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Sample records for bwr stability simulations

  1. The BWR Stability Issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to supply general information about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) stability. The main concerned topics are: phenomenological aspects, experimental database, modelling features and capabilities, numerical models, three-dimensional modelling, BWR system performance during stability, stability monitoring and licensing aspects.

  2. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  3. BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valtonen, K.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to examine TVO-I oscillation incident, which occured in February 22.1987 and to find out safety implications of oscillations in ATWS incidents. Calculations have been performed with RAMONA-3B and TRAB codes. RAMONA-3B is a BWR transient analysis code with three-dimencional neutron kinetics and nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous thermal hydraulics. TRAB code is a one-dimencional BWR transient code which uses methods similar to RAMONA-3B. The results have shown that both codes are capable of analyzing of the oscillation incidents. Both out-of-phase and in-phase oscillations are possible. If the reactor scram fails (ATWS) during oscillations the severe fuel failures are always possible and the reactor core may exceed the prompt criticality

  4. BWR stability: history and state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, George

    2014-01-01

    The paper briefly recalls the historical developments, reviews the important phenomena, the analytical and simulation tools that are used for the analysis of BWR stability focussing on the linear, frequency domain methods

  5. BWR stability analysis at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1991-01-01

    Following the unexpected, but safely terminated, power and flow oscillations in the LaSalle-2 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) on March 9, 1988, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Offices of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) requested that the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) carry out BWR stability analyses, centered around fourteen specific questions. Ten of the fourteen questions address BWR stability issues in general and are dealt with in this paper. The other four questions address local, out-of-phase oscillations and matters of instrumentation; they fall outside the scope of the work reported here. It was the purpose of the work documented in this report to answer ten of the fourteen NRC-stipulated questions. Nine questions are answered by analyzing the LaSalle-2 instability and related BWR transients with the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA) and by performing an uncertainty assessment of the EPA predictions. The tenth question is answered on the basis of first principles. The ten answers are summarized

  6. A simplified spatial model for BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Y.; Lederer, Y.; Meron, E.

    2012-01-01

    A spatial reduced order model for the study of BWR stability, based on the phenomenological model of March-Leuba et al., is presented. As one dimensional spatial dependence of the neutron flux, fuel temperature and void fraction is introduced, it is possible to describe both global and regional oscillations of the reactor power. Both linear stability analysis and numerical analysis were applied in order to describe the parameters which govern the model stability. The results were found qualitatively similar to past results. Doppler reactivity feedback was found essential for the explanation of the different regions of the flow-power stability map. (authors)

  7. Investigation of BWR stability in Forsmark 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, R.; Reisch, F.; Bergdahl, B.G.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.; Kellner, S.

    1988-01-01

    A series of noise measurements have been conducted at the Forsmark-2 reactor during its start-up operation after the revision in 1987. The main purpose was to investigate the BWR stability problem based on noise analysis, i.e. the problem of resonant power oscillation with frequency of about 0.5 Hz, which tends to arise at high power and low core flow condition. The noise analysis was performed to estimate the noise source which gives rise to the power oscillation, to evaluate the stability condition of the Forsmark-2 reactor in terms of the decay ratio (DR), as well as to investigate a safety related problem in connection with the BWR stability. The results indicate that the power oscillation is due to dynamic coupling between the neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics via void reactivity feedback. The DR reached as high as ≅ 0.7 at 63% of the rated power and 4100 kg/s of the total core flow. An investigation was made for the noise recording which represents a strong pressure oscillation with a peak frequency at 0.33 Hz. The result suggests that such pressure oscillation, if the peak frequency coincided with that of the resonant power oscillation, might become a cause of scram. The present noise analysis indicates the importance of a BWR on-line surveillance system with functions like stability condition monitoring and control system diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. BWR-stability investigation at Forsmark 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergdahl, B.G.; Reisch, F.; Oguma, R.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1988-01-01

    A series of noise measurements have been conducted at Forsmark 1 during start-up operation after the revision summer '87. The main purpose was to investigate BWR-stability problems, i.e. resonant power oscillations of 0.5 Hz around 65% power and 4100 kg/s core flow, which tend to arise at high power and low core flow conditions. The analysis was performed to estimate the noise source which gives rise to the oscillation, to evaluate the measure of stability, i.e. the Decay Ratio (Dr) as well as to investigate other safety related problems. The result indicates that the oscillation is due to the dynamic coupling between the neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics via void reactivity feedback. The Dr ranged between values of 0.7 and > 0.9, instead of expected 0.6 (Dr=1 is defined as instability). These high values imply that the core cannot suppress oscillations fast enough and a small perturbation can cause scram. Further it was found that the entire core is oscillating in phase (LPRM's) with varying strength where any connection to the consequences of different fuel (8x8, 9x9) being present simultaneously cannot be excluded. This report elucidates the importance of an on-line BWR-stability surveillance system with functions like stability condition monitoring and control system diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. The HAMBO BWR simulator of HAMMLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Tommy; Jokstad, Haakon; Meyer, Brita D.; Nihlwing, Christer; Norrman, Sixten; Puska, Eija Karita; Raussi, Pekka; Tiihonen, Olli

    2001-02-01

    Modernisation of control rooms of the nuclear power plants has been a major issue in Sweden and Finland the last few years, and this will continue in the years to come. As an aid in the process of introducing new technology into the control rooms, the benefit of having an experimental simulator where proto typing of solutions can be performed, has been emphasised by many plants. With this as a basis, the BWR plants in Sweden and Finland decided to fund, in co-operation with the Halden Project, an experimental BWR simulator based on the Forsmark 3 plant in Sweden. The BWR simulator development project was initiated in January 1998. VTT Energy in Finland developed the simulator models with the aid of their APROS tool, while the operator interface was developed by the Halden Project. The simulator was thoroughly tested by experienced HRP personnel and professional Forsmark 3 operators, and accepted by the BWR utilities in June 2000. The acceptance tests consisted of 19 well-defined transients, as well as the running of the simulator from full power down to cold shutdown and back up again with the use of plant procedures. This report describes the HAMBO simulator, with its simulator models, the operator interface, and the underlying hardware and software infrastructure. The tools used for developing the simulator, APROS, Picasso-3 and the Integration Platform, are also briefly described. The acceptance tests are described, and examples of the results are presented, to illustrate the level of validation of the simulator. The report concludes with an indication of the short-term usage of the simulator. (Author)

  10. BWR stability using a reducing dynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J. M.; Blazquez Martinez, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical structure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations is non-linear. Simple parametric calculation of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author)

  11. BWR stability using a reduced dynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J.M.; Blazquez, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical struct-ure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations in non-linear. Simple parametric calculat-ion of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author). 7 refs

  12. Simulation of BWR stability following an ATWS with boron injection using TRAC-BF1 with one-dimensional kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lider, S.; Maclan, R.; Baratta, A.J.; Mahaffy, J.; Robinson, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    The scenario following an ATWS is characterized by the necessity to reduce the power in the reactor as fast as possible. The only means to insert a significant amount of negative reactivity in a BWR during an ATWS are the natural reactor negative void coefficient, and the injection of highly enriched boron through the SLCS. The ATWS management strategy suggested by BWR owner's group contemplates an initial rapid decrease in power as a result of the recirculation pump trip. This is followed by lowering of vessel water level and the injection of borated water into the lower plenum. A recent paper of Dias, et al. reports that reducing core power and lowering water level causes a reduction in boron mixing efficiency and the net effect is a longer time to shut down and an increase in Suppression Pool (SP) temperature. In the present paper, a series of analyses are made to address this issue. The preliminary results for the water level positions at TAF, TAF+1.5 m (TAF+5') and TAF+3 m (TAF+10') support the similar findings of Dias, et al. (author)

  13. Advanced technology for BWR operator training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Akira; Fujita, Eimitsu; Nakao, Toshihiko; Nakabaru, Mitsugu; Asaoka, Kouchi.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plants which went into service recently. The simulator is a full scope replica type simulator which faithfully replicates the control room environment of the reference plant with six main control panels and twelve auxiliary ones. In comparison with earlier simulators, the scope of the simulation is significantly extended in both width and depth. The simulation model is also refined in order to include operator training according to sympton-based emergency procedure guidelines to mitigate the results in accident cases. In particular, the core model and the calculational model of the radiation intensity distribution, if radioactive materials were released, are improved. As for simulator control capabilities by which efficient and effective training can be achieved, various advanced designs are adopted allowing easy use of the simulators. (author)

  14. BWR nuclear plant maintenance simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, I.F.

    1985-01-01

    As early as 1977, the General Electric Company, USA, Nuclear Energy Operation was making plans to construct a maintenance-type simulator to support Training and Services. The Company's pioneering experience with control room simulators started in 1968 with the Dresden simulator and showed clearly the benefits of having such facilities for training, checkout of procedures and, in the case of maintenance, match-up of equipment or tools as needed. Since the dedication of the facility, it has proved to be an invaluable resource in the training of refuelling and servicing crews. The facility has also been extensively used as developmental and test facility for in-vessel servicing equipment and procedures. (author)

  15. Simulation of decreasing reactor power level with BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwoto; Zuhair; Rivai, Abu Khalid

    2002-01-01

    Study on characteristic of BWR using Desktop PC Based Simulator Program was analysed. This simulator is more efficient and cheaper for analyzing of characteristic and dynamic respond than full scope simulator for decreasing power level of BW. Dynamic responses of BWR reactor was investigated during the power level reduction from 100% FP (Full Power) which is 3926 MWth to 0% FP with 25% steps and 1 % FP/sec rate. The overall results for core flow rate, reactor steam flow, feed-water flow and turbine-generator power show tendency proportional to reduction of reactor power. This results show that reactor power control in BWR could be done by control of re-circulation flow that alter the density of water used as coolant and moderator. Decreasing the re-circulation flow rate will decrease void density which has negative reactivity and also affect the position of control rods

  16. Recent technology for BWR operator training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Kato, Kanji; Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Asaoka, Koichi.

    1990-01-01

    As one of the important factors for maintaining the high capacity ratio in Japanese nuclear power stations, the contribution of excellent operators is pointed out. BWR Operation Training Center has trained many operators using two full scope simulators for operation training modeling BWRs. But in order to meet the demands of the recent increase of training needs and the upgrading of the contents, it was decided to install the third simulator, and Hitachi Ltd. received the order to construct the main part, and delivered it. This simulator obtained the good reputation as its range of simulation is wide, and the characteristics resemble very well those of the actual plants. Besides, various new designs were adopted in the control of the simulator, and its handling became very easy. Japanese nuclear power plants are operated at constant power output, and the unexpected stop is very rare, therefore the chance of operating the plants by operators is very few. Accordingly, the training using the simulators which can simulate the behavior of the plants with computers, and can freely generate abnormal phenomena has become increasingly important. The mode and positioning of the simulators for operation training, the full scope simulator BTC-3 and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  17. PREDICTIVE METHODS FOR STABILITY MARGIN IN BWR

    OpenAIRE

    MELARA SAN ROMÁN, JOSÉ

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Power and flow oscillations in a BWR are very undesirable. One of the major concerns is to ensure, during power oscillations, compliance with GDC 10 and 12. GDC 10 requires that the reactor core be designed with appropriate margin to assure that specified acceptable fuel design limits will not be exceeded during any condition of normal operation, including the effects of anticipated operational occurrences. GDC 12 requires assurance that power oscillations which can result in conditions ...

  18. Assessment of the Prony's method for BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier; Castillo-Duran, Rogelio; Palacios-Hernandez, Javier C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper describes a method to determine the degree of stability of a BWR. → Performance comparison between Prony's and common AR techniques is presented. → Benchmark data and actual BWR transient data are used for comparison. → DR and f results are presented and discussed. → The Prony's method is shown to be a robust technique for BWR stability. - Abstract: It is known that Boiling Water Reactors are susceptible to present power oscillations in regions of high power and low coolant flow, in the power-flow operational map. It is possible to fall in one of such instability regions during reactor startup, since both power and coolant flow are being increased but not proportionally. One other possibility for falling into those areas is the occurrence of a trip of recirculation pumps. Stability monitoring in such cases can be difficult, because the amount or quality of power signal data required for calculation of the stability key parameters may not be enough to provide reliable results in an adequate time range. In this work, the Prony's Method is presented as one complementary alternative to determine the degree of stability of a BWR, through time series data. This analysis method can provide information about decay ratio and oscillation frequency from power signals obtained during transient events. However, so far not many applications in Boiling Water Reactors operation have been reported and supported to establish the scope of using such analysis for actual transient events. This work presents first a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results obtained by Prony's method and those results obtained by the participants of the Forsmark 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactor Stability Benchmark using diverse techniques. Then, a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results is performed for four real BWR transient event data, using Prony's method and two other techniques based on an autoregressive modeling. The four

  19. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A; Wehle, F; Opel, S; Velten, R [AREVA, AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  20. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A.; Wehle, F.; Opel, S.; Velten, R.

    2008-01-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  1. LAPUR5 BWR stability analysis in Kuosheng nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunlung Wu; Chunkuan Shih; Wang, J.R.; Kao, L.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Unstable oscillation of a nuclear power reactor core is one of the main reasons that causes minor core damage. Stability analysis needs to be performed to predict the potential problem as early as possible and to prevent core instability events from happening. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requests all BWR licensees to examine each core reload and to impose operating limitations, as appropriate, to ensure compliance with GDC 10 and 12. GDC 10 requires that the reactor core be designed with appropriate margin to assure that specified acceptable fuel design limits will not be exceeded during any condition of normal operation, including anticipated operational occurrences. GDC 12 requires assurance that power oscillations which can result in conditions exceeding specified acceptable fuel design limits are either not possible or can be reliably and readily detected and suppressed. Therefore, the core instability is directly related to the fuel design limits. The core and channel DR (decay ratio) calculation are commonly performed to determine system's stability when new fuel designs are introduced in the core. In order to establish the independent analysis technology for BWR licensees and verifications, the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) has obtained agreement from NRC and implemented the 'Methodology and Procedure for Calculation of Core and Channel Decay Ratios with LAPUR', which was developed by the IBERINCO in 2001. LAPUR5 uses a multi-nodal description of the neutron dynamics, together with a distributed parameter model of the core thermal hydrodynamics to produce a space-dependent representation of the dynamics of a BWR in the frequency domain for small perturbations around a steady state condition. From the output of LAPUR5, the following results are obtained: global core decay ratio, out-of phase core decay ratio, and channel decay ratio. They are key parameters in the determination of BWR core stability

  2. Status update of the BWR cask simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Durbin, Samuel G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are typically evaluated through detailed numerical analysis of the system's thermal performance. These modeling efforts are performed by the vendor to demonstrate the performance and regulatory compliance and are independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Numerous studies have been previously conducted. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have moved the storage location from above ground to below ground and significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the canister helium pressure. Previous cask performance validation testing did not capture these parameters. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern dry casks. These modern cask designs utilize elevated helium pressure in the sealed canister or are intended for subsurface storage. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above ground and below ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the canister. The symmetric single assembly geometry with well-controlled boundary conditions simplifies interpretation of results. Various configurations of outer concentric ducting will be used to mimic conditions for above and below ground storage configurations

  3. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A.; Castlllo D, R.

    2006-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the Laguna Verde

  4. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Findlay, J.A.; Hwang, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation

  5. Operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadasu

    1988-01-01

    For the operation management of nuclear power stations with high reliability and safety, the role played by operators is very important. The effort of improving the man-machine interface in the central control rooms of nuclear power stations is energetically advanced, but the importance of the role of operators does not change. For the training of the operators of nuclear power stations, simulators have been used from the early stage. As the simulator facilities for operator training, there are the full scope simulator simulating faithfully the central control room of an actual plant and the small simulator mainly aiming at learning the plant functions. For BWR nuclear power stations, two full scope simulators are installed in the BWR Operator Training Center, and the training has been carried out since 1974. The plant function learning simulators have been installed in respective electric power companies as the education and training facilities in the companies. The role of simulators in operator training, the BTC No.1 simulator of a BWR-4 of 780 MWe and the BTC No.2 simulator of a BWR-5 of 1,100 MWe, plant function learning simulators, and the design of the BTC No.2 simulator and plant function learning simulators are reported. (K.I.)

  6. BWR stability using a reducing dynamical model; Estabilidad de un BWR con un modelo dinamico reducido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J M; Blazquez Martinez, J B

    1990-07-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical structure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations is non-linear. Simple parametric calculation of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author)

  7. Specifications of the BWR simulator for HAMMLAB 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grini, Rolf-Einar; Miettinen, Jaakko; Nurmilaukas, Pekka; Raussi; Pekka; Saarni, Ray; Stokke; Egil; Soerensen, Aimar; Tiihonen, Olli

    1998-02-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) simulator for HAMMLAB 2000 will be a model of the Swedish plant Forsmark-3. This report gives the specifications of the BWR simulator. The bulk of the report is a copy of the relevant addendum to the contract with the developer, and to the contract with the group of utilities and with ABB Atom. After a general overview, each plant system is described one after the other (using the reference plant system coding), and the simulation of each system is specified. Even the systems that shall not be simulated are included; in those cases the specification is: It is not required that ... is simulated. A list of malfunctions is given, as well as a list of validation transients. Finally the operator interface is specified. (author)

  8. Simplified distributed parameters BWR dynamic model for transient and stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro; Vazquez-Rodriguez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a simplified model to perform transient and linear stability analysis for a typical boiling water reactor (BWR). The simplified transient model was based in lumped and distributed parameters approximations, which includes vessel dome and the downcomer, recirculation loops, neutron process, fuel pin temperature distribution, lower and upper plenums reactor core and pressure and level controls. The stability was determined by studying the linearized versions of the equations representing the BWR system in the frequency domain. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the wide application of the simplified BWR model. We concluded that this simplified model describes properly the dynamic of a BWR and can be used for safety analysis or as a first approach in the design of an advanced BWR

  9. TRACE/PARCS analysis of the OECD/NEA Oskarshamn-2 BWR stability benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, T. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Downar, T.; Xu, Y.; Wysocki, A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ivanov, K.; Magedanz, J.; Hardgrove, M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Univ. Park, PA (United States); March-Leuba, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hudson, N.; Woodyatt, D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01

    On February 25, 1999, the Oskarshamn-2 NPP experienced a stability event which culminated in diverging power oscillations with a decay ratio of about 1.4. The event was successfully modeled by the TRACE/PARCS coupled code system, and further analysis of the event is described in this paper. The results show very good agreement with the plant data, capturing the entire behavior of the transient including the onset of instability, growth of the oscillations (decay ratio) and oscillation frequency. This provides confidence in the prediction of other parameters which are not available from the plant records. The event provides coupled code validation for a challenging BWR stability event, which involves the accurate simulation of neutron kinetics (NK), thermal-hydraulics (TH), and TH/NK. coupling. The success of this work has demonstrated the ability of the 3-D coupled systems code TRACE/PARCS to capture the complex behavior of BWR stability events. The problem was released as an international OECD/NEA benchmark, and it is the first benchmark based on measured plant data for a stability event with a DR greater than one. Interested participants are invited to contact authors for more information. (authors)

  10. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR; Estabilidad termohidraulica acoplada a la neutronica en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Mpio. Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico); Castlllo D, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gcm9acpp@cfe.gob.mx

    2006-07-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the

  11. Stability analysis of BWR nuclear-coupled thermal-hyraulics using a simple model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karve, A.A.; Rizwan-uddin; Dorning, J.J. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A simple mathematical model is developed to describe the dynamics of the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulics in a boiling water reactor (BWR) core. The model, which incorporates the essential features of neutron kinetics, and single-phase and two-phase thermal-hydraulics, leads to simple dynamical system comprised of a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The stability boundary is determined and plotted in the inlet-subcooling-number (enthalpy)/external-reactivity operating parameter plane. The eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix of the dynamical system also are calculated at various steady-states (fixed points); the results are consistent with those of the direct stability analysis and indicate that a Hopf bifurcation occurs as the stability boundary in the operating parameter plane is crossed. Numerical simulations of the time-dependent, nonlinear ODEs are carried out for selected points in the operating parameter plane to obtain the actual damped and growing oscillations in the neutron number density, the channel inlet flow velocity, and the other phase variables. These indicate that the Hopf bifurcation is subcritical, hence, density wave oscillations with growing amplitude could result from a finite perturbation of the system even where the steady-state is stable. The power-flow map, frequently used by reactor operators during start-up and shut-down operation of a BWR, is mapped to the inlet-subcooling-number/neutron-density (operating-parameter/phase-variable) plane, and then related to the stability boundaries for different fixed inlet velocities corresponding to selected points on the flow-control line. The stability boundaries for different fixed inlet subcooling numbers corresponding to those selected points, are plotted in the neutron-density/inlet-velocity phase variable plane and then the points on the flow-control line are related to their respective stability boundaries in this plane.

  12. Sophistication of operator training using BWR plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshiro, Nobuo; Endou, Hideaki; Fujita, Eimitsu; Miyakita, Kouji

    1986-01-01

    In Japanese nuclear power stations, owing to the improvement of fuel management, thorough maintenance and inspection, and the improvement of facilities, high capacity ratio has been attained. The thorough training of operators in nuclear power stations also contributes to it sufficiently. The BWR operator training center was established in 1971, and started the training of operators in April, 1974. As of the end of March, 1986, more than 1800 trainees completed training. At present, in the BWR operator training center, No.1 simulator of 800 MW class and No.2 simulator of 1100 MW class are operated for training. In this report, the method, by newly adopting it, good result was obtained, is described, that is, the method of introducing the feeling of being present on the spot into the place of training, and the new testing method introduced in retraining course. In the simulator training which is apt to place emphasis on a central control room, the method of stimulating trainees by playing the part of correspondence on the spot and heightening the training effect of multiple monitoring was tried, and the result was confirmed. The test of confirmation on the control board was added. (Kako, I.)

  13. BWR stability analysis: methodology of the stability analysis and results of PSI for the NEA/NCR benchmark task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, D.; Nechvatal, L.

    1996-09-01

    The report describes the PSI stability analysis methodology and the validation of this methodology based on the international OECD/NEA BWR stability benchmark task. In the frame of this work, the stability properties of some operation points of the NPP Ringhals 1 have been analysed and compared with the experimental results. (author) figs., tabs., 45 refs

  14. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST). Phase I test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W.S.; Alamgir, M.; Sutherland, W.A.

    1984-09-01

    A new full height BWR system simulator has been built under the Full-Integral-Simulation-Test (FIST) program to investigate the system responses to various transients. The test program consists of two test phases. This report provides a summary, discussions, highlights and conclusions of the FIST Phase I tests. Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests have investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. Results and governing phenomena of each test have been evaluated and discussed in detail in this report. One of the FIST program objectives is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two pretest predictions made with TRACB02 are presented and compared with test data in this report

  15. Physical model of nonlinear noise with application to BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Perez, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of the present model it is shown that the BWR reactor cannot be unstable in the linear sense, but rather it executes limited power oscillations of a magnitude that depends on the operating conditions. The onset of these oscillations can be diagnosed by the decrease in stochasticity in the power traces and by the appearance of harmonics in the PSD

  16. Cobra-TF simulation of BWR bundle dry out experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frepoli, C.; Ireland, A.; Hochreiter, L.; Ivanov, K. [Penn State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA (United States); Velten, R. [Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The COBRA-TF computer code uses a two-fluid, three-field and three-dimensional formulation to model a two-phase flow field in a specific geometry. The liquid phase is divided in a continuous liquid field and a separate dispersed field, which is used to describe the entrained liquid drops. For each space dimension, the code solves three momentum equations, three mass conservation equations and two energy conservation equations. Entrainment and depositions models are implemented into the code to model the mass transfer between the two liquid fields. This study presents the results obtained with COBRA-TF for the simulation of the Siemens 9-9Q BWR Bundle Dryout experiments. The model includes 20 channels and 34 axial nodes in the heated section. The predicted critical power and dryout location is compared with the measured values. An assessment of the code entrainment and de-entrainment models is presented. (authors)

  17. Upgrading BWR training simulators for annual outage operation training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakabe, K.; Nakajima, A.; Shiyama, H.; Noji, K.; Okabe, N.; Murata, F.

    2006-01-01

    Based upon the recently developed quality assurance program by the Japanese electric companies, BWR Operator Training Center (BTC) identified the needs to enhance operators' knowledge and skills for operations tasks during annual outage, and started to develop a dedicated operator training course specialized for them. In this paper, we present the total framework of the training course for annual outage operations and the associated typical three functions of our full-scope simulators specially developed and upgraded to conduct the training; namely, (1) Simulation model upgrade for the flow and temperature behavior concerning residual heat removal (RHR) system with shutdown cooling mode, (2) Addition of malfunctions for DC power supply equipment, (3) Simulation model upgrade for water filling operation for reactor pressurization (future development). We have implemented a trial of the training course by using the upgraded 800MW full-scope training simulator with functions (1) and (2) above. As the result of this trial, we are confident that the developed training course is effective for enhancing operators' knowledge and skills for operations tasks during annual outage. (author)

  18. ZZ BWRSB-RINGHALS1, Stability Benchmark Data from BWR RINGHALS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Description of program or function: The purpose of this benchmark is to enable code developers to test their codes and also to validate the predictive capability of their respective codes and models for BWR stability analysis. Emphasis is put on the modelling of flow dynamics of the reactor core and in-vessel flow loop wit detailed neutronic and thermodynamic feedback. The secondary systems as well as the control and production systems will be neglected. Data provided comes from measurements in beginning of cycle (BOC) 14, 15, 16 and 17 and middle of cycle (MOC) 16 in the Swedish BWR reactor Ringhals 1. For these measurements complete data sets are given

  19. Applicability of best-estimate analysis TRACE in terms of natural circulation BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Masahiro; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Nishi, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    As a part of the international CAMP-Program of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the best-estimate code TRACE is validated with the stability database of SIRIUS-N Facility at high pressure. The TRACE code analyzed is version 5 patch level 2. The SIRIUS-N facility simulates thermal-hydraulics of the economic simplified BWR (ESBWR). The oscillation period correlates well with bubble transit time through the chimney region regardless of the system pressure, inlet subcooling and heat flux. Numerical results exhibits type-I density wave oscillation characteristics, since core inlet restriction shifts stability boundary toward the higher inlet subcooling, and chimney exit restriction enlarges instability region and oscillation amplitude. Stability maps in reference to the subcooling and heat flux obtained from the TRACE code agrees with those of the experimental data at 1 MPa. As the pressure increases from 2 MPa to 7.2 MPa, numerical results become much stable than the experimental results. This is because that two-phase frictional loss is underestimate, since the natural circulation flow rate of numerical results is higher by approximately 20% than that of experimental results. (author)

  20. Numerical simulation of boron injection in a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinoco, Hernan, E-mail: htb@forsmark.vattenfall.s [Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB, SE-742 03 Osthammar (Sweden); Buchwald, Przemyslaw [Reactor Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Frid, Wiktor, E-mail: wiktor@reactor.sci.kth.s [Reactor Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    The present study constitutes a first step to understand the process of boron injection, transport and mixing in a BWR. It consists of transient CFD simulations of boron injection in a model of the downcomer of Forsmark's Unit 3 containing about 6 million elements. The two cases studied are unintentional start of boron injection under normal operation and loss of offsite power with partial ATWS leaving 10% of the core power uncontrolled. The flow conditions of the second case are defined by means of an analysis with RELAP5, assuming boron injection start directly after the first ECCS injection. Recent publications show that meaningful conservative results may be obtained for boron or thermal mixing in PWRs with grids as coarse as that utilized here, provided that higher order discretization schemes are used to minimize numerical diffusion. The obtained results indicate an apparently strong influence of the scenario in the behavior of the injection process. The normal operation simulation shows that virtually all boron solution flows down to the Main Recirculation Pump inlet located directly below the boron inlet nozzle. The loss of offsite power simulation shows initially a spread of the boron solution over the entire sectional area of the lower part of the downcomer filled with colder water. This remaining effect of the ECCS injection lasts until all this water has left the downcomer. Above this region, the boron injection jet develops in a vertical streak, eventually resembling the injection of the normal operation scenario. Due to the initial spread, this boron injection will probably cause larger temporal and spatial concentration variations in the core. In both cases, these variations may cause reactivity transients and fuel damage due to local power escalation. To settle this issue, an analysis using an extended model containing the downcomer, the MRPs and the Lower Plenum will be carried out. Also, the simulation time will be extended to a scale of

  1. Numerical simulation of boron injection in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Hernan; Buchwald, Przemyslaw; Frid, Wiktor

    2010-01-01

    The present study constitutes a first step to understand the process of boron injection, transport and mixing in a BWR. It consists of transient CFD simulations of boron injection in a model of the downcomer of Forsmark's Unit 3 containing about 6 million elements. The two cases studied are unintentional start of boron injection under normal operation and loss of offsite power with partial ATWS leaving 10% of the core power uncontrolled. The flow conditions of the second case are defined by means of an analysis with RELAP5, assuming boron injection start directly after the first ECCS injection. Recent publications show that meaningful conservative results may be obtained for boron or thermal mixing in PWRs with grids as coarse as that utilized here, provided that higher order discretization schemes are used to minimize numerical diffusion. The obtained results indicate an apparently strong influence of the scenario in the behavior of the injection process. The normal operation simulation shows that virtually all boron solution flows down to the Main Recirculation Pump inlet located directly below the boron inlet nozzle. The loss of offsite power simulation shows initially a spread of the boron solution over the entire sectional area of the lower part of the downcomer filled with colder water. This remaining effect of the ECCS injection lasts until all this water has left the downcomer. Above this region, the boron injection jet develops in a vertical streak, eventually resembling the injection of the normal operation scenario. Due to the initial spread, this boron injection will probably cause larger temporal and spatial concentration variations in the core. In both cases, these variations may cause reactivity transients and fuel damage due to local power escalation. To settle this issue, an analysis using an extended model containing the downcomer, the MRPs and the Lower Plenum will be carried out. Also, the simulation time will be extended to a scale of several

  2. An advanced frequency-domain code for boiling water reactor (BWR) stability analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrooz, A.

    2008-01-01

    The two-phase flow instability is of interest for the design and operation of many industrial systems such as boiling water reactors (BWRs), chemical reactors, and steam generators. In case of BWRs, the flow instabilities are coupled to the power instabilities via neutronic-thermal hydraulic feedbacks. Since these instabilities produce also local pressure oscillations, the coolant flashing plays a very important role at low pressure. Many frequency-domain codes have been used for two-phase flow stability analysis of thermal hydraulic industrial systems with particular emphasis to BWRs. Some were ignoring the effect of the local pressure, or the effect of 3D power oscillations, and many were not able to deal with the neutronics-thermal hydraulics problems considering the entire core and all its fuel assemblies. The new frequency domain tool uses the best available nuclear, thermal hydraulic, algebraic and control theory methods for simulating BWRs and analyzing their stability in either off-line or on-line fashion. The novel code takes all necessary information from plant files via an interface, solves and integrates, for all reactor fuel assemblies divided into a number of segments, the thermal-hydraulic non-homogenous non-equilibrium coupled linear differential equations, and solves the 3D, two-energy-group diffusion equations for the entire core (with spatial expansion of the neutron fluxes in Legendre polynomials).It is important to note that the neutronics equations written in terms of flux harmonics for a discretized system (nodal-modal equations) generate a set of large sparse matrices. The eigenvalue problem associated to the discretized core statics equations is solved by the implementation of the implicit restarted Arnoldi method (IRAM) with implicit shifted QR mechanism. The results of the steady state are then used for the calculation of the local transfer functions and system transfer matrices. The later are large-dense and complex matrices, (their size

  3. Stability monitoring for BWR based on singular value decomposition method using artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Michishita, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    A new method for evaluating the decay ratios in a boiling water reactor (BWR) using the singular value decomposition (SVD) method had been proposed. In this method, a signal component closely related to the BWR stability can be extracted from independent components of the neutron noise signal decomposed by the SVD method. However, real-time stability monitoring by the SVD method requires an efficient procedure for screening such components. For efficient screening, an artificial neural network (ANN) with three layers was adopted. The trained ANN was actually applied to decomposed components of local power range monitor (LPRM) signals that were measured in stability experiments conducted in the Ringhals-1 BWR. In each LPRM signal, multiple candidates were screened from the decomposed components. However, decay ratios could be estimated by introducing appropriate criterions for selecting the most suitable component among the candidates. The estimated decay ratios are almost identical to those evaluated by visual screening in a previous study. The selected components commonly have the largest singular value, the largest decay ratio and the least squared fitting error among the candidates. By virtue of excellent screening performance of the trained ANN, the real-time stability monitoring by the SVD method can be applied in practice. (author)

  4. Application of noise analysis to stability determination of a natural circulation cooled BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Dam, H. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Nissen, W.H.M.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed on the Dodewaard natural circulation cooled BWR at different conditions. The absolute stability was determined by measuring system responses to control rod and steam flow valve steps. Changes in core stability were studied using the signal of an average power range monitor (APRM) in time domain (auto-correlation function and impulse response) and in frequency domain (power spectral density and peaking factor), the outlet void fraction and variations of the incore coolant velocity. It is shown that the reactor is very stable and that cooling by natural circulation improves load following. Stability monitoring can be performed by all mentioned methods but using APRM signals in frequency domain is preferred.

  5. Application of tearing modulus stability concepts to nuclear piping. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotter, K.H.; Chang, H.Y.; Zahoor, A.

    1982-02-01

    The recently developed tearing modulus stability concept was successfully applied to several boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems. Circumferentially oriented through-the-thickness cracks were postulated at numerous locations in each system. For each location, the simplified tearing stability methods developed in USNRC Report NUREG/CR-0838 were used to determine crack stability. The J-T diagram was used to present the results of the computations. The piping systems considered included Type 304 stainless steel as well as A106 carbon steel materials. These systems were analyzed using the piping analysis computer code MINK.

  6. Hybrid Reactor Simulation and 3-D Information Display of BWR Out-of-Phase Oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Robert; Huang, Zhengyu

    2001-01-01

    The real-time hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability of the Penn State TRIGA reactor has been expanded for boiling water reactor (BWR) out-of-phase behavior. During BWR out-of-phase oscillation half of the core can significantly oscillate out of phase with the other half, while the average power reported by the neutronic instrumentation may show a much lower amplitude for the oscillations. A description of the new HRS is given; three computers are employed to handle all the computations required, including real-time data processing and graph generation. BWR out-of-phase oscillation was successfully simulated. By adjusting the reactivity feedback gains from boiling channels to the TRIGA reactor and to the first harmonic mode power simulation, limit cycle can be generated with both reactor power and the simulated first harmonic power. A 3-D display of spatial power distributions of fundamental mode, first harmonic, and total powers over the reactor cross section is shown

  7. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  8. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  9. TLTA/6431, Two-Loop-Test-Apparatus, BWR/6 Simulator, Small-Break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: The Two-Loop-Test-Apparatus (TLTA) is a 1:624 volume scaled BWR/6 simulator. It was the predecessor of the better-scaled FIST facility. The facility is capable of full BWR system pressure and has a simulated core with a full size 8 x 8, full power single bundle of indirect electrically heated rods. All major BWR systems are simulated including lower plenum, guide tube, core region (bundle and bypass), upper plenum, steam separator, steam dome, annular downcomer, recirculation loops and ECC injection systems. The fundamental scaling consideration was to achieve real-time response. A number of the scaling compromises present in TLTA were corrected in the FIST configuration. These compromises include a number of regional volumes and component elevations. 2 - Description of test: 64.45 sqcm small break LOCA with activation of the full emergency core cooling system, but without activation of the automatic decompression system

  10. On the fast estimation of transit times application to BWR simulated data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonopoulos-Domis, M.; Marseguerra, M.; Padovani, E.

    1996-01-01

    Real time estimators of transit times are proposed. BWR noise is simulated including a global component due to rod vibration. The time obtained form the simulation is used to investigate the robustness and noise immunity of the estimators. It is found that, in presence of a coincident (global) signal, the cross-correlation function is the worst estimator. (authors)

  11. Ranking of input parameters importance for BWR stability based on Ringhals-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajev, Ivan; Kozlowski, Tomasz; Xu, Yunlin; Downar, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Unstable behavior of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is known to occur during operation at certain power and flow conditions. Uncertainty calculations for BWR stability, based on the Wilks' formula, have been already done for the Ringhals-1 benchmark. In this work, these calculations have been used to identify and rank the most important parameters affecting the stability of the Ringhals-1 plant. The ranking has been done in two different ways and a comparison of these two methods has been demonstrated. Results show that the methods provide different, but meaningful evaluations of the ranking. (author)

  12. A real-time BWR stability measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; King, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of a portable, real-time system used for nonperturbational measurements of stability in boiling water reactors. The algorithm used in this system estimates the closed-loop asymptotic decay ratio using only the naturally occurring neutron noise and it is based on the univariate autoregressive methodology. (author)

  13. BWR stability: analysis of cladding temperature for high amplitude oscillations - 146

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.; Wehle, F.

    2010-01-01

    Power oscillations associated with density waves in boiling water reactors (BWRs) have been studied widely. Industrial research in this area is active since the invention of the first BWR. Stability measurements have been performed in various plants during commissioning phase but especially the magnitude and divergent nature of the oscillations during the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant event on March 9, 1988, renewed concern about the state of knowledge on BWR instabilities and possible consequences to fuel rod integrity. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified stability tool, applicable for stability analysis in the non-linear regime, which extends to high amplitude oscillations where inlet reverse flow occurs. In case of high amplitude oscillations a cyclical dryout and rewetting process at the fuel rod may take place, which leads in turn to rapid changes of the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. The application of this stability tool allows for a conservative determination of the fuel rod cladding temperature in case of high amplitude oscillations during the dryout / re-wet phase. Moreover, it reveals in good agreement to experimental findings the stabilizing effect of the reverse bundle inlet flow, which might be obtained for large oscillation amplitudes. (authors)

  14. Identification of process dynamics. Stability monitoring in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamsson, P.; Hallgren, P.

    1991-06-01

    Identification of process dynamics is used for stability monitoring in nuclear reactors (Boiling Water Reactor). This report treats the problem of estimating a damping factor and a resonance frequency from the neutron flux as measured in the reactor. A new parametric online method for identification is derived and presented, and is shown to meet the requirements of stability monitoring. The technique for estimating the process parameters is based on a recursive lattice filter algorithm. The problem of time varying parameters and offset, as well as offline experiments and signal processing are treated. All parts are implemented in a realtime program, using the language C. In comparison with earlier identifications, the new way of estimating the damping factor is shown to work well. Estimates of both the damping factor and the resonance frequency show a stable and reliable behavior. Future development and improvements are also indicated. (au)

  15. TRACE/PARCS validation for BWR stability based on OECD/NEA Oskarshamn-2 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, T.; Roshan, S.; Lefvert, T.; Downar, T.; Xu, Y.; Wysocki, A.; Ivanov, K.; Magedanz, J.; Hardgrove, M.; Netterbrant, C.; March-Leuba, J.; Hudson, N.; Sandervag, O.; Bergman, A.

    2011-01-01

    On February 25, 1999, the Oskarshamn-2 NPP experienced a stability event, which culminated in diverging power oscillations with decay ratio greater than 1.3. The event was successfully modeled by TRACE/PARCS coupled code system and the details of the modeling and solution are described in the paper. The obtained results show excellent agreement with the plant data, capturing the entire behavior of the transient including onset of instability, growth of oscillation (decay ratio) and the oscillation frequency. The event allows coupled code validation for BWR with a real, challenging stability event, which challenges accuracy of neutron kinetics (NK), thermal-hydraulics (TH) and TH/NK coupling. The success of this work has demonstrated the ability of 3-D coupled code systems to capture the complex behavior of BWR stability events. The problem is released as an international OECD/NEA benchmark, and it is the first benchmark based on measured plant data for a stability event with a DR greater than one. Interested participants are invited to contact authors for more information. (author)

  16. BWR full integral simulation test (FIST) pretest predictions with TRACBO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.

    1984-01-01

    The Full Integral Simulation Test program is a three pronged approach to the development of best-estimate analysis capability for BWR systems. An analytical method development program is underway to extend the BWR-TRAC computer code to model reactor kinetics and major interfacing systems, including balance-of-plant, to improve application modeling flexibility, and to reduce computer running time. An experimental program is underway in a new single bundle system test facility to extend the large break loss-of-coolant accident LOCA data base to small breaks and operational transients. And a method qualification program is underway to test TRACBO2 against experiments in the FIST facility. The recently completed Phase 1 period included a series of LOCA and power transient tests, and successful pretest analysis of the large and small break LOCA tests with TRACBO2. These comparisons demonstrate BWR-TRAC capability for small and large break analysis, and provide detailed understanding of the phenomena

  17. Subchannel analysis of a critical power test, using simulated BWR 8x8 fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsutake, T.; Terasaka, H.; Yoshimura, K.; Oishi, M.; Inoue, A.; Akiyama, M.

    1990-01-01

    Critical power predictions have been compared with the critical power test data obtained in simulated BWR 8x8 fuel rod assemblies. Two analytical methods for the critical power prediction in rod assemblies are used in the prediction, which are the subchannel analysis using the COBRA/BWR subchannel computer code with empirical critical heat flux (CHF) correlations and the liquid film dryout estimation using the CRIPP-3F 'multi-fluid' computer code. Improvements in both the analytical methods were made for spacer effect modeling, though they were specific for application to the current BWR rod assembly type. In general a reasonable agreement was obtained, though comparisons, between the prediction and the obtained test data. (orig.)

  18. Thermal-hydraulics stability of natural circulation BWR under startup. Flashing effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Rui; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2009-01-01

    To help achieve the necessary natural circulation flow, a fairly long chimney is installed in a boiling natural circulation reactor like the ESBWR. In such systems, thermal-hydraulic stability during low pressure start-up should be examined while considering the flashing induced by the pressure drop in the channel and the chimney due to gravity head. In this work, a BWR stability analysis code in the frequency domain, named FISTAB (Flashing-Induced STability Analysis for BWR), was developed to address the issue of flashing-induced instability. A thermal-hydraulics non-homogeneous equilibrium model (NHEM) based on a drift flux formulation along with a lumped fuel dynamics model is incorporated in the work. The vapor generation rate is derived from the mixture energy conservation equation while considering the effect of flashing. The functionality of the FISTAB code was confirmed by comparison to experimental results from SIRIUS-N facility at CRIEPI, Japan. Both stationary and perturbation results agree well with the experimental results. (author)

  19. Nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic nonlinear stability analysis using a novel BWR reduced order model. Pt. 1. The effects of using drift flux versus homogeneous equilibrium models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dokhane, A.; Henning, D.; Chawla, R.; Rizwan-Uddin

    2003-01-01

    BWR stability analysis at PSI, as at other research centres, is usually carried out employing complex system codes. However, these do not allow a detailed investigation of the complete manifold of all possible solutions of the associated nonlinear differential equation set. A novel analytical, reduced order model for BWR stability has been developed at PSI, in several successive steps. In the first step, the thermal-hydraulic model was used for studying the thermal-hydraulic instabilities. A study was then conducted of the one-channel nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic dynamics in a BWR by adding a simple point kinetic model for neutron kinetics and a model for the fuel heat conduction dynamics. In this paper, a two-channel nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic model is introduced to simulate the out-of phase oscillations in a BWR. This model comprises three parts: spatial mode neutron kinetics with the fundamental and fist azimuthal modes; fuel heat conduction dynamics; and thermal-hydraulics model. This present model is an extension of the Karve et al. model i.e., a drift flux model is used instead of the homogeneous equilibrium model for two-phase flow, and lambda modes are used instead of the omega modes for the neutron kinetics. This two-channel model is employed in stability and bifurcation analyses, carried out using the bifurcation code BIFDD. The stability boundary (SB) and the nature of the Poincare-Andronov-Hopf bifurcation (PAF-B) are determined and visualized in a suitable two-dimensional parameter/state space. A comparative study of the homogeneous equilibrium model (HEM) and the drift flux model (DFM) is carried out to investigate the effects of the DFM parameters the void distribution parameter C 0 and the drift velocity V gi -on the SB, the nature of PAH bifurcation, and on the type of oscillation mode (in-phase or out-of-phase). (author)

  20. On the Decay Ratio Determination in BWR Stability Analysis by Auto-Correlation Function Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.; Hennig, D.

    2002-11-01

    A novel auto-correlation function (ACF) method has been investigated for determining the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio in BWR stability analyses. The neutron signals are band-pass filtered to separate the oscillation peak in the power spectral density (PSD) from background. Two linear second-order oscillation models are considered. These models, corrected for signal filtering and including a background term under the peak in the PSD, are then least-squares fitted to the ACF of the previously filtered neutron signal, in order to determine the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio. Our method uses fast Fourier transform techniques with signal segmentation for filtering and ACF estimation. Gliding 'short-term' ACF estimates on a record allow the evaluation of uncertainties. Numerical results are given which have been obtained from neutron data of the recent Forsmark I and Forsmark II NEA benchmark project. Our results are compared with those obtained by other participants in the benchmark project. The present PSI report is an extended version of the publication K. Behringer, D. Hennig 'A novel auto-correlation function method for the determination of the decay ratio in BWR stability studies' (Behringer, Hennig, 2002)

  1. Numerical simulation of progressive BWR fuel inlet orifices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sara Lundgren; Hernan Tinoco; Aleksander Pohl; Wiktor Frid

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A 'progressive' orifice is characterized by an edge-shaped hole that gives a Reynolds number dependent resistance coefficient. For Reynolds numbers smaller than a critical one, the resistance coefficient has a high constant value that drops to a much lower value for Reynolds numbers greater than this critical value. A similar effect is widely known for external flows around bodies of different shapes, i. e. spheres, cylinders, etc., and the sudden drop in drag coefficient is due to the shift from laminar to turbulent boundary-layer flow. Experimentally, progressive orifices have been investigated under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions by Akiba et al. (2001) for a reduced set of geometrical parameters. Using the sparse experimental data, a core stability study was carried out by Forsmaks Kraftgrupp AB that showed an improvement in core stability but without the expected reduction in pump power at normal operation. The reason for this partial success was the impossibility of optimizing the fuel inlet pressure drop owing to the limited amount of available data. Due to the high costs associated with the experimental generation of high-pressure, high-temperature data, it was considered that, if possible, the lacking data could be generated numerically at much lower cost. Therefore, the present work deals with the possibility of numerically simulate the flow through progressive orifices, and with the conditions under which to reproduce and generate resistance coefficient data by means of a commercial CFD-code. The results obtained with a two-dimensional, axisymmetric approximation show that Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models are able to qualitatively capture the physics of the phenomenon but with an earlier transition to turbulent boundary-layer flow and with an underestimation of the resistance coefficient by approximately 20 %. This underestimation of the resistance coefficient is related to the two

  2. Numerical simulation of progressive BWR fuel inlet orifices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sara Lundgren; Hernan Tinoco [Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB, 742 03 Oesthammar (Sweden); Aleksander Pohl; Wiktor Frid [The Royal Institute of Technology, Dept. Energy Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: A 'progressive' orifice is characterized by an edge-shaped hole that gives a Reynolds number dependent resistance coefficient. For Reynolds numbers smaller than a critical one, the resistance coefficient has a high constant value that drops to a much lower value for Reynolds numbers greater than this critical value. A similar effect is widely known for external flows around bodies of different shapes, i. e. spheres, cylinders, etc., and the sudden drop in drag coefficient is due to the shift from laminar to turbulent boundary-layer flow. Experimentally, progressive orifices have been investigated under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions by Akiba et al. (2001) for a reduced set of geometrical parameters. Using the sparse experimental data, a core stability study was carried out by Forsmaks Kraftgrupp AB that showed an improvement in core stability but without the expected reduction in pump power at normal operation. The reason for this partial success was the impossibility of optimizing the fuel inlet pressure drop owing to the limited amount of available data. Due to the high costs associated with the experimental generation of high-pressure, high-temperature data, it was considered that, if possible, the lacking data could be generated numerically at much lower cost. Therefore, the present work deals with the possibility of numerically simulate the flow through progressive orifices, and with the conditions under which to reproduce and generate resistance coefficient data by means of a commercial CFD-code. The results obtained with a two-dimensional, axisymmetric approximation show that Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models are able to qualitatively capture the physics of the phenomenon but with an earlier transition to turbulent boundary-layer flow and with an underestimation of the resistance coefficient by approximately 20 %. This underestimation of the resistance coefficient is related to

  3. Efficient method for simulation of BWR severe accident sequence events before core uncovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    BWR-LACP has been a versatile tool for the ORNL SASA program. The development effort was minimal, and the code is fast running and economical. Operator actions are easily simulated and the complete scope of both reactor vessel and primary containment are modeled. Valuable insights have been gained into accident sequences. A Fortran version is under development and it will be modified for application to Mark II plants

  4. Characterization of sensitization and stress corrosion cracking behavior of stabilized stainless steels under BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilian, R.; Ilg, U.; Meier, V.; Teichmann, H.; Wachter, O.

    1995-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking occurs if the three parameters -- material condition, tensile stress and water chemistry -- are in a critical range. In this study the material conditions especially of Ti- and Nb-stabilized steels are considered. The purpose of this work is to show the influence of the degree of sensitization of Ti- and Nb-stabilized stainless steels on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility in BWR water chemistry. This is an on-going research program. Preliminary results will be presented. Different types of stabilized, and for comparison unstabilized, stainless steels are examined in various heat treatment conditions with regard to their sensitization behavior by EPR tests (double loop) and TEM. The results are plotted in sensitization diagrams. The sensitization behavior depends on many parameters such as carbon content, stabilization element, stabilization ratio and materials history, e.g. solution heat treatment or cold working. The obtained EPR sensitization diagrams are compared with the well known sensitization diagrams from the literature, which were determined by standard IC test according to e.g. German standard DIN 50914 (equivalent to ASTM A 262, Pract. E). Based on the obtained EPR sensitization diagrams material conditions for SSRT tests were selected. The EPR values (Ir/Ia x 100%) of the tested Ti-stabilized stainless steel are in the range of ∼ 0.1--20%. The SSRT tests are carried out in high-temperature water with 0.4 ppm O 2 , a conductivity of 0.5 microS/cm and a strain rate of 1x10 -6-1 . The test temperature is 280 C. Ti-stabilized stainless steel with Ir/Ia x 100% > 1% suffered intergranular stress corrosion cracking under these conditions. The SCC tests for Nb-stabilized stainless steel are still in progress. The correlation between EPR value, chromium depletion and SSRT result will be shown for a selected material condition of sensitized Ti-stabilized stainless steel

  5. Core followup studies of the Tarapur Reactors with the three dimensional BWR simulator COMTEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, S. R.; Jagannathan, V.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Srinivasan, K. R.; Rastogi, B. P.

    1976-07-01

    Both the units of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station started operation in the year 1969. Since then, these units have completed three cycles. For efficient operation and fuel management of these reactors, a three dimensional BWR simulator COMETG has been developed. The reactors are closely being followed using the simulator. The detailed analyses for cycle 3/4 operation of both the units are described in the paper. The results show very good agreement between calculated and measured values. It is concluded that reactor core behaviour could be predicted in a satisfactory manner with the core simulator COMETG.

  6. Stability analysis of a recycling circuit of a BWR type reactor. Theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas H, J.G.; Espinosa P, G.; Gonzalez M, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Technology, Regulation and Services Management of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards financed and in coordinate form with the I.P.H. Department of the Metropolitan Autonomous-Iztapalapa University developed the present project with the purpose of studying the effect of the recycling system on the linear stability of a BWR reactor whose reference central is the Laguna Verde power station. The present project forms part of a work series focused to the linear stability of the nuclear reactor of the Unit 1 at Laguna Verde power station. The components of the recycling system considered for the study of stability are the recycling external circuit (recycling pumps, valves) and the internal circuit (downcomer, jet pumps, lower full, driers, separators). The mathematical model is obtained applying mass balances and movement quantity in each one of the mentioned circuits. With respect to the nucleus model two regions are considered, the first one is made of a flow in one phase and the second one of a flow in two phases. For modelling the biphasic region it is considered homogenous flow. Generally it is studied the system behavior in the frequency domain starting from the transfer function applied to four operational states which correspond to the lower stability zone in the map power-flow of the Unit 1 of Laguna Verde power station. The Nyquist diagrams corresponding to each state as well as their characteristic frequency were determined. The results show that exists a very clear dependence of the power-flow relation on the stability of the system. It was found that the boiling length is an important parameter for the linear stability of the system. The obtained results show that the characteristic frequencies in unstability zones are similar to the reported data of the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde power station in the event of power oscillations carried out in January 1995. (Author)

  7. Prediction of the stability of BWR reactors during the start-up process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz E, J.A.; Castillo D, R.; Blazquez M, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are susceptible of uncertainties of power when they are operated to low flows of coolant (W) and high powers (P), being presented this situation mainly in the start-up process. The start-up process could be made but sure if the operator knew the value of the stability index Decay reason (Dr) before going up power and therefore to guarantee the stability. The power and the flow are constantly measures, the index Dr could also be considered its value in real time. The index Dr depends on the power, flow and many other values, such as, the distribution of the flow axial and radial neutronic, the temperature of the feeding water, the fraction of holes and other thermohydraulic and nuclear parameters. A simple relationship of Dr is derived leaving of the pattern reduced of March-Leuba, where three independent variables are had that are the power, the flow and a parameter that it contains the rest of the phenomenology, that is to say all the other quantities that affect the value of Dr. This relationship developed work presently and verified its prediction with data of start-up of commercial reactors could be used for the design of a practical procedure practice of start-up, what would support to the operator to prevent this type of events of uncertainty. (Author)

  8. BWR thermohydraulics simulation on the AD-10 peripheral processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation demonstrates the feasibility of simulating plant transients and severe abnormal transients in nuclear power plants at much faster than real-time computing speeds in a low-cost, dedicated, interactive minicomputer. This is achieved by implementing advanced modeling techniques in modern, special-purpose peripheral processors for high-speed system simulation. The results of this demonstration will impact safety analyses and parametric studies, studies on operator responses and control system failures and it will make possible the continuous on-line monitoring of plant performance and the detection and diagnosis of system or component failures

  9. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) program: facility description report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, A.G.

