acidogenesis and acetogenesis. In addition, the organic micropollutants kinetics suggest that the main removal mechanisms of these hydrophobic compounds are biodegradation and/or sequestration depending on the compounds.

  17. Research on Anaerobic Digestion: Optimization and Scalability of Mixed High-strength Food Processing Wastes for Renewable Biogas Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhongtang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Hitzhusen, Fredrick [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2012-12-27

    This research project developed and improved anaerobic digestion technologies, created a comprehensive Inventory of Ohio Biomass and a database of microorganisms of anaerobic digesters, and advanced knowledge and understanding of the underpinning microbiology of the anaerobic digestion process. The results and finding of this research project may be useful for future development and implementation of anaerobic digesters, especially at livestock farms. Policy makers and investors may also find the information on the biomass availability in Ohio and valuation of energy projects useful in policy making and making of investment decisions. The public may benefit from the information on biogas as an energy source and the potential impact of anaerobic digester projects on their neighborhoods.

  18. Effect of domestication on microorganism diversity and anaerobic digestion of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, S J; Hong, X J; Wang, G X; Li, Y; Gao, Y M; Yan, L; Wang, Y J; Wang, W D

    2016-08-19

    To accomplish the rapid start-up and stable operation of biogas digesters, an efficient inoculum is required. To obtain such an inoculum for food waste anaerobic digestion, we domesticated dairy manure anaerobic digestion residue by adding food waste every day. After 36 days, the pH and biogas yield stabilized signifying the completion of domestication. During domestication, the microbial communities in the inocula were investigated by constructing 16S rDNA clone libraries. We evaluated the effect of the domesticated inoculum by testing batch food waste anaerobic digestion with a non-domesticated inoculum as a control. The pH and methane yield of the digestion systems were determined as measurement indices. Domestication changed the composition and proportion of bacteria and archaea in the inocula. Of the bacteria, Clostridia (49.3%), Bacteroidales (19.5%), and Anaerolinaceae (8.1%) species were dominant in the seed sludge; Anaerolinaceae (49.0%), Clostridia (28.4%), and Bacteroidales (9.1%), in domestication sludge. Methanosaeta was the dominant genus in both of the seed (94.3%) and domestication (74.3%) sludge. However, the diversity of methanogenic archaea was higher in the domestication than in seed sludge. Methanoculleus, which was absent from the seed sludge, appeared in the domestication sludge (21.7%). When the domesticated inoculum was used, the digestion system worked stably (organic loading rate: 20 gVS/L; methane yield: 292.2 ± 9.8 mL/gVS; VS = volatile solids), whereas the digestion system inoculated with seed sludge failed to generate biogas. The results indicate that inoculum domestication ensures efficient and stable anaerobic digestion by enriching the methanogenic strains.

  19. ENHANCEMENT OF BIOGAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL FOR ANAEROBIC CO-DIGESTION OF WASTEWATER USING DECANTER CAKE

    OpenAIRE

    Thaniya Kaosol; Narumol Sohgrathok

    2013-01-01

    The wastewater from agro-industry treated with the biological treatment cannot produce the biogas because of its low COD level and its low organic content. In this research, the co-digestion with decanter cake will improve the biogas yield and biogas production of wastewater. The effect of three parameters (i.e., type of wastewater, mixing and mesophilic temperature) will be evaluated in batch digesters under anaerobic condition. Moreover, the study determines the biogas production potential ...

  20. ENHANCEMENT OF BIOGAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL FOR ANAEROBIC CO-DIGESTION OF WASTEWATER USING DECANTER CAKE

    OpenAIRE

    Thaniya Kaosol; Narumol Sohgrathok

    2012-01-01

    The wastewater from agro-industry treated with the biological treatment cannot produce the biogas because of its low COD level and its low organic content. In this research, the co-digestion with decanter cake will improve the biogas yield and biogas production of wastewater. The effect of three parameters (i.e., type of wastewater, mixing and mesophilic temperature) will be evaluated in batch digesters under anaerobic condition. Moreover, the study determines the biogas production potential ...

  1. Monitoring methanogenic population dynamics in a full-scale anaerobic digester to facilitate operational management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie; Williams, Haydn; Dinsdale, Richard; Guwy, Alan; Esteves, Sandra

    2013-07-01

    Microbial populations in a full-scale anaerobic digester fed on food waste were monitored over an 18-month period using qPCR. The digester exhibited a highly dynamic environment in which methanogenic populations changed constantly in response to availability of substrates and inhibitors. The methanogenic population in the digester was dominated by Methanosaetaceae, suggesting that aceticlastic methanogenesis was the main route for the production of methane. Sudden losses (69%) in Methanosaetaceae were followed by a build-up of VFAs which were subsequently consumed when populations recovered. A build up of ammonium inhibited Methanosaetaceae and resulted in shifts from acetate to hydrogen utilization. Addition of trace elements and alkalinity when propionate levels were high stimulated microbial growth. Routine monitoring of microbial populations and VFAs provided valuable insights into the complex processes occurring within the digester and could be used to predict digester stability and facilitate digester optimization.

  2. [Research advances in anaerobic co-digestion of biogas fermentation substrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fei-Qing; Li, Xia; Lu, Jian-Bo

    2012-07-01

    With global climate change, more and more attention has been paid to the development of bio-energy. Biogas fermentation, as a fairly mature technology of bio-matter energy transformation, has received considerable attention and experienced much development. How to improve the efficiency of biogas fermentation and promote its industrialization is a pressing issue. Anaerobic co-digestion is a simple, low-cost, and high-efficiency method for enhancing the efficiency of biogas fermentation, and received increasing attention from related researchers. This paper summarized the characteristics of various fermentation substrates, reviewed the research advances in the co-digestion of animal manure, sewage sludge, and industrial waste, with the focus on the advantages of co-digestion and the factors affecting the rate and efficiency of co-digestion, and prospected the future research of co-digestion and its application, aimed to provide theoretical guidance for the promotion and application of co-digestion techniques.

  3. High-solid Anaerobic Co-digestion of Food Waste and Rice Straw for Biogas Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Zhan-jiang; Liu Jie; Shi Feng-mei; Wang Su; GaoYa-bing; Zhang Da-lei

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste (FW) and rice straw (RS) in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at high organic loading rate (OLR) was investigated. Co-digestion studies of FW and RS with six different mixing ratios were conducted at an initial volatile solid (VS) concentration of more than 3 gVS•L-1. The biogas production, methane contents, degradation efficiency of VS, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were determined to evaluate the stability and performance of the system. The results showed that the co-digestion process had higher system stability and higher volumetric biogas production than mono-digestions. Increase in FW content in the feedstock could increase the methane yield and shorten retention time. The efficiency of co-digestion systems mainly relied on the mixing ratios of FW and RS to some extent. The highest methane yield was 60.55 mL•gV•S-1•d-1 at a mass ratio (FW/RS) of 3: 1, which was 178% and 70% higher than that of mono-digestions of FW and RS, respectively. Consequently, the anaerobic co-digestion of FW and RS could have superior stability and better performance than mono-digestions in higher organic loading system.

  4. Environmental assessment of farm-scaled anaerobic co-digestion for bioenergy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lijó, Lucía, E-mail: lucia.lijo@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); González-García, Sara [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bacenetti, Jacopo; Negri, Marco; Fiala, Marco [Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Production, Landscape, Agroenergy, University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, María Teresa [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Anaerobic monodigestion and codigestion were compared. • The environmental advantages of suitable waste management were proved. • The use of cereal crops as feedstock improves biogas yield. • Cultivation step implies the most important environmental hotspot. • Digestate management options were evaluated. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to assess the environmental profile of a bioenergy system based on a co-digestion plant using maize silage and pig slurry as substrates. All the processes involved in the production of bioenergy as well as the avoided processes accrued from the biogas production system were evaluated. The results evidenced the environmental importance of the cultivation step and the environmental credits associated to the avoided processes. In addition, this plant was compared with two different plants that digest both substrates separately. The results revealed the environmental benefits of the utilisation of pig slurry due to the absence of environmental burdens associated with its production as well as credits provided when avoiding its conventional management. The results also presented the environmental drawbacks of the utilisation of maize silage due to the environmental burdens related with its production. Accordingly, the anaerobic mono-digestion of maize silage achieved the worst results. The co-digestion of both substrates was ranked in an intermediate position. Additionally, three possible digestate management options were assessed. The results showed the beneficial effect of digestate application as an organic fertiliser, principally on account of environmental credits due to avoided mineral fertilisation. However, digestate application involves important acidifying and eutrophicating emissions.

  5. Effect of organic loading rate during anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Hiya; Kumar, Pradeep; Kumar, Sunil; Mukherjee, Somnath; Vaidya, Atul N

    2016-10-01

    The effect of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and volatile solids (VS) on subsequent methane (CH4) production during anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) was studied in a laboratory-scale digester. The experiment was performed in 2L anaerobic digester under different experimental conditions using different input mass co-digested with inoculum and organic loading rate (OLR) for 27days at 38±2°C. Three digesters (digesters 1, 2 and 3) were operated at initial loading of 5.1, 10.4 and 15.2g/L CODS per batch which were reduced to 77.9% and 84.2%, respectively. Cumulative biogas productions were 9.3, 10.7 and 17.7L in which CH4 yields were 84.3, 101.0 and 168.4mL/gVS removal in digesters 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The observed COD removal was found to be influenced on variation in CH4 production. Co-efficient of determination (R(2)) was 0.67 and 0.74 in digesters 1 and 2, respectively.

  6. Effect of dietary arsonic acids on performance characteristics of swine waste anaerobic digesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumm, M.C.; Sutton, A.L.; Jones, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    A completely random design experiment was conducted to determine the effect of dietary arsonic acids on the performance of laboratory swine waste anaerobic digesters. Fortified corn-soybean meal diets containing no arsonic acids (control), 100 ppm arsanilic acid or 75 ppm roxarsone were fed to growing-finishing pigs. Fresh waste (including urine) from all treatments were collected daily for 74 days and loaded at a rate of 2.4 kg volatile solids/cubic meter into nine 25-L anaerobic digesters heated to 34 degrees with continuous agitation and total gas collection. After a 60-day acclimation period, daily gas production and composition and nutrient composition data were obtained from the anaerobic digesters. Inclusion of the arsonic acids in swine diets reduced dry matter and volatile solids content. Dietary arsonic acids also increased NH4+-N. Alky. was high in all the digesters; however, arsonic acids decreased alky. Dietary arsonic acids reduced the ratio of CH4 to CO2 in the gas compared to the control. Significant amounts of As accumulated in the digesters. Alcohol, ethanol, and propanol concentrations were increased by roxarsone, and arsanilic acid increased the PrCO2H concentrations over the percentage in both the roxarsone and control digesters.

  7. The Impact of Chemical Phosphorus Removal on the Process of Anaerobic Sludge Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Ofverstrom

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the efficiency of the mixture of primary sludge and excess activated sludge in Vilnius WWTP with reference to the anaerobic digestion process. Sludge digestion was carried out under laboratory conditions using anaerobic sludge digestion model W8 (Armfield Ltd., UK. Laboratory analyses consist of two periods – the anaerobic digestion of the un-dosed and Fe-dosed sludge mixture. The results of digestion were processed using the methods of statistical analysis. The findings showed reduction in volatile solids approx. by 6% when dosing min FeCl3·6H2O and 15% when dosing max FeCl3·6H2O into feed sludge. Gas volume produced during the digestion of the un-dosed sludge was 90–160 ml/d and 60–125 ml/d in min Fe-dosed sludge and 45-95 ml/d. Also, correlation between VS loadings and biogas production was found. A rise in VS loading from 0,64 g/l/d to 1,01 g/l/d increased biogas production from 90 ml/d to 140–160 ml/d.Article in Lithuanian

  8. Hydrogen production from the dissolution of nano zero valent iron and its effect on anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Xi; Guo, Jialiang; Zhang, Chunyang; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nano zero valent iron (NZVI) has shown inhibition on methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion due to its reductive decomposition of cell membrane. The inhibition was accompanied by the accumulation of hydrogen gas due to rapid NZVI dissolution. It is not clear whether and how rapid hydrogen release from NZVI dissolution directly affects anaerobic digestion. In this study, the hydrogen release kinetics from NZVI (average size = 55 ± 11 nm) dissolution in deionized water under anaerobic conditions was first evaluated. The first-order NZVI dissolution rate constant was 2.62 ± 0.26 h(-1) with its half-life of 0.26 ± 0.03 h. Two sets of anaerobic digestion experiments (i.e., in the presence of glucose or without any substrate but at different anaerobic sludge concentrations) were performed to study the impact of H2 release from rapid NZVI dissolution, in which H2 was generated in a separate water bottle containing NZVI (i.e., ex situ H2 or externally supplied from NZVI dissolution) before hydrogen gas was introduced to anaerobic digestion. The results showed that the H2 partial pressure in the headspace of the digestion bottle reached as high as 0.27 atm due to rapid NZVI dissolution, resulting in temporary inhibition of methane production. Nevertheless, the 5-d cumulative methane volume in the group with ex situ H2 production due to NZVI dissolution was actually higher than that of control, suggesting NZVI inhibition on methanogenesis is solely due to the reductive decomposition of cell membrane after direct contact with NZVI.

  9. Determination of Physical, Chemical and Digestibility of some Agricultural by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    majed dehgan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, physical and chemical characteristics and estimation of effective fiber and digestibility of some agricultural by-products such as lerd, pulp and date kernel, grape pomace, pistachio hulls, lime and rice straw were determined by using in vitro technique. Experimental data were analyzed as a complete randomized design, with three replicates. Physical and chemical characteristics and digestibility parameters among samples were significantly different. Rice straw due to high water holding capacity and low-density mass were floating on the liquid phase of reticulo-rumen and stimulates rumination but palm seed with high bulk density tends to deposit in the rumen. Chemical characteristics such as non-fibrous carbohydrates of lemon pulp and pistachio hull and crude protein of grape pomace, lerd and pulp of date were significantly different between samples. Results of physical characteristics, particle size separation and physical effective cell wall showed that rice straw provides adequate fiber in diet. Also, to some extent physical effective cell wall can be provided by grape pomace, kernel and lerd of date. The predictions of particle size separation and physical effective cell wall were found to compare reasonably well when new Pennsylvania sieves, compare to old ones, were used. By considering physical and chemical characteristics of above mentioned agricultural by-products date pulp with non-fibrous carbohydrate and high protein content and digestibility can be used in higher amounts in ruminant diets.

  10. Evaluating digestion efficiency in full-scale anaerobic digesters by identifying active microbial populations through the lens of microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Ran; Narihiro, Takashi; Nobu, Masaru K.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a common technology to biologically stabilize wasted solids produced in municipal wastewater treatment. Its efficiency is usually evaluated by calculating the reduction in volatile solids, which assumes no biomass growth associated with digestion. To determine whether this assumption is valid and further evaluate digestion efficiency, this study sampled 35 digester sludge from different reactors at multiple time points together with the feed biomass in a full-scale water reclamation plant at Chicago, Illinois. The microbial communities were characterized using Illumina sequencing technology based on 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene (rDNA). 74 core microbial populations were identified and represented 58.7% of the entire digester community. Among them, active populations were first identified using the ratio of 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA (rRNA/rDNA) for individual populations, but this approach failed to generate consistent results. Subsequently, a recently proposed mass balance model was applied to calculate the specific growth rate (μ), and this approach successfully identified active microbial populations in digester (positive μ) that could play important roles than those with negative μ. It was further estimated that 82% of microbial populations in the feed sludge were digested in comparison with less than 50% calculated using current equations. PMID:27666090

  11. Evaluating digestion efficiency in full-scale anaerobic digesters by identifying active microbial populations through the lens of microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Ran; Narihiro, Takashi; Nobu, Masaru K.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a common technology to biologically stabilize wasted solids produced in municipal wastewater treatment. Its efficiency is usually evaluated by calculating the reduction in volatile solids, which assumes no biomass growth associated with digestion. To determine whether this assumption is valid and further evaluate digestion efficiency, this study sampled 35 digester sludge from different reactors at multiple time points together with the feed biomass in a full-scale water reclamation plant at Chicago, Illinois. The microbial communities were characterized using Illumina sequencing technology based on 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene (rDNA). 74 core microbial populations were identified and represented 58.7% of the entire digester community. Among them, active populations were first identified using the ratio of 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA (rRNA/rDNA) for individual populations, but this approach failed to generate consistent results. Subsequently, a recently proposed mass balance model was applied to calculate the specific growth rate (μ), and this approach successfully identified active microbial populations in digester (positive μ) that could play important roles than those with negative μ. It was further estimated that 82% of microbial populations in the feed sludge were digested in comparison with less than 50% calculated using current equations.

  12. Anaerobic digestion of the shredded organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traverso, P.G.; Cecchi, Franco

    1988-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of the shredded organic fraction of municipal solid waste has been investigated in a pilot-scale completely mixed digester, under mesophilic conditions. Detailed comparisons of the size distributions of the particles in the feed and in the digester effluent are reported under varying organic loading rates and hydraulic retention times. About 20% of the particulate matter in the organic feed is refractory and resists hydrolysis. Hence the maximum removal of total volatile solids attainable under hydraulic retention times of practical interest is about 70%. The optimum hydraulic retention time is around 14 to 15 days.

  13. Microalgae Cultivation on Anaerobic Digestate of Municipal Wastewater, Sewage Sludge and Agro-Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Zuliani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are fast-growing photosynthetic organisms which have the potential to be exploited as an alternative source of liquid fuels to meet growing global energy demand. The cultivation of microalgae, however, still needs to be improved in order to reduce the cost of the biomass produced. Among the major costs encountered for algal cultivation are the costs for nutrients such as CO2, nitrogen and phosphorous. In this work, therefore, different microalgal strains were cultivated using as nutrient sources three different anaerobic digestates deriving from municipal wastewater, sewage sludge or agro-waste treatment plants. In particular, anaerobic digestates deriving from agro-waste or sewage sludge treatment induced a more than 300% increase in lipid production per volume in Chlorella vulgaris cultures grown in a closed photobioreactor, and a strong increase in carotenoid accumulation in different microalgae species. Conversely, a digestate originating from a pilot scale anaerobic upflow sludge blanket (UASB was used to increase biomass production when added to an artificial nutrient-supplemented medium. The results herein demonstrate the possibility of improving biomass accumulation or lipid production using different anaerobic digestates.

  14. Using a combination of binning strategies and taxonomic approaches to unravel the anaerobic digestion microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campanaro, Stefano; Treu, Laura; Kougias, Panagiotis

    of scaffolds comprehensive of thousands genome sequences, but the binning of these scaffolds into OTUs representative of microbial genomes is still challenging. In the attempt to obtain a deep characterization of the anaerobic digestion microbiome, different metagenomic binning approaches were integrated...

  15. Enhancing recovery of ammonia from swine manure anaerobic digester effluent using gas-permeable membrane technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas-permeable membrane technology is useful to recover ammonia from manure. In this study, the technology was enhanced using aeration instead of alkali chemicals to increase pH and the ammonia recovery rate. Digested effluents from covered anaerobic swine lagoons containing 1375 to 2089 milligram am...

  16. Counteracting ammonia inhibition in anaerobic digestion by removal with a hollow fiber membrane contactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterböck, B; Ortner, M; Haider, R; Fuchs, W

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the feasibility of membrane contactors for continuous ammonia (NH₃-N) removal in an anaerobic digestion process and to counteract ammonia inhibition. Two laboratory anaerobic digesters were fed slaughterhouse wastes with ammonium (NH₄⁺) concentrations ranging from 6 to 7.4 g/L. One reactor was used as reference reactor without any ammonia removal. In the second reactor, a hollow fiber membrane contactor module was used for continuous ammonia removal. The hollow fiber membranes were directly submerged into the digestate of the anaerobic reactor. Sulfuric acid was circulated in the lumen as an adsorbent solution. Using this set up, the NH₄⁺-N concentration in the membrane reactor was significantly reduced. Moreover the extraction of ammonia lowered the pH by 0.2 units. In combination that led to a lowering of the free NH₃-N concentration by about 70%. Ammonia inhibition in the reference reactor was observed when the concentration exceeded 6 g/L NH₄⁺-N or 1-1.2 g/L NH₃-N. In contrast, in the membrane reactor the volatile fatty acid concentration, an indicator for process stability, was much lower and a higher gas yield and better degradation was observed. The chosen approach offers an appealing technology to remove ammonia directly from media having high concentrations of solids and it can help to improve process efficiency in anaerobic digestion of ammonia rich substrates.

  17. Strategies for the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste: an overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, H.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2006-01-01

    Different process strategies for anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) are reviewed weighing high-solids versus low-solids, mesophilic versus thermophilic and single-stage versus multi-stage processes. The influence of different waste characteristics...

  18. Effects of ionic strength and ion pairing on (plant-wide) modelling of anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solon, Kimberly; Flores Alsina, Xavier; Mbamba, Christian Kazadi

    2015-01-01

    and overall plant performance indicators, namely effluent quality index (EQI) and operational cost index (OCI). The acid-base equilibria implemented in the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) are modified to account for non-ideal aqueous-phase chemistry. The model corrects for ionic strength via the Davies...... to be required when precipitation is to be modelled....

  19. Utilization of vegetable dumplings waste from industrial production by anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarska, Agnieszka A.; Pilarski, Krzysztof; Ryniecki, Antoni; Tomaszyk, Kamila; Dach, Jacek; Wolna-Maruwka, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides the analysis of results of biogas and methane yield for vegetable dumplings waste: dough with fat, vegetable waste, and sludge from the clarifier. Anaerobic digestion of food waste used in the experiments was stable after combining the substrates with a digested pulp composed of maize silage and liquid manure (as inoculum), at suitable ratios. The study was carried out in a laboratory scale using anaerobic batch reactors, at controlled (mesophilic) temperature and pH conditions. The authors present the chemical reactions accompanying biodegradation of the substrates and indicate the chemical compounds which may lead to acidification during the anaerobic digestion. An anaerobic digestion process carried out with the use of a dough-and-fat mixture provided the highest biogas and methane yields. The following yields were obtained in terms of fresh matter: 242.89 m3 Mg-1 for methane and 384.38 m3 Mg-1 for biogas, and in terms of volatile solids: 450.73 m3 Mg-1 for methane and 742.40 m3 Mg-1 for biogas. Vegetables and sludge from the clarifier (as fresh matter) provided much lower yields.

  20. Effect of the chlortetracycline addition method on methane production from the anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Wen, Xin; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yongde; Ma, Baohua; Liao, Xindi; Liang, Juanboo; Wu, Yinbao

    2014-10-01

    Effects of antibiotic residues on methane production in anaerobic digestion are commonly studied using the following two antibiotic addition methods: (1) adding manure from animals that consume a diet containing antibiotics, and (2) adding antibiotic-free animal manure spiked with antibiotics. This study used chlortetracycline (CTC) as a model antibiotic to examine the effects of the antibiotic addition method on methane production in anaerobic digestion under two different swine wastewater concentrations (0.55 and 0.22mg CTC/g dry manure). The results showed that CTC degradation rate in which manure was directly added at 0.55mg CTC/g (HSPIKE treatment) was lower than the control values and the rest of the treatment groups. Methane production from the HSPIKE treatment was reduced (pmethane production under different antibiotic addition methods might be explained by the microbial activity and the concentrations of antibiotic intermediate products and metabolites. Because the primary entry route of veterinary antibiotics into an anaerobic digester is by contaminated animal manure, the most appropriate method for studying antibiotic residue effects on methane production may be using manure from animals that are given a particular antibiotic, rather than adding the antibiotic directly to the anaerobic digester.

  1. Bioelectrochemical enhancement of methane production in low temperature anaerobic digestion at 10 °C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Si; Buisman, Cees; Heijne, ter Annemiek

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion at low temperature is an attractive technology especially in moderate climates, however, low temperature results in low microbial activity and low rates of methane formation. This study investigated if bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can enhance methane production from organ

  2. Effect of temperature and temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mashad, El H.; Zeeman, G.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Bot, G.P.A.; Lettinga, G.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of temperature, 50 and 60 °C, at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20 and 10 days, on the performance of anaerobic digestion of cow manure has been investigated in completely stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). Furthermore, the effect of both daily downward and daily upward temperature fl

  3. A Model of Solar Energy Utilisation in the Anaerobic Digestion of Cattle Manure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mashad, El H.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Zeeman, G.

    2003-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion of cow manure has a higher destruction of pathogens and weed seeds under thermophilic conditions compared to mesophilic conditions. To maintain such conditions, solar energy can be used. In this research, the consequences of the use of solar energy under Egyptian conditions a

  4. Anaerobic digestion of aircraft deicing fluid wastes: interactions and toxicity of corrosion inhibitors and surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruden, Cyndee L; Hernandez, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Corrosion inhibitors and surfactants are present in aircraft deicing fluids (ADFs) at significant concentrations (> 1% w/w). The purpose of this research was to study the interactions of a common nonionic surfactant with the commercially significant corrosion inhibitors used in modern ADF (4- and 5-methylbenzotriazole [MeBT]), and to determine the effects of their mixture on the conventional anaerobic digestion process. In mesophilic anaerobic microcosms codigesting wastewater solids, propylene glycol, and MeBT, increasing surfactant levels resulted in enhanced MeBT sorption on digester solids. As judged by anaerobic toxicity assays, responses from digesters containing surfactant concentrations below their critical micelle concentration (CMC) suggested that low nonionic surfactant concentrations could facilitate a reduction in the apparent toxicity of MeBT. In microcosms exposed to surfactant concentrations above their CMC, no increase in MeBT solubility was observed, and the anaerobic toxicity response corresponded to control systems not containing surfactant. Direct microscopic measurements of digesting biomass using fluorescent phylogenetic probes (fluorescent in situ hybridization) revealed that members of the domain Bacteria were more sensitive to MeBT in the presence of surfactant than were members of the domain Archaea.

  5. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of Lurgi coal gasification wastewater in a UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Wencheng; Han, Hongjun; Li, Huiqiang; Yuan, Min

    2011-02-01

    Lurgi coal gasification wastewater (LCGW) is a refractory wastewater, whose anaerobic treatment has been a severe problem due to its toxicity and poor biodegradability. Using a mesophilic (35±2°C) reactor as a control, thermophilic anaerobic digestion (55±2°C) of LCGW was investigated in a UASB reactor. After 120 days of operation, the removal of COD and total phenols by the thermophilic reactor could reach 50-55% and 50-60% respectively, at an organic loading rate of 2.5 kg COD/(m(3) d) and HRT of 24 h; the corresponding efficiencies were both only 20-30% in the mesophilic reactor. After thermophilic digestion, the wastewater concentrations of the aerobic effluent COD could reach below 200 mg/L compared with around 294 mg/L if mesophilic digestion was done and around 375 mg/L if sole aerobic pretreatment was done. The results suggested that thermophilic anaerobic digestion improved significantly both anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation of LCGW.

  6. Psychrophilic anaerobic digestion of swine manure slurry in sequencing batch reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, D.I. [Agriculture Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Food Research Branch; Droste, R.L. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-12-31

    This work presents preliminary results of an ongoing laboratory study to evaluate the feasibility of psychrophilic anaerobic digestion in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) for stabilizing, deodorizing and adding value to swine manure. Preliminary results show that the process is feasible. (author). 14 refs., 7 tabs.

  7. Prediction of trace compounds in biogas from anaerobic digestion using the MATLAB Neural Network Toolbox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Domnanovich, A.M.; Zani, L.; Braun, R.; Holubar, P.

    2005-01-01

    The outlook to apply the highly energetic biogas from anaerobic digestion into fuel cells will result in a significantly higher electrical efficiency and can contribute to an increase of renewable energy production. The practical bottleneck is the fuel cell poisoning caused by several gaseous trace

  8. Manual of procedures for the operation of bench-scale anaerobic digesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, R.R.

    1978-12-01

    The successful operation of any laboratory-scale biological system is often a difficult and frustrating experience. This is especially true when dealing with the anaerobic digestion process. Because of the stringent environmental requirements associated with anaerobic digesters, efficient operation of bench-scale units requires rigid monitoring and control. The purpose of this manual is to present the methods and procedures which are followed in bench-scale anaerobic digestion studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Among the topics discussed are operating parameters, a description of the experimental system, typical digestion substrates, operational procedures, analytical techniques, and safety considerations. The document serves as a technical guide to PNL personnel assigned to a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored program evaluating the effect of powdered activated carbon on the anaerobic digestio of sewage sludge. It should be noted that the methods described in this manual do not necessarily represent the best or only means of conducting the research. They are merely procedures that have been found to be successful at PNL. It is hoped that this information may be useful to other researchers who are contemplating or pursuing bench-scale studies of their own.

  9. Minimisation of excess sludge production in a WWTP by coupling thermal hydrolysis and rapid anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauzy, J; Graja, S; Gerardin, F; Crétenot, D; Patria, L; Fernandes, P

    2005-01-01

    In many cases, reducing sludge production could be the solution for wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) that here difficulty evacuating the residuals of wastewater treatment. The aim of this study was to test the possibility of minimising the excess sludge production by coupling a thermal hydrolysis stage and an anaerobic digestion with a very short HRT. The tests were carried out on a 2,500 p.e. pilot plant installed on a recycling loop between the clarifier and the actived sludge basin. The line equipped with the full scale pilot plant produced 38% TSS less than the control line during a 10 week period. Moreover, the rapid anaerobic digestion removed, on average, more than 50% of the total COD load with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3 days. Lastly, the dryness of the remaining excess sludge, sanitised by the thermal hydrolysis, was more than 35% with an industrial centrifuge. This combination of thermal hydrolysis and rapid anaerobic digestion equally permits a significant gain of compactness compared to traditional anaerobic digesters.

  10. Spatial and environmental assessment of energy potentials for Anaerobic Digestion production systems applied to the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierie, F.; Benders, R.M.J.; Bekkering, J.; Gemert, W.J.T. van; Moll, H.C.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) can play an important role in achieving renewable goals set within the Netherlands which strives for 40 PJ bio-energy in the year 2020. This research focusses on reaching this goal with locally available biomass waste flows (e.g. manures, grasses, harvest remains, municipal

  11. How to use molecular biology tools for the study of the anaerobic digestion process?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabezas, Angela; Araujo, de Juliana Calabria; Callejas, Cecilia; Galès, Amandine; Hamelin, Jérôme; Marone, Antonella; Machado de Sousa, Diana; Trably, Eric; Etchebehere, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is used with success for the treatment of solid waste, urban and industrial effluents with a concomitant energy production. The process is robust and stable, but the complexity of the microbial community involved in the process is not yet fully comprehensive. Nowadays, the stu

  12. Fungal pretreatment of albizia chips for enhanced biogas production by solid-state anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albizia biomass is a forestry waste, and holds a great potential in biogas production by solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD). However, low methane yields from albizia chips were observed due to their recalcitrant structure. In this study, albizia chips were pretreated by Ceriporiopsis subvermisp...

  13. Anaerobic digestion foaming in full-scale biogas plants: A survey on causes and solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan; O-Thong, Sompong;

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming is a common operation problem in biogas plants with negative impacts on the biogas plants economy and environment. A survey of 16 Danish full-scale biogas plants on foaming problems revealed that most of them had experienced foaming in their processes up to three times...

  14. Anaerobic Digestion. Selected Instructional Activities and References. Instructional Resources Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Robert D., Comp.

    Focusing specifically on the wastewater treatment process of anaerobic digestion, this document identifies instructional and reference materials for use by professionals in the field in the development and implementation of new programs or in the updating of existing programs. It is designed to help trainers, plant operators, educators, engineers,…

  15. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF FOOD WASTE AND DAIRY MANURE FOR BIOENERGY PRODUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The performance of continuously mixed anaerobic digesters was evaluated in the laboratory for treating manure, food waste and their mixtures at 35 ± 2oC and a hydraulic retention time of 20 days. The first mixture was composed of 32% and 68%, and the second was composed of 48% and 52% food waste and...

  16. Test/QA Plan For Verification Of Anaerobic Digester For Energy Production And Pollution Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ETV-ESTE Program conducts third-party verification testing of commercially available technologies that improve the environmental conditions in the U.S. A stakeholder committee of buyers and users of such technologies guided the development of this test on anaerobic digesters...

  17. Wastewater polishing by a channelized macrophyte-dominated wetland and anaerobic digestion of the harvested phytomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Constructed wetlands (CW) offer a mechanism to meet regulatory standards for wastewater treatment while minimizing energy inputs. To optimize CW wastewater polishing activities and investigate integration of CW with energy production from anaerobic digestion we constructed a pair of three-tier ch...

  18. Anaerobic Digestion of Saline Creeping Wild Ryegrass for Biogas Production and Pretreatment of Particleboard Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to develop an integrated process to produce biogas and high-quality particleboard using saline creeping wild ryegrass (CWR), Leymus triticoides through anaerobic digestion (AD). Besides producing biogas, AD also serves as a pretreatment method to remove the wax la...

  19. Pathogen inactivation in liquid dairy manure during anaerobic and aerobic digestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, S.; Pandey, P.; Castillo, A. R.; Vaddella, V. K.

    2014-12-01

    Controlling manure-borne pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are crucial for protecting surface and ground water as well as mitigating risks to human health. In California dairy farms, flushing of dairy manure (mainly animal feces and urine) from freestall barns and subsequent liquid-solid manure separation is a common practice for handling animal waste. The liquid manure fraction is generally pumped into the settling ponds and it goes into aerobic and/or anaerobic lagoons for extended period of time. Considering the importance of controlling pathogens in animal waste, the objective of the study was to understand the effects of anaerobic and aerobic digestions on the survival of three human pathogens in animal waste. The pathogen inactivation was assessed at four temperatures (30, 35, 42, and 50 °C), and the relationships between temperature and pathogen decay were estimated. Results showed a steady decrease of E. coli levels in aerobic and anaerobic digestion processes over the time; however, the decay rates varied with pathogens. The effect of temperature on Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes survival was different than the E. coli survival. In thermophilic temperatures (42 and 50 °C), decay rate was considerable greater compared to the mesophilic temperatures (30 and 35°C). The E. coli log reductions at 50 °C were 2.1 in both aerobic and anaerobic digestions after 13 days of incubation. The Salmonella spp. log reductions at 50 °C were 5.5 in aerobic digestion, and 5.9 in anaerobic digestion. The Listeria monocytogenes log reductions at 50 °C were 5.0 in aerobic digestion, and 5.6 in anaerobic digestion. The log reduction of E. coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogens at 30 °C in aerobic environment were 0.1, 4.7, and 5.6, respectively. In anaerobic environment, the corresponding reductions were 0.4, 4.3, and 5.6, respectively. We anticipate that the outcomes of the study will help improving the

  20. Toxicity and biodegradability of olive mill wastewaters in batch anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdi, M. (Centre de Biotechnologie, Sfax (Tunisia) Universite de Provence, Marseille (France))

    1992-11-01

    The anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity of olive mill wastewaters (OMW) were studied in batch anaerobic digestion experiments. Anaerobic digestion of OMW or the supernatant of its centrifugation, the methane production was achieved at up to 5-15% (V/V) dilution corresponding to only 5-20 g/L COD. The washed suspended solids of OMW were toxic at up to 80 g/L COD; however, the kinetic of biodegradability of OMW or the supernatant was faster than for suspended solids, which are constituted mealy of cellulose and lignin. The darkly colored polyphenols induce the problem of biodegradation of OMW, whereas the long chain fatty acids (LCFA), tannins and simple phenolic compounds are responsible for its toxicity for methanogenic bacteria. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Anaerobic digestion of linear alkyl benzene sulfonates: biodegradation kinetics and metabolite analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M T; Campos, E; Ribosa, I; Latorre, A; Sánchez-Leal, J

    2005-09-01

    In the present work the effect of the alkyl chain length and the position of the sulfophenyl substituent of the linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) on their anaerobic biodegradability have been investigated. Degradation kinetics of the linear alkyl benzene sulfonates homologues, 2phiC10LAS, 2phiC12LAS and 2phiC14LAS, have been studied. It has been also investigated the effect of the isomer type on the degradation rate of the LAS molecule through the comparative study of the 2phiC10LAS and 5phiC10LAS isomers. Batch anaerobic biodegradation tests were performed using sludge from the anaerobic digester of a wastewater treatment plant as microorganisms source. Ultimate biodegradation was evaluated from the biogas production whereas primary biodegradation was determined by specific analysis of the surfactant. LAS homologues and isomers showed a negligible primary biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, analysis of sulfophenyl carboxilates (SPC) by LC-MS indicated a low and constant level of these LAS degradation metabolites over the test period. These data are consistent with a minimal transformation of the LAS parent molecule in the anaerobic digesters. On the other hand, the addition of the shortest alkyl chain length homologues, decyl and dodecylbenzene sulfonates, reduces the biogas production whereas the most hydrophobic homologue, the tetradecylbenzene sulfonate, enhances the biogas production. This LAS homologue seems to increase the availability of organic compounds sorbed on the anaerobic sludge promoting their biodegradation.

  2. Pilot project to investigate the anaerobic digestion of the European water chestnut. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    A pilot project was undertaken by the City of Watervliet, New York, funded by the US Department of Energy, Appropriate Technology Small Grants Program, to verify the feasibility of producing methane gas through the anaerobic digestion of the European Water Chestnut Trapa natans L. Previous laboratory scale experiments confirmed the hypothesis that Trapa natans L. was susceptible to digestion by anaerobic bacteria. The experiment described herein confirmed those results in a ''real-world'' environment. Furthermore, it was shown that Trapa natans L. could be harvested, held in storage, and digested without employing unusual technologies. Energy for the digestion reaction was obtained from solar radiation, not fossil fuels, limiting the energy-debt to the construction and harvesting aspects of the project. Phase One of this project took place during the months of June through November, 1982. The digester failed to produce gas due to high oxygen levels. It was hypothesized that the buoyancy cells of the uncrushed plants were the source of this oxygen. Phase Two took place during the months of June through September, 1983. At that time, the Trapa natans L. plants were manually crushed and shredded before introduction to the digester. Gas production was 51% methane and 46% carbon dioxide for the second digester run. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of paunch in a CSTR for renewable energy production and nutrient mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkemka, Valentine Nkongndem; Marchbank, Douglas H; Hao, Xiying

    2015-09-01

    A laboratory study investigated the anaerobic digestion of paunch in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the recovery of biogas and mineralization of nutrients. At an organic loading rate (OLR) of 2.8gVSL(-1)day(-1) with a 30-day hydraulic retention time (HRT), a CH4 yield of 0.213Lg(-1)VS and CH4 production rate of 0.600LL(-1)day(-1) were obtained. Post-anaerobic digestion of the effluent from the CSTR for 30days at 40°C recovered 0.067Lg(-1)VS as CH4, which was 21% of the batch CH4 potential. Post-digestion of the effluent from the digestate obtained at this OLR is needed to meet the stable effluent criteria. Furthermore, low levels of soluble ions such as K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were found in the liquid fraction of the digestate and the remainder could have been retained in the solid digestate fraction. This study demonstrates the potential of biogas production from paunch in providing renewable energy. In addition, recovery of plant nutrients in the digestate is important for a sustainable agricultural system.

  4. Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and primary clarifier skimmings for increased biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanya, S; Yilmazel, Y D; Park, C; Willis, J L; Keaney, J; Kohl, P M; Hunt, J A; Duran, M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to identify the impact of co-digesting clarifier skimmings on the overall methane generation from the treatment plant and additional energy value of the increased methane production. Biogas production from co-digesting clarifier skimmings and sewage sludge in pilot-scale fed-batch mesophilic anaerobic digesters has been evaluated. The digester was fed with increasing quantities of clarifier skimmings loads: 1.5, 2.6, 3.5 and 7.0 g COD equivalent/(L·d) (COD: chemical oxygen demand). Average volatile solids reduction of 65% was achieved in the scum-fed digester, compared with 51% in the control digester. Average 69% COD removal was achieved at highest scum loading (7 g COD eq/(L·d)) with approximate methane yield of 250 L CH(4)/kg COD fed (4 ft(3)/lb COD fed). The results show that scum as co-substrate in anaerobic digestion systems improves biogas yields while a 29% increase in specific CH(4) yield could be achieved when scum load is 7 g COD eq/(L·d). Based on the pilot-scale study results and full-scale data from South East Water Pollution Control Plant and Northeast Water Pollution Control Plant the expected annual energy recovery would be approximately 1.7 billion BTUs or nearly 0.5 million kWh.

  5. Principles and potential of the anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appels, Lise; Degreve, Jan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, W. De Croylaan 46, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Baeyens, Jan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Dewil, Raf [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, W. De Croylaan 46, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Chemical Engineering, Associated Faculty of Technology and Biosciences, Campus De Nayer, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Jan De Nayerlaan 5, B-2860 Sint-Katelijne-Waver (Belgium)

    2008-12-15

    When treating municipal wastewater, the disposal of sludge is a problem of growing importance, representing up to 50% of the current operating costs of a wastewater treatment plant. Although different disposal routes are possible, anaerobic digestion plays an important role for its abilities to further transform organic matter into biogas (60-70 vol% of methane, CH{sub 4}), as thereby it also reduces the amount of final sludge solids for disposal whilst destroying most of the pathogens present in the sludge and limiting odour problems associated with residual putrescible matter. Anaerobic digestion thus optimises WWTP costs, its environmental footprint and is considered a major and essential part of a modern WWTP. The potential of using the biogas as energy source has long been widely recognised and current techniques are being developed to upgrade quality and to enhance energy use. The present paper extensively reviews the principles of anaerobic digestion, the process parameters and their interaction, the design methods, the biogas utilisation, the possible problems and potential pro-active cures, and the recent developments to reduce the impact of the problems. After having reviewed the basic principles and techniques of the anaerobic digestion process, modelling concepts will be assessed to delineate the dominant parameters. Hydrolysis is recognised as rate-limiting step in the complex digestion process. The microbiology of anaerobic digestion is complex and delicate, involving several bacterial groups, each of them having their own optimum working conditions. As will be shown, these groups are sensitive to and possibly inhibited by several process parameters such as pH, alkalinity, concentration of free ammonia, hydrogen, sodium, potassium, heavy metals, volatile fatty acids and others. To accelerate the digestion and enhance the production of biogas, various pre-treatments can be used to improve the rate-limiting hydrolysis. These treatments include

  6. Mathematical modelling of anaerobic digestion processes: applications and future needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batstone, Damien J.; Puyol, Daniel; Flores Alsina, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic process modelling is a mature and well-established field, largely guided by a mechanistic model structure that is defined by our understanding of underlying processes. This led to publication of the IWA ADM1, and strong supporting, analytical, and extension research in the 15 years sinc...

  7. Anaerobic digestion of swine manure: Inhibition by ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kaare Hvid; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1998-01-01

    A stable anaerobic degradation of swine manure with ammonia concentration of 6 g-N/litre was obtained in continuously stirred tank reactors with a hydraulic retention time of 15 days, at Four different temperatures. Methane yields of 188, 141, 67 and 22 ml-CH4/g-VS were obtained at 37, 45, 55...

  8. Application of protein misfolding cyclic amplification to detection of prions in anaerobic digestate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroyed, Brandon H; Braithwaite, Shannon L; Price, Luke M; Reuter, Tim; Czub, Stefanie; Graham, Catherine; Balachandran, Arumuga; McAllister, Tim A; Belosevic, Miodrag; Neumann, Norman F

    2015-11-01

    The exceptional physio-chemical resistance of prions to established decontamination procedures poses a challenge to assessing the suitability of applied inactivation methods. Prion detection is limited by the sensitivity level of Western blotting or by the cost and time factors of bioassays. In addition, prion detection assays can be limited by either the unique or complex nature of matrices associated with environmental samples. To investigate anaerobic digestion (AD) as a practical and economical approach for potential conversion of specified risk materials (SRM) into value added products (i.e., renewable energy), challenges associated with detection of prions in a complex matrix need to be overcome to determine potential inactivation. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay, with subsequent Western blot visualization, was used to detect prions within the AD matrix. Anaerobic digestate initially inhibited the PMCA reaction and/or Western blot detection. However, at concentrations of ≤1% of anaerobic digestate, 263K scrapie prions could be amplified and semi-quantitatively detected. Infectious 263K prions were also proven to be bioavailable in the presence of high concentrations of digestate (10-90%). Development of the PMCA application to digestate provides extremely valuable insight into the potential degradation and/or fate of prions in complex biological matrices without requiring expensive and time-consuming bioassays.

  9. Modeling anaerobic digestion of blue algae: stoichiometric coefficients of amino acids acidogenesis and thermodynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xian-Zheng; Shi, Xiao-Shuang; Yuan, Chun-Xin; Wang, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yan-Ling; Guo, Rong-Bo; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2014-02-01

    In order to facilitate the application of Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1), an approach for a detailed calculation of stoichiometric coefficients for amino acids acidogenesis during the anaerobic digestion of blue algae is presented. The simulation results obtained support the approach by good predictions of the dynamic behavior of cumulative methane production, pH values as well as the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate and inorganic nitrogen. The sensitivity analysis based on Monte Carlo simulation showed that the stoichiometric coefficients for amino acids acidogenesis had high sensitivities to the outputs of the model. The model further indicated that the Gibbs free energies from the uptake of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), valerate and butyrate were positive through the digestion, while the free energies for other components were negative. During the digestion, the cumulative heat productions from microbial activities and methane were 77.69 kJ and 185.76 kJ, respectively. This result suggested that proper heat preservation of anaerobic digesters could minimize the external heating needs due to the heat produced from microbial activities.

  10. Performance and Analysis of Floating dome Anaerobic Digester with Wet and Dry Feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, S.; Parthiban, A.; Venugopal, S.; Jothi Prakash, V. M.

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of anaerobic digestion to generate biogas yield and it’s performed using wet and dry feed stock. The laboratory experiment is conducted in a floating dome type anaerobic digester with 1m3 capacity. It is made up of fibre material at continues process. The starter cowdung used as an inoculum of the anaerobic digester. Then raw materials feeded as a wet type wheat straw and dry type wheat straw is the ratio of 1:1 waste/water in both the experiments wet and dry wheat straw. In this experiments are fermented at 30ºC to 35ºC temperature is maintained. The daily biogas yield, cumulative biogas yield, pH, CH4, and hydro retention time these parameters is studied and analysed. The maximum daily biogas is 25liters and 42% of methane is achieved in dry wheat straw at 15th day of digestion. The highest gas yield obtained in dry condition compare to wet condition and acid level also decreased in wet digestion.

  11. Pilot-scale gasification of municipal solid wastes by high-rate and two-phase anaerobic digestion (TPAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Henry, M P; Sajjad, A; Mensinger, M C; Arora, J L

    2000-01-01

    Bioconversion of municipal solid waste-sludge blend by conventional high-rate and two-phase anaerobic digestion was studied. RDF (refused-derived fuel)-quality feed produced in a Madison, Wisconsin, USA, MRF (materials-recovery facility) was used. High-rate digestion experiments were conducted with bench-scale digesters under target operating conditions developed from an economic feasibility study. The effects of digestion temperature, RDF content of digester feed, HRT, loading rate, RDF particle size, and RDF pretreatment with cellulase or dilute solutions of NaOH or lime on digester performance were studied. A pilot-scale two-phase digestion plant was operated with 80:20 (weight ratio) RDF-sludge blends to show that this process exhibited a higher methane yield, and produced a higher methane-content digester gas than those obtained by single-stage, high-rate anaerobic digestion.

  12. Recovery of methane-rich gas from solid-feed anaerobic digestion of ipomoea (Ipomoea carnea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar Ganesh, P; Sanjeevi, R; Gajalakshmi, S; Ramasamy, E V; Abbasi, S A

    2008-03-01

    Studies are presented on new types of anaerobic digesters in which chopped or dry crushed Ipomoea carnea was fed without any other pretreatment, in an attempt to develop commercially viable means of utilizing the otherwise very harmful plant. Two types of solid-feed anaerobic digesters (SFADs) were studied. The first type had a single vessel in which the bottom 35% portion was separated from the top portion by a perforated PVC disk. The weed was charged from the top and inoculated with anaerobically digested cowdung-water slurry. The fermentation of the weed in the reactor led to the formation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) plus some biogas. The leachate, rich in the VFAs, was passed through the perforated PVC sheet and collected in the lower portion of the vessel. The other type of reactors had two vessels, the first one was fully charged with the weed and the second received the VFA leachate. With both types were attached upflow anaerobic filters (UAFs) which converted the leachate into combustible biogas consisting of approximately 70% methane. All SFADs developed very consistent performance in terms of biogas yield within 17 weeks of start. The two-compartment reactors yielded significantly more biogas than the single-compartment reactors of corresponding total volume, and the reactors with which anaerobic filters (AF) were attached yielded more biogas than the ones without AF. The best performing units generated 2.41m(3) of biogas per m(3) of digester volume, as compared to 0.1-0.2m(3) of biogas, m(-3)d(-1), obtainable with conventional digesters. This indicates the viability of this technology. The spent weed can be vermicomposted directly to obtain good soil-conditioner cum fertilizer; earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae produced 540mg vermicast per animal every day, achieving near total conversion of feed to vermicast in 20 days. The proposed systems, thus, makes it possible to accomplish total utilization of ipomoea.

  13. A full-scale study of mixing and foaming in egg-shaped anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Bhargavi; Miot, Alexandre; Jones, Bonnie; Klibert, Corey; Pagilla, Krishna R

    2015-09-01

    Seasonal foaming in full-scale egg-shaped digesters (ESD) at the Oceanside Water Pollution Control Plant was investigated over a two-year period. The causes and contributors of anaerobic digestion (AD) foaming, namely, Gordonia amarae filaments and mixing effects were evaluated in these ESDs. The seasonal presence of high levels of G. amarae as a primary cause and excessive induced mixing as an important contributor of AD foaming has been established. The induced mixing frequency in the ESDs was gradually reduced and eventually shut off in a series of controlled experimental phases. Total solids and temperature profiles indicated that reducing mixing frequency did not significantly impact digester performance or disrupt the homogeneity of digester contents, although it did reduce the occurrence of foam in the digesters. Excessive induced mixing, a contributor to foaming, increased foam events at G. amarae thresholds above 10(6)intersections/mg VSS in the mixed liquor.

  14. Biogas production as affected by heavy metals in the anaerobic digestion of sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein I. Abdel-Shafy

    2014-12-01

    The sewage sludge samples were separated from the sewage water of the pilot plant at the National Research Centre, TDC site. The effect of heavy metals on the biogas production of the anaerobic digester was studied. The inhibitory effect on the biogas production and toxic level of metals was determined in this study. The general ranking of heavy metal toxicity appears to be Hg > Cd > Cr (III. The present investigation reveals that heavy metals in addition to the anaerobic digester decreased the biogas production as an indication of efficiency of the process. A significant decrease in gas production and volatile organic matter removal was obtained. It was also noted that an accumulation of organic acid intermediates was obtained as a result of methanogenic bacterial inhibition. This accumulation was limited during the pulse feed of metals. This is due to the rapid poisoning of the active bacterial forms in the digester.

  15. Early warning indicators for monitoring the process failure of anaerobic digestion system of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; He, Qingming; Wei, Yunmei; He, Qin; Peng, Xuya

    2014-11-01

    To determine reliable state parameters which could be used as early warning indicators of process failure due to the acidification of anaerobic digestion of food waste, three mesophilic anaerobic digesters of food waste with different operation conditions were investigated. Such parameters as gas production, methane content, pH, concentrations of volatile fatty acid (VFA), alkalinity and their combined indicators were evaluated. Results revealed that operation conditions significantly affect the responses of parameters and thus the optimal early warning indicators of each reactor differ from each other. None of the single indicators was universally valid for all the systems. The universally valid indicators should combine several parameters to supply complementary information. A combination of total VFA, the ratio of VFA to total alkalinity (VFA/TA) and the ratio of bicarbonate alkalinity to total alkalinity (BA/TA) can reflect the metabolism of the digesting system and realize rapid and effective early warning.