    1984-09-01

    A new boiling water reactor safety test facility (FIST, Full Integral Simulation Test) is described. It will be used to investigate small breaks and operational transients and to tie results from such tests to earlier large-break test results determined in the TLTA. The new facility's full height and prototypical components constitute a major scaling improvement over earlier test facilities. A heated feedwater system, permitting steady-state operation, and a large increase in the number of measurements are other significant improvements. The program background is outlined and program objectives defined. The design basis is presented together with a detailed, complete description of the facility and measurements to be made. An extensive component scaling analysis and prediction of performance are presented

  10. Quantitative evaluation for training results of nuclear plant operator on BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Sato, Tatsuaki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Miyakita, Kohji; Mizuno, Toshiyuki

    1985-01-01

    Recently, the reliability of neclear power plants has largely risen, and the abnormal phenomena in the actual plants are rarely encountered. Therefore, the training using simulators becomes more and more important. In BWR Operator Training Center Corp., the training of the operators of BWR power plants has been continued for about ten years using a simulator having the nearly same function as the actual plants. The recent high capacity ratio of nuclear power plants has been mostly supported by excellent operators trained in this way. Taking the opportunity of the start of operation of No.2 simulator, effort has been exerted to quantitatively grasp the effect of training and to heighten the quality of training. The outline of seven training courses is shown. The technical ability required for operators, the items of quantifying the effect of training, that is, operational errors and the time required for operation, the method of quantifying, the method of collecting the data and the results of the application to the actual training are described. It was found that this method is suitable to quantify the effect of training. (Kako, I.)

  11. General model for Pc-based simulation of PWR and BWR plant components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratemi, W M; Abomustafa, A M [Faculty of enginnering, alfateh univerity Tripoli, (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, we present a basic mathematical model derived from physical principles to suit the simulation of PWR-components such as pressurizer, intact steam generator, ruptured steam generator, and the reactor component of a BWR-plant. In our development, we produced an NMMS-package for nuclear modular modelling simulation. Such package is installed on a personal computer and it is designed to be user friendly through color graphics windows interfacing. The package works under three environments, namely, pre-processor, simulation, and post-processor. Our analysis of results using cross graphing technique for steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident, yielded a new proposal for on-line monitoring of control strategy of SGTR-accident for nuclear or conventional power plant. 4 figs.

  12. U.S. Department Of Energy's nuclear engineering education research: highlights of recent and current research-II. 7. Hybrid Reactor Simulation and 3-D Information Display of BWR Out-of-Phase Oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Robert; Huang, Zhengyu

    2001-01-01

    The real-time hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability of the Penn State TRIGA reactor has been recently expanded for BWR out-of-phase behavior. Out-of-phase oscillation is a phenomenon that occurs at BWRs. During this kind of event, half of the core can significantly oscillate out of phase with the other half, while the average power reported by the neutronic instrumentation may show a much lower amplitude for the oscillations. The HRS will be used for development and validation of stability monitoring and control techniques as part of an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Engineering Education and Research grant. The Penn State TRIGA reactor is used to simulate BWR fundamental mode power dynamics. The first harmonic mode power, together with detailed thermal hydraulics of boiling channels of both fundamental mode and first harmonic mode, is simulated digitally in real time with a computer. Simulations of boiling channels provide reactivity feedback to the TRIGA reactor, and the TRIGA reactor's power response is in turn fed into the channel simulations and the first harmonic mode power simulation. The combination of reactor power response and the simulated first harmonic power response with spatial distribution functions thus mimics the stability phenomena actually encountered in BWRs. The digital simulations of the boiling channels are performed by solving conservation equations for different regions in the channel with C-MEX S-functions. A fast three-dimensional (3-D) reactor power display of modal BWR power distribution was implemented using MATLAB graphics capability. Fundamental mode, first harmonic, together with the total power distribution over the reactor cross section, are displayed. Because of the large amount of computation for BWR boiling channel simulation and real-time data processing and graph generation, one computer is not sufficient to handle these jobs in the hybrid reactor simulation environment. A new three-computer setup has been

  13. Prediction of the stability of BWR reactors during the start-up process; Prediccion de la estabilidad de reactores BWR durante el proceso de arranque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz E, J.A.; Castillo D, R. [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Blazquez M, J.B. [Centro de Investigaciones Energetics, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are susceptible of uncertainties of power when they are operated to low flows of coolant (W) and high powers (P), being presented this situation mainly in the start-up process. The start-up process could be made but sure if the operator knew the value of the stability index Decay reason (Dr) before going up power and therefore to guarantee the stability. The power and the flow are constantly measures, the index Dr could also be considered its value in real time. The index Dr depends on the power, flow and many other values, such as, the distribution of the flow axial and radial neutronic, the temperature of the feeding water, the fraction of holes and other thermohydraulic and nuclear parameters. A simple relationship of Dr is derived leaving of the pattern reduced of March-Leuba, where three independent variables are had that are the power, the flow and a parameter that it contains the rest of the phenomenology, that is to say all the other quantities that affect the value of Dr. This relationship developed work presently and verified its prediction with data of start-up of commercial reactors could be used for the design of a practical procedure practice of start-up, what would support to the operator to prevent this type of events of uncertainty. (Author)

  14. Simulation of the operational monitoring of a BWR with Simulate-3; Simulacion del seguimiento operacional de un reactor BWR con Simulate-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez F, J. O.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: ace.jo.cu@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    This work was developed in order to describe the methodology for calculating the fuel burned of nuclear power reactors throughout the duration of their operating cycle and for each fuel reload. In other words, simulate and give monitoring to the main operation parameters of sequential way along its operation cycles. For this particular case, the operational monitoring of five consecutive cycles of a reactor was realized using the information reported by their processes computer. The simulation was performed with the Simulate-3 software and the results were compared with those of the process computer. The goal is to get the fuel burned, cycle after cycle for obtain the state conditions of the reactor needed for the fuel reload analyses, stability studies and transients analysis, and the development of a methodology that allows to manage and resolve similar cases for future fuel cycles of the nuclear power plant and explore the various options offered by the simulator. (Author)

  15. Core heat transfer analysis during a BWR LOCA simulation experiment at ROSA-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonomoto, T.; Koizumi, Y.; Tasaka, K.

    1987-01-01

    The ROSA-III test facility is a 1/424-th volumetrically scaled BWR/6 simulator with an electrically heated core to study the thermal-hydraulic response during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Heat transfer analyses for 5, 15, 50 and 200% break tests were conducted to understand the basic heat transfer behavior in the core under BWR LOCA conditions and to obtain a data base of post-critical heat flux (CHF) heat transfer coefficients and quench temperature. The results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient of dried-out rods at the core midplane during a steam cooling period is less than approximately 120 W/m 2 K. It is larger than existing data measured at lower pressures during a spray cooling period. Bottom-up quench temperatures are given by a simple equations: The sum of the saturation temperature and a constant of 262 K. Then the heat transfer model in the RELAP4/MOD6/U4/J3 code was revised using the present results. The rod surface temperature behavior in the 200% break test was calculated better by using the revised model although the model is very simple. (orig.)

  16. Comparisons of ROSA-III and FIST BWR loss of coolant accident simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Kanji; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Koizumi, Yasuo

    1985-10-01

    A common understanding and interpretation of BWR system response and the controlling phenomena in LOCA transients has been achieved through the evaluation and comparison of counterpart tests performed in the ROSA-III and FIST test facilities. These facilities, which are designed to simulate the thermal-hydraulic response of BWR systems, are operated respectively by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the General Electric Company. Comparison is made between three types of counterpart tests, each performed under similar tests conditions in the two facilities. They are large break, small break, and steamline break LOCA's. The system responses to these tests in each facility are quite similar. The sequence of events are similar, and the timing of these events are similar. Differences that do occur are due to minor differences in modeling objectives, facility scaling, and test conditions. Parallel channel flow interactions effects in the ROSA-III four channel (half length) core, although noticeable in the large break test, do not result in major differences with the single channel response in FIST. In the small break tests the timing of events is offset by the earlier ADS actuation in FIST. The steamline test responses are similar except there is no heatup in FIST, resulting from a different ECCS trip modeling. Overall comparisons between ROSA-III and FIST system responses in LOCA tests is very good. (author)

  17. An interactive simulation-based education system for BWR emergency, procedure guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanikawa, Naoshi; Shida, Touichi [Hitachi Ltd (Japan). Hitachi Works; Ujita, Hiroshi; Yokota, Takeshi; Kato, Kanji [Hitachi Ltd, (Japan). Energy Research Lab.

    1994-12-31

    When applying EPGs (Emergency Procedure Guidelines), an operator decides the operational procedure by predicting the change of parameters from the plant status, because EPGs are described in a symptom style for emergency conditions. Technical knowledge of the plant behavior and its operation are necessary for operator to understand the EPGs. An interactive simulation-based education system, EPG-ICAI (Intelligent Computer Assisted Instruction), has been developed for BWR plant operators to acquire the knowledge of EPGs. EPG-ICAI is designed to realize an effective education by the step-by-step study by using an interactive real time simulator and an individual education by applying an intelligent tutoring function. (orig.) (2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.).

  18. An interactive simulation-based education system for BWR emergency, procedure guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanikawa, Naoshi; Shida, Touichi; Ujita, Hiroshi; Yokota, Takeshi; Kato, Kanji

    1994-01-01

    When applying EPGs (Emergency Procedure Guidelines), an operator decides the operational procedure by predicting the change of parameters from the plant status, because EPGs are described in a symptom style for emergency conditions. Technical knowledge of the plant behavior and its operation are necessary for operator to understand the EPGs. An interactive simulation-based education system, EPG-ICAI (Intelligent Computer Assisted Instruction), has been developed for BWR plant operators to acquire the knowledge of EPGs. EPG-ICAI is designed to realize an effective education by the step-by-step study by using an interactive real time simulator and an individual education by applying an intelligent tutoring function. (orig.) (2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.)

  19. Development of neural network simulating power distribution of a BWR fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Shinfuku, K.; Nakamae, T.

    1992-01-01

    A neural network model is developed to simulate the precise nuclear physics analysis program code for quick scoping survey calculations. The relation between enrichment and local power distribution of BWR fuel bundles was learned using two layers neural network (ENET). A new model is to introduce burnable neutron absorber (Gadolinia), added to several fuel rods to decrease initial reactivity of fresh bundle. The 2nd stages three layers neural network (GNET) is added on the 1st stage network ENET. GNET studies the local distribution difference caused by Gadolinia. Using this method, it becomes possible to survey of the gradients of sigmoid functions and back propagation constants with reasonable time. Using 99 learning patterns of zero burnup, good error convergence curve is obtained after many trials. This neural network model is able to simulate no learned cases fairly as well as the learned cases. Computer time of this neural network model is about 100 times faster than a precise analysis model. (author)

  20. Peach Bottom Turbine Trip Simulations with RETRAN Using INER/TPC BWR Transient Analysis Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao Lainsu; Chiang, Show-Chyuan

    2005-01-01

    The work described in this paper is benchmark calculations of pressurization transient turbine trip tests performed at the Peach Bottom boiling water reactor (BWR). It is part of an overall effort in providing qualification basis for the INER/TPC BWR transient analysis method developed for the Kuosheng and Chinshan plants. The method primarily utilizes an advanced system thermal hydraulics code, RETRAN02/MOD5, for transient safety analyses. Since pressurization transients would result in a strong coupling effect between core neutronic and system thermal hydraulics responses, the INER/TPC method employs the one-dimensional kinetic model in RETRAN with a cross-section data library generated by the Studsvik-CMS code package for the transient calculations. The Peach Bottom Turbine Trip (PBTT) tests, including TT1, TT2, and TT3, have been successfully performed in the plant and assigned as standards commonly for licensing method qualifications for years. It is an essential requirement for licensing purposes to verify integral capabilities and accuracies of the codes and models of the INER/TPC method in simulating such pressurization transients. Specific Peach Bottom plant models, including both neutronics and thermal hydraulics, are developed using modeling approaches and experiences generally adopted in the INER/TPC method. Important model assumptions in RETRAN for the PBTT test simulations are described in this paper. Simulation calculations are performed with best-estimated initial and boundary conditions obtained from plant test measurements. The calculation results presented in this paper demonstrate that the INER/TPC method is capable of calculating accurately the core and system transient behaviors of the tests. Excellent agreement, both in trends and magnitudes between the RETRAN calculation results and the PBTT measurements, shows reliable qualifications of the codes/users/models involved in the method. The RETRAN calculated peak neutron fluxes of the PBTT

  1. Simulation of the operational monitoring of a BWR with Simulate-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez F, J. O.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    This work was developed in order to describe the methodology for calculating the fuel burned of nuclear power reactors throughout the duration of their operating cycle and for each fuel reload. In other words, simulate and give monitoring to the main operation parameters of sequential way along its operation cycles. For this particular case, the operational monitoring of five consecutive cycles of a reactor was realized using the information reported by their processes computer. The simulation was performed with the Simulate-3 software and the results were compared with those of the process computer. The goal is to get the fuel burned, cycle after cycle for obtain the state conditions of the reactor needed for the fuel reload analyses, stability studies and transients analysis, and the development of a methodology that allows to manage and resolve similar cases for future fuel cycles of the nuclear power plant and explore the various options offered by the simulator. (Author)

  2. Experimental simulation of the water cooling of corium spread over the floor of a BWR containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morage, F.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Podowski, M.Z. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with an experimental investigation of the cooling effect of water collected on the surface of corium released onto the floor of a BWR drywell. In the present experiments, the actual reactor materials were replaced by simulant materials. Specifically, the results are shown for Freon-11 film boiling over liquid Wood`s metal spread above a solid porous surface through which argon gas was injected. An analysis of the obtained experimental data revealed that the actual film boiling heat transfer between a molten pool of corium and the water above the pool should be more efficient than predicted by using standard correlations for boiling over solid surfaces. This effect will be further augmented by the gas released due to the ablation of concrete floor beneath the corium and percolating towards its upper surface and into through the water layer above.

  3. An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

    2012-09-01

    The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

  4. Boiling water reactors with uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. Report 5: Analysis of the reactivity coefficients and the stability of a BWR loaded with MOx fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires

    2000-01-01

    This report is a part of the project titled 'Boiling Water Reactors With Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide (MOx) Fuel'. The aim of this study is to model the impact of a core loading pattern containing MOx bundles upon the main characteristics of a BWR (reactivity coefficients, stability, etc.). For this purpose, the Core Management System (CMS) codes of Studsvik Scandpower are used. This package is constituted by CASMO-4/TABLES-3/SIMULATE-3. It has been shown in previous reports that these codes are able to accurately represent and model MOx bundles. This report is thus devoted to the study of BWR cores loaded (partially or totally) with MOx bundles. The plutonium quality used is the Pu type 2016 (mostly Pu-239, 56 %, and Pu-240, 26 %), but a variation of the plutonium isotopic vector was also investigated, in case of a partial MOx loading. One notices that the reactivity coefficients do not present significant changes in comparison with a full UOx loading. Nevertheless, two main problems arise: the shutdown margin at BOC is lower than 1 % and the stability to in-phase oscillations is slightly decreased. (The SIMULATE-3 version used for this study does not contain the latest MOx enhancements described in literature, since these code developments have not been provided to the department. Nevertheless, as the nominal average enrichment of the MOx bundles is 5.41 % (total amount of plutonium), which can still be considered as a relatively low enrichment, the accuracy of the CMS codes is acceptable without the use of the MOx improvements for this level of Pu enrichment.

  5. Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for

  6. BWR simulation in a stationary state for the evaluation of fuel cell design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del C, R.; Castillo M, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the simulation of a BWR in order to evaluate the performance of a set of fuel assemblies under stationary state in three dimensions (3-D) is presented. 15 cases selected from a database containing a total of 18225 cases are evaluated. The main selection criteria were based on the results of the design phase of the power cells in two dimensions (2-D) and 3-D initial study. In 2-D studies the parameters that were used to qualify and select the designs were basically the local power peaking factor and neutron multiplication factor of each fuel cell. In the initial 3-D study variables that defined the quality of results, and from which the selection was realized, are the margins to thermal limits of reactor operation and the value of the effective multiplication factor at the end of cycle operation. From the 2-D and 3-D results of the studies described a second 3-D study was realized, where the optimizations of the fuel reload pattern was carried out. The results presented in this paper correspond to this second 3-D study. It was found that the designs of the fuel cell they had a similar behavior to those provided by the fuel supplier of reference BWR. Particularly it noted the impact of reload pattern on the cold shut down margin. An estimate of the operation costs of reference cycle analyzed with each one designed reload batch was also performed. As a result a positive difference (gain) up to 10,347 M/US D was found. (Author)

  7. BWR core response to fluctuations in coolant flow and pressure, with implications on noise diagnosis and stability monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomstrand, J.H.; Andersson, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor dynamic tests, utilizing sinuosidal oscillations in pressure and recirculation flow, have been conducted in operating BWRs in Sweden and Finland. Test data recorded, as well as recordings of process noise, have been analyzed in terms of dynamic core properties. The results obtained show good qualitative agreement with model predictions of BWR core dynamics. Model studies can often support interpretation of dynamic information obtained from operating plants. Comparisons between model studies, dynamic tests and process noise may also provide improved understanding of test results and noise patterns; in this way it can be demonstrated that some neutron flux noise is caused by noise in coolant flow and steam flow. From reactor test data nd noise recordings, core stability parameters have been evaluated by a number of methods. These have been found to provide essentially the same results. The cores investigated were found to be very stable under normal operating conditions. In special operating points, outside the normal operating range, higher decay ratios may occur. The experience indicates that for BWR cores, operated at decay ratios above quarter damping, the stability parameters may be identified from the oscillatory behavior of the autocorrelation in the time domain of the neutron flux noise

  8. Simulation of the automatic depressurization system (Ads) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, C.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    The automatic depressurization system (Ads) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) like part of the emergency cooling systems is designed to liberate the vapor pressure of the reactor vessel, as well as the main vapor lines. At the present time in the Engineering Faculty, UNAM personnel works in the simulation of the Laguna Verde reactor based on the nuclear code RELAP/SCADAP and in the incorporation to the same of the emergency cooling systems. The simulation of the emergency cooling systems began with the inclusion of two hydrodynamic volumes, one source and another drain, and the incorporation of the initiation logic for each emergency system. In this work is defined and designed a simplified model of Ads of the reactor, considering a detail level based on the main elements that compose it. As tool to implement the proposed model, the RELAP code was used. The simulated main functions of Ads are centered in the quick depressurization of the reactor by means of the vapor discharge through the relief/safety valves to the suppression pool, and, in the event of break of the main vapor line, the reduction of the vessel pressure operates for that the cooling systems of the core to low pressure (Lpcs and Lpci) they can begin their operation. (Author)

  9. SUN-RAH: a nucleoelectric BWR university simulator based in reduced order models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales S, J.B.; Lopez R, A.; Sanchez B, A.; Sanchez S, R.; Hernandez S, A.

    2003-01-01

    The development of a simulator that allows to represent the dynamics of a nucleo electric central, with nuclear reactor of the BWR type, using reduced order models is presented. These models present the characteristics defined by the dominant poles of the system (1) and most of those premature operation transitories in a power station can be reproduced with considerable fidelity if the models are identified with data of plant or references of a code of better estimate like RAMONA, TRAC (2) or RELAP. The models of the simulator are developments or own simplifications starting from the physical laws and retaining the main terms. This work describes the objective of the project and the general specifications of the University student of Nucleo electric simulator with Boiling Water Reactor type (SUN-RAH) as well as the finished parts that fundamentally are the nuclear reactor, the one of steam supply (NSSS), the plant balance (BOP), the main controllers of the plant and the implemented graphic interfaces. The pendent goals as well as the future developments and applications of SUN-RAH are described. (Author)

  10. Numerical simulations of pressure fluctuations at branch piping in BWR main steam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Ryo; Inada, Fumio; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Shiro

    2009-01-01

    The power uprating of a nuclear power plant may increase/accelerate degradation phenomena such as flow-induced vibration and wall thinking. A steam dryer was damaged by a high cycle fatigue due to an acoustic-induced vibration at the branch piping of safety relief valves (SRVs) in main steam lines. In this study, we conducted the numerical simulations of steam/air flow around a simplified branch piping to clarify the basic characteristics of resonance. LES simulations were conducted in ordinary pressure/temperature air and steam under BWR plant conditions. In both cases, the excitation of the pressure fluctuations at the branch was observed under some inlet velocity conditions. These fluctuations and inlet conditions were normalized and the obtained results were compared. The normalized results showed that the range and maximum amplitude of pressure fluctuations were almost the same in low-pressure/temperature air and high-pressure/temperature steam. We found that ordinary pressure/temperature air experiments and simulations can possibly clarify the characteristics of the resonance in high-pressure/temperature steam. (author)

  11. BWR stability analysis: methodology of the stability analysis and results of PSI for the NEA/NCR benchmark task; SWR Stabilitaetsanalyse: Methodik der Stabilitaetsanalyse und PSI-Ergebnisse zur NEA/NCR Benchmarkaufgabe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, D.; Nechvatal, L. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-09-01

    The report describes the PSI stability analysis methodology and the validation of this methodology based on the international OECD/NEA BWR stability benchmark task. In the frame of this work, the stability properties of some operation points of the NPP Ringhals 1 have been analysed and compared with the experimental results. (author) figs., tabs., 45 refs.

  12. Cobra-IE Evaluation by Simulation of the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Test (BFBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, C. J.; Aumiler, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    The COBRA-IE computer code is a thermal-hydraulic subchannel analysis program capable of simulating phenomena present in both PWRs and BWRs. As part of ongoing COBRA-IE assessment efforts, the code has been evaluated against experimental data from the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Tests (BFBT). The BFBT experiments utilized an 8 x 8 rod bundle to simulate BWR operating conditions and power profiles, providing an excellent database for investigation of the capabilities of the code. Benchmarks performed included steady-state and transient void distribution, single-phase and two-phase pressure drop, and steady-state and transient critical power measurements. COBRA-IE effectively captured the trends seen in the experimental data with acceptable prediction error. Future sensitivity studies are planned to investigate the effects of enabling and/or modifying optional code models dealing with void drift, turbulent mixing, rewetting, and CHF

  13. Model for the analysis of transitories and stability of a BWR reactor with fuel of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez C, A.; Espinosa P, G.; Francois L, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    In this work it is described the thermo hydraulic and neutronic pattern used to simulate the behavior of a nucleus of thorium-uranium under different conditions of operation. The analysed nucleus was designed with base to assemblies that operate under the cover-seed concept. The pattern was proven to conditions of stationary state and transitory state. Here it is only presented the simulation of the one SCRAM manual and it is compared in the behavior of a nucleus with UO 2 . Additionally one carries out an analysis of stability taking into account the four corners that define the area of stability of the map flow-power and to conditions of 100% of flow and 100% of power. The module of stability is based on the pattern of Lahey and Podowsky to estimate the drops of pressure during a perturbation. It is concludes that the behavior of this nucleus is not very different to the one shown by the nuclei loaded with the fuel of UO 2 . (Author)

  14. SUN-RAH: a nucleoelectric BWR university simulator based in reduced order models; SUN-RAH: simulador universitario de nucleoelectrica BWR basado en modelos de orden reducido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales S, J.B.; Lopez R, A.; Sanchez B, A.; Sanchez S, R.; Hernandez S, A. [DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jms0620@yahoo.com

    2003-07-01

    The development of a simulator that allows to represent the dynamics of a nucleo electric central, with nuclear reactor of the BWR type, using reduced order models is presented. These models present the characteristics defined by the dominant poles of the system (1) and most of those premature operation transitories in a power station can be reproduced with considerable fidelity if the models are identified with data of plant or references of a code of better estimate like RAMONA, TRAC (2) or RELAP. The models of the simulator are developments or own simplifications starting from the physical laws and retaining the main terms. This work describes the objective of the project and the general specifications of the University student of Nucleo electric simulator with Boiling Water Reactor type (SUN-RAH) as well as the finished parts that fundamentally are the nuclear reactor, the one of steam supply (NSSS), the plant balance (BOP), the main controllers of the plant and the implemented graphic interfaces. The pendent goals as well as the future developments and applications of SUN-RAH are described. (Author)

  15. OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Benchmark: Simulation by POLCA-T Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, Dobromir

    2004-01-01

    Westinghouse transient code POLCA-T brings together the system thermal-hydraulics plant models and three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics core models. Participation in the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip (TT) Benchmark is a part of our efforts toward the code's validation. The paper describes the objectives for TT analyses and gives a brief overview of the developed plant system input deck and 3-D core model.The results of exercise 1, system model without netronics, are presented. Sensitivity studies performed cover the maximal time step, turbine stop valve position and mass flow, feedwater temperature, and steam bypass mass flow. Results of exercise 2, 3-D core neutronic and thermal-hydraulic model with boundary conditions, are also presented. Sensitivity studies include the core inlet temperature, cladding properties, and direct heating to core coolant and bypass.The entire plant model was validated in the framework of the benchmark's phase 3. Sensitivity studies include the effect of SCRAM initialization and carry-under. The results obtained - transient fission power and its initial axial distribution and steam dome, core exit, lower and upper plenum, main steam line, and turbine inlet pressures - showed good agreement with measured data. Thus, the POLCA-T code capabilities for correct simulation of pressurizing transients with very fast power were proved

  16. 3D simulation of a core operation cycle of a BWR using Serpent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera Ch, M. A.; Del Valle G, E.; Gomez T, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This work had the main goal to develop a methodology to obtain the length of an operating cycle of the core of a BWR under different operating states using the Serpent code. The reactor core modeled in Serpent is composed of 444 fuel assemblies (120 with fresh fuels and 324 fuels from previous cycles), 109 cruciform control rods and light water as moderator and coolant. Once the core of the reactor was modeled in Serpent (Three-dimensional) without considering the cruciform control rods, a simulation was carried out with different steps of burning in the operational state with the average values of the fuel temperature (900 K), moderator temperature (600 K) and voids fraction equal to 0.4. In addition, the thermal power considered was 2017 MWt. This operational state was chosen because a previous analysis (not shown in this work) was carried out in 4 types of control cells. The first and second control cell has all of its natural uranium fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod respectively. The third and fourth control cell types have various types of enrichment, both natural uranium and gadolinium in their fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod. The conclusion of this previous analysis was that the behavior of the effective multiplication factor along the fuel burnout within the four control cell types was almost unaffected by the fuel temperature but was affected by the voids fraction. Thus, for this operating cycle in the operating state defined above, its length was 14,63052 GW t/Tm. In addition, at the end of this cycle, the decay heat obtained was equal to 116.71 MWt and the inventory of the most important isotopes to be considered was obtained, such as some isotopes of uranium, neptune, plutonium, americium and curio. (Author)

  17. Effect of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel on deformation behavior and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility in BWR simulated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Kain, V.; Dey, G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) components in boiling water reactor (BWR has been a serious issue and is generic in nature. Initial cracking incidences were attributed to weld induced sensitisation and low temperature sensitisation which was mitigated by the use of low carbon grade of SS and molybdenum and nitrogen containing nuclear grade SS. However, IGSCC has occurred in these SS in the non-sensitised condition which was attributed to residual weld induced strain. Strain hardening in SS has been identified as a major cause for enhanced IGSCC susceptibility in BWR environment. Nitrogen in SS has a significant effect on the strain hardening characteristics and has potential to affect the IGSCC susceptibility in BWR environment. Type 304LN stainless steel is a candidate material for use in future reactors with long design life like the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR), in which the operating conditions are similar to BWR. This study reports the effect of nitrogen in type 304LN stainless steel on the strain hardening behaviour and deformation characteristics and its effect on the IGSCC susceptibility in BWR/AHWR environment. Two heats of type 304LN stainless steel were used containing different levels of nitrogen, 0.08 and 0.16 wt % (SS alloys A and B, respectively). Both the SS was strain hardened by cross rolling at 200℃ to simulate the strain hardened regions having higher IGSCC susceptibility in BWRs. Tensile testing was done at both room temperature and 288℃(temperature simulating operating BWR conditions) and the effect of nitrogen on the tensile properties were established. Tensile testing was done at strain rates similar to the crack tip strain rates associated with a growing IGSCC in SS. Detailed transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies were done to establish the effect of nitrogen on the deformation modes. Results indicated twinning was the major mode of deformation during cross rolling while

  18. Results of the Simulator smart against synthetic signals using a model of reduced order of BWR with additive and multiplicative noise; Resultados del simulador smart frente a senales sinteticas utilizando un modelo de orden reducido de BWR con ruido aditivo y multiplicativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Montesino, M. E.; Pena, J.; Escriva, A.; Melara, J.

    2011-07-01

    Results of SMART-simulator front of synthetic signals with models of reduced order of BWR with additive and multiplicative noise Under the SMART project, which aims to monitor the signals Cofrentes nuclear plant, we have developed a signal generator of synthetics BWR that will allow together real signals of plant the validation of the monitor.

  19. 3D simulation of a core operation cycle of a BWR using Serpent; Simulacion 3D de un ciclo de operacion del nucleo de un BWR usando SERPENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera Ch, M. A.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: rionchez@icloud.com [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This work had the main goal to develop a methodology to obtain the length of an operating cycle of the core of a BWR under different operating states using the Serpent code. The reactor core modeled in Serpent is composed of 444 fuel assemblies (120 with fresh fuels and 324 fuels from previous cycles), 109 cruciform control rods and light water as moderator and coolant. Once the core of the reactor was modeled in Serpent (Three-dimensional) without considering the cruciform control rods, a simulation was carried out with different steps of burning in the operational state with the average values of the fuel temperature (900 K), moderator temperature (600 K) and voids fraction equal to 0.4. In addition, the thermal power considered was 2017 MWt. This operational state was chosen because a previous analysis (not shown in this work) was carried out in 4 types of control cells. The first and second control cell has all of its natural uranium fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod respectively. The third and fourth control cell types have various types of enrichment, both natural uranium and gadolinium in their fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod. The conclusion of this previous analysis was that the behavior of the effective multiplication factor along the fuel burnout within the four control cell types was almost unaffected by the fuel temperature but was affected by the voids fraction. Thus, for this operating cycle in the operating state defined above, its length was 14,63052 GW t/Tm. In addition, at the end of this cycle, the decay heat obtained was equal to 116.71 MWt and the inventory of the most important isotopes to be considered was obtained, such as some isotopes of uranium, neptune, plutonium, americium and curio. (Author)

  20. Recent SCDAP/RELAP5 improvements for BWR severe accident simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, F.P.

    1995-01-01

    A new model for the SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident analysis code that represents the control blade and channel box structures in a boiling water reactor (BWR) has been under development since 1991. This model accounts for oxidation, melting, and relocation of these structures, including the effects of material interactions between B 4 C, stainless steel, and Zircaloy. This paper describes improvements that have been made to the BWR control blade/channel box model during 1994 and 1995. These improvements include new capabilities that represent the relocation of molten material in a more realistic manner and modifications that improve the usability of the code by reducing the frequency of code failures. This paper also describes a SCDAP/RELAP5 assessment calculation for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant design based upon a short-term station blackout accident sequence

  1. Infinite fuel element simulation of pin power distributions and control blade history in a BWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Nuenighoff, K.; Allelein, H.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung (IEK), Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik (IEK-6)

    2011-07-01

    Pellet-Cladding Interaction (PCI) is a well known effect in fuel pins. One possible reason for PCI-effects could be local power excursions in the fuel pins, which can led to a rupture of the fuel cladding tube. From a reactor safety point of view this has to be considered as a violence of the barrier principal in order to retain fission products in the fuel pins. This paper focuses on the pin power distributions in a 2D infinite lattice of a BWR fuel element. Lots of studies related PCI effect can be found in the literature. In this compact, coupled neutronic depletion calculations taking the control history effect into account are described. Depletion calculations of an infinite fuel element of a BWR were carried out with controlled, uncontrolled and temporarily controlled scenarios. Later ones are needed to describe the control blade history (CBH) effect. A Monte-Carlo approach is mandatory to simulate the neutron physics. The VESTA code was applied to couple the Monte-Carlo-Code MCNP(X) with the burnup code ORIGEN. Additionally, CASMO-4 is also employed to verify the method of simulation results from VESTA. The cross sections for Monte Carlo and burn-up calculations are derived from ENDF/B-VII.0. (orig.)

  2. Detecting long-range correlation with detrended fluctuation analysis: Application to BWR stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico)]. E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico); Vazquez, Alejandro [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico)

    2006-11-15

    The aim of this paper is to explore the application of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to study boiling water reactor stability. DFA is a scaling method commonly used for detecting long-range correlations in non-stationary time series. This method is based on the random walk theory and was applied to neutronic power signal of Forsmark stability benchmark. Our results shows that the scaling properties breakdown during unstable oscillations.

  3. Detecting long-range correlation with detrended fluctuation analysis: Application to BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Vazquez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the application of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to study boiling water reactor stability. DFA is a scaling method commonly used for detecting long-range correlations in non-stationary time series. This method is based on the random walk theory and was applied to neutronic power signal of Forsmark stability benchmark. Our results shows that the scaling properties breakdown during unstable oscillations

  4. Automatic determination of BWR fuel loading patterns based on K.E. technique with core physics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, T.; Tsuiki, M.; Takeshita, T.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis oof a computerized search method, a prototype for a fuel loading pattern expert system has been developed to support designers in core design for BWRs. The method was implemented by coupling rules and core physics simulators into an inference engine to establish an automated generate-and-test cycle. A search control mechanism, which prunes paths to be searched and selects appropriate rules through the interaction with the user, was also introduced to accomplish an effective search. The constraints in BWR core design are: (1) cycle length more than L, (2) core shutdown margin more than S, and (3) thermal margin more than T. Here L, S, and T are the specified minimum values. In this system, individual rules contain the manipulation to improve the core shutdown margin explicitly. Other items were taken into account only implicitly. Several applications to the test cases were carried out. It was found that the results were comparable with those obtained by human expert engineers. Broad applicability of the present method in the BWR core design domain was proved

  5. Parametric tests of the effects of water chemistry impurities on corrosion of Zr-alloys under simulated BWR condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, S; Ito, K [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co. Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Lin, C C [GE Nucklear Energy (United States); Cheng, B [Electric Power Research Inst. (United States); Ikeda, T [Toshiba Corp. (Japan); Oguma, M [Hitachi, Ltd (Japan); Takei, T [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Vitanza, C; Karlsen, T M [Institutt for Energiteknikk, Halden (Norway). OECD Halden Reaktor Projekt

    1997-02-01

    The Halden BWR corrosion test loop was constructed to evaluate the impact of water chemistry variables, heat flux and boiling condition on corrosion performance of Zr-alloys in a simulated BWR environment. The loop consists of two in-core rigs, one for testing fuel rod segments and the other for evaluating water chemistry variables utilizing four miniautoclaves. Ten coupon specimens are enclosed in each miniautoclave. The Zr-alloys for the test include Zircaloy-2 having different nodular corrosion resistance and five new alloys. The first and second of the six irradiation tests planned in this program were completed. Post-irradiation examination of those test specimens have shown that the test loop is capable of producing nodular corrosion on the fuel rod cladding tested under the reference chemistry condition. The miniautoclave tests showed that nodular corrosion could be formed without flux and boiling under some water chemistry conditions and the new alloys, generally, had higher corrosion resistance than the Zircaloy in high oxygen environments. (author). 5 refs, 4 figs, 5 tabs.

  6. A real-time BWR [boiling water reactor] stability measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; King, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of a portable, real-time system used for nonperturbational measurements of stability in boiling water reactors. The algorithm used in this system estimates the closed-loop asymptotic decay ratio using only the naturally occurring neutron noise and it is based on the univariate autoregressive methodology

  7. CFD Simulation of rigid venting of the containment of a BWR-5 Mark-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo G, I. F.; Vazquez B, A. K.; Velazquez E, L.; Tijerina S, F.; Tapia M, R.

    2016-09-01

    In conditions of prolonged loss of external energy or a severe accident, venting to the atmosphere is an alternative to prevent overpressure and release of fission products from the primary containment of a nuclear reactor. Due to the importance of flow determination through rigid vents, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is proposed to verify the capacity of rigid vents in the primary containment of a boiling water reactor (BWR) under different operating conditions (pressure, temperature and compositions of the fluids). The model predicts and provides detailed information on variables such as mass flow and velocity of the venting gases. In the proposed model the primary containment gas is vented to the atmosphere via rigid vents (pipes) from the dry and wet pit. Is assumed that the container is pressurized because is in a defined scenario, and at one point the venting is open and the gas released into the atmosphere. The objective is to characterize the flow and validate the CFD model for the overpressure conditions that occur in an accident such as a LOCA, Sbo, etc. The model is implemented with Ansys-Fluent general-purpose CFD software based on the geometry of the venting ducts of the containment of a BWR. The model is developed three-dimensional and resolves at steady state for compressible flow and includes the effects of the turbulence represented by the Reynolds stress model. The CFD results are compared with the values of a one-dimensional and isentropic model for compressible flow. The relative similarity of results leads to the conclusion that the proposed CFD model can help to predict the rigid venting capacity of the containment of a BWR, however more information is required for full validation of the proposed model. (Author)

  8. Simulation in 3 dimensions of a cycle 18 months for an BWR type reactor using the Nod3D program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, N.; Alonso, G.; Valle, E. del

    2004-01-01

    The development of own codes that you/they allow the simulation in 3 dimensions of the nucleus of a reactor and be of easy maintenance, without the consequent payment of expensive use licenses, it can be a factor that propitiates the technological independence. In the Department of Nuclear Engineering (DIN) of the Superior School of Physics and Mathematics (ESFM) of the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) a denominated program Nod3D has been developed with the one that one can simulate the operation of a reactor BWR in 3 dimensions calculating the effective multiplication factor (kJJ3, as well as the distribution of the flow neutronic and of the axial and radial profiles of the power, inside a means of well-known characteristics solving the equations of diffusion of neutrons numerically in stationary state and geometry XYZ using the mathematical nodal method RTN0 (Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec of index zero). One of the limitations of the program Nod3D is that it doesn't allow to consider the burnt of the fuel in an independent way considering feedback, this makes it in an implicit way considering the effective sections in each step of burnt and these sections are obtained of the code Core Master LEND. However even given this limitation, the results obtained in the simulation of a cycle of typical operation of a reactor of the type BWR are similar to those reported by the code Core Master LENDS. The results of the keJ - that were obtained with the program Nod3D they were compared with the results of the code Core Master LEND, presenting a difference smaller than 0.2% (200 pcm), and in the case of the axial profile of power, the maxim differs it was of 2.5%. (Author)

  9. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in the neutronic parameters generation for BWR and PWR coupled thermal-hydraulic–neutronic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ánchel, F.; Barrachina, T.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G.; Juanas, J.; Macián-Juan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Best-estimate codes are affected by the uncertainty in the methods and the models. ► Influence of the uncertainty in the macroscopic cross-sections in a BWR and PWR RIA accidents analysis. ► The fast diffusion coefficient, the scattering cross section and both fission cross sections are the most influential factors. ► The absorption cross sections very little influence. ► Using a normal pdf the results are more “conservative” comparing the power peak reached with uncertainty quantified with a uniform pdf. - Abstract: The Best Estimate analysis consists of a coupled thermal-hydraulic and neutronic description of the nuclear system's behavior; uncertainties from both aspects should be included and jointly propagated. This paper presents a study of the influence of the uncertainty in the macroscopic neutronic information that describes a three-dimensional core model on the most relevant results of the simulation of a Reactivity Induced Accident (RIA). The analyses of a BWR-RIA and a PWR-RIA have been carried out with a three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and neutronic model for the coupled system TRACE-PARCS and RELAP-PARCS. The cross section information has been generated by the SIMTAB methodology based on the joint use of CASMO-SIMULATE. The statistically based methodology performs a Monte-Carlo kind of sampling of the uncertainty in the macroscopic cross sections. The size of the sampling is determined by the characteristics of the tolerance intervals by applying the Noether–Wilks formulas. A number of simulations equal to the sample size have been carried out in which the cross sections used by PARCS are directly modified with uncertainty, and non-parametric statistical methods are applied to the resulting sample of the values of the output variables to determine their intervals of tolerance.

  10. Simulation of hydrogen deflagration and detonation in a BWR reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, M.; Silde, A.; Lindholm, I.; Huhtanen, R.; Sjoevall, H.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic study was carried out to investigate the hydrogen behaviour in a BWR reactor building during a severe accident. BWR core contains a large amount of Zircaloy and the containment is relatively small. Because containment leakage cannot be totally excluded, hydrogen can build up in the reactor building, where the atmosphere is normal air. The objective of the work was to investigate, whether hydrogen can form flammable and detonable mixtures in the reactor building, evaluate the possibility of onset of detonation and assess the pressure loads under detonation conditions. The safety concern is, whether the hydrogen in the reactor building can detonate and whether the external detonation can jeopardize the containment integrity. The analysis indicated that the possibility of flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in the reactor building could not be ruled out in case of a 20 mm 2 leakage from the containment. The detonation analyses indicated that maximum pressure spike of about 7 MPa was observed in the reactor building room selected for the analysis

  11. In-Pile Tests for IASCC Growth Behavior of Irradiated 316L Stainless Steel under Simulated BWR Condition in JMTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kasahara, Shigeki; Ise, Hideo; Kawaguchi, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Junichi; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has an in-pile irradiation test plan to evaluate in-situ effects of neutron/γ-ray irradiation on stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth of irradiated stainless steels using the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). SCC growth rate and its dependence on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) are different between in-pile test and post irradiation examination (PIE). These differences are not fully understood because of a lack of in-pile data. This paper presents a systematic review on SCC growth data of irradiated stainless steels, an in-pile test plan for crack growth of irradiated SUS316L stainless steel under simulated BWR conditions in the JMTR, and the development of the in-pile test techniques.

  12. A pneumatic bellows-driven setup for controlled-distance electrochemical impedance measurements of Zircaloy-2 in simulated BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arilahti, E.; Bojinov, M.; Hansson-Lyyra, L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a novel pneumatic bellows-driven arrangement designed for controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) measurements. The feasibility of the new arrangement has been verified by performing contact electric impedance measurements to study corrosion of Zircaloy-2 in a re-circulation loop simulating the BWR conditions. Until now, the measurements have been carried out using a step-motor driven controlled-distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. The electrical and electrochemical properties of the pre transition oxide on Zircaloy-2 determined from these measurements were in good agreement with those estimated from measurements with a step-motor driven CDE. Furthermore, the results indicate that the bellows-driven CDE device is less sensitive to the contact pressure variation than the step-motor driven arrangement. This property combined with the bellows driven displacement mechanism provides a clear advantage for future in-core corrosion studies of fuel cladding materials. (Author)

  13. Dynamics of a BWR with inclusion of boiling nonlinearity, clad temperature and void-dependent core power removal: Stability and bifurcation characteristics of advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Dinkar, E-mail: dinkar@iitk.ac.in [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Program, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India); Kalra, Manjeet Singh, E-mail: drmanjeet.singh@dituniversity.edu.in [DIT University, Dehradun 248 009 (India); Wahi, Pankaj, E-mail: wahi@iitk.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Simplified models with inclusion of the clad temperature are considered. • Boiling nonlinearity and core power removal have been modeled. • Method of multiple time scales has been used for nonlinear analysis to get the nature and amplitude of oscillations. • Incorporation of modeling complexities enhances the stability of system. • We find that reactors with higher nominal power are more desirable from the point of view of global stability. - Abstract: We study the effect of including boiling nonlinearity, clad temperature and void-dependent power removal from the primary loop in the mathematical modeling of a boiling water reactor (BWR) on its dynamic characteristics. The advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR) is taken as a case study. Towards this end, we have analyzed two different simplified models with different handling of the clad temperature. Each of these models has the necessary modifications pertaining to boiling nonlinearity and power removal from the primary loop. These simplified models incorporate the neutronics and thermal–hydraulic coupling. The effect of successive changes in the modeling assumptions on the linear stability of the reactor has been studied and we find that incorporation of each of these complexities in the model increases the stable operating region of the reactor. Further, the method of multiple time scales (MMTS) is exploited to carry out the nonlinear analysis with a view to predict the bifurcation characteristics of the reactor. Both subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations are present in each model depending on the choice of operating parameters. These analytical observations from MMTS have been verified against numerical simulations. A parametric study on the effect of changing the nominal reactor power on the regions in the parametric space of void coefficient of reactivity and fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity with sub- and super-critical Hopf bifurcations has been performed for all

  14. Stability analysis of a recycling circuit of a BWR type reactor. Theoretical study; Analisis de estabilidad de un circuito de recirculacion de un reactor del tipo BWR. Estudio teorico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas H, J.G.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, 09000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez M, V.M. [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, 04000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The Technology, Regulation and Services Management of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards financed and in coordinate form with the I.P.H. Department of the Metropolitan Autonomous-Iztapalapa University developed the present project with the purpose of studying the effect of the recycling system on the linear stability of a BWR reactor whose reference central is the Laguna Verde power station. The present project forms part of a work series focused to the linear stability of the nuclear reactor of the Unit 1 at Laguna Verde power station. The components of the recycling system considered for the study of stability are the recycling external circuit (recycling pumps, valves) and the internal circuit (downcomer, jet pumps, lower full, driers, separators). The mathematical model is obtained applying mass balances and movement quantity in each one of the mentioned circuits. With respect to the nucleus model two regions are considered, the first one is made of a flow in one phase and the second one of a flow in two phases. For modelling the biphasic region it is considered homogenous flow. Generally it is studied the system behavior in the frequency domain starting from the transfer function applied to four operational states which correspond to the lower stability zone in the map power-flow of the Unit 1 of Laguna Verde power station. The Nyquist diagrams corresponding to each state as well as their characteristic frequency were determined. The results show that exists a very clear dependence of the power-flow relation on the stability of the system. It was found that the boiling length is an important parameter for the linear stability of the system. The obtained results show that the characteristic frequencies in unstability zones are similar to the reported data of the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde power station in the event of power oscillations carried out in January 1995. (Author)

  15. Numerical Simulations and Design Optimization of the PHT Loop of Natural Circulation BWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Durga Prasad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of natural circulation boiling water reactor (NCBWR are very important in order to study its performance for different designs and various off-design conditions and for design optimization. In the present work, parametric studies of the primary heat transport loop of NCBWR have been performed using lumped parameter models and RELAP5/MOD3.4 code. The lumped parameter models are based on the drift flux model and homogeneous equilibrium mixture (HEM model of two-phase flow. Numerical simulations are performed with both models. Compared to the results obtained from the HEM model, those obtained from the drift flux model are closer to RELAP5. The variations of critical heat flux with various geometric parameters and operating conditions are thoroughly investigated. The material required to construct the primary heat transport (PHT loop of NCBWR has been minimized using sequential quadratic programming. The stability of NCBWR has also been verified at the optimum point.

  16. A nonlinear 3D real-time model for simulation of BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercan, Y.

    1982-02-01

    A nonlinear transient model for BWR nuclear power plants which consists of a 3D-core (subdivided into a number of superboxes, and with parallel flow and subcooled boiling), a top plenum, steam removal and feed water systems and main coolant recirculation pumps is given. The model describes the local core and global plant transient situation as dependent on both the inherent core dynamics and external control actions, i.e., disturbances such as motions of control rod banks, changes of mass flow rates of coolant, feed water and steam outlet. The case of a pressure-controlled reactor operation is also considered. The model which forms the basis for the digital code GARLIC-B (Er et al. 82) is aimed to be used on an on-site process computer in parallel to the actual reactor process (or even in predictive mode). Thus, special measures had to be taken into account in order to increase the computational speed and reduce the necessary computer storage. This could be achieved by - separating the neutron and power kinetics from the xenon-iodine dynamics, - treating the neutron kinetics and most of the thermodynamics and hydrodynamics in a pseudostationary way, - developing a special coupling coefficient concept to describe the neutron diffusion, calculating the coupling coefficients from a basic neutron kinetics code, - combining coarse mesh elements into superboxes, taking advantage of the symmetry properties of the core and - applying a sparse matrix technique for solving the resulting algebraic power equation system. (orig.) [de

  17. An improved one-and-a-half group BWR core simulator for a new-generation core management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Munenari

    2000-01-01

    An improved one-and-a-half group core simulator method for a next-generation BWR core management system is presented. In the improved method, intranodal spectral index (thermal to fast flux ratio) is expanded with analytic solutions to the diffusion equation, and the nodal power density and the interface net current are calculated, taking the intranodal flux shape into consideration. A unique method was developed for assembly heterogeneity correction. Thus eliminating the insufficiencies of the conventional one-and-a-half group method, we can have accurate power distributions as well as local peaking factors for cores having large spectral mismatch between fuel assemblies. The historical effects of spectral mismatch are also considered in both nodal power and local peaking calculations. Although reflectors are not solved explicitly, there is essentially no need for core dependent adjustable parameters, since boundary conditions are derived in the same manner as in the interior nodes. Calculation time for nodal solutions is comparable to that for the conventional method, and is less than 1/10 of a few-group nodal simulator. Verifications of the present method were made by comparing the results with those obtained by heterogeneous fine-mesh multi-group core depletion calculations, and the accuracy was shown to be fairly good. (author)

  18. Simulation of the flow obstruction of a jet pump in a BWR reactor with the code RELAP/SCDAPSIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Filio L, C.