  16. Cellulose accessibility and microbial community in solid state anaerobic digestion of rape straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiang-Hao; Pourcher, Anne-Marie; Bureau, Chrystelle; Peu, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Solid state anaerobic digestion (SSAD) with leachate recirculation is an appropriate method for the valorization of agriculture residues. Rape straw is a massively produced residue with considerable biochemical methane potential, but its degradation in SSAD remains poorly understood. A thorough study was conducted to understand the performance of rape straw as feedstock for laboratory solid state anaerobic digesters. We investigated the methane production kinetics of rape straw in relation to cellulose accessibility to cellulase and the microbial community. Improving cellulose accessibility through milling had a positive influence on both the methane production rate and methane yield. The SSAD of rape straw reached 60% of its BMP in a 40-day pilot-scale test. Distinct bacterial communities were observed in digested rape straw and leachate, with Bacteroidales and Sphingobacteriales as the most abundant orders, respectively. Archaeal populations showed no phase preference and increased chronologically.

  17. Coupling System for Food Wastes Anaerobic Digestion and Polyhydroxyalkanoates Production with Ralstonia eutropha

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new technology was developed to couple the anaerobic digestion of food wastes with production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic acids were produced during food wastes anaerobic digestion and their concentrations reached 5.5, 1.8, 27.4 and 32.7 g/L, respectively under appropriate digestion conditions. The fermentative acids were transferred through a dialysis membrane to an air-lift reactor for PHA synthesis by Ralstonia eutropha. Dry cell concentration and PHA content reached 22.7 g/L and 72.6%, respectively. The obtained PHA was a copolymer of (-hydroxybutyrate (HB) and (-hydroxyvalerate (HV) with 2.8% (mole ratio) of HV units in polymer.

  18. Toxicity of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate on the anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatriste-Mondragon, Felipe; Iranpour, R.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    are considered recalcitrant. Moreover, they inhibit methanogenesis. However, studies have not been made on the effect of feeding a combination of recalcitrant and biodegradable PAEs into anaerobic digesters treating wastewater sludge. The present study was conducted with wastewater sludge from the Los Angeles...... Bureau of Sanitation's Hyperion Treatment Plant. Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), the most common persistent PAE found in wastewater, and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), a common PAE with short ester chains, were sorbed into the sludge fed to a bench-scale digester for a period of 12 weeks. DEHP...... populations in the anaerobic bioreactor. Our results imply that high levels of DEHP or other recalcitrant PAEs in wastewater sludge are likely to compromise methanogenesis and removal of biodegradable PAEs in sludge digesters....

  19. Model-based predictions of anaerobic digestion of agricultural substrates for biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haidong; Löffler, Daniel; Kranert, Martin

    2011-12-01

    A modified Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1), calibrated on a laboratory digester with a feeding mix of 30% weight of cow manure and 70% weight of corn silage, was implemented, showing its performances of simulation as a decision-making and planning-supporting tool for the anaerobic digestion of agricultural substrates. The virtual fermenter obtained was used to conduct simulations with different feeding compositions and loading rates of cow manure, corn silage, grass silage and rape oil. All simulations were started at the same initial state which was represented by a steady state with an organic loading rate of 2.5 kg ODM/(mdigester3∗d). The effects of the different feeding combinations on biogas composition and biogas yield were predicted reasonably, and partly verified with the available literature data. Results demonstrated that the simulations could be helpful for taking decisions on agricultural biogas plant operation or experimental set-ups, if used advisedly.

  20. Optimization of process parameters for production of volatile fatty acid, biohydrogen and methane from anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Liu, Y; Nghiem, L D; Hai, F I; Deng, L J; Wang, J; Wu, Y

    2016-11-01

    The anaerobic digestion process has been primarily utilized for methane containing biogas production over the past few years. However, the digestion process could also be optimized for producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and biohydrogen. This is the first review article that combines the optimization approaches for all three possible products from the anaerobic digestion. In this review study, the types and configurations of the bioreactor are discussed for each type of product. This is followed by a review on optimization of common process parameters (e.g. temperature, pH, retention time and organic loading rate) separately for the production of VFA, biohydrogen and methane. This review also includes additional parameters, treatment methods or special additives that wield a significant and positive effect on production rate and these products' yield.

  1. Mechanism and Effect of Temperature on Variations in Antibiotic Resistance Genes during Anaerobic Digestion of Dairy Manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Xun; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Duan, Man-Li

    2016-07-01

    Animal manure comprises an important reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but the variation in ARGs during anaerobic digestion at various temperatures and its underlying mechanism remain unclear. Thus, we performed anaerobic digestion using dairy manure at three temperature levels (moderate: 20 °C, mesophilic: 35 °C, and thermophilic: 55 °C), to analyze the dynamics of ARGs and bacterial communities by quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We found that 8/10 detected ARGs declined and 5/10 decreased more than 1.0 log during thermophilic digestion, whereas only four and five ARGs decreased during moderate and mesophilic digestion, respectively. The changes in ARGs and bacterial communities were similar under the moderate and mesophilic treatments, but distinct from those in the thermophilic system. Potential pathogens such as Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Corynebacterium were removed by thermophilic digestion but not by moderate and mesophilic digestion. The bacterial community succession was the dominant mechanism that influenced the variation in ARGs and integrons during anaerobic digestion. Thermophilic digestion decreased the amount of mesophilic bacteria (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria) carrying ARGs. Anaerobic digestion generally decreased the abundance of integrons by eliminating the aerobic hosts of integrons (Actinomycetales and Bacilli). Thermophilic anaerobic digestion is recommended for the treatment and reuse of animal manure.

  2. Mechanism and Effect of Temperature on Variations in Antibiotic Resistance Genes during Anaerobic Digestion of Dairy Manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Xun; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Duan, Man-Li

    2016-07-22

    Animal manure comprises an important reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but the variation in ARGs during anaerobic digestion at various temperatures and its underlying mechanism remain unclear. Thus, we performed anaerobic digestion using dairy manure at three temperature levels (moderate: 20 °C, mesophilic: 35 °C, and thermophilic: 55 °C), to analyze the dynamics of ARGs and bacterial communities by quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We found that 8/10 detected ARGs declined and 5/10 decreased more than 1.0 log during thermophilic digestion, whereas only four and five ARGs decreased during moderate and mesophilic digestion, respectively. The changes in ARGs and bacterial communities were similar under the moderate and mesophilic treatments, but distinct from those in the thermophilic system. Potential pathogens such as Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Corynebacterium were removed by thermophilic digestion but not by moderate and mesophilic digestion. The bacterial community succession was the dominant mechanism that influenced the variation in ARGs and integrons during anaerobic digestion. Thermophilic digestion decreased the amount of mesophilic bacteria (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria) carrying ARGs. Anaerobic digestion generally decreased the abundance of integrons by eliminating the aerobic hosts of integrons (Actinomycetales and Bacilli). Thermophilic anaerobic digestion is recommended for the treatment and reuse of animal manure.

  3. Optimization of the operation of the anaerobic digestion in a water treatment plant; Optimizacion de la explotacion de la digestion anaerobia en una EDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez Gabina, R.

    2002-07-01

    Nowadays the companies demand an optimization of the operation in an anaerobic digestion facility in a water treatment plant. Up to now, the practice of this operation has been made controlling the internal parameters of the digester experimentally. The delay in the application of the corrections is enough to decrease the performances. Thanks to the investigation carried out in the water treatment plants of Lleida an Granollers, we conclude that the most secure way to drive the anaerobic digester is to manage a strict control of the inlet parameters into digestion process. (Author)

  4. Viability and fate of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia in tubular anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinyua, Maureen N; Trimmer, John; Izurieta, Ricardo; Cunningham, Jeffrey; Ergas, Sarina J

    2016-06-01

    In many developing countries where pathogenic diseases of animal waste origin, such as giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis, are often prevalent, facilities are limited to treat livestock waste. However, household-scale anaerobic digesters are currently being promoted for bioenergy production from livestock manure. Since the effluent is often used as a fertilizer for food crops, it is critical to understand the effect of environmental conditions within household-scale digesters on the viability of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Giardia lamblia cysts. In this study, key environmental parameters affecting (oo)cyst inactivation were measured in four tubular anaerobic digesters, which are a type of household-scale digester promoted for treatment of swine waste in rural Costa Rica. Interviews and participant observations were used to understand digester operation and maintenance procedures. Ambient temperatures (21-24°C), near-neutral pH, total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) concentrationsGiardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum were 0.155 ± 0.041 and 0.054 ± 0.006 day(-1), respectively. Temperature and volatile fatty acids were the main factors contributing to Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia inactivation. A mathematical model was developed that predicts the concentration of (oo)cysts in the liquid effluent of tubular digesters like those observed in Costa Rica. A mathematical model was developed that predicts the concentration of (oo)cysts in the liquid effluent of tubular digesters like those observed in Costa Rica. Two dimensionless groups can be used to predict the performance of the digesters for inactivating pathogens; both dimensionless groups depend upon the average HRT in the digester. This is the first study to combine mathematical modeling with qualitative analysis, field and laboratory studies to predict the concentrations of (oo)cysts in tubular digester effluents.

  5. Anaerobic digester foaming in full-scale cylindrical digesters--effects of organic loading rate, feed characteristics, and mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Bhargavi; Pagilla, Krishna R

    2014-05-01

    Cylindrical anaerobic digesters (AD) were investigated to determine the causes and contributors of AD foaming due to the following: organic loading rate (OLR) and mixing effects, waste activated sludge (WAS) storage effects and foam suppression mixing at the surface of AD, and the effects of primary sludge (PS) solids fraction in the feed sludge. No foaming was observed over the duration of the study, indicating absence of a primary foaming cause even though the suspected contributors to AD foaming were present. Total solids and temperature profiles showed that reducing mixing frequency did not significantly impact digester performance or the homogeneity of the digester contents. The results showed that high organic loading rates, reduced mixing, and feed sludge storage by themselves do not cause foaming in most ADs when the primary foaming cause is absent. Reduced mixing and surface sludge sprays are practical strategies to control AD foaming.

  6. Anaerobic alkaline digestion of sewage sludge. 4. ed. Anaerobe alkalische Schlammfaulung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roediger, H.; Roediger, M.; Kapp, H.

    1990-01-01

    The book presents a historical outline, the biological and chemical processes, measures for intensivation and disinfestation, and for dimensioning and installation of sewage sludge digestion systems. (EF).

  7. [Pilot study of thermal treatment/thermophilic anaerobic digestion process treating waste activated sludge of high solid content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Guang-qi; Cao, Zhi-ping; Li, Zhong-hua; Hu, Yu-ying; Wang, Kai-jun; Zu, Jian-e

    2014-09-01

    A pilot-scale experiment about the process of "thermal pretreatment at 70°C/thermophilic anaerobic digestion" of waste activated sludge of high solid content (8% -9% ) was conducted. The process employed thermal treatment of 3 days to accelerate the hydrolysis and thermophilic digestion to enhance anaerobic reaction. Thus it was good at organic removal and stabilization. When the solid retention time (SRT) was longer than 20 days, the VSS removal rate was greater than 42. 22% and it was linearly correlated to the SRT of the aerobic digestion with the R2 of 0. 915 3. It was suggested that SRT of anaerobic digestion was 25 days in practice. VSS removal rate and biogas production rate of the pilot experiment were similar to those of the run-well traditional full-scale sludge anaerobic digestion plants (solid content 3% -5% ) and the plant of high solid content using German technique.

  8. Thermo- and mesophilic anaerobic digestion of wheat straw by the upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Marcel; Mumme, Jan; Heeg, Kathrin; Nettmann, Edith

    2012-11-01

    In this experimental work, the feasibility of wheat straw as a feedstock for biogas production is investigated using the newly developed upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) process. With the analytical emphasis placed on methane and metabolite production, both mesophilic and thermophilic 39 L UASS reactors were operated for 218 days at an organic loading rate of 2.5 g(VS)L(-1)d(-1) using wheat straw as sole substrate. For improved methanization of soluble metabolites, each UASS reactor was connected to an individual 30 L anaerobic filter (AF). During steady state thermophilic straw digestion was found to have a 36% higher methane yield (0.165 L g(VS)(-1)) whereas the hydrolysis rate constant increased by 106% (0.066 d(-1)).

  9. Impact of PCB-118 and transformer oil toxicity on anaerobic digestion of sludge: anaerobic toxicity assay results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Devrim; Imamoglu, Ipek; Dilek Sanin, F

    2013-08-01

    In this study, possible toxicity of increasing doses of PCB-118 and transformer oil (TO) on anaerobic sludge digestion was investigated. For this purpose, five different sets of reactors were prepared in which four different PCB-118 concentration (1, 10, 20, and 30mgL(-1)) and three different TO concentration (0.38, 0.76, and 1.52gL(-1)) were applied. Throughout the study, biogas production and composition, pH, TS, VS, and COD as well as PCB concentration were monitored. Toxicity was investigated by anaerobic toxicity assay (ATA) evaluating the reduction in methane production. A notable inhibition was observed mostly in 30mgL(-1) PCB reactors. A negative influence of PCB-118 and TO was observed on COD and solids removal. A maximum of 26.5% PCB-118 removal was attained.

  10. Research of Toxic Mechanism on Anaerobic Digestion by Lead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Jianhong; Wang Zhe; Zhang Lianke; Han Jintao

    2008-01-01

    The paper analyzes the influence of lead toxicity by anaerobic granule sludge inhibition and recovering experiments.The result shows that there are different inhibition types at differ ent lead contents.Higher lead content leads to more inhibition granular sludge,and at the same time,the time of gas recovery is different.Lower lead content per microorganism results in sooner sludge recovery.Microorganisms have a good ability to resist lead toxicity.

  11. Microbial Anaerobic Digestion (Bio-Digesters) as an Approach to the Decontamination of Animal Wastes in Pollution Control and the Generation of Renewable Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E.; Sampson N. Mamphweli; Meyer, Edson L.; Anthony I. Okoh; Makaka, Golden; Simon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    With an ever increasing population rate; a vast array of biomass wastes rich in organic and inorganic nutrients as well as pathogenic microorganisms will result from the diversified human, industrial and agricultural activities. Anaerobic digestion is applauded as one of the best ways to properly handle and manage these wastes. Animal wastes have been recognized as suitable substrates for anaerobic digestion process, a natural biological process in which complex organic materials are broken d...

  12. Triclocarban Influences Antibiotic Resistance and Alters Anaerobic Digester Microbial Community Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Daniel E; Zitomer, Daniel H; Hristova, Krassimira R; Kappell, Anthony D; McNamara, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is one of the most abundant organic micropollutants detected in biosolids. Lab-scale anaerobic digesters were amended with TCC at concentrations ranging from the background concentration of seed biosolids (30 mg/kg) to toxic concentrations of 850 mg/kg to determine the effect on methane production, relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes, and microbial community structure. Additionally, the TCC addition rate was varied to determine the impacts of acclimation time. At environmentally relevant TCC concentrations (max detect = 440 mg/kg), digesters maintained function. Digesters receiving 450 mg/kg of TCC maintained function under gradual TCC addition, but volatile fatty acid concentrations increased, pH decreased, and methane production ceased when immediately fed this concentration. The concentrations of the mexB gene (encoding for a multidrug efflux pump) were higher with all concentrations of TCC compared to a control, but higher TCC concentrations did not correlate with increased mexB abundance. The relative abundance of the gene tet(L) was greater in the digesters that no longer produced methane, and no effect on the relative abundance of the class 1 integron integrase encoding gene (intI1) was observed. Illumina sequencing revealed substantial community shifts in digesters that functionally failed from increased levels of TCC. More subtle, yet significant, community shifts were observed in digesters amended with TCC levels that did not inhibit function. This research demonstrates that TCC can select for a multidrug resistance encoding gene in mixed community anaerobic environments, and this selection occurs at concentrations (30 mg/kg) that can be found in full-scale anaerobic digesters (U.S. median concentration = 22 mg/kg, mean = 39 mg/kg).

  13. Anaerobic digestion of manure - consequences for plant production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løes, Anne-Kristin; Pommeresche, Reidun; Johansen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    methane (CH4) emissions during manure storage. Co-digestion of substrates rich in energy increases the economic viability of the biogas plant, and off-farm substrates such as fish silage or household waste may add nutrients to the farming system. AD may also ease manure handling, while reducing the amount...

  14. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF ANIMAL WASTE: EFFECT OF MODE OF MIXING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory-scale digesters were operated to study the effect of mixing (via biogas recirculation, impeller mixing, and slurry recirculation) on biogas production. Three sets of experiments were performed using cow manure slurry feed with either 50, 100, or 150 g/L total solids (TS) concentrations (r...

  15. The effect of managing nutrients in the performance of anaerobic digesters of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirer, Sibel Uludag; Taskin, Bilgin; Demirer, Goksel N; Duran, Metin

    2013-09-01

    Is it possible to create conditions in the anaerobic digesters to control nutrients without changing the performance of a reactor? This study investigates an answer for this question. To this purpose, anaerobic reactors are operated at high concentrations of Mg(2+) ion to harvest the nutrient ions (NH4 (+) and PO4 (3-)) in the form of struvite, that is, magnesium ammonium phosphate. The effects of this modification on the anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge were investigated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and cumulative CH4 production as well as the changes in the biological diversity. The results showed that approximately 50 % of the nutrients (NH4 (+) and PO4 (3-)) were removed regardless of the method adopted for the addition of Mg(2+) ion, slug or daily dosing. The numbers of Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina in the samples withdrawn prior to and after the addition of Mg(2+) did not show significant difference according to the results obtained from qPCR analyses. The research results showed that the addition of Mg(2+) into the anaerobic digesters in municipal wastewater treatment facilities may help to remove the nutrients from the effluent while recovering in their solid forms.

  16. Effect of thermal hydrolysis and ultrasounds pretreatments on foaming in anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, N; Cano, R; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2014-10-01

    Foam appears regularly in anaerobic digesters producing operational and safety problems. In this research, based on the operational observation at semi-industrial pilot scale where sludge pretreatment mitigated foaming in anaerobic digesters, this study aimed at evaluating any potential relationship between foaming tools applied to activated sludge at lab-scale (foam potential, foam stability and Microthrix parvicella abundance) and the experimental behavior observed in pilot scale and full-scale anaerobic digesters. The potential of thermal hydrolysis and ultrasounds for reducing foaming capacity was also evaluated. Filamentous bacteria abundance was directly linked to foaming capacity in anaerobic processes. A maximum reduction of M.parvicella abundance (from 5 to 2) was reached using thermal hydrolysis with steam explosion at 170°C and ultrasounds at 66.7kWh/m(3), showing both good anti-foaming properties. On the other hand, foam potential and stability determinations showed a lack of consistency with the bacteria abundance results and experimental evidences.

  17. Application of Hydrothermal Treatment to High Concentrated Sewage Sludge for Anaerobic Digestion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Orikawa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomato and seaweed were produced by utilizing CO2 and heat discharged from power generation using biogas in Toyogawa biomass park, Japan. The biogas was obtained by anaerobic digestion with hydrothermal treatment. The hydrothermal treatment was applied to the high concentrated sewage sludge (22 % total solids (TS dewatered sludge. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of hydrothermal treatment on the qualities of high concentrated sewage sludge, by analyzing particulate organic carbon (POC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC. The hydrothermal treatment was investigated under 10-60 min of treatment time, 180-200 °C of temperature, 10-22 %-TS of sewage sludge concentration. The results showed that the DOC in each conditions increased through hydrothermal treatment. The highest DOC obtained was 67 % of total carbon concentration, when the temperature was 180 °C, treatment time was 60 min and sewage sludge concentration was 10 %-TS. Furthermore, the viscosity of treated sewage sludge was decreased by hydrothermal treatment. In batch anaerobic digestion test, methane gas production was confirmed. In addition, this study evaluated the energy balance of this system. Thus, the results of this study indicated that the possibility of application of hydrothermal treatment to high concentrated sewage sludge for anaerobic digestion process. Keywords: anaerobic reaction, hydrothermal treatment, sewage sludge, solubilization

  18. Effects of digestate from anaerobically digested cattle slurry and plant materials on soil microbial community and emission of CO2 and N2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Carter, Mette Sustmann; Jensen, Erik S.

    2013-01-01

    and fertility because they contain more mineral nitrogen (N) and less organic carbon (C) than the non-digested input materials (e.g. raw animal slurry or fresh plant residues). Hence, an incubation study was performed where (1) water, (2) raw cattle slurry, (3) anaerobically digested cattle slurry/maize, (4......Anaerobic digestion of animal manure and crop residues may be employed to produce biogas as a climate-neutral source of energy and to recycle plant nutrients as fertilizers. However, especially organic farmers are concerned that fertilizing with the digestates may impact the soil microbiota...... of the other treatments during the 9 days. Regarding microbial community composition, grass-clover induced the largest changes in microbial diversity measures compared to the controls, where raw cattle slurry and the two anaerobically digested materials (cattle slurry/maize, cattle slurry/grass-clover) only...

  19. Thermophilic versus Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion of Sewage Sludge: A Comparative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew D. Gebreeyessus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During advanced biological wastewater treatment, a huge amount of sludge is produced as a by-product of the treatment process. Hence, reuse and recovery of resources and energy from the sludge is a big technological challenge. The processing of sludge produced by Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs is massive, which takes up a big part of the overall operational costs. In this regard, anaerobic digestion (AD of sewage sludge continues to be an attractive option to produce biogas that could contribute to the wastewater management cost reduction and foster the sustainability of those WWTPs. At the same time, AD reduces sludge amounts and that again contributes to the reduction of the sludge disposal costs. However, sludge volume minimization remains, a challenge thus improvement of dewatering efficiency is an inevitable part of WWTP operation. As a result, AD parameters could have significant impact on sludge properties. One of the most important operational parameters influencing the AD process is temperature. Consequently, the thermophilic and the mesophilic modes of sludge AD are compared for their pros and cons by many researchers. However, most comparisons are more focused on biogas yield, process speed and stability. Regarding the biogas yield, thermophilic sludge AD is preferred over the mesophilic one because of its faster biochemical reaction rate. Equally important but not studied sufficiently until now was the influence of temperature on the digestate quality, which is expressed mainly by the sludge dewateringability, and the reject water quality (chemical oxygen demand, ammonia nitrogen, and pH. In the field of comparison of thermophilic and mesophilic digestion process, few and often inconclusive research, unfortunately, has been published so far. Hence, recommendations for optimized technologies have not yet been done. The review presented provides a comparison of existing sludge AD technologies and the gaps that need to be filled so

  20. Development of Electroactive and Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing (Anammox Biofilms from Digestate in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enea Gino Di Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial Fuel cells (MFCs have been proposed for nutrient removal and energy recovery from different wastes. In this study the anaerobic digestate was used to feed H-type MFC reactors, one with a graphite anode preconditioned with Geobacter sulfurreducens and the other with an unconditioned graphite anode. The data demonstrate that the digestate acts as a carbon source, and even in the absence of anode preconditioning, electroactive bacteria colonise the anodic chamber, producing a maximum power density of 172.2 mW/m2. The carbon content was also reduced by up to 60%, while anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox bacteria, which were found in the anodic compartment of the reactors, contributed to nitrogen removal from the digestate. Overall, these results demonstrate that MFCs can be used to recover anammox bacteria from natural sources, and it may represent a promising bioremediation unit in anaerobic digestor plants for the simultaneous nitrogen removal and electricity generation using digestate as substrate.

  1. Enhanced solid-state anaerobic digestion of corn stover by alkaline pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiying; Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo

    2010-10-01

    Alkaline pretreatment was applied to enhance biogas production from corn stover through solid-state anaerobic digestion. Different NaOH loadings (1%, 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% (w/w)) were tested for solid-state pretreatment of corn stover. Lignin degradation during pretreatment increased from 9.1% to 46.2% when NaOH concentration increased from 1.0% to 7.5%. The NaOH-pretreated corn stover was digested using effluent of liquid anaerobic digestion as inoculum and nitrogen source. NaOH loading of 1% did not cause significant improvement on biogas yield. The highest biogas yield of 372.4 L/kg VS was obtained with 5% NaOH-pretreated corn stover, which was 37.0% higher than that of the untreated corn stover. However, a higher NaOH loading of 7.5% caused faster production of volatile fatty acids during the hydrolysis and acidogenesis stages, which inhibited the methanogenesis. Simultaneous NaOH treatment and anaerobic digestion did not significantly improve the biogas production (P>0.05).

  2. Variation of ADM1 by using temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Yeol; Suh, Chang-Won; Ahn, Yong-Tae; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2009-06-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the application of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) developed by the IWA task group for mathematical modelling of anaerobic process. Lab-scale temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) process were operated continuously, and were fed with co-substrate composed of dog food and flour. The model platform implemented in the simulation was a derivative of the ADM1. Sensitivity analysis showed that k(m.process) (maximum specific uptake rate) and K(S.process) (half saturation value) had high sensitivities to model components. Important parameters including maximum uptake rate for propionate utilisers (k(m.pro)) and half saturation constant for acetate utilisers (K(S.ac)) in the thermophilic digester and maximum uptake rate for acetate utilisers (k(m.ac)) in the mesophilic digester were estimated using iterative methods, which optimized the parameters with experimental results. Simulation with estimated parameters showed good agreement with experimental results in the case of methane production, uptake of acetate, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD). Under these conditions, the model predicted reasonably well the dynamic behavior of the TPAD process for verifying the model.

  3. Microbial community structure and dynamics during anaerobic digestion of various agricultural waste materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Liebetrau, Jan; Pröter, Jürgen; Kleinsteuber, Sabine

    2013-06-01

    The influence of the feedstock type on the microbial communities involved in anaerobic digestion was investigated in laboratory-scale biogas reactors fed with different agricultural waste materials. Community composition and dynamics over 2 months of reactors' operation were investigated by amplicon sequencing and profiling terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms of 16S rRNA genes. Major bacterial taxa belonged to the Clostridia and Bacteroidetes, whereas the archaeal community was dominated by methanogenic archaea of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales. Correlation analysis revealed that the community composition was mainly influenced by the feedstock type with the exception of a temperature shift from 38 to 55 °C which caused the most pronounced community shifts. Bacterial communities involved in the anaerobic digestion of conventional substrates such as maize silage combined with cattle manure were relatively stable and similar to each other. In contrast, special waste materials such as chicken manure or Jatropha press cake were digested by very distinct and less diverse communities, indicating partial ammonia inhibition or the influence of other inhibiting factors. Anaerobic digestion of chicken manure relied on syntrophic acetate oxidation as the dominant acetate-consuming process due to the inhibition of aceticlastic methanogenesis. Jatropha as substrate led to the enrichment of fiber-degrading specialists belonging to the genera Actinomyces and Fibrobacter.

  4. Evaluation of integrated anaerobic digestion and hydrothermal carbonization for bioenergy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, M Toufiq; Werner, Maja; Pohl, Marcel; Mumme, Jan

    2014-06-15

    Lignocellulosic biomass is one of the most abundant yet underutilized renewable energy resources. Both anaerobic digestion (AD) and hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) are promising technologies for bioenergy production from biomass in terms of biogas and HTC biochar, respectively. In this study, the combination of AD and HTC is proposed to increase overall bioenergy production. Wheat straw was anaerobically digested in a novel upflow anaerobic solid state reactor (UASS) in both mesophilic (37 °C) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions. Wet digested from thermophilic AD was hydrothermally carbonized at 230 °C for 6 hr for HTC biochar production. At thermophilic temperature, the UASS system yields an average of 165 LCH4/kgVS (VS: volatile solids) and 121 L CH4/kgVS at mesophilic AD over the continuous operation of 200 days. Meanwhile, 43.4 g of HTC biochar with 29.6 MJ/kgdry_biochar was obtained from HTC of 1 kg digestate (dry basis) from mesophilic AD. The combination of AD and HTC, in this particular set of experiment yield 13.2 MJ of energy per 1 kg of dry wheat straw, which is at least 20% higher than HTC alone and 60.2% higher than AD only.

  5. Hyperspectral imaging techniques applied to the monitoring of wine waste anaerobic digestion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serranti, Silvia; Fabbri, Andrea; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    An anaerobic digestion process, finalized to biogas production, is characterized by different steps involving the variation of some chemical and physical parameters related to the presence of specific biomasses as: pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile solids, nitrate (NO3-) and phosphate (PO3-). A correct process characterization requires a periodical sampling of the organic mixture in the reactor and a further analysis of the samples by traditional chemical-physical methods. Such an approach is discontinuous, time-consuming and expensive. A new analytical approach based on hyperspectral imaging in the NIR field (1000 to 1700 nm) is investigated and critically evaluated, with reference to the monitoring of wine waste anaerobic digestion process. The application of the proposed technique was addressed to identify and demonstrate the correlation existing, in terms of quality and reliability of the results, between "classical" chemical-physical parameters and spectral features of the digestate samples. Good results were obtained, ranging from a R2=0.68 and a RMSECV=12.83 mg/l for nitrate to a R2=0.90 and a RMSECV=5495.16 mg O2/l for COD. The proposed approach seems very useful in setting up innovative control strategies allowing for full, continuous control of the anaerobic digestion process.

  6. Neutral fat hydrolysis and long-chain fatty acid oxidation during anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, L; Massé, D I; Kennedy, K J; Chou, S P

    2002-07-05

    Neutral fat hydrolysis and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) oxidation rates were determined during the digestion of slaughterhouse wastewater in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors operated at 25 degrees C. The experimental substrate consisted of filtered slaughterhouse wastewater supplemented with pork fat particles at various average initial sizes (D(in)) ranging from 60 to 450 microm. At the D(in) tested, there was no significant particle size effect on the first-order hydrolysis rate. The neutral fat hydrolysis rate averaged 0.63 +/- 0.07 d(-1). LCFA oxidation rate was modelled using a Monod-type equation. The maximum substrate utilization rate (kmax) and the half-saturation concentration (Ks) averaged 164 +/- 37 mg LCFA/L/d and 35 +/- 31 mg LCFA/L, respectively. Pork fat particle degradation was mainly controlled by LCFA oxidation rate and, to a lesser extent, by neutral fat hydrolysis rate. Hydrolysis pretreatment of fat-containing wastewaters and sludges should not substantially accelerate their anaerobic treatment. At a D(in) of 450 microm, fat particles were found to inhibit methane production during the initial 20 h of digestion. Inhibition of methane production in the early phase of digestion was the only significant effect of fat particle size on anaerobic digestion of pork slaughterhouse wastewater. Soluble COD could not be used to determine the rate of lipid hydrolysis due to LCFA adsorption on the biomass.

  7. [Isolation, Identification and Characteristic Analysis of an Oil-producing Chlorella sp. Tolerant to High-strength Anaerobic Digestion Effluent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuang; Wang, Wen-guo; Ma, Dan-wei; Tang, Xiao-yu; Hu, Qi-chun

    2015-07-01

    A Chlorella strain tolerant to high-strength anaerobic digestion effluent was isolated from the anaerobic digestion effluent with a long-term exposure to air. The strain was identified as a Chlorella by morphological and molecular biological methods, and named Chlorella sp. BWY-1, The anaerobic digestion effluent used in this study was from a biogas plant with the raw materials of swine wastewater after solid-liquid separation. The Chlorella regularis (FACHB-729) was used as the control strain. The comparative study showed that Chlorella sp, BWY-Ihad relatively higher growth rate, biomass accumulation capacity and pollutants removal rate in BG11. and different concentrations of anaerobic digestion effluent. Chlorella sp. BWY-1 had the highest growth rate and biomass productivity (324.40 mg.L-1) in BG11, but its lipid productivity and lipid content increased with the increase of anaerobic digestion effluent concentration, In undiluted anaerobic digestion effluent, the lipid productivity and lipid content of Chlorella sp. BWY-1 were up to 44. 43% and 108. 70 mg.L-1, respectively. Those results showed that the isolated algal strain bad some potential applications in livestock wastewater treatment and bioenergy production, it could be combined with a solid-liquid separation, anaerobic fermentation and other techniques for processing livestock wastewater and producing biodiesel.

  8. Anaerobic digestion of catering wastes: effect of micronutrients and retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climenhaga, M A; Banks, C J

    2008-01-01

    Source-separated foodwastes collected from a campus catering facility were processed in bench-scale single-stage anaerobic digesters. The feedstock contained a varied mix of fruits, vegetables, meats and fried foods. A constant organic loading rate (OLR) was maintained with differing hydraulic retention times (HRT). Regular addition of trace elements or prolonged retention time allowed stable digestion at high total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) levels. Reactors on HRT of 25, 50, and 100 days with no micronutrient supplementation exhibited methanogenic failure after approximately 40, 100 and 90 days respectively, while duplicate reactors with micronutrient supplementation maintained stable digestion. An extended HRT of 180 days has so far allowed continued digestion (for reactors with and without micronutrient supplementation) at levels of ammonia nitrogen exceeding 5.7 g l(-1) and volatile fatty acid levels exceeding 15 g l(-1), usually considered inhibitory or toxic.

  9. Thermal wet oxidation improves anaerobic biodegradability of raw and digested biowaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; De Baere, L.;

    2004-01-01

    profits. The objective of this research was to enhance the anaerobic biodegradability and methane yields from different biowastes (food waste, yard waste, and digested biowaste already treated in a full-scale biogas plant (DRANCO, Belgium)) by assessing thermal wet oxidation. The biodegradability...... of the waste was evaluated by using biochemical methane potential assays and continuous 3-L methane reactors. Wet oxidation temperature and oxygen pressure (T, 185-220 degreesC; O-2 pressure, 0-12 bar; t, 15 min) were varied for their effect on total methane yield and digestion kinetics of digested biowaste....... Measured methane yields for raw yard waste, wet oxidized yard waste, raw food waste, and wet oxidized food waste were 345, 685, 536, and 571 mL of CH4/g of volatile suspended solids, respectively. Higher oxygen pressure during wet oxidation of digested biowaste considerably increased the total methane...

  10. Anaerobic digestion of corn stovers for methane production in a novel bionic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meixia; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Panyue; Fan, Shiyang; Jin, Shuguang; Wu, Dan; Fang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To improve the biogas production from corn stovers, a new bionic reactor was designed and constructed. The bionic reactor simulated the rumen digestion of ruminants. The liquid was separated from corn stovers and refluxed into corn stovers again, which simulated the undigested particles separated from completely digested materials and fed back again for further degradation in ruminant stomach. Results showed that the bionic reactor was effective for anaerobic digestion of corn stovers. The liquid amount and its reflux showed an obvious positive correlation with biogas production. The highest biogas production rate was 21.6 ml/gVS-addedd, and the total cumulative biogas production was 256.5 ml/gVS-added. The methane content in biogas ranged from 52.2% to 63.3%. The degradation of corn stovers were greatly enhanced through simulating the animal digestion mechanisms in this bionic reactor.

  11. AMMONIA INHIBITION IN THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF DAIRY CATTLE MANURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sutaryo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of five different concentrations of total ammonia nitrogen (TANand free ammonia (FA on the methane yield and digester performance under thermophilic conditions(50°C. Five identical continuously fed digesters were used. The experiment was run for four timeshydraulic retention time (HRT. Data were statitically analysed using the data Analysis Tool Packavailable with the Microsoft Excel program. Different ammonia levels were obtained by pulsing urea toobtain the target level of TAN and FA, and to subsequently maintaining the concentration of ammonialevels by daily urea additions. The result showed a strong negative correlation between both TAN andFA concentrations and methane yield. The methane yield was reduced by 24, 30, 52 and 66% indigesters that had TAN levels of 2.9, 3.6, 4.4 and 5.1 g/L, respectively, corresponding to 0.7, 1.1,1.5 and1.8 g/L FA. Total volatile fatty acid and especially isovaleric and isobutyric acid concentrations wereelevated during ammonia inhibition. Concentration of TAN in the biogas digester exceeding 3 g/Lindicating that very often the full biogas potential is not achieved due to ammonia inhibition and thatlonger HRT should be used to compensate or a lower process temperature should be chosen.

  12. Methane enrichment digestion experiments at the anaerobic experimental test unit at Walt Disney World. Final report, March 1989-August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, V.J.; Hill, A.H.

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the project was to determine the technical feasibility of utilizing a novel concept in anaerobic digestion, in-situ methane enrichment digestion or MED for producing utility-grade gas from a pilot-scale anaerobic digester. MED tests conducted during this program consistently achieved digester product gas with a methane (CH4) content of greater than 90% (on a dry-, nitrogen-free basis). The MED concept, because it requires relatively simple equipment and modest energy input, has the potential to simplify gas cleanup requirements and substantially reduce the cost of converting wastes and biomass to pipeline quality gas.

  13. Preliminary experimental results of Sewage Sludge (SS) Co-digestion with Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) for Enhanced Biogas Production in Laboratory Scale Anaerobic Digester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankari, R.; Kumaran, P.; Normanbhay, Saifuddin; Halim Shamsuddin, Abd

    2013-06-01

    An investigation on the feasibility of co-digesting Sewage Sludge with Palm Oil Mill Effluent for enhancing the biogas production and the corresponding effect of the co-digestion substrate ratio on the biogas production has been evaluated. Anaerobic co-digestion of POME with SS was performed at ratios of 100:0, 70:30, 60:40 and 0:100 to find the optimum blend required for enhanced waste digestion and biogas production. Single stage batch digestion was carried out for 12 days in a laboratory scale anaerobic digester. Co-digestion of sludge's at the 70:30 proportion resulted in optimal COD and C: N ratio which subsequently recorded the highest performance with regards to biogas production at 28.1 L's compared to the 1.98 L's of biogas produced from digestion of SS alone. From the results obtained, it is evident that co-digestion of POME and SS is an attractive option to be explored for enhancement of biogas production in anaerobic digesters.

  14. Rheological properties of sewage sludge during enhanced anaerobic digestion with microwave-H2O2 pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jibao; Yu, Dawei; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Min; Wang, Yawei; Wei, Yuansong; Tong, Juan

    2016-07-01

    The rheological behavior of sludge is of serious concern in anaerobic digestion. This study investigated the rheological properties of sewage sludge during enhanced anaerobic digestion with microwave-H2O2 pretreatment (MW-H2O2). The results showed that MW-H2O2 pretreatment resulted in the improvement of sludge flowability and weakening of its viscoelastic properties. Further positive effects on the rheological properties of digested sludge during anaerobic digestion were observed. The flowability was improved with a low level of apparent viscosity. The decrease of the consistency index and increase of the flow behavior index indicated that the strength of the inner structures and non-Newtonian flow characteristics of digested sludge weakened. Both the storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″) decreased, indicating that the viscoelastic behavior became weak. These effects were possibly attributed to the changes of the digested sludge micro-structures, such as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This study concluded that anaerobic digestion for treating sewage sludge combined with pretreatment is a more favorable option than single anaerobic digestion from the perspective of rheology.

  15. Start-up performances of dry anaerobic mesophilic and thermophilic digestions of organic solid wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Shu-guang; IMAI Tsuyoshi; UKITA Masao; SEKINE Masahiko

    2007-01-01

    Two dry anaerobic digestions of organic solid wastes were conducted for 6 weeks in a lab-scale batch experiment for investigating the start-up performances under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The enzymatic activities,i.e., β-glucosidase, β-glucosidase, N-α -benzoyl-L-argininamide (BAA)-hydrolysing protease, urease and phosphatase activities were analysed. The lower BAA-hydrolysing protease activity during the first 2-3 weeks was due to the inhibition of the low pH, but was enhanced simultaneously later with the pH increase. β-glucosidase activity showed the lowest values in weeks 1-2, and recovered simultaneously with the increase of BAA-hydrolysing protease activity. Acetic acid dominated most of the total VFAs in thermophilic digestion, while propionate and butyrate dominated in mesophilic digestion. Thermophilic digestion is confirmed more feasible for achieving better performance against misbalance, especially during the start-up period in a dry anaerobic digestion process.

  16. Comparative evaluation of anaerobic digestion for sewage sludge and various organic wastes with simple modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Taira; Wang, Feng; Tsumori, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and other organic wastes, such as kitchen garbage, food waste, and agricultural waste, at a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is a promising method for both energy and material recovery. Substrate characteristics and the anaerobic digestion performance of sewage sludge and various organic wastes were compared using experiments and modeling. Co-digestion improved the value of digested sewage sludge as a fertilizer. The relationship between total and soluble elemental concentrations was correlated with the periodic table: most Na and K (alkali metals) were soluble, and around 20-40% of Mg and around 10-20% of Ca (alkaline earth metals) were soluble. The ratio of biodegradable chemical oxygen demand of organic wastes was 65-90%. The methane conversion ratio and methane production rate under mesophilic conditions were evaluated using a simplified mathematical model. There was reasonably close agreement between the model simulations and the experimental results in terms of methane production and nitrogen concentration. These results provide valuable information and indicate that the model can be used as a pre-evaluation tool to facilitate the introduction of co-digestion at WWTPs.

  17. Improving anaerobic sewage sludge digestion by implementation of a hyper-thermophilic prehydrolysis step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jingquan; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.;

    2008-01-01

    at a HRT of 13 days. A one-step anaerobic digester operated at 55 degrees C and 15 days HRT Was used as a reference process. The two-step process was characterized by a 12% higher organic suspended solids removal efficiency and better pathogen reduction effect than the conventional one-step digestion......The present study focuses on a two-step process for treatment and stabilisation of primary sludge. The process consists of a hyperthermophilic hydrolysis step operated at 70 degrees C and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 clays followed by a thermophilic (55 degrees C) anaerobic digestion step....... The microbial community of the digester fed with pre-treated sludge was characterised by it higher activity compared to that of the digester treating raw sludge. Moreover, the pre-treatment of the primary sludge resulted up to 48% increase of the methane potential (20.09 and 13.56 mmol CH4 g(-)VS(-1...

  18. Anaerobic digestion of sulfate-acidified cattle slurry: One-stage vs. two-stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moset, Veronica; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Xavier, Cristiane de Almeida Neves; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2016-05-15

    Two strategies to include acidified cattle manure (AcCM) in co-digestion with normal cattle manure (CM) are presented in this work. The strategies are a single thermophilic (50 °C) continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digestion and a two-step (65 °C + 50 °C) CSTR process. In both strategies, two different inclusion levels of H2SO4-acidified CM (10% and 20%) in co-digestion with normal CM were tested and compared with a control CSTR fed only CM. Important enhancement of methane (CH4) yield and solid reductions were observed in the thermophilic one-step CSTR working with 10% AcCM. However, a higher inclusion level of AcCM (20%) caused volatile fatty acid accumulation in the reactor and a more than 30% reduction in CH4 production. In terms of CH4 production, when 10% of AcCM was co-digested with 90% of CM, the two-step anaerobic co-digestion yielded less than the single step. During the first step of the two-step CSTR process, acidogenesis and a partial sulfate reduction were achieved. However, sulfide stripping between the first and the second step must be promoted in order to advance this technology.

  19. Biogas by two-stage microbial anaerobic and semi-continuous digestion of Chinese cabbage waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoying Dong; Lijie Shao; Yan Wang; Wei Kou; Yanxin Cao; Dalei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of Chinese cabbage waste was investigated through a pilot-scale two-stage digester at a mesophilic temperature of 37 °C. In the acidification digester, the main product was acetic acid, with the maxi-mum concentration of 4289 mg·L-1 on the fourth day, accounting for 50.32%of total volatile fatty acids. The oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and NH4+-N level decreased gradual y with hydraulic retention time (HRT) of acidification. In the second digestion phase, the maximum methanogenic bacterial concentration reached 9.6 × 1010 ml-1 at the organic loading rate (OLR) of 3.5–4 kg VS·m-3, with corresponding HRT of 12–16 days. Accordingly, the optimal biogas production was 0.62 m3·(kg VS)-1, with methane content of 65%–68%. ORP and NH4+-N levels in the methanizer remained between-500 and-560 mV and 2000–4500 mg·L-1, respec-tively. Methanococcus and Methanosarcina served as the main methanogens in the anaerobic digester.

  20. Influence of thermal pretreatment on physical and chemical properties of kitchen waste and the efficiency of anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yiying; Li, Yangyang; Li, Jinhui

    2016-09-15

    The effects of thermal pretreatment at moderate temperatures (70, 80 and 90 °C) and high temperatures (120, 140 and 160 °C) over heating durations of 10-120 min on the physical and chemical properties of kitchen waste and on anaerobic digestion were investigated. The results show that thermal pretreatment significantly enhances the solubilisation of organic compounds (chemical oxygen demand, crude proteins, crude fats and volatile fatty acids) and their biodegradability during subsequent anaerobic digestion. High temperature and long heating duration are beneficial for the release and reduction of organic compounds, and the efficiency of subsequent anaerobic digestion is improved markedly under these conditions. Moreover, both the methane production rate and methane yield were observed to increase significantly at moderate treatment temperatures when the anaerobic digestion time was longer than 50 h.

  1. [Anaerobic co-digestion of RSU and macro-algae in the Venice lagoon. Preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, F; Pavan, P; Bassetti, A; Farneti, A; Barbaresi, U

    1991-01-01

    In these last few years in the lagoon of Venice the phenomenon of eutrophization has increased. The possibility of turning to an anaerobic digestion of the biomass seems to be interesting. In this view, the following experiment describes a study on the co-digestion of mechanically selected algaebiomass and organic fraction of solid urban waste. The results relevant to both yield parameters and process stability are reported, which have been obtained by monitoring a 3 m3 pilot digestor during a running period of about 85 days, under different working conditions.

  2. Effects of disinfectants and antibiotics on the anaerobic digestion of piggery waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poels, J.; Van Assche, P.; Verstraete, W.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of disinfectants and antibiotics on the anaerobic digestion of piggery waste were investigated. The disinfectants Tego 51, Dettol, NaOCl and Creolin, and the antibiotics, chlortetracyclin, tylosin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, bacitracin and virginiamycin were tested at different concentrations. At concentrations normally used in practice, no inhibitory effect on methanisation process was detected. However, higher concentrations of the antimicrobial agents, Dettol, Creolin, bacitracin and virginiamycin, markedly inhibited biogas production. In order to minimize possible digester failures, farmers are advised to respect the normal recommended dose and to use low-toxicity antimicrobial agents. (Refs. 8).

  3. Influence of different pre-treatment routes on the anaerobic digestion of a filamentous algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehimen, Ehiazesebhor Augustine; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Poulsen, M.

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion of outdoor cultivated Rhizoclonium biomass was investigated in this study. The influence of applying mechanical and biological pre-treatment methods prior to the biomass digestion on the overall methane yields was examined. The results show that the application of a combined...... biomass blending (treatment improved the methane yields by >20% compared to use of a mechanical size reduction method alone. The methane yields from Rhizoclonium biomass were however observed to be considerably lower than those of other algae species from...

  4. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF ANIMAL MANURE – IMPLICATIONS FOR CROP YIELDS AND SOIL BIOTA IN ORGANIC FARMING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Pommeresche, Reidun; Riely, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of farmyard manures may help farmers to produce bioenergy instead of using fossil fuels, support cycling of nutrients and reduce greenhouse gas emission. However, compared to pristine slurry, digested slurry has a reduced content of organic carbon which may impact the soil biota...... organic matter levels over the first 2 years. Application of high levels of manure increased the mortality of both surface-dwelling and soil-living earthworms just after application, but the long-term effect of manure application seemed more positive, especially at low application levels. Springtails...

  5. Detailed study of anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algae biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, R.; LeDuy, A.

    1986-07-01

    Biomass of the blue-green alga Spirulina maxima was converted to methane using continuous stirred tank digesters with an energy conversion efficiency of 59%. Digesters were operated using once-a-day feeding with a retention time (theta) between 5 and 40 days, volatile solid concentrations (Sto) between 20 and 100 kg VS/cubic m, and temperatures between 15 and 52/sup 0/C. The results indicated a maximum methane yield of 0.35 cubic m (STP)/kg VS added at theta = 30 days and Sto = 20 kg VS/cubic m. Under such conditions, the energy conversion of the algal biomass to methane was 59%. The maximum methane production rate of 0.80 cubic m (STP)/cubic m day was obtained with theta = 20 days and Sto = 100 kg VS/cubic m. The mesophilic condition at 35/sup 0/C produced the maximum methane yield and production rate. The process was stable and characterized by a high production of volatile acids (up to 23,200 mg/l), alkalinity (up to 20,000 mg/l), and ammonia (up to 7000 mg/l), and the high protein content of the biomass produced a well-buffered environment which reduced inhibitory effects. At higher loading rates, the inhibition of methanogenic bacteria was observed, but there was no clear-cut evidence that such a phenomenon was due to nonionized volatile acids or gaseous ammonia. The kinetic analysis using the model proposed by Chen and Hashimoto indicated that the minimum retention time was seven days. The optimum retention time increased gradually from 11 to 16 days with an increase in the initial volatile solid concentration. The kinetic constant K decreased with the improvement in the digester performance and increased in parallel with the ammonia concentration in the culture media. 32 references.

  6. Influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory-scale experiment was carried out to assess the influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste (MOSW). Heating failure was simulated by decreasing temperature suddenly from 55 ℃ to 20 ℃ suddenly; 2 h time is needed for temperature decrease and recovery. Under the conditions ofS.0 g/(L·d) and 15 d respectively for MOSW load and retention time, following results were noted: (1) biogas production almost stopped and VFA (volatile fatty acid) accumulated rapidly, accompanied by pH decrease; (2) with low temperature (20 ℃) duration of 1, 5, 12 and 24 h, it took 3, 11, 56 and 72 h for the thermophilic anaerobic digestion system to reproduce methane after temperature fluctuation;(3) the longer the low temperature interval lasted, the more the methanogenic bacteria would decay; hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis were all influenced by temperature fluctuation; (4) the thermophilic microorganisms were highly resilient to temperature fluctuation.

  7. Anaerobic digestion of antibiotic residue in combination with hydrothermal pretreatment for biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangyi; Li, Chunxing; Ma, Dachao; Zhang, Zhikai; Xu, Guangwen

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic residues are difficult to be treated or utilized because of their high water content and residual antibiotics. This article is devoted to investigating the possibility of biogas production from cephalosporin C residue (CPCAR), one typical type of antibiotic residues, via anaerobic digestion in combination with hydrothermal pretreatment (HTPT). The results from the bench-scale experiments showed that the combination of HTPT and anaerobic digestion can provide a viable way to convert CPCAR into biogas, and the biogas and methane yields reached 290 and 200 ml(g TS)(-1), respectively. This article further evaluated the proposed technology in terms of energy balance and technical feasibility based on theoretical calculation using the data from a pilot HTPT test. It was shown that the process is totally self-sufficient in energy and its main challenging problem of ammonia inhibition can be solved via ammonia stripping.

  8. NIR Monitoring of Ammonia in Anaerobic Digesters Using a Diffuse Reflectance Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair J. Ward

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of using a diffuse reflectance probe attached to a near infrared spectrometer to monitor the total ammonia nitrogen (TAN content in an anaerobic digester run on cattle manure was investigated; as a previous study has indicated that this probe can be easily attached to an anaerobic digester. Multivariate modelling techniques such as partial least squares regression and interval partial least squares methods were used to build models. Various data pre-treatments were applied to improve the models. The TAN concentrations measured were in the range of 1.5 to 5.5 g/L. An R2 of 0.91 with an RMSEP of 0.32 was obtained implying that the probe could be used for monitoring and screening purposes.

  9. Enhancement of Taihu blue algae anaerobic digestion efficiency by natural storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hengfeng; Lu, Minfeng; Zhao, Mingxing; Huang, Zhenxing; Ren, Hongyan; Yan, Qun; Ruan, Wenquan

    2013-12-01

    Taihu blue algae after different storage time from 0 to 60 d were anaerobic fermented to evaluate their digestibility and process stability. Results showed that anaerobic digestion (AD) of blue algae under 15 d natural storage led to the highest CH4 production of 287.6 mL g(-1) VS at inoculum substrate ratio 2.0, demonstrating 36.69% improvement comparing with that from fresh algae. Storage of blue algae led to cell death, microcystins (MCs) release and VS reduction by spontaneous fermentation. However, it also played an important role in removing algal cell wall barrier, pre-hydrolysis and pre-acidification, leading to the improvement in CH4 yield. Closer examination of volatile fatty acids (VFA) variation, VS removal rates and key enzymes change during AD proved short storage time (≤ 15 d) of blue algae had higher efficiencies in biodegradation and methanation. Furthermore, AD presented significant biodegradation potential for MCs released from Taihu blue algae.