    2016-09-01

    This work simulates the flow obstruction of a jet pump in one of the recirculation loops of a nuclear power plant with a reactor of type BWR at 100% of operating power, in order to analyze the behavior of the total flow of the refrigerant passing through the reactor core, the total flow in each recirculation loop of the reactor, together with the 10 jet pumps of each loop. The behavior of the power and the reactivity insertion due to the change of the refrigerant flow pattern is also analyzed. The simulation was carried out using the RELAP/SCDAPSIM version 3.5 code, using a reactor model with 10 jet pumps in each recirculation loop and a core consisting of 6 radial zones and 25 axial zones. The scenario postulates the flow obstruction in a jet pump in a recirculation loop A when the reactor operates at 100% rated power, causing a change in the total flow of refrigerant in the reactor core, leading to a decrease in power. Once the reactor conditions are established to its new power, the operator tries to recover the nominal power using the flow control valve of the recirculation loop A, opening stepwise as a strategy to safely recover the reactor power. In this analysis is assumed that the intention of the nuclear plant operator is to maintain the operation of the reactor during the established cycle. (Author)

  19. BWR-plant simulator and its neural network companion with programming under mat lab environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghenniwa, Fatma Suleiman

    2008-01-01

    Stand alone nuclear power plant simulators, as well as building blocks based nuclear power simulator are available from different companies throughout the world. In this work, a review of such simulators has been explored for both types. Also a survey of the possible authoring tools for such simulators development has been performed. It is decided, in this research, to develop prototype simulator based on components building blocks. Further more, the authoring tool (Mat lab software) has been selected for programming. It has all the basic tools required for the simulator development similar to that developed by specialized companies for simulator like MMS, APROS and others. Components simulations, as well as integrated components for power plant simulation have been demonstrated. Preliminary neural network reactor model as part of a prepared neural network modules library has been used to demonstrate module order shuffling during simulation. The developed components library can be refined and extended for further development. (author)

  20. Methyl Iodide Decomposition at BWR Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Mike; Bell, Merl

    2012-09-01

    Based on favourable results from short-term testing of methanol addition to an operating BWR plant, AREVA has performed numerous studies in support of necessary Engineering and Plant Safety Evaluations prior to extended injection of methanol. The current paper presents data from a study intended to provide further understanding of the decomposition of methyl iodide as it affects the assessment of methyl iodide formation with the application of methanol at BWR Plants. This paper describes the results of the decomposition testing under UV-C light at laboratory conditions and its effect on the subject methyl iodide production evaluation. The study as to the formation and decomposition of methyl iodide as it is effected by methanol addition is one phase of a larger AREVA effort to provide a generic plant Safety Evaluation prior to long-term methanol injection to an operating BWR. Other testing phases have investigated the compatibility of methanol with fuel construction materials, plant structural materials, plant consumable materials (i.e. elastomers and coatings), and ion exchange resins. Methyl iodide is known to be very unstable, typically preserved with copper metal or other stabilizing materials when produced and stored. It is even more unstable when exposed to light, heat, radiation, and water. Additionally, it is known that methyl iodide will decompose radiolytically, and that this effect may be simulated using ultra-violet radiation (UV-C) [2]. In the tests described in this paper, the use of a UV-C light source provides activation energy for the formation of methyl iodide. Thus is similar to the effect expected from Cherenkov radiation present in a reactor core after shutdown. Based on the testing described in this paper, it is concluded that injection of methanol at concentrations below 2.5 ppm in BWR applications to mitigate IGSCC of internals is inconsequential to the accident conditions postulated in the FSAR as they are related to methyl iodide formation

  1. Simulation in 3 dimensions of a cycle 18 months for an BWR type reactor using the Nod3D program; Simulacion en 3 dimensiones de un ciclo de 18 meses para un reactor BWR usando el programa Nod3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, N.; Alonso, G. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: nhm@nuclear.inin.mx; Valle, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The development of own codes that you/they allow the simulation in 3 dimensions of the nucleus of a reactor and be of easy maintenance, without the consequent payment of expensive use licenses, it can be a factor that propitiates the technological independence. In the Department of Nuclear Engineering (DIN) of the Superior School of Physics and Mathematics (ESFM) of the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) a denominated program Nod3D has been developed with the one that one can simulate the operation of a reactor BWR in 3 dimensions calculating the effective multiplication factor (kJJ3, as well as the distribution of the flow neutronic and of the axial and radial profiles of the power, inside a means of well-known characteristics solving the equations of diffusion of neutrons numerically in stationary state and geometry XYZ using the mathematical nodal method RTN0 (Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec of index zero). One of the limitations of the program Nod3D is that it doesn't allow to consider the burnt of the fuel in an independent way considering feedback, this makes it in an implicit way considering the effective sections in each step of burnt and these sections are obtained of the code Core Master LEND. However even given this limitation, the results obtained in the simulation of a cycle of typical operation of a reactor of the type BWR are similar to those reported by the code Core Master LENDS. The results of the keJ - that were obtained with the program Nod3D they were compared with the results of the code Core Master LEND, presenting a difference smaller than 0.2% (200 pcm), and in the case of the axial profile of power, the maxim differs it was of 2.5%. (Author)

  2. High-speed BWR power plant simulations on the special-purpose peripheral processor AD10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    A newly developed technique is described for fast, on-line simulations of normal and accidental transients in nuclear power plants. The technique is based on the utilization of the special-purpose peripheral processor AD10, which is specifically designed for high-speed systems simulations through integration of large systems of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The Peach Bottom-II Boiling Water Reactor power plant has been simulated and results are presented. It is shown that the new technique not only advances safety analyses but also supports plant monitoring, failure diagnosis and accident mitigation, as well as the training of nuclear power plant operators. (author)

  3. BWR simulation in a stationary state for the evaluation of fuel cell design; Simulacion de un reactor BWR en estado estacionario para la evaluacion del diseno de celdas de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del C, R.; Castillo M, A., E-mail: joseluis.montes@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper the simulation of a BWR in order to evaluate the performance of a set of fuel assemblies under stationary state in three dimensions (3-D) is presented. 15 cases selected from a database containing a total of 18225 cases are evaluated. The main selection criteria were based on the results of the design phase of the power cells in two dimensions (2-D) and 3-D initial study. In 2-D studies the parameters that were used to qualify and select the designs were basically the local power peaking factor and neutron multiplication factor of each fuel cell. In the initial 3-D study variables that defined the quality of results, and from which the selection was realized, are the margins to thermal limits of reactor operation and the value of the effective multiplication factor at the end of cycle operation. From the 2-D and 3-D results of the studies described a second 3-D study was realized, where the optimizations of the fuel reload pattern was carried out. The results presented in this paper correspond to this second 3-D study. It was found that the designs of the fuel cell they had a similar behavior to those provided by the fuel supplier of reference BWR. Particularly it noted the impact of reload pattern on the cold shut down margin. An estimate of the operation costs of reference cycle analyzed with each one designed reload batch was also performed. As a result a positive difference (gain) up to 10,347 M/US D was found. (Author)

  4. Plant analyzer development for high-speed interactive simulation of BWR plant transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced modeling techniques have been combined with modern, special-purpose peripheral minicomputer technology to develop a plant analyzer which provides realistic and accurate predictions of plant transients and severe off-normal events in nuclear power plants through on-line simulations at speeds of approximately 10 times faster than actual process speeds. The new simulation technology serves not only for carrying out routinely and efficiently safety analyses, optimizations of emergency procedures and design changes, parametric studies for obtaining safety margins and for generic training but also for assisting plant operations. Five modeling principles are presented which serve to achieve high-speed simulation of neutron kinetics, thermal conduction, nonhomogeneous and nonequilibrium two-phase flow coolant dynamics, steam line acoustical effects, and the dynamics of the balance of plant and containment systems, control systems and plant protection systems. 21 refs

  5. Plant analyzer for high-speed interactive simulation of BWR plant transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.; Wulff, W.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A combination of advanced modeling techniques and modern, special-purpose peripheral minicomputer technology was utilized to develop a plant analyzer which affords realistic predictions of plant transients and severe off-normal events in LWR power plants through on-line simulations at speeds up to 10 times faster than actual process speeds. The mathematical models account for nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous two-phase flow effects in the coolant, for acoustical effects in the steam line and for the dynamics of the entire balance of the plant. Reactor core models include point kinetics with reactivity feedback due to void fraction, fuel temperature, coolant temperature, and boron concentration as well as a conduction model for predicting fuel and clad temperatures. Control systems and trip logic for plant protection systems are also simulated. The AD10 of Applied Dynamics International, a special-purpose peripheral processor, is used as the principal hardware of the plant analyzer

  6. The BWR core simulator COSIMA with 2 group nodal flux expansion and control rod history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoejerup, C.F.

    1989-08-01

    The boiling water simulator NOTAM has been modified and improved in several aspects: - The ''1 1/2'' energy group TRILUX nodal flux solution method has been exchanged with a 2 group modal expansion method. - Control rod ''history'' has been introduced. - Precalculated instrument factors have been introduced. The paper describes these improvements, which were considered sufficiently large to justify a new name to the programme: COSIMA. (author)

  7. Effect of a Sulphate Transient on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Test 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H. P

    2002-03-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5th EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. Within WP 3 of this project, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) investigates the effect of water chemistry transients on the EAC crack growth behaviour under periodical partial unloading (PPU) conditions. The present report is a summary of the first PSI test of WP 3 with a Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} transient. In the first part of the report, the theoretical background on crack growth mechanisms, crack chemistry, mass transport and water chemistry transients as well as a brief literature survey on other water chemistry transient investigations is given. Furthermore, the experimental equipment and test procedure is presented, followed by a summary of the results of PSI test 1 of WP 3. Finally the results are discussed in detail and compared to literature data. In the first part of the experiment, an actively growing EAC crack was generated by PPU in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 288 {sup o}C, DO = 8 ppm, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} < 0.6 ppb). Then a sulphate transient was applied. The duration ({approx} 300 h) and the amount of sulphate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = 368 ppb) of the applied sulphate transient conservatively covered all sulphate transients, which might occur in BWR/normal water chemistry (NWC) practice. After the transient, outlet conductivity was lowered from ca. 1 {mu}S/cm to less than 0.15 {mu}S/cm within 2.6 h by a 'two-loop technique'. No accelerating effect of the sulphate transient on the EAC crack growth of both tested fracture mechanics specimens under highly oxidising BWR/NWC conditions was observed, making it impossible to deterrnine incubation or delay times. The EAC crack growth rates (CGR) before, during and after the

  8. Simulation of the automatic depressurization system (Ads) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP; Simulacion del sistema de despresurizacion automatica (ADS) para un reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR) basado en RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez G, C.; Chavez M, C., E-mail: ces.raga@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The automatic depressurization system (Ads) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) like part of the emergency cooling systems is designed to liberate the vapor pressure of the reactor vessel, as well as the main vapor lines. At the present time in the Engineering Faculty, UNAM personnel works in the simulation of the Laguna Verde reactor based on the nuclear code RELAP/SCADAP and in the incorporation to the same of the emergency cooling systems. The simulation of the emergency cooling systems began with the inclusion of two hydrodynamic volumes, one source and another drain, and the incorporation of the initiation logic for each emergency system. In this work is defined and designed a simplified model of Ads of the reactor, considering a detail level based on the main elements that compose it. As tool to implement the proposed model, the RELAP code was used. The simulated main functions of Ads are centered in the quick depressurization of the reactor by means of the vapor discharge through the relief/safety valves to the suppression pool, and, in the event of break of the main vapor line, the reduction of the vessel pressure operates for that the cooling systems of the core to low pressure (Lpcs and Lpci) they can begin their operation. (Author)

  9. FIX-II/2032, BWR Pump Trip Experiment 2032, Simulation Mass Flow and Power Transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: In the FIX-II pump trip experiments, mass flow and power transients were simulated subsequent to a total loss of power to the recirculation pumps in an internal pump boiling water reactor. The aim was to determine the initial power limit to give dryout in the fuel bundle for the specified transient. In addition, the peak cladding temperature was measured and the rewetting was studied. 2 - Description of test: Pump trip experiment 2032 was a part of test group 2, i.e. the mass flow transient was to simulate the pump coast down with a pump inertia of 11.3 kg.m -2 . The initial power in the 36-rod bundle was 4.44 MW which gave dryout after 1.4 s from the start of the flow transient. A maximum rod cladding temperature of 457 degrees C was measured. Rewetting was obtained after 7.6 s. 3 - Experimental limitations or shortcomings: No ECCS injection systems

  10. A method of taking control rod history into account in core simulation calculations for BWR'S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojerup, C.F.; Nonbol, E.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of taking control rod history into account in core simulator codes using precalculated cross sections has been examined, and two methods have been devised and tested. The very demanding first method, using the accumulated control rod in burn-up as a parameter, turned out to be even more inaccurate than the much less demanding second method, which only requires two full burn-up histories, one with the control rod in all the time, and another with the control rod out all the time. From the analysis it can be seen that the proper treatment of the control rod history is quite important, both for the cross sections, as several per cent on the reactivity are at stake, as for the pin powers, which for some pins are very much affected

  11. Simulation of the electro-hydraulic control system of a BWR-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, M.; Montoya, J.; Chavez, H.

    1986-01-01

    The methodology used to develop the mathematical models for the simulation of the principal turbine electro-hydraulic control of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Plant (LVNP) is presented in this report. The development of the systems mathematical model is based on the response curves of each of its elements. Therefore, little error is expected with respect to real results. On the other hand, due to the fact that the greater part of the systems dynamics is governed by first order differential equations the explicit solution method is used allowing to solve the equations algebraically. The model is validated by comparing real valves and the ones obtained through our model. The analogical and logical parts will be tested considering transitory and steady state situations. The results are presented as computer graphs

  12. Simulation of the flow obstruction of a jet pump in a BWR reactor with the code RELAP/SCDAPSIM; Simulacion de la obstruccion de flujo de una bomba jet en un reactor BWR con el codigo RELAP/SCDAPSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas V, J.; Filio L, C., E-mail: jaime.cardenas@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose M. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This work simulates the flow obstruction of a jet pump in one of the recirculation loops of a nuclear power plant with a reactor of type BWR at 100% of operating power, in order to analyze the behavior of the total flow of the refrigerant passing through the reactor core, the total flow in each recirculation loop of the reactor, together with the 10 jet pumps of each loop. The behavior of the power and the reactivity insertion due to the change of the refrigerant flow pattern is also analyzed. The simulation was carried out using the RELAP/SCDAPSIM version 3.5 code, using a reactor model with 10 jet pumps in each recirculation loop and a core consisting of 6 radial zones and 25 axial zones. The scenario postulates the flow obstruction in a jet pump in a recirculation loop A when the reactor operates at 100% rated power, causing a change in the total flow of refrigerant in the reactor core, leading to a decrease in power. Once the reactor conditions are established to its new power, the operator tries to recover the nominal power using the flow control valve of the recirculation loop A, opening stepwise as a strategy to safely recover the reactor power. In this analysis is assumed that the intention of the nuclear plant operator is to maintain the operation of the reactor during the established cycle. (Author)

  13. Corrosion of pre-oxidized nickel alloy X-750 in simulated BWR environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzi, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.tuzi@chalmers.se [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Lai, Haiping [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Göransson, Kenneth [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, SE-721 63 Västerås (Sweden); Thuvander, Mattias; Stiller, Krystyna [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Samples of pre-oxidized Alloy X-750 were exposed to a simulated boiling water reactor environment in an autoclave at a temperature of 286 °C and a pressure of 80 bar for four weeks. The effect of alloy iron content on corrosion was investigated by comparing samples with 5 and 8 wt% Fe, respectively. In addition, the effect of two different surface pre-treatments was investigated. The microstructure of the formed oxide scales was studied using mainly electron microscopy. The results showed positive effects of an increased Fe content and of removing the deformed surface layer by pickling. After four weeks of exposure the oxide scale consists of oxides formed in three different ways. The oxide formed during pre-oxidization at 700 °C, mainly consisting of chromia, is partly still present. There is also an outer oxide consisting of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals, reaching a maximum size of 3 μm, which has formed by precipitation of dissolved metal ions. Finally, there is an inner nanocrystalline and porous oxide, with a metallic content reflecting the alloy composition, which has formed by corrosion.

  14. TEM/STEM study of Zircaloy-2 with protective FeAl(Cr) layers under simulated BWR environment and high-temperature steam exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donghee; Mouche, Peter A.; Zhong, Weicheng; Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Was, Gary S.; Heuser, Brent J.

    2018-04-01

    FeAl(Cr) thin-film depositions on Zircaloy-2 were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with respect to oxidation behavior under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions and high-temperature steam. Columnar grains of FeAl with Cr in solid solution were formed on Zircaloy-2 coupons using magnetron sputtering. NiFe2O4 precipitates on the surface of the FeAl(Cr) coatings were observed after the sample was exposed to the simulated BWR environment. High-temperature steam exposure resulted in grain growth and consumption of the FeAl(Cr) layer, but no delamination at the interface. Outward Al diffusion from the FeAl(Cr) layer occurred during high-temperature steam exposure (700 °C for 3.6 h) to form a 100-nm-thick alumina oxide layer, which was effective in mitigating oxidation of the Zircaloy-2 coupons. Zr intermetallic precipitates formed near the FeAl(Cr) layer due to the inward diffusion of Fe and Al. The counterflow of vacancies in response to the Al and Fe diffusion led to porosity within the FeAl(Cr) layer.

  15. BWR 90: The ABB advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced fight water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and the total power generation costs have been low. In the development of BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to the reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher dim that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Thus, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The work is scheduled for completion in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with the 'evolutionary' design BWR 90+. The primary design goal is to develop the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is

  16. A novel auto-correlation function method and FORTRAN codes for the determination of the decay ratio in BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.

    2001-08-01

    A novel auto-correlation function (ACF) method has been investigated for determining the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio in BWR stability analyses. The report describes not only the method but also documents comprehensively the used and developed FORTRAN codes. The neutron signals are band-pass filtered to separate the oscillation peak in the power spectral density (PSD) from background. Two linear second-order oscillation models are considered. The ACF of each model, corrected for signal filtering and with the inclusion of a background term under the peak in the PSD, is then least-squares fitted to the ACF estimated on the previously filtered neutron signals, in order to determine the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio. The procedures of filtering and ACF estimation use fast Fourier transform techniques with signal segmentation. Gliding 'short-time' ACF estimates along a signal record allow the evaluation of uncertainties. Some numerical results are given which have been obtained from neutron signal data offered by the recent Forsmark I and Forsmark II NEA benchmark project. They are compared with those from other benchmark participants using different other analysis methods. (author)

  17. A novel auto-correlation function method and FORTRAN codes for the determination of the decay ratio in BWR stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behringer, K

    2001-08-01

    A novel auto-correlation function (ACF) method has been investigated for determining the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio in BWR stability analyses. The report describes not only the method but also documents comprehensively the used and developed FORTRAN codes. The neutron signals are band-pass filtered to separate the oscillation peak in the power spectral density (PSD) from background. Two linear second-order oscillation models are considered. The ACF of each model, corrected for signal filtering and with the inclusion of a background term under the peak in the PSD, is then least-squares fitted to the ACF estimated on the previously filtered neutron signals, in order to determine the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio. The procedures of filtering and ACF estimation use fast Fourier transform techniques with signal segmentation. Gliding 'short-time' ACF estimates along a signal record allow the evaluation of uncertainties. Some numerical results are given which have been obtained from neutron signal data offered by the recent Forsmark I and Forsmark II NEA benchmark project. They are compared with those from other benchmark participants using different other analysis methods. (author)

  18. Model for the analysis of transitories and stability of a BWR reactor with fuel of thorium; Modelo para el analisis de transitorios y de estabilidad de un reactor BWR con combustible de torio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez C, A. [CNSNS, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: anunezc@cnsns.gob.mx; Espinosa P, G. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois L, J.L. [Fac. de Ingenieria, UNAM 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In this work it is described the thermo hydraulic and neutronic pattern used to simulate the behavior of a nucleus of thorium-uranium under different conditions of operation. The analysed nucleus was designed with base to assemblies that operate under the cover-seed concept. The pattern was proven to conditions of stationary state and transitory state. Here it is only presented the simulation of the one SCRAM manual and it is compared in the behavior of a nucleus with UO{sub 2}. Additionally one carries out an analysis of stability taking into account the four corners that define the area of stability of the map flow-power and to conditions of 100% of flow and 100% of power. The module of stability is based on the pattern of Lahey and Podowsky to estimate the drops of pressure during a perturbation. It is concludes that the behavior of this nucleus is not very different to the one shown by the nuclei loaded with the fuel of UO{sub 2}. (Author)

  19. Digital implementation, simulation and tests in MATLAB of the models of Steam line, the turbines, the pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez R, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this phase of the project they were carried out exhaustive tests to the models of the steam lines, turbines and pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric central for to verify that their tendencies and behaviors are it more real possible. For it, it was necessary to also analyze the transfer functions of the different components along the steam line until the power generator. Such models define alone the dominant poles of the system, what is not limitation to reproduce a wide range of anticipated transitoriness of a power station operation. In the same manner, it was integrated and proved the integrated model form with the models of feeding water of the SUN-RAH, simulating the nuclear reactor starting from predetermined entrances of the prospective values of the vessel. Also it was coupled with the graphic interface developed with the libraries DirectX implementing a specific monitoring panel for this system. (Author)

  20. Studies of Corrosion of Cladding Materials in Simulated BWR-environment Using Impedance Measurements. Part I: Measurements in the Pre-transition Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, Stefan; Ahlberg, Elisabet; Andersson, Ulf

    2004-09-01

    The corrosion of three Zircaloy 2 cladding materials, LK2, LK2+ and LK3, have been studied in-situ in an autoclave using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Measurements were performed in simulated BWR water at temperatures up to 288 deg C. The impedance spectra were successfully modelled using equivalent circuits. When the oxide grew thicker during the experiments, a change-over from one to two time constants was seen, showing that a layered structure was formed. Oxide thickness, oxide conductivity and effective donor density were evaluated from the impedance data. The calculated oxide thickness at the end of the experiments was consistent with the value obtained from SEM. It was shown that the difference in oxide growth rate between the investigated materials is small in the pre-transition region. The effective donor density, which is a measure of electronic conductivity, was found to be lower for the LK3 material compared to the other two materials

  1. Simulations of ex-vessel fuel coolant interactions in a Nordic BWR using MC3D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W.

    2013-08-01

    Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) employ a drywell cavity flooding technique as a nuclear severe accident management strategy. In case of core melt accident where the reactor pressure vessel will fail and the melt will eject from the lower head and fall into a water pool, may be in the form of a continuous jet. It is assumed that the melt jet will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed into the water pool. The melt interaction with a water pool may cause an energetic steam explosion which creates a potential risk towards the integrity of containment, leading to fission products release into the atmosphere. The results of the APRI-7 project suggest that the significant damage to containment structures by steam explosion cannot be ruled according to the state-of-the-art knowledge about corresponding accident scenario. In the follow-up project APRI-8 (2012-2016) one of the goals of the KTH research is to resolve the steam explosion energetics (SEE) issue, developing a risk-oriented framework for quantifying conditional threats to containment integrity for a Nordic type BWR. The present study deals with the premixing and explosion phase calculations of a Nordic BWR dry cavity, using MC3D, a multiphase CFD code for fuel coolant interactions. The main goal of the study is the assessment of pressure buildup in the cavity and the impact loading on the side walls. The conditions for the calculations are used from the SERENA-II BWR case exercise. The other objective was to do the sensitivity analysis of the parameters in modeling of fuel coolant interactions, which can help to reduce uncertainty in assessment of steam explosion energetics. The results show that the amount of liquid melt droplets in the water (region of void<0.6) is maximum even before reaching the jet at the bottom. In the explosion phase, maximum pressure is attained at the bottom and the maximum impulse on the wall is at the bottom of the wall. The analysis is carried out using two different

  2. Simulations of ex-vessel fuel coolant interactions in a Nordic BWR using MC3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) employ a drywell cavity flooding technique as a nuclear severe accident management strategy. In case of core melt accident where the reactor pressure vessel will fail and the melt will eject from the lower head and fall into a water pool, may be in the form of a continuous jet. It is assumed that the melt jet will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed into the water pool. The melt interaction with a water pool may cause an energetic steam explosion which creates a potential risk towards the integrity of containment, leading to fission products release into the atmosphere. The results of the APRI-7 project suggest that the significant damage to containment structures by steam explosion cannot be ruled according to the state-of-the-art knowledge about corresponding accident scenario. In the follow-up project APRI-8 (2012-2016) one of the goals of the KTH research is to resolve the steam explosion energetics (SEE) issue, developing a risk-oriented framework for quantifying conditional threats to containment integrity for a Nordic type BWR. The present study deals with the premixing and explosion phase calculations of a Nordic BWR dry cavity, using MC3D, a multiphase CFD code for fuel coolant interactions. The main goal of the study is the assessment of pressure buildup in the cavity and the impact loading on the side walls. The conditions for the calculations are used from the SERENA-II BWR case exercise. The other objective was to do the sensitivity analysis of the parameters in modeling of fuel coolant interactions, which can help to reduce uncertainty in assessment of steam explosion energetics. The results show that the amount of liquid melt droplets in the water (region of void<0.6) is maximum even before reaching the jet at the bottom. In the explosion phase, maximum pressure is attained at the bottom and the maximum impulse on the wall is at the bottom of the wall. The analysis is carried out using two different

  3. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Wulff, W.; Mallen, A.N.; Lekach, S.V.; Stritar, A.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced technology for high-speed interactive nuclear power plant simulations is of great value for timely resolution of safety issues, for plant monitoring, and for computer-aided emergency responses to an accident. Presented is the methodology employed at BNL to develop a BWR plant analyzer capable of simulating severe plant transients at much faster than real-time process speeds. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is given for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computers to achieve the very high simulation speeds. Typical results are shown to demonstrate the modeling fidelity of the BWR plant analyzer

  4. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Toshio; Masuda, Hisao; Isono, Tomoyuki; Noji, Kunio; Togo, Toshiki

    1989-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) was established in April 1971 for the purpose of training the operators from all BWR utilities in Japan. Since April 1974, more than 2600 operators and 1000 shift teams have been trained with the full-scope simulators in BTC up to the end of March 1988. To get the satisfactory results of the training, BTC has been making every effort to improve the facilities, the training materials, the instruction methods and the curricula. In this paper, such a series of recent improvements in the instruction methods and the curricula are presented that are effective to expand the knowledge and to improve the skills of middle or senior class operators. (author)

  5. Compact modular BWR (CM-BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennern, Larry; Boardman, Charles; Carroll, Douglas G.; Hida, Takahiko

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary assessment has shown that a small 350 MWe BWR reactor can be placed within a close fitting steel containment vessel that is 7.1 meters inside diameter. This allows the technology and manufacturing capability currently used to fabricate large ABWR reactor vessels to be used to provide a factory fabricated containment vessel for a 350 MWe BWR. When a close fitted steel containment is combined with a passive closed loop isolation condenser system and a natural circulating reactor system that contains a large water inventory, primary system leaks cannot uncover the core. This eliminates many of the safety systems needed in response to a LOCA that are common to large, conventional plant designs including. Emergency Core Flooding, Automatic Depressurization System, Active Residual Heat Removal, Safety Related Auxiliary Cooling, Safety Related Diesel Generators, Hydrogen Re-Combiners, Ex-vessel Core Retention and Cooling. By fabricating the containment in a factory and eliminating most of the conventional safety systems, the construction schedule is shortened and the capital cost reduced to levels that would not otherwise be possible for a relatively small modular BWR. This makes the CM-BWR a candidate for applications where smaller incremental power additions are desired relative to a large ALWR or where the local infrastructure is not able to accommodate a conventional ALWR plant rated at 1350 MWe or more. This paper presents a preliminary design description of a Compact Modular BWR (CM-BWR) whose design features dramatically reduce the size and cost of the reactor building and associated safety systems. (author)

  6. CFD Simulation of rigid venting of the containment of a BWR-5 Mark-II reactor; Simulacion CFD de los venteos rigidos de la contencion de un reactor BWR-5 Mark-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo G, I. F.; Vazquez B, A. K.; Velazquez E, L. [Instituto Nacional de Electricidad y Energias Limpias, Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Tijerina S, F.; Tapia M, R., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [CFE, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Federal Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, 91476 Municipio Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    In conditions of prolonged loss of external energy or a severe accident, venting to the atmosphere is an alternative to prevent overpressure and release of fission products from the primary containment of a nuclear reactor. Due to the importance of flow determination through rigid vents, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is proposed to verify the capacity of rigid vents in the primary containment of a boiling water reactor (BWR) under different operating conditions (pressure, temperature and compositions of the fluids). The model predicts and provides detailed information on variables such as mass flow and velocity of the venting gases. In the proposed model the primary containment gas is vented to the atmosphere via rigid vents (pipes) from the dry and wet pit. Is assumed that the container is pressurized because is in a defined scenario, and at one point the venting is open and the gas released into the atmosphere. The objective is to characterize the flow and validate the CFD model for the overpressure conditions that occur in an accident such as a LOCA, Sbo, etc. The model is implemented with Ansys-Fluent general-purpose CFD software based on the geometry of the venting ducts of the containment of a BWR. The model is developed three-dimensional and resolves at steady state for compressible flow and includes the effects of the turbulence represented by the Reynolds stress model. The CFD results are compared with the values of a one-dimensional and isentropic model for compressible flow. The relative similarity of results leads to the conclusion that the proposed CFD model can help to predict the rigid venting capacity of the containment of a BWR, however more information is required for full validation of the proposed model. (Author)

  7. Improvement for BWR operator training, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noji, Kunio; Toeda, Susumu; Saito, Genhachi; Suzuki, Koichi

    1990-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) is conducting training for BWR plant operators using Full-scope Simulators. There are several courses for individual operators and one training course for shift crew (Family Training Course) in BTC. Family Training is carried out by all members of the operating shift-crew. BTC has made efforts to improve the Family Training in order to acquire more effective training results and contribute to up-grade team performance of all crews. This paper describes some items of our efforts towards Family Training improvement. (author)

  8. Effect of a Chloride Transient on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Test 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.-P.

    2002-11-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5 t h EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. The present report is a summary of the second test of working package (WP) 3 with a NaCl transient, performed at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). In the first part of the experiment, an actively growing EAC crack with a crack growth rate (CGR) in the range of the 'low-sulphur SCC line' of the GE-model was generated by periodical partial unloading (PPU) in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 288 o C, DO = 8 ppm). Then a chloride transient of 49 ppb Cl - was applied for ∼40 h. After this transient, the load level was reduced and the loading conditions were changed to pure cyclic loading. Thereupon a second transient with a chloride concentration of 49 ppb was applied. In both RPV steels, the first chloride transient of 49 ppb Cl - resulted in an acceleration of the EAC crack growth by more than one order of magnitude and in fast, stationary SCC crack growth during the constant load phase of the PPU cycles at K I values 1/2 . 3 h after adding chloride to the high-purity water, the EAC CGR started to increase in the high-sulphur RPV steel during the constant load phase of a PPU cycle and after 20 h a stationary EAC CGR value in the range of the 'high-sulphur SCC curve' of the GE-model was reached. After 5 h in high-purity water, the crack growth began to slow down after a partial unloading cycle and 15 h later it reached again a stationary CGR value in the range of the 'low-sulphur SCC curve' of the GE-model. The second chloride transient did not result in an acceleration of the crack growth in both investigated specimens. This was explained by crack closure effects, which occurred in both specimens after the reduction of the load. The CGR

  9. The AutoAssociative Neural Network in signal analysis: II. Application to on-line monitoring of a simulated BWR component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marseguerra, M.; Zoia, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, Robust AutoAssociative Neural Networks (RAANN) are applied to a series of signals produced by the Halden simulator of the 1200MWe BWR Forsmark-3 plant in Sweden. The applications concern: - correction of drifts and gross errors in sensors, for diagnostic and control purposes, - cluster analysis, to individuate a failed component and the intensity of the failure, - forecasting system signals, for safety or economic purposes, - reconstruction of unmeasured signals (virtual sensors). In the attainment of the above results, the geometric interpretation of the mapping performed by the network, propounded in Part I of this work, has provided a reasoned choice of the most critical free parameter, i.e., the number f of nodes of the bottleneck layer, thus allowing a deep understanding of the network functioning and also avoiding the traditional and troubling procedure of selection by trial-and-error. The theoretical basis of this analysis, discussed in details in the companion paper, is founded on the idea of dimension and in particular of fractal dimension, which has been used as a numerical estimator of f

  10. Simulation of SBWR startup transient and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1998-01-01

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designed by General Electric is a natural circulation reactor with enhanced safety features for potential accidents. It has a strong coupling between power and flow in the reactor core, hence the neutronic coupling with thermal-hydraulics is specially important. The potential geysering instability during the early part of a SBWR startup at low flow, low power and low pressure is of particular concern. The RAMONA-4B computer code developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the SBWR has been used to simulate a SBWR startup transient and evaluate its stability, using a simplified four-channel representation of the reactor core for the thermal-hydraulics. This transient was run for 20,000 sec (5.56 hrs) in order to cover the essential aspect of the SBWR startup. The simulation showed that the SBWR startup was a very challenging event to analyze as it required accurate modeling of the thermal-hydraulics at low pressures. This analysis did not show any geysering instability during the startup, following the startup procedure as proposed by GE

  11. Dynamic large eddy simulation: Stability via realizability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarpoor, Reza; Heinz, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    The concept of dynamic large eddy simulation (LES) is highly attractive: such methods can dynamically adjust to changing flow conditions, which is known to be highly beneficial. For example, this avoids the use of empirical, case dependent approximations (like damping functions). Ideally, dynamic LES should be local in physical space (without involving artificial clipping parameters), and it should be stable for a wide range of simulation time steps, Reynolds numbers, and numerical schemes. These properties are not trivial, but dynamic LES suffers from such problems over decades. We address these questions by performing dynamic LES of periodic hill flow including separation at a high Reynolds number Re = 37 000. For the case considered, the main result of our studies is that it is possible to design LES that has the desired properties. It requires physical consistency: a PDF-realizable and stress-realizable LES model, which requires the inclusion of the turbulent kinetic energy in the LES calculation. LES models that do not honor such physical consistency can become unstable. We do not find support for the previous assumption that long-term correlations of negative dynamic model parameters are responsible for instability. Instead, we concluded that instability is caused by the stable spatial organization of significant unphysical states, which are represented by wall-type gradient streaks of the standard deviation of the dynamic model parameter. The applicability of our realizability stabilization to other dynamic models (including the dynamic Smagorinsky model) is discussed.

  12. Modelling of the dynamics of the vessel and circuits of recirculation of a BWR type nucleo electric as part of the SUN-RAH university simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez S, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the present project, the development of a model for the dynamics of the process of energy transport generated in the nuclear fuel until the main steam lines of a nucleo electric central with BWR type nuclear reactor, using mathematical models of reduced order is presented. These models present the main characteristics of the reactor vessel and of the recirculation system, defined by the main phenomena that intervene in those physical processes. Likewise, the objective of the general project of the one University student nucleo electric simulator with Boiling Water Reactor (SUN-RAH) for later on to establish the modeling equations for each part of the nuclear reactor as well as of the load pursuit system. Also, its were described the graphic interfaces implemented in an three layers architecture in which the different measuring variables are presented in the monitor. It fits signalize that the advantage presented by the University student nucleo electric simulator is the possibility to carry out changes in the magnitudes of those different variables that intervene in the physical processes made in the one reactor and in the recirculation system in execution time of the same one. Of same way, the creation of a graphic intuitive interface, friendly, and designed with the same technology with the one that the video games are programmed in the present time. Besides all the above mentioned, the pending goals inside of the project are exposed, as well as the developments in construction process or conceptualized to be included in future versions of the simulator. Finally its are thinking about possible scenarios of applications of SUN-RAH, as well as their reaches. (Author)

  13. BWR water chemistry impurity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Korhonen, S.; Renstroem, K.; Hofling, C.G.; Rebensdorff, B.

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory studies were made on the effect of water impurities on environmental cracking in simulated BWR water of stainless steel, low alloy steel and nickel-base alloys. Constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests were run in simulated normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or start-up environment. Sulfate, chloride and copper with chloride added to the water at levels of a fraction of a ppM were found to be extremely deleterious to all kinds of materials except Type 316 NG. Other detrimental impurities were fluoride, silica and some organic acids, although acetic acid was beneficial. Nitrate and carbon dioxide were fairly inoccuous. Corrosion fatigue and constant load tests on compact tension specimens were run in simulated normal BWR water chemistry (NWC) or hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), without impurities or with added sulfate or carbon dioxide. For sensitized Type 304 SS in NWC, 0.1 ppM sulfate increased crack propagation rates in constant load tests by up to a factor of 100, and in fatigue tests up to a factor of 10. Also, cracking in Type 316 nuclear grade SS and Alloy 600 was enhanced, but to a smaller degree. Carbon dioxide was less detrimental than sulfate. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Power oscillations in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa P, G.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main problems in the operation of BWR type reactors is the instability in power that these could present. One type of oscillations and that is the objective of this work is the named density wave, which is attributed to the thermohydraulic processes that take place in the reactor core. From the beginnings of the development of BWR reactors, the stability of these has been an important aspect in their design, due to its possible consequences on the fuel integrity. The reactor core operates in two phase flow conditions and it is observed that under certain power and flow conditions, power instabilities appear. Studying this type of phenomena is complex, due to that a reactor core is constituted approximately by 27,000 fuel bars with different distributions of power and flow. The phenomena that cause the instability in BWR reactors continue being matter of scientific study. In the literature mainly in nuclear subject, it can be observed that exist different methods and approximations for studying this type of phenomena, nevertheless, their results are focused to establish safety limits in the reactor operation, instead of studying in depth of the knowledge about. Also in this line sense of the reactor data analysis, the oscillations characteristic frequencies are obtained for trying to establish if the power is growing or decreasing. In addition to that before mentioned in this paper it is presented a rigorous study applying the volumetric average method, for obtaining the vacuum waves propagation velocities and its possible connection with the power oscillations. (Author)

  15. Kinematics of two-phase mixture level motion in BWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Stritar, A.

    1985-01-01

    A model is presented for predicting two-phase mixture level elevations in BWR systems. The model accounts for the particular geometry and conditions in a BWR system during Small-Break Loss of Coolant Accidents. The model presented here is particularly suitable for efficient, high-speed simulations on small minicomputers. The model has been implemented and tested. Results are shown from BWR ATWS simulations

  16. Simulation of the BWR experiments CORA-17 and CORA-28 using ATHLET-CD and assessment of BWR modelling. 1{sup st} Technical report. Validation and interpretation of the ATHLET-CD model basis; Simulation der SWR-Versuche CORA-17 und CORA-28 mit dem Programmsystem ATHLET-CD und Bewertung der SWR-Modellbasis. 1. Technischer Fachbericht. Validierung und Interpretation der ATHLET-CD Modellbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, M.; Gremme, F.; Koch, M.K.

    2013-08-15

    The 1st Technical Report was prepared for the research project ''Validation and Interpretation of the ATHLET-CD Model Basis'' funded by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi1501385) and carried out at the Chair of Energy Systems and Energy Economics at Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (RUB). This report provides results of the simulation of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) experiments CORA-17 and -28 with ATHLET-CD Mod. 2.2A. The system code ATHLET-CD (Analysis of Thermal-hydraulics of Leaks and Transients - Core Degradation) is developed by the German Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH. Code results are compared to measurements in order to assess and to analyze the capabilities of the current code version with regard to the modeling of BWR components. The CORA test series was carried out between the years 1987 and 1993 at the former Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), now Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The investigations provided experimental data regarding the material behavior during the early phase of core degradation in Light Water Reactors (LWR). The tests CORA17 and -28 represented a typical BWR arrangement of the fuel rod bundle and provided insights about the bundle behavior during the quenching process (CORA-17) and regarding the influence of a preoxidized bundle (CORA-28), respectively. The simulation results are analyzed and discussed in terms of the thermal bundle behavior, the zirconium oxidation in steam and the resulting hydrogen generation as well as the material relocation. In particular, the recently extended modeling capabilities of the code in terms of the relocation of BWR components like the absorber blade and the canister wall are assessed. The analysis shows that the code captures the thermal behavior in good agreement in both experiments. An even enhanced reproduction of the test CORA-28 is obtained in comparison to a calculation using the previous code version ATHLET-CD Mod

  17. Residual stress analysis in BWR pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Leung, C.P.; Pont, D.

    1992-06-01

    Residual stresses from welding processes can be the primary driving force for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR components. Thus, a better understanding of the causes and nature of these residual stresses can help assess and remedy SCC. Numerical welding simulation software, such as SYSWELD, and material property data have been used to quantify residual stresses for application to SCC assessments in BWR components. Furthermore, parametric studies using SYSWELD have revealed which variables significantly affect predicted residual stress. Overall, numerical modeling techniques can be used to evaluate residual stress for SCC assessments of BWR components and to identify and plan future SCC research

  18. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core low pressure (LPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrillo G, O. E.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    The present work presents the modeling and simulation of the aspersion system to low pressure of reactor of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde using the nuclear code RELAP/SCDAP. The objective of the emergency systems inside a nuclear reactor is the cooling of the core, nor caring the performance of any other emergency system in the case of an accident design base for coolant loss. To obtain a simulation of the system is necessary to have a model based on their main components, pipes, pumps, valves, etc. This article describes the model for the simulation of the main line and the test line for the HPCS. At the moment we have the simulation of the reactor vessel and their systems associated to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, this work will allow to associate the emergency system model LPCS to the vessel model. The simulation of the vessel and the emergency systems will allow knowing the behavior of the reactor in the stage of the coolant loos, giving the possibility to analyze diverse scenarios. The general model will provide an auxiliary tool for the training in classroom and at distance in the operation of nuclear power plants. (Author)

  19. Simulation of a large break loss of coolant (LBLOCA), without actuation of the emergency injection systems (ECCS) for a BWR-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Lopez M, R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the analysis of scenario for the loss of coolant case was realized with break at the bottom of a recirculation loop of a BWR-5 with containment type Mark II and a thermal power of 2317 MWt considering that not have coolant injection. This in order to observe the speed of progression of the accident, the phenomenology of the scenario, the time to reach the limit pressure of containment venting and the amount of radionuclides released into the environment. This simulation was performed using the MELCOR code version 2.1. The scenario posits a break in one of the shear recirculation loops. The emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and the reactor core isolation cooling (Rcic) have not credit throughout the event, which allowed achieve greater severity on scenario. The venting of the primary containment was conducted via valve of 30 inches instead of the line of 24 inches of wet well, this in order to have a larger area of exhaust of fission products directly to the reactor building. The venting took place when the pressure in the primary containment reached the 4.5 kg/cm 2 and remained open for the rest of the scenario to maximize the amount released of radionuclides to the atmosphere. The safety relief valves were considered functional they do not present mechanical failure or limit their ability to release pressure due to the large number of performances in safety mode. The results of the analysis covers about 48 hours, time at which the accident evolution was observed; behavior of level, pressure in the vessel and the fuel temperature profile was analyzed. For progression of the scenario outside the vessel, the pressure and temperature of the primary containment, level and temperature of the suppression pool, the hydrogen accumulation in the container and the radionuclides mass released into the atmosphere were analyzed. (Author)

  20. Simulation of a scenario of total loss of external and internal power (Sbo) for different vent pressures of the containment of a BWR-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Godinez S, V.

    2014-10-01

    The simulation of a Station Black Out (Sbo) was realized with intervention of the vent containment by means of a rigid vent coming from the dry-well and that discharges directly to the atmosphere, with the MELCOR code version 2.1. This scenario was carried out for a BWR-5 and containment type Mark II, with a thermal power of 2317 MWt similar to the reactor of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. For this scenario was considered as only available system for coolant injection to the reactor to the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (Rcic), which remained operating 4 hours with batteries bank. The Security and Relief Valves (SR V) were considered functional (by simplicity) and that they mechanically do not exceed their capacity to liberate pressure due to the performances in their safety way. The operator maneuver to perform the SR V and to de pressurize the vessel until the pressure (13 kg/cm 2 ) to operate the low pressure systems was modeled. The results cover approximately 48 hours (172000 seconds), time in which was observed the behavior of the level and pressure in the vessel. Also the scenario evolution was analyzed to different vent pressures of the primary containment (2.0, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, and 10.0 kg/cm 2 ), the temperature profiles of the dry-well, the hydrogen accumulation in the containment, the radio-nuclides liberation through rigid vent to the atmosphere and the inventory of these. In this work an analysis of the pressure behavior in the primary containment is presented, with the purpose of minimizing liberated fission products to the environment. (Author)

  1. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study for transport behavior of CsI in heating test simulating a BWR severe accident condition: Chemical effects of boron vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okane, T., E-mail: okanet@spring8.or.jp [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Kobata, M. [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Sato, I. [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Kobayashi, K. [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Osaka, M. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Yamagami, H. [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto, 603-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We have clarified the temperature-dependent chemical forms of Cs/I products. • We have examined the CsI-decomposing effects of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} vapor. • The possibility of Cs re-evaporation from CsI-deposited surface is suggested. • We have demonstrated the usefulness of HAXPES on FP chemistry. - Abstract: Transport behavior of CsI in the heating test, which simulated a BWR severe accident, was investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) with an emphasis on the chemical effect of boron vapors. CsI deposited on metal tube at temperatures ranging from 150 °C to 750 °C was reacted with vapor/aerosol B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and the chemical form of reaction products on the sample surface was examined from the HAXPES spectra of core levels, e.g., Ni 2p, Cs 3d and I 3d levels, and valence band. For the samples at ∼300 °C, while the chemical form of major product on the sample surface without an exposure to B{sub 2}O{sub 3} was suggested to be CsI from the HAXPES spectra, an intensity ratio of Cs/I was dramatically reduced at the sample surface after the reaction with B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The results suggest the possibility of significant decomposition of deposited CsI induced by the chemical reaction with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} at specific temperatures.

  2. Effects of cold working ratio and stress intensity factor on intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steels in simulated BWR and PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaguchi, Seiji; Yonezawa, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of cold working ratio, stress intensity factor and water chemistry on an IGSCC susceptibility of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steel, constant displacement DCB specimens were applied to SCC tests in simulated BWR and PWR primary water for the three types of austenitic stainless steels, Types 316L, 347 and 321. IGSCC was observed on the test specimens in simulated BWR and PWR primary water. The observed IGSCC was categorized into the following two types. The one is that the IGSCC observed on the same plane of the pre-fatigue crack plane, and the other is that the IGSCC observed on a plane perpendicular to the pre-fatigue crack plane. The later IGSCC fractured plane is parallel to the rolling plane of a cold rolled material. Two types of IGSCC fractured planes were changed according to the combination of the testing conditions (cold working ratio, stress intensity factor and simulated water). It seems to suggest that the most susceptible plane due to fabrication process of materials might play a significant role of IGSCC for non-sensitized cold worked austenitic stainless steels, especially, in simulated PWR primary water. Based upon evaluating on the reference crack growth rate (R-CGR) of the test specimens, the R-CGR seems to be mainly affected by cold working ratio. In case of simulated PWR primary water, it seems that the effect of metallurgical aspects dominates IGSCC susceptibility. (author)

  3. Development of BWR [boiling water reactor] and PWR [pressurized water reactor] event descriptions for nuclear facility simulator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.; Bovell, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    A number of tools that can aid nuclear facility training developers in designing realistic simulator scenarios have been developed. This paper describes each of the tools, i.e., event lists, events-by-competencies matrices, and event descriptions, and illustrates how the tools can be used to construct scenarios

  4. Development of advanced BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Masatoshi

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese technology and domestic production of BWR type nuclear power plants have been established through the experiences in the construction and operation of BWRs in addition to the technical agreement with the General Electric Co. In early days, the plants experienced some trouble such as stress corrosion cracking and some inconvenience in the operation and maintenance. The government, electric power companies and BWR manufacturers have endeavored to standardize and improve the design of LWRs for the purpose of improving the safety, reliability and the rate of operation and reducing the radiation exposure dose of plant workers. The first and second stages of the standardization and improvement of LWRs have been completed. Five manufacturers of BWRs in the world have continued the conceptual design of a new version of BWR power plants. It was concluded that this is the most desirable version of BWR nuclear power stations, but the technical and economic evaluation must be made before the commercial application. Six electric power companies and three manufacturers of BWRs in Japan set up the organization to develop the technology in cooperation. The internal pump system, the new control rod drive mechanism and others are the main features. (Kako, I.)

  5. Best-estimate analysis development for BWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Kalra, S.P.; Beckner, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Program is a three pronged approach to the development of best-estimate analysis capability for BWR systems. An experimental program in the FIST BWR system simulator facility extends the LOCA data base and adds operational transients data. An analytical method development program with the BWR-TRAC computer program extends the modeling of BWR specific components and major interfacing systems, and improves numerical techniques to reduce computer running time. A method qualification program tests TRAC-B against experiments run in the FIST facility and extends the results to reactor system applications. With the completion and integration of these three activities, the objective of a best-estimate analysis capability has been achieved. (author)

  6. Valuation of power oscillations in a BWR after control rod banks withdrawal events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A. L.; Pereira, C.; Da Silva, C. A. M.; Veloso, M. A. F.

    2009-01-01

    The out-of-phase mode of oscillation is a very challenging type of instability occurring in BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) and its study is relevant because of the safety implications related to the capability to promptly detect any such inadvertent occurrence by in-core neutron detectors, thus triggering the necessary countermeasures in terms of selected rod insertion or even reactor shutdown. In this work, control rod banks (CRB) withdrawal transient was considered to study the power instability occurring in a BWR. To simulate this transient, the control rod banks were continuously removed from the BWR core in different cases. The simulation resulted in a very large increase of power. To perform the instability simulations, the RELAP5/MOD3.3 thermal hydraulic system code was coupled with the PARCS/2.4 3D neutron kinetic code. Data from a real BWR, the Peach Bottom, have been used as reference conditions and reactor parameters. The trend of the mass flow rate, pressure, coolant temperature and the void fraction to four thermal hydraulic channels symmetrically located in the core with respect to the core centre, were taken. It appears that the velocity of the rod bank withdrawal is a very important aspect for reactor stability. The slowest CRB withdrawal (180 s) did not cause power perturbation while the fast removal (20 s) triggered a slow power oscillation that little by little amplified to reach levels of more 100% of the initial power after about 210 s. The investigation of the related thermo hydraulic parameters showed that the mass flow rate, the void fraction and also the coolant temperature began to oscillate at approximately the same time interval

  7. Hydraulic modeling and simulation of a System Division of Essential Service Water in a BWR plant with Flow master

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegazo Juzgado, L.; Rodriguez Garcia, G. M.; Mota Coloma, M.

    2012-01-01

    At the conclusion of the project can say that Flow master is a simulation tool that allows you to create your model from a library of components and obtain useful results from the point of view of the operation, engineering and maintenance. Compared to previous software from the point of view of use, can comment that Flow master is a tool which has an intuitive and user-friendly interaction between the user and the program thus facilitating the modeling of the system and definition of the components of same.

  8. BWR modeling capability and Scale/Triton lattice-to-core integration of the Nestle nodal simulator - 331

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, J.; Hernandez, H.; Maldonado, G.I.; Jessee, M.; Popov, E.; Clarno, K.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the status of recent and substantial enhancements made to the NESTLE nodal core simulator, a code originally developed at North Carolina State University (NCSU) of which version 5.2.1 has been available for several years through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) software repository. In its released and available form, NESTLE is a seasoned, well-developed and extensively tested code system particularly useful to model PWRs. In collaboration with NCSU, University of Tennessee (UT) and ORNL researchers have recently developed new enhancements for the NESTLE code, including the implementation of a two-phase drift-flux thermal hydraulic and flow redistribution model to facilitate modeling of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) as well as the development of an integrated coupling of SCALE/TRITON lattice physics to NESTLE so to produce an end-to-end capability for reactor simulations. These latest advancements implemented into NESTLE as well as an update of other ongoing efforts of this project are herein reported. (authors)

  9. 3D pin-by-pin power density profiles with high spatial resolution in the vicinity of a BWR control blade tip simulated with coupled neutronics/burn-up calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Nünighoff, K.; Allelein, H.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► High spatial resolution neutronic and burn-up calculations of quarter BWR fuel element section. ► Coupled MCNP(X)–ORIGEN2.2 simulation using VESTA. ► Control blade history effect was taken into account. ► Determining local power excursion after instantaneous control rod movement. ► Correlation between control blade geometry and occurrence of local power excursions. - Abstract: Pellet cladding interaction (PCI) as well as pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) are well-known fuel failures in light water reactors, especially in boiling water reactors (BWR). Whereas the thermo-mechanical processes of PCI effects have been intensively investigated in the last decades, only rare information is available on the role of neutron physics. However, each power transient is primary due to neutron physics effects and thus knowledge of the neutron physical background is mandatory to better understand the occurrence of PCI effects in BWRs. This paper will focus on a study of local power excursions in a typical BWR fuel assembly during control rod movements. Burn-up and energy deposition were simulated with high spatial granularity, especially in the vicinity of the control blade tip. It could be shown, that the design of the control blade plays a dominant role for the occurrence of local power peaks while instantaneously moving down the control rod. The main result is, that the largest power peak occurs at the interface between steel handle and absorber rods. A full width half maximum (FWHM) of ±2.5 cm was observed. This means, the local power excursion due to neutron physics phenomena involve approximately five pellets. With the VESTA code coupled MCNP(X)/ORIGEN2.2 calculations were performed with more than 3400 burn-up zones in order to take history effects into account.

  10. Stability of molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The existence of a shadow Hamiltonian for discrete classical dynamics, obtained by an asymptotic expansion for a discrete symplectic algorithm, is employed to determine the limit of stability for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with respect to the time-increment h of the discrete dynamics....... The investigation is based on the stability of the shadow energy, obtained by including the first term in the asymptotic expansion, and on the exact solution of discrete dynamics for a single harmonic mode. The exact solution of discrete dynamics for a harmonic potential with frequency ω gives a criterion...... for the limit of stability h ⩽ 2/ω. Simulations of the Lennard-Jones system and the viscous Kob-Andersen system show that one can use the limit of stability of the shadow energy or the stability criterion for a harmonic mode on the spectrum of instantaneous frequencies to determine the limit of stability of MD...