  10. Temperature regulates methane production through the function centralization of microbial community in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; De Vrieze, Jo; He, Guihua; Li, Xiangzhen; Li, Jiabao

    2016-09-01

    Temperature is crucial for the performance of anaerobic digestion process. In this study of anaerobic digestion of swine manure, the relationship between the microbial gene expression and methane production at different temperatures (25-55°C) was revealed through metatranscriptomic analysis. Daily methane production and total biogas production increased with temperature up to 50°C, but decreased at 55°C. The functional gene expression showed great variation at different temperatures. The function centralization (opposite to alpha-diversity), assessed by the least proportions of functional pathways contributing for at least 50% of total reads positively correlated to methane production. Temperature regulated methane production probably through reducing the diversity of functional pathways, but enhancing central functional pathways, so that most of cellular activities and resource were invested in methanogenesis and related pathways, enhancing the efficiency of conversion of substrates to methane. This research demonstrated the importance of function centralization for efficient system functioning.

  11. Comparison of existing models to simulate anaerobic digestion of lipid-rich waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béline, F; Rodriguez-Mendez, R; Girault, R; Bihan, Y Le; Lessard, P

    2017-02-01

    Models for anaerobic digestion of lipid-rich waste taking inhibition into account were reviewed and, if necessary, adjusted to the ADM1 model framework in order to compare them. Experimental data from anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse waste at an organic loading rate (OLR) ranging from 0.3 to 1.9kgVSm(-3)d(-1) were used to compare and evaluate models. Experimental data obtained at low OLRs were accurately modeled whatever the model thereby validating the stoichiometric parameters used and influent fractionation. However, at higher OLRs, although inhibition parameters were optimized to reduce differences between experimental and simulated data, no model was able to accurately simulate accumulation of substrates and intermediates, mainly due to the wrong simulation of pH. A simulation using pH based on experimental data showed that acetogenesis and methanogenesis were the most sensitive steps to LCFA inhibition and enabled identification of the inhibition parameters of both steps.

  12. Mechanism and kinetics model of hydrolysis in anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴云; 张代钧; 杨钢

    2009-01-01

    The profile of hydrolysates during the anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes was investigated. The experimental results show that the hysteresis of hydrolytic rate is mainly controlled by the diffusion effect. The hydrolytic mechanism of kitchen wastes is elaborated by taking the diffusion effect into consideration. A segment model of the hydrolysis for kitchen waste is formulated including the coefficient of diffusion resistance in the model. The coefficients of diffusion resistance for different particle sizes are 1.42,2.12 and 2.78 respectively based on the experimental data,in which the coefficients of diffusion resistance conform an exponential function. So,the partitioning kinetic model could be integrated as a unified experience model. The model is verified with experimental data,which shows that the model could predict the concentration of organic substances during the anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes.

  13. Effect of anaerobic digestion on the high rate of nitritation, treating piggery wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiyeol Im; Kyungik Gil

    2011-01-01

    The amount of piggery wastewater as domestic livestock is increasing.The volume of piggery wastewater produced is less than the volume of other wastewaters,but piggery wastewater has a heavy impact on wastewater streams due to an extremely high concentration of nitrogen and COD.In this study,laboratory reactors were operated using piggery wastewater and the effluent of anaerobic digester from piggery wastewater plants.The purpose of this study was to induce the nitritation process,which is an economically advantageous nitrogen removal method that converts ammonium nitrogen into nitrite.The results showed that the effluent of anaerobic digester from piggery wastewater was more efficient than raw piggery wastewater in terms of inducing nitritation.It can be deduced that nitritation is largely affected by an organic fraction of piggery wastewater.It can also be concluded that a small amount of biodegradable organic matter in piggery wastewater is efficient in inducing nitritation.

  14. Experimental and modeling study of a two-stage pilot scale high solid anaerobic digester system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Zhao, Quanbao; Ma, Jingwei; Frear, Craig; Chen, Shulin

    2012-11-01

    This study established a comprehensive model to configure a new two-stage high solid anaerobic digester (HSAD) system designed for highly degradable organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW). The HSAD reactor as the first stage was naturally separated into two zones due to biogas floatation and low specific gravity of solid waste. The solid waste was retained in the upper zone while only the liquid leachate resided in the lower zone of the HSAD reactor. Continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) and advective-diffusive reactor (ADR) models were constructed in series to describe the whole system. Anaerobic digestion model No. 1 (ADM1) was used as reaction kinetics and incorporated into each reactor module. Compared with the experimental data, the simulation results indicated that the model was able to well predict the pH, volatile fatty acid (VFA) and biogas production.

  15. Biological conversion of biogas to methanol using methanotrophs isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yueh-Fen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria) that can directly convert biogas produced at a commercial anaerobic digestion (AD) facility to methanol. A methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate. The isolate had characteristics comparable to obligate methanotrophs from the genus Methylocaldum. This newly isolated methanotroph grew on biogas or purified CH4 and successfully converted biogas from AD to methanol. Methanol production was achieved using several methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) inhibitors and formate as an electron donor. The isolate also produced methanol using phosphate with no electron donor or using formate with no MDH inhibitor. The maximum methanol concentration (0.43±0.00gL(-1)) and 48-h CH4 to methanol conversion (25.5±1.1%) were achieved using biogas as substrate and a growth medium containing 50mM phosphate and 80mM formate.

  16. Anaerobic digestion performance of vinegar residue in continuously stirred tank reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Ruihong; He, Yanfeng; Wang, Wen; Chen, Chang; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-06-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of vinegar residue was investigated in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The influence of organic loading rate (OLR) and effluent recirculation on AD performance of vinegar residue was tested. Five OLRs, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 g(vs) L(-1) d(-1), were used. The highest volumetric methane productivity of 581.88 mL L(-1) was achieved at OLR of 2.5 g(vs) L(-1) d(-1). Effluent reflux ratio was set as 50%, the results showed that effluent recirculation could effectively neutralize the acidity of vinegar residue, raise the pH of the feedstock, and enhance the buffering capacity of the AD system. Anaerobic digestion of vinegar residue could be a promising way not only for converting this waste into gas energy but also alleviating environmental pollution which might be useful for future industrial application.

  17. Anaerobic co-digestion of swine and poultry manure with municipal sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Sebastian; Domański, Jarosław; Weatherley, Laurence

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic digestion of municipal sewage sludge (SS) with swine manure (SM) and poultry manure (PM) was undertaken. It was found that a mixture of sewage sludge with a 30% addition of swine manure gave around 400 dm(3)/kg VS of biogas, whereas the maximal biogas yield from ternary mixture (SS:SM:PM=70:20:10 by weight) was only 336 dm(3)/kg VS. An inhibition of methanogenesis by free ammonia was observed in poultry manure experiments. The anaerobic digestion was inefficient in pathogen inactivation as the reduction in the number of E. coli an Enterobacteriaceae was only by one logarithmic unit. A substantial portion of pathogens was also released into the supernatant.

  18. Immobilization of anaerobic bacteria on rubberized-coir for psychrophilic digestion of night soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Ramana, Karna Venkat; Tomar, Arvind; Waghmare, Chandrakant; Kamboj, Dev Vrat; Singh, Lokendra

    2005-08-01

    Low-ambient temperatures, biodigesters due to low-growth rate of the constituent bacterial consortium. Immobilization of anaerobic bacteria has been attempted in the biodigester operating at 10 degrees C. Various matrices were screened and evaluated for the immobilization of bacteria in digesters. Anaerobic digestion of night soil was carried out with hydraulic retention time in the range of 9-18 days. Among the tested matrices, rubberized-coir was found to be the most useful at 10 degrees C with optimum hydraulic retention time of 15 days. Optimum amount of coir was found as 25 g/L of the working volume of biodigesters. Immobilization of bacteria on the coir was observed by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent microscopy. The study indicates that rubberized-coir can be utilized to increase biodegradation of night soil at higher organic loading. Another advantage of using this matrix is that it is renewable and easily available in comparison to other synthetic polymeric matrices.

  19. Innovative bioelectrochemical-anaerobic-digestion integrated system for ammonia recovery and bioenergy production from ammonia-rich residues

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia (NH4+/NH3) inhibition during anaerobic digestion process is one of the most frequent problems existing in biogas plants, resulting in unstable process and reduced biogas production. In this study, we developed a novel hybrid system, consisted of a submersed microbial resource recovery cell (SMRC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), to prevent ammonia toxicity during anaerobic digestion by in-situ ammonia recovery and electricity production (Figure 1). In batch experiment, th...

  20. Recovery of anaerobic digestion after exposure to toxicants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Parkin, G.F.; Speece, R.E.

    1979-12-01

    The concept that methane fermentation cannot tolerate chronic or slug doses of toxicants has almost totally precluded methane fermentation as a viable contender for the treatment of industrial wastewaters. This study assayed a wide variety of toxicants, heavy metals, inorganic salts, organic chemicals, solvents, and antibiotics which are used in industrial processes and, therefore, appear in the industrial wastewaters therefrom. Toxicity was related to the reduction in methane production of a control containing no toxicant. The response of methane fermentation after exposure to a toxicant was assayed with unacclimated cultures as well as cultures which had been acclimated to increasing concentrations of the toxicant over long periods of time. The reversible nature of the toxicants was assayed by adding slug doses to plug flow anaerobic filters and recording gas production prior to, during, and after toxicant addition.

  1. Adapting Dynamic Mathematical Models to a Pilot Anaerobic Digestion Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Haugen, R. Bakke, and B. Lie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model has been adapted to a pilot anaerobic reactor fed diarymanure. Both steady-state data from online sensors and laboratory analysis anddynamic operational data from online sensors are used in the model adaptation.The model is based on material balances, and comprises four state variables,namely biodegradable volatile solids, volatile fatty acids, acid generatingmicrobes (acidogens, and methane generating microbes (methanogens. The modelcan predict the methane gas flow produced in the reactor. The model may beused for optimal reactor design and operation, state-estimation and control.Also, a dynamic model for the reactor temperature based on energy balance ofthe liquid in the reactor is adapted. This model may be used for optimizationand control when energy and economy are taken into account.

  2. Using feature objects aided strategy to evaluate the biomethane production of food waste and corn stalk anaerobic co-digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi; Yuan, Hairong; Liu, Yanping; Zou, Dexun; Zhu, Baoning; Chufo, Wachemo A; Jaffar, Muhammad; Li, Xiujin

    2015-03-01

    Feature objects aided strategy was used to predict and evaluate the biomethane production of food waste and corn stalk anaerobic co-digestion. The kinetics of co-digestion and mono-digestion of food waste and/or corn stalk was also analyzed. The results indicated that the compositions of food waste and corn stalk were significantly different. The anaerobic digestion of three feature objects at different mixing ratios showed the different biomethane yields and kinetic constants. Food waste and corn stalk co-digestion enhanced the digestion rate and achieved 22.48% and 41.55% higher biomethane production than those of food waste and corn stalk mono-digestion, respectively.

  3. Anaerobic co-digestion of perennials: Methane potential and digestate nitrogen fertilizer value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller-Stover, Dorette Sophie; Sun, Guotao; Kroff, Pablo;

    2016-01-01

    Co-digestion of crop biomass improves the traditional manure-based biogas yield due to an increased content of easily degradable carbon compounds. In this study, the methane potential of three perennials (grass, legumes, and grass+legume) was determined using various amounts together with animal...... manure. The nitrogen (N) mineralization dynamics in soil and the N-fertilizer value of the derived digestates were subsequently tested in both a soil incubation study and a pot experiment with spring barley. Digestion of all tested perennials together with a manure-based inoculum increased the cumulative...... by 40-170%, to an extent statistically comparable to mineral N fertilizer. However, the application of the digestate originating from fermentation with pure grass resulted in lower plant growth and a more fluctuating soil mineral N content throughout the incubation study compared to the other digestates...

  4. Environmental assessment of farm-scaled anaerobic co-digestion for bioenergy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijó, Lucía; González-García, Sara; Bacenetti, Jacopo; Negri, Marco; Fiala, Marco; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, María Teresa

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the environmental profile of a bioenergy system based on a co-digestion plant using maize silage and pig slurry as substrates. All the processes involved in the production of bioenergy as well as the avoided processes accrued from the biogas production system were evaluated. The results evidenced the environmental importance of the cultivation step and the environmental credits associated to the avoided processes. In addition, this plant was compared with two different plants that digest both substrates separately. The results revealed the environmental benefits of the utilisation of pig slurry due to the absence of environmental burdens associated with its production as well as credits provided when avoiding its conventional management. The results also presented the environmental drawbacks of the utilisation of maize silage due to the environmental burdens related with its production. Accordingly, the anaerobic mono-digestion of maize silage achieved the worst results. The co-digestion of both substrates was ranked in an intermediate position. Additionally, three possible digestate management options were assessed. The results showed the beneficial effect of digestate application as an organic fertiliser, principally on account of environmental credits due to avoided mineral fertilisation. However, digestate application involves important acidifying and eutrophicating emissions.

  5. Anaerobic digestion modelling: innovative characterization tool and extension to micropollutant fate

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Julie; Aemig, Quentin; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Patureau, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Advanced dynamic anaerobic digestion models, such as ADM1, requires both detailed organic matter characterisation and intimate knowledge of the involved metabolic pathways. In the current study, a methodology for municipal sludge characterization previously developed is used to describe two key parameters: biodegradability and bioaccessibility of organic matter. The methodology is based on coupling sequential chemical extractions with 3D fluorescence spectroscopy. Experimental data, obtained ...

  6. Modelling inhibitory effects of long chain fatty acids in the anaerobic digestion process

    OpenAIRE

    Flotats Ripoll, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modelling of anaerobic digestion process has been used to give new insights regarding dynamics of the long chain fatty acids (LCFA) inhibition. Previously published experimental data, including batch tests with clay mineral bentonite additions, were used for parameter identification. New kinetics were considered to describe the bio-physics of the inhibitory process, including: i) adsorption of LCFA over granular biomass and ii) specific LCFA substrate (saturated/unsaturated) a...

  7. Euler-Lagrange CFD modelling of unconfined gas mixing in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapelo, Davide; Alberini, Federico; Bridgeman, John

    2015-11-15

    A novel Euler-Lagrangian (EL) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) finite volume-based model to simulate the gas mixing of sludge for anaerobic digestion is developed and described. Fluid motion is driven by momentum transfer from bubbles to liquid. Model validation is undertaken by assessing the flow field in a labscale model with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Conclusions are drawn about the upscaling and applicability of the model to full-scale problems, and recommendations are given for optimum application.

  8. Bioaugmenting anaerobic digestion of biosolids with selected strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and Actinomycetes species for increased methanogenesis and odor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Metin; Tepe, Nalan; Yurtsever, Deniz; Punzi, Vito L; Bruno, Charles; Mehta, Raj J

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of bioaugmenting anaerobic biosolids digestion with a commercial product containing selected strains of bacteria from genera Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and Actinomycetes, along with ancillary organic compounds containing various micronutrients. Specifically, the effects of the bioaugment in terms of volatile solids destruction and generation and fate of odor-causing compounds during anaerobic digestion and during storage of the digested biosolids were studied. Two bench-scale anaerobic digesters receiving primary and secondary clarifier biosolids from various full-scale biological wastewater treatment plants were operated. One of the digesters received the bioaugment developed by Organica Biotech, while the other was operated as control. The bioaugmented digester generated 29% more net CH(4) during the 8 weeks of operation. In addition, the average residual propionic acid concentration in the bioaugmented digester was 54% of that in the control. The monitoring of two organic sulfide compounds, methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH) and dimethyl sulfide (CH(3)SCH(3)), clearly demonstrated the beneficial effects of the bioaugmentation in terms of odor control. The biosolids digested in the bioaugmented digester generated a negligible amount of CH(3)SH during 10 days of post-digestion storage, while CH(3)SH concentration in the control reached nearly 300 ppm(v) during the same period. Similarly, peak CH(3)SCH(3) generated by stored biosolids from the bioaugmented digester was only 37% of that from the control.

  9. A spreadsheet calculator for estimating biogas production and economic measures for UK-based farm-fed anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Anthony; Lovett, David; McEwan, Matthew; Cecelja, Franjo; Chen, Tao

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a spreadsheet calculator to estimate biogas production and the operational revenue and costs for UK-based farm-fed anaerobic digesters. There exist sophisticated biogas production models in published literature, but the application of these in farm-fed anaerobic digesters is often impractical. This is due to the limited measuring devices, financial constraints, and the operators being non-experts in anaerobic digestion. The proposed biogas production model is designed to use the measured process variables typically available at farm-fed digesters, accounting for the effects of retention time, temperature and imperfect mixing. The estimation of the operational revenue and costs allow the owners to assess the most profitable approach to run the process. This would support the sustained use of the technology. The calculator is first compared with literature reported data, and then applied to the digester unit on a UK Farm to demonstrate its use in a practical setting.

  10. Bioaugmentation with an acetate-oxidising consortium as a tool to tackle ammonia inhibition of anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia is the major inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process in biogas plants. In the current study, the bioaugmentation of the ammonia tolerant SAO co-culture (i.e. Clostridium ultunense spp. nov. in association with Methanoculleus spp. strain MAB1) in a mesophilic up-flow anaerobic sludge...

  11. Effect of increasing total solids contents on anaerobic digestion of food waste under mesophilic conditions: performance and microbial characteristics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yi

    Full Text Available The total solids content of feedstocks affects the performances of anaerobic digestion and the change of total solids content will lead the change of microbial morphology in systems. In order to increase the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, it is necessary to understand the role of the total solids content on the behavior of the microbial communities involved in anaerobic digestion of organic matter from wet to dry technology. The performances of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste with different total solids contents from 5% to 20% were compared and the microbial communities in reactors were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing technology. Three stable anaerobic digestion processes were achieved for food waste biodegradation and methane generation. Better performances mainly including volatile solids reduction and methane yield were obtained in the reactors with higher total solids content. Pyrosequencing results revealed significant shifts in bacterial community with increasing total solids contents. The proportion of phylum Chloroflexi decreased obviously with increasing total solids contents while other functional bacteria showed increasing trend. Methanosarcina absolutely dominated in archaeal communities in three reactors and the relative abundance of this group showed increasing trend with increasing total solids contents. These results revealed the effects of the total solids content on the performance parameters and the behavior of the microbial communities involved in the anaerobic digestion of food waste from wet to dry technologies.

  12. Pig slurry concentration by vacuum evaporation: influence of previous mesophilic anaerobic digestion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmatí, August; Flotats, Xavier

    2003-01-01

    Water can be removed from pig slurry by evaporation, through the application of wasted heat from a power plant or from other processes. Apart from obtaining a concentrate with an obviously higher nutrient concentration than the original slurry, another objective of water removal is to obtain water as condensate, which could be reused. The objective of this work was to study the vacuum evaporation of pig slurry liquid fraction and to evaluate condensate composition as a function of both pH (4, 5, and 6) and pig slurry type (fresh slurry and anaerobically digested slurry). Batch experiments showed that condensate characteristics, total ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), volatile fatty acids (VFA), and chemical oxygen demand were strongly dependent on initial slurry pH. In addition to producing part of the required thermal energy, previous anaerobic digestion presented several other clear advantages. The consumption of VFA and other volatile organic compounds during anaerobic digestion reduced the volatilization of organic matter in the evaporation treatment and, consequently, provided a higher quality condensate.

  13. Life cycle assessment of energy from waste via anaerobic digestion: a UK case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Sara; Lettieri, Paola; Borello, Domenico; Clift, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Particularly in the UK, there is potential for use of large-scale anaerobic digestion (AD) plants to treat food waste, possibly along with other organic wastes, to produce biogas. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment to compare the environmental impacts of AD with energy and organic fertiliser production against two alternative approaches: incineration with energy production by CHP and landfill with electricity production. In particular the paper investigates the dependency of the results on some specific assumptions and key process parameters. The input Life Cycle Inventory data are specific to the Greater London area, UK. Anaerobic digestion emerges as the best treatment option in terms of total CO2 and total SO2 saved, when energy and organic fertiliser substitute non-renewable electricity, heat and inorganic fertiliser. For photochemical ozone and nutrient enrichment potentials, AD is the second option while incineration is shown to be the most environmentally friendly solution. The robustness of the model is investigated with a sensitivity analysis. The most critical assumption concerns the quantity and quality of the energy substituted by the biogas production. Two key issues affect the development and deployment of future anaerobic digestion plants: maximising the electricity produced by the CHP unit fuelled by biogas and to defining the future energy scenario in which the plant will be embedded.

  14. A novel process simulation model (PSM) for anaerobic digestion using Aspen Plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Karthik; Kankanala, Harshavardhan R; Lundin, Magnus; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2014-09-01

    A novel process simulation model (PSM) was developed for biogas production in anaerobic digesters using Aspen Plus®. The PSM is a library model of anaerobic digestion, which predicts the biogas production from any substrate at any given process condition. A total of 46 reactions were used in the model, which include inhibitions, rate-kinetics, pH, ammonia, volume, loading rate, and retention time. The hydrolysis reactions were based on the extent of the reaction, while the acidogenic, acetogenic, and methanogenic reactions were based on the kinetics. The PSM was validated against a variety of lab and industrial data on anaerobic digestion. The P-value after statistical analysis was found to be 0.701, which showed that there was no significant difference between discrete validations and processing conditions. The sensitivity analysis for a ±10% change in composition of substrate and extent of reaction results in 5.285% higher value than the experimental value. The model is available at http://hdl.handle.net/2320/12358 (Rajendran et al., 2013b).

  15. Seasonal Variation on Microbial Community and Methane Production during Anaerobic Digestion of Cattle Manure in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Juliana Alves; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Bonnafous, Anaïs; Arcuri, Pedro Braga; Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Otenio, Marcelo Henrique; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo

    2016-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an alternative method for the treatment of animal manure and wastewater. The anaerobic bioconversion of biomass requires a multi-step biological process, including microorganisms with distinct roles. The diversity and composition of microbial structure in pilot-scale anaerobic digestion operating at ambient temperature in Brazil were studied. Influence of the seasonal and temporal patterns on bacterial and archaeal communities were assessed by studying the variations in density, dynamic and diversity and structure. The average daily biogas produced in the summer and winter months was 18.7 and 16 L day(-1), respectively, and there was no difference in the average methane yield. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that no differences in abundances and dynamics were found for bacterial communities and the total number of Archaea in different seasons. Analysis of bacterial clone libraries revealed a predominance of Firmicutes (54.5 %/summer and 46.7 %/winter) and Bacteroidetes (31.4 %/summer and 44.4 %/winter). Within the Archaea, the phylum Euryarchaeota was predominant in both digesters. Phylogenetic distribution showed changes in percentage between the phyla identified, but no alterations were recorded in the quality and amount of produced methane or community dynamics. The results may suggest that redundancy of microbial groups may have occurred, pointing to a more complex microbial community in the ecosystem related to this ambient temperature system.

  16. Nutrients removal and recovery from anaerobically digested swine wastewater by struvite crystallization without chemical additions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Hui; Qiu, Guang-Lei; Yuan, Peng; Cui, Xiao-Yu; Peng, Jian-Feng; Zeng, Ping; Duan, Liang; Xiang, Lian-Cheng; Qian, Feng

    2011-06-15

    Anaerobically digested swine wastewater contains high concentrations of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N). A pilot-scale experiment was carried out for nutrients removal and recovery from anaerobically digested swine wastewater by struvite crystallization. In the pilot plant, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and a continuous-flow reactor with struvite accumulation devices were designed and employed. The wastewater pH value was increased by CO(2) stripping, and the struvite crystallization process was performed without alkali and Mg(2+) additions. Results of the long-term operation of the system showed that, both reactors provided up to 85% P removal and recovery over wide ranges of aeration times (1.0-4.0 h), hydraulic retention times (HRT) (6.0-15.0 h) and temperatures (0-29.5°C) for an extended period of 247 d, in which approximate 30% of P was recovered by the struvite accumulation devices. However, 40-90% of NH(4)(+)-N removed was through air stripping instead of being immobilized in the recovered solids. The recovered products were detected and analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical methods, which were proved to be struvite with purity of more than 90%. This work demonstrated the feasibility and effects of nutrients removal and recovery from anaerobically digested swine wastewater by struvite crystallization without chemical additions.

  17. [Analysis of aliphatic carboxylic acids in anaerobic digestion process waters by ion-exclusion chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kazuaki; Sakamoto, Jun; Nagaoka, Kazuya; Takayama, Yohichi; Kanahori, Takashi; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Sato, Shinji; Hirokawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of seven aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, iso-butyric, n-butyric, iso-valeric and n-valeric acid) in anaerobic digestion process waters for biogas production was examined by ion-exclusion chromatography with dilute acidic eluents (benzoic acid, perfluorobutyric acid (PFBA) and sulfuric acid) and non-suppressed conductivity/ultraviolet (UV) detection. The columns used were a styrene/divinylbenzene-based strongly acidic cation-exchange resin column (TSKgel SCX) and a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column (TSKgel Super IC-A/C). Good separation was performed on the TSKgel SCX in shorter retention times. For the TSKgel Super IC-A/C, peak shape of the acids was sharp and symmetrical in spite of longer retention times. In addition, the mutual separation of the acids was good except for iso- and n-butyric acids. The better separation and good detection was achieved by using the two columns (TSKgel SCX and TSKgel Super IC-A/C connected in series), lower concentrations of PFBA and sulfuric acid as eluents, non-suppressed conductivity detection and UV detection at 210 nm. This analysis was applied to anaerobic digestion process waters. The chromatograms with conductivity detection were relatively simpler compared with those of UV detection. The use of two columns with different selectivities for the aliphatic carboxylic acids and the two detection modes was effective for the determination and identification of the analytes in anaerobic digestion process waters containing complex matrices.

  18. Anaerobic co-digestion of aquatic flora and quinoa with manures from Bolivian Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, René; Lidén, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    Quinoa stalk (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) from agricultural crop residue, totora (Schoenoplectus tatora) and o-macrophytes (aquatic flora) from Lake Titicaca (on the Bolivian Altiplano) were studied in a wet anaerobic co-digestion process together with manure from llama, cow and sheep. Anaerobic semi-continuous experiments were performed in (10) 2-l reactors at a temperature of 25 degrees C with 30 days of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.8 kg VS m(-3) d(-1). Totora was found to be the best co-substrate. In mixture ratios of 1:1 (VS basis), it increased the biogas productivity by 130% for llama manure, 60% for cow manure, and 40% for sheep manure. It was possible to use up to 58% (VS basis) of totora in the substrate. Higher concentrations (including pure totora) could not be digested, as that caused acidification problems similar to those caused by other lignocellulosic materials. When quinoa and o-macrophytes were used as co-substrates, the increase in biogas productivity was slightly less. However, these co-substrates did not cause any operational problems. An additional advantage of quinoa and o-macrophytes was that they could be used in any proportion (even in pure form) without causing any destabilization problems in the anaerobic digestion process.

  19. Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of aloe peel waste with dairy manure in the batch digester: Focusing on mixing ratios and digestate stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinlei; Yun, Sining; Zhu, Jiang; Du, Tingting; Zhang, Chen; Li, Xue

    2016-10-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of aloe peel waste (APW) with dairy manure (DM) was evaluated in terms of biogas and methane yield, volatile solids (VS) removal rate, and the stability of digestate. Batch experiments were performed under mesophilic condition (36±1°C) at five different APW/DM wet weight ratios (1:0, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, and 0:1). Experimental methane yield from the mixtures was higher than the yield from APW or DM alone, indicating the synergistic effect and benefits of co-digestion of APW with DM. The optimal mixing ratio of APW/DM was found to be 3:1. The cumulative methane yield was 195.1mL/g VS and the VS removal rate was 59.91%. The characteristics of the digestate were investigated by the thermal analysis which indicated the high stability in the samples of the co-digestion. The co-digestion can be an efficient way to improve the degradation efficiency of the bio-wastes and increase the energy output.

  20. Impacts of microwave pretreatments on the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy waste activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uma Rani, R.; Adish Kumar, S. [Department of Civil Engineering, Regional Centre of Anna University, Tirunelveli 627 007, Tamil Nadu (India); Kaliappan, S. [Department of Civil Engineering, Ponjesly College of Engineering, Nagercoil 629 003, Tamil Nadu (India); Yeom, IckTae [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Rajesh Banu, J., E-mail: rajeshces@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Regional Centre of Anna University, Tirunelveli 627 007, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Microwave pretreatment of dairy WAS was studied. ► MW pretreatment at 70% intensity for 12 min, COD solubilization was 18.6%. ► Biogas production and SS reduction was 35% and 14% higher than control. ► In digester at 15 days SRT with medium OLR, SS and VS reduction was 67% and 64%. ► Biogas and methane production was 57% and 49% higher than control, in digesters. - Abstract: Microwave (MW) irradiation is one of the new and possible methods used for pretreating the sludge. Following its use in different fields, this MW irradiation method has proved to be more appropriate in the field of environmental research. In this paper, we focused on the effects of MW irradiation at different intensities on solubilization, biodegradation and anaerobic digestion of sludge from the dairy sludge. The changes in the soluble fractions of the organic matter, the biogas yield, the methane content in the biogas were used as control parameters for evaluating the efficiency of the MW pretreatment. Additionally, the energetic efficiency was also examined. In terms of an energetic aspect, the most economical pretreatment of sludge was at 70% intensity for 12 min irradiation time. At this, COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production were found to be 18.6%, 14% and 35% higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein and carbohydrate hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this microwave pretreatment even at low irradiation energy input. Also, experiments were carried out in semi continuous anaerobic digesters, with 3.5 L working volume. Combining microwave pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 67%, 64% and 57% of SS reduction, VS reduction and biogas production higher than the control, respectively.

  1. Elucidation of the thermophilic phenol biodegradation pathway via benzoate during the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos-Hernandez, Carolina; Hoffmann, Marieke; Guenne, Angeline; Mazeas, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion makes it possible to valorize municipal solid waste (MSW) into biogas and digestate which are, respectively, a renewable energy source and an organic amendment for soil. Phenols are persistent pollutants present in MSW that can inhibit the anaerobic digestion process and have a toxic effect on microbiota if they are applied to soil together with digestate. It is then important to define the operational conditions of anaerobic digestion which allow the complete degradation of phenol. In this context, the fate of phenol during the anaerobic digestion of MSW at 55°C was followed using an isotopic tracing approach ((13)C6-phenol) in experimental microcosms with inoculum from an industrial thermophilic anaerobic digester. With this approach, it was possible to demonstrate the complete phenol biodegradation into methane and carbon dioxide via benzoate. Benzoate is known to be a phenol metabolite under mesophilic conditions, but in this study it was found for the first time to be a phenol degradation product at thermophilic temperature.

  2. The future of anaerobic digestion and biogas utilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Al Seadi, Teodorita; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr

    2009-01-01

      One of the common tendencies of animal production activities in Europe and in developed countries in general is to intensify the animal production and to increase the size of the animal production units. High livestock density is always accompanied by production of a surplus of animal manure, r...... organic materials such as: animal manure, whole crop silages, wet food and feed wastes, etc.......  One of the common tendencies of animal production activities in Europe and in developed countries in general is to intensify the animal production and to increase the size of the animal production units. High livestock density is always accompanied by production of a surplus of animal manure......, representing a considerable pollution threat for the environment in these areas. Avoiding over-fertilization is not only important for environmental protection reasons but also for economical reasons. Intensive animal production areas need therefore suitable manure management, aiming to export...

  3. COMPARISON OF TWO CHEMICAL PRETREATMENTS OF RICE STRAW FOR BIOGAS PRODUCTION BY ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilin Song,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is considered the most abundant renewable resource that has the potential to contribute remarkably in the supply of biofuel. Previous studies have shown that chemical pretreatment prior to anaerobic digestion (AD can increase the digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass and methane yield. In the present study, the effect of rice straw pretreatment using ammonium hydroxide (NH3•H2O and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the biogasification performance through AD was investigated. A self-designed, laboratory-scale, and continuous anaerobic biogas digester was used for the evaluation. Results showed that the contents of the rice straw, i.e. the lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose were degraded significantly after the NH3•H2O and H2O2 treatments, and that biogas production from all pretreated rice straw increased. In addition, the optimal treatments for biogas production were the 4% and 3% H2O2 treatments (w/w, which yielded 327.5 and 319.7 mL/gVS, biogas, respectively, higher than the untreated sample. Biogas production from H2O2 pretreated rice straw was more favorable than rice straw pretreated with same concentration of ammonia, ranking in the order of 4% ≈ 3% > 2% > 1%. The optimal amount of H2O2 treatment for rice straw biogas digestion is 3% when economics and biogas yields are considered.

  4. Biogas Production from Batch Anaerobic Co-Digestion of Night Soil with Food Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assadawut Khanto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the biogas production from Anaerobic Co-Digestion of Night Soil (NS with Food Waste (FW. The batch experiment was conducted through the NS and FW with a ratio of 70:30 by weight. The experiment is mainly evaluated by the characteristic of Co-Digestion and Biogas Production. In addition of food waste was inflating the COD loading from 17,863 to 42,063 mg/L which is 135 % increased. As the result, it shows that pH has dropped off in the beginning of 7-day during digestion and it was slightly increased into the range of optimum anaerobic condition. After digestion of the biogas production was 2,184 l and 56.5 % of methane fraction has obtained within 31 days of experimentation. The investigation of Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP and Specific Methanogenic Activities (SMA were highly observed. And the results were obtained by 34.55 mL CH4/gCODremoval and 0.38 g CH4-COD/gVSS-d. While the average COD removal from the 4 outlets got 92%, 94%, 94 % and 92 % respectively. However, the effluent in COD concentration was still high and it needs further treatment before discharge.

  5. Optimising the anaerobic co-digestion of urban organic waste using dynamic bioconversion mathematical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitamo, T; Boldrin, A; Dorini, G; Boe, K; Angelidaki, I; Scheutz, C

    2016-12-01

    Mathematical anaerobic bioconversion models are often used as a convenient way to simulate the conversion of organic materials to biogas. The aim of the study was to apply a mathematical model for simulating the anaerobic co-digestion of various types of urban organic waste, in order to develop strategies for controlling and optimising the co-digestion process. The model parameters were maintained in the same way as the original dynamic bioconversion model, albeit with minor adjustments, to simulate the co-digestion of food and garden waste with mixed sludge from a wastewater treatment plant in a continuously stirred tank reactor. The model's outputs were validated with experimental results obtained in thermophilic conditions, with mixed sludge as a single substrate and urban organic waste as a co-substrate at hydraulic retention times of 30, 20, 15 and 10 days. The predicted performance parameter (methane productivity and yield) and operational parameter (concentration of ammonia and volatile fatty acid) values were reasonable and displayed good correlation and accuracy. The model was later applied to identify optimal scenarios for an urban organic waste co-digestion process. The simulation scenario analysis demonstrated that increasing the amount of mixed sludge in the co-substrate had a marginal effect on the reactor performance. In contrast, increasing the amount of food waste and garden waste resulted in improved performance.

  6. Anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure and crude glycerol at mesophilic conditions: biogas and digestate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astals, S; Nolla-Ardèvol, V; Mata-Alvarez, J

    2012-04-01

    Crude glycerol derived from biodiesel production is characterized by its high concentration of organic carbon and its solubility in water; properties that make it a suitable co-substrate to improve the efficiency of a manure digester. An increase of about 400% in biogas production was obtained under mesophilic conditions when pig manure was co-digested with 4% of glycerol, on a wet-basis, compared to mono-digestion. The increase in biogas production was mainly a consequence of the increase in organic loading rate. However, the differences could also be related to the synergy between both substrates and the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Moreover, the analysis of the macro-compounds, protein, lipids, carbohydrates and fibers, showed lower removal efficiencies in the co-digester as the microorganisms obtained nutrients from the soluble carbohydrates provided by the glycerol. The digestate stability, evaluated through a respirometric assay, showed that co-substrate addition does not exert a negative impact on digestate quality.

  7. Syntrophic acetate oxidation in two-phase (acid-methane) anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, T; Morgenroth, E; Tandukar, M; Pavlostathis, S G; Smith, A; Raskin, L; Kilian, R E

    2011-01-01

    The microbial processes involved in two-phase anaerobic digestion were investigated by operating a laboratory-scale acid-phase (AP) reactor and analyzing two full-scale, two-phase anaerobic digesters operated under mesophilic (35 °C) conditions. The digesters received a blend of primary sludge and waste activated sludge (WAS). Methane levels of 20% in the laboratory-scale reactor indicated the presence of methanogenic activity in the AP. A phylogenetic analysis of an archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone library of one of the full-scale AP digesters showed that 82% and 5% of the clones were affiliated with the orders Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales, respectively. These results indicate that substantial levels of aceticlastic methanogens (order Methanosarcinales) were not maintained at the low solids retention times and acidic conditions (pH 5.2-5.5) of the AP, and that methanogenesis was carried out by hydrogen-utilizing methanogens of the order Methanobacteriales. Approximately 43, 31, and 9% of the archaeal clones from the methanogenic phase (MP) digester were affiliated with the orders Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanobacteriales, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis of a bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library suggested the presence of acetate-oxidizing bacteria (close relatives of Thermacetogenium phaeum, 'Syntrophaceticus schinkii,' and Clostridium ultunense). The high abundance of hydrogen consuming methanogens and the presence of known acetate-oxidizing bacteria suggest that acetate utilization by acetate oxidizing bacteria in syntrophic interaction with hydrogen-utilizing methanogens was an important pathway in the second-stage of the two-phase digestion, which was operated at high ammonium-N concentrations (1.0 and 1.4 g/L). A modified version of the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) with extensions for syntrophic acetate oxidation and weak-acid inhibition adequately described the dynamic profiles of volatile acid production

  8. Effect of microwave hydrolysis on transformation of steroidal hormones during anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Hanna; Eskicioglu, Cigdem

    2013-09-15

    Fate and removal of 16 steroidal (estrogenic, androgenic and progestogenic) hormones were studied during advanced anaerobic digestion of sludge cake using microwave (MW) pretreatment. Effect of pretreatment temperature (80, 120, 160 °C), operating temperature (mesophilic at 35 ± 2 °C, thermophilic at 55 ± 2 °C) and sludge retention time (SRT: 20, 10, 5 days) were studied employing eight lab-scale semi-continuously fed digesters. To determine the potential effect of MW hydrolysis, hormones were quantified in total (sorbed + soluble) and supernatant (soluble) phases of the digester influent and effluent streams. Seven of 16 hormones were above the method reporting limit (RL) in one or more of the samples. Hormone concentrations in total phase of un-pretreated (control) and pretreated digester feeds ranged in hormones from soluble and/or total phase. MW hydrolysis of the influent resulted in both release (from sludge matrix) and attenuation of hormones in the soluble phase. Accumulation of estrone (E1) as well as progesterone (Pr) and androstenedione (Ad) in most of the digesters indicated possible microbial transformations among the hormones. Compared to controls, all pretreated digesters had lower total hormone concentrations in their influent streams. At 20 days SRT, highest total removal (E1+E2+Ad +Pr) was observed for the thermophilic control digester (56%), followed by pretreated mesophilic digesters at 120 °C and 160 °C with around 48% efficiency. In terms of conventional performance parameters, relative (to control) improvements of MW pretreated digesters at a 5-d SRT ranged in 98-163% and 57-121%, for volatile solids removal and methane production, respectively.

  9. Intermediate-Scale High-Solids Anaerobic Digestion System Operational Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C. J.

    1995-02-01

    Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. During the first 1.5 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements, which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using ,the NREL high-solids digester design are detailed in this report.

  10. Impact of pretreatment on solid state anaerobic digestion of yard waste for biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhikai; Li, Wangliang; Zhang, Guangyi; Xu, Guangwen

    2014-02-01

    Solid state anaerobic digestion, as a safe and environment-friendly technology to dispose municipal solid wastes, can produce methane and reduce the volume of wastes. In order to raise the digestion efficiency, this study investigated the pretreatment of yard waste by thermal or chemical method to break down the complex lignocellulosic structure. The composition and structure of pretreated yard waste were analyzed and characterized. The results showed that the pretreatment decreased the content of cellulose and hemicelluloses in yard waste and in turn improved the hydrolysis and methanogenic processes. The thermal pretreatment sample (P1) had the highest methane yield, by increasing 88% in comparison with digesting the raw material. The maximum biogas production reached 253 mL/g volatile solids (VS). The largest substrate mass reduction was obtained by the alkaline pretreatment (P5). The VS of the alkaline-treated sample decreased about 60% in comparison with the raw material.

  11. Feasibility assessment of anaerobic digestion of European water chestnuts (Trapa natans L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besha, J.A.; Countryman, W.D.

    1980-07-01

    The project determined the technical and economic feasibility of anaerobic digestion of Trapa natans L. or European water chestnuts, to produce methane. Trapa natans is a nuisance aquatic plant presently found in the northeastern United States. The field data collection phase included color aerial photogrammetry and manual sampling. Yields of 9.08 kg per square meter of raw material with a corresponding dry weight of 1.53 kg/sq meter were determined. Bacterial digestion resulting in gas production of 69% methane and 31% carbon dioxide was shown in laboratory-scale digestion experiments. Mass spectrographic analysis indicated no contaminants in the gas stream. Conceptual technical design of a 400 kW methane-fueled electric generation facility indicated economic feasibility of this facility either as an independent or a hybrid process in conjunction with a small hydroelectric facility. Substantial economic and environmental benefits may accure from the control of Trapa natans by this means.

  12. Optimisation of substrate blends in anaerobic co-digestion using adaptive linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gen, Santiago; Rodríguez, Jorge; Lema, Juan M

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of multiple substrates has the potential to enhance biogas productivity by making use of the complementary characteristics of different substrates. A blending strategy based on a linear programming optimisation method is proposed aiming at maximising COD conversion into methane, but simultaneously maintaining a digestate and biogas quality. The method incorporates experimental and heuristic information to define the objective function and the linear restrictions. The active constraints are continuously adapted (by relaxing the restriction boundaries) such that further optimisations in terms of methane productivity can be achieved. The feasibility of the blends calculated with this methodology was previously tested and accurately predicted with an ADM1-based co-digestion model. This was validated in a continuously operated pilot plant, treating for several months different mixtures of glycerine, gelatine and pig manure at organic loading rates from 1.50 to 4.93 gCOD/Ld and hydraulic retention times between 32 and 40 days at mesophilic conditions.

  13. Properties of cellulose micro/nanofibers obtained from eucalyptus pulp fiber treated with anaerobic digestate and high shear mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    High production costs remain the single greatest factor limiting wider use of cellulose micro/nanofibers in the industry. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential of using a low-cost bacteria-rich digestate (liquid anaerobic digestate – AD supernatant) on milled eucalyptus...

  14. Biological nutrients removal from the supernatant originating from the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamis, S; Katsou, E; Di Fabio, S; Bolzonella, D; Fatone, F

    2014-09-01

    This study critically evaluates the biological processes and techniques applied to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from the anaerobic supernatant produced from the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and from its co-digestion with other biodegradable organic waste (BOW) streams. The wide application of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of several organic waste streams results in the production of high quantities of anaerobic effluents. Such effluents are characterized by high nutrient content, because organic and particulate nitrogen and phosphorus are hydrolyzed in the anaerobic digestion process. Consequently, adequate post-treatment is required in order to comply with the existing land application and discharge legislation in the European Union countries. This may include physicochemical and biological processes, with the latter being more advantageous due to their lower cost. Nitrogen removal is accomplished through the conventional nitrification/denitrification, nitritation/denitritation and the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal process; the latter is accomplished by nitritation coupled with the anoxic ammonium oxidation process. As anaerobic digestion effluents are characterized by low COD/TKN ratio, conventional denitrification/nitrification is not an attractive option; short-cut nitrogen removal processes are more promising. Both suspended and attached growth processes have been employed to treat the anaerobic supernatant. Specifically, the sequencing batch reactor, the membrane bioreactor, the conventional activated sludge and the moving bed biofilm reactor processes have been investigated. Physicochemical phosphorus removal via struvite precipitation has been extensively examined. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal from the anaerobic supernatant can take place through the sequencing anaerobic/aerobic process. More recently, denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite or nitrate has been explored. The removal of

  15. Low temperature anaerobic digestion of mixtures of llama, cow and sheep manure for improved methane production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Rene [IIDEPROQ, UMSA, Plaza del Obelisco 1175, La Paz (Bolivia)]|[Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Liden, Gunnar [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-03-15

    Biogas production in anaerobic digestion in farm-scale units is typically performed under mesophilic conditions when used for producing domestic fuel and stabilizing animal waste for the use of digested manure as a fertilizer. Previous studies on the digestion of llama and cow manure have shown the feasibility of producing biogas under altiplano conditions (low pressure and low temperature) and of llama manure as a promising feedstock. The present study concerns the utilization of various mixtures of feedstocks from the Bolivian altiplano under low temperature conditions (18-25 C). Laboratory scale experiments were performed on the digestion of mixtures of llama, sheep and cow manure in a semi-continuous process using ten 2-L stainless steel digesters to determine the effects of organic loading rate (OLR) and the feed composition. The semi-continuous operation of mixture of llama-cow-sheep manure proved to be a reliable system, which could be operated with good stability. The results suggest that in a system digesting a mixture of llama-cow-sheep manure at low temperature (18-25 C) the maximum OLR value is between 4 and 6 kg VS m{sup 3} d{sup -1}. The methane yields obtained in the mixture experiments were in the range 0.07-0.14 m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} VS added, with a methane concentration in the gas of between 47 and 55%. (author)

  16. EFFECT OF SULPHATE ON LOW-TEMPERATURE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhraig eMadden

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulphate addition on the stability of, and microbial community behaviour in, low-temperature anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed-based bioreactors was investigated at 15°C. Efficient bioreactor performance was observed, with chemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies of >90%, and a mean SO42- removal rate of 98.3%. In situ methanogensis appeared unaffected at a COD:SO42- influent ratio of 8:1, and subsequently of 3:1, and was impacted marginally only when the COD: SO42- ratio was 1:2. . Specific methanogenic activity assays indicated a complex set of interactions between sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB, methanogens and homoacetogenic bacteria. SO42- addition resulted in predominantly acetoclastic, rather than hydrogenotrophic, methanogenesis until >600 days of SO42--influenced bioreactor operation. Temporal microbial community development was monitored by denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE of 16S rRNA genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridisations (FISH, qPCR and microsensor analysis were combined to investigate the distribution of microbial groups, and particularly SRB and methanogens, along the structure of granular biofilms. qPCR data indicated that sulphidogenic genes were present in methanogenic and sulfidogenic biofilms, indicating the potential for sulphate reduction even in bioreactors not exposed to SO42-. Although the architecture of methanogenic and sulphidogenic granules was similar, indicating the presence of SRB even in methanogenic systems, FISH with rRNA targets found that the SRB were more abundant in the sulphidogenic biofilms. Methanosaeta species were the predominant, keystone members of the archaeal community, with the complete absence of the Methanosarcina species in the experimental bioreactor by trial conclusion. Microsensor data suggested the ordered distribution of sulphate reduction and sulphide accumulation, even in methanogenic granules.

  17. Effect of sulfate on low-temperature anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Pádhraig; Al-Raei, Abdul M; Enright, Anne M; Chinalia, Fabio A; de Beer, Dirk; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Collins, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    The effect of sulfate addition on the stability of, and microbial community behavior in, low-temperature anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed-based bioreactors was investigated at 15°C. Efficient bioreactor performance was observed, with chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of >90%, and a mean SO(2-) 4 removal rate of 98.3%. In situ methanogensis appeared unaffected at a COD: SO(2-) 4 influent ratio of 8:1, and subsequently of 3:1, and was impacted marginally only when the COD: SO(2-) 4 ratio was 1:2. Specific methanogenic activity assays indicated a complex set of interactions between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methanogens and homoacetogenic bacteria. SO(2-) 4 addition resulted in predominantly acetoclastic, rather than hydrogenotrophic, methanogenesis until >600 days of SO(2-) 4-influenced bioreactor operation. Temporal microbial community development was monitored by denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH), qPCR and microsensor analysis were combined to investigate the distribution of microbial groups, and particularly SRB and methanogens, along the structure of granular biofilms. qPCR data indicated that sulfidogenic genes were present in methanogenic and sulfidogenic biofilms, indicating the potential for sulfate reduction even in bioreactors not exposed to SO(2-) 4. Although the architecture of methanogenic and sulfidogenic granules was similar, indicating the presence of SRB even in methanogenic systems, FISH with rRNA targets found that the SRB were more abundant in the sulfidogenic biofilms. Methanosaeta species were the predominant, keystone members of the archaeal community, with the complete absence of the Methanosarcina species in the experimental bioreactor by trial conclusion. Microsensor data suggested the ordered distribution of sulfate reduction and sulfide accumulation, even in methanogenic granules.

  18. Methane production from the Anaerobic digestion of some Marine Macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habig, C.; Ryther, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Recently, considerable interest has developed concerning the use of biomass as an alternative fuel source. Among the possible substrates, marine plant biomass has frequently been mentioned, primarily due to the fact that such plants do not have competing, more valuable uses for food or fiber and their cultivation does not compete for valuable agricultural lands (1,2). Also, recent research has demonstrated that at least one potential marine energy crop, the red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae, is capable of extremely high production rates that equal or exceed those of terrestrial plants, and are rivaled by the productivity of another possible aquatic energy crop, the water hyacinth. To date, seaweed energy research has emphasized cultivation, while a marked paucity of information exists regarding the comparative performance of these algae as a methanogenic substrate. Only two species, the giant kelp, Macrocystic pyrifera and Gracilaria tikvahiae, have been tested in fermentation trials. The relative merits of a red, a green, and a brown alga, run vis a vis at four different loading rates are discussed in this report. In addition, two loading procedures were utilized to assess what if any, effect they might have on digester performance.

  19. Methane production from the anaerobic digestion of some marine macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habig, C.; Ryther, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Recently, considerable interest has developed concerning the use of biomass as an alternative fuel source. Among the possible substrates, marine plant biomass has frequently been mentioned, primarily due to the fact that such plants do not have competing, more valuable uses for food or fiber and their cultivation does not compete for valuable agricultural lands. Also, recent research has demonstrated that at least one potential marine energy crop, the red alga Graciliaria tikvahiae, is capable of extremely high production rates that equal or exceed those of terrestrial plants, and are rivaled by the productivity of another possible aquatic energy crop, the water hyacinth. To date, seaweed energy research has emphasized cultivation, while a marked paucity of information exists regarding the comparative performance of these algae as a methanogenic substrate. Only two species, the giant kelp, Macrocystic pyrifera and Gracilaria tikvahiae, have been tested in fermentation trials. The relative merits of a red, a green, and a brown alga, run vis a vis at four different loading rates, are discussed in this report. In addition, two loading procedures were utilized to assess what if any, effect they might have on digester performance. (Refs. 14).