  11. BWR level estimation using Kalman Filtering approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, G.; Divakaruni, S.M.; Meyer, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Work is in progress on development of a system for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) vessel level validation and failure detection. The levels validated include the liquid level both inside and outside the core shroud. This work is a major part of a larger effort to develop a complete system for BWR signal validation. The demonstration plant is the Oyster Creek BWR. Liquid level inside the core shroud is not directly measured during full power operation. This level must be validated using measurements of other quantities and analytic models. Given the available sensors, analytic models for level that are based on mass and energy balances can contain open integrators. When such a model is driven by noisy measurements, the model predicted level will deviate from the true level over time. To validate the level properly and to avoid false alarms, the open integrator must be stabilized. In addition, plant parameters will change slowly with time. The respective model must either account for these plant changes or be insensitive to them to avoid false alarms and maintain sensitivity to true failures of level instrumentation. Problems are addressed here by combining the extended Kalman Filter and Parity Space Decision/Estimator. The open integrator is stabilized by integrating from the validated estimate at the beginning of each sampling interval, rather than from the model predicted value. The model is adapted to slow plant/sensor changes by updating model parameters on-line

  12. Scaling and uncertainty in BWR instability problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Auria, F.; Pellicoro, V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with a critical review of activities, performed at the DCMN of Pisa University, in relation to the thermo-hydraulic oscillations in two-phase systems. Stability analyses, including model development and achievement of experimental data, are generally performed for BWRs in order to achieve the following objectives: to reach a common understanding in relation to the predictive capabilities of system codes and to the influence of various parameters on the instability; to establish a data base for the qualification of the analytical tools already or becoming available; to set-up qualified tools (code/models + nodalization + user assumption) suitable for predicting the unstable behaviour of the nuclear plants of interest (current BWR, SBWR, ABWR and RBMK). These considerations have been the basis for the following researches: 1) proposal of the Boiling Instability Program (BIP) (1) 2) evaluation of stability tests in PIPER-ONE apparatus (2) 3) coupled thermal-hydraulic and neutronic instabilities in the LaSalle-2 BWR plant (3) 4) participation to the NEA-OECD BWR Benchmark (4) The RELAP/MOD2 and RELAP5/MOD3 codes have been used. (author)

  13. TRAC-BWR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.L.; Rouhani, S.Z.

    1983-01-01

    The TRAC-BD1/MOD1 code containing many new or improved models has been assembled and is undergoing developmental assessment and testing and should be available shortly. The preparation of the manual for this code version is underway and should be available to the USNRC and their designated contractors by April of 1984. Finally work is currently underway on a fast running version of TRAC-BWR which will contain a one-dimensional neutron kinetics model

  14. Glenohumeral stability in simulated rotator cuff tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, F.; Groot, J.H.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Helm, F.C.; Rozing, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears disrupt the force balance in the shoulder and the glenohumeral joint in particular, resulting in compromised arm elevation torques. The trade-off between glenohumeral torque and glenohumeral stability is not yet understood. We hypothesize that compensation of lost abduction torque

  15. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I

  16. Digital implementation, simulation and tests in MATLAB of the models of Steam line, the turbines, the pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric power plant; Implementacion digital, simulacion y pruebas en MATLAB de los modelos de la linea de vapor, las turbinas y el regulador de presion de una central Nucleoelectrica tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez R, A [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In this phase of the project they were carried out exhaustive tests to the models of the steam lines, turbines and pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric central for to verify that their tendencies and behaviors are it more real possible. For it, it was necessary to also analyze the transfer functions of the different components along the steam line until the power generator. Such models define alone the dominant poles of the system, what is not limitation to reproduce a wide range of anticipated transitoriness of a power station operation. In the same manner, it was integrated and proved the integrated model form with the models of feeding water of the SUN-RAH, simulating the nuclear reactor starting from predetermined entrances of the prospective values of the vessel. Also it was coupled with the graphic interface developed with the libraries DirectX implementing a specific monitoring panel for this system. (Author)

  17. Parallel channel effects under BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Hatamiya, S.; Murase, M.

    1988-01-01

    Due to parallel channel effects, different flow patterns such as liquid down-flow and gas up-flow appear simultaneously in fuel bundles of a BWR core during postulated LOCAs. Applying the parallel channel effects to the fuel bundle, water drain tubes with a restricted bottom end have been developed in order to mitigate counter-current flow limiting and to increase the falling water flow rate at the upper tie plate. The upper tie plate with water drain tubes is an especially effective means of increasing the safety margin of a reactor with narrow gaps between fuel rods and high steam velocity at the upper tie plate. The characteristics of the water drain tubes have been experimentally investigated using a small-scaled steam-water system simulating a BWR core. Then, their effect on the fuel cladding temperature was evaluated using the LOCA analysis program SAFER. (orig.)

  18. BWR internals life assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, M.L.; Stancavage, P.P.

    1988-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) internal components play an important role in power plant life extension. Many important internals were not designed for easy removal and changes in material properties and local environmental effects due to high radiation makes stress corrosion cracking more likely and more difficult to correct. Over the past several years, operating experience has shown that inspection, monitoring and refurbishment can be accomplished for internal structures with existing technology. In addition, mitigation techniques which address the causes of degradation are available to assure that life extension targets can be met. This paper describes the many considerations and aspects when evaluating life extension for reactor vessel internals

  19. The effect of betaine on the foam stability: Molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fengfeng [Chemistry Engineering Department, Zibo Vocational Institute, Zibo 255314 (China); Key laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Guokui [Key laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Yuan, Shiling, E-mail: shilingyuan@sdu.edu.cn [Key laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The reasons of betaine to enhance the stability of foam films are investigated by molecular simulation. • An electrostatic structure is formed at the air/water interface due to the electrostatic interaction. • The electrostatic structure becomes denser with the increasing concentration of betaine. - Abstract: Zwitterionic betaines are widely used as foam boosters due to these can enhance the stability of foam films. In this paper, mechanistic insights of betaine to improve the stability of alkyl-polyoxyethylene carboxylate (AEC) foam are provided by molecular simulation. In the simulation, we observe the electropositive nitrogen atoms in betaine interact with the electronegative sulfur atoms, an electrostatic structure is formed at the air/water interface. Interaction energies of the mixed surfactants are calculated by the quantum chemistry methods. The calculations show betaine-AEC and betaine–betaine possess attractive interaction, and that AEC–AEC has repulsion to each other. In the other words, the repulsion between the headgroups of anionic surfactants is relaxed by betaine. Additionally, the influence of concentration of betaine on the stability of foam films is also simulated. The RDF and coordination numbers show that the electrostatic structures become denser with the increasing concentration of betaine. Therefore, entry barrier is enhanced accordingly. The SMD simulation also demonstrates the same variation tendency of entry barrier. The simulation details provide vital supplements to experiments.

  20. BWR condensate filtration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.A.; Pasricha, A.; Rekart, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Poor removal of particulate corrosion products (especially iron) from condensate is one of the major problems in BWR systems. The presence of activated corrosion products creates ''hot spots'' and increases piping dose rates. Also, fuel efficiency is reduced and the risk of fuel failure is increased by the deposit of corrosion products on the fuel. Because of these concerns, current EPRI guidelines call for a maximum of 2 ppb of iron in the reactor feedwater with a level of 0.5 ppb being especially desirable. It has become clear that conventional deep bed resins are incapable of meeting these levels. While installation of prefilter systems is an option, it would be more economical for plants with naked deep beds to find an improved bead resin for use in existing systems. BWR condensate filtration technologies are being tested on a condensate side stream at Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station. After two years of testing, hollow fiber filters (HFF) and fiber matrix filters (FMF), and low crosslink cation resin, all provide acceptable results. The results are presented for pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and water quality measurements. The costs are compared for backwashable non-precoat HFF and FMF. Results are also presented for full deep bed vessel tests of the low crosslink cation resin

  1. BWR type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toru.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain reactor core characteristics with less changes in the excess reactivity due to fuel burnup even when the operation period varies. Constitution: In a BWR type reactor where fuel assemblies containing fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons are arranged, the fuel assemblies are grouped into first fuel assemblies and second fuel assemblies. Then, the number of fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons within the first fuel assemblies is made greater than that of the second fuel rods, while the concentration of the burnable poisons in the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the first fuel assemblies is made lower than that of the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the second fuel assemblies. In the BWR type reactor constituted in this way, the reactor core characteristics can be improved by changing the ratio between the first fuel assemblies and the second fuel assemblies charged to the reactor core, thereby decreasing the changes in the burnup of the excess reactivity. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. BWR zinc addition Sourcebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Alfred J.

    2014-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have been injecting zinc into the primary coolant via the reactor feedwater system for over 25 years for the purpose of controlling primary system radiation fields. The BWR zinc injection process has evolved since the initial application at the Hope Creek Nuclear Station in 1986. Key transitions were from the original natural zinc oxide (NZO) to depleted zinc oxide (DZO), and from active zinc injection of a powdered zinc oxide slurry (pumped systems) to passive injection systems (zinc pellet beds). Zinc addition has continued through various chemistry regimes changes, from normal water chemistry (NWC) to hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC with noble metals (NobleChem™) for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of reactor internals and primary system piping. While past reports published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) document specific industry experience related to these topics, the Zinc Sourcebook was prepared to consolidate all of the experience gained over the past 25 years. The Zinc Sourcebook will benefit experienced BWR Chemistry, Operations, Radiation Protection and Engineering personnel as well as new people entering the nuclear power industry. While all North American BWRs implement feedwater zinc injection, a number of other BWRs do not inject zinc. This Sourcebook will also be a valuable resource to plants considering the benefits of zinc addition process implementation, and to gain insights on industry experience related to zinc process control and best practices. This paper presents some of the highlights from the Sourcebook. (author)

  3. BWR 90 and BWR 90+: Two advanced BWR design generations from ABB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced light water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and total power generation costs have been low. When developing the BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to a reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher than that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Hence, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The review work was completed in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with an 'evolutionary' design called BWR 90+, which aims at developing the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is performed by ABB Atom

  4. Stabilization effect of fission source in coupled Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Borge; Dufek, Jan [Div. of Nuclear Reactor Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-08-15

    A fission source can act as a stabilization element in coupled Monte Carlo simulations. We have observed this while studying numerical instabilities in nonlinear steady-state simulations performed by a Monte Carlo criticality solver that is coupled to a xenon feedback solver via fixed-point iteration. While fixed-point iteration is known to be numerically unstable for some problems, resulting in large spatial oscillations of the neutron flux distribution, we show that it is possible to stabilize it by reducing the number of Monte Carlo criticality cycles simulated within each iteration step. While global convergence is ensured, development of any possible numerical instability is prevented by not allowing the fission source to converge fully within a single iteration step, which is achieved by setting a small number of criticality cycles per iteration step. Moreover, under these conditions, the fission source may converge even faster than in criticality calculations with no feedback, as we demonstrate in our numerical test simulations.

  5. Recycling systems for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Akio; Yamamoto, Fumiaki; Fukumoto, Ryuji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To stabilize the coolant flowing characteristics and reactor core reactivity. Constitution: The recycling system in a BWR type reactor comprises a recycling pump disposed to the outside of a reactor pressure vessel, a ring header connected to the recycling pump through main pipe ways, and a plurality of pipes branched from and connected with the ring header and connected to a plurality of jet pumps within the pressure vessel. Then, by making the diameter for the pipeways of each of the branched pipes different from each other, the effective cross-sectional area is varied to thereby average the coolant flow rate supplied to each of the jet pumps. (Seki, T.)

  6. Stability Simulation of a Vehicle with Wheel Active Steering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brabec Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the possibility of increasing the vehicle driving stability at a higher speed. One of the ways how to achieve higher stability is using the 4WS system. Mathematical description of vehicle general movement is a very complex task. For simulation, models which are aptly simplified are used. For the first approach, so-called single-truck vehicle model (often linear is usually used. For the simulation, we have chosen to extend the model into a two-truck one, which includes the possibility to input more vehicle parameters. Considering the 4WS system, it is possible to use a number of potential regulations. In our simulation model, the regulation system with compound coupling was used. This type of regulation turns the rear wheels depending on the input parameters of the system (steering angle of the front wheels and depending on the output moving quantities of the vehicle, most frequently the yaw rate. Criterion for compensation of lateral deflection centre of gravity angle is its zero value, or more precisely the zero value of its first-order derivative. Parameters and set-up of the simulation model were done in conjunction with the dSAPACE software. Reference performances of the vehicle simulation model were made through the defined manoeuvres. But the simulation results indicate that the rear-wheels steering can have a positive effect on the vehicle movement stability, especially when changing the driving direction at high speed.

  7. FIST small break accident analysis with BWR TRACBO2-pretest predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M.; Sutherland, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    The BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) program includes experimental simulation and analytical evaluation of BWR thermal-hydraulic phenomena during transient events. One such event is a small size break in the suction line of one of the recirculation pumps. The results from a test simulating this transient in the FIST facility are compared with a system analysis using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRACB02). This comparison demonstrates BWR-TRAC capability for small break analyses and provides detailed understanding of the phenomena

  8. Numerical simulation of plasma vertical position stabilization in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astapkovich, A.M.; Sadakov, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The paper deals with numerical simulation of plasma vertical position stabilization in ITER. The calculations are performed using EDDY C-2 code by the method of direct numerical simulation of transient electromagnetic processes taking into account the evolution of plasma position, cross-section shape and full plasma current. When simulating free vertical plasma drift in ITER with twin passive stabilization loops, it was shown that account of the effects of cross-section deformation and plasma current alternations results in almost two fold degradation of passive stabilization parameters as compared to the calculations for 'rigid displacement' model. In terms of methodology, the account of the effects of cross section deformation and plasma current alternations requires clarification of the definitions for reverse increment of vertical instability and for stability margin coefficient. The simulation of plasma pinch return to equilibrium position after the closure of control coils allows to assess the required parameters of active control system and demonstrate the effect of screen current reverse in twin loops. The obtained results were used to develop the ITER conceptual design and affected the choice of the concept of twin passive loops and new positron of control coils as the basis approaches. 11 refs.; 12 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Stability of reaction fronts in random walk simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagy, Noemi; Izsak, F.

    A model of propagating reaction fronts is given for simple autocatalytic reactions and the stability of the propagating reaction fronts are studied in several numerical experiments. The corresponding random walk simulations - extending of a recent algorithm - make possible the simultaneous treatment

  10. BWR fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baily, W.E.; Armijo, J.S.; Jacobson, J.; Proebstle, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The General Electric experience base on BWR fuel includes over 29,000 fuel assemblies which contain 1,600,000 fuel rods. Over the last five years, design, process and operating changes have been introduced which have had major effects in improving fuel performance. Monitoring this fuel performance in BWRs has been accomplished through cooperative programs between GE and utilities. Activities such as plant fission product monitoring, fuel sipping and fuel and channel surveillance programs have jointly contributed to the value of this extensive experience base. The systematic evaluation of this data has established well-defined fuel performance trends which provide the assurance and confidence in fuel reliability that only actual operating experience can provide

  11. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ryoichi; Sato, Takashi; Osaki, Masahiko; Hirayama, Fumio; Watabe, Atsushi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively eliminate radioactive substances released upon loss of coolant accidents in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A high pressure gas jetting device having a plurality of small aperture nozzles is provided above a spray nozzle, that is, at the top of a dry well. The jetting device is connected to a vacuum breaker provided in a pressure suppression chamber. Upon loss of coolant accident, coolants are sprayed from the spray nozzle and air or nitrogen is jetted from the gas jetting device as well. Then, the gases in the dry well are disturbed, whereby radioactive iodine at high concentration liable to be accumulated in the dry well is forced downwardly, dissolved in the spray water and eliminated. (Ikeda, J.)

  12. Decay ratio studies in BWR and PWR using wavelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, Oe.

    1996-10-01

    The on-line stability of BWR and PWR is studied using the neutron noise signals as the fluctuations reflect the dynamic characteristics of the reactor. Using appropriate signal modeling for time domain analysis of noise signals, the stability parameters can be directly obtained from the system impulse response. Here in particular for BWR, an important stability parameter is the decay ratio (DR) of the impulse response. The time series analysis involves the autoregressive modeling of the neutron detector signal. The DR determination is strongly effected by the low frequency behaviour since the transfer function characteristic tends to be a third order system rather than a second order system for a BWR. In a PWR low frequency behaviour is modified by the Boron concentration. As a result of these phenomena there are difficulties in the consistent determination of the DR oscillations. The enhancement of the consistency of this DR estimation is obtained by wavelet transform using actual power plant data from BWR and PWR. A comparative study of the Restimation with and without wavelets are presented. (orig.)

  13. POLCA-T simulation of OECD/NRC BWR turbine trip benchmark exercise 3 best estimate scenario TT2 test and four extreme scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, D.

    2004-01-01

    Westinghouse transient code POLCA-T brings together the system thermal-hydraulics plant models and the 3D neutron kinetics core model. Code validation plan includes the calculations of Peach Bottom end of cycle 2 turbine trip transients and low-flow stability tests. The paper describes the objectives, method, and results of analyses performed in the final phase of OECD/NRC Peach Bottom 2 Boiling Water Reactor Turbine Trip Benchmark. Brief overview of the code features, the method of simulation, the developed 3D core model and system input deck for Peach Bottom 2 are given. The paper presents the results of benchmark exercise 3 best estimate scenario: coupled 3D core neutron kinetics with system thermal-hydraulics analyses. Performed sensitivity studies cover the SCRAM initiation, carry-under, and decay power. Obtained results including total power, steam dome, core exit, lower and upper plenum, main steam line and turbine inlet pressures showed good agreement with measured plant data Thus the POLCA-T code capabilities for correct simulation of turbine trip transients were proved The performed calculations and obtained results for extreme cases demonstrate the POLCA-T code wide range capabilities to simulate transients when scram, steam bypass, and safety and relief valves are not activated. The code is able to handle such transients even when the reactor power and pressure reach values higher than 600 % of rated power, and 10.8 MPa. (authors)

  14. A MARTe based simulator for the JET Vertical Stabilization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellizio, Teresa, E-mail: teresa.bellizio@unina.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, University di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); De Tommasi, Gianmaria; Risoli, Nicola; Albanese, Raffaele [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, University di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Neto, Andre [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Inst. de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior, Tecnico, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-10-15

    Validation by means of simulation is a crucial step when developing real-time control systems. Modeling and simulation are an essential tool since the early design phase, when the control algorithms are designed and tested. This phase is commonly carried out in off-line environments such as Matlab and Simulink. A MARTe-based simulator has been recently developed to validate the new JET Vertical Stabilization (VS) system. MARTe is the multi-thread framework used at JET to deploy hard real-time control systems. This paper presents the software architecture of the MARTe-based simulator and it shows how this tool has been effectively used to evaluate the effects of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) on the VS system. By using the simulator it is possible to analyze different plasma configurations, extrapolating the limit of the new vertical amplifier in terms of the energy of the largest rejectable ELM.

  15. Effects of Cr and Nb contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type Ni-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in a simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune

    1995-01-01

    In order to discuss the effects of chromium and niobium contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type nickel-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR primary coolant environment, a series of creviced bent-beam (CBB) tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-purity water environment. Chromium, niobium, and titanium as alloying elements improved the resistivity to stress-corrosion cracking, whereas carbon enhanced the susceptibility to it. Alloy-chemistry-based correlations have been defined to predict the relative resistances of alloys to stress-corrosion cracking. A strong correlation was found, for several heats of alloys, between grain-boundary chromium depletion and the susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking

  16. Hydraulic modeling and simulation of a System Division of Essential Service Water in a BWR plant with Flow master; Modelo hidraulico y simulacion de una division del Sistema de Agua de Servicio Esencial de una central BWR con Flowmaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vegazo Juzgado, L.; Rodriguez Garcia, G. M.; Mota Coloma, M.

    2012-07-01

    At the conclusion of the project can say that Flow master is a simulation tool that allows you to create your model from a library of components and obtain useful results from the point of view of the operation, engineering and maintenance. Compared to previous software from the point of view of use, can comment that Flow master is a tool which has an intuitive and user-friendly interaction between the user and the program thus facilitating the modeling of the system and definition of the components of same.

  17. Simulation studies on stability of hot electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsawa, Yukiharu

    1985-01-01

    Stability of a hot electron plasma in an NBT(EBT)-like geometry is studied by using a 2-1/2 dimensional relativistic, electromagnetic particle code. For the low-frequency hot electron interchange mode, comparison of the simulation results with the analytical predictions of linear stability theory show fairly good agreement with the magnitude of the growth rates calculated without hot electron finite Larmor radius effects. Strong stabilizing effects by finite Larmor radius of the hot electrons are observed for short wavelength modes. As for the high-frequency hot electron interchange mode, there is a discrepancy between the simulation results and the theory. The high-frequency instability is not observed though a parameter regime is chosen in which the high-frequency hot electron interchange mode is theoretically predicted to grow. Strong cross-field diffusion in a poloidal direction of the hot electrons might explain the stability. Each particle has a magnetic drift velocity, and the speed of the magnetic drift is proportional to the kinetic energy of each particle. Hence, if the particles have high temperature, the spread of the magnetic drift velocity is large. This causes a strong cross-field diffusion of the hot electrons. In the simulation for this interchange mode, an enhanced temperature relaxation is observed between the hot and cold electrons although the theoretically predicted high frequency modes are stable. (Nogami, K.)

  18. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurisu, Takanori; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Harada, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Iwao.

    1988-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center was founded in April, 1971, and in April, 1974, training was begun, since then, 13 years elapsed. During this period, the curriculum and training facilities were strengthened to meet the training needs, and the new training techniques from different viewpoint were developed, thus the improvement of training has been done. In this report, a number of the training techniques which have been developed and adopted recently, and are effective for the improvement of the knowledge and skill of operators are described. Recently Japanese nuclear power stations have been operated at stable high capacity factor, accordingly the chance of experiencing the occurrence of abnormality and the usual start and stop of plants decreased, and the training of operators using simulators becomes more important. The basic concept on training is explained. In the standard training course and the short period fundamental course, the development of the guide for reviewing lessons, the utilization of VTRs and the development of the techniques for diagnosing individual degree of learning were carried out. The problems, the points of improvement and the results of these are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. Peach Bottom transient analysis with BWR TRACB02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M.; Sutherland, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    TRAC calculations have been performed for a Turbine Trip transient (TT1) in the Peach Bottom BWR power plant. This study is a part of the qualification of the BWR-TRAC code. The simulation is aimed at reproducing the observed thermal hydraulic behavior in a pressurization transient. Measured core power is an input to the calculation. Comparison with data show the code reasonably well predicts the generation and propagation of the pressure waves in the main steam line and associated pressurization of the reactor vessel following the closure of the turbine stop valve

  20. BWR shutdown analyzer using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype alarm system for detecting abnormal reactor shutdowns based on artificial intelligence technology is described. The system incorporates knowledge about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant design and component behavior, as well as knowledge required to distinguish normal, abnormal, and ATWS accident conditions. The system was developed using a software tool environment for creating knowledge-based applications on a LISP machine. To facilitate prototype implementation and evaluation, a casual simulation of BWR shutdown sequences was developed and interfaced with the alarm system. An intelligent graphics interface for execution and control is described. System performance considerations and general observations relating to artificial intelligence application to nuclear power plant problems are provided

  1. Analysis of multi-dimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a BWR provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in co-current and countercurrent flow under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the Steam Sector Test Facility (SSTF) which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests and integral transients with vessel blowdown and refill were performed. The present of multi-dimensional and parallel channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  2. Analysis of multidimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in cocurrent and countercurrent flow under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the steam sector test facility (SSFT), which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests an integral transients with vessel vlowdown and refill were performed. The presence of multidimensional and parallel-channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  3. Modelling of the dynamics of the vessel and circuits of recirculation of a BWR type nucleo electric as part of the SUN-RAH university simulator; Modelado de la dinamica de la vasija y circuitos de recirculacion de una nucleoelectrica tipo BWR como parte del simulador universitario SUN-RAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez S, R A [DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the present project, the development of a model for the dynamics of the process of energy transport generated in the nuclear fuel until the main steam lines of a nucleo electric central with BWR type nuclear reactor, using mathematical models of reduced order is presented. These models present the main characteristics of the reactor vessel and of the recirculation system, defined by the main phenomena that intervene in those physical processes. Likewise, the objective of the general project of the one University student nucleo electric simulator with Boiling Water Reactor (SUN-RAH) for later on to establish the modeling equations for each part of the nuclear reactor as well as of the load pursuit system. Also, its were described the graphic interfaces implemented in an three layers architecture in which the different measuring variables are presented in the monitor. It fits signalize that the advantage presented by the University student nucleo electric simulator is the possibility to carry out changes in the magnitudes of those different variables that intervene in the physical processes made in the one reactor and in the recirculation system in execution time of the same one. Of same way, the creation of a graphic intuitive interface, friendly, and designed with the same technology with the one that the video games are programmed in the present time. Besides all the above mentioned, the pending goals inside of the project are exposed, as well as the developments in construction process or conceptualized to be included in future versions of the simulator. Finally its are thinking about possible scenarios of applications of SUN-RAH, as well as their reaches. (Author)

  4. BWR regional instability model and verification on ringhals-1 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Akitoshi; Suzawa, Yojiro

    1996-01-01

    Regional instability is known as one type of the coupled neutronic-thermohydraulic phenomena of boiling water reactors (BWRs), where the thermohydraulic density wave propagation mechanism is predominant. Historically, it has been simulated by the three-dimensional time domain code in spite of its significant computing time. On the other hand, there have been proposals to apply the frequency domain models in regional instability considering the subcriticality of the higher neutronic mode. However, their application still remains in corewide instability mainly because of the lack of more detailed methodological and empirical studies. In this study, the current version of the frequency domain model was extended and verified based on actual core regional instability measurement data. The mathematical model LAPUR, the well-known frequency domain stability code, was reviewed from the standpoint of pure thermohydraulics and neutronic-thermohydraulic interaction mechanisms. Based on the ex-core loop test data, the original LAPUR mixed friction and local pressure loss model was modified, taking into account the different dynamic behavior of these two pressure-loss mechanisms. The perturbation term of the two-phase friction multiplier, which is the sum of the derivative of void fraction and subcool enthalpy, was adjusted theoretically. The adequacy of the instability evaluation system was verified based on the Ringhals unit 1 test data, which were supplied to participants of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency BWR Stability Benchmark Project

  5. Effect of Loading Transients on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Tests 3 and 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.-P

    2003-04-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5{sup t}h EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. The present report is a summary of the third and fourth test of working package (WP) 3 with loading transients, performed at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Two different low-alloy steels (20 MnMoNi 5 5, 0.015 wt.% S and 22 NiMoCr 3 7, 0.007 wt. %S) were investigated in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 240 {sup o}C, DO = 400 ppb) in a daisy chain at two different load ratios (R = 0.8 and 0.2). In the first part of the experiments, asymmetrical saw tooth loading with different rise times {delta}t{sub R} of the load and different loading frequencies were applied. Then the loading conditions were changed to an asymmetrical trapezoid waveform loading (periodical partial unloading, PPU) and the hold time {delta}t{sub H} at maximum load was varied. In the final phase of WP 3 PSI tests 3 and 4 the SCC behaviour was investigated under constant load. With decreasing loading frequency the corrosion fatigue (CF) crack advance per cycle {delta}a/{delta}N{sub EAC} of material A increased. Sustained EAC crack growth could be maintained down to low frequencies of 10{sup -5} Hz. The time-based crack growth rate (CGR) da/dt{sub EAC} decreased with decreasing frequency. In material B no effect of the loading frequency could be resolved. Up to a hold time of 1 h at maximum constant load the CGR da/dt{sub EAC} seemed to be independent of the hold time. Above hold times of 1 h the CGR decreased and dropped down to CGR values in the range or below the BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines. This behaviour was observed in both investigated materials. The cycle-based CGR {delta}a/{delta}N{sub EAC} remained approximately constant with increasing hold time. The

  6. Two-dimensional simulation of the MHD stability, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Gen-ichi; Amano, Tsuneo.

    1976-03-01

    The two-dimensional computer code has been prepared to study MHD stability of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma with and without the surrounding vacuum region. It also includes the effect of magnetic surfaces with non-circular cross sections. The linearized equations of motion are solved as an initial value problem. The results by computer simulation are compared with those by the theory for the cylindrical plasma; they are in good agreement. (auth.)

  7. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to remove water not by way of mechanical operation in a reactor core and improve the fuel economy in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A hollow water removing rod of a cross-like profile made of material having a smaller neutron absorption cross section than the moderator is disposed to the water gap for each of unit structures composed of four fuel assemblies, and water is charged and discharged to and from the water removing rod. Water is removed from the water removing rod to decrease the moderators in the water gap to carry out neutron spectrum shift operation from the initial to the medium stage of reactor core cycles. At the final stage of the cycle, airs in the water removing rod are extracted and the moderator is introduced. The moderator is filled and the criticality is maintained with the accumulated nuclear fission materials. The neutron spectrum shift operation can be attained by eliminating hydrothermodynamic instability and using a water removing rod of a simple structure. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. BWR emergency procedure guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, J.S.; Karner, E.F.; Stratman, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes plans for dealing with reactor accidents developed by the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Owners' Group in response to post-Three Mile Island US NRC requirements. The devised Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs), applicable to all BWRs, are symptom-based rather than event-based. According to the EPGs, the operator does not need to identify what event is occurring in the plant in order to decide what action to take, but need only observe the symptoms (values and trends of key control parameters) which exist and take appropriate action to control these symptoms. The original objective was to provide reactor operator guidance in responding to a small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), but subsequent revisions have included other types of reactor accidents. Topics considered include the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) control guideline, the primary containment control guideline, the secondary containment control guideline, the radioactivity release control guideline, multiple failures vs. the design basis, safe limits vs. technical specifications, the technical status, licensing, and implementation. The EPGs are based upon maintaining both adequate core cooling and primary containment integrity

  9. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  10. BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Shigeru.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, control rod drives are disposed in the upper portion of a reactor pressure vessel, and a control rod guide tube is disposed in adjacent with a gas/liquid separator at a same height, as well as a steam separator is disposed in the control rod guide tube. The length of a connection rod can be shortened by so much as the control rod guide tube and the gas/liquid separator overlapping with each other. Since the control rod guide tube and the gas/liquid separator are at the same height, the number of the gas/liquid separators to be disposed is decreased and, accordingly, even if the steam separation performance by the gas/liquid separator is lowered, it can be compensated by the steam separator of the control rod guide tube. In view of the above, since the direction of emergent insertion of the control rod is not against gravitational force but it is downward direction utilizing the gravitational force, reliability for the emergent insertion of the control rod can be further improved. Further, the length of the connection rod can be minimized, thereby enabling to lower the height of the reactor pressure vessel. The construction cost for the nuclear power plant can be reduced. (N.H.)

  11. Stabilization effect of fission source in coupled Monte Carlo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Börge Olsen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A fission source can act as a stabilization element in coupled Monte Carlo simulations. We have observed this while studying numerical instabilities in nonlinear steady-state simulations performed by a Monte Carlo criticality solver that is coupled to a xenon feedback solver via fixed-point iteration. While fixed-point iteration is known to be numerically unstable for some problems, resulting in large spatial oscillations of the neutron flux distribution, we show that it is possible to stabilize it by reducing the number of Monte Carlo criticality cycles simulated within each iteration step. While global convergence is ensured, development of any possible numerical instability is prevented by not allowing the fission source to converge fully within a single iteration step, which is achieved by setting a small number of criticality cycles per iteration step. Moreover, under these conditions, the fission source may converge even faster than in criticality calculations with no feedback, as we demonstrate in our numerical test simulations.

  12. Parametric study of the behaviour of a pre irradiated BWR fuel rod under conditions of LOCA simulated in the halden in pile test system with the FALCON code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostov, G.; Zimmermann, M. A. [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Ledergerber, G. [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt AG, Leibstadt (Switzerland); Kolstad, E. [Institute for Energy Technology - OECD Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); Montgomery, R. O. [Anatech Corporation, San Diego (United States)

    2008-10-15

    A new LOCA test at Halden was planned as the first experiment within the Halden LOCA program addressing the behaviour of commercially irradiated BWR fuel of medium burn up with burst of the cladding expected to occur at a temperature of about 1050.deg.C, which is essentially higher than in the preceding experiments. The specific measures to be adopted have been suggested based upon a parametric study using the FALCON fuel behaviour code and aimed at an optimized design of the test fuel rod for the given high target cladding temperature of 1150 .deg. C (peak local). The analysis has shown a reasonable agreement with the fundamental experimental findings, such as correlations of NUREG 0630, as well as consistency with the data from Halden LOCA testing available so far. Thus, a general conclusion is drawn about the applicability of the methodology developed at PSI to the analysis of LWR fuel rod behaviour during LOCA, in consideration of the effects of fuel burn up.

  13. Simulation and linear stability of traffic jams; Kotsu jutai no senkei anteisei to simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, M. [Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Nagatani, T. [Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-05-25

    A traffic jam induced by slowing down is investigated using simulation techniques of molecular dynamics. When cars are decelerated by the presence of hindrance, two typical traffic jams occur behind the hindrance: one is an oscillating jam and the other is a homogeneous jam. When the slowing down is small, the oscillating jam occurs. If the slowing down is large, the jam is homogeneous over space and time. Also, a backward propagating soliton-like jam is observed. The linear stability theory is applied to the traffic flow. The phase boundary between the oscillating and homogeneous jams is compared with the neutral stability line obtained by the linear stability theory. (author)

  14. BWR Services maintenance training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.H.; Chittenden, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    BWR Services has implemented a five-phase program to increase plant availability and capacity factor in operating BWR's. One phase of this program is establishing a maintenance training program on NSSS equipment; the scope encompasses maintenance on both mechanical equipment and electrical control and instrumentation equipment. The program utilizes actual product line equipment for practical Hands-on training. A total of 23 formal courses will be in place by the end of 1979. The General Electric Company is making a multimillion dollar investment in facilities to support this training. These facilities are described

  15. Direct numerical simulation of bluff-body-stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Arias, Paul G.

    2014-01-10

    To enable high fidelity simulation of combustion phenomena in realistic devices, an embedded boundary method is implemented into direct numerical simulations (DNS) of reacting flows. One of the additional numerical issues associated with reacting flows is the stable treatment of the embedded boundaries in the presence of multicomponent species and reactions. The implemented method is validated in two test con gurations: a pre-mixed hydrogen/air flame stabilized in a backward-facing step configuration, and reactive flows around a square prism. The former is of interest in practical gas turbine combustor applications in which the thermo-acoustic instabilities are a strong concern, and the latter serves as a good model problem to capture the vortex shedding behind a bluff body. In addition, a reacting flow behind the square prism serves as a model for the study of flame stabilization in a micro-channel combustor. The present study utilizes fluid-cell reconstruction methods in order to capture important flame-to-solid wall interactions that are important in confined multicomponent reacting flows. Results show that the DNS with embedded boundaries can be extended to more complex geometries without loss of accuracy and the high fidelity simulation data can be used to develop and validate turbulence and combustion models for the design of practical combustion devices.

  16. Hydrodynamic stability of inverted annular flow in an adiabatic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.; Linehan, J.

    1986-01-01

    Inverted annular flow was simulated adiabatically with turbulent water jets, issuing downward from large aspect ratio nozzles, enclosed in gas annuli. Velocities, diameters, and gas species were varied, and core jet length, shape, breakup mode, and dispersed core droplet sizes were recorded at approximately 750 data points. Inverted annular flow destabilization led to inverted slug flow at low relative velocities, and to dispersed droplet flow, core breakup length correlations were developed by extending work on free liquid jets to include this coaxial, jet disintegration phenomenon. The results show length dependence upon D/sub J/, Re/sub J/, We/sub J/, α, and We/sub G/,rel. Correlations for core shape, breakup mechanisms, and dispersed core droplet size were also developed, by extending the results of free jet stability, roll wave entrainment, and churn turbulent droplet stability studies

  17. Simulation of a scenario of total loss of external and internal power (Sbo) for different vent pressures of the containment of a BWR-5; Simulacion de un escenario de perdida total de potencia externa e interna (SBO) para distintas presiones de venteo de la contencion de un reactor BWR-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Godinez S, V., E-mail: Jaime.cardenas@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The simulation of a Station Black Out (Sbo) was realized with intervention of the vent containment by means of a rigid vent coming from the dry-well and that discharges directly to the atmosphere, with the MELCOR code version 2.1. This scenario was carried out for a BWR-5 and containment type Mark II, with a thermal power of 2317 MWt similar to the reactor of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. For this scenario was considered as only available system for coolant injection to the reactor to the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (Rcic), which remained operating 4 hours with batteries bank. The Security and Relief Valves (SR V) were considered functional (by simplicity) and that they mechanically do not exceed their capacity to liberate pressure due to the performances in their safety way. The operator maneuver to perform the SR V and to de pressurize the vessel until the pressure (13 kg/cm{sup 2}) to operate the low pressure systems was modeled. The results cover approximately 48 hours (172000 seconds), time in which was observed the behavior of the level and pressure in the vessel. Also the scenario evolution was analyzed to different vent pressures of the primary containment (2.0, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, and 10.0 kg/cm{sup 2}), the temperature profiles of the dry-well, the hydrogen accumulation in the containment, the radio-nuclides liberation through rigid vent to the atmosphere and the inventory of these. In this work an analysis of the pressure behavior in the primary containment is presented, with the purpose of minimizing liberated fission products to the environment. (Author)

  18. Simulation of a large break loss of coolant (LBLOCA), without actuation of the emergency injection systems (ECCS) for a BWR-5; Simulacion de un escenario de perdida de refrigerante grande (LBLOCA), sin actuacion de los sistemas de inyeccion de emergencia (ECCS) para un reactor BWR-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Lopez M, R., E-mail: jaime.cardenas@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper the analysis of scenario for the loss of coolant case was realized with break at the bottom of a recirculation loop of a BWR-5 with containment type Mark II and a thermal power of 2317 MWt considering that not have coolant injection. This in order to observe the speed of progression of the accident, the phenomenology of the scenario, the time to reach the limit pressure of containment venting and the amount of radionuclides released into the environment. This simulation was performed using the MELCOR code version 2.1. The scenario posits a break in one of the shear recirculation loops. The emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and the reactor core isolation cooling (Rcic) have not credit throughout the event, which allowed achieve greater severity on scenario. The venting of the primary containment was conducted via valve of 30 inches instead of the line of 24 inches of wet well, this in order to have a larger area of exhaust of fission products directly to the reactor building. The venting took place when the pressure in the primary containment reached the 4.5 kg/cm{sup 2} and remained open for the rest of the scenario to maximize the amount released of radionuclides to the atmosphere. The safety relief valves were considered functional they do not present mechanical failure or limit their ability to release pressure due to the large number of performances in safety mode. The results of the analysis covers about 48 hours, time at which the accident evolution was observed; behavior of level, pressure in the vessel and the fuel temperature profile was analyzed. For progression of the scenario outside the vessel, the pressure and temperature of the primary containment, level and temperature of the suppression pool, the hydrogen accumulation in the container and the radionuclides mass released into the atmosphere were analyzed. (Author)

  19. Post-processor for simulations of the ORIGEN program and calculation of the composition of the activity of a burnt fuel core by a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval V, S.

    2006-01-01

    The composition calculation and the activity of nuclear materials subject to processes of burnt, irradiation and decay periods are of utility for diverse activities inside the nuclear industry, as they are it: the processes design and operations that manage radioactive material, the calculation of the inventory and activity of a core of burnt nuclear fuel, for studies of type Probabilistic Safety Analysis (APS), as well as for regulation processes and licensing of nuclear facilities. ORIGEN is a program for computer that calculates the composition and the activity of nuclear materials subject to periods of burnt, irradiation and decay. ORIGEN generates a great quantity of information whose processing and analysis are laborious, and it requires thoroughness to avoid errors. The automation of the extraction, conditioning and classification of that information is of great utility for the analyst. By means of the use of the post-processor presented in this work it is facilitated, it speeds up and wide the capacity of analysis of results, since diverse consultations with several classification options and filtrate of results can be made. As illustration of the utility of the post-processor, and as an analysis of interest for itself, it is also presented in this work the composition of the activity of a burned core in a BWR type reactor according to the following classification criteria: by type of radioisotope (fission products, activation products and actinides), by specie type (gassy, volatile, semi-volatile and not volatile), by element and by chemical group. The results show that the total activity of the studied core is dominated by the fission products and for the actinides, in proportion four to one, and that the gassy and volatile species conform a fifth part of the total activity of the core. (Author)

  20. Fast measurements of the in-core coolant velocity in a BWR by neutron noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A method to determine in-core coolant velocities from neutron noise within short time intervals has been developed. The accuracy of the method was determined by using a simulation set-up and by using signals of a twin self-powered neutron detector installed in the core of the Dodewaard BWR in the Netherlands. In-core coolant velocities can be estimated within 2.5 s with a standard deviation (due to statistics) less than 2.1%. The method is suitable for velocity monitoring as is shown by the application to a stepwise velocity change of the coolant in a model of a coolant channel of a BWR. The presented technique was applied to determine the variations of the coolant velocity in the Dodewaard core during normal operation and during pressure steps. Only minor variations of the coolant velocity were detected during normal reactor conditions. An increase of those variations with pressure lowering - indicating a lower thermal hydraulic stability - could be detected. A clear velocity response to pressure steps could be determined which was also reflected in the cross-spectrum of the velocity with the vessel pressure and with the in-core neutron flux. (author)

  1. Simulation of the Nonlinear Dose Dependence of Stabilized Point Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R; Pagonis, V; Lawless, J L

    2010-01-01

    The dose dependence of the concentration of point defects in alkali-halides as well as other crystals, as exhibited by the dependence of the thermoluminescence (TL), optical absorption and ESR on the dose of non-ionizing UV excitation is studied using numerical simulation. The relevant set of coupled rate equations are first written and plausible sets of trapping parameters are chosen. Instead of using simplifying assumptions previously used for reaching conclusions concerning this dose behavior, exact numerical solutions have now been reached. Depending on the parameters chosen, different dose dependencies are seen. In some cases, linear dose dependence is reached in a broad range. Sublinear dose dependence, close to a D 1/2 dependence when D is the dose of excitation can be reached when retrapping is stronger than trapping in other traps stabilizing the defects. When strong competition between stabilizing traps takes place, an initial linear range is observed followed by strong superlinearity and an approach to saturation. All these behaviors have been observed experimentally in TL measurements as well as ESR and optical absorption in different materials. Similarities and dissimilarities to linear and non-linear dose dependencies obtained experimentally and by simulations when ionizing irradiation is used for excitation are discussed.

  2. Optimal Subinterval Selection Approach for Power System Transient Stability Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soobae Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Power system transient stability analysis requires an appropriate integration time step to avoid numerical instability as well as to reduce computational demands. For fast system dynamics, which vary more rapidly than what the time step covers, a fraction of the time step, called a subinterval, is used. However, the optimal value of this subinterval is not easily determined because the analysis of the system dynamics might be required. This selection is usually made from engineering experiences, and perhaps trial and error. This paper proposes an optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability analysis, which is based on modal analysis using a single machine infinite bus (SMIB system. Fast system dynamics are identified with the modal analysis and the SMIB system is used focusing on fast local modes. An appropriate subinterval time step from the proposed approach can reduce computational burden and achieve accurate simulation responses as well. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated with the GSO 37-bus system.

  3. Results of modeling advanced BWR fuel designs using CASMO-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, D.; Edenius, M.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced BWR fuel designs from General Electric, Siemens and ABB-Atom have been analyzed using CASMO-4 and compared against fission rate distributions and control rod worths from MCNP. Included in the analysis were fuel storage rack configurations and proposed mixed oxide (MOX) designs. Results are also presented from several cycles of SIMULATE-3 core follow analysis, using nodal data generated by CASMO-4, for cycles in transition from 8x8 designs to advanced fuel designs. (author)

  4. Synergistic failure of BWR internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A. G.; Chang, T.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components

  5. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennard, M W [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Pleasantville, NY (United States); Harbottle, J E [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Thornbury, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B{sub 4}C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  6. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennard, M.W.; Harbottle, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B 4 C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  7. Development of next BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke

    1995-01-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.)

  8. Development of next BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works

    1995-04-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.).

  9. Peach bottom cycle 2 stability analysis using RELAP5/PARCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggini, F.; D'Auria, F.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.; Ginestar, D.

    2003-01-01

    Boiling channels and systems may oscillate owing to the behaviour of the liquid-steam mixture used for removing the thermal power. A thermal-hydraulic system may be unstable under particular operating conditions. Two kinds of power oscillation have been observed in BWR cores. One is an in-phase (core-wide) and the other is an out-of-phase (regional) oscillation. Since the above feature can make detection more difficult, the latter oscillation is potentially more severe. The problem is well known since the design of the first BWR system. However, to improve the safety systems of these reactors, it is necessary to be able to detect in a reliable way these oscillations from the neutronic signals. The purpose of this work is to characterize the unstable behaviour of a BWR. Within this study, it has been performed a number of perturbation analysis. The coupled codes RELAP5-Mod3.3/PARCS have used for the simulation of the transients. Validation has been performed against Peach Bottom-2 Low-Flow Stability Test PT3. Three dimensional time domain BWR stability analysis were performed on test point 3 for the core wide oscillation mode. In this transient dynamically complex events take place, i.e., neutron kinetics is coupled with thermal-hydraulics and an in-phase oscillation has been developed. The calculated results are compared against the available experimental data. (author)

  10. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core at high pressure (HPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas O, D.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    A high-priority topic for the nuclear industry is the safety, consequently a nuclear power plant should have the emergency systems of cooling of the core (ECCS), designed exclusively to enter in operation in the event of an accident with coolant loss, including the design base accident. The objective of the aspersion system of the core at high pressure (HPCS) is to provide in an autonomous way the cooling to the core maintaining for if same the coolant inventory even when a small break is presented that does not allow the depressurization of the reactor and also avoiding excessive temperatures that affect the shielding of the fuel. The present work describes the development of the model and the simulation of the HPCS using the RELAP/SCDAP code. During the process simulation, for the setting in march of the system HPCS in an accident with coolant loss is necessary to implement the main components of the system taking into account what unites them, the main pump, the filled pump, the suction and injection valves, pipes and its water sources that can be condensed storage tanks and the suppression pool. The simulation of this system will complement the model with which counts the Analysis Laboratory in Nuclear Reactors Engineering of the UNAM regarding to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde which does not have a detailed simulation of the emergency cooling systems. (Author)

  11. BWR Steam Dryer Alternating Stress Assessment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hambric, S. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ziada, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an overview of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) steam dryer design; the fatigue cracking failures that occurred at the Quad Cities (QC) plants and their root causes; a history of BWR Extended Power Uprates (EPUs) in the USA; and a discussion of steam dryer modifications/replacements, alternating stress mechanisms on steam dryers, and structural integrity evaluations (static and alternating stress).

  12. Initiation model for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWR pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, Mamoru; Kawakubo, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yuji; Arii, Mitsuru.

    1981-01-01

    Discussions were made on the keys of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature water in laboratories and stress corrosion cracking incidents in operating plants. Based on these discussions, a model was set up of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation in BWR pipes. Regarding the model, it was presumed that the intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiates during start up periods whenever heat-affected zones in welded pipes are highly sensitized and suffer dynamic strain in transient water containing dissolved oxygen. A series of BWR start up simulation tests were made by using a flowing autoclave system with slow strain rate test equipment. Validity of the model was confirmed through the test results. (author)

  13. Large bundle BWR test CORA-18: Test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Sepold, L.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.

    1998-04-01

    The CORA out-of-pile experiments are part of the international Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Program. They were performed to provide information on the damage progression of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel elements in Loss-of-coolant Accidents in the temperature range 1200 C to 2400 C. CORA-18 was the large BWR bundle test corresponding to the PWR test CORA-7. It should investigate if there exists an influence of the BWR bundle size on the fuel damage behaviour. Therefore, the standard-type BWR CORA bundle with 18 fuel rod simulators was replaced by a large bundle with two additional surrounding rows of 30 rods (48 rods total). Power input and steam flow were increased proportionally to the number of fuel rod simulators to give the same initial heat-up rate of about 1 K/s as in the smaller bundles. Emphasis was put on the initial phase of the damage progression. More information on the chemical composition of initial and intermediate interaction products and their relocation behaviour should be obtained. Therefore, power and steam input were terminated after the onset of the temperature escalation. (orig.) [de

  14. Experimental investigation of cooling by top spray and bottom flooding of a simulated 64 rod bundle for a BWR. Pt. 2. Main experiment with modified test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, L.; Gustafson, L.; Harju, R.

    1978-06-01

    The cooling of an electrically heated, full scale 64-rod bundle has been investigated under simulated emergency core cooling conditions. Emphasis was laid on measurements of rod cladding and canister temperatures. By means of difference pressure measurements the levels in bundle, by-pass and downcomer could be estimated and thus the effective reflooding velocity. The test section was modified compared to the pre-tests, in order to improve system effects simulation. A new rod bundle was installed including a hollow, water, rod and 63 indirectly heated rods. Parameter effects of coolant mass flow rate and distribution, initial cladding temperature, pressure and power were studied. The effect of the way the test section was vented was also investigated and turned out to be very significant. (author)

  15. Simulation of the injection system of cooling water to low pressure (Lpci) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado C, R. A.; Lopez S, E.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    The present article describes the modeling and simulation of the Injection System of Cooling Water to Low Pressure (Lpci) for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Is very important to be able to predict the behavior of the nuclear plant in the case of an emergency stop, and while nearer to the reality are the results of a simulation, better is the safety protocol that can be devised. In the Engineering Faculty of the UNAM at the present is had logical models of the safety systems, but due to the nature of the same, these simulations do not provide of the quantity of enough information to be able to reproduce with more accuracy the behavior of the Lpci in the case of a severe accident. For this reason, the RELAP code was used for the flows modeling, components and structures of heat transfers in relation to the system Lpci. The modeling of the components is carried out with base on technical information of the nuclear plant and the results will be corroborated with information in reference documents as the Rasp (the Reactor analysis support package) and the Fsar (Final safety analysis report) for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  16. Development and Evaluation of cooperative control system for an HVDC transmission system connected with an isolated BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Susumu; Hara, Tsukusi; Matori, Iwao; Hirayama, Kaiichirou.

    1987-01-01

    In the cooperative control system developed for an HVDC transmission system connected with an isolated BWR power plant, the equilibrium state between power plant output and DC transmission power is examined by way of the detection of the generator frequency. And, thereby start-up and shutdown of the DC system and controlling of the transmission power are made, so that the signal transmission with the power plant becomes unnecessary, enabling the easy cooperative operation. In order to investigate validity of this control system, various digital simulation and simulator test with the control system were carried out. In this way, behavior of the power plant and stability of the DC transmission system were evaluated in the connection to the DC system at power plant start-up, follow of the transmission power in change of the power plant output and in various system failures. (Mori, K.)

  17. Influence of sulphate ions on the composition and structure of the oxide films on stainless steel and nickel alloys in simulated BWR crack conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, E.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P.; Toivonen, A.; Campbell, J.M.; Johansson, L.S.; Helin, M.; Muttilainen, E.; Reinvall, A.; Ollonqvist, T.; Vaeyrynen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present work has been to clarify the influence of sulphate ions on the oxide films formed on stainless steel and Ni-based alloys in simulated crack chemistry conditions using different ex situ analytical techniques. The main observations of this work can be summarised as follows: The thickness of the films formed in simulated oxygen-free crack chemistry conditions during an exposure of circa 4 days varies roughly in the range 200..500 nm, which corresponds to observations reported in the literature [2]. The presence of 10000 ppb sulphate ions in simulated crack tip conditions seems to lead to a considerably lower thickness of the oxide films when compared to sulphate-free conditions. The presence of 10000 ppb sulphate ions leads also to considerable changes in the morphology of the oxide crystals on the material samples. In the absence of sulphate the outer oxide layer contains elongated round-edged crystals, while in the presence of sulphate ions the crystals are longish and needle-like. No visible difference can be observed in the outlook of the crystals formed on stainless steel and Inconel alloy surfaces. A small amount of sulphur in the form of sulphate can be found on the oxide surface on all the studied materials after exposure to the 10000 ppb solution. Sulphur seems to become incorporated inside the oxide film on AISI 316 L(NG). It is not clear at this stage, whether the observed influence of the sulphate ions can be ascribed to the lower pH, to a possible effect on solubility or to a direct influence of the anionic species. (authors)

  18. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450 0 C to 1100 0 C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7 0 C/hour from an 1100 0 C melt down to 500 0 C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7 0 C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO 2 and (Ni, Mn, Fe) 2 O 4 form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500 0 C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300 0 C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so

  19. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour from an 1100/sup 0/C melt down to 500/sup 0/C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO/sub 2/ and (Ni, Mn, Fe)/sub 2/O/sub 4/ form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500/sup 0/C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300/sup 0/C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so.

  20. Influence of partial blockage of a BWR bundle on heat transfer, cladding temperature, and quenching during bottom flooding or top spraying under simulated LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, B.; Gaul, H.P.; Sarkar, J.

    1982-01-01

    In a test facility with two parallel boiling water reactor fuel assemblies, experiments were carried out with top spray and bottom flooding, simulating loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The flow area restriction, caused by the ballooning of fuel rod cladding within one of the bundles, was provided by blockage plates, which had reductions of 37% in one case and in a second series 70% of the flow area. Test parameters were system pressure (1, 5, and 10 bars), spray (0.68 and 1.02 m 3 /h) and flooding rates (1.5,2, and 3.3 cm/s), power input (520 and 614 kW), and the initial cladding temperature (600 and 800 0 C at midplane) of the heaters. The test results showed no significant variations from those without blockage, except in the blocked region. An enhancement of heat transfer was observed in a close region downstream from the blockage in cases such as bottom flooding and top spray tests. The results will serve the purpose of code verification for reactor LOCA analysis

  1. Novel modular natural circulation BWR design and safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Shi, Shanbin; Yang, Won Sik; Wu, Zeyun; Rassame, Somboon; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Introduction of BWR-type natural circulation small modular reactor preliminary design (NMR-50). • Design of long fuel cycle length for the NMR-50. • Design of double passive safety systems for the NMR-50. • RELAP5 analyses of design basis accidents for the NMR-50. - Abstract: The Purdue NMR (Novel Modular Reactor) represents a BWR-type small modular reactor with a significantly reduced reactor pressure vessel (RPV) height. Specifically, it has one third the height of a conventional BWR RPV with an electrical output of 50 MWe. The preliminary design of the NMR-50 including reactor, fuel cycle, and safety systems is described and discussed. The improved neutronics design of the NMR-50 extends the fuel cycle length up to 10 years. The NMR-50 is designed with double passive engineering safety system, which is intended to withstand a prolonged station black out with loss of ultimate heat sink accident such as experienced at Fukushima. In order to evaluate the safety features of the NMR-50, two representative design basis accidents, i.e. main steam line break (MSLB) and bottom drain line break (BDLB), are simulated by using the best-estimate thermal–hydraulic code RELAP5. The RPV water inventory, containment pressure, and the performance of engineering safety systems are investigated for about 33 h after the initiation of the accidents

  2. Verification of a BWR code package by gamma scan measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Iwamoto, Tatsuya; Kumanomido, Hironori

    1996-01-01

    High-burnup 8 x 8 fuel with a large central water rod (called step 2 fuel) has been recently introduced to the latest Japanese boiling water reactor (BWR) plants. Lanthanum-140 gamma intensity is almost directly related to nodal powers. By gamma scan measurement, the axial distribution of 140 La in the exposed fuel was measured at the end of cycle (EOC) 1 and was compared with the calculation by a BWR code package TGBLA/LOGOS. The multienrichment fuel-type core (MEC) design was adopted for the initial cycle core of the plants. The MEC design contains three different enrichment types of fuels to simulate the equilibrium cycles, achieve much higher discharge exposure, and save fuel cycle cost, and the low-enrichment fuels are loaded in periphery and in control cells. Such MEC design could be a challenge to the BWR design methods because of the large spectrum mismatch among the fuel assemblies of the different enrichments. The aforementioned comparison has shown that the accuracy of the TGBLA/LOGOS code package is satisfactory

  3. The effect of simulated acid rain on the stabilization of cadmium in contaminated agricultural soils treated with stabilizing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Wu, Chunfa; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xumei

    2018-04-16

    Stabilization technology is one of widely used remediation technologies for cadmium (Cd)-contaminated agricultural soils, but stabilized Cd in soil may be activated again when external conditions such as acid rain occurred. Therefore, it is necessary to study the effect of acid rain on the performance of different stabilizing agents on Cd-polluted agriculture soils. In this study, Cd-contaminated soils were treated with mono-calcium phosphate (MCP), mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP), and artificial zeolite (AZ) respectively and incubated 3 months. These treatments were followed by two types of simulated acid rain (sulfuric acid rain and mixed acid rain) with three levels of acidity (pH = 3.0, 4.0, and 5.6). The chemical forms of Cd in the soils were determined by Tessier's sequential extraction procedure, and the leaching toxicities of Cd in the soils were assessed by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). The results show that the three stabilizing agents could decrease the mobility of Cd in soil to some degree with or without simulated acid rain (SAR) treatment. The stabilization performances followed the order of AZ stabilized soil, and both anion composition and pH of acid rain were two important factors that influenced the stabilization effect of Cd.