  20. Anaerobic Co-digestion for Enhanced Renewable Energy and Green House Gas Emission Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navaratnam, Navaneethan; Zitomer, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    The need to develop renewable energy is important for replacing fossil fuel, which is limited in quantity and also tends to increase in price over time. The addition of high strength organic wastes in municipal anaerobic digesters is growing and tends to increase renewable energy production. In addition, conversion of wastes to energy significantly reduces uncontrolled greenhouse gas emissions. Co-digestion of municipal sludge with any combination of wastes can result in synergistic, antagonistic or neutral outcomes. The objectives of this study were to identify potential co-digestates, determine synergistic, antagonistic and neutral effects, determine economic benefits, quantify performance of bench scale co-digesters, identify influence of co-digestion on microbial communities and implement appropriate co-digestion, if warranted, after full-scale testing. A market study was used to identify promising co-digestates. Most promising wastes were determined by biochemical methane potential (BMP) and other testing followed by a simple economic analysis. Performance was investigated using bench-scale digesters receiving synthetic primary sludge with and without co-digestates. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses were performed on the gene encoding the α subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) to compare methanogen communities among the digesters. One significant band contributing to the greatest difference in banding patterns was excised, cloned, amplified and sequenced. Full- scale co-digestion was conducted using the most promising co-digestate at South Shore Wastewater Reclamation Facility (Oak Creek, WI). Over 80 wastes were identified from 54 facilities within 160 km of an existing municipal digester. A simple economic comparison identified the greatest benefits for seven co-digestates. Methane production rates of two co- digester systems increased by 105% and 66% in comparison to a control

  1. Digestion of frozen/thawed food waste in the hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabnikova, O; Liu, X Y; Wang, J Y

    2008-01-01

    The hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid (HASL) system, which is a modified two-phase anaerobic digester, is to be used in an industrial scale operation to minimize disposal of food waste at incineration plants in Singapore. The aim of the present research was to evaluate freezing/thawing of food waste as a pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system. The hydrolytic and fermentation processes in the acidogenic reactor were enhanced when food waste was frozen for 24h at -20 degrees C and then thawed for 12h at 25 degrees C (experiment) in comparison with fresh food waste (control). The highest dissolved COD concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 16.9 g/l on day 3 in the control and 18.9 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The highest VFA concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 11.7 g/l on day 3 in the control and 17.0 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The same volume of methane was produced during 12 days in the control and 7 days in the experiment. It gave the opportunity to diminish operational time of batch process by 42%. The effect of freezing/thawing of food waste as pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system was comparable with that of thermal pre-treatment of food waste at 150 degrees C for 1h. However, estimation of energy required either to heat the suspended food waste to 150 degrees C or to freeze the same quantity of food waste to -20 degrees C showed that freezing pre-treatment consumes about 3 times less energy than thermal pre-treatment.

  2. Psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion of dairy cow feces: Long-term operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massé, Daniel I., E-mail: Daniel.masse@agr.gc.ca; Cata Saady, Noori M.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion (PDAD) of cow feces (CF) is feasible. • PDAD of CF is as efficient as mesophilic and thermophilic AD at TCL 21 days. • CF (13–16% TS at OLR 5.0 g TCOD{sub fed} kg{sup −1} inoculum d{sup −1}) yielded 222 ± 27 {sub N}L CH{sub 4} kg{sup −1} VS fed. - Abstract: This paper reports experimental results which demonstrate psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion of cow feces during long-term operation in sequence batch reactor. Cow feces (13–16% total solids) has been anaerobically digested in 12 successive cycles (252 days) at 21 days treatment cycle length (TCL) and temperature of 20 °C using psychrotrophic anaerobic mixed culture. An average specific methane yield (SMY) of 184.9 ± 24.0, 189.9 ± 27.3, and 222 ± 27.7 {sub N}L CH{sub 4} kg{sup −1} of VS fed has been achieved at an organic loading rate of 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 g TCOD kg{sup −1} inoculum d{sup −1} and TCL of 21 days, respectively. The corresponding substrate to inoculum ratio (SIR) was 0.39 ± 0.06, 0.48 ± .02, 0.53 ± 0.05, respectively. Average methane production rate of 10 ± 1.4 {sub N}L CH{sub 4} kg{sup −1} VS fed d{sup −1} has been obtained. The low concentration of volatile fatty acids indicated that hydrolysis was the reaction limiting step.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of hemicellulose hydrolysate produced after hydrothermal pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse in UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fernanda Resende; Passos, Fabiana; Gurgel, Leandro Vinícius Alves; Baêta, Bruno Eduardo Lobo; de Aquino, Sérgio Francisco

    2017-04-15

    In the context of a sugarcane biorefinery, sugarcane bagasse produced may be pretreated generating a solid and liquid fraction. The solid fraction may be used for 2G bioethanol production, while the liquid fraction may be used to produce biogas through anaerobic digestion. The aim of this study consisted in evaluating the anaerobic digestion performance of hemicellulose hydrolysate produced after hydrothermal pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse. For this, hydrothermal pretreatment was assessed in a continuous upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 18.4h. Process performance was investigated by varying the dilution of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate with a solution containing xylose and the inlet organic loading rate (OLR). Experimental data showed that an increase in the proportion of hydrolysate in the feed resulted in better process performance for steps using 50% and 100% of real substrate. The best performance condition was achieved when increasing the organic loading rate (OLR) from 1.2 to 2.4gCOD/L·d, with an organic matter removal of 85.7%. During this period, the methane yield estimated by the COD removal would be 270LCH4/kg COD. Nonetheless, when further increasing the OLR to 4.8gCOD/L·d, the COD removal decreased to 74%, together with an increase in effluent concentrations of VFA (0.80gCOD/L) and furans (115.3mg/L), which might have inhibited the process performance. On the whole, the results showed that anaerobic digestion of sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate was feasible and may improve the net energy generation in a bioethanol plant, while enabling utilization of the surplus sugarcane bagasse in a sustainable manner.

  4. Potential use of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in anaerobic co-digestion with wastewater in submerged anaerobic membrane technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moñino, P; Jiménez, E; Barat, R; Aguado, D; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2016-10-01

    Food waste was characterized for its potential use as substrate for anaerobic co-digestion in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor pilot plant that treats urban wastewater (WW). 90% of the particles had sizes under 0.5mm after grinding the food waste in a commercial food waste disposer. COD, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were 100, 2 and 20 times higher in food waste than their average concentrations in WW, but the relative flow contribution of both streams made COD the only pollutant that increased significantly when both substrates were mixed. As sulphate concentration in food waste was in the same range as WW, co-digestion of both substrates would increase the COD/SO4-S ratio and favour methanogenic activity in anaerobic treatments. The average methane potential of the food waste was 421±15mLCH4g(-1)VS, achieving 73% anaerobic biodegradability. The anaerobic co-digestion of food waste with WW is expected to increase methane production 2.9-fold. The settleable solids tests and the particle size distribution analyses confirmed that both treatment lines of a conventional WWTP (water and sludge lines) would be clearly impacted by the incorporation of food waste into its influent. Anaerobic processes are therefore preferred over their aerobic counterparts due to their ability to valorise the high COD content to produce biogas (a renewable energy) instead of increasing the energetic costs associated with the aeration process for aerobic COD oxidation.

  5. Dynamics of biofilm formation during anaerobic digestion of organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Susanne; Schropp, Daniel; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Othman, Maazuza; Kazda, Marian

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm-based reactors are effectively used for wastewater treatment but are not common in biogas production. This study investigated biofilm dynamics on biofilm carriers incubated in batch biogas reactors at high and low organic loading rates for sludge from meat industry dissolved air flotation units. Biofilm formation and dynamics were studied using various microscopic techniques. Resulting micrographs were analysed for total cell numbers, thickness of biofilms, biofilm-covered surface area, and the area covered by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cell numbers within biofilms (10(11) cells ml(-1)) were up to one order of magnitude higher compared to the numbers of cells in the fluid reactor content. Further, biofilm formation and structure mainly correlated with the numbers of microorganisms present in the fluid reactor content and the organic loading. At high organic loading (45 kg VS m(-3)), the thickness of the continuous biofilm layer ranged from 5 to 160 μm with an average of 51 μm and a median of 26 μm. Conversely, at lower organic loading (15 kg VS m(-3)), only microcolonies were detectable. Those microcolonies increased in their frequency of occurrence during ongoing fermentation. Independently from the organic loading rate, biofilms were embedded completely in EPS within seven days. The maturation and maintenance of biofilms changed during the batch fermentation due to decreasing substrate availability. Concomitant, detachment of microorganisms within biofilms was observed simultaneously with the decrease of biogas formation. This study demonstrates that biofilms of high cell densities can enhance digestion of organic waste and have positive effects on biogas production.

  6. Effect of natural zeolite on methane production for anaerobic digestion of ammonium rich organic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Chika; Yang, Yingnan; Hanaoka, Toshiaki; Sonoda, Akinari; Ooi, Kenta; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2005-03-01

    The effect of an inorganic additive on the methane production from NH(4+)-rich organic sludge during anaerobic digestion was investigated using different kinds of inorganic adsorbent zeolites (mordenite, clinoptilolite, zeolite 3A, zeolite 4A), clay mineral (vermiculite), and manganese oxides (hollandite, birnessite). The additions of inorganic materials resulted in significant NH4+ removals from the natural organic sludge ([NH4+]=1, 150 mg N/l), except for the H-type zeolite 3A and birnessite. However, an enhanced methane production was only achieved using natural mordenite. Natural mordenite also enhanced the methane production from the sludge with a markedly high NH4+ concentration (4500 mg N/l) during anaerobic digestion. Chemical analyses of the sludge after the digestion showed considerable increases in the Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations in the presence of natural mordenite, but not with synthetic zeolite 3A. The effect of Ca2+ or Mg2+ addition on the methane production was studied using Na(+)-exchanges mordenite and Ca2+ or Mg(2+)-enriched sludge. The simultaneous addition of Ca2+ ions and Na(+)-exchanged mordenite enhanced the methane production; the amount of produced methane was about three times greater than that using only the Na(+)-exchanged mordenite. In addition, comparing the methane production by the addition of natural mordenite or Ca2+ ions, the methane production with natural mordenite was about 1.7 times higher than that with only Ca2+ ions. The addition of 5% and 10% natural mordenite were suitable condition for obtaining a high methane production. These results indicated that the Ca2+ ions, which are released from natural mordenite by a Ca2+/NH4+ exchange, enhanced the methane production of the organic waste at a high NH4+ concentration. Natural mordenite has a synergistic effect on the Ca2+ supply as well on the NH4+ removal during anaerobic digestion, which is effective for the mitigation of NH4+ inhibition against methane production.

  7. Anaerobic co-digestion of cattle manure with rice straw: economic & energy feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, G; Gómez, M P; Pascual, A; Ruiz, B

    2013-01-01

    Rice straw (RS) is one of the most abundant wastes generated in Valencia (Spain). Traditional waste disposal methods are harmful to the environment. The straw burning emits large amounts of toxic air pollutants and the straw burying produces uncontrolled anaerobic fermentation in the soil. The aim of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of cow manure anaerobic co-digestion with RS in a semi-continuous plug flow pilot-scale reactor. Three different periods of co-digestion were carried out as the RS dose was increased. When the addition of RS was 1, 2 and 5% (on weight basis) the biogas productivity increased by 4, 28 and 54% respectively. Furthermore, economic and energy feasibility were analysed considering the logistics cost of the RS (baling, collection, crushing and transportation). Two different scenarios were analysed. In scenario 1, the anaerobic co-digestion process was considered that take place in a new biogas installation, and in scenario 2 the process was considered that take place in a biogas plant already in operation. In scenario 1, the cow manure co-digestion with 2% of RS in a biogas installation of 500 kW showed the best economic analysis (net present value of 13.23%). In scenario 2, the results showed that the maximum distance between the rice field and the biogas plant that produces a positive economic balance was less than 95 km (2% RS) and 74 km (5% RS). In the case of the addition of 1% RS the economic balance is negative. Energy balance is positive in the three mixtures analysed.

  8. Evaluation and characterization during the anaerobic digestion of high-strength kitchen waste slurry via a pilot-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaolan; Huang, Zhenxing; Ruan, Wenquan; Yan, Lintao; Miao, Hengfeng; Ren, Hongyan; Zhao, Mingxing

    2015-10-01

    The anaerobic digestion of high-strength kitchen waste slurry via a pilot-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) was investigated at two different operational modes, including no sludge discharge and daily sludge discharge of 20 L. The AnMBR provided excellent and reliable permeate quality with high COD removal efficiencies over 99%. The obvious accumulations of long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) and Ca(2+) were found in the anaerobic digester by precipitation and agglomeration. Though the physicochemical process contributed to attenuating the free LCFAs toxicity on anaerobic digestion, the digestion efficiency was partly influenced for the low bioavailability of those precipitates. Moreover, higher organic loading rate (OLR) of 5.8 kg COD/(m(3) d) and digestion efficiency of 78% were achieved as the AnMBR was stably operated with sludge discharge, where the membrane fouling propensity was also alleviated, indicating the crucial significance of SRT control on the treatment of high-strength kitchen waste slurry via AnMBRs.

  9. Microbial community dynamics of a continuous mesophilic anaerobic biogas digester fed with sugar beet silage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, B.; Neumann, L.; Scherer, P. [Hochschule fuer Angewandte Wissenschaften, Fakultaet Life Sciences, Lifetec Process Engineering, Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term fermentation of an extremely sour substrate without any addition of manure. In the future, the limitation of manure and therefore the anaerobic digestion of silage with a very low buffering capacity will be an increasing general bottleneck for energy production from renewable biomass. During the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sugar beet silage (without top and leaves) as the sole substrate (without any addition of manure), which had an extreme low pH of around 3.3, the highest specific gas production rate (spec. GPR) of 0.72 L/g volatile solids (VS) d was achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 25 days compared to an organic loading rate (OLR) of 3.97 g VS/L d at a pH of around 6.80. The methane (CH{sub 4}) content of the digester ranged between 58 and 67 %, with an average of 63 %. The use of a new charge of substrate (a new harvest of the same substrate) with higher phosphate content improved the performance of the biogas digester significantly. The change of the substrate charge also seemed to affect the methanogenic population dynamics positively, thus improving the reactor performance. Using a new substrate charge, a further decrease in the HRT from 25 to 15 days did not influence the digester performance and did not seem to affect the structure of the methanogenic population significantly. However, a decrease in the HRT affected the size of the methanogenic population adversely. The lower spec. GPR of 0.54 L/g VS d attained on day 15 of the HRT could be attributed to a lower size of methanogenic population present in the anaerobic digester during this stage of the process. Furthermore, since sugar beet silage is a relatively poor substrate, in terms of the buffering capacity and the availability of nutrients, an external supply of buffering agents and nutrients is a prerequisite for a safe and stable digester operation. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Modelling the rheological properties of sludge during anaerobic digestion in a batch reactor by using electrical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieudé-Fauvel, E; Héritier, P; Chanet, M; Girault, R; Pastorelli, D; Guibelin, E; Baudez, J C

    2014-03-15

    Anaerobic digestion is a significant process leading to biogas production and waste management. Despite this double interest, professionals still face a lack of efficient tools to monitor and manage the whole procedure. This is especially true for rheological properties of the material inside the reactor, which are of major importance for anaerobic digestion management. However, rheological properties can hardly be determined in-situ and it would be very helpful to determine indicators of their evolution. To solve this problem, this paper investigates the evolution of sewage sludge rheological and electrical properties during the anaerobic digestion in a batch reactor. We especially focus on apparent viscosity and complex impedance, measured by electrical impedance spectroscopy. Both of them can be modelled by a linear combination of raw sludge and inoculum properties, weighted by time-dependent coefficients. Thus, by determining digested sludge electrical signature, it is possible to obtain those coefficients and model sludge apparent viscosity. This work offers many theoretical and practical prospects.

  11. Peracetic acid oxidation as an alternative pre-treatment for the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appels, Lise; Van Assche, Ado; Willems, Kris; Degrève, Jan; Van Impe, Jan; Dewil, Raf

    2011-03-01

    Anaerobic digestion is generally considered to be an economic and environmentally friendly technology for treating waste activated sludge, but has some limitations, such as the time it takes for the sludge to be digested and also the ineffectiveness of degrading the solids. Various pre-treatment technologies have been suggested to overcome these limitations and to improve the biogas production rate by enhancing the hydrolysis of organic matter. This paper studies the use of peracetic acid for disintegrating sludge as a pre-treatment of anaerobic digestion. It has been proved that this treatment effectively leads to a solubilisation of organic material. A maximum increase in biogas production by 21% is achieved. High dosages of PAA lead to a decrease in biogas production. This is due to the inhibition of the anaerobic micro-organisms by the high VFA-concentrations. The evolution of the various VFAs during digestion is studied and the observed trends support this hypothesis.

  12. Kinetics and dynamic modelling of batch anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in a stirred reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopharatana, Annop; Pullammanappallil, Pratap C; Clarke, William P

    2007-01-01

    A series of batch, slurry anaerobic digestion experiments were performed where the soluble and insoluble fractions, and unwashed MSW were separately digested in a 200l stirred stainless steel vessel at a pH of 7.2 and a temperature of 38 degrees C. It was found that 7% of the total MSW COD was readily soluble, of which 80% was converted to biogas; 50% of the insoluble fraction was solubilised, of this only 80% was converted to biogas. The rate of digesting the insoluble fraction was about four times slower than the rate of digesting the soluble fraction; 48% of the total COD was converted to biogas and 40% of the total nitrogen was converted to ammonia. Soluble and insoluble fractions were broken down simultaneously. The minimum time to convert 95% of the degradable fraction to biogas was 20 days. The lag phase for the degradation of insoluble fraction of MSW can be overcome by acclimatising the culture with the soluble fraction. The rate of digestion and the methane yield was not affected by particle size (within the range of 2-50mm). A dynamic model was developed to describe batch digestion of MSW. The parameters of the model were estimated using data from the separate digestion of soluble and insoluble fractions and validated against data from the digestion of unwashed MSW. Trends in the specific aceticlastic and formate-utilising methanogenic activity were used to estimate initial methanogenic biomass concentration and bacterial death rate coefficient. The kinetics of hydrolysis of insoluble fraction could be adequately described by a Contois equation and the kinetics of acidogenesis, and aceticlastic and hydrogen utilising methanogenesis by Monod equations.

  13. Conductive heating and microwave hydrolysis under identical heating profiles for advanced anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Seyedeh Neda; Eskicioglu, Cigdem; Bobowski, Jake; Johnson, Thomas

    2013-09-15

    Microwave (2.45 GHz, 1200 W) and conventional heating (custom pressure vessel) pretreatments were applied to dewatered municipal waste sludge (18% total solids) using identical heating profiles that span a wide range of temperatures (80-160 °C). Fourteen lab-scale semi-continuous digesters were set up to optimize the energy (methane) output and sludge retention time (SRT) requirements of untreated (control) and thermally pretreated anaerobic digesters operated under mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures. Both pretreatment methods indicated that in the pretreatment range of 80-160 °C, temperature was a statistically significant factor (p-value heating, had no statistically significant effect (p-value >0.05) on sludge solubilization. With the exception of the control digesters at a 5-d SRT, all control and pretreated digesters achieved steady state at all three SRTs, corresponding to volumetric organic loading rates of 1.74-6.96 g chemical oxygen demand/L/d. At an SRT of 5 d, both mesophilic and thermophilic controls stopped producing biogas after 20 d of operation with total volatile fatty acids concentrations exceeding 1818 mg/L at pH <5.64 for mesophilic and 2853 mg/L at pH <7.02 for thermophilic controls, while the pretreated digesters continued producing biogas. Furthermore, relative (to control) organic removal efficiencies dramatically increased as SRT was shortened from 20 to 10 and then 5 d, indicating that the control digesters were challenged as the organic loading rate was increased. Energy analysis showed that, at an elevated temperature of 160 °C, the amount of methane recovered was not enough to compensate for the energy input. Among the digesters with positive net energy productions, control and pretreated digesters at 80 °C were more favorable at an SRT of 10 d.

  14. Anaerobic co-digestion of kitchen waste and pig manure with different mixing ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hailin; Duan, Na; Lin, Cong; Li, Xue; Zhong, Mingzhu

    2015-07-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of kitchen waste (KW) and pig manure (PM) with seven different PM to KW total solids (TS) ratios of 1:0, 5:1, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, 1:5 and 0:1 was conducted at mesophilic temperature (35 ± 1 °C) to investigate the feasibility and process performance. The co-digestion of PM and KW was found to be an available way to enhance methane production compared with solo-digestion of PM or KW. The ratio of PM to KW of 1:1 got the highest biodegradability (BDA) of 85.03% and a methane yield of 409.5 mL/gVS. For the co-digestion of KW and PM, there was no obvious inhibition of ammonia nitrogen because it was in an acceptable range from 1380 mg/L to 2020 mg/L in the whole process. However, severe methane inhibition and long lag phase due to the accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) was observed while the KW content was over 50%, and in the lag phase, propionic acid and butyric acid made up the major constituents of the total VFAs. The technical digestion time (T80: the time it takes to produce 80% of the digester's maximum gas production) of the above 7 ratios was 15, 21, 22, 27, 49, 62 and 61 days, respectively. In this study, a mixing ratio of 1:1 for PM and KW was found to maximize BDA and methane yield, provided a short digestion time and stable digestion performance and was therefore recommended for further study and engineering application.

  15. Valorisation of biodiesel production wastes: Anaerobic digestion of residual Tetraselmis suecica biomass and co-digestion with glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Ballardo, David U; Font-Segura, Xavier; Ferrer, Antoni Sánchez; Barrena, Raquel; Rossi, Sergio; Valdez-Ortiz, Angel

    2015-03-01

    One of the principal opportunity areas in the development of the microalgal biodiesel industry is the energy recovery from the solid microalgal biomass residues to optimise the fuel production. This work reports the cumulative methane yields reached from the anaerobic digestion of the solid microalgal biomass residues using different types of inocula, reporting also the improvement of biogas production using the co-digestion of microalgal biomass with glycerol. Results demonstrate that the solid microalgal biomass residues showed better biogas production using a mesophilic inoculum, reaching almost two-fold higher methane production than under thermophilic conditions. Furthermore, the solid microalgal biomass residues methane production rate showed an increase from 173.78 ± 9.57 to 438.46 ± 40.50 mL of methane per gram of volatile solids, when the co-digestion with glycerol was performed. These results are crucial to improve the energy balance of the biodiesel production from Tetraselmis suecica, as well as proposing an alternative way to treat the wastes derived from the microalgae biodiesel production.

  16. Progress in Anaerobic Digestion Models%国内外厌氧消化模型研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨双春; 邓丹; 梁丹丹; 潘一

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic biological method is a process of low energy consumption and high efficiency to deal with high concentration organic wastewater. An anaerobic digestion model describes how the bacteria and the facultative anaerobic bacteria decompose the biodegradable organic in the sludge into carbon dioxide, methane and water under anaerobic conditions. As a structure model, it contains all procedures, including the production processes of decomposition and hydrolysis, acid, acetic acid and methane. In this paper, some sludge anaerobic digestion models are reviewed, such as the single-phase anaerobic digestion model (SP- ADM1), the Two-Phase Anaerobic Digestion Model (TP-ADM1), the combination of the Anaerobic Digestion and the Activated Sludge (ADM1-ASMs), the Sulfate Reduction of Anaerobic Digestion Model (SR-ADM1), the Nitrate Reduction of Anaerobic Digestion Expansion Model (NR-ADEM1), the Gas Production and its Expansion of the Anaerobic Digestion Model (GPAE-ADM1), the Sedimentation Tank of Anaerobic Digestion Model (ST-ADM1), and the Inhibition Kinetics of Anaerobic Digestion Model (IK-ADM1). In addition, the anaerobic digestion models are evaluated in comparison with the anaerobic digestion model 1, and some suggestions are made for future researches .%厌氧生物法是一种适用于处理高浓度有机废水的高效低能耗的处理工艺,厌氧消化模型是表述兼性细菌和厌氧细菌将可生物降解的有机物分解成二氧化碳、甲烷和水的过程模型.它是一个具有分解和水解、产酸、产乙酸和产甲烷等过程的复杂的结构化模型.本文主要介绍了国内外污泥厌氧消化模型的研究现状及其进展,模型包括厌氧消化1号模型(ADM1)、好氧活性污泥-厌氧消化模型(ASM1-ADM1)、单相中温-厌氧消化模型(SPMT-ADM1)、单相高温-厌氧消化模型(SPHT-ADM1)、两相-厌氧消化模型(TP-ADM1)、厌氧消化-活性污泥复合模型(ADM1 -ASMs)、硫酸盐

  17. Application of urea dosing for alkalinity supply during anaerobic digestion of vinasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncz, M A; Formagini, E L; Santos, L da S; Marques, R D; Paulo, P L

    2012-01-01

    Pushed by demand for renewable energy, the ethanol industry in Brazil is expanding. However, production of 1 m(3) of ethanol generates around 13 m(3) of liquid residues (vinasse), so this expansion results in an increasing need for a more adequate destination of these residues. Nowadays the vinasse is dispersed on the sugar cane fields in the practice of fertirrigation, but anaerobic digestion of this residue may be a better solution, additionally offering an alternative source of energy, able to complement hydroelectric power supply in the dry season. However, when trying to digest vinasse at reduced hydraulic retention times, complications arise from its strong tendency toward acidification, upsetting the fragile balance of transformations normally occurring under anaerobic conditions. For successful operation of an anaerobic treatment process with acceptable hydraulic residence times, increasing alkalinity levels inside the reactor is neces-sary. In the present work we show that pH regulation by means of urea dosing, in spite of the risk posed by ammonia toxicity towards methanogenic biomass, can be a viable alternative to avoid vinasse acidification. The ammonia formed in urea conversion remains in solution, rather than escaping to the biogas, and so its use as fertiliser can offset its cost of application in the process.

  18. The efficiency of concentration methods used to detect enteric viruses in anaerobically digested sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Prado

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of enteric viruses in biosolids can be underestimated due to the inefficient methods (mainly molecular methods used to recover the viruses from these matrices. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the different methods used to recover adenoviruses (AdV, rotavirus species A (RVA, norovirus genogroup II (NoV GII and the hepatitis A virus (HAV from biosolid samples at a large urban wastewater treatment plant in Brazil after they had been treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used for spiking experiments to compare the detection limits of feasible methods, such as beef extract elution and ultracentrifugation. Tests were performed to detect the inhibition levels and the bacteriophage PP7 was used as an internal control. The results showed that the inhibitors affected the efficiency of the PCR reaction and that beef extract elution is a suitable method for detecting enteric viruses, mainly AdV from biosolid samples. All of the viral groups were detected in the biosolid samples: AdV (90%, RVA, NoV GII (45% and HAV (18%, indicating the viruses' resistance to the anaerobic treatment process. This is the first study in Brazil to detect the presence of RVA, AdV, NoV GII and HAV in anaerobically digested sludge, highlighting the importance of adequate waste management.

  19. Evaluation of single vs. staged mesophilic anaerobic digestion of kitchen waste with and without microwave pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin

    2013-08-15

    Effects of single and dual stage (acidogenic-methanogenic) mesophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) of kitchen waste (KW) was evaluated at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20, 15, 12 and 9 d with and without thermal microwave (MW) pretreatment (145 °C). Anaerobic acidification in terms of acid accumulation was superior compared to microaerophilic acidification. Maximum anaerobic acidification of KW was determined to occur with an HRT of 2 d which was then selected for the acidification stage. The dual stage AD system fed with untreated KW produced the maximum biogas and volatile solids (VS) stabilization efficiencies at the shortest HRT of 9 d. Conversely, for free liquid resulting from MW pretreatment of KW the two stage reactor at 20 d HRT produced three fold more methane compared with the untreated free liquid control. However, MW pretreatment and AD of the free liquid fraction only, was not a sustainable treatment option. For KW, staging of the AD process had a greater positive impact on waste stabilization and methane yield compared to single stage reactors or MW pretreatment. KW can be characterized as being a readily biodegradable solid waste; concomitantly it is recommended that digester staging without MW pretreatment be employed to maximize methane yield and production.

  20. Enhanced anaerobic treatment of CSTR-digested effluent from chicken manure: The effect of ammonia inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan-Guang; Zhou, Xue-Fei; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Zhu, Hong-Guang

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ammonia inhibition was evaluated during the enhanced anaerobic treatment of digested effluent from a 700m(3) chicken-manure continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). A 12.3L internal circulation (IC) reactor inoculated with an anaerobic granular sludge and operated at 35±1°C was employed for the investigation. With a corresponding organic loading rate of 1.5-3.5kg-COD/m(3)d over a hydraulic retention time of 1.5d, a maximum volumetric biogas production rate of 1.2m(3)/m(3)d and TCOD (total COD) removal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80% was achieved. However, the continual increase in the influent TAN content led to ammonia inhibition in the methanogenesis system. The SCOD/TAN (soluble COD/total ammonia nitrogen) ratio was presented to be the key controlling factor for the anaerobic treatment of semi-digested chicken manure, and further validation through shock loading and ammonia inhibition experiments was conducted. The threshold value of the SCOD/TAN ratio was determined to be 2.4 (corresponding to a TAN of 1250mg/L) at an influent pH of 8.5-9.

  1. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION IN SANITIZATION OF PIG SLURRY AND BIOMASS IN AGRICULTURAL BIOGAS PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Grudziński

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pig slurry is one of the production manure, which should be managed properly because of environmental threats it can cause. Pig slurry contains a wide range of microorganisms, most of which are opportunistic or obligatory pathogens for people and animals. Spreading it on fields without control can cause microbial contaminations of water and soil. Use of pig slurry as substrate in anaerobic digestion can be an effective way of sanitization. In this work role of methanogenic fermentation in pig slurry sanitization was laboratory examined. Study materials were biological samples: 1 sample of raw slurry and 3 samples of fermented biomass from different stages of fermentation. Total number of coliforms was determined by MPN (most probable number method, and presence of enterococci was verified in each sample. Study have shown that anaerobic digestion reduced total number of coliforms from initial amount of 7.0 x 106 [MPN/ml] in raw slurry to 3.7 x 104 [MPN/ml]. Total reduction was 99.47%. Moreover, after first fermentation, enterococci in the sample were undetectable. Results of this study proved anaerobic fermentation to be an affective way to neutralize microbial threat, that is pig slurry.

  2. The efficiency of concentration methods used to detect enteric viruses in anaerobically digested sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Tatiana; Guilayn, Wilma de Carvalho Pereira Bonet; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2013-01-01

    The presence of enteric viruses in biosolids can be underestimated due to the inefficient methods (mainly molecular methods) used to recover the viruses from these matrices. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the different methods used to recover adenoviruses (AdV), rotavirus species A (RVA), norovirus genogroup II (NoV GII) and the hepatitis A virus (HAV) from biosolid samples at a large urban wastewater treatment plant in Brazil after they had been treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for spiking experiments to compare the detection limits of feasible methods, such as beef extract elution and ultracentrifugation. Tests were performed to detect the inhibition levels and the bacteriophage PP7 was used as an internal control. The results showed that the inhibitors affected the efficiency of the PCR reaction and that beef extract elution is a suitable method for detecting enteric viruses, mainly AdV from biosolid samples. All of the viral groups were detected in the biosolid samples: AdV (90%), RVA, NoV GII (45%) and HAV (18%), indicating the viruses' resistance to the anaerobic treatment process. This is the first study in Brazil to detect the presence of RVA, AdV, NoV GII and HAV in anaerobically digested sludge, highlighting the importance of adequate waste management. PMID:23440119

  3. Anaerobic co-digestion of forage radish and dairy manure in complete mix digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmers are increasingly using forage radish as a winter cover crop to achieve multiple soil and environmental benefits. In this study, pilot-scale mixed digesters were used to quantify methane (CH4) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production when using forage radish, a sulfur-rich cover crop, as a co-d...

  4. Environmental assessment of energy and waste systems based on anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehl, Torsten

    2013-08-01

    The results of the studies show that biogas production brings about many or environmental improvements compared to energy generation based on fossil sources when designed and managed properly. Environmental advantages are found for GWP (Global Warming Potential) and energy consumption, disadvantages however for EP (Eutrophication Potential), AP (Acidification Potential) and POCP (Photochemical Ozone Creation Potential). However the large amount of technologies and measures indicate that there is a large potential to reduce the environmental impacts. Another finding is that all life cycle phases and subsystems must be carefully considered, as no single dominating item or aspect in the life cycle can be identified. The most environmentally relevant phases are found to be storage, treatment and field application of manure and digestate. This result is to a large part due to the emission of ammonia, nitrous oxide and nitrate. It can therefore be concluded that from a lifecycle perspective, control and mitigation of nitrogen related emissions will be of utmost importance in the future to improve the environmental performance of biogas systems. Considerable emission reduction potentials are exposed when proper technological modifications (e.g. storage covers, filter technologies, digestate treatment or field application technologies) or adopted management practices (early soil incorporation of digestate) are applied. The environmental analysis also shows that whenever possible the focus of anaerobic digestion should be on the use of organic residues from households, agriculture or food industry instead of using energy crops. In this case conventional waste management systems are replaced and manifold positive effects of anaerobic digestion such as waste stabilization, nutrient recycling and energy generation emerge.

  5. Life Cycle Environmental Impacts of Electricity from Biogas Produced by Anaerobic Digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusi, Alessandra; Bacenetti, Jacopo; Fiala, Marco; Azapagic, Adisa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate life cycle environmental impacts associated with the generation of electricity from biogas produced by the anaerobic digestion (AD) of agricultural products and waste. Five real plants in Italy were considered, using maize silage, slurry, and tomato waste as feedstocks and cogenerating electricity and heat; the latter is not utilized. The results suggest that maize silage and the operation of anaerobic digesters, including open storage of digestate, are the main contributors to the impacts of biogas electricity. The system that uses animal slurry is the best option, except for the marine and terrestrial ecotoxicity. The results also suggest that it is environmentally better to have smaller plants using slurry and waste rather than bigger installations, which require maize silage to operate efficiently. Electricity from biogas is environmentally more sustainable than grid electricity for seven out of 11 impacts considered. However, in comparison with natural gas, biogas electricity is worse for seven out of 11 impacts. It also has mostly higher impacts than other renewables, with a few exceptions, notably solar photovoltaics. Thus, for the AD systems and mesophilic operating conditions considered in this study, biogas electricity can help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to a fossil-intensive electricity mix; however, some other impacts increase. If mitigation of climate change is the main aim, other renewables have a greater potential to reduce GHG emissions. If, in addition to this, other impacts are considered, then hydro, wind, and geothermal power are better alternatives to biogas electricity. However, utilization of heat would improve significantly its environmental sustainability, particularly global warming potential, summer smog, and the depletion of abiotic resources and the ozone layer. Further improvements can be achieved by banning open digestate storage to prevent methane emissions and regulating

  6. Life cycle environmental impacts of electricity from biogas produced by anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eFusi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate life cycle environmental impacts associated with the generation of electricity from biogas produced by the anaerobic digestion of agricultural products and waste. Five real plants in Italy were considered, using maize silage, slurry and tomato waste as feedstocks and co-generating electricity and heat; the latter is not utilized. The results suggest that maize silage and the operation of anaerobic digesters, including open storage of digestate, are the main contributors to the impacts of biogas electricity. The system which uses animal slurry is the best option, except for the marine and terrestrial eco-toxicity. The results also suggest that it is environmentally better to have smaller plants using slurry and waste rather than bigger installations which require maize silage to operate efficiently. Electricity from biogas is environmentally more sustainable than grid electricity for seven out of 11 impacts considered. However, in comparison with natural gas, biogas electricity is worse for seven out of 11 impacts. It also has mostly higher impacts than other renewables, with a few exceptions, notably solar photovoltaics. Thus, for the AD systems and mesophilic operating conditions considered in this study, biogas electricity can help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG emissions relative to a fossil-intensive electricity mix; however, some other impacts increase. If mitigation of climate change is the main aim, other renewables have a greater potential to reduce GHG emissions. If, in addition to this, other impacts are considered, then hydro, wind and geothermal power are better alternatives to biogas electricity. However, utilization of heat would improve significantly its environmental sustainability, particularly global warming potential, summer smog and the depletion of abiotic resources and the ozone layer. Further improvements can be achieved by banning open digestate storage to prevent methane emissions and

  7. Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano Beach anaerobic digestion facility. Semi-annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, S; Farooq, S; Gerrish, H P; Wong, K F; Daly, Jr, E L; Chriswell, C

    1980-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion of municipal waste has been demonstrated to be feasible in bench scale experiments by Pfeffer (1974). Approximately, 50% reduction in mass and production of 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas/ton have been estimated. The gas composition is estimated to be 50% methane and 50% carbon monoxide. The technical and economic feasibility of anaerobic digestion with an ultimate objective of commercialization are discussed. A plant has been built at Pompano Beach, Florida on an existing shredding and landfill operation site. The plant design capacity is 100 tons/day. Two digesters have been constructed to be used in parallel. The process consists of primary shredding, metal separation, secondary shredding, air classification and digestion of light fraction. Sewage sludge was used to seed the initial mixture in the digester. The output slurry is vacuum filtered and the filter cake disposed on an existing landfill. The filtrate is recycled. Excess filtrate is sprayed on the landfill. At present the output gas is being flared. A flow chart for the plant is presented. It is imperative that environmental investigations be conducted on new energy technology prior to commercialization. A project was initiated to characterize all input and output streams and to assess the potential for ground water contamination by landfill disposal of effluents. Detailed chemical, biological and physical characterization efforts supported by leaching and modelling studies are being conducted to achieve the stated objectives. Some mutagenic studies were also conducted. The environmental investigations were started in August 1978. Sengupta et al (1979a) reported the first year's efforts.

  8. Life Cycle Environmental Impacts of Electricity from Biogas Produced by Anaerobic Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusi, Alessandra; Bacenetti, Jacopo; Fiala, Marco; Azapagic, Adisa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate life cycle environmental impacts associated with the generation of electricity from biogas produced by the anaerobic digestion (AD) of agricultural products and waste. Five real plants in Italy were considered, using maize silage, slurry, and tomato waste as feedstocks and cogenerating electricity and heat; the latter is not utilized. The results suggest that maize silage and the operation of anaerobic digesters, including open storage of digestate, are the main contributors to the impacts of biogas electricity. The system that uses animal slurry is the best option, except for the marine and terrestrial ecotoxicity. The results also suggest that it is environmentally better to have smaller plants using slurry and waste rather than bigger installations, which require maize silage to operate efficiently. Electricity from biogas is environmentally more sustainable than grid electricity for seven out of 11 impacts considered. However, in comparison with natural gas, biogas electricity is worse for seven out of 11 impacts. It also has mostly higher impacts than other renewables, with a few exceptions, notably solar photovoltaics. Thus, for the AD systems and mesophilic operating conditions considered in this study, biogas electricity can help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to a fossil-intensive electricity mix; however, some other impacts increase. If mitigation of climate change is the main aim, other renewables have a greater potential to reduce GHG emissions. If, in addition to this, other impacts are considered, then hydro, wind, and geothermal power are better alternatives to biogas electricity. However, utilization of heat would improve significantly its environmental sustainability, particularly global warming potential, summer smog, and the depletion of abiotic resources and the ozone layer. Further improvements can be achieved by banning open digestate storage to prevent methane emissions and regulating

  9. Anaerobic digestion of fruit and vegetable processing wastes for biogas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanath, P.; Sumithra Devi, S.; Nand, K. (Central Food Technological Research Inst., Mysore (IN))

    1992-01-01

    The effect of feeding different fruit and vegetable wastes, mango, pineapple, tomato, jackfruit, banana and orange, was studied in a 60-litre digester by cycling each waste every fifth day in order to operate the digester as and when there was supply of feed. The characteristics of the anaerobically digested fluid and digester performance in terms of biogas production were determined at different loading rates (LR) and at different hydraulic retention times (HRT) and the maximum biogas yield of 0.6 m{sup 3}/kg VS added was achieved at a 20-day HRT and 40 kg TS m{sup -3}day{sup -1} loading rate. The hourly gas production was observed in the digesters operated at 16 and 24 days HRT. The major yield (74.5%) of gas was produced within 12h of feeding at a 16-day HRT whereas at a 24-day HRT only 59.03% of the total gas could be obtained at this time. (author).

  10. Ammonia removal in food waste anaerobic digestion using a side-stream stripping process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna-Maza, A; Heaven, S; Banks, C J

    2014-01-01

    Three 35-L anaerobic digesters fed on source segregated food waste were coupled to side-stream ammonia stripping columns and operated semi-continuously over 300 days, with results in terms of performance and stability compared to those of a control digester without stripping. Biogas was used as the stripping medium, and the columns were operated under different conditions of temperature (55, 70, 85 °C), pH (unadjusted and pH 10), and RT (2-5 days). To reduce digester TAN concentrations to a useful level a high temperature (≥70 °C) and a pH of 10 were needed; under these conditions 48% of the TAN was removed over a 138-day period without any detrimental effects on digester performance. Other effects of the stripping process were an overall reduction in digestate organic nitrogen-containing fraction compared to the control and a recovery in the acetoclastic pathway when TAN concentration was 1770±20 mg kg(-1).

  11. Growth kinetics and competition between Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in mesophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Anne; Stensel, H David; Ferguson, John

    2006-05-01

    Methanosarcina species with a high maximum specific growth rate (mumax) and high half-saturation coefficient (KS) and Methanosaeta species with a low mumax and low KS are the only known aceticlastic methanogens. Because of Methanosaeta's low KS, the low acetate concentrations in conventional, mesophilic anaerobic digestion yield Methanosaeta dominance. However, Methanosarcina absorbs increases in acetate more efficiently and thus promotes more stable digestion. This paper tests the hypothesis that decreasing digester feeding frequencies can increase Methanosarcina predominance. Two acetate-fed reactors were established at a 17-day solids retention time. One reactor was fed hourly, and one was fed once daily. Microscopic and molecular methods were used to verify that the hourly fed reactor enriched for Methanosaeta, while the daily fed reactor enriched for Methanosarcina. Growth and substrate-use kinetics were measured for each reactor. A digester overload condition was simulated, and the Methanosarcina-enriched reactor was found to perform better than the Methanosaeta-enriched reactor. These findings indicate that Methanosarcina dominance can be achieved with infrequent feedings, leading to more stable digestion.

  12. Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge. Application to the macroalgae from the Venice lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchi, F. [University of L`Aquila, Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, Abruzzo (Italy); Pavan, P. [Environmental Sciences, University of Venice, Venice (Italy); Mata-Alvarez, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    1996-07-05

    Possibilities of co-digestion of sewage sludge (SS) with other organic wastes are examined in this paper. Anaerobic co-digestion of macroalgae of the Venice lagoon (A) with SS, in wastewater treatment plants is studied in detail. This approach can contribute to the solution of the final disposal of the 50,000 m{sup 3} of macrophytes harvested each season. These are mainly Ulva rigida and Gracilaria confervoides. In the experiments A and SS were mixed at different ratios (20 - 40% algae, TS basis) and fed to mesophilic (37C) and thermophilic (55C) digesters which operated at 11- to 15-day hydraulic retention times and 1.7 - 4.4 kgTVS/ m{sup 3}/day organic loading rates. It was concluded that the mesophilic co-digestion process is applicable with potentialities of around 30% of the present SS flow-rate. Thermophilic digestion is not possible, because of the inhibition of methanogens probably due to the activity of sulphate-reducers

  13. Biomass production, anaerobic digestion, and nutrient recycling of small benthic or floating seaweeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    A number of experiments have been carried out supporting the development of a seaweed-based ocean energy farm. Beginning in 1976, forty-two species of seaweed indigenous to the coastal waters of Central Florida were screened for high biomass yields in intensive culture. Gracilaria tikvahiae achieved the highest annual yield of 34.8 g dry wt/m/sup 2/ day. Yield has been found to vary inversely with seawater exchange rate, apparently because of carbon dioxide limitation at low exchange rates. Gracilaria was anaerobically digested in 120 liter and 2 liter reactors. Gas yields in the large digesters averaged 0.4 1/g volatile solids (.24 1 CH/sub 4//gv.s.) with a bioconversion efficiency of 48%. Studies of the suitability of digester residue as a nutrient source for growing Gracilaria have been conducted. Nitrogen recycling efficiency from harvested plant through liquid digestion residue to harvested plant approached 75%. Studies of nutrient uptake and storage by Gracilaria, Ascophyllum, and Sargassum showed that nutrient starved plants are capable of rapidly assimilating and storing inorganic nutrients which may be used later for growth when no nutrients are present in the medium. A shallow water seaweed farm was proposed which would produce methane from harvested seaweed and use digester residues as a concentrated source of nutrients for periodic fertilizations.

  14. Biogas Production through the Anaerobic Digestion of Date Palm Tree Wastes - Process Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Y. Al-Juhaimi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A process for the production of biogas through the anaerobic digestion (AD of date palm tree waste (DPTW was developed. The effects of different substrate pretreatments and operating conditions on the yield of biogas and on the chemical composition of DPTW before and after AD were studied. The best results were obtained using alkali pretreatment, with a particle size of 2 to 5 mm, a C:N ratio of 30:1, a digestion temperature of 40 °C, an initial pH of 7.0, and a volatile solids concentration of approximately 10%. The production of flammable biogas containing up to 50% methane started after about one week of operation and continued for approximately 11 weeks. The highest average biogas yield obtained was 342.2 L gas/kg of volatile solids fed to the digester. The highest maximum and average volumetric biogas production rates obtained were 674.5 and 404.4 L/m3 of digester volume per day, respectively. After digestion, there was up to a 58% reduction in the organic matter content of the substrate. Reductions in the contents of cellulose, hemicellulose, and soluble organic compounds were 68.7, 73.4, and 71.9%, respectively, while the ash and lignin contents remained mostly constant. The remaining sludge contained nutrient minerals and some organic matter which qualifies it as a potential soil fertilizer for crop production.

  15. Anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste as a treatment prior to landfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, P.H.L.; Kuruparan, P.; Visvanathan, C. [Asian Institute of Technology, Pathumthani (Thailand). Environmental Engineering and Management Program

    2007-02-15

    Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste was conducted in pilot-scale reactor based on high-solid combined anaerobic digestion process. This study was performed in two runs. In Run1 and Run 2, pre-stage flushing and micro-aeration were conducted to determine their effect in terms of enhancing hydrolysis and acidification in ambient condition. In Run 2, after pre-stage, the methane phase (methanogenesis) was started-up after pH adjustment and inoculum addition in mesophilic condition. Acidified leachate produced in pre-stage was used for percolation during active methane phase. At the end of methane phase, air flushing was conducted before unloading the digesters. Hydrolysis an acidification yield of 140 g C/kg TS and 180 g VFA/kg TS were achieved, respectively in pre-stage. Micro-aeration exhibited an equivocal result in terms of enhancing hydrolysis/acidification; however it showed a positive effect in methane phase performance and this needed further investigation. Leachate percolation during methane phase showed an enhanced methanization when compared to the reactors without leachate percolation. After 60 days, 260 l CH{sub 4}/kg VS was obtained. Based on the waste methane potential, 75% biogas conversion and 61% VS degradation were achieved. (author)

  16. Liquid digestate from anaerobic treatment of source-separated household waste as fertilizer to barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsen, Trond Knapp; Andersen, Uno; Krogstad, Tore; Sørheim, Roald

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the efficiency of different organic waste materials as NPK fertilizer, in addition to the risk for leaching losses related to shower precipitation in the first part of the growing season. The experiment was tested in a pot trial on a sandy soil in a greenhouse. Six organic fertilizers were evaluated: liquid anaerobic digestate (LAD) sourced from separated household waste, nitrified liquid anaerobic digestate (NLAD) of the same origin as LAD, meat and bone meal (MBM), hydrolysed salmon protein (HSP), reactor-composted catering waste (CW) and cattle manure (CM). An unfertilized control, calcium nitrate (CN) and Fullgjødsel® 21-4-10 were used as reference fertilizers. At equal amounts of mineral nitrogen both LAD and Fullgjødsel® gave equal yield of barley in addition to equal uptake of N, P, and K in barley grain. NLAD gave significantly lower barley yield than the original LAD due to leaching of nitrate-N after a simulated surplus of precipitation (28 mm) at Zadoks 14. There was significantly increased leaching of nitrate N from the treatments receiving 160 kg N ha(-1) of CN and NLAD in comparison with all the other organic fertilizers. In this study LAD performed to the same degree as Fullgjødsel® NPK fertilizer and it was concluded that LAD can be recommended as fertilizer for cereals. Nitrification of the ammonium N in the digestate caused significantly increased nitrate leaching, and cannot be recommended.

  17. Anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by lime mud from papermaking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jishi; Wang, Qinqing; Zheng, Pengwei; Wang, Yusong

    2014-10-01

    The effects of lime mud from papermaking process (LMP) addition as buffer agent and inorganic nutrient on the anaerobic digestion stability of food waste (FW) were investigated under mesophilic conditions with the aim of avoiding volatile fatty acids accumulation, and inorganic elements deficiency. When LMP concentration ranged from 6.0 to 10g/L, the FW anaerobic digestion could maintain efficient and stable state. These advantages are attributed to the existence of Ca, Na, Mg, K, Fe, and alkaline substances that favor the methanogenic process. The highest CH4 yield of 272.8mL/g-VS was obtained at LMP and VS concentrations of 10.0 and 19.8g/L, respectively, with the corresponding lag-phase time of 3.84d and final pH of 8.4. The methanogens from residue digestates mainly consisted of Methanobrevibacter, coccus-type and sarcina-type methanogens with LMP addition compared to Methanobacteria in control. However, higher concentration of LMP inhibited methanogenic activities and methane production.

  18. Effects of lactone, ketone, and phenolic compounds on methane production and metabolic intermediates during anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikandari, Rachma; Sari, Noor Kartika; A'yun, Qurrotul; Millati, Ria; Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2015-02-01

    Fruit waste is a potential feedstock for biogas production. However, the presence of fruit flavors that have antimicrobial activity is a challenge for biogas production. Lactones, ketones, and phenolic compounds are among the several groups of fruit flavors that are present in many fruits. This work aimed to investigate the effects of two lactones, i.e., γ-hexalactone and γ-decalactone; two ketones, i.e., furaneol and mesifurane; and two phenolic compounds, i.e., quercetin and epicatechin on anaerobic digestion with a focus on methane production, biogas composition, and metabolic intermediates. Anaerobic digestion was performed in a batch glass digester incubated at 55 °C for 30 days. The flavor compounds were added at concentrations of 0.05, 0.5, and 5 g/L. The results show that the addition of γ-decalactone, quercetin, and epicathechin in the range of 0.5-5 g/L reduced the methane production by 50 % (MIC50). Methane content was reduced by 90 % with the addition of 5 g/L of γ-decalactone, quercetin, and epicathechin. Accumulation of acetic acid, together with an increase in carbon dioxide production, was observed. On the contrary, γ-hexalactone, furaneol, and mesifurane increased the methane production by 83-132 % at a concentration of 5 g/L.

  19. An integrated approach to energy recovery from biomass and waste: Anaerobic digestion-gasification-water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, M; Montorsi, L; Stefani, M

    2014-07-01

    The article investigates the performance of an integrated system for the energy recovery from biomass and waste based on anaerobic digestion, gasification and water treatment. In the proposed system, the organic fraction of waste of the digestible biomass is fed into an anaerobic digester, while a part of the combustible fraction of the municipal solid waste is gasified. Thus, the obtained biogas and syngas are used as a fuel for running a cogeneration system based on an internal combustion engine to produce electric and thermal power. The waste water produced by the integrated plant is recovered by means of both forward and inverse osmosis. The different processes, as well as the main components of the system, are modelled by means of a lumped and distributed parameter approach and the main outputs of the integrated plant such as the electric and thermal power and the amount of purified water are calculated. Finally, the implementation of the proposed system is evaluated for urban areas with a different number of inhabitants and the relating performance is estimated in terms of the main outputs of the system.

  20. Hydrolysis and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Borghi, A.; Converti, A.; Palazzi, E.; Del Borghi, M. [Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering ``G.B. Bonino``, Genoa University, Via Opera Pia 15, 16145 Genoa (Italy)

    1999-06-01

    An attempt is presented and discussed to adapt a well-known process successfully employed in the U.S.A. for the simultaneous treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSWOF) and sewage sludge to the particular situation of water works in Italy. It consists of preliminary domestic grinding of MSWOF, its discharge into the sewer, screening, and final digestion of the resulting residue together with sewage sludge. In order to avoid extension work of the present activated sludge sections necessary to face the organic load increase, a fine screening is necessary, while the efficiency of anaerobic digestion can be improved by shifting the system from mesophilic (37 C) to thermophilic (55 C) conditions. The effects of thermal, chemical, and biological pretreatments of both MSWOF and sewage sludge on methane, carbon dioxide, and biogas productions are investigated either separately or jointly. During these pretreatments, volatile suspended solid (VSS) concentration remarkably decreased while soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) increased as the result of the progressive hydrolysis of the polymeric materials present in the feed. Finally, the kinetic parameters of the hydrolysis of these materials are estimated and compared in order to provide useful information on the factors limiting the anaerobic digestion as well as to suggest the best way to carry out the process on a large scale. (orig.) With 8 figs., 7 tabs., 20 refs.