  4. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  5. Application of the FFTBM method and the power relative contribution to the discharge transitory of the recirculation pumps of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo D, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Fuentes M, L.

    2013-10-01

    In this work was realized the simulation of the discharge transitory of both recirculation pumps of a BWR with the Simulate-3K code. This type of transitory is used in the stability analyses for the licensing of the fuel reload. An analysis of the precision of the simulation is also presented, using the FFTBM method jointly with the power relative contribution. This way, instead of determining the total precision of the calculation, a weighed precision is obtained by the contribution of each relevant parameter of the transitory. The results show that the precision of the simulation is acceptable due to the small magnitude of the merit figure of the width total average. The error in the merit figure comes mainly from the parameters total flow in the core and temperature of the fuel in the core. (Author)

  6. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR system on a

  7. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR

  8. The mechanical structure of the SVEA BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nylund, O.; Johansson, A.; Junkrans, S.

    1985-01-01

    The SVEA BWR fuel assembly design is characterized by a double-wall cruciform internal structure forming an internal water gap and dividing the assembly into 4 subbundles. The effect is a favourable distribution of fuel and moderator, a minimum amount of structural material in active core, a combination of structural stability and flexibility for minimum control rod friction in reduced gaps and a reduced creep deformation of the fuel assembly. The results of a laboratory test program confirm the much lower friction force obtained with the SVEA fuel assemblies while withdrawing and inserting the control rod. (RF)

  9. Advances in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Mary L.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water chemistry control with examples of plant experiences at U.S. designed BWRs. Water chemistry advances provide some of the most effective methods for mitigating materials degradation, reducing fuel performance concerns and lowering radiation fields. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials remains a high priority and improved techniques that have been demonstrated in BWRs will be reviewed, specifically hydrogen injection combined with noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and the newer on-line noble metal application process (OLNC). Hydrogen injection performance, an important part of SCC mitigation, will also be reviewed for the BWR fleet, highlighting system improvements that have enabled earlier injection of hydrogen including the potential for hydrogen injection during plant startup. Water chemistry has been significantly improved by the application of pre-filtration and optimized use of ion exchange resins in the CP (condensate polishing) and reactor water cleanup (RWCU) systems. EPRI has monitored and supported water treatment improvements to meet water chemistry goals as outlined in the EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines, particularly those for SCC mitigation of reactor internals and piping, minimization of fuel risk due to corrosion and crud deposits and chemistry control for radiation field reduction. In recent years, a significant reduction has occurred in feedwater corrosion product input, particularly iron. A large percentage of plants are now reporting <0.1 ppb feedwater iron. The impacts to plant operation and chemistry of lower feedwater iron will be explored. Depleted zinc addition is widely practiced across the fleet and the enhanced focus on radiation reduction continues to emphasize the importance of controlling radiation source term. In addition, shutdown chemistry control is necessary to avoid excessive release of activated corrosion products from fuel

  10. Two-dimensional simulation of the MHD stability, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Gen-ichi; Amano, Tsuneo.

    1977-09-01

    Growth rate and eigen-function of the MHD instability of a toroidal plasma were calculated numerically as an initial-boundary value problem. When a conducting shell is away from the plasma, toroidicity hardly influences growth rate of the external kink modes in a slender tokamak, but it stabilizes the modes in a fat tokamak. On the other hand, when the shell is near to the plasma, the unstable external modes are stabilized by both toroidicity and shell effect. (auth.)

  11. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  12. BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kosuke.

    1991-01-01

    In a BWR type nuclear power plant in which reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel can be drained to a waste processing system by way of reactor recycling pipeways and remaining heat removal system pipeways, a pressurized air supply device is disposed for supplying air for pressurizing reactor water to the inside of the reactor pressure vessel by way of an upper head. With such a constitution, since the pressurized air sent from the pressurized air supply device above the reactor pressure vessel for the reactor water discharging pressure upon draining, the water draining pressure is increased compared with a conventional case and, accordingly, the amount of drained water is not reduced even in the latter half of draining. Accordingly, the draining efficiency can be improved and only a relatively short period of time is required till the completion of the draining, which can improve safety and save labors. (T.M.)

  13. Improving stability of stabilized and multiscale formulations in flow simulations at small time steps

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Ming-Chen

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to show that use of the element-vector-based definition of stabilization parameters, introduced in [T.E. Tezduyar, Computation of moving boundaries and interfaces and stabilization parameters, Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 43 (2003) 555-575; T.E. Tezduyar, Y. Osawa, Finite element stabilization parameters computed from element matrices and vectors, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. 190 (2000) 411-430], circumvents the well-known instability associated with conventional stabilized formulations at small time steps. We describe formulations for linear advection-diffusion and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and test them on three benchmark problems: advection of an L-shaped discontinuity, laminar flow in a square domain at low Reynolds number, and turbulent channel flow at friction-velocity Reynolds number of 395. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of the FFTBM method and the power relative contribution to the discharge transitory of the recirculation pumps of a BWR; Aplicacion del metodo FFTBM y de la contribucion relativa de potencia al transitorio de disparo de las bombas de recirculacion de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo D, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Fuentes M, L., E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In this work was realized the simulation of the discharge transitory of both recirculation pumps of a BWR with the Simulate-3K code. This type of transitory is used in the stability analyses for the licensing of the fuel reload. An analysis of the precision of the simulation is also presented, using the FFTBM method jointly with the power relative contribution. This way, instead of determining the total precision of the calculation, a weighed precision is obtained by the contribution of each relevant parameter of the transitory. The results show that the precision of the simulation is acceptable due to the small magnitude of the merit figure of the width total average. The error in the merit figure comes mainly from the parameters total flow in the core and temperature of the fuel in the core. (Author)

  15. Development of water chemistry diagnosis system for BWR primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Asakura, Yamato; Sakagami, Masaharu; Uchida, Shunsuke; Ohsumi, Katsumi.

    1988-01-01

    The prototype of a water chemistry diagnosis system for BWR primary loop has been developed. Its purposes are improvement of water chemistry control and reduction of the work burden on plant chemistry personnel. It has three main features as follows. (1) Intensifying the observation of water chemistry conditions by variable sampling intervals based on the on-line measured data. (2) Early detection of water chemistry data trends using a second order regression curve which is calculated from the measured data, and then searching the cause of anomaly if anything (3) Diagnosis of Fe concentration in feedwater using model simulations, in order to lower the radiation level in the primary system. (author)

  16. BWR 9 X 9 Fuel Assembly Thermal-Hydraulic Tests (2): Hydraulic Vibration Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiaki Tsukuda; Katsuichiro Kamimura; Toshiitsu Hattori; Akira Tanabe; Noboru Saito; Masahiko Warashina; Yuji Nishino

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) conducted thermal-hydraulic projects for verification of thermal-hydraulic design reliability for BWR high-burnup 8 x 8 and 9 x 9 fuel assemblies, entrusted by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). As a part of the NUPEC thermal-hydraulic projects, hydraulic vibration tests using full-scale test assemblies simulating 9 x 9 fuel assemblies were carried out to evaluate BWR fuel integrity. The test data were applied to development of a new correlation for the estimation of fuel rod vibration amplitude. (authors)

  17. BWR power oscillation evaluation methodologies in core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Akitoshi

    1995-01-01

    At the initial stage of BWR development, the power oscillation due to the nuclear-thermal interaction originated in random boiling phenomena and nuclear void feedback was feared. But it was shown that under the high pressure condition in the normal operation of recent commercial BWRs, the core is in very stable state. However, power oscillation events have been observed in actual machines, and it is necessary to do the stability evaluation that sufficiently reflects the detailed operation conditions of actual plants. As the cause of power oscillation events, the instability of control system and nuclear-thermal coupling instability are important, and their mechanisms are explained. As the model for analyzing the stability of BWR core, the nuclear-thermal coupling model in frequency domain is the central existence. As the information for the design, the parameters of fuel assemblies, and the nuclear parameters and the thermohydraulic parameters of cores are enumerated. LAPUR-TSI is a nuclear-thermal coupling model. The analysis system in the software of Tokyo Electric Power Co. is outlined, and the analysis model was verified. (K.I.)

  18. Comparative analysis of the simulation of the instantaneous closing of the discharge valve of a recirculation loop of a BWR with a model of recirculation loop with 2 jet pumps and another model with 20 jet pumps using RELAP5/SCDAPSIM Mod. 3.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araiza M, E.; Ortiz V, J.; Martinez C, E.; Amador G, R.; Castillo D, R.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the results of the simulation of the instantaneous closing of the water hammer, of a recirculation loop using two different arrangements in the loops. One of these arrangements corresponds to the traditional model that uses only two jet pumps to simulate the twenty pumps of the two recirculation loops of a BWR. The second nodalization models each of the ten jet pumps of each recirculation loop. The results obtained from the execution of both models are compared, using important variables such as pressures and mass costs for the same components of both models. In addition, the maximum pressure value generated on the pipe located upstream of the water hammer, relative to the design pressure of the pipe, is compared for each arrangement. (Author)

  19. Analysis of a BWR direct cycle forced circulation power plants operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, G.G. de.

    1973-01-01

    First, it is established a general view over the operational problems of the BWR direct cycle forced circulation power plants, and then it is analysed the possibility of the utilization of the energy purged from the turbine as an additional energy for the electrical generation. To simulate the BWR power plant and to obtain the solution of the mathematical model it was developed a computer code named ATOR which shows the feasibility of the proposed method. In this way it is shown the possibility to get a better maneuvering allowance for the BWR power plant whenever it is permitted a convenient use of the vapor extracted from the turbine for the feedwater pre-heaters of the reactor. (author)

  20. Key Parameters for Operator Diagnosis of BWR Plant Condition during a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the key information needed from nuclear power plant instrumentation to guide severe accident management and mitigation for boiling water reactor (BWR) designs (specifically, a BWR/4-Mark I), estimate environmental conditions that the instrumentation will experience during a severe accident, and identify potential gaps in existing instrumentation that may require further research and development. This report notes the key parameters that instrumentation needs to measure to help operators respond to severe accidents. A follow-up report will assess severe accident environmental conditions as estimated by severe accident simulation model analysis for a specific US BWR/4-Mark I plant for those instrumentation systems considered most important for accident management purposes.

  1. Dynamic Biological Functioning Important for Simulating and Stabilizing Ocean Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, P. J.; Matear, R. J.; Chase, Z.; Phipps, S. J.; Bindoff, N. L.

    2018-04-01

    The biogeochemistry of the ocean exerts a strong influence on the climate by modulating atmospheric greenhouse gases. In turn, ocean biogeochemistry depends on numerous physical and biological processes that change over space and time. Accurately simulating these processes is fundamental for accurately simulating the ocean's role within the climate. However, our simulation of these processes is often simplistic, despite a growing understanding of underlying biological dynamics. Here we explore how new parameterizations of biological processes affect simulated biogeochemical properties in a global ocean model. We combine 6 different physical realizations with 6 different biogeochemical parameterizations (36 unique ocean states). The biogeochemical parameterizations, all previously published, aim to more accurately represent the response of ocean biology to changing physical conditions. We make three major findings. First, oxygen, carbon, alkalinity, and phosphate fields are more sensitive to changes in the ocean's physical state. Only nitrate is more sensitive to changes in biological processes, and we suggest that assessment protocols for ocean biogeochemical models formally include the marine nitrogen cycle to assess their performance. Second, we show that dynamic variations in the production, remineralization, and stoichiometry of organic matter in response to changing environmental conditions benefit the simulation of ocean biogeochemistry. Third, dynamic biological functioning reduces the sensitivity of biogeochemical properties to physical change. Carbon and nitrogen inventories were 50% and 20% less sensitive to physical changes, respectively, in simulations that incorporated dynamic biological functioning. These results highlight the importance of a dynamic biology for ocean properties and climate.

  2. Distributed-Order Dynamic Systems Stability, Simulation, Applications and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Zhuang; Podlubny, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Distributed-order differential equations, a generalization of fractional calculus, are of increasing importance in many fields of science and engineering from the behaviour of complex dielectric media to the modelling of nonlinear systems. This Brief will broaden the toolbox available to researchers interested in modeling, analysis, control and filtering. It contains contextual material outlining the progression from integer-order, through fractional-order to distributed-order systems. Stability issues are addressed with graphical and numerical results highlighting the fundamental differences between constant-, integer-, and distributed-order treatments. The power of the distributed-order model is demonstrated with work on the stability of noncommensurate-order linear time-invariant systems. Generic applications of the distributed-order operator follow: signal processing and viscoelastic damping of a mass–spring set up. A new general approach to discretization of distributed-order derivatives and integrals ...

  3. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  4. An analysis of instabilities of nuclear-coupled density-wave in BWR using modern frequency-domain control theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yangping; Gao Huahun; Fu Longzhou

    1991-01-01

    A state-of-the-art multi-variable frequency-domain model has been developed for analysis of instabilities of nuclear-coupled density-wave in BWR core. The characteristic locus method is used for analysing the stability of BWR. A computer code-NUCTHIA has been derived. The model has been tested against the existing experimental data and compared with results of past single-variable analyses. By using the NUCTHIA code, the investigations of effects of main system parameters on BWW core stability have also been made. All the results are consistent with the experimental data

  5. Simulation of longitudinal differential protection of transmission lines with additional stabilization and APU system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajić Tomislav D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the algorithm for the longitudinal differential protection of transmission lines with automatic reclosing. Classic stabilization is not sufficient for avoiding of unnecessary operations caused by saturation of current transformer. This problem can occur during the fault plased outside of the protected zone of the transmission line. It is shown how unnecessary operation can occur during the outside fault whithout using of additional stabilization. The different types of faults were simulated and comparison of relay operations with and without additional stabilization is presented. The simulations were performed on the three-phase model of the transmission line formed by using of MATLAB/Simulink program.

  6. State of the art report on boiling water reactor stability (SOAR on BWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Starting issues of this SOAR are BWR plant descriptions including peculiarities relevant to stability and the manifestation of instabilities during operation. The report continues with the characterization of instabilities from various experiments, the features and the capabilities of relevant codes and models, BWR core instrumentation and control, the stability behaviour of operating BWR plants and the regulatory approach to the stability issue. The main conclusion is that the BWR stability should not be considered as a safety issue; however R and D in specific areas is recommended

  7. Prony's method application for BWR instabilities characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Ramírez, J. Ramón, E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Alonso, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.alonso@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Ed. 9, Lindavista, D.F. 07300 (Mexico); Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier, E-mail: javier.ortiz@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Prony's method application for BWR instability events. • Several BWR instability benchmark are assessed using this method. • DR and frequency are obtained and a new parameter is proposed to eliminate false signals. • Adequate characterization of in-phase and out-of-phase events is obtained. • The Prony's method application is validated. - Abstract: Several methods have been developed for the analysis of reactor power signals during BWR power oscillations. Among them is the Prony's method, its application provides the DR and the frequency of oscillations. In this paper another characteristic of the method is proposed to determine the type of oscillations that can occur, in-phase or out-of-phase. Prony's method decomposes a given signal in all the frequencies that it contains, therefore the DR of the fundamental mode and the first harmonic are obtained. To determine the more dominant pole of the system a normalized amplitude W of the system is calculated, which depends on the amplitude and the damping coefficient. With this term, it can be analyzed which type of oscillations is present, if W of the fundamental mode frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is in-phase, if W of the first harmonic frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is out-of-phase. The method is applied to several stability benchmarks to assess its validity. Results show the applicability of the method as an alternative analysis method to determine the type of oscillations occurred.

  8. Prony's method application for BWR instabilities characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Rogelio; Ramírez, J. Ramón; Alonso, Gustavo; Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Prony's method application for BWR instability events. • Several BWR instability benchmark are assessed using this method. • DR and frequency are obtained and a new parameter is proposed to eliminate false signals. • Adequate characterization of in-phase and out-of-phase events is obtained. • The Prony's method application is validated. - Abstract: Several methods have been developed for the analysis of reactor power signals during BWR power oscillations. Among them is the Prony's method, its application provides the DR and the frequency of oscillations. In this paper another characteristic of the method is proposed to determine the type of oscillations that can occur, in-phase or out-of-phase. Prony's method decomposes a given signal in all the frequencies that it contains, therefore the DR of the fundamental mode and the first harmonic are obtained. To determine the more dominant pole of the system a normalized amplitude W of the system is calculated, which depends on the amplitude and the damping coefficient. With this term, it can be analyzed which type of oscillations is present, if W of the fundamental mode frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is in-phase, if W of the first harmonic frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is out-of-phase. The method is applied to several stability benchmarks to assess its validity. Results show the applicability of the method as an alternative analysis method to determine the type of oscillations occurred

  9. Transient Stability Improvement of IEEE 9 Bus System Using Power World Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Ramandeep

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of transient stability of power system was one of the most challenging research areas in power engineer.The main aim of this paper was transient stability analysis and improvement of IEEE 9 bus system. These studies were computed using POWER WORLD SIMULATOR. The IEEE 9 bus system was modelled in power world simulator and load flow studies were performed to determine pre-fault conditions in the system using Newton-Raphson method. The transient stability analysis was carried out using Runga method during three-phase balanced fault. For the improvement transient stability, the general methods adopted were fast acting exciters, FACT devices and addition of parallel transmission line. These techniques play an important role in improving the transient stability, increasing transmission capacity and damping low frequency oscillations.

  10. Fast simulation of wind generation for frequency stability analysis in island power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, James [EirGrid, Dublin (Ireland)

    2010-07-01

    Frequency stability is a major issue for power system planning and operation in an island power system such as Ireland. As increasing amounts of variable speed wind generation are added to the system, this issue becomes more prominent, as variable speed wind generation does not provide an inherent inertial response. This lack of an inertial response means that simplified models for variable speed wind farms can be used for investigating frequency stability. EirGrid uses DIgSILENT Power Factory (as well as other software tools) to investigate frequency stability. In PowerFactory, an automation program has been created to convert detailed wind farm representation (as necessary for other types of analysis) to negative load models for frequency stability analysis. The advantage of this approach is much-improved simulation speed without loss of accuracy. This approach can also be to study future wind energy targets, and long-term simulation of voltage stability. (orig.)

  11. Comparative analysis of the simulation of the instantaneous closing of the discharge valve of a recirculation loop of a BWR with a model of recirculation loop with 2 jet pumps and another model with 20 jet pumps using RELAP5/SCDAPSIM Mod. 3.4; Analisis comparativo de la simulacion del cierre instantaneo de la valvula de descarga de un lazo de recirculacion de un BWR con un modelo de lazo de recirculacion con 2 bombas chorro y un modelo con 20 bombas chorro empleando RELAP5/SCDAPSIM Mod. 3.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araiza M, E.; Ortiz V, J.; Martinez C, E.; Amador G, R.; Castillo D, R., E-mail: enrique.araiza@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This work presents the results of the simulation of the instantaneous closing of the water hammer, of a recirculation loop using two different arrangements in the loops. One of these arrangements corresponds to the traditional model that uses only two jet pumps to simulate the twenty pumps of the two recirculation loops of a BWR. The second nodalization models each of the ten jet pumps of each recirculation loop. The results obtained from the execution of both models are compared, using important variables such as pressures and mass costs for the same components of both models. In addition, the maximum pressure value generated on the pipe located upstream of the water hammer, relative to the design pressure of the pipe, is compared for each arrangement. (Author)

  12. Design of Simulation Product for Stability of Electric Power System Using Power System Stabilizer and Optimal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaidi, Agus; Hamid, K. Abdul

    2018-03-01

    This paper will discuss the use of optimal control and Power System Stabilizer (PSS) in improving the oscillation of electric power system. Oscillations in the electric power system can occur due to the sudden release of the load (Switcing-Off). The oscillation of an unstable system for a long time causes the equipment to work in an interruption. To overcome this problem, a control device is required that can work effectively in repairing the oscillation. The power system is modeled from the Single Machine Infinite Bus Model (SMIB). The state space equation is used to mathematically model SMIB. SMIB system which is a plant will be formed togetherness state variables (State-Space), using riccati equation then determined the optimal gain as controller plant. Plant is also controlled by Power Stabilizer System using phase compensation method. Using Matlab Software based simulation will be observed response of rotor speed change and rotor angle change for each of the two controlling methods. Simulation results using the Simulink-MATLAB 6.1 software will compare the analysis of the plant state in Open loop state and use the controller. The simulation response shows that the optimal control and PSS can improve the stability of the power system in terms of acceleration to achieve settling-time and Over Shoot improvement. From the results of both methods are able to improve system performance.

  13. Direct numerical simulation of bluff-body-stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Arias, Paul G.; Lee, Bok Jik; Im, Hong G.

    2014-01-01

    are important in confined multicomponent reacting flows. Results show that the DNS with embedded boundaries can be extended to more complex geometries without loss of accuracy and the high fidelity simulation data can be used to develop and validate turbulence and combustion models for the design of practical combustion devices.

  14. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  15. Simulation methods with extended stability for stiff biochemical Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rué Pau

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increasing computer power, simulating the dynamics of complex systems in chemistry and biology is becoming increasingly routine. The modelling of individual reactions in (biochemical systems involves a large number of random events that can be simulated by the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA. The key quantity is the step size, or waiting time, τ, whose value inversely depends on the size of the propensities of the different channel reactions and which needs to be re-evaluated after every firing event. Such a discrete event simulation may be extremely expensive, in particular for stiff systems where τ can be very short due to the fast kinetics of some of the channel reactions. Several alternative methods have been put forward to increase the integration step size. The so-called τ-leap approach takes a larger step size by allowing all the reactions to fire, from a Poisson or Binomial distribution, within that step. Although the expected value for the different species in the reactive system is maintained with respect to more precise methods, the variance at steady state can suffer from large errors as τ grows. Results In this paper we extend Poisson τ-leap methods to a general class of Runge-Kutta (RK τ-leap methods. We show that with the proper selection of the coefficients, the variance of the extended τ-leap can be well-behaved, leading to significantly larger step sizes. Conclusions The benefit of adapting the extended method to the use of RK frameworks is clear in terms of speed of calculation, as the number of evaluations of the Poisson distribution is still one set per time step, as in the original τ-leap method. The approach paves the way to explore new multiscale methods to simulate (biochemical systems.

  16. Two-fluid model stability, simulation and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bertodano, Martín López de; Clausse, Alejandro; Ransom, Victor H

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the linear and nonlinear two-phase stability of the one-dimensional Two-Fluid Model (TFM) material waves and the numerical methods used to solve it. The TFM fluid dynamic stability is a problem that remains open since its inception more than forty years ago. The difficulty is formidable because it involves the combined challenges of two-phase topological structure and turbulence, both nonlinear phenomena. The one dimensional approach permits the separation of the former from the latter. The authors first analyze the kinematic and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities with the simplified one-dimensional Fixed-Flux Model (FFM). They then analyze the density wave instability with the well-known Drift-Flux Model. They demonstrate that the Fixed-Flux and Drift-Flux assumptions are two complementary TFM simplifications that address two-phase local and global linear instabilities separately. Furthermore, they demonstrate with a well-posed FFM and a DFM two cases of nonlinear two-phase behavior that are ...

  17. Effect of the inlet throttling on the thermal-hydraulic instability of the natural circulation BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Masahiro; Inada, Fumio; Yoneda, Kimitoshi

    1997-01-01

    Although it is well-established that inlet restriction has a stabilizing for forced circulation BWR, the effect of inlet on the thermal-hydraulic stability of natural circulation BWR remains unknown since increasing inlet restriction affect thermal-hydraulic stability due to reduction of the recirculation flow rate. Therefore experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of inlet restriction on the thermal-hydraulic stability. A test facility used in this experiments was designed and constructed to have non-dimensional values which are nearly equal to those of natural circulation BWR. Experimental results showed that driving force of the natural circulation was described as a function of heat flux and inlet subcooling independent of inlet restriction. Stability maps in reference to the channel inlet subcooling, heat flux were presented for various inlet restriction which were carried out by an analysis based on the homogeneous flow various using this function. Instability region during the inlet subcooling shifted to the higher inlet subcooling with increasing inlet restriction and became larger with increasing heat flux. (author)

  18. BWROPT: A multi-cycle BWR fuel cycle optimization code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottinger, Keith E.; Maldonado, G. Ivan, E-mail: Ivan.Maldonado@utk.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A multi-cycle BWR fuel cycle optimization algorithm is presented. • New fuel inventory and core loading pattern determination. • The parallel simulated annealing algorithm was used for the optimization. • Variable sampling probabilities were compared to constant sampling probabilities. - Abstract: A new computer code for performing BWR in-core and out-of-core fuel cycle optimization for multiple cycles simultaneously has been developed. Parallel simulated annealing (PSA) is used to optimize the new fuel inventory and placement of new and reload fuel for each cycle considered. Several algorithm improvements were implemented and evaluated. The most significant of these are variable sampling probabilities and sampling new fuel types from an ordered array. A heuristic control rod pattern (CRP) search algorithm was also implemented, which is useful for single CRP determinations, however, this feature requires significant computational resources and is currently not practical for use in a full multi-cycle optimization. The PSA algorithm was demonstrated to be capable of significant objective function reduction and finding candidate loading patterns without constraint violations. The use of variable sampling probabilities was shown to reduce runtime while producing better results compared to using constant sampling probabilities. Sampling new fuel types from an ordered array was shown to have a mixed effect compared to random new fuel type sampling, whereby using both random and ordered sampling produced better results but required longer runtimes.

  19. Evaluation of thermal margin during BWR neutron flux oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Yutaka; Takigawa, Yukio; Chuman, Kazuto; Ebata, Shigeo

    1992-01-01

    Fuel integrity is very important, from the view point of nuclear power plant safety. Recently, neutron flux oscillations were observed at several BWR plants. The present paper describes the evaluations of the thermal margin during BWR neutron flux oscillations, using a three-dimensional transient code. The thermal margin is evaluated as MCPR (minimum critical power ratio). The LaSalle-2 event was simulated and the MCPR during the event was evaluated. It was a core-wide oscillation, at which a large neutron flux oscillation amplitude was observed. The results indicate that the MCPR had a sufficient margin with regard to the design limit. A regional oscillation mode, which is different from a core-wide oscillation, was simulated and the MCPR response was compared with that for the LaSalle-2 event. The MCPR decrement is greater in the regional oscillation, than in the core wide -oscillation, because of the sensitivity difference in a flow-to-power gain. A study was carried out about regional oscillation detectability, from the MCPR response view point. Even in a hypothetically severe case, the regional oscillation is detectable by LPRM signals. (author)

  20. A detailed BWR recirculation loop model for RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araiza-Martínez, Enrique, E-mail: enrique.araiza@inin.gob.mx; Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier, E-mail: javier.ortiz@inin.gob.mx; Castillo-Durán, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A new detailed BWR recirculation loop model was developed for RELAP. • All jet pumps, risers, manifold, suction and control valves, and recirculation pump are modeled. • Model is tested against data from partial blockage of two jet pumps. • For practical applications, simulation results showed good agreement with available data. - Abstract: A new detailed geometric model of the whole recirculation loop of a BWR has been developed for the code RELAP. This detailed model includes the 10 jet pumps, 5 risers, manifold, suction and control valves, and the recirculation pump, per recirculation loop. The model is tested against data from an event of partial blockage at the entrance nozzle of one jet pump in both recirculation loops. For practical applications, simulation results showed good agreement with data. Then, values of parameters considered as figure of merit (reactor power, dome pressure, core flow, among others) for this event are compared against those from the common 1 jet pump per loop model. The results show that new detailed model led to a closer prediction of the reported power change. The detailed recirculation loop model can provide more reliable boundary condition data to a CFD models for studies of, for example, flow induced vibration, wear, and crack initiation.

  1. TRAB, a transient analysis program for BWR. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajamaeki, Markku.

    1980-03-01

    TRAB is a transient analysis program for BWR. The present report describes its principles. The program has been developed from TRAWA-program. It models the interior of the pressure vessel and related subsystems of BWR viz. reactor core, recirculation loop including the upper part of the vessel, recirculation pumps, incoming and outgoing flow systems, and control and protection systems. Concerning core phenomena and all flow channel hydraulics the submodels are one-dimensional of main features. The geometry is very flexible. The program has been made particularly to simulate various reactivity transients, but it is applicable more generally to reactor incidents and accidents in which no flow reversal or no emptying of the circuit must occur below the water level. The program is extensively supplied by input and output capabilities. The user can act upon the simulation of a transient by defining external disturbances, scheduled timevariations for any system variable, by modeling new subsystems, which are representable with ordinary linear differential equations, and by defining relations of functional form between system variables. The run of the program can be saved and restarted. (author)

  2. BWR Refill-Reflood Program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.L.

    1983-09-01

    The BWR Refill-Reflood Program is part of the continuing Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) research in the United States which is jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Electric Power Research Institute, and the General Electric Company. The current program expanded the focus of this research to include full scale experimental evaluations of multidimensional and multichannel effects during system refill. The program has also made major contributions to the BWR version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) which has been developed cooperatively with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for application to BWR transients. A summary description of the complete program is provided including the principal findings and main conclusions of the program. The results of the program have shown that multidimensional and parallel channel effects have the potential to significantly improve the system response over that observed in single channel tests

  3. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research, and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are shown. After a short outline of historical developments the basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are dealt with. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies, which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurements on a BWR in The Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  4. ABB advanced BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Helmersson, S.; Andersson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel designed and fabricated by ABB is now operating in 40 PWRs and BWRs in Europe, the United States and Korea. An excellent fuel reliability track record has been established. High burnups are proven for both BWR and PWR. Thermal margin improving features and advanced burnable absorber concepts enable the utilities to adopt demanding duty cycles to meet new economic objectives. In particular we note the excellent reliability record of ABB PWR fuel equipped with Guardian TM debris filter, proven to meet the -6 rod-cycles fuel failure goal, and the out-standing operating record of the SVEA 10x10 BWR fuel, where ABB is the only vendor to date with multi batch experience to high burnup. ABB is dedicated to maintain high fuel reliability as well as continually improve and develop a broad line of BWR and PWR products. ABB's development and fuel follow-up activities are performed in close co-operation with its customers. (orig.)

  5. Rippled shock front solutions for testing hydrodynamic stability simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    The response of a shock front to arbitrary small perturbations can be calculated analytically. Such rippled shock front solutions are useful for determining the accuracy of hydrodynamic simulation codes such as LASNEX [Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 2, 51 (1977)], which are used to compute perturbation growth in inertial fusion targets. The LASNEX fractional errors are of order κ 2 L 2 , where κ is the transverse wavenumber of the perturbation, and L is the largest zone dimension. Numerical errors are about 25% for a calculation using 26 zones per transverse wavelength

  6. BWR radiation exposure--experience and projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, C.F.; Wilkinson, C.D.; Hollander, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    The BWR/6 Mark III radiation exposures are projected to be about half of those of current average operating experience of 725 man-rem. These projections are said to be realistic and based on current achievements and not on promises of future development. The several BWRs operating with low primary system radiation levels are positive evidence that radiation sources can be reduced. Improvements have been made in reducing the maintenance times for the BWR/6, and further improvements can be made by further attention to cost-effective plant arrangement and layout during detail design to improve accessibility and maintainability of each system and component

  7. General Electric's training program for BWR chemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.N.; Lim, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the General Electric boiling water reactor chemistry training program from 1959 to the present. The original intention of this program was to provide practical hands on type training in radiochemistry to BWR chemistry supervisors with fossil station experience. This emphasis on radiochemistry has not changed through the years, but the training has expanded to include the high purity water chemistry of the BWR and has been modified to include new commission requirements, engineering developments and advanced instrumentation. Student and instructor qualifications are discussed and a description of the spin off courses for chemistry technicians and refresher training is presented

  8. The BWR Hybrid 4 control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, H.; Fuchs, H.P.; Lippert, H.J.; Dambietz, W.

    1988-01-01

    The service life of BWR control rods designed in the past has been unsatisfactory. The main reason was irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of B 4 C rods caused by external swelling of the B 4 C powder. By this reason KWU developed an improved BWR control rod (Hybrid 4 control rod) with extended service life and increased control rod worth. It also allows the procedure for replacing and rearranging fuel assemblies to be considerably simplified. A complete set of Hydbrid 4 control rods is expected to last throughout the service life of a plant (assumption: ca. 40 years) if an appropriate control rod reshuffling management program is used. (orig.)

  9. Stabilizing simulations of complex stochastic representations for quantum dynamical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, C; Petersen, W P, E-mail: wpp@math.ethz.ch [Seminar for Applied Mathematics, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-03-04

    Path integral representations of quantum dynamics can often be formulated as stochastic differential equations (SDEs). In a series of papers, Corney and Drummond (2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 260401), Deuar and Drummond (2001 Comput. Phys. Commun. 142 442-5), Drummond and Gardnier (1980 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 13 2353-68), Gardiner and Zoller (2004 Quantum Noise: A Handbook of Markovian and Non-Markovian Quantum Stochastic Methods with Applications to Quantum Optics (Springer Series in Synergetics) 3rd edn (Berlin: Springer)) and Gilchrist et al (1997 Phys. Rev. A 55 3014-32) and their collaborators have derived SDEs from coherent states representations for density matrices. Computationally, these SDEs are attractive because they seem simple to simulate. They can be quite unstable, however. In this paper, we consider some of the instabilities and propose a few remedies. Particularly, because the variances of the simulated paths typically grow exponentially, the processes become de-localized in relatively short times. Hence, the issues of boundary conditions and stable integration methods become important. We use the Bose-Einstein Hamiltonian as an example. Our results reveal that it is possible to significantly extend integration times and show the periodic structure of certain functionals.

  10. Panorama of the BWR reactors - Evolution of the concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, C.; Uhrig, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Safety Engineering Department - PEPS-G (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Nowadays, a fleet of more than 50 boiling water reactors (BWR) are in operation in the world. This article gives a short overview on the developments of nuclear power plants of the BWR type, with a focus on the European builds. It describes the technical bases from the early designs in the fifties, sketches the innovations of the sixties and seventies in the types BWR 69 and 72 (Baulinie 69 and 72) and gives an outlook of a possible next generation BWR. A promising approach in recent BWR developments is the the combination of passive safety systems with established design basis

  11. Simulation of beam pointing stability on targeting plane of high power excimer laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dahui; Zhao Xueqing; Zhang Yongsheng; Zheng Guoxin; Hu Yun; Zhao Jun

    2011-01-01

    Based on characteristics of image-relaying structure in high power excimer MOPA laser system, simulation and analysis software of targeting beam's barycenter stability was designed by using LABVIEW and MATLAB. Simulation was made to measured results of every optical component in laboratory environment. Simulation and validation of budget values for optical components was and optimization of error budget of system was accomplished via post-allocation for several times. It is shown that targeting beam's barycenter stability in the condition of current laboratory environment can't satisfy needs and index of high demand optical components can be allotted to 1.7 μrad when index of low demand optical components have some stability margin. These results can provide a guide to construction of system and design and machining of optical components and optimization of system. Optical components of laboratory on work can satisfy optimized distributed index, which reduce the demand of structure to some extent. (authors)

  12. arXiv Simulation of gain stability of THGEM gas-avalanche particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, P.M.M.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Breskin, A.; Bressler, S.; Oliveira, C.A.B.; Silva, A.L.M.; Veenhof, R.; Veloso, J.F.C.A.

    2018-01-19

    Charging-up processes affecting gain stability in Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEM) were studied with a dedicated simulation toolkit. Integrated with Garfield++, it provides an effective platform for systematic phenomenological studies of charging-up processes in MPGD detectors. We describe the simulation tool and the fine-tuning of the step-size required for the algorithm convergence, in relation to physical parameters. Simulation results of gain stability over time in THGEM detectors are presented, exploring the role of electrode-thickness and applied voltage on its evolution. The results show that the total amount of irradiated charge through electrode's hole needed for reaching gain stabilization is in the range of tens to hundreds of pC, depending on the detector geometry and operational voltage. These results are in agreement with experimental observations presented previously.

  13. Post-processor for simulations of the ORIGEN program and calculation of the composition of the activity of a burnt fuel core by a BWR type reactor; Post-procesador para simulaciones del programa ORIGEN y calculo de la composicion de la actividad de un nucleo de combustible quemado por un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval V, S. [IIE, Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: sandoval@iie.org.mx

    2006-07-01

    The composition calculation and the activity of nuclear materials subject to processes of burnt, irradiation and decay periods are of utility for diverse activities inside the nuclear industry, as they are it: the processes design and operations that manage radioactive material, the calculation of the inventory and activity of a core of burnt nuclear fuel, for studies of type Probabilistic Safety Analysis (APS), as well as for regulation processes and licensing of nuclear facilities. ORIGEN is a program for computer that calculates the composition and the activity of nuclear materials subject to periods of burnt, irradiation and decay. ORIGEN generates a great quantity of information whose processing and analysis are laborious, and it requires thoroughness to avoid errors. The automation of the extraction, conditioning and classification of that information is of great utility for the analyst. By means of the use of the post-processor presented in this work it is facilitated, it speeds up and wide the capacity of analysis of results, since diverse consultations with several classification options and filtrate of results can be made. As illustration of the utility of the post-processor, and as an analysis of interest for itself, it is also presented in this work the composition of the activity of a burned core in a BWR type reactor according to the following classification criteria: by type of radioisotope (fission products, activation products and actinides), by specie type (gassy, volatile, semi-volatile and not volatile), by element and by chemical group. The results show that the total activity of the studied core is dominated by the fission products and for the actinides, in proportion four to one, and that the gassy and volatile species conform a fifth part of the total activity of the core. (Author)

  14. Linear and nonlinear stability analysis in BWRs applying a reduced order model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera G, O. A.; Espinosa P, G.; Prieto G, A., E-mail: omar_olverag@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) stability studies are generally conducted through nonlinear reduced order models (Rom) employing various techniques such as bifurcation analysis and time domain numerical integration. One of those models used for these studies is the March-Leuba Rom. Such model represents qualitatively the dynamic behavior of a BWR through a one-point reactor kinetics, a one node representation of the heat transfer process in fuel, and a two node representation of the channel Thermal hydraulics to account for the void reactivity feedback. Here, we study the effect of this higher order model on the overall stability of the BWR. The change in the stability boundaries is determined by evaluating the eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix. The nonlinear model is also integrated numerically to show that in the nonlinear region, the system evolves to stable limit cycles when operating close to the stability boundary. We also applied a new technique based on the Empirical Mode Decomposition (Emd) to estimate a parameter linked with stability in a BWR. This instability parameter is not exactly the classical Decay Ratio (Dr), but it will be linked with it. The proposed method allows decomposing the analyzed signal in different levels or mono-component functions known as intrinsic mode functions (Imf). One or more of these different modes can be associated to the instability problem in BWRs. By tracking the instantaneous frequencies (calculated through Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT) and the autocorrelation function (Acf) of the Imf linked to instability. The estimation of the proposed parameter can be achieved. The current methodology was validated with simulated signals of the studied model. (Author)

  15. Linear and nonlinear stability analysis in BWRs applying a reduced order model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olvera G, O. A.; Espinosa P, G.; Prieto G, A.

    2016-09-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) stability studies are generally conducted through nonlinear reduced order models (Rom) employing various techniques such as bifurcation analysis and time domain numerical integration. One of those models used for these studies is the March-Leuba Rom. Such model represents qualitatively the dynamic behavior of a BWR through a one-point reactor kinetics, a one node representation of the heat transfer process in fuel, and a two node representation of the channel Thermal hydraulics to account for the void reactivity feedback. Here, we study the effect of this higher order model on the overall stability of the BWR. The change in the stability boundaries is determined by evaluating the eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix. The nonlinear model is also integrated numerically to show that in the nonlinear region, the system evolves to stable limit cycles when operating close to the stability boundary. We also applied a new technique based on the Empirical Mode Decomposition (Emd) to estimate a parameter linked with stability in a BWR. This instability parameter is not exactly the classical Decay Ratio (Dr), but it will be linked with it. The proposed method allows decomposing the analyzed signal in different levels or mono-component functions known as intrinsic mode functions (Imf). One or more of these different modes can be associated to the instability problem in BWRs. By tracking the instantaneous frequencies (calculated through Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT) and the autocorrelation function (Acf) of the Imf linked to instability. The estimation of the proposed parameter can be achieved. The current methodology was validated with simulated signals of the studied model. (Author)

  16. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor; Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, F.J. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Fuentes C, P. [ITT, Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fjmc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  17. Calculation and Simulation Study on Transient Stability of Power System Based on Matlab/Simulink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xiu Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The stability of the power system is destroyed, will cause a large number of users power outage, even cause the collapse of the whole system, extremely serious consequences. Based on the analysis in single machine infinite system as an example, when at the f point two phase ground fault occurs, the fault lines on either side of the circuit breaker tripping resection at the same time,respectively by two kinds of calculation and simulation methods of system transient stability analysis, the conclusion are consistent. and the simulation analysis is superior to calculation analysis.

  18. Moderator temperature coefficient in BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka

    1977-01-01

    Temperature dependences of infinite multiplication factor k sub(infinity) and neutron leakage from the core must be examined for estimation of moderator temperature coefficient. Temperature dependence on k sub(infinity) has been investigated by many researchers, however, the dependence on neutron leakage of a BWR with cruciformed control rods has hardly been done. Because there are difficulties and necessity on calculations of three space dimensional and multi-energy groups neutron distribution in a BWR core. In this study, moderator temperature coefficients of JPDR-II (BWR) core were obtained by calculation with DIFFUSION-ACE, which is newly developed three-dimensional multi-group computer code. The results were compared with experimental data measured from 20 to 275 0 C of the moderator temperature and the good agreement was obtained between calculation and measurement. In order to evaluate neutron leakage from the core, the other two calculations were carried out, adjusting criticality by uniform absorption rate and by material buckling. The former underestimated neutron leakage and the latter overestimated it. Discussion on the results shows that in order to estimate the temperature coefficient of BWR, neutron leakage must be evaluated precisely, therefore the calculation at actual pattern of control rods is necessary. (auth.)

  19. BWR vessel and internals project (BWRVIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilanin, W.J.; Dyle, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) inspections indicate that Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) is a significant technical issue for some BWR internals. IN response, the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) was formed by an associated of domestic and international utilities which own and operate BWRs. The project is identifying or developing generic, cost-effective strategies for managing degradation of reactor internals from which each utility can select the alternative most appropriate for their plant. The Electric Power Research Institute manages the technical program, implementing the utility defined programs. The BWRVIP is organized into four technical tasks: Assessment, Inspection, Repair and Mitigation. An Integration task coordinates the work. The goal of the Assessment task is to develop methodologies for evaluation of vessel and internal components in support of decisions for operation, inspection, mitigation or repair. The goal of the Inspection task is to develop and assess effective and predictable inspection techniques which can be used to determine the condition of BWR vessel and internals that are potentially susceptible to service-related SCC degradation. The goal of the Repair task is to assure the availability of cost-effective repair/replacement alternatives. The goal of the Mitigation task is to develop and demonstrate countermeasures for SCC degradation. This paper summarizes the BWRVIP approach for addressing BWR internals SCC degradation and illustrates how utilities are utilizing BWRVIP products to successfully manage the effect of SCC on core shrouds

  20. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  1. Secondary systems of PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, N.

    1981-01-01

    The secondary systems of a nuclear power plant comprises the steam, condensate and feedwater cycle, the steam plant auxiliary or ancillary systems and the cooling water systems. The presentation gives a general review about the main systems which show a high similarity of PWR and BWR plants. (orig./RW)

  2. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs

  3. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E.

    2002-01-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10 18 n/cm 2 ) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni +3 ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A 2 ). (Author)

  4. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10 18 n/cm 2 ) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni +3 ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A 2 . (Author)

  5. Study of transient turbine shot without bypass in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    The study and analysis of operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-terms events and the impact that would cause this transition. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could result in an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis of results of a turbine shot transient, which is not taken into operation the bypass is presented. The study is realized for a BWR of 2027 MWt, to an intermediate cycle life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a depressurization stage of the vessel is created which shows the response of other security systems and gives a coherent prediction to the event presented type. (Author)

  6. Impact of advanced BWR core physics method on BWR core monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, H; Wells, A [Siemens Power Corporation, Richland (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Siemens Power Corporation recently initiated development of POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III for delivery to the Grand Gulf Nuclear Power Station. The main change introduced in POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III as compared to its predecessor POWERPLEX{sup TM}-II is the incorporation of the advances BWR core simulator MICROBURN-B2. A number of issues were identified and evaluated relating to the implementation of MICROBURN-B2 and its impact on core monitoring. MICROBURN-B2 demands about three to five times more memory and two to three times more computing time than its predecessor MICROBURN-B in POWERPLEX {sup TM}-II. POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III will improve thermal margin prediction accuracy and provide more accurate plant operating conditions to operators than POWERPLEX{sup TM}-II due to its improved accuracy in predicted TIP values and critical k-effective. The most significant advantage of POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III is its capability to monitor a relaxed rod sequence exchange operation. (authors)

  7. Analysis of natural circulation BWR dynamics with stochastic and deterministic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanderHagen, T.H.; Van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Kleiss, E.B.J.; Nissen, W.H.M.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Reactor kinetic, thermal hydraulic and total plant stability of a natural convection cooled BWR was studied using noise analysis and by evaluation of process responses to control rod steps and to steamflow control valve steps. An estimate of the fuel thermal time constant and an impression of the recirculation flow response to power variations was obtained. A sophisticated noise analysis method resulted in more insight into the fluctuations of the coolant velocity

  8. FIST/6IB1, BWR/6 System Responses to Intermediate Break in Recirculation Suction Line LINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: BWR/6-218 standard plant. A full size bundle with electrically heated rods is used to simulate the reactor core. A scaling ratio of 1/624 is applied in the design of the system components. Key features of the FIST facility include: (1) Full height test vessel and internals; (2) correctly scaled fluid volume distribution; (3) simulation of ECCS, S/RV, and ADS; (4) level trip capability; (5) heated feedwater supply system, which provides the capability for steady state operation. 2 - Description of test: Test 6IB1 investigates system responses to an intermediate break in the recirculation suction line. BWR system licensing evaluations for various size recirculation break LOCA's indicates that a break size of about 0.2 sq.ft., without LPCS operation, is the highest PCT case for the intermediate break LOCA. Test 6IB1 simulates this event

  9. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors; Estudios de fragilizacion en aceros de vasija de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A{sup 2}. (Author)

  10. Validation and application of the system code ATHLET-CD for BWR severe accident analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Marcello, Valentino, E-mail: valentino.marcello@kit.edu; Imke, Uwe; Sanchez, Victor

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • We present the application of the system code ATHLET-CD code for BWR safety analyses. • Validation of core in-vessel models is performed based on KIT CORA experiments. • A SB-LOCA scenario is simulated on a generic German BWR plant up to vessel failure. • Different core reflooding possibilities are investigated to mitigate the accident consequences. • ATHLET-CD modelling features reflect the current state of the art of severe accident codes. - Abstract: This paper is aimed at the validation and application of the system code ATHLET-CD for the simulation of severe accident phenomena in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The corresponding models for core degradation behaviour e.g., oxidation, melting and relocation of core structural components are validated against experimental data available from the CORA-16 and -17 bundle tests. Model weaknesses are discussed along with needs for further code improvements. With the validated ATHLET-CD code, calculations are performed to assess the code capabilities for the prediction of in-vessel late phase core behaviour and reflooding of damaged fuel rods. For this purpose, a small break LOCA scenario for a generic German BWR with postulated multiple failures of the safety systems was selected. In the analysis, accident management measures represented by cold water injection into the damaged reactor core are addressed to investigate the efficacy in avoiding or delaying the failure of the reactor pressure vessel. Results show that ATHLET-CD is applicable to the description of BWR plant behaviour with reliable physical models and numerical methods adopted for the description of key in-vessel phenomena.

  11. Boiling transition phenomenon in BWR fuel assemblies effect of fuel spacer shape on critical power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Morooka, Shin-ichi; Mitsutake, Toru; Yokobori, Seiichi; Kimura, Jiro.

    1996-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena near fuel spacer is necessary for the accurate prediction of the critical power of BWR fuel assemblies, and is thus essential for effective developments of a new BWR fuel assembly. The main purpose of this study is to develop an accurate method for predicting the effect of spacer shapes on critical power. Tests have been conducted under actual BWR operating conditions, using an annulus flow channel consisting of a heated rod and circular-tube channel, and BWR simulated 4x4 rod bundles with heater rods unheated just upsteam of spacer. The effect of spacer shapes on critical power was predicted analytically based on the droplet deposition rate estimation. The droplet deposition rate for different spacer shapes was calculated using a single-phase flow model. The prediction results were compared with the test results for the annulus flow channel using ring-type spacers. Analytical results of critical power agreed with measured critical power from point of the effects of changes in the rod-spacer clearance and the spacer thickness on critical power. (author)

  12. Advanced hybrid transient stability and EMT simulation for VSC-HVDC systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Meer, A.A.; Gibescu, M.; Van Der Meijden, M.A.M.M.; Kling, W.L.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with advanced hybrid transient stability and electromagnetic-transient (EMT) simulation of combined ac/dc power systems containing large amounts of renewable energy sources interfaced through voltage-source converter-high-voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC). The concerning transient

  13. Influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes: A large-eddy simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation is combined with a turbine model to investigate the influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes. In the simulations, subgrid-scale turbulent fluxes are parameterized using tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic models. These models optimize the local value of the model coefficients based on the dynamics of the resolved scales. The turbine-induced forces are parameterized with an actuator-disk model with rotation. In this technique, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces acting on the blades. Emphasis is placed on the structure and characteristics of wind-turbine wakes in the cases where the incident flows to the turbine have the same mean velocity at the hub height but different stability conditions. The simulation results show that atmospheric stability has a significant effect on the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit and turbulent fluxes in the wake region. In particular, the magnitude of the velocity deficit increases with increasing stability in the atmosphere. In addition, the locations of the maximum turbulence intensity and turbulent stresses are closer to the turbine in convective boundary layer compared with neutral and stable ones. Detailed analysis of the resolved turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget inside the wake reveals also that the thermal stratification of the incoming wind considerably affects the magnitude and spatial distribution of the turbulent production, transport term and dissipation rate (transfer of energy to the subgrid scales). It is also shown that the near-wake region can be extended to a farther distance downstream in stable condition compared with neutral and unstable counterparts. In order to isolate the effect of atmospheric stability, additional simulations of neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layers are performed with the same turbulence intensity at hub height as convective and stable ones. The results show that the

  14. Simulation of the MHD stabilities of the experiment on HL-2A tokamak by GATO code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Wei; Chen Liaoyuan; Dong Jiaqi; Shen Yong; Zhang Jinhua

    2009-01-01

    The ideal two-dimensional MHD stabilities code, GATO, has been successfully immigrated to the high-performance computing system of HL-2A and used to the simulation study of the ideal MHD stabilities of the plasmas produced by one of the pellets injection experiments on HL-2A tokamak. The EFIT code was used to reconstruct the equilibrium configures firstly and the GATO was used to compute their MHD stabilities secondly whose source data were obtained by the NO.4050 discharge of the experiments on HL-2A, and finally by analyzing these results the preliminary conclusion was devised that the confinement performance of the plasma was improved because of the stabilization effect of the anti-sheared configures created by the pellets injection. (authors)

  15. BWR NSSS design basis documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vij, R.S.; Bates, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    programs that GE has participated in and describes the different options and approaches that have been used by various utilities in their design basis programs. Some of these variations deal with the scope and depth of coverage of the information, while others are related to the process (how the work is done). Both of these topics can have a significant effect on the program cost. Some insight into these effects is provided. The final section of the paper presents a set of lessons learned and a recommendation for an optimum approach to a design basis information program. The lessons learned reflect the knowledge that GE has gained by participating in design basis programs with nineteen domestic and international BWR owner/operators. The optimum approach described in this paper is GE's attempt to define a set of information and a work process for a utility/GE NSSS Design Basis Information program that will maximize the cost effectiveness of the program for the utility. (author)

  16. Predictive uncertainty reduction in coupled neutron-kinetics/thermal hydraulics modeling of the BWR-TT2 benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, Aurelian F., E-mail: aurelian.badea@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Vincenz-Prießnitz-Str. 3, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cacuci, Dan G. [Center for Nuclear Science and Energy/Dept. of ME, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark. • Substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted transient power. • 6660 uncertain model parameters were calibrated. - Abstract: By applying a comprehensive predictive modeling methodology, this work demonstrates a substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted total transient power in the BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark while calibrating the numerical simulation of this benchmark, comprising 6090 macroscopic cross sections, and 570 thermal-hydraulics parameters involved in modeling the phase-slip correlation, transient outlet pressure, and total mass flow. The BWR-TT2 benchmark is based on an experiment that was carried out in 1977 in the NPP Peach Bottom 2, involving the closure of the turbine stop valve which caused a pressure wave that propagated with attenuation into the reactor core. The condensation of the steam in the reactor core caused by the pressure increase led to a positive reactivity insertion. The subsequent rise of power was limited by the feedback and the insertion of the control rods. The BWR-TT2 benchmark was modeled with the three-dimensional reactor physics code system DYN3D, by coupling neutron kinetics with two-phase thermal-hydraulics. All 6660 DYN3D model parameters were calibrated by applying a predictive modeling methodology that combines experimental and computational information to produce optimally predicted best-estimate results with reduced predicted uncertainties. Simultaneously, the predictive modeling methodology yields optimally predicted values for the BWR total transient power while reducing significantly the accompanying predicted standard deviations.

  17. Predictive uncertainty reduction in coupled neutron-kinetics/thermal hydraulics modeling of the BWR-TT2 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badea, Aurelian F.; Cacuci, Dan G.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark. • Substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted transient power. • 6660 uncertain model parameters were calibrated. - Abstract: By applying a comprehensive predictive modeling methodology, this work demonstrates a substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted total transient power in the BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark while calibrating the numerical simulation of this benchmark, comprising 6090 macroscopic cross sections, and 570 thermal-hydraulics parameters involved in modeling the phase-slip correlation, transient outlet pressure, and total mass flow. The BWR-TT2 benchmark is based on an experiment that was carried out in 1977 in the NPP Peach Bottom 2, involving the closure of the turbine stop valve which caused a pressure wave that propagated with attenuation into the reactor core. The condensation of the steam in the reactor core caused by the pressure increase led to a positive reactivity insertion. The subsequent rise of power was limited by the feedback and the insertion of the control rods. The BWR-TT2 benchmark was modeled with the three-dimensional reactor physics code system DYN3D, by coupling neutron kinetics with two-phase thermal-hydraulics. All 6660 DYN3D model parameters were calibrated by applying a predictive modeling methodology that combines experimental and computational information to produce optimally predicted best-estimate results with reduced predicted uncertainties. Simultaneously, the predictive modeling methodology yields optimally predicted values for the BWR total transient power while reducing significantly the accompanying predicted standard deviations.

  18. Validation of SIMULATE-3K for stability analysis of Laguna Verde nuclear plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Alonso, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.alonso@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Ed. 9, Lindavista, D.F. 07300 (Mexico); Ramírez, J. Ramón, E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic/thermal hydraulic event in Laguna Verde is modeled. • A good agreement is obtained between SIMULATE-3K results and data plant for frequency and DR. • Other noise analysis techniques are used for the same purpose with good agreement. • Validation of SIMULATE-3K for stability analysis of Laguna Verde is confirmed - Abstract: Boiling Water Reactors are two phase flow systems which are susceptible to different types of flow instabilities. Among these are the coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic instabilities, these may compromise established fuel safety limits. These instabilities are characterized by periodic core-power and hydraulic oscillations. SIMULATE-3K code has been tested for stability analysis for several benchmarks, however to qualify the SIMULATE-3K code for a particular power plant a specific reactor plant analysis must be done. In this paper, the plant model of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant is built and SIMULATE-3K is tested against the 1995 coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic instability event of Laguna Verde. Results obtained show the adequacy of this code to specific Laguna Verde power plant stability analysis.

  19. A new method to determine oxidative stability of vegetable fats and oils at simulated frying temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertz Christian

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure at simulated frying conditions in our laboratory was developed to monitor frying stability of fats and oils. Water-conditioned silica was prepared and added to the fresh vegetable oil, which was heated for two hours at 170°C. The oil stability at frying temperature was then evaluated by determining the amount of formed dimeric triglycerides The results obtained showed that the stability of the vegetable oils at frying temperature could not be explained by the fatty acid composition alone. Corn oil was observed to be more stable than soybean oil, and rapeseed oil was better than olive oil. It was also observed that crude, non-refined oils were found to have a better heat stability than refin-ed oils. To estimate the effectiveness of synthetic and naturally occurring antioxidants, namely various tocopherols, tocopherol acetate and phytosterol fractions, phenolic compounds like quercetin, oryzanol, ferulic acid, gallates, BHT, BHA and other compounds like ascorbic acid 6-palmitate and squalene were added to refined sunflower and rape seed oil, and their oxidative stability at elevated temperature (OSET values determined. Both linoleic and oleic rich oils gave comparable results for the activity of the various compounds. alpha-tocopherol, tocopherol esters and BHA had low effects on oil stability at frying temperature, while ascorbyl palmitate and some phytosterol fractions were found to have the most stabilizing activity under frying conditions.

  20. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  1. Development of a BWR core burn-up calculation code COREBN-BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Yuichi; Okumura, Keisuke

    1992-05-01

    In order to evaluate core performances of BWR type reactors, the three dimensional core burnup calculation code COREBN-BWR and the fuel management code HIST-BWR have been developed. In analyses of BWR type reactors, thermal hydraulics calculations must be coupled with neutronics calculations to evaluate core performances, because steam void distribution changes according to the change of the power distribution. By installing new functions as follows to the three dimensional core burnup code COREBN2 developed in JAERI for PWR type reactor analyses, the code system becomes to be applicable to burnup analyses of BWR type reactors. (1) Macroscopic cross section calculation function taking into account of coolant void distribution. (2) Thermal hydraulics calculation function to evaluate core flow split, coolant void distribution and thermal margin. (3) Burnup calculation function under the Haling strategy. (4) Fuel management function to incorporate the thermal hydraulics information. This report consists of the general description, calculational models, input data requirements and their explanations, detailed information on usage and sample input. (author)

  2. Time-dependent simulations of feedback stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes in KSTAR plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyungjin [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Yong-Su, E-mail: ysna@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Seok [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Maraschek, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching bei München (Germany); Park, Y.S. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York (United States); Stober, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching bei München (Germany); Terzolo, L. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Zohm, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching bei München (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    A simulation is performed for feedback stabilization of neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) for KSTAR in preparation for experiments. An integrated numerical system is constructed by coupling plasma transport, NTM stability, and heating and current drive modules and applied to a KSTAR plasma by assuming similar experimental conditions as ASDEX Upgrade to predict NTM behaviors in KSTAR. System identification is made with database produced by predictive simulations with this integrated numerical system so that three plasma response models are extracted which describe the relation between the EC poloidal launcher angle and the island width in KSTAR. Among them, the P1DI model exhibiting the highest fit accuracy is selected for designing a feedback controller based on the classical Proportional–Integral–Derivative (PID) concept. The controller is coupled with the integrated numerical system and applied to a simulation of NTM stabilization. It is observed that the controller can search and fully stabilize the mode even though the poloidal launch angle is misaligned with the island initially.

  3. Behavior of small-sized BWR fuel under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Fujishiro, Toshio; Horiki, Oichiro; Chen Dianshan; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The present work was performed on this small-sized BWR fuel, where Zr liner and rod prepressurization were taken as experimental parameters. Experiment was done under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) belonged to Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Major remarks obtained are as follows: (1) Three different types of the fuel rods consisted of (a) Zr lined/pressurized (0.65MPa), (b) Zr lined/non-pressurized and (c) non-Zr lined/pressurized (o.65MPa) were used, respectively. Failure thresholds of these were not less than that (260 cal/g·fuel) described in Japanese RIA Licensing Guideline. Small-sized BWR and conventional 8 x 8 BWR fuels were considered to be in almost the same level in failure threshold. Failure modes of the three were (a) cladding melt/brittle, (b) cladding melt/brittle and (c) rupture by large ballooning, respectively. (2) The magnitude of pressure pulse at fuel fragmentation was also studied by lined/pressurized and non-lined/pressurized fuels. Above the energy deposition of 370 cal/g·fuel, mechanical energy (or pressure) was found to be released from these fragmented fuels. No measurable difference was, however, observed between the tested fuels and NSRR standard (and conventional 8 x 8 BWR) fuels. (3) It is worthy of mentioning that Zr liner tended to prevent the cladding from large ballooning. Non-lined/pressurized fuel tended to cause wrinkle deformation at cladding. Hence, cladding external was notched much by the wrinkles. (4) Time to fuel failure measured from the tested BWR fuels (pressurization < 0.6MPA) was longer than that measured from PWR fuels (pressurization < 3.2MPa). The magnitude of the former was of the order of 3 ∼ 6s, while that of the latter was < 1s. (J.P.N.)

  4. High burnup (41 - 61 GWd/tU) BWR fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Kusagaya, Kazuyuki; Yoshinaga, Makio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    High burnup boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel was pulse irradiated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate fuel behavior under cold startup reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. Temperature, deformation, failure, and fission gas release behavior under the simulated RIA condition was studied in the tests. Fuel failure due to pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) did not occur in the tests with typical domestic BWR fuel at burnups up to 56 GWd/tU, because they had limited cladding embrittlement due to hydrogen absorption of about 100 ppm or less. However, the cladding failure occurred in tests with fuel at a burnup of 61 GWd/tU, in which the peak hydrogen content in the cladding was above 150 ppm. This type of failure was observed for the first time in BWR fuels. The cladding failure occurred at fuel enthalpies of 260 to 360 J/g (62 to 86 cal/g), which were higher than the PCMI failure thresholds decided by the Japanese Nuclear Safety Commission. From post-test examinations of the failed fuel, it was found that the crack in the BWR cladding progressed in a manner different from the one in PWR cladding failed in earlier tests, owing to its more randomly oriented hydride distribution. Because of these differences, the BWR fuel was judged to have failed at hydrogen contents lower than those of the PWR fuel. Comparison of the test results with code calculations revealed that the PCMI failure was caused by thermal expansion of pellets, rather than by the fission gas expansion in the pellets. The gas expansion, however, was found to cause large cladding hoop deformation later after the cladding temperature escalated. (author)

  5. Fast Dynamic Simulation-Based Small Signal Stability Assessment and Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Naresh [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Baone, Chaitanya [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Veda, Santosh [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Dai, Jing [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Chaudhuri, Nilanjan [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Leonardi, Bruno [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Sanches-Gasca, Juan [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Diao, Ruisheng [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wu, Di [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huang, Zhenyu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Yu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jin, Shuangshuang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zheng, Bin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, Yousu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Power grid planning and operation decisions are made based on simulation of the dynamic behavior of the system. Enabling substantial energy savings while increasing the reliability of the aging North American power grid through improved utilization of existing transmission assets hinges on the adoption of wide-area measurement systems (WAMS) for power system stabilization. However, adoption of WAMS alone will not suffice if the power system is to reach its full entitlement in stability and reliability. It is necessary to enhance predictability with "faster than real-time" dynamic simulations that will enable the dynamic stability margins, proactive real-time control, and improve grid resiliency to fast time-scale phenomena such as cascading network failures. Present-day dynamic simulations are performed only during offline planning studies, considering only worst case conditions such as summer peak, winter peak days, etc. With widespread deployment of renewable generation, controllable loads, energy storage devices and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles expected in the near future and greater integration of cyber infrastructure (communications, computation and control), monitoring and controlling the dynamic performance of the grid in real-time would become increasingly important. The state-of-the-art dynamic simulation tools have limited computational speed and are not suitable for real-time applications, given the large set of contingency conditions to be evaluated. These tools are optimized for best performance of single-processor computers, but the simulation is still several times slower than real-time due to its computational complexity. With recent significant advances in numerical methods and computational hardware, the expectations have been rising towards more efficient and faster techniques to be implemented in power system simulators. This is a natural expectation, given that the core solution algorithms of most commercial simulators were developed

  6. Development of BWR computerized operator support system for emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, F.

    1984-01-01

    A BWR computerized operator support system (COSS) for emergency conditions has been under development for three years. The conceptual design of the system has been settled and some of the subsystems are in the detailed design or manufacturing stage. The principal functions are technical specification monitoring, diagnosis, guidance during emergency conditions, predictive simulation and safety monitoring. Before a reactor trip, alternative operational guidance for anomalous events is provided by utilization of the CTT (cause consequence tree) and FPS (failure propagation simulator). After the trip, operational guidance is based on event-oriented and symptom-oriented methods in association with the safety function monitor. The technical specification monitor controls the readiness monitor and performs surveillance tests of safety systems to maintain plant operational reliability and to ensure correct performance when initiated. The predictive simulator gives the future trends of significant plant parameters. These subsystems are expected to assist the operational personnel. The feasibility of the COSS functions is confirmed separately by off-line simulation. The paper considers the conceptual design, the functions of the subsystems and the off-line simulation results. Each subsystem has shown that useful information to operational personnel is provided. Henceforth these functions will be integrated into a single system and the feasibility will be thoroughly evaluated using a plant simulator which is being separately developed to verify the COSS. (author)

  7. BWR Mark I pressure suppression study: bench mark experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    Computer simulations representative of the wetwell of Mark I BWR's have predicted pressures and related phenomena. However, calculational predictions for purposes of engineering decision will be possible only if the code can be verified, i.e., shown to compute in accord with measured values. Described in the report is a set of single downcomer spherical flask bench mark experiments designed to produce quantitative data to validate various air-water dynamic computations; the experiments were performed since relevant bench mark data were not available from outside sources. Secondary purposes of the study were to provide a test bed for the instrumentation and post-experiment data processing techniques to be used in the Laboratory's reactor safety research program and to provide additional masurements for the air-water scaling study

  8. Crud deposition modeling on BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucuk, Aylin; Cheng, Bo; Potts, Gerald A.; Shiralkar, Bharat; Morgan, Dave; Epperson, Kenny; Gose, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of boiling water reactor (BWR) system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance-limiting conditions in a number of plants. The operational impact of performance-limiting conditions involving crud deposition can be detrimental to a BWR operator, resulting in unplanned or increased frequency of fuel inspections, fuel failure and associated radiological consequences, operational restrictions including core power derate and/or forced shutdowns to remove failed fuel, premature discharge of individual bundles or entire reloads, and/or undesirable core design restrictions. To facilitate improved management of crud-related fuel performance risks, EPRI has developed the CORAL (Crud DepOsition Risk Assessment ModeL) tool. This paper presents a summary of the CORAL elements and benchmarking results. Applications of CORAL as a tool for fuel performance risk assessment are also discussed. (author)

  9. BWR radiation buildup control with ionic zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marble, W.J.; Wood, C.J.; Leighty, C.E.; Green, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    In 1983 a hypothesis was disclosed which suggested that the presence of ionic zinc in the reactor water of the BWR could reduce radiation buildup. This hypothesis was developed from correlations of plant data, and subsequently, from laboratory experiments which demonstrated clearly that ionic zinc inhibits the corrosion of stainless steel. The benefits of zinc addition have been measured at the Vallecitos Nuclear Center under and EPRI/GE project. Experimentation and analyses have been performed to evaluate the impact of intentional zinc addition on the IGSCC characteristics of primary system materials and on the performance of the nuclear fuel. It has been concluded that no negative effects are expected. The author conclude that the intentional addition of ionic zinc to the BWR reactor water at a concentration of approximately 10 ppb will provide major benefits in controlling the Co-60 buildup on primary system stainless steel surfaces. The intentional addition of zinc is now a qualified technique for use in BWRs

  10. BWR mechanics and materials technology update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses technical results obtained from a variety of important programs underway at General Electric's Nuclear Engineering Division. The principal objective of these programs is to qualify and improve BWR product related technologies that fall broadly under the disciplines of Applied Mechanics and Materials Engineering. The paper identifies and deals with current technical issues that are of general importance to the LWR industry albeit the specific focus is directed to the development and qualification of analytical predictive methods and criteria, and improved materials for use in the design of the BWR. In this paper, specific results and accomplishments are summarized to provide a braod perspective of technology advances. Results are presented in sections which discuss: dynamic analysis and modeling; fatigue and fracture evaluation; materials engineering advances; and flow induced vibration. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of boiling transition analysis code against data from NUPEC BWR full-size fine-mesh bundle tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuno, Hideaki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Masuhara, Yasuhiro; Kasahara, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Transient BT analysis code TCAPE based on mechanistic methods coupled with subchannel analysis has been developed for the evaluation on fuel integrity under abnormal operations in BWR. TCAPE consisted mainly of the drift-flux model, the cross-flow model, the film model and the heat transfer model. Assessment of TCAPE has been performed against data from BWR full-size fine-mesh bundle tests (BFBT), which consisted of two major parts: the void distribution measurement and the critical power measurement. Code and data comparison was made for void distributions with varying number of unheated rods in simulated actual fuel assembly. Prediction of steady-state critical power was compared with the measurement on full-scale bundle under a range of BWR operational conditions. Although the cross-sectional averaged void fraction was underestimated when it became lower, the accuracy was obtained that the averaged ratio 0.910 and its standard deviation 0.076. The prediction of steady-state critical power agreed well with the data in the range of BWR operations, where the prediction accuracy was obtained that the averaged ratio 0.997 and its standard deviation 0.043. These results demonstrated that TCAPE is well capable to predict two-phase flow distribution and liquid film dryout phenomena occurring in BWR rod bundles. Part of NUPEC BFBT database will be made available for an international benchmark exercise. The code assessment shall be continued against the OECD/NRC benchmark based on BFBT database. (author)

  12. Stability of nanocrystalline Ni-based alloys: coupling Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseda, O.; Goldenstein, H.; Silva, G. F. B. Lenz e.; Neiva, A.; Chantrenne, P.; Morthomas, J.; Perez, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Veiga, R. G. A.

    2017-10-01

    The thermal stability of nanocrystalline Ni due to small additions of Mo or W (up to 1 at%) was investigated in computer simulations by means of a combined Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) two-steps approach. In the first step, energy-biased on-lattice MC revealed segregation of the alloying elements to grain boundaries. However, the condition for the thermodynamic stability of these nanocrystalline Ni alloys (zero grain boundary energy) was not fulfilled. Subsequently, MD simulations were carried out for up to 0.5 μs at 1000 K. At this temperature, grain growth was hindered for minimum global concentrations of 0.5 at% W and 0.7 at% Mo, thus preserving most of the nanocrystalline structure. This is in clear contrast to a pure Ni model system, for which the transformation into a monocrystal was observed in MD simulations within 0.2 μs at the same temperature. These results suggest that grain boundary segregation of low-soluble alloying elements in low-alloyed systems can produce high-temperature metastable nanocrystalline materials. MD simulations carried out at 1200 K for 1 at% Mo/W showed significant grain boundary migration accompanied by some degree of solute diffusion, thus providing additional evidence that solute drag mostly contributed to the nanostructure stability observed at lower temperature.

  13. Eulerian fluid-structure analysis of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, W.H.

    1979-05-01

    A fluid-structure-interaction algorithm is developed for the analysis of the dynamic response of a BWR pressure-suppression pool and containment structure. The method is incorporated into a two-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics code, PELE-IC, for the solution of incompressible flow coupled to flexible structures. The fluid, structure, and coupling algorithms have been verified by calculation of solved problems from the literature and by comparison with air and steam blowdown experiments

  14. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schardt, J.F. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  15. Complex Lyapunov exponents from short and noisy sets of data. Application to stability analysis of BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdu, G.; Ginestar, D.; Bovea, M.D.; Jimenez, P.; Pena, J.; Munoz-Cobo, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics reconstruction techniques have been applied to systems as BWRs with a big amount of noise. The success of this methodology was limited due to the noise in the signals. Recently, new techniques have been introduced for short and noisy data sets based on a global fit of the signal by means of orthonormal polynomials. In this paper, we revisit these ideas in order to adapt them for the analysis of the neutronic power signals to characterize the stability regime of BWR reactors. To check the performance of the methodology, we have analyzed simulated noisy signals, observing that the method works well, even with a big amount of noise. Also, we have analyzed experimental signals from Ringhals 1 BWR. In this case, the reconstructed phase space for the system is not very good. A modal decomposition treatment for the signals is proposed producing signals with better behaviour. (author)

  16. IFPE/IFA-432, Fission Gas Release, Mechanical Interaction BWR Fuel Rods, Halden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Description: It contains data from experiments that have been performed at the IFE/OECD Halden Reactor Project, available for use in fuel performance studies. It covers experiments on thermal performance, fission product release, clad properties and pellet clad mechanical interaction. It includes also experimental data relevant to high burn-up behaviour. IFA-432: Measurements of fuel temperature response, fission gas release and mechanical interaction on BWR-type fuel rods up to high burn-ups. The assembly featured several variations in rod design parameters, including fuel type, fuel/cladding gap size, fill gas composition (He and Xe) and fuel stability. It contained 6 BWR-type fuel rods with fuel centre thermocouples at two horizontal planes, rods were also equipped with pressure transducers and cladding extensometers. Only data from 6 rods are compiled here

  17. Single pin BWR benchmark problem for coupled Monte Carlo - Thermal hydraulics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.; Sanchez, V.; Hoogenboom, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the European NURISP research project, a single pin BWR benchmark problem was defined. The aim of this initiative is to test the coupling strategies between Monte Carlo and subchannel codes developed by different project participants. In this paper the results obtained by the Delft Univ. of Technology and Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology will be presented. The benchmark problem was simulated with the following coupled codes: TRIPOLI-SUBCHANFLOW, MCNP-FLICA, MCNP-SUBCHANFLOW, and KENO-SUBCHANFLOW. (authors)

  18. Single pin BWR benchmark problem for coupled Monte Carlo - Thermal hydraulics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.; Sanchez, V. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology, Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Herman-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hoogenboom, J. E. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    As part of the European NURISP research project, a single pin BWR benchmark problem was defined. The aim of this initiative is to test the coupling strategies between Monte Carlo and subchannel codes developed by different project participants. In this paper the results obtained by the Delft Univ. of Technology and Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology will be presented. The benchmark problem was simulated with the following coupled codes: TRIPOLI-SUBCHANFLOW, MCNP-FLICA, MCNP-SUBCHANFLOW, and KENO-SUBCHANFLOW. (authors)

  19. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino C, F.J.; Fuentes C, P.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  20. Utility experience with BWR-PSMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The BWR Power Shape Monitoring System (BWR-PSMS) has proven to be an effective and versatile tool for core monitoring. GPU Nuclear Corporation's (GPUN) Oyster Creek plant has been involved in the PSMS development since its inception, having been selected by EPRI as the initial demonstration site. Beginning with Cycle 10, Oyster Creek has been applying the BWR-PSMS as the primary core monitoring tool. Although the system has been in operation at Oyster Creek for the past several cycles, this is the first time the PSMS was used to monitor compliance to the plant technical specifications, to guide adherence to vendore fuel maneuvering recommendations and to develop data for certain performance records such as fuel burnup, isotopic accounting, etc. This paper will discuss the bases for the decision to apply PSMS as the fundamental core monitoring system, the experience in implementing the PSMS in this mode, activities currently underway or planned related to PSMS, and potential future extensions and applications of PSMS at Oyster Creek

  1. Economic analysis of hydride fueled BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganda, F.; Shuffler, C.; Greenspan, E.; Todreas, N.

    2009-01-01

    The economic implications of designing BWR cores with hydride fuels instead of conventional oxide fuels are analyzed. The economic analysis methodology adopted is based on the lifetime levelized cost of electricity (COE). Bracketing values (1970 and 3010 $/kWe) are used for the overnight construction costs and for the power scaling factors (0.4 and 0.8) that correlate between a change in the capital cost to a change in the power level. It is concluded that a newly constructed BWR reactor could substantially benefit from the use of 10 x 10 hydride fuel bundles instead of 10 x 10 oxide fuel bundles design presently in use. The cost saving would depend on the core pressure drop constraint that can be implemented in newly constructed BWRs - it is between 2% and 3% for a core pressure drop constraint as of the reference BWR, between 9% and 15% for a 50% higher core pressure drop, and between 12% and 21% higher for close to 100% core pressure. The attainable cost reduction was found insensitive to the specific construction cost but strongly dependent on the power scaling factor. The cost advantage of hydride fuelled cores as compared to that of the oxide reference core depends only weakly on the uranium and SWU prices, on the 'per volume base' fabrication cost of hydride fuels, and on the discount rate used. To be economically competitive, the uranium enrichment required for the hydride fuelled core needs to be around 10%.

  2. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for the management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after-core degradation has occurred) of postulated boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities, and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for further assessment. The first was a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertained to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose was to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies were performed during 1991 and this paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies, and the potential for their success. ((orig.))

  3. BWR recirculation pump diagnostic expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, S.C.; Morimoto, C.N.; Torres, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    At General Electric (GE), an on-line expert system to support maintenance decisions for BWR recirculation pumps for nuclear power plants has been developed. This diagnostic expert system is an interactive on-line system that furnishes diagnostic information concerning BWR recirculation pump operational problems. It effectively provides the recirculation pump diagnostic expertise in the plant control room continuously 24 hours a day. The expert system is interfaced to an on-line monitoring system, which uses existing plant sensors to acquire non-safety related data in real time. The expert system correlates and evaluates process data and vibration data by applying expert rules to determine the condition of a BWR recirculation pump system by applying knowledge based rules. Any diagnosis will be automatically displayed, indicating which pump may have a problem, the category of the problem, and the degree of concern expressed by the validity index and color hierarchy. The rules incorporate the expert knowledge from various technical sources such as plant experience, engineering principles, and published reports. These rules are installed in IF-THEN formats and the resulting truth values are also expressed in fuzzy terms and a certainty factor called a validity index. This GE Recirculation Pump Expert System uses industry-standard software, hardware, and network access to provide flexible interfaces with other possible data acquisition systems. Gensym G2 Real-Time Expert System is used for the expert shell and provides the graphical user interface, knowledge base, and inference engine capabilities. (author)

  4. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1982-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are touched on. The basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are treated. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurement of the reactor transfer function, which is demonstrated by results from measurements on a BWR in the Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  5. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez S, A.

    2004-01-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  6. Improving the Stability and Accuracy of Power Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation Using Virtual Impedance Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Zha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL systems are advanced, real-time platforms for combined software and hardware testing. Two paramount issues in PHIL simulations are the closed-loop stability and simulation accuracy. This paper presents a virtual impedance (VI method for PHIL simulations that improves the simulation’s stability and accuracy. Through the establishment of an impedance model for a PHIL simulation circuit, which is composed of a voltage-source converter and a simple network, the stability and accuracy of the PHIL system are analyzed. Then, the proposed VI method is implemented in a digital real-time simulator and used to correct the combined impedance in the impedance model, achieving higher stability and accuracy of the results. The validity of the VI method is verified through the PHIL simulation of two typical PHIL examples.

  7. Large Eddy Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Flow in a Swirl Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Kewlani, Gaurav

    2012-01-09

    Swirling flows are the preferred mode of flame stabilization in lean premixed gas turbine engine combustors. Developing a fundamental understanding of combustion dynamics and flame stability in such systems requires a detailed investigation of the complex interactions between fluid mechanics and combustion. The turbulent reacting flow in a sudden expansion swirl combustor is studied using compressible large eddy simulations (LES) and compared with experimental data measured using PIV. Different vortex breakdown structures are observed, as the mixture equivalence ratio is reduced, that progressively diminish the stability of the flame. Sub-grid scale combustion models such as the artificially thickened flame method and the partially stirred reactor approach, along with appropriate chemical schemes, are implemented to describe the flame. The numerical predictions for average velocity correspond well with experimental results, and higher accuracy is obtained using the more detailed reaction mechanism. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.

  8. BWR Refill-Reflood Program, Task 4.7 - model development: TRAC-BWR component models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Y.K.; Parameswaran, V.; Shaug, J.C.

    1983-09-01

    TRAC (Transient Reactor Analysis Code) is a computer code for best-estimate analysis for the thermal hydraulic conditions in a reactor system. The development and assessment of the BWR component models developed under the Refill/Reflood Program that are necessary to structure a BWR-version of TRAC are described in this report. These component models are the jet pump, steam separator, steam dryer, two-phase level tracking model, and upper-plenum mixing model. These models have been implemented into TRAC-B02. Also a single-channel option has been developed for individual fuel-channel analysis following a system-response calculation

  9. Analysis of results of AZTRAN and AZKIND codes for a BWR; Analisis de resultados de los codigos AZTRAN y AZKIND para un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Vallejo Q, J. A.; Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Xolocostli M, J. V.; Rodriguez H, A.; Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: gbo729@yahoo.com.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents an analysis of results obtained from simulations performed with the neutron transport code AZTRAN and the kinetic code of neutron diffusion AZKIND, based on comparisons with models corresponding to a typical BWR, in order to verify the behavior and reliability of the values obtained with said code for its current development. For this, simulations of different geometries were made using validated nuclear codes, such as CASMO, MCNP5 and Serpent. The results obtained are considered adequate since they are comparable with those obtained and reported with other codes, based mainly on the neutron multiplication factor and the power distribution of the same. (Author)

  10. LISA Pathfinder E2E performance simulation: optical and self-gravity stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, N.; Fichter, W.; Kersten, M.; Lucarelli, S.; Montemurro, F.

    2005-05-01

    End-to-end (E2E) modelling and simulation, i.e. verifying the science performance of LISA Pathfinder (spacecraft and payload), is mandatory in order to minimize mission risks. In this paper, focus is on two particular applications of the E2E performance simulator currently being developed at EADS Astrium GmbH: the opto-dynamical stability and the self-gravity disturbance stability analysis. The E2E models applied here comprise the opto-dynamical modelling of the optical metrology systems (OMS) laser interferometry, the thermo-elastic distortion modelling of the OMS optical elements and the self-gravity disturbance model accounting for structural distortions. Preliminary analysis results are presented in detail, identifying shortcomings of the current LISA technology package (LTP) mounting baseline. As a consequence, the design is now being revised.

  11. LISA Pathfinder E2E performance simulation: optical and self-gravity stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, N; Fichter, W; Kersten, M; Lucarelli, S; Montemurro, F

    2005-01-01

    End-to-end (E2E) modelling and simulation, i.e. verifying the science performance of LISA Pathfinder (spacecraft and payload), is mandatory in order to minimize mission risks. In this paper, focus is on two particular applications of the E2E performance simulator currently being developed at EADS Astrium GmbH: the opto-dynamical stability and the self-gravity disturbance stability analysis. The E2E models applied here comprise the opto-dynamical modelling of the optical metrology systems (OMS) laser interferometry, the thermo-elastic distortion modelling of the OMS optical elements and the self-gravity disturbance model accounting for structural distortions. Preliminary analysis results are presented in detail, identifying shortcomings of the current LISA technology package (LTP) mounting baseline. As a consequence, the design is now being revised

  12. State-dependent sensorimotor processing: gaze and posture stability during simulated flight in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Kimberly L; Dickman, J David

    2011-04-01

    Vestibular responses play an important role in maintaining gaze and posture stability during rotational motion. Previous studies suggest that these responses are state dependent, their expression varying with the environmental and locomotor conditions of the animal. In this study, we simulated an ethologically relevant state in the laboratory to study state-dependent vestibular responses in birds. We used frontal airflow to simulate gliding flight and measured pigeons' eye, head, and tail responses to rotational motion in darkness, under both head-fixed and head-free conditions. We show that both eye and head response gains are significantly higher during flight, thus enhancing gaze and head-in-space stability. We also characterize state-specific tail responses to pitch and roll rotation that would help to maintain body-in-space orientation during flight. These results demonstrate that vestibular sensorimotor processing is not fixed but depends instead on the animal's behavioral state.

  13. Experimental Study of Turbine Fuel Thermal Stability in an Aircraft Fuel System Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranos, A.; Marteney, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal stability of aircraft gas turbines fuels was investigated. The objectives were: (1) to design and build an aircraft fuel system simulator; (2) to establish criteria for quantitative assessment of fuel thermal degradation; and (3) to measure the thermal degradation of Jet A and an alternative fuel. Accordingly, an aircraft fuel system simulator was built and the coking tendencies of Jet A and a model alternative fuel (No. 2 heating oil) were measured over a range of temperatures, pressures, flows, and fuel inlet conditions.

  14. Integrated ELM simulation with edge MHD stability and transport of SOL-divertor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Takizuka, Tomonori; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Ozeki, Takahisa; Oyama, Naoyuki

    2007-07-01

    The effect of the pressure profile on the energy loss caused by edge localized modes (ELMs) has been investigated by using an integrated simulation code TOPICS-IB based on a core transport code with a stability code for the peeling-ballooning modes and a transport model for scrape-off-layer and divertor plasmas. The steep pressure gradient inside the pedestal top is found to broaden the region of the ELM enhanced transport through the broadening of eigenfunctions and enhance the ELM energy loss. The ELM energy loss in the simulation becomes larger than 15% of the pedestal energy, as is shown in the database of multi-machine experiments. (author)

  15. Numerical simulation of feedback stabilization of axisymmetric modes in tokamaks using driven halo currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to model a new method of feedback stabilization of the axisymmetric instability in tokamaks using driven halo (or scrape-off layer) currents. The method appears to be feasible for a wide range of plasma edge parameters. It may offer advantages over the more conventional method of controlling this instability when applied in a reactor environment. (author)

  16. Stability analysis and finite element simulations of superplastic forming in the presence of hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzal, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    It is established that some superplastic materials undergo significant cavitation during deformation. In this work, stability analysis for the superplastic copper based alloy Coronze-638 at 550 °C based on Hart's definition of stable plastic deformation and finite element simulations for the balanced biaxial loading case are carried out to study the effects of hydrostatic pressure on cavitation evolution during superplastic forming. The finite element results show that imposing hydrostatic pressure yields to a reduction in cavitation growth.

  17. Simulation for transient stability study of the Taiwan power system - a nuclear majority system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A transient stability program was developed for the Taiwan Power Company, which has a high proportion of nuclear generation in its power system. This program offers a new territory to investigate nuclear plant effects on the power system transient stability. This program also provides a high speed tool for the Taipower system operational planning. A generalized procedure of synchronous machine modeling for a large-scale stability study is presented. The merits and weaknesses of machine modeling can be comprehended through each item of this procedure. Three types of nonlinear synchronous machine modeling implemented into this stability program are derived by following this procedure. A robust subroutine was derived to perform the fourth order Runge-Kutta integration method, making the software programming neat and systematical. For simulating the nuclear plant influence on the system, this program implemented an additional four functions: load-limit operation simulated by a low-value gate in the governor model, bypass valve capacity monitored by sending out a warning message, rotor overspeed protection relay, and generator anti-motoring relay

  18. Simulation methods supporting homologation of Electronic Stability Control in vehicle variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Albert; Schick, Bernhard; Holzmann, Henning; Kochem, Michael; Meyer-Tuve, Harald; Lange, Olav; Mao, Yiqin; Tosolin, Guido

    2017-10-01

    Vehicle simulation has a long tradition in the automotive industry as a powerful supplement to physical vehicle testing. In the field of Electronic Stability Control (ESC) system, the simulation process has been well established to support the ESC development and application by suppliers and Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). The latest regulation of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe UN/ECE-R 13 allows also for simulation-based homologation. This extends the usage of simulation from ESC development to homologation. This paper gives an overview of simulation methods, as well as processes and tools used for the homologation of ESC in vehicle variants. The paper first describes the generic homologation process according to the European Regulation (UN/ECE-R 13H, UN/ECE-R 13/11) and U.S. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS 126). Subsequently the ESC system is explained as well as the generic application and release process at the supplier and OEM side. Coming up with the simulation methods, the ESC development and application process needs to be adapted for the virtual vehicles. The simulation environment, consisting of vehicle model, ESC model and simulation platform, is explained in detail with some exemplary use-cases. In the final section, examples of simulation-based ESC homologation in vehicle variants are shown for passenger cars, light trucks, heavy trucks and trailers. This paper is targeted to give a state-of-the-art account of the simulation methods supporting the homologation of ESC systems in vehicle variants. However, the described approach and the lessons learned can be used as reference in future for an extended usage of simulation-supported releases of the ESC system up to the development and release of driver assistance systems.

  19. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core low pressure (LPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP; Simulacion del sistema de aspersion del nucleo a baja presion (LPCS) para un reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR) basado en RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Membrillo G, O. E.; Chavez M, C., E-mail: garzo1012@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The present work presents the modeling and simulation of the aspersion system to low pressure of reactor of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde using the nuclear code RELAP/SCDAP. The objective of the emergency systems inside a nuclear reactor is the cooling of the core, nor caring the performance of any other emergency system in the case of an accident design base for coolant loss. To obtain a simulation of the system is necessary to have a model based on their main components, pipes, pumps, valves, etc. This article describes the model for the simulation of the main line and the test line for the HPCS. At the moment we have the simulation of the reactor vessel and their systems associated to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, this work will allow to associate the emergency system model LPCS to the vessel model. The simulation of the vessel and the emergency systems will allow knowing the behavior of the reactor in the stage of the coolant loos, giving the possibility to analyze diverse scenarios. The general model will provide an auxiliary tool for the training in classroom and at distance in the operation of nuclear power plants. (Author)

  20. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor; Identificacion de modelos de orden reducido de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez S, A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: augusto@correo.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  1. Simulating the effect of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability during oil and gas development in deepwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingchao; Cheng, Yuanfang; Zhang, Huaiwen; Yan, Chuanliang; Liu, Yuwen

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that methane hydrate has been identified as an alternative resource due to its massive reserves and clean property. However, hydrate dissociation during oil and gas development (OGD) process in deep water can affect the stability of subsea equipment and formation. Currently, there is a serious lack of studies over quantitative assessment on the effects of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability. In order to solve this problem, ABAQUS finite element software was used to develop a model and to evaluate the behavior of wellhead caused by hydrate dissociation. The factors that affect the wellhead stability include dissociation range, depth of hydrate formation and mechanical properties of dissociated hydrate region. Based on these, series of simulations were carried out to determine the wellhead displacement. The results revealed that, continuous dissociation of hydrate in homogeneous and isotropic formations can causes the non-linear increment in vertical displacement of wellhead. The displacement of wellhead showed good agreement with the settlement of overlying formations under the same conditions. In addition, the shallower and thicker hydrate formation can aggravate the influence of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability. Further, it was observed that with the declining elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio, the wellhead displacement increases. Hence, these findings not only confirm the effect of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability, but also lend support to the actions, such as cooling the drilling fluid, which can reduce the hydrate dissociation range and further make deepwater operations safer and more efficient.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Swirl Stabilized Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo-Rios, Salvador; Karagozian, Ann

    2017-11-01

    Flame stabilization is an important design criterion for many combustion chambers, especially at lean conditions and/or high power output, where insufficient stabilization can result in dangerous oscillations and noisy or damaged combustors. At high flow rates, swirling flow can offer a suitable stabilization mechanism, although understanding the dynamics of swirl-stabilized turbulent flames remains a significant challenge. Utilizing the General Equation and Mesh Solver (GEMS) code, which solves the Navier-Stokes equations along with the energy equation and five species equations, 2D axisymmetric and full 3D parametric studies and simulations are performed to guide the design and development of an experimental swirl combustor configuration and to study the effects of swirl on statistically stationary combustion. Results show that as the momentum of air is directed into the inner air inlet rather than the outer inlet of the swirl combustor, the central recirculating region becomes stronger and more unsteady, improving mixing and burning efficiency in that region. A high temperature region is found to occur as a result of burning of the trapped fuel from the central toroidal vortex. The effects of other parameters on flowfield and flame-stabilization dynamics are explored. Supported by ERC, Inc. (PS150006) and AFOSR (Dr. Chiping Li).

  3. Learning Probabilistic Models of Hydrogen Bond Stability from Molecular Dynamics Simulation Trajectories

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-04-02

    Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) play a key role in both the formation and stabilization of protein structures. H-bonds involving atoms from residues that are close to each other in the main-chain sequence stabilize secondary structure elements. H-bonds between atoms from distant residues stabilize a protein’s tertiary structure. However, H-bonds greatly vary in stability. They form and break while a protein deforms. For instance, the transition of a protein from a nonfunctional to a functional state may require some H-bonds to break and others to form. The intrinsic strength of an individual H-bond has been studied from an energetic viewpoint, but energy alone may not be a very good predictor. Other local interactions may reinforce (or weaken) an H-bond. This paper describes inductive learning methods to train a protein-independent probabilistic model of H-bond stability from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories. The training data describes H-bond occurrences at successive times along these trajectories by the values of attributes called predictors. A trained model is constructed in the form of a regression tree in which each non-leaf node is a Boolean test (split) on a predictor. Each occurrence of an H-bond maps to a path in this tree from the root to a leaf node. Its predicted stability is associated with the leaf node. Experimental results demonstrate that such models can predict H-bond stability quite well. In particular, their performance is roughly 20% better than that of models based on H-bond energy alone. In addition, they can accurately identify a large fraction of the least stable H-bonds in a given conformation. The paper discusses several extensions that may yield further improvements.

  4. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core at high pressure (HPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP; Simulacion del sistema de aspersion del nucleo alta presion (HPCS) para un reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR) basado en RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas O, D.; Chavez M, C., E-mail: danmirnyi@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    A high-priority topic for the nuclear industry is the safety, consequently a nuclear power plant should have the emergency systems of cooling of the core (ECCS), designed exclusively to enter in operation in the event of an accident with coolant loss, including the design base accident. The objective of the aspersion system of the core at high pressure (HPCS) is to provide in an autonomous way the cooling to the core maintaining for if same the coolant inventory even when a small break is presented that does not allow the depressurization of the reactor and also avoiding excessive temperatures that affect the shielding of the fuel. The present work describes the development of the model and the simulation of the HPCS using the RELAP/SCDAP code. During the process simulation, for the setting in march of the system HPCS in an accident with coolant loss is necessary to implement the main components of the system taking into account what unites them, the main pump, the filled pump, the suction and injection valves, pipes and its water sources that can be condensed storage tanks and the suppression pool. The simulation of this system will complement the model with which counts the Analysis Laboratory in Nuclear Reactors Engineering of the UNAM regarding to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde which does not have a detailed simulation of the emergency cooling systems. (Author)

  5. Development of alternative materials for BWR fuel springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruma, Y.; Osato, T.; Yamazaki, K.

    2002-01-01

    Major sources of radioactivity introduced into reactor water of BWR were estimated fuel crud and in-core materials (especially, fuel springs). Fuel springs are used for fixation of fuel cladding tubes with spacer grid. Those are small parts (total length is only within 25 mm) and so many numbers are loaded simultaneously and then total surfaces area are calculated up to about 200 m 2 . Fuel springs are located under high radiation field and high oxidative environment. Conventional fuel spring is made of alloy-X750 which is one of nickel-based alloy and is reported to show relatively higher corrosion release rate. 58 Co and 60 Co will be released directly into reactor water from intensely radio-activated fuel springs surface and increase radioactivity concentrations in primary coolant. Corrosion release control from fuel springs is an important technical item and a development of alternative material instead of alloy-X750 for fuel spring is a key subject to achieve ultra low man-rem exposure BWR plant. In present work, alloy-X718 which started usage for PWR fuel springs and stainless steel type 316L which has many mechanical property data are picked up for alternative materials and compared their corrosion behaviors with conventional material. Corrosion experiment was conducted under vapor-water two phases flow which is simulated fuel cladding surface boiling condition. After exposure, corrosion film formed under corrosion test was analyzed in detail and corrosion film amount and corrosion release amount are estimated among three materials. (authors)

  6. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Tobin, S.J.; Favalli, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hu, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) (Sweden); Trellue, H.; Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-11

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 134}Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  7. An Automatic Approach to the Stabilization Condition in a HIx Distillation Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ji Woon; Shin, Young Joon; Lee, Ki Young; Kim, Yong Wan; Chang, Jong Hwa; Youn, Cheung

    2010-01-01

    In the Sulfur-Iodine(SI) thermochemical process to produce nuclear hydrogen, an H 2 O-HI-I 2 ternary mixture solution discharged from the Bunsen reaction is primarily concentrated by electro-electrodialysis. The concentrated solution is distillated in the HIx distillation column to generate a high purity HI vapor. The pure HI vapor is obtained at the top of the HIx distillation column and the diluted HIx solution is discharged at the bottom of the column. In order to simulate the steady-state HIx distillation column, a vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) model of the H 2 O-HI-I 2 ternary system is required and the subprogram to calculate VLE concentrations has been already introduced by KAERI research group in 2006. The steady state simulation code for the HIx distillation process was also developed in 2007. However, the intrinsic phenomena of the VLE data such as the steep slope of a T-x-y diagram caused the instability of the simulation calculation. In this paper, a computer program to automatically find a stabilization condition in the steady state simulation of the HIx distillation column is introduced. A graphic user interface (GUI) function to monitor an approach to the stabilization condition was added in this program

  8. Experimental and numerical investigations of BWR fuel bundle inlet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoashi, E; Morooka, S; Ishitori, T; Komita, H; Endo, T; Honda, H; Yamamoto, T; Kato, T; Kawamura, S

    2009-01-01

    We have been studying the mechanism of the flow pattern near the fuel bundle inlet of BWR using both flow visualization test and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. In the visualization test, both single- and multi-bundle test sections were used. The former test section includes only a corner orifice facing two support beams and the latter simulates 16 bundles surrounded by four beams. An observation window is set on the side of the walls imitating the support beams upstream of the orifices in both test sections. In the CFD simulation, as well as the visualization test, the single-bundle model is composed of one bundle with a corner orifice and the multi-bundle model is a 1/4 cut of the test section that includes 4 bundles with the following four orifices: a corner orifice facing the corner of the two neighboring support beams, a center orifice at the opposite side from the corner orifice, and two side orifices. Twin-vortices were observed just upstream of the corner orifice in the multi-bundle test as well as the single-bundle test. A single-vortex and a vortex filament were observed at the side orifice inlet and no vortex was observed at the center orifice. These flow patterns were also predicted in the CFD simulation using Reynolds Stress Model as a turbulent model and the results were in good agreement with the test results mentioned above. (author)

  9. Strategies of operation cycles in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, D.; Sendino, F.

    1996-01-01

    The article analyzes the operation cycles in BWR type reactors. The cycle size of operation is the consequence on the optimization process of the costs with the technical characteristics of nuclear fuel and the characteristics of demand and production. The authors analyze the cases of Garona NP and Cofrentes NP, both with BWR reactors. (Author)

  10. GPE-BWR and the containment venting and filtering issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, J.; Santiago, J. de

    1988-01-01

    The Spanish Boiling Water Reactor Owner's Group (GPE-BWR) is formed by three utilities, owning four units: Santa Maria de Garona (46 MWe, BWR3, Mark I containment), Cofrentes (975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) and Valdecaballeros (2x975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) - all of the reactors having been supplied by General Electric. One of the GPE-BWR's several committees is the Safety and Licensing Committee, which follows up the evolution of severe accident topics and particularly the containment venting and filtering issue. In September 1987, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), the Spanish Regulatory Body, asked the GPE-BWR to define its position on the installation of a containment venting system. The GPE-BWR created a Working Group which presented a Report on Containment Venting to the CSN in January 1987 gathered from: the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); some US utilities; and several European countries, especially France, Germany and Sweden. CSN's review of the containment venting Report and the Action Plan proposed by the GPE-BWR finished in April 1988. The conclusion of the Report and the proposed Action Plan take into account the US NRC's identified open items on severe accidents and the R and D programs scheduled to close these items

  11. Governor stability simulations of Svartisen power plant verified by the installed monitoring system on site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, T K; Kjeldsen, M

    2010-01-01

    Many Norwegian hydro power plants have complex lay-out with several reservoirs, broke intakes, surge shafts and even air cushion chambers. There are kilometers of excavated tunnels as well as long tail water systems. The stations are often equipped by multiple of turbines, both in series and parallel. A number of operation modes are therefore possible. Doing transient simulations and simulations of governor stability in the design phase, the problem is to find the worst case scenario regarding these operating modes. Svartisen power plant has been of particular interest these days. The power plant is originally designed for two 350 MW Francis turbines, however, only one turbine was installed. When designed, governor stability was regarded as problematic due to the long penstock. A long penstock will give a too high time constant for the hydraulic inertia. The main problem here is, however, the water hammer frequency that interferes with the governor performance. The frequency is in the same range as the cross frequency. Therefore the governor will react on these water hammer waves, which in its nature is notoriously unstable. The common solution is to build an air cushion and thereby increase the water hammer frequency above the cross frequency. The expenses were, however, deemed too high, and it was necessary to seek for other solutions. A pressure feedback on the governor was introduced in order to have stable operation at least for two turbines. With only one turbine installed, the pressure feedback has not been activated because, based on the simulations, it was regarded unnecessary. Even if the original simulations shows good stability margins when only one turbine is running, there has been some indications that the aggregate has suffered from instability. In 2004 Svartisen Power Plant was equipped with a comprehensive monitoring system. Both the turbine and the generator performance have been observed. This gives valuable information on how the hydropower

  12. Governor stability simulations of Svartisen power plant verified by the installed monitoring system on site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, T. K.; Kjeldsen, M.

    2010-08-01

    Many Norwegian hydro power plants have complex lay-out with several reservoirs, broke intakes, surge shafts and even air cushion chambers. There are kilometers of excavated tunnels as well as long tail water systems. The stations are often equipped by multiple of turbines, both in series and parallel. A number of operation modes are therefore possible. Doing transient simulations and simulations of governor stability in the design phase, the problem is to find the worst case scenario regarding these operating modes. Svartisen power plant has been of particular interest these days. The power plant is originally designed for two 350 MW Francis turbines, however, only one turbine was installed. When designed, governor stability was regarded as problematic due to the long penstock. A long penstock will give a too high time constant for the hydraulic inertia. The main problem here is, however, the water hammer frequency that interferes with the governor performance. The frequency is in the same range as the cross frequency. Therefore the governor will react on these water hammer waves, which in its nature is notoriously unstable. The common solution is to build an air cushion and thereby increase the water hammer frequency above the cross frequency. The expenses were, however, deemed too high, and it was necessary to seek for other solutions. A pressure feedback on the governor was introduced in order to have stable operation at least for two turbines. With only one turbine installed, the pressure feedback has not been activated because, based on the simulations, it was regarded unnecessary. Even if the original simulations shows good stability margins when only one turbine is running, there has been some indications that the aggregate has suffered from instability. In 2004 Svartisen Power Plant was equipped with a comprehensive monitoring system. Both the turbine and the generator performance have been observed. This gives valuable information on how the hydropower

  13. Development of a BWR loading pattern design system based on modified genetic algorithms and knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-del-Campo, Cecilia; Francois, Juan Luis; Avendano, Linda; Gonzalez, Mario

    2004-01-01

    An optimization system based on Genetic Algorithms (GAs), in combination with expert knowledge coded in heuristics rules, was developed for the design of optimized boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel loading patterns. The system was coded in a computer program named Loading Pattern Optimization System based on Genetic Algorithms, in which the optimization code uses GAs to select candidate solutions, and the core simulator code CM-PRESTO to evaluate them. A multi-objective function was built to maximize the cycle energy length while satisfying power and reactivity constraints used as BWR design parameters. Heuristic rules were applied to satisfy standard fuel management recommendations as the Control Cell Core and Low Leakage loading strategies, and octant symmetry. To test the system performance, an optimized cycle was designed and compared against an actual operating cycle of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant, Unit I

  14. Experimental study on reduced moderation BWR with Advanced Recycle System (BARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraiwa, K.; Yoshioka, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Akiba, M.; Yamaoka, M.; Abe, N.; Mimatsu, J.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental study has been done for reduced-moderation spectrum boiling water reactor named BARS (BWR with Advanced Recycle System). The critical assembly experiment for triangular tight uranium lattice has been done in TOSHIBA critical assembly (NCA). Experimental method based on modified conversion ratio was adopted to evaluate the void reactivity effect. Void fraction was simulated by formed polystyrene in this experiment. The measured void coefficient for tight uranium lattice agreed with calculation. The thermal hydraulic test study has been done to study the coolability of BARS lattice. Visual test and high-pressure thermal hydraulic test have been done as the thermal hydraulic test. Visual test has indicated the flow behavior for BARS lattice is same as that of current BWR. The high-pressure thermal hydraulic test has indicated the applicability of modified Arai's correlation to the BARS lattice. (authors)

  15. Development of membrane moisture separator for BWR off-gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawamura, S.; Kumasaka, M.; Nishikubo, M.

    2001-01-01

    In BWR plant off-gas treatment systems, dehumidifiers are used to maintain noble gas adsorption efficiency in the first half of the charcoal hold-up units. From the perspective of simplifying and reducing the cost of such a dehumidification system, Japanese BWR utilities and plant fabricators have been developing a dehumidification system employing moisture separation membrane of the type already proven in fields such as medical instrumentation and precision measuring apparatus. The first part of this development involved laboratory testing to simulate the conditions found in an actual off-gas system, the results of which demonstrated satisfactory results in terms of moisture separation capability and membrane durability, and suggested favorable prospects for application in actual off-gas systems. Further, in-plant testing to verify moisture separation capability and membrane durability in the presence of actual gases is currently underway, with results so far suggesting that the system is capable of obtaining good moisture separation capability. (author)

  16. Analysis of void reactivity measurements in full MOX BWR physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoshihira; Yamamoto, Toru; Umano, Takuya

    2008-01-01

    In the full MOX BWR physics experiments, FUBILA, four 9x9 test assemblies simulating BWR full MOX assemblies were located in the center of the core. Changing the in-channel moderator condition of the four assemblies from 0% void to 40% and 70% void mock-up, void reactivity was measured using Amplified Source Method (ASM) technique in the subcritical cores, in which three fission chambers were located. ASM correction factors necessary to express the consistency of the detector efficiency between measured core configurations were calculated using collision probability cell calculation and 3D-transport core calculation with the nuclear data library, JENDL-3.3. Measured reactivity worth with ASM correction factor was compared with the calculated results obtained through a diffusion, transport and continuous energy Monte Carlo calculation respectively. It was confirmed that the measured void reactivity worth was reproduced well by calculations. (author)

  17. High fidelity analysis of BWR fuel assembly with COBRA-TF/PARCS and trace codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarca, A.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.; Soler, A.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of detailed reactor core and fuel assembly description for light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the sub-channel safety analysis requires high fidelity models and coupled neutronic/thermalhydraulic codes. Hand in hand with advances in the computer technology, the nuclear safety analysis is beginning to use a more detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics. Previously, a PWR core and a 16 by 16 fuel assembly models were developed to test and validate our COBRA-TF/PARCS v2.7 (CTF/PARCS) coupled code. In this work, a comparison of the modeling and simulation advantages and disadvantages of modern 10 by 10 BWR fuel assembly with CTF/PARCS and TRACE codes has been done. The objective of the comparison is making known the main advantages of using the sub-channel codes to perform high resolution nuclear safety analysis. The sub-channel codes, like CTF, permits obtain accurate predictions, in two flow regime, of the thermalhydraulic parameters important to safety with high local resolution. The modeled BWR fuel assembly has 91 fuel rods (81 full length and 10 partial length fuel rods) and a big square central water rod. This assembly has been modeled with high level of detail with CTF code and using the BWR modeling parameters provided by TRACE. The same neutronic PARCS's model has been used for the simulation with both codes. To compare the codes a coupled steady state has be performed. (author)

  18. Simulation of the injection system of cooling water to low pressure (Lpci) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP; Simulacion del sistema de inyeccion de agua de refrigeracion a baja presion (LPCI) para un reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR) basado en RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado C, R. A.; Lopez S, E.; Chavez M, C., E-mail: renedelgado2015@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The present article describes the modeling and simulation of the Injection System of Cooling Water to Low Pressure (Lpci) for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Is very important to be able to predict the behavior of the nuclear plant in the case of an emergency stop, and while nearer to the reality are the results of a simulation, better is the safety protocol that can be devised. In the Engineering Faculty of the UNAM at the present is had logical models of the safety systems, but due to the nature of the same, these simulations do not provide of the quantity of enough information to be able to reproduce with more accuracy the behavior of the Lpci in the case of a severe accident. For this reason, the RELAP code was used for the flows modeling, components and structures of heat transfers in relation to the system Lpci. The modeling of the components is carried out with base on technical information of the nuclear plant and the results will be corroborated with information in reference documents as the Rasp (the Reactor analysis support package) and the Fsar (Final safety analysis report) for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  19. Analysis of BWR out-of-phase instabilities in the frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farawila, Y.M.; Pruitt, D.W.; Kreuter, D.

    1992-01-01

    During startup or because of an inadvertent recirculation pump trip, a boiling water reactor (BWR) may operate at relatively low flow and high power conditions. At these conditions, a BWR is susceptible to coupled flow and power oscillations that could result in undesirable reactor scram unless appropriate countermeasures are taken. This contribution to analytical methods has been developed to address in part a general industrywide and regulatory concern about BWR stability initiated by the LaSalle 2 instability event in March 1988. This work is designed to extend the capability of the one-dimensional parallel channel frequency domain code STAIF to predict the regional oscillation decay ratio. The basic theory follows that developed by March-Leuba and Blakeman, where the oscillation mechanism is identified as the excitation of a subcritical neutronic mode with a constant core pressure drop boundary condition. The improvements to the basic theory include applying the theory to one-dimensional neutronics instead of point kinetics and taking account of the actual three-dimensional harmonic flux distribution

  20. Mixed Finite Element Simulation with Stability Analysis for Gas Transport in Low-Permeability Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. El-Amin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas exists in considerable quantities in tight reservoirs. Tight formations are rocks with very tiny or poorly connected pors that make flow through them very difficult, i.e., the permeability is very low. The mixed finite element method (MFEM, which is locally conservative, is suitable to simulate the flow in porous media. This paper is devoted to developing a mixed finite element (MFE technique to simulate the gas transport in low permeability reservoirs. The mathematical model, which describes gas transport in low permeability formations, contains slippage effect, as well as adsorption and diffusion mechanisms. The apparent permeability is employed to represent the slippage effect in low-permeability formations. The gas adsorption on the pore surface has been described by Langmuir isotherm model, while the Peng-Robinson equation of state is used in the thermodynamic calculations. Important compatibility conditions must hold to guarantee the stability of the mixed method by adding additional constraints to the numerical discretization. The stability conditions of the MFE scheme has been provided. A theorem and three lemmas on the stability analysis of the mixed finite element method (MFEM have been established and proven. A semi-implicit scheme is developed to solve the governing equations. Numerical experiments are carried out under various values of the physical parameters.

  1. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karjunen, T.; Laitinen, T.; Piippo, J.; Sirkiae, P.

    1996-01-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR's as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs

  2. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrey Ioilev; Maskhud Samigulin; Vasily Ustinenko; Simon Lo; Adrian Tentner

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The goal of this project is to develop an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle under various operating conditions. This code will include more fundamental physical models than the current generation of sub-channel codes and advanced numerical algorithms for improved computational accuracy, robustness, and speed. It is highly desirable to understand the detailed two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for the analysis of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is still too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Recent progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), coupled with the rapidly increasing computational power of massively parallel computers, shows promising potential for the fine-mesh, detailed simulation of fuel assembly two-phase flow phenomena. However, the phenomenological models available in the commercial CFD programs are not as advanced as those currently being used in the sub-channel codes used in the nuclear industry. In particular, there are no models currently available which are able to reliably predict the nature of the flow regimes, and use the appropriate sub-models for those flow regimes. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD Code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. The paper describes the model development strategy which has been adopted by the development team for the

  3. Development of methodology for early detection of BWR instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandro Petruzzi; Shin Chin; Kostadin Ivanov; Asok Ray; Fan-Bill Cheung

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The objective of the work presented in this paper research, which is supported by the US Department of Energy under the NEER program, is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology in order to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, based on the US NRC coupled code TRACE/PARCS, is being utilized as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The concept of the methodology is based on the fact that nonlinear systems show bifurcation, which is a change in the qualitative behavior as the system parameters vary. Some of these parameters may change on their own accord and account for the anomaly, while certain parameters can be altered in a controlled fashion. The non-linear, non-autonomous BWR system model considered in this research exhibits phenomena at two time scales. Anomalies occur at the slow time scale while the observation of the dynamical behavior, based on which inferences are made, takes place at the fast time scale. It is assumed that: (i) the system behavior is stationary at the fast time scale; and (ii) any observable non-stationary behavior is associated with parametric changes evolving at the slow time scale. The goal is to make inferences about evolving anomalies based on the asymptotic behavior derived from the computer simulation. However, only sufficient changes in the slowly varying parameter may lead to detectable difference in the asymptotic behavior. The need to detect such small changes in parameters and hence early detection of an anomaly motivate the utilized stimulus-response approach. In this approach, the model

  4. Level 2 PRA for a German BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassen, F.; Rapp, W.; Tietsch, W.; Roess, P.

    2007-01-01

    A concept for a Level 2 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (L2 PRA) for a German Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) has been developed taking into account the role of L2 PRA within the German regulatory landscape. According to this concept, a plant specific evaluation of the severe accident phenomenology as well as analyses of the accident progression for the severe accident scenarios has been performed. Furthermore a plant specific MELCOR 1.8.6 model has been developed and special MELCOR source term calculations have been performed for the different release paths. This paper will present examples from the different areas described above. (author)

  5. Maintenance of BWR control rod drive mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) replacement and rebuilding is one of the highest dose, most physically demanding, and complicated maintenance activities routinely accomplished by BWR utilities. A recent industry workshop sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which dealt with the effects of CRDM aging, revealed enhancements in maintenance techniques and tooling which have reduced ALARA, improved worker comfort and productivity, and have provided revised guidelines for CRDM changeout selection. Highlights of this workshop and ongoing research on CRDM aging are presented in this paper

  6. Numerical simulations and linear stability analysis of a boundary layer developed on wavy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siconolfi, Lorenzo; Camarri, Simone; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2015-11-01

    The development of passive methods leading to a laminar to turbulent transition delay in a boundary layer (BL) is a topic of great interest both for applications and academic research. In literature it has been shown that a proper and stable spanwise velocity modulation can reduce the growth rate of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and delay transition. In this study, we investigate numerically the possibility of obtaining a stabilizing effect of the TS waves through the use of a spanwise sinusoidal modulation of a flat plate. This type of control has been already successfully investigated experimentally. An extensive set of direct numerical simulations is carried out to study the evolution of a BL flow developed on wavy surfaces with different geometric characteristics, and the results will be presented here. Moreover, since this configuration is characterized by a slowly-varying flow field in streamwise direction, a local stability analysis is applied to define the neutral stability curves for the BL flow controlled by this type of wall modifications. These results give the possibility of investigating this control strategy and understanding the effect of the free parameters on the stabilization mechanism.

  7. Bioactive hydroxyapatite/graphene composite coating and its corrosion stability in simulated body fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janković, Ana; Eraković, Sanja [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Mitrić, Miodrag [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Mike Petrovića Alasa 12-14, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Matić, Ivana Z.; Juranić, Zorica D. [Institute of Oncology and Radiology of Serbia, Pasterova 14, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Tsui, Gary C.P.; Tang, Chak-yin [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Mišković-Stanković, Vesna [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rhee, Kyong Yop, E-mail: rheeky@khu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 449-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo Jin [Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-05

    Highlights: • Bioactive HAP/Gr coating on Ti was successfully obtained by EPD. • Increased fracture toughness of the HAP/Gr coating compared to pure HAP coating. • HAP/Gr coating exhibited superior biomimetic mineralization vs. pure HAP coating. • Gr improved the mechanical properties and thermal stability of HAP/Gr coating. • HAP/Gr coating was classified as non-cytotoxic against the targeted PBMC. - Abstract: The hydroxyapatite/graphene (HAP/Gr) composite was electrodeposited on Ti using the electrophoretic deposition process to obtain uniform bioactive coating with improved mechanical strength and favorable corrosion stability in simulated body fluid (SBF). Incorporation of Gr was verified by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron analysis. The HAP/Gr composite coating exhibited reduced surface cracks, nearly double the hardness, and elastic modulus increased by almost 50% compared to pure HAP coating, as estimated by a nanoindentation test. The bioactive HAP/Gr composite coating provided a newly formed apatite layer in SBF with enhanced corrosion stability, as evidenced by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the HAP/Gr coating was improved in comparison to the pure HAP coating, and the Ca/P ratio was closer to the stoichiometric value. No antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli could be verified. The HAP/Gr composite coating was classified as non-cytotoxic when tested against healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)

  8. Bioactive hydroxyapatite/graphene composite coating and its corrosion stability in simulated body fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janković, Ana; Eraković, Sanja; Mitrić, Miodrag; Matić, Ivana Z.; Juranić, Zorica D.; Tsui, Gary C.P.; Tang, Chak-yin; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna; Rhee, Kyong Yop; Park, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Bioactive HAP/Gr coating on Ti was successfully obtained by EPD. • Increased fracture toughness of the HAP/Gr coating compared to pure HAP coating. • HAP/Gr coating exhibited superior biomimetic mineralization vs. pure HAP coating. • Gr improved the mechanical properties and thermal stability of HAP/Gr coating. • HAP/Gr coating was classified as non-cytotoxic against the targeted PBMC. - Abstract: The hydroxyapatite/graphene (HAP/Gr) composite was electrodeposited on Ti using the electrophoretic deposition process to obtain uniform bioactive coating with improved mechanical strength and favorable corrosion stability in simulated body fluid (SBF). Incorporation of Gr was verified by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron analysis. The HAP/Gr composite coating exhibited reduced surface cracks, nearly double the hardness, and elastic modulus increased by almost 50% compared to pure HAP coating, as estimated by a nanoindentation test. The bioactive HAP/Gr composite coating provided a newly formed apatite layer in SBF with enhanced corrosion stability, as evidenced by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the HAP/Gr coating was improved in comparison to the pure HAP coating, and the Ca/P ratio was closer to the stoichiometric value. No antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli could be verified. The HAP/Gr composite coating was classified as non-cytotoxic when tested against healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)

  9. Kuosheng BWR/6 containment safety analysis with gothic code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Ansheng; Wang Jongrong; Yuann Rueyyng; Shih Chunkuan

    2011-01-01

    Kuosheng Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan is a GE-designed twin-unit BWR/6 plant, each unit rated at 2894 MWt. In this study, we presented the calculated results of the containment pressure and temperature responses after the main steam line break accident, which is the design basis for the containment system. During the simulation, a power of SPU range (105.1%) was used and a model of the Mark III type containment was built using the containment thermal-hydraulic program GOTHIC. The simulation consists of short and long-term responses. The drywell pressure and temperature responses which display the maximum values in the early state of the LOCA were investigated in the short-term response; the primary containment pressure and temperature responses in the long-term response. The blowdown flow was provided by FSAR and used as boundary conditions in the short-term model; in the long-term model, the blowdown flow was calculated using a GOTHIC built-in homogeneous equilibrium model. In the long-term analysis, a simplifier RPV model was employed to calculate the blowdown flow. Finally, the calculated results, similar to the FSAR results, indicate the GOTHIC code has the capability to simulate the pressure/temperature response of Mark III containment to the main steam line break LOCA. (author)

  10. Synergistic and alkaline stability studies of mixtures of simulated high level waste sludge with selected energetic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the stability of mercury oxalate and mercury fulminate in alkaline sludge simulating Savannah River Site waste. These compounds represent two classes of energetic compounds previously speculated as potential components in sludge stored without a supernatant liquid

  11. Numerical computation of the linear stability of the diffusion model for crystal growth simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.; Sorensen, D.C. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Meiron, D.I.; Wedeman, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We consider a computational scheme for determining the linear stability of a diffusion model arising from the simulation of crystal growth. The process of a needle crystal solidifying into some undercooled liquid can be described by the dual diffusion equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Here U{sub t} and U{sub a} denote the temperature of the liquid and solid respectively, and {alpha} represents the thermal diffusivity. At the solid-liquid interface, the motion of the interface denoted by r and the temperature field are related by the conservation relation where n is the unit outward pointing normal to the interface. A basic stationary solution to this free boundary problem can be obtained by writing the equations of motion in a moving frame and transforming the problem to parabolic coordinates. This is known as the Ivantsov parabola solution. Linear stability theory applied to this stationary solution gives rise to an eigenvalue problem of the form.

  12. Learning probabilistic models of hydrogen bond stability from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-02-15

    Background: Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) play a key role in both the formation and stabilization of protein structures. They form and break while a protein deforms, for instance during the transition from a non-functional to a functional state. The intrinsic strength of an individual H-bond has been studied from an energetic viewpoint, but energy alone may not be a very good predictor.Methods: This paper describes inductive learning methods to train protein-independent probabilistic models of H-bond stability from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories of various proteins. The training data contains 32 input attributes (predictors) that describe an H-bond and its local environment in a conformation c and the output attribute is the probability that the H-bond will be present in an arbitrary conformation of this protein achievable from c within a time duration ?. We model dependence of the output variable on the predictors by a regression tree.Results: Several models are built using 6 MD simulation trajectories containing over 4000 distinct H-bonds (millions of occurrences). Experimental results demonstrate that such models can predict H-bond stability quite well. They perform roughly 20% better than models based on H-bond energy alone. In addition, they can accurately identify a large fraction of the least stable H-bonds in a conformation. In most tests, about 80% of the 10% H-bonds predicted as the least stable are actually among the 10% truly least stable. The important attributes identified during the tree construction are consistent with previous findings.Conclusions: We use inductive learning methods to build protein-independent probabilistic models to study H-bond stability, and demonstrate that the models perform better than H-bond energy alone. 2011 Chikalov et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. Postural stability changes in the elderly with cataract simulation and refractive blur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vijay; Buckley, John G; Scally, Andy; Elliott, David B

    2003-11-01

    To determine the influence of cataractous and refractive blur on postural stability and limb-load asymmetry (LLA) and to establish how postural stability changes with the spatial frequency and contrast of the visual stimulus. Thirteen elderly subjects (mean age, 70.76 +/- 4.14 [SD] years) with no history of falls and normal vision were recruited. Postural stability was determined as the root mean square [RMS] of the center of pressure (COP) signal in the anterior-posterior (A-P) and medial-lateral directions and LLA was determined as the ratio of the average body weight placed on the more-loaded limb to the less-loaded limb, recorded during a 30-second period. Data were collected under normal standing conditions and with somatosensory system input disrupted. Measurements were repeated with four visual targets with high (8 cyc/deg) or low (2 cyc/deg) spatial frequency and high (Weber contrast, approximately 95%) or low (Weber contrast, approximately 25%) contrast. Postural stability was measured under conditions of binocular refractive blur of 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 D and with cataract simulation. The data were analyzed in a population-averaged linear model. The cataract simulation caused significant increases in postural instability equivalent to that caused by 8-D blur conditions, and its effect was greater when the input from the somatosensory system was disrupted. High spatial frequency targets increased postural instability. Refractive blur, cataract simulation, or eye closure had no effect on LLA. Findings indicate that cataractous and refractive blur increase postural instability, and show why the elderly, many of whom have poor vision along with musculoskeletal and central nervous system degeneration, are at greater risk of falling. Findings also highlight that changes in contrast sensitivity rather than resolution changes are responsible for increasing postural instability. Providing low spatial frequency information in certain environments may be useful in

  14. Brownian dynamics simulations of an order-disorder transition in sheared sterically stabilized colloidal suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigos, A.A.; Wilemski, G.

    1992-01-01

    The shear thinning behavior of a sterically stabilized nonaqueous colloidal suspension was investigated using nonequilibrium Brownian dynamics simulations of systems with 108 and 256 particles. At a volume fraction of 0.4, the suspension is thixotropic: it has a reversible shear thinning transition from a disordered state to an ordered, lamellar state with triangularly packed strings of particles. The time scale for the transition is set by the free particle diffusion constant. For the smaller system, the transition occurs gradually with increasing shear rate. For the larger system, the transition is sharp and discontinuous shear thinning is found. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  15. The determination of temperature stability of silver nanotubes by the molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, O.; Soldatenko, S.; Soldatenko, O.

    2018-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation using the embedded-atom method is applied to study thermal stability of silver nanotubes and its coefficient of linear thermal expansion. The correspondence of face centered cubic structure potential for this task is tested. Three types of nanotubes are modelled: scrolled from graphene-like plane, scrolled from plane with cubic structure and cut from cylinder. It is established that only the last two of them are stable. The last one describes in details. There is critical temperature when free ends of the nanotube close but the interior surface retains. At higher temperatures, the interior surface collapses and the nanotube is unstable.

  16. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  17. Phenomenology of BWR fuel assembly degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Masaki; Barrachin, Marc; Haste, Tim; Steinbrueck, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) which required an immediate re-examination of fuel degradation phenomenology. The present paper reviews the updated knowledge on the phenomenology of the fuel degradation, focusing mainly on the BWR fuel assembly degradation at the macroscopic scale and that of the individual interactions at the meso-scale. Oxidation of boron carbide (B4C) control rods potentially generates far larger amounts of heat and hydrogen under BWR accident conditions. All integral tests with B4C control rods or control blades have shown early failure, liquefaction, relocation and oxidation of B4C starting at temperatures around 1250 °C, well below the significant interaction temperatures of UO2-Zry. These interactions or reactions potentially influence the progress of fuel degradation in the early phase. The steam-starved conditions, which are being discussed as a likely scenario at the FDNPS accident, highly influence the individual interactions and potentially lead the fuel degradation in non-prototypical directions. The detailed phenomenology of individual interactions and their influence on the transient and on the late phase of the severe accidents are also discussed.

  18. BWR normal water chemistry guidelines: 1986 revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) have experienced stress corrosion cracking in the reactor cooling system piping resulting in adverse impacts on plant availability and personnel radiation exposure. The BWR Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major research and development program to provide remedies for this stress corrosion cracking problem. This work shows that the likelihood of cracking depends on the plant's water chemistry performance (environment) as well as on material condition and stress level. Plant experience and other research demonstrate that water quality also affects fuel performance and radiation field buildup in BWRs. This report,''BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1986 Revision,'' presents suggested generic water chemistry specifications, justifies the proposed water chemistry limits, suggests responses to out-of-specification water chemistry, discusses available chemical analysis methods as well as data management and surveillance schemes, and details the management philosophy required to successfully implement a water chemistry control program. An appendix contains recommendations for water quality of auxiliary systems. 73 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs

  19. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, G. Ivan; Christenson, John M.; Renier, J.P.; Marcille, T.F.; Casal, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs). A top-level objective of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis program element of the DOE NERI program is to investigate spent fuel treatment and recycling options for current light water reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, this project targets to expand the traditional scope of nuclear fuel management optimization into the following two complementary specific objectives: (1) To develop a direct coupling between the pin-by-pin within-bundle loading control variables and core-wide (bundle-by-bundle) optimization objectives, (2) to extend the methodology developed to explicitly encompass control variables, objectives, and constraints designed to maximize minor actinide incineration in BWR bundles and cycles. The first specific objective is projected to 'uncover' dormant thermal margin made available by employing additional degrees of freedom within the optimization process, while the addition of minor actinides is expected to 'consume' some of the uncovered thermal margin. Therefore, a key underlying goal of this project is to effectively invest some of the uncovered thermal margin into achieving the primary objective.

  20. Recent BWR fuel management reactor physics advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, R.L.; Congdon, S.P.; Crawford, B.W.; Kang, C.M.; Martin, C.L.; Reese, A.P.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Welchly, R.

    1982-01-01

    Improvements in BWR fuel management have been under development to reduce uranium and separative work (SWU) requirements and reduce fuel cycle costs, while also maintaining maximal capacity factors and high fuel reliability. Improved reactor physics methods are playing an increasingly important role in making such advances feasible. The improved design, process computer and analysis methods both increase knowledge of the thermal margins which are available to implement fuel management advance, and improve the capability to reliably and efficiently analyze and design for fuel management advances. Gamma scan measurements of the power distributions of advanced fuel assembly and advanced reactor core designs, and improved in-core instruments also are important contributors to improving 3-d predictive methods and to increasing thermal margins. This paper is an overview of the recent advances in BWR reactor physics fuel management methods, coupled with fuel management and core design advances. The reactor physics measurements which are required to confirm the predictions of performance fo fuel management advances also are summarized

  1. CECP, Decommissioning Costs for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Cost Estimating Computer Program CECP, designed for use on an IBM personal computer or equivalent, was developed for estimating the cost of decommissioning boiling water reactor (BWR) and light-water reactor (PWR) power stations to the point of license termination. 2 - Method of solution: Cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial volume and costs; and manpower staffing costs. Using equipment and consumables costs and inventory data supplied by the user, CECP calculates unit cost factors and then combines these factors with transportation and burial cost algorithms to produce a complete report of decommissioning costs. In addition to costs, CECP also calculates person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is designed for a specific waste charge structure. The waste cost data structure cannot handle intermediate waste handlers or changes in the charge rate structures. The decommissioning of a reactor can be divided into 5 periods. 200 different items for special equipment costs are possible. The maximum amount for each special equipment item is 99,999,999$. You can support data for 10 buildings, 100 components each; ESTS1071/01: There are 65 components for 28 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (BWR). ESTS1071/02: There are 75 components for 25 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (PWR)

  2. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C.; Arai, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  3. Hydrogen injection device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the increasing ratio of main steam system dose rate due to N-16 activity due to excess hydrogen injection in the hydrogen injection operation of BWR type reactors. Constitution: There are provided a hydrogen injection mechanism for injecting hydrogen into primary coolants of a BWR type reactor, and a chemical injection device for injecting chemicals such as methanol, which makes nitrogen radioisotopes resulted in the reactor water upon hydrogen injection non-volatile, into the pressure vessel separately from hydrogen. Injected hydrogen and the chemicals are not reacted in the feedwater system, but the reaction proceeds due to the presence of radioactive rays after the injection into the pressure vessel. Then, hydrogen causes re-combination in the downcomer portion to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration. Meanwhile, about 70 % of the chemicals is supplied by means of a jet pump directly to the reactor core, thereby converting the chemical form of N-16 in the reactor core more oxidative (non-volatile). (Kawakami, Y.)

  4. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P. [ABB Atom, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions.

  5. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Arai, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  6. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P.

    1997-01-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions

  7. BWR fuel experience with zinc injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.A.; Garcia, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    In 1982 a correlation between low primary recirculation system dose rates in BWR's and the presence of ionic zinc in reactor water was identified. The source of the zinc was primarily from Admiralty brass condensers. Plants with brass condensers are called ''natural zinc'' plants. Brass condensers were also a source of copper that was implicated in crude induced localized corrosion (CILC) fuel failures. In 1986 the first BWR intentionally injected zinc for the benefits of dose rate control. Although zinc alone was never implicated in fuel degradation of failures, a comprehensive fuel surveillance program was initiated to monitor fuel performance. Currently there are 14 plants that are injecting zinc. Six of these plants are also on hydrogen water chemistry. This paper describes the effect on both Zircaloy corrosion and the cruding characteristics as a result of these changes in water chemistry. Fuel rod corrosion was found to be independent of the specific water chemistry of the plants. The corrosion behavior was the same with the additions of zinc alone or zinc plus hydrogen and well within the operating experience for fuel without either of these additions. No change was observed in the amounts of crude deposited on the fuel rods, both for the adherent and loosely held deposits. One of the effects of the zinc addition was the trend to form more of the zinc rich iron spinel in the fuel deposits rather than the hematite deposits that are predominantly formed with non additive water chemistry

  8. Dose rate reduction method for NMCA applied BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Aizawa, Motohiro; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Varela, Juan; Caine, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    BRAC (BWR Radiation Assessment and Control) dose rate is used as an indicator of the incorporation of activated corrosion by products into BWR recirculation piping, which is known to be a significant contributor to dose rate received by workers during refueling outages. In order to reduce radiation exposure of the workers during the outage, it is desirable to keep BRAC dose rates as low as possible. After HWC was adopted to reduce IGSCC, a BRAC dose rate increase was observed in many plants. As a countermeasure to these rapid dose rate increases under HWC conditions, Zn injection was widely adopted in United States and Europe resulting in a reduction of BRAC dose rates. However, BRAC dose rates in several plants remain high, prompting the industry to continue to investigate methods to achieve further reductions. In recent years a large portion of the BWR fleet has adopted NMCA (NobleChem TM ) to enhance the hydrogen injection effect to suppress SCC. After NMCA, especially OLNC (On-Line NobleChem TM ), BRAC dose rates were observed to decrease. In some OLNC applied BWR plants this reduction was observed year after year to reach a new reduced equilibrium level. This dose rate reduction trends suggest the potential dose reduction might be obtained by the combination of Pt and Zn injection. So, laboratory experiments and in-plant tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of Pt and Zn on Co-60 deposition behaviour. Firstly, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of noble metal deposition on Co deposition on stainless steel surfaces. Polished type 316 stainless steel coupons were prepared and some of them were OLNC treated in the test loop before the Co deposition test. Water chemistry conditions to simulate HWC were as follows: Dissolved oxygen, hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide were below 5 ppb, 100 ppb and 0 ppb (no addition), respectively. Zn was injected to target a concentration of 5 ppb. The test was conducted up to 1500 hours at 553 K. Test

  9. CFD predictions of standby liquid control system mixing in lower plenum of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Christopher; Skarda, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Computational fluid dynamics analysis of BWR lower plenum. • Mixing and stratification of the standby liquid control system injection. • Scoping study highlights the expected flow paths and limitations of experiments. - Abstract: During an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) scenario in certain boiling water reactor (BWR) systems, a standby liquid control system (SLCS) is used to inject a sodium pentaborate solution into the reactor system in order to quickly shut down (scram) the reactor without the use of the control rods. Some BWR designs utilize a SLCS that injects through a set of nozzles on a vertical pipe in the peripheral region of the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. During the scenario, system water levels are reduced and natural circulation flow rates down through the jet pump nozzles and up into the core are a small fraction of the rated system flow. It is during this period that the SLCS flows are considered. This work outlines some initial scoping studies completed by the staff at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). An attempt at benchmarking the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach using a set of available test data from a small facility is outlined. Due to our lack of information related to specific details of the facility geometry along with the limited data available from the test, the benchmark exercise produced only a qualitative basis for selecting turbulence models and mesh density. A CFD model simulating a full-scale reactor system is developed for the lower plenum of a representative BWR/4 design and SLCS flows and mixing are studied under a range of flow conditions. The full-scale BWR simulation builds upon the lessons learned from the benchmark exercise. One challenge for this work is the large size of the domain and the relatively small size of the geometric details such as flow passages and gaps. The geometry is simplified to make meshing feasible by eliminating some of the small features. The

  10. Analysis of results of AZTRAN and AZKIND codes for a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Vallejo Q, J. A.; Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L.; Xolocostli M, J. V.; Rodriguez H, A.; Gomez T, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of results obtained from simulations performed with the neutron transport code AZTRAN and the kinetic code of neutron diffusion AZKIND, based on comparisons with models corresponding to a typical BWR, in order to verify the behavior and reliability of the values obtained with said code for its current development. For this, simulations of different geometries were made using validated nuclear codes, such as CASMO, MCNP5 and Serpent. The results obtained are considered adequate since they are comparable with those obtained and reported with other codes, based mainly on the neutron multiplication factor and the power distribution of the same. (Author)

  11. Self-organization and stability of magnetosome chains—A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, Damien; Klumpp, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria orient in magnetic fields with the help of their magnetosome chain, a linear structure of membrane enclosed magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) anchored to a cytoskeletal filament. Here, we use simulations to study the assembly and the stability of magnetosome chains. We introduce a computational model describing the attachment of the magnetosomes to the filament and their magnetic interactions. We show that the filamentous backbone is crucial for the robust assembly of the magnetic particles into a linear chain, which in turn is key for the functionality of the chain in cellular orientation and magnetically directed swimming. In addition, we simulate the response to an external magnetic field that is rotated away from the axis of the filament, an experimental method used to probe the mechanical stability of the chain. The competition between alignment along the filament and alignment with the external fields leads to the rupture of a chain if the applied field exceeeds a threshold value. These observations are in agreement with previous experiments at the population level. Beyond that, our simulations provide a detailed picture of chain rupture at the single cell level, which is found to happen through two abrupt events, which both depend on the field strength and orientation. The re-formation of the chain structure after such rupture is found to be strongly sped up in the presence of a magnetic field parallel to the filament, an observation that may also be of interest for the design of self-healing materials. Our simulations underline the dynamic nature of the magnetosome chain. More generally, they show the rich complexity of self-assembly in systems with competing driving forces for alignment. PMID:29315342

  12. Optimization of axial enrichment and gadolinia distributions for BWR fuel under control rod programming, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hida, Kazuki; Yoshioka, Ritsuo

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed for optimizing the axial enrichment and gadolinia distributions for the reload BWR fuel under control rod programming. The problem was to minimize the enrichment requirement subject to the criticality and axial power peaking constraints. The optimization technique was based on the successive linear programming method, each linear programming problem being solved by a goal programming algorithm. A rapid and practically accurate core neutronics model, named the modified one-dimensional core model, was developed to describe the batch-averaged burnup behavior of the reload fuel. A core burnup simulation algorithm, employing a burnup-power-void iteration, was also developed to calculate the rigorous equilibrium cycle performance. This method was applied to the optimization of axial two- and 24-region fuels for demonstrative purposes. The optimal solutions for both fuels have proved the optimality of what is called burnup shape optimization spectral shift. For the two-region fuel with a practical power peaking of 1.4, the enrichment distribution was nearly uniform, because a bottom-peaked burnup shape flattens the axial power shape. Optimization of the 24-region fuel has shown a potential improvement in BWR fuel cycle economics, which will guide future advancement in BWR fuel designs. (author)

  13. Prediction of droplet deposition around BWR fuel spacer by FEM flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Morooka, Shinichi

    1997-01-01

    The critical power of the BWR fuel assembly has been remarkably increased. That increase mainly depends on the improvement of the spacer which keeps fixed gaps between fuel rods. So far, these improvements have been carried out on the basis of what developers consider to be appropriate and the results of mockup tests of the BWR fuel assembly. However, continued reliance on these approaches for the development of a higher performance fuel assembly will prove time-consuming and costly. Therefore, it is hoped that the spacer effects for the critical power can be investigated by computer simulation, and it is significantly important to develop the critical power prediction method. Direct calculation of the two-phase flow in a BWR fuel channel s still difficult. Accordingly, a new method for predicting the critical power was proposed. Our method consists of CFD (computer fluid dynamics) code based on the single-phase flow analysis method and the subchannel analysis code. To verify our method, the critical power predictions for various spacer geometries were performed. The predicted results of the critical power were compared with the experimental data. The result of the comparison showed a good agreement and the applicability of our method for various spacer geometries. (author)

  14. Stabilities and Dynamics of Protein Folding Nuclei by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Shun; Zhou, Xin; Zheng, Wei-Mou; Wang, Yan-Ting

    2017-07-01

    To understand how the stabilities of key nuclei fragments affect protein folding dynamics, we simulate by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in aqueous solution four fragments cut out of a protein G, including one α-helix (seqB: KVFKQYAN), two β-turns (seqA: LNGKTLKG and seqC: YDDATKTF), and one β-strand (seqD: DGEWTYDD). The Markov State Model clustering method combined with the coarse-grained conformation letters method are employed to analyze the data sampled from 2-μs equilibrium MD simulation trajectories. We find that seqA and seqB have more stable structures than their native structures which become metastable when cut out of the protein structure. As expected, seqD alone is flexible and does not have a stable structure. Throughout our simulations, the native structure of seqC is stable but cannot be reached if starting from a structure other than the native one, implying a funnel-shape free energy landscape of seqC in aqueous solution. All the above results suggest that different nuclei have different formation dynamics during protein folding, which may have a major contribution to the hierarchy of protein folding dynamics. Supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant No. 2013CB932804, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11421063, and the CAS Biophysics Interdisciplinary Innovation Team Project

  15. Stability of [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Sushila; Tran, Van H; Duke, Colin C

    2007-11-30

    The degradation kinetics of [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol were investigated in simulated gastric (pH 1) and intestinal (pH 7.4) fluids at 37 degrees C. Degradation products were quantitatively determined by HPLC (Lichrospher 60 RP select B column, 5 microm, 125 mm x 4 mm; mobile phase: methanol-water-acetic acid (60:39:1 v/v); flow rate: 0.6 ml/min; detection UV: 280 nm). In simulated gastric fluid (SGF) [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol underwent first-order reversible dehydration and hydration reactions to form [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, respectively. The degradation was catalyzed by hydrogen ions and reached equilibrium at approximately 200 h. In simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) both [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol showed insignificant interconversion between one another. Addition of amino acids glycine, 3-amino propionic acid (beta-alanine) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), and ammonium acetate at a range of concentrations of 0.05-0.5mM had no effect on the rate of degradation of [6]-shogaol in SGF and 0.1M HCl solution. However, at exceedingly high concentration (0.5M) of ammonium acetate and glycine, significant amounts of [6]-shogaol ammonia and glycine adducts were detected. The degradation profile of [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol under simulated physiological conditions reported in this study will provide insight into the stability of these compounds when administered orally.

  16. Activity and stability of a complex bacterial soil community under simulated Martian conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Merrison, Jonathan; Nørnberg, Per; Aagaard Lomstein, Bente; Finster, Kai

    2005-04-01

    A simulation experiment with a complex bacterial soil community in a Mars simulation chamber was performed to determine the effect of Martian conditions on community activity, stability and survival. At three different depths in the soil core short-term effects of Martian conditions with and without ultraviolet (UV) exposure corresponding to 8 Martian Sol were compared. Community metabolic activities and functional diversity, measured as glucose respiration and versatility in substrate utilization, respectively, decreased after UV exposure, whereas they remained unaffected by Martian conditions without UV exposure. In contrast, the numbers of culturable bacteria and the genetic diversity were unaffected by the simulated Martian conditions both with and without UV exposure. The genetic diversity of the soil community and of the colonies grown on agar plates were evaluated by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on DNA extracts. Desiccation of the soil prior to experimentation affected the functional diversity by decreasing the versatility in substrate utilization. The natural dominance of endospores and Gram-positive bacteria in the investigated Mars-analogue soil may explain the limited effect of the Mars incubations on the survival and community structure. Our results suggest that UV radiation and desiccation are major selecting factors on bacterial functional diversity in terrestrial bacterial communities incubated under simulated Martian conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that forward contamination of Mars is a matter of great concern in future space missions.

  17. Development of new irradiation facility for BWR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yuji; Magome, Hirokatsu; Iida, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    In JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), about the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel and the stress corrosion cracking of reactor core composition apparatus concerning the long-term use of the light water reactor (BWR), in order to check the influence of the temperature, pressure, and water quality, etc on BWR condition. The water environmental control facility which performs irradiation assisted stress corrosion-cracking (IASCC) evaluation under BWR irradiation environment was fabricated in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor). This report is described the outline of manufacture of the water environmental control facility for doing an irradiation test using the saturation temperature capsule after JMTR re-operation. (author)

  18. Spinel formation for stabilizing simulated nickel-laden sludge with aluminum-rich ceramic precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Kaimin; White, Tim; Leckie, James O

    2006-08-15

    The feasibility of stabilizing nickel-laden sludge from commonly available Al-rich ceramic precursors was investigated and accomplished with high nickel incorporation efficiency. To simulate the process, nickel oxide was mixed alternatively with gamma-alumina, corundum, kaolinite, and mullite and was sintered from 800 to 1480 degrees C. The nickel aluminate spinel (NiAl2O4) was confirmed as the stabilization phase for nickel and crystallized with efficiencies greater than 90% for all precursors above 1250 degrees C and 3-h sintering. The nickel-incorporation reaction pathways with these precursors were identified, and the microstructure and spinel yield were investigated as a function of sintering temperature with fixed sintering time. This study has demonstrated a promising process for forming nickel spinel to stabilize nickel-laden sludge from a wide range of inexpensive ceramic precursors, which may provide an avenue for economically blending waste metal sludges via the building industry processes to reduce the environmental hazards of toxic metals. The correlation of product textures and nickel incorporation efficiencies through selection of different precursors also provides the option of tailoring property-specific products.

  19. Computer Simulation Study of the Stability Mechanism of Thermophile, MJ0305

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyundeok; Beck, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Methanococcus jannaschii (MJ) is a methane-producing thermophile, which was discovered in a 2600m-deep Pacific Ocean vent in 1983. It has the ability to thrive at high temperatures and high pressures, which are unfavorable for most life forms. There have been some experiments to study its stability under extreme conditions, but still the origin of the stability of MJ is not exactly known. MJ0305 is MJ's chloride channel protein. The structure of MJ0305 was built by homology modeling. We compared the stability of MJ0305 with mesophilic Ecoli at 300K, 330K, and 360K by computer simulation to test the effects of temperature. Our results show that high temperatures significantly affect the number of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. High temperatures decreased the average number of hydrogen bonds for Ecoli and MJ0305. Increased salt bridges at 330K make MJ0305 more stable. Network analysis of MJ0305 showed an increase in the number of hubs at high temperatures. In contrast, the number of hubs of Ecoli was decreased at high temperatures. Calculated network entropy is proportional to the number of hubs. Increased network entropy of MJ0305 at 330K implies increased robustness.

  20. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Oxygen and Cation Diffusion in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is of interest to the aerospace community, notably for its application as a thermal barrier coating for turbine engine components. In such an application, diffusion of both oxygen ions and cations is of concern. Oxygen diffusion can lead to deterioration of a coated part, and often necessitates an environmental barrier coating. Cation diffusion in YSZ is much slower than oxygen diffusion. However, such diffusion is a mechanism by which creep takes place, potentially affecting the mechanical integrity and phase stability of the coating. In other applications, the high oxygen diffusivity of YSZ is useful, and makes the material of interest for use as a solid-state electrolyte in fuel cells. The kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) method offers a number of advantages compared with the more widely known molecular dynamics simulation method. In particular, kMC is much more efficient for the study of processes, such as diffusion, that involve infrequent events. We describe the results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of oxygen and cation diffusion in YSZ. Using diffusive energy barriers from ab initio calculations and from the literature, we present results on the temperature dependence of oxygen and cation diffusivity, and on the dependence of the diffusivities on yttria concentration and oxygen sublattice vacancy concentration. We also present results of the effect on diffusivity of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the barrier cations that determine the oxygen diffusion energy barriers.

  1. Parameterization experiments performed via synthetic mass movements prototypes generated by 3D slope stability simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Antonio C.

    2010-05-01

    The central purpose of this work is to perform a reverse procedure in the mass movement conventional parameterization approach. The idea is to generate a number of synthetic mass movements by means of the "slope stability simulator" (Colangelo, 2007), and compeer their morphological and physical properties with "real" conditions of effective mass movements. This device is an integrated part of "relief unity emulator" (rue), that permits generate synthetic mass movements in a synthetic slope environment. The "rue" was build upon fundamental geomorphological concepts. These devices operate with an integrated set of mechanical, geomorphic and hydrological models. The "slope stability simulator" device (sss) permits to perform a detailed slope stability analysis in a theoretical three dimensional space, by means of evaluation the spatial behavior of critical depths, gradients and saturation levels in the "potential rupture surfaces" inferred along a set of slope profiles, that compounds a synthetic slope unity. It's a meta-stable 4-dimensional object generated by means of "rue", that represents a sequence evolution of a generator profile applied here, was adapted the infinite slope model for slope. Any slope profiles were sliced by means of finite element solution like in Bishop method. For the synthetic slope systems generated, we assume that the potential rupture surface occurs at soil-regolith or soil-rock boundary in slope material. Sixteen variables were included in the "rue-sss" device that operates in an integrated manner. For each cell, the factor of safety was calculated considering the value of shear strength (cohesion and friction) of material, soil-regolith boundary depth, soil moisture level content, potential rupture surface gradient, slope surface gradient, top of subsurface flow gradient, apparent soil bulk density and vegetation surcharge. The slope soil was considered as cohesive material. The 16 variables incorporated in the models were analyzed for

  2. Two-loop feed water control system in BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Takashi; Watanabe, Takao; Hirose, Masao.

    1982-01-01

    In the process of the start-up and shutdown of BWR plants, the operation of changing over feed pumps corresponding to plant output is performed. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the automatic changeover system for feed pumps, which minimizes the variation of water level in reactors and is easy to operate. The three-element control system with the water level in reactors, the flow rate of main steam and the flow rate of feed water as the input is mainly applied, but long time is required for the changeover of feed pumps. The two-loop feed control system can control simultaneously two pumps being changed over, therefore it is suitable to the automatic changeover control system for feed pumps. Also it is excellent for the control of the recirculating valves of feed pumps. The control characteristics of the two-loop feed water control system against the external disturbance which causes the variation of water level in reactors were examined. The results of analysis by simulation are reported. The features of the two-loop feed water control system, the method of simulation and the evaluation of the two-loop feed water control system are described. Its connection with a digital feed water recirculation control system is expected. (Kako, I.)

  3. Design of a redundant meteorological station for a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, R.; Celis del Angel, L.; Bucio, F.; Rivero, T.; Palacios, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the design of a meteorological station for a reactor type BWR is proposed. Two independent channels of data acquisition that allow him to have a bigger readiness is exposed. It is incorporate sensors without mobile parts to measure speed, wind direction and pluvial precipitation. It also counts, with sensors of global solar radiation, net radiation, barometric pressure, relative humidity and ambient temperature; with them they are possible to be calculated, moreover, other variables as temperature differential, dew point and atmospheric stability. The sensors are placed on a tower to different heights and send their information (each second) to a local registration system, the one which in turn, it remits the data to the monitoring office so that a computer is linked with the system, display and management the information in real time and automatic way. The redundant structure allows that in the event of maintenance the data acquisition is not interrupted, even if the information is transferred to another place. In all the station sections it is used protocols of standard communication to allow that a great quantity of devices can be connected without major problem. The above-mentioned would allow to the operators in the control room to have reliable information during the whole time of the reactor operation. (Author)

  4. Development of a numerical code for the analysis of the linear stability of the U1 and U2 reactors of the CNLV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa P, G.; Estrada P, C.E.; Nunez C, A.; Amador G, R.

    2001-01-01

    The computer code ANESLI-1 developed by the CNSNS and UAM-I, has the main goal of making stability analysis of nuclear reactors of the BWR type, more specifically, the reactors of the U1 and U2 of the CNLV. However it can be used for another kind of applications. Its capacity of real time simulator, allows the prediction of operational transients, and conditions of dynamic steady states. ANESLI-1 was developed under a modular scheme, which allows to extend or/and to improve its scope. The lineal stability analysis predicts the instabilities produced by the wave density phenomenon. (Author)

  5. Stability of Anthocyanins from Commercial Black Currant Juice under Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alija Uzunović

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins are effective antioxidants but they have also been proposed to have other biological activities independent of their antioxidant capacities that produce health benefits. Examples range from inhibition of cancer cell growth in vitro, induction of insulin production in isolated pancreatic cells, reduction of starch digestion through inhibition of a-glucosidase activity, suppression of inflammatory responses as well as protection against age-related declines in cognitive behavior and neuronal dysfunction in the central nervous system. However, to achieve any biological effect in a specific tissue or organ, anthocyanins must be bioavailable; i.e. effectively absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT into the circulation and delivered to the appropriate location within the body. In this study, we assess the stability of anthocyanins from commercial Black currant (Ribes nigrum L. juice using an in vitro digestion procedure that mimics the physiochemical and biochemical conditions encountered in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT. The main objective of this work was the evaluation of stability of anthocyanins during in vitro digestion in gastric and intestinal fluid regarding whether appropriate enzyme (pepsin or pancreatin was added or not. Anthocyanins present in commercial black currant juice remain stable during in vitro digestion in gastric fluid regardless whether pepsin was added into the medium or not. Also, they remain stable during in vitro digestion in simulated intestinal fluid without pancreatin. The stability studies of anthocyanins in the intestinal fluid containing pancreatin indicated reduced stability, which also mainly contribute to slight reduction of total anthocyanins content (1,83%- in commercial black currant juice.

  6. Stability monitoring of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Stability monitoring is of great importance for optimal plant performance. Decay ratios for several operating conditions show that the Dodewaard BWR is very stable and that pressure lowering, power increase and flux peaking lead to a higher decay ratio (worse stability). 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 ref

  7. Boiling water system of nuclear power plants (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martias Nurdin

    1975-01-01

    About 85% of the world electric generators are light water reactors. It shows that LWR is technologically and economically competitive with other generators. The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is one of the two systems in the LWR group. The techniques of BWR operation in several countries, especially low and moderate power BWR, are presented. The discussion is made in relation with the interconnection problems of electric installation in developing countries, including Indonesia, where the total electric energy installation is low. The high reliability and great flexibility of the operation of a boiling water reactor for a sufficiently long period are also presented. Component standardization for BWR system is discussed to get a better technological and economical performance for further development. (author)

  8. Level controlling system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joge, Toshio; Higashigawa, Yuichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reasonably attain fully automatic water level control in the core of BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: A feedwater flow regulation valve for reactor operation and a feedwater flow regulation valve for starting are provided at the outlet of a motor-driven feedwater pump in a feedwater system, and these valves are controlled by a feedwater flow rate controller. While on the other hand, a damp valve for reactor clean up system is controlled either in ''computer'' mode or in ''manual'' mode selected by a master switch, that is, controlled from a computer or the ON-OFF switch of the master switch by way of a valve control analog memory and a turn-over switch. In this way, the water level in the nuclear reactor can be controlled in a fully automatic manner reasonably at the starting up and shutdown of the plant to thereby provide man power saving. (Seki, T.)

  9. Pressure vessel for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the retention of low temperature water and also prevent the thermal fatigue of the pressure vessel by making large the curvature radius of a pressure vessel of a feed water sparger fitting portion and accelerating the mixing of low-temperature water at the feed water sparger base and in-pile hot water. Constitution: The curvature radius of the corner of the feed water sparger fitting portion in a pressure vessel is formed largely. In-pile circulating water infiltrates up to the base portion of the feed water sparger to carry outside low-temperature water at the base part, which is mixed with in-pile hot water. Accordingly, low temperature water does not stay at the base portion of the feed water sparger and generation of thermal fatigue in the pressure vessel can be prevented and the safety of the BWR type reactor can be improved. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Development of long operating cycle simplified BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Maruya, T.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Narabayash, T.; Aritomi, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative plant concept for long operating cycle simplified BWR (LSBWR) In this plant concept, 1) Long operating cycle ( 3 to 15 years), 2) Simplified systems and building, 3) Factory fabrication in module are discussed. Designing long operating core is based on medium enriched U-235 with burnable poison. Simplified systems and building are realized by using natural circulation with bottom located core, internal CRD and PCV with passive system and an integrated reactor and turbine building. This LSBWR concept will have make high degree of safety by IVR (In Vessel Retention) capability, large water inventory above the core region and no PCV vent to the environment due to PCCS (Passive Containment Cooling System) and internal vent tank. Integrated building concept could realize highly modular arrangement in hull structure (ship frame structure), ease of seismic isolation capability and high applicability of standardization and factory fabrication. (authors)

  11. BWR plant advanced central control panel PODIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Neda, T.; Suto, O.; Takamiya, S.

    1983-01-01

    BWR plant central control panels have become more and more enlarged and complicated recently due to the magnification of the scale of a plant and the requirement to reinforce safety. So, it is important to make communication between men and the complicated central control panel smooth. Toshiba has developed an advanced central control panel, named PODIA, which uses many computers and color CRTs, and PODIA is now in the stage of application to practical plants. In this article, the writers first touch upon control functions transition in the central control room, the PODIA position concerning the world-wide trend in this technology phase and the human engineering on the design. Then they present concrete design concepts for the control board and computer system which constitute PODIA

  12. Evaluation of internal flooding in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, K.; Papazoglou, I.A.; Sun, Y.H.; Anavim, E.; Ilberg, D.

    1985-01-01

    Flooding inside a nuclear power station is capable of concurrently disabling redundant safety systems. This paper presents the results of a recent review study performed on internally-generated floods inside a boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor building. The study evaluated the flood initiator frequency due to either maintenance or ruptures using Markovian models. A time phased event tree approach was adopted to quantify the core damage frequency based on the flood initiator frequency. It is found in the study that the contribution to the total core damage due to internal flooding events is not insignificant and is comparable to other transient contributors. The findings also indicate that the operator plays an important role in the prevention as well as the mitigation of a flooding event

  13. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.E.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Chen, J.C.; Lappa, D.A.; Chuang, T.Y.; Murray, R.C.; Johnson, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The simplified seismic risk methodology developed in the USNRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant (PWR). The simplified seismic risk methodology was developed to reduce the costs associated with a seismic risk analysis while providing adequate results. A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models, was developed and used in assessing the seismic risk of the Zion nuclear power plant (FSAR). The simplified seismic risk methodology was applied to the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant, a BWR; to further demonstrate its applicability, and if possible, to provide a basis for comparing the seismic risk from PWRs and BWRs. (orig./HP)

  14. A BWR Safety and Operability Improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, Craig D.

    1993-01-01

    The A BWR is the culmination of 30 years of design, development and operating experience of BWRs around the world. It represents across the board improvements is safety, operation and maintenance practices (O and M), economics, radiation exposure and rad waste generation. More than ten years and $20m5 went into the design and development of its new features, and it is now under construction in Japan. This paper concentrates on the safety and operability improvements. In the safety area, more than a decade improvement in core damage frequency (CDFR) has been assessed by formal PIRA techniques, with CDFR less than 10 -6 /year. Severe accident mitigation has also been formally addressed in the design. Plant operations were simplified by incorporation of better materials, optimum use of redundancy in mechanical and electrical equipment so that on-line maintenance can be performed, by better arrangements which account for required maintenance practices, and by an advanced control room

  15. Manufacturing technology and process for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    Following recent advanced technologies, processes and requests of the design changes of BWR fuel, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) has upgraded the manufacturing technology and honed its own skills to complete its brand-new automated facility in Tokai in the latter half of 1980's. The plant uses various forms of automation throughout the manufacturing process: the acceptance of uranium dioxide powder, pelletizing, fuel rod assembling, fuel bundle assembling and shipment. All processes are well computerized and linked together to establish the integrated control system with three levels of Production and Quality Control, Process Control and Process Automation. This multi-level system plays an important role in the quality assurance system which generates the highest quality of fuels and other benefits. (author)

  16. Facility of BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Mitsuji

    1998-01-01

    A condensate filtering device for cleaning condensate flown from a low pressure turbine and a condensate desalting device are connected by way of a condensate pipeline. Control rod drives (CRD) are disposed to the lower portion of BWR. A CRD pump and one end of a CRD feedwater pipeline are connected in series to the upstream of CRD. The other end of the CRD feedwater pipeline is connected to a CRD water taking pipeline branched from the condensate pipeline. Water is taken to the CRD from downstream of the condensate filtering device and upstream of a connecting portion between a low pressure heater drain pipeline and the condensate pipeline. Flow of impurities leached out of the condensate desalting device to the reactor can be suppressed, and rising of temperature of CRD water by the low pressure heater drain water is prevented. In addition, flowing of dissolved oxygen to the CRD system can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  17. Performance of iron–chromium–aluminum alloy surface coatings on Zircaloy 2 under high-temperature steam and normal BWR operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Weicheng; Mouche, Peter A.; Han, Xiaochun [University of Illinois, Department of Nuclear, Radiological, and Plasma Engineering, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Heuser, Brent J., E-mail: bheuser@illinois.edu [University of Illinois, Department of Nuclear, Radiological, and Plasma Engineering, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Was, Gary S. [University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) coatings deposited on Zircaloy 2 (Zy2) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by magnetron sputtering have been tested with respect to oxidation weight gain in high-temperature steam. In addition, autoclave testing of FeCrAl-coated Zy2 coupons under pressure-temperature-dissolved oxygen coolant conditions representative of a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment has been performed. Four different FeCrAl compositions have been tested in 700 °C steam; compositions that promote alumina formation inhibited oxidation of the underlying Zy2. Parabolic growth kinetics of alumina on FeCrAl-coated Zy2 is quantified via elemental depth profiling. Autoclave testing under normal BWR operating conditions (288 °C, 9.5 MPa with normal water chemistry) up to 20 days demonstrates observable weight gain over uncoated Zy2 simultaneously exposed to the same environment. However, no FeCrAl film degradation was observed. The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe–Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system. - Graphical abstract: Weight gain normalized to total sample surface area versus time during 700 °C steam exposure for FeCrAl samples with different composition (A) and Fe/Cr/Al:62/4/34 (B). In both cases, the responses of uncoated Zry2 (Zry2-13A and Zry2-19A) are shown for comparison. This uncoated Zry2 response shows the expected pre-transition quasi-cubic kinetic behavior and eventual breakaway (linear) kinetics. Highlights: • FeCrAl coatings deposited on Zy2 have been tested with respect to oxidation in high-temperature steam. • FeCrAl compositions promoting alumina formation inhibited oxidation of Zy2 and delay weight gain. • Autoclave testing to 20 days of coated Zy2 in a simulated BWR environment demonstrates minimal weight gain and no film degradation. • The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe-Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system.

  18. Consequences of Urban Stability Conditions for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Urban Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, J K; Chan, S T

    2005-11-30

    The validity of omitting stability considerations when simulating transport and dispersion in the urban environment is explored using observations from the Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment and computational fluid dynamics simulations of that experiment. Four releases of sulfur hexafluoride, during two daytime and two nighttime intensive observing periods, are simulated using the building-resolving computational fluid dynamics model, FEM3MP to solve the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with two options of turbulence parameterizations. One option omits stability effects but has a superior turbulence parameterization using a non-linear eddy viscosity (NEV) approach, while the other considers buoyancy effects with a simple linear eddy viscosity (LEV) approach for turbulence parameterization. Model performance metrics are calculated by comparison with observed winds and tracer data in the downtown area, and with observed winds and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) profiles at a location immediately downwind of the central business district (CBD) in the area we label as the urban shadow. Model predictions of winds, concentrations, profiles of wind speed, wind direction, and friction velocity are generally consistent with and compare reasonably well with the field observations. Simulations using the NEV turbulence parameterization generally exhibit better agreement with observations. To further explore this assumption of a neutrally-stable atmosphere within the urban area, TKE budget profiles slightly downwind of the urban wake region in the 'urban shadow' are examined. Dissipation and shear production are the largest terms which may be calculated directly. The advection of TKE is calculated as a residual; as would be expected downwind of an urban area, the advection of TKE produced within the urban area is a very large term. Buoyancy effects may be neglected in favor of advection, shear production, and dissipation. For three of the IOPs, buoyancy

  19. Stability of magnetite nanoparticles with different coatings in a simulated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favela-Camacho, Sarai E.; Pérez-Robles, J. Francisco [Center for Research and Advanced Studies of National Polytechnic Institute, CINVESTAV-Querétaro Unit (Mexico); García-Casillas, Perla E. [Autonomous University of Juarez, Department of Materials Science, Institute of Engineering and Technology (Mexico); Godinez-Garcia, Andrés, E-mail: andgodinez@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Departamento de Ingeniería de Procesos e Hidráulica (Mexico)

    2016-07-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have demonstrated to be a potential platform for simultaneous anticancer drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, magnetite is unstable at the blood plasma conditions. Therefore, to study their stability in a broad range of particle size, the MNPs were synthesized using two methods, the fast injection co-precipitation method (FIC) and the reflux co-precipitation method (RC). The MNPs obtained by the RC and the FIC methods have an average size of agglomerates of 200 and 45 nm respectively. They were dispersed using sodium citrate as surfactant and were coated with silica and chitosan. A total of four kind of coated MNPs were synthesized: magnetite/sodium citrate, magnetite/silica, magnetite/sodium citrate/silica and magnetite/sodium citrate/silica/chitosan. Different samples of the coated MNPs were immersed in a simulated blood plasma solution (Phosphate-Buffered Saline, PBS, Gibco{sup ®}), for periods of 24, 48 and 72 h. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technique was used to analyze the composition of the simulated plasma after those periods of time. The obtained results suggest that the uncoated samples showed an appreciable weight loss, and the iron composition in the simulated plasma increased. This last means that the used coatings avoid iron dissolution from the MNPs.Graphical abstract.

  20. BWR alloy 182 stress Corrosion Cracking Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, R.M.; Hickling, J.

    2002-01-01

    Modern Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) have successfully operated for more than three decades. Over that time frame, different materials issues have continued to arise, leading to comprehensive efforts to understand the root cause while concurrently developing different mitigation strategies to address near-term, continued operation, as well as provide long-term paths to extended plant life. These activities have led to methods to inspect components to quantify the extent of degradation, appropriate methods of analysis to quantify structural margin, repair designs (or strategies to replace the component function) and improved materials for current and future application. The primary materials issue has been the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). While this phenomenon has been primarily associated with austenitic stainless steel, it has also been found in nickel-base weldments used to join piping and reactor internal components to the reactor pressure vessel consistent with fabrication practices throughout the nuclear industry. The objective of this paper is to focus on the history and learning gained regarding Alloy 182 weld metal. The paper will discuss the chronology of weld metal cracking in piping components as well as in reactor internal components. The BWR industry has pro-actively developed inspection processes and procedures that have been successfully used to interrogate different locations for the existence of cracking. The recognition of the potential for cracking has also led to extensive studies to understand cracking behavior. Among other things, work has been performed to characterize crack growth rates in both oxygenated and hydrogenated environments. The latter may also be relevant to PWR systems. These data, along with the understanding of stress corrosion cracking processes, have led to extensive implementation of appropriate mitigation measures. (authors)

  1. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    A recently completed Oak Ridge effort proposes two management strategies for mitigation of the events that might occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage in a BWR severe accident. While the probability of such an accident is low, there may be effective yet inexpensive mitigation measures that could be implemented employing the existing plant equipment and requiring only additions to the plant emergency procedures. In this spirit, accident management strategies have been proposed for use of a borated solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and for containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if injection systems cannot be restored. The proposed strategy for poisoning of the water used for vessel reflood should injection systems be restored after control blade damage has occurred has great promise, using only the existing plant equipment but employing a different chemical form for the boron poison. The dominant BWR severe accident sequence is Station Blackout and without means for mechanical stirring or heating of the storage tank, the question of being able to form the poisoned solution under accident conditions becomes of supreme importance. On the other hand, the proposed strategy for drywell flooding to cool the reactor vessel bottom head and prevent the core and structure debris from escaping to the drywell holds less promise. This strategy does, however, have potential for future plant designs in which passive methods might be employed to completely submerge the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions without the need for containment venting

  2. Seismic PRA of a BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masahide; Fujimoto, Haruo

    2014-01-01

    Since the occurrence of nuclear power plant accidents in the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power station, the regulatory framework on severe accident (SA) has been discussed in Japan. The basic concept is to typify and identify the accident sequences leading to core/primary containment vessel (PCV) damage and to implement SA measures covering internal and external events extensively. As Japan is an earthquake-prone country and earthquakes and tsunami are important natural external events for nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, JNES performed the seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) on a typical nuclear power plant and evaluated the dominant accident sequences leading to core/PCV damage to discuss dominant scenarios of severe accident (SA). The analytical models and the results of level-1 seismic PRA on a 1,100 MWe BWR-5 plant are shown here. Seismic PRA was performed for a typical BWR5 plant. Initiating events with large contribution to core damage frequency are the loss of all AC powers (station blackout) and the large LOCA. The top of dominant accident sequences is the simultaneous occurrence of station blackout and large LOCA. Important components to core damage frequency are electric power supply equipment. It needs to keep in mind that the results are influenced on site geologic characteristic to a greater or lesser. In the process of analysis, issues such as conservative assumptions related to damages of building or structure and success criteria for excessive LOCA are left to be resolved. These issues will be further studied including thermal hydric analysis in the future. (authors)

  3. BWR startup and shutdown activity transport control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.E., E-mail: sgarcia@epri.com [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, A.J., E-mail: jgiannelli@finetech.com, E-mail: ajarvis@finetech.com [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, New Jersey (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper summarizes BWR industry experience on good practices for controlling the transport of corrosion product activity during shutdowns, particularly refueling outages, and for startup chemistry control to minimize IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking). For shutdown, overall goals are to minimize adverse impacts of crud bursts and the time required to remove activated corrosion products from the reactor coolant during the shutdown process prior to refueling, and to assist plants in predicting and controlling radiation exposure during outages. For startup, the overall goals are to highlight conditions during early heatup and startup when sources of reactor coolant oxidants are high, when there is a greater likelihood for chemical excursions associated with refueling outage work activities, and when hydrogen injection is not available to mitigate IGSCC due to system design limitations. BWR water chemistry has changed significantly in recent years with the adoption of hydrogen water chemistry, zinc addition and noble metal chemical applications. These processes have, in some instances, resulted in significant activity increases during shutdown evolutions, which together with reduced time for cleanup because of shorter outages, has consequently increased outage radiation exposure. A review several recent outages shows that adverse effects from these conditions can be minimized, leading to the set of good practice recommendations for shutdown chemistry control. Most plants lose the majority of their hydrogen availability hours during early startup because feedwater hydrogen injection systems were not originally designed to inject hydrogen below 20% power. Hydrogen availability has improved through modifications to inject hydrogen at lower power levels, some near 5%. However, data indicate that IGSCC is accelerated during early startup, when dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide levels are high and reactor coolant temperatures are in the 300 to 400 {sup o

  4. BWR Radiation Assessment and Control Program: assessment and control of BWR radiation fields. Volume 1. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.

    1983-05-01

    This report covers work on the BWR Radiation Assessment and Control (BRAC) Program from 1978 to 1982. The major activities during this report period were assessment of the radiation-level trends in BWRs, evaluation of the effects of forward-pumped heater drains on BWR water quality, installation and operation of a corrosion-product deposition loop in an operating BWR, and analyzation of fuel-deposit samples from two BWRs. Radiation fields were found to be controlled by cobalt-60 and to vary from as low as 50 mr/hr to as high as 800 mr/hr on the recirculation-system piping. Detailed information on BWR corrosion films and system deposits is presented in the report. Additionally, the results of an oxygen-injection experiment and recontamination monitoring studies are provided

  5. One dimensional simulation on stability of detached plasma in a tokamak divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Shinji; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Okamoto, Masao; Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi

    1999-06-01

    The stability of radiation front in the Scrape-Off-Layer (SOL) of a tokamak is studied with a one dimensional fluid code; the time-dependent transport equations are solved in the direction parallel to a magnetic field line. The simulation results show that stable detached solutions exist, where the plasma temperature near the divertor target is ∼2 eV. It is found that whenever such stable detached states are attained, the strong radiation front is contact with or at a small distance from the divertor target. When the energy externally injected into the SOL is decreased below a critical value, the radiation front starts to move towards the X-point, cooling the SOL plasma. In such cases, no stationary solutions such that the radiation front rests in the divertor channel are observed in our parameter space. This qualitatively corresponds to the results of tokamak divertor experiments which show the movement of radiation front. (author)

  6. Study of MHD stability beta limit in LHD by hierarchy integrated simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Nakamura, Y.

    2008-10-01

    The beta limit by the ideal MHD instabilities (so-called 'MHD stability beta limit') for helical plasmas is studied by a hierarchy integrated simulation code. A numerical model for the effect of the MHD instabilities is introduced such that the pressure profile is flattened around the rational surface due to the MHD instabilities. The width of the flattening of the pressure gradient is determined from the width of the eigenmode structure of the MHD instabilities. It is assumed that there is the upper limit of the mode number of the MHD instabilities which directly affect the pressure gradient. The upper limit of the mode number is determined using a recent high beta experiment in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The flattening of the pressure gradient is calculated by the transport module in a hierarchy integrated code. The achievable volume averaged beta value in the LHD is expected to be beyond 6%. (author)

  7. Large Scale Simulation of Hydrogen Dispersion by a Stabilized Balancing Domain Decomposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-He Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion behaviour of leaking hydrogen in a partially open space is simulated by a balancing domain decomposition method in this work. An analogy of the Boussinesq approximation is employed to describe the connection between the flow field and the concentration field. The linear systems of Navier-Stokes equations and the convection diffusion equation are symmetrized by a pressure stabilized Lagrange-Galerkin method, and thus a balancing domain decomposition method is enabled to solve the interface problem of the domain decomposition system. Numerical results are validated by comparing with the experimental data and available numerical results. The dilution effect of ventilation is investigated, especially at the doors, where flow pattern is complicated and oscillations appear in the past research reported by other researchers. The transient behaviour of hydrogen and the process of accumulation in the partially open space are discussed, and more details are revealed by large scale computation.

  8. Two-dimensional simulations of steady perforated-plate stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Altay, H. Murat

    2010-03-17

    The objective of this work is to examine the impact of the operating conditions and the perforated-plate design on the steady, lean premixed flame characteristics. We perform two-dimensional simulations of laminar flames using a reduced chemical kinetics mechanism for methane-air combustion, consisting of 20 species and 79 reactions. We solve the heat conduction problem within the plate, allowing heat exchange between the gas mixture and the solid plate. The physical model is based on a zero-Mach-number formulation of the axisymmetric compressible conservation equations. The results suggest that the flame consumption speed, the flame structure, and the flame surface area depend significantly on the equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, the distance between the perforated-plate holes and the plate thermal conductivity. In the case of an adiabatic plate, a conical flame is formed, anchored near the corner of the hole. When the heat exchange between themixture and the plate is finite, the flame acquires a Gaussian shape stabilizing at a stand-off distance, that grows with the plate conductivity. The flame tip is negatively curved; i.e. concave with respect to the reactants. Downstream of the plate, the flame base is positively curved; i.e. convex with respect to the reactants, stabilizing above a stagnation region established between neighboring holes. As the plate\\'s thermal conductivity increases, the heat flux to the plate decreases, lowering its top surface temperature. As the equivalence ratio increases, the flame moves closer to the plate, raising its temperature, and lowering the flame stand-off distance. As the mean inlet velocity increases, the flame stabilizes further downstream, the flame tip becomes sharper, hence raising the burning rate at that location. The curvature of the flame base depends on the distance between the neighboring holes; and the flame there is characterized by high concentration of intermediates, like carbon monoxide. © 2010 Taylor

  9. Simulation of neoclassical tearing mode stabilization via minimum seeking method on ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M. H.; Kim, K.; Na, D. H.; Byun, C. S.; Na, Y. S. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M. [FNC Technology Co. Ltd, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are well known resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. These instabilities are sustained by a helically perturbed bootstrap current. NTMs produce magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas that can degrade confinement and lead to plasma disruption. Because of this, the stabilization of NTMs is one of the key issues for tokamaks that achieve high fusion performance such as ITER. Compensating for the lack of bootstrap current by an Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) has been proved experimentally as an effective method to stabilize NTMs. In order to stabilize NTMs, it is important to reduce misalignment. So that even ECCD can destabilize the NTMs when misalignment is large. Feedback control method that does not fully require delicate and accurate real-time measurements and calculations, such as equilibrium reconstruction and EC ray-tracing, has also been proposed. One of the feedback control methods is minimum seeking method. This control method minimizes the island width by tuning the misalignment, assuming that the magnetic island width is a function of the misalignment. As a robust and simple method of controlling NTM, minimum 'island width growth rate' seeking control is purposed and compared with performance of minimum ' island width' seeking control. At the integrated numerical system, simulations of the NTM suppression are performed with two types of minimum seeking controllers; one is a FDM based minimum seeking controller and the other is a sinusoidal perturbation based minimum seeking method. The full suppression is achieved both types of controller. The controllers adjust poloidal angle of EC beam and reduce misalignment to zero. The sinusoidal perturbation based minimum seeking control need to modify the adaptive gain.

  10. Development of a detailed BWR core thermal-hydraulic analysis method based on the Japanese post-BT standard using a best-estimate code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, H.; Mototani, A.; Kawamura, S.; Abe, N.; Takeuchi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The post-BT standard is a new fuel integrity standard or the Atomic Energy Society of Japan that allows temporary boiling transition condition in the evaluation for BWR anticipated operational occurrences. For application of the post-BT standard to BWR anticipated operational occurrences evaluation, it is important to identify which fuel assemblies and which axial, radial positions of fuel rods have temporarily experienced the post-BT condition and to evaluates how high the fuel cladding temperature rise was and how long the dryout duration continued. Therefore, whole bundle simulation, in which each fuel assembly is simulated independently by one thermal-hydraulic component, is considered to be an effective analytical method. In the present study, a best-estimate thermal-hydraulic code, TRACG02, has been modified to extend it predictive capability by implementing the post-BT evaluation model such as the post-BT heat transfer correlation and rewetting correlation and enlarging the number of components used for BWR plant simulation. Based on new evaluation methods, BWR core thermal-hydraulic behavior has been analyzed for typical anticipated operational occurrence conditions. The location where boiling transition occurs and the severity of fuel assembly in the case of boiling transition conditions such as fuel cladding temperature, which are important factors in determining whether the reuse of the fuel assembly can be permitted, were well predicted by the proposed evaluation method. In summary, a new evaluation method for a detailed BWR core thermal-hydraulic analysis based on the post-BT standard of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan has been developed and applied to the evaluation of the post-BT standard during the actual BWR plant anticipated operational occurrences. (author)

  11. Preliminary numerical simulation for shallow strata stability of coral reef in South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qinqin; Zhan, Wenhuan; Zhang, Jinchang

    2017-04-01

    Coral reefs are the geologic material and special rock and soil, which live in shallow water of the tropic ocean and are formed through biological and geological action. Since infrastructure construction is being increasingly developed on coral reefs during recent years, it is necessary to evaluate the shallow strata stability of coral reefs in the South China Sea. The paper is to study the borehole profiles for shallow strata of coral reefs in the South China Sea, especially in the hydrodynamic marine environment?, and to establish a geological model for numerical simulation with Geo-Studio software. Five drilling holes show a six-layer shallow structure of South China Sea, including filling layer, mid-coarse sand, coral sand gravel, fine sand, limestone debris and reef limestone. The shallow coral reef profile next to lagoon is similar to "layers cake", in which the right side close to the sea is analogous to "block cake". The simulation results show that coral reef stability depends on wave loads and earthquake strength, as well as the physical properties of coral reefs themselves. The safety factor of the outer reef is greater than 10.0 in the static condition, indicating that outer reefs are less affected by the wave and earthquake. However, the safety factor next to lagoon is ranging from 0.1 to 4.9. The main reason for the variations that the strata of coral reefs close to the sea are thick. For example, the thickness of reef limestone is more than 10 m and equivalent to the block. When the thickness of inside strata is less than 10 m, they show weak engineering geological characteristics. These findings can provide useful information for coral reef constructions in future. This work was funded by National Basic Research Program of China (contract: 2013CB956104) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (contract: 41376063).

  12. Simulation and stability analysis of supersonic impinging jet noise with microjet control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Nathaniel; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2014-11-01

    A model for an ideally expanded 1.5 Mach turbulent jet impinging on a flat plate using unstructured high-fidelity large eddy simulations (LES) and hydrodynamic stability analysis is presented. Note the LES configuration conforms exactly to experiments performed at the STOVL supersonic jet facility of the Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion allowing validation against experimental measurements. The LES are repeated for different nozzle-wall separation distances as well as with and without the addition of sixteen microjets positioned uniformly around the nozzle lip. For some nozzle-wall distances, but not all, the microjets result in substantial noise reduction. Observations of substantial noise reduction are associated with a relative absence of large-scale coherent vortices in the jet shear layer. To better understand and predict the effectiveness of microjet noise control, the application of global stability analysis about LES mean fields is used to extract axisymmetric and helical instability modes connected to the complex interplay between the coherent vortices, shocks, and acoustic feedback. We gratefully acknowledge computational resources provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  13. Simulated stability tests of a small articulated tractor designed for extreme-sloped vineyards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mazzetto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A new reversible wheeled articulated tractor, designed to work in terraced vineyards trained with “pergola” system, common in mountain areas, is here described in its latest version and analysed through numerical simulations. This tractor has small dimensions, necessary to operate in that environment, and its central articulation has two rotational degrees-offreedom. The described features are surely strong design points but could be critical for vehicle’s stability, as affecting the supporting base’s dimensions and shape. Therefore, the tractor was equipped with a new automatic safety system: a self-locking articulation activated by contact sensors on the wheels. This device makes the vehicle partially-rigid in case of lateral unbalancing, so that rollover can happen only by overcoming the whole vehicle mass. A mathematical description of vehicle-ground interactions was implemented to deeply inquiry the tractor behaviour in different configurations (straight, angled at increasing values of ground slope; roll and pitch stability indexes were then computed and used for comparisons with conventional tractors. Thanks to the low centre-of-gravity, the resulting rollover angle with the vehicle in straight configuration is promising (43.8°→96%: it is greater than the maximum lateral (20°→36% and frontal (38°→78% slope angle ever recorded on terraced vineyards. The same rollover angle is lower when the tractor turns.

  14. BWR/5 Pressure-Suppression Pool Response during an SBO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ortiz-Villafuerte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP/SCDAPSIM Mod 3.4 has been used to simulate a station blackout occurring at a BWR/5 power station. Further, a simplified model of a wet well and dry well has been added to the NSSS model to study the response of the primary containment during the evolution of this accident. The initial event leading to severe accident was considered to be a LOOP with simultaneous scram. The results show that RCIC alone can keep the core fully covered, but even in this case about 30% of the original liquid water inventory in the PSP is vaporized. During the SBO, without RCIC, this inventory is reduced about 5% more within six hours. Further, a significant pressure rise occurs in containment at about the time when a sharp increase of heat generation occurs in RPV due to cladding oxidation. Failure temperature of fuel clad is also reached at this point. As the accident progresses, conditions for containment venting can be reached in about nine hours, although there still exists considerable margin before reaching containment design pressure. Detailed information of accident progress in reactor vessel and containment is presented and discussed.

  15. Development of power change maneuvering method for BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzaki, Takaharu; Yamada, Naoyuki; Kiguchi, Takashi; Sakurai, Mikio.

    1985-01-01

    A power change maneuvering method for BWR has been proposed to generate an optimal power control maneuver, which realizes the power change operation closest to a power change demand pattern under operating constraints. The method searches for the maneuver as an optimization problem, where the variables are thermal power levels sampled from the demand pattern, the performance index is defined to express the power mismatch between demand and feasible patterns, and the constraints are limit lines on the thermal power-core flow rate map and limits on keeping fuel integrity. The usable feasible direction method is utilized as the optimization algorithm, with newly developed techniques for initial value generation and step length determination, which apply one-dimensional search and inverse-interpolation methods, respectively, to realize the effective search of the optimal solution. Simulation results show that a typical computing time is about 5 min by a general purpose computer and the method has been verified to be practical even for on-line use. (author)

  16. Interpretation of the results of the CORA-33 dry core BWR test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.; Hagen, S.

    1993-01-01

    All BWR degraded core experiments performed prior to CORA-33 were conducted under ''wet'' core degradation conditions for which water remains within the core and continuous steaming feeds metal/steam oxidation reactions on the in-core metallic surfaces. However, one dominant set of accident scenarios would occur with reduced metal oxidation under ''dry'' core degradation conditions and, prior to CORA-33, this set had been neglected experimentally. The CORA-33 experiment was designed specifically to address this dominant set of BWR ''dry'' core severe accident scenarios and to partially resolve phenomenological uncertainties concerning the behavior of relocating metallic melts draining into the lower regions of a ''dry'' BWR core. CORA-33 was conducted on October 1, 1992, in the CORA tests facility at KfK. Review of the CORA-33 data indicates that the test objectives were achieved; that is, core degradation occurred at a core heatup rate and a test section axial temperature profile that are prototypic of full-core nuclear power plant (NPP) simulations at ''dry'' core conditions. Simulations of the CORA-33 test at ORNL have required modification of existing control blade/canister materials interaction models to include the eutectic melting of the stainless steel/Zircaloy interaction products and the heat of mixing of stainless steel and Zircaloy. The timing and location of canister failure and melt intrusion into the fuel assembly appear to be adequately simulated by the ORNL models. This paper will present the results of the posttest analyses carried out at ORNL based upon the experimental data and the posttest examination of the test bundle at KfK. The implications of these results with respect to degraded core modeling and the associated safety issues are also discussed

  17. Behaviour of the reactivity for BWR fuel cells; Comportamiento de la reactividad para celdas de combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Delfin, A.; Vargas, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: galonso@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the behaviour of the reactivity of a fuel assembly type BWR was studied, the objective is to obtain some expressions that consider the average enrichment of U-235 and the gadolinium concentration like a function of the fuel cells burnt. Also, the applicability of the lineal reactivity model was analyzed for fuel cells type BWR. The analysis was carried out with the CASMO-4 code. (Author)

  18. A Non-Linear Digital Computer Model Requiring Short Computation Time for Studies Concerning the Hydrodynamics of the BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisch, F; Vayssier, G

    1969-05-15

    This non-linear model serves as one of the blocks in a series of codes to study the transient behaviour of BWR or PWR type reactors. This program is intended to be the hydrodynamic part of the BWR core representation or the hydrodynamic part of the PWR heat exchanger secondary side representation. The equations have been prepared for the CSMP digital simulation language. By using the most suitable integration routine available, the ratio of simulation time to real time is about one on an IBM 360/75 digital computer. Use of the slightly different language DSL/40 on an IBM 7044 computer takes about four times longer. The code has been tested against the Eindhoven loop with satisfactory agreement.

  19. Effect of zinc injection on BWR fuel cladding corrosion. Pt. 1. Study on an accelerated corrosion condition to evaluate corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Kanbe, Hiromu; Furuya, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Japanese BWR utilities have a plan to apply zinc injection to the primary coolant in order to reduce radioactivity accumulation on the structure. Prior to applying the zinc injection to BWR plants, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of zinc injection on corrosion resistance of fuel cladding. The objective of this report was to examine the accelerated corrosion condition for evaluation of BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance under non-irradiated conditions, as the first step of a zinc injection evaluation study. A heat transfer corrosion test facility, in which a two phase flow condition could be achieved, was designed and constructed. The effects of heat flux, void fraction and solution temperature on BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance were quantitatively investigated. The main findings were as follows. (1) In situ measurements using high speed camera and a void sensor together with one dimensional two phase flow analysis results showed that a two phase flow simulated BWR core condition can be obtained in the corrosion test facility. (2) The heat transfer corrosion test results showed that the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer increased with increasing solution temperature and was independent of heat flux and void fraction. The corrosion accelerating factor was about 2.5 times in the case of a temperature increase from 288degC to 350degC. (author)

  20. Description of the power plant model BWR-plasim outlined for the Barsebaeck 2 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, P. la Cour.

    1979-08-01

    A description is given of a BWR power plant model outlined for the Barsebaeck 2 plant with data placed at our disposal by the Swedish Power Company Sydkraft A/B. The basic operations are derived and simplifications discussed. The model is implemented with a simulation system DYSYS which assures reliable solutions and easy programming. Emphasis has been placed on the models versatility and flexibility so new features are easy to incorporate. The model may be used for transient calculations for both normal plant conditions and for abnormal occurences as well as for control system studies. (author)

  1. Modeling boundary-layer transition in direct and large-eddy simulations using parabolized stability equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Durán, A.; Hack, M. J. P.; Moin, P.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the potential of the nonlinear parabolized stability equations (PSE) to provide an accurate yet computationally efficient treatment of the growth of disturbances in H-type transition to turbulence. The PSE capture the nonlinear interactions that eventually induce breakdown to turbulence and can as such identify the onset of transition without relying on empirical correlations. Since the local PSE solution at the onset of transition is a close approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations, it provides a natural inflow condition for direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES) by avoiding nonphysical transients. We show that a combined PSE-DNS approach, where the pretransitional region is modeled by the PSE, can reproduce the skin-friction distribution and downstream turbulent statistics from a DNS of the full domain. When the PSE are used in conjunction with wall-resolved and wall-modeled LES, the computational cost in both the laminar and turbulent regions is reduced by several orders of magnitude compared to DNS.

  2. Effect of gold nanoparticle on stability of the DNA molecule: A study of molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izanloo, Cobra

    2017-09-02

    An understanding of the mechanism of DNA interactions with gold nanoparticles is useful in today medicine applications. We have performed a molecular dynamics simulation on a B-DNA duplex (CCTCAGGCCTCC) in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle with a truncated octahedron structure composed of 201 gold atoms (diameter ∼1.8 nm) to investigate gold nanoparticle (GNP) effects on the stability of DNA. During simulation, the nanoparticle is closed to DNA and phosphate groups direct the particles into the major grooves of the DNA molecule. Because of peeling and untwisting states that are occur at end of DNA, the nucleotide base lies flat on the surface of GNP. The configuration entropy is estimated using the covariance matrix of atom-positional fluctuations for different bases. The results show that when a gold nanoparticle has interaction with DNA, entropy increases. The results of conformational energy and the hydrogen bond numbers for DNA indicated that DNA becomes unstable in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle. The radial distribution function was calculated for water hydrogen-phosphate oxygen pairs. Almost for all nucleotide, the presence of a nanoparticle around DNA caused water molecules to be released from the DNA duplex and cations were close to the DNA.

  3. An algorithm for emulsion stability simulations: account of flocculation, coalescence, surfactant adsorption and the process of Ostwald ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Villalba, German

    2009-03-01

    The first algorithm for Emulsion Stability Simulations (ESS) was presented at the V Conferencia Iberoamericana sobre Equilibrio de Fases y Diseño de Procesos [Luis, J.; García-Sucre, M.; Urbina-Villalba, G. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Emulsion Stability In: Equifase 99. Libro de Actas, 1(st) Ed., Tojo J., Arce, A., Eds.; Solucion's: Vigo, Spain, 1999; Volume 2, pp. 364-369]. The former version of the program consisted on a minor modification of the Brownian Dynamics algorithm to account for the coalescence of drops. The present version of the program contains elaborate routines for time-dependent surfactant adsorption, average diffusion constants, and Ostwald ripening.

  4. Benchmarking and qualification of the NUFREQ-NPW code for best estimate prediction of multi-channel core stability margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; McFarlane, A.F.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The NUFREQ-NPW code was modified and set up at Westinghouse, USA for mixed fuel type multi-channel core-wide stability analysis. The resulting code, NUFREQ-NPW, allows for variable axial power profiles between channel groups and can handle mixed fuel types. Various models incorporated into NUFREQ-NPW were systematically compared against the Westinghouse channel stability analysis code MAZDA-NF, for which the mathematical model was developed, in an entirely different manner. Excellent agreement was obtained which verified the thermal-hydraulic modeling and coding aspects. Detailed comparisons were also performed against nuclear-coupled reactor core stability data. All thirteen Peach Bottom-2 EOC-2/3 low flow stability tests were simulated. A key aspect for code qualification involved the development of a physically based empirical algorithm to correct for the effect of core inlet flow development on subcooled boiling. Various other modeling assumptions were tested and sensitivity studies performed. Good agreement was obtained between NUFREQ-NPW predictions and data. Moreover, predictions were generally on the conservative side. The results of detailed direct comparisons with experimental data using the NUFREQ-NPW code; have demonstrated that BWR core stability margins are conservatively predicted, and all data trends are captured with good accuracy. The methodology is thus suitable for BWR design and licensing purposes. 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Development of a methodology of analysis of instabilities in BWR reactors; Desarrollo de una metodologia de analisis de inestabilidades en reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Fenoll, M.; Abarca, A.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology of analysis of the reactors instabilities of BWR type. This methodology covers of modal analysis of the point operation techniques of signal analysis and simulation of transients, through 3D Coupled RELAP5/PARCSv2.7 code.

  6. Convective transport in ATM simulations and its relation to the atmospheric stability conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2017-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 80 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, supported by the atmospheric transport modeling (ATM). One of the important noble gases, monitored on a daily basis, is radioxenon. It can be produced either during a nuclear explosion with a high fission yield, and thus be considered as an important tracer to prove the nuclear character of an explosion, or be emitted from nuclear power plants (NPPs) or from isotope production facilities (IPFs). To investigate the transport of xenon emissions, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) operates an Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) system based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. To address the question whether including the convective transport in ATM simulations will change the results significantly, the differences between the outputs with the convective transport turned off and turned on, were computed and further investigated taking into account the atmospheric stability conditions. For that purpose series of 14 days forward simulations, with convective transport and without it, released daily in the period January 2011 to February 2012, were analysed. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The unique opportunity of having access to both daily emission values for ANSTO as well as measured Xe-133 activity concentration (AC) values at the IMS stations, gave a chance to validate the simulations.

  7. Advanced Construction of Compact Containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Maruyama, T.; Mori, H.; Hoshino, K.; Hijioka, Y.; Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Hoshi, T.

    2006-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a mid/small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. Compact Containment BWR (CCR) is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified safety system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in case of design base accidents including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. CCR's specific self-standing steel high pressure resistible PCV is designed to contain minimum piping and valves inside with reactor pressure vessel (RPV), only 13 m in diameter and 24 m in height. This compact PCV makes it possible to

  8. Development status of compact containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Mori, H.; Sekiguchi, K.; Kuroki, M.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2005-01-01

    In Japan, increase of nuclear plant unit capacity has been promoted to take advantage of economies of scale while further enhancing safety and reliability. As a result, more than 50 units of nuclear power plants are playing important role in electric power generation. However, the factors, such as stagnant growth in the recent electricity demand, limitation in electricity grid capacity and limited in initial investment avoiding risk, will not be in favor of large plant outputs. The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response

  9. Experience using individually supplied heater rods in critical power testing of advanced BWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majed, M.; Morback, G.; Wiman, P. [ABB Atom AB, Vasteras (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The ABB Atom FRIGG loop located in Vasteras Sweden has during the last six years given a large experience of critical power measurements for BWR fuel designs using indirectly heated rods with individual power supply. The loop was built in the sixties and designed for maximum 100 bar pressure. Testing up to the mid eighties was performed with directly heated rods using a 9 MW, 80 kA power supply. Providing test data to develop critical power correlations for BWR fuel assemblies requires testing with many radial power distributions over the full range of hydraulic conditions. Indirectly heated rods give large advantages for the testing procedure, particularly convenient for variation of individual rod power. A test method being used at Stern Laboratories (formerly Westinghouse Canada) since the early sixties, allows one fuel assembly to simulate all required radial power distributions. This technique requires reliable indirectly heated rods with independently controlled power supplies and uses insulated electric fuel rod simulators with built-in instrumentation. The FRIGG loop was adapted to this system in 1987. A 4MW power supply with 10 individual units was then installed, and has since been used for testing 24 and 25 rod bundles simulating one subbundle of SVEA-96/100 type fuel assemblies. The experience with the system is very good, as being presented, and it is selected also for a planned upgrading of the facility to 15 MW.

  10. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels; Dano por radiacion en materiales estructurales de vasijas de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A{sup 2}). (Author)

  11. Optimization of fuel reloads for a BWR using the ant colony system; Optimizacion de recargas de combustible para un BWR usando el sistema de colonia de hormigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel E, J. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Ingenieria, Cerro de Coatepec s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 50110 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ortiz S, J. J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: jaime.es.jaime@gmail.com

    2009-10-15

    In this work some results obtained during the development of optimization systems are presented, which are employees for the fuel reload design in a BWR. The systems use the ant colony optimization technique. As first instance, a system is developed that was adapted at travel salesman problem applied for the 32 state capitals of Mexican Republic. The purpose of this implementation is that a similarity exists with the design of fuel reload, since the two problems are of combinatorial optimization with decision variables that have similarity between both. The system was coupled to simulator SIMULATE-3, obtaining good results when being applied to an operation cycle in equilibrium for reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  12. Study of transient rod extraction failure without RBM in a BWR; Estudio del transitorio error de extraccion de barra sin RBM en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: amhed_jvq@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The study and analysis of the operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-term events and the impact that would cause this transient. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could cause an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis results of the transient rod extraction failure in which not taken into operation the RBM is presented. The study was conducted for a BWR of 2027 MWt, in an intermediate cycle of its useful life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a scenario of anomalies was created in the core reactivity which gave a coherent prediction to the type of presented event. (Author)

  13. Study of transient turbine shot without bypass in a BWR; Estudio del transitorio disparo de turbina sin bypass en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: amhed_jvq@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The study and analysis of operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-terms events and the impact that would cause this transition. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could result in an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis of results of a turbine shot transient, which is not taken into operation the bypass is presented. The study is realized for a BWR of 2027 MWt, to an intermediate cycle life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a depressurization stage of the vessel is created which shows the response of other security systems and gives a coherent prediction to the event presented type. (Author)

  14. Optimization of analysis best-estimate of a fuel element BWR with Code STAR-CCM+; Optimizacion del analisis best-estimate de un elemento combustible BWR con el codigo STAR-CCM+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado Canada, E.; Concejal Barmejo, A.; Jimenez Varas, G.; Solar Martinez, A.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the project is the evaluation of the code STAR-CCM +, as well as the establishment of guidelines and standardized procedures for the discretization of the area of study and the selection of physical models suitable for the simulation of BWR fuel. For this purpose several of BFBT experiments have simulated [1] provide a data base for the development of experiments for measuring distribution of fractions of holes to changes in power in order to find the most appropriate models for the simulation of the problem. (Author)

  15. Water level measurement uncertainty during BWR instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, R.C.; Derbidge, T.C.; Healzer, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the performance of the water-level measurement system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) during severe instability oscillations which, under some circumstances, can occur during an anticipated transient without SCRAM (ATWS). Test data from a prototypical mock-up of the water-level measurement system was used to refine and calibrate a water-level measurement system model. The model was then used to predict level measurement system response, using as boundary conditions vessel pressures calculated by ppercase RETRAN for an ATWS/instability event.The results of the study indicate that rapid pressure changes in the reactor pressure vessel which cause oscillations in downcomer water level, coupled with differences in instrument line lengths, can produce errors in the sensed water level. Using nominal parameters for the measurement system components, a severe instability transient which produced a 0.2 m peak-to-minimum water-level oscillation in the vessel downcomer was predicted to produce pressure difference equivalent to a 0.7 m level oscillation at the input to the differential pressure transmitter, 0.5 m oscillation at the output of the transmitter, and an oscillation of 0.3 m on the water-level indicator in the control room. The level measurement system error, caused by downcomer water-level oscillations and instrument line length differential, is mitigated by damping both in the differential pressure transmitter used to infer level and in the control room display instrument. ((orig.))

  16. BWR fuel clad behaviour following LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Vyas, K.N.; Dinesh Babu, R.

    1996-01-01

    Flow and pressure through the fuel coolant channel reduce rapidly following a loss of coolant accident. Due to stored energy and decay heat, fuel and cladding temperatures rise rapidly. Increase in clad temperature causes deterioration of mechanical properties of clad material. This coupled with increase of pressure inside the cladding due to accumulation of fission gases and de-pressurization of coolant causes the cladding to balloon. This phenomenon is important as it can reduce or completely block the flow passages in a fuel assembly causing reduction of emergency coolant flow. Behaviour of a BWR clad is analyzed in a design basis LOCA. Fuel and clad temperatures following a LOCA are calculated. Fission gas release and pressure is estimated using well established models. An elasto-plastic analysis of clad tube is carried out to determine plastic strains and corresponding deformations using finite-element technique. Analysis of neighbouring pins gives an estimate of flow areas available for emergency coolant flow. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Method of operating BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reactor control depending on any demanded loads by performing control by the insertion of control rods in addition to the control by the regulation of the flow rate of the reactor core water at high power operation of a BWR type reactor. Method: The power is reduced at high power operation by decreasing the flow rate of reactor core water from the starting time for the power reduction and the flow rate is maintained after the time at which it reaches the minimum allowable flow rate. Then, the control rod is started to insert from the above time point to reduce the power to an aimed level. Thus, the insufficiency in the reactivity due to the increase in the xenon concentration can be compensated by the withdrawal of the control rods and the excess reactivity due to the decrease in the xenon concentration can be compensated by the insertion of the control rods, whereby the reactor power can be controlled depending on any demanded loads without deviating from the upper or lower limit for the flow rate of the reactor core water. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Method of operating BWR type power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the operation efficiency of BWR type reactors by reducing the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start-up of the turbine and electrical generator, as well as decrease the pressure difference in each of the sections of the pressure vessel to thereby extend its life span. Method: The operation comprises switching the nuclear reactor from the shutdown mode to the start-up mode, increasing the reactor power to a predetermined level lower than a rated power while maintaining the reactor pressure to a predetermined level lower than a rated pressure, starting up a turbine and an electrical generator in the state of the predetermined reactor pressure and the reactor power to connect the electrical generator to the power transmission system and, thereafter, increasing the reactor pressure and the reactor power to the predetermined rated pressure and rated power respectively. This can shorten the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start of the power transmission system, whereby the operation efficiency of the power plant can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. Experience on a BWR plant diagnosis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, A.; Kawai, K.; Hashimoto, Y.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to watch plant dynamics and equipment condition for avoiding a big transient or avoiding damage to a system by equipment failure. After the TMI accident the necessity of a diagnosis system has been recognized and such development activities have become of primary importance in many organizations. A diagnosis system has two kinds of function. One is the early detection of an anomaly before detection by a conventional instrumentation system. The other is appropriate instruction after alarm or scram has occurred. The authors have been developing the former system by a noise analysis technique and a feasibility study has been undertaken in recent years as a joint research programme of several electric power companies and the Toshiba Corporation. A prototype diagnosis system has been installed on a BWR plant in Japan. This diagnosis system concerns reactor core, jet pumps and three main control systems. Many data from normal operation have been accumulated using this system and a variation pattern of normal noise data is clarified. On this basis, anomally detection criteria have been determined using statistical decision theory. It is confirmed that this system performance is satisfactory, and that the system will be of great use for surveillance of core and control systems without artificial disturbances. (author)

  20. Power control system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yasuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To control the reactor power so that the power distribution can satisfy the limiting conditions, by regulating the reactor core flow rate while monitoring the power distribution in the reactor core of a BWR type reactor. Constitution: A power distribution monitor determines the power distribution for the entire reactor core based on the data for neutron flux, reactor core thermal power, reactor core flow rate and control rod pattern from the reactor and calculates the linear power density distribution. A power up ratio computing device computes the current linear power density increase ratio. An aimed power up ratio is determined by converting the electrical power up ratio transferred from a load demand input device into the reactor core thermal power up ratio. The present reactor core thermal power up ratio is subtracted from the limiting power up ratio and the difference is sent to an operation amount indicator and the reactor core flow rate is changed in a reactor core flow rate regulator, by which the reactor power is controlled. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Fuel assemblies for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Takao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable effective failed fuel detection by the provision of water rod formed with a connecting section connected to a warmed water feed pipe of a sipping device at the lower portion and with a warmed water jetting port in the lower portion in a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor to thereby carry out rapid sipping. Constitution: Fuel rods and water rods are contained in the channel box of a fuel assembly, and the water rod is provided at its upper portion with a connecting section connected to the warmed water feed pipe of the sipping device and formed at its lower portion with a warmed water jetting port for jetting warmed water fed from the warmed water feed pipe. Upon detection of failed fuels, the reactor operation is shut down and the reactor core is immersed in water. The cover for the reactor container is removed and the cap of the sipping device is inserted to connect the warmed water feed pipe to the connecting section of the water rod. Then, warmed water is fed to the water rod and jetted out from the warmed water jetting port to cause convection and unify the water of the channel box in a short time. Thereafter, specimen is sampled and analyzed for the detection of failed fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Primary coolant system of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Masanori; Aoki, Yasuko

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a water quality control system for preventing corrosion and for extending working life of structural materials of a BWR-type reactor. Namely, a sensor group 1 and a sensor group 2 are disposed at different positions such as in a feedwater system, a recycling system, main steam pipes, and a pressure vessel, respectively. Each sensor group can record and generate alarms independently. The sensor group 1 for usual monitoring is connected to a calculation device by way of a switch to confirm that the monitored values are within a proper range by the injection of a water quality moderating agent. The sensor group 2 is caused to stand alone or connected with the calculation device by way of a switch optionally. When abnormality should occur in the sensor group 1, the sensor group 2 determines the limit for the increase/decrease of controlling amount of the moderating agent at a portion where the conditions are changed to the most severe direction by using data base. The moderating agent is injected and controlled based on the controlling amount. The system of the present invention can optionally cope with a new sensor and determination for new water quality standards. Then the evaluation/control accuracy of the entire system can be improved while covering up the errors of each sensor. (I.S.)

  3. Feedwater control system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, Jun-ichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the water level control performance in BWR type reactor by regulating the water level set to the reactor depending on the rate of change in the recycling amount of coolant to thereby control the fluctuations in the water level resulted in the reactor within an aimed range even upon significant fluctuations in the recycling flow rate. Constitution: The recycling flow rate of coolant in the reactor is detected and the rate of its change with time is computed to form a rate of change signal. The rate of change signal is inputted to a reactor level setter to amend the actual reactor water level demand signal and regulate the water level set to the reactor water depending on the rate of change in the recycling flow rate. Such a regulation method for the set water level enables to control the water level fluctuation resulted in the reactor within the aimed range even upon the significant fluctuation in the recycling flow rate and improve the water level control performance of the reactor, whereby the operationability for the reactor is improved to enhance the operation rate. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Power generator in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to perform stable and dynamic conditioning operation for nuclear fuels in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The conditioning operation for the nuclear fuels is performed by varying the reactor core thermal power in a predetermined pattern by changing the predetermined power changing pattern of generator power, the rising rate of the reactor core thermal power and the upper limit for the rising power of the reactor core thermal power are calculated and the power pattern for the generator is corrected by a power conditioning device such that the upper limit for the thermal power rising rate and the upper limit for the thermal power rising rate are at the predetermined levels. Thus, when the relation between the reactor core thermal power and the generator electrical power is fluctuated, the fluctuation is detected based on the variation in the thermal power rising rate and the limit value for the thermal power rising rate, and the correction is made to the generator power changing pattern so that these values take the predetermined values to thereby perform the stable conditioning operation for the nuclear fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Siemens experience on linear and nonlinear analyses of out-of-phase BWR instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuter, D.; Wehle, F.

    1995-01-01

    The Siemens design code STAIF has been applied extensively for linear analysis of BWR instabilities. The comparison between measurements and STAIF calculations for different plants under various conditions has shown good agreement for core-wide and regional instabilities. Based on the high quality of STAIF, the North German TUeV has decided to replace the licensing requirement of extensive stability measurements by predictive analyses with the code STAIF. Nonlinear stability analysis for beyond design boundary conditions with RAMONA has shown dryout during temporarily reversed flow at core inlet in case of core-wide oscillations. For large out-of-phase oscillations, dryout occurs already for small, still positive channel inlet flow. (orig.)

  6. State of the art of second international exercise on benchmarks in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdu, G.; Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Palomo, M. J.; Escriva, A.; Ginestar, D.

    1998-01-01

    This is a second in series of Benchmarks based on data from operating Swedish BWRs. The first one concerned measurements made in cycles 14,15 16 and 17 at Ringhals 1 Nuclear Power Plant and addressed predictive power of analytical tools used in BWR stability analysis. Part of the data was disclosed only after participants had provided their results. This work has been published in the report: NEA/NSC/DOC(96)22, November 1996. In this report it was recognised that there is a need for better qualification of the applied noise analysis methods. A follow up Benchmark was thus proposed dedicated to the analysis of time series data and including the evaluation of both global and regional stability of Forsmarks 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Plant. In this second Benchmark have participated Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB,NEA Nuclear Science Committee, CSN Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear and Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering of Polytechnic University of Valencia. (Author)

  7. Grid frequency control capability of a modern BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemst, Paul van

    If a large generating units is tripped or if an intertie with a large amount of imported power is disconnected, the other units in the grid are firstly required to withstand the disturbance. The rapid restoration of the balance between energy production and consumption constitutes the second requirement. Tests performed on the Scandinavian grid have shown that the frequency minimum is reached about five seconds after a load rejection. The amplitude of the frequency drop depends on the load rejected and the grid power: 800 MWe in a 22,000 MWe grid yields 0.5 Hz drop. The grid frequency then returns to a value just under nominal in another 10 to 15 seconds. These figures agree well with calculations made by the Swedish State Power Board. The tests have also shown that the turbine generator should not be automatically and immediately disconnected after a reactor scram. This is in close agreement with and confirms traditional ASEA ATOM design policy and is in effect in all ASEA ATOM designed plants. The stored energy and residual power in the turbine and reactor cause the energy production to decrease with a time constant of 5 to 10 seconds. This, in turn, means that the minimum grid frequency is reached after more than 10 seconds and thus doubles the time available for other generating units to incease their power in order to compensate for the production loss and restore grid frequency. To minimize the frequency deviation and to improve network stability, a rapid increase in power production from those units that participate in grid frequency control may be necessary. The BWR has proved to be excellent for this purpose. A rapid increase of the electric power can be obtained by simultaneously decreasing the pressure, using some of energy stored in the reactor, and rapidly increasing recirculation flow

  8. Burnup credit feasibility for BWR spent fuel shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent of fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Analyses 1 have shown the feasibility estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This paper summarizes the extension of the previous PWR feasibility assessments to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. As with the PWR analysis, the purpose was not verification of burnup credit (see ref. 2 for ongoing work in this area) but a reasonable assessment of the feasibility and potential gains from its use in BWR applications. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. The method includes characterization of a typical pin-cell spectrum, using a one-dimensional (1-D) model of a BWR assembly. The calculated spectrum allows burnup-dependent few-group material constants to be generated. Point depletion methods were then used to obtain the time-varying characteristics of the fuel. These simple methods were validated, where practical, with multidimensional methods. 6 refs., 1 tab

  9. Modeling and simulation of adaptive Neuro-fuzzy based intelligent system for predictive stabilization in structured overlay networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanpreet Kaur

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent prediction of neighboring node (k well defined neighbors as specified by the dht protocol dynamism is helpful to improve the resilience and can reduce the overhead associated with topology maintenance of structured overlay networks. The dynamic behavior of overlay nodes depends on many factors such as underlying user’s online behavior, geographical position, time of the day, day of the week etc. as reported in many applications. We can exploit these characteristics for efficient maintenance of structured overlay networks by implementing an intelligent predictive framework for setting stabilization parameters appropriately. Considering the fact that human driven behavior usually goes beyond intermittent availability patterns, we use a hybrid Neuro-fuzzy based predictor to enhance the accuracy of the predictions. In this paper, we discuss our predictive stabilization approach, implement Neuro-fuzzy based prediction in MATLAB simulation and apply this predictive stabilization model in a chord based overlay network using OverSim as a simulation tool. The MATLAB simulation results present that the behavior of neighboring nodes is predictable to a large extent as indicated by the very small RMSE. The OverSim based simulation results also observe significant improvements in the performance of chord based overlay network in terms of lookup success ratio, lookup hop count and maintenance overhead as compared to periodic stabilization approach.

  10. The Simulation of the stabilizing process of glass nanoparticle in optical tweezer using series of laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Quang Quy; Hoang Dinh Hai

    2012-01-01

    In this article the stable region and stabilizing process of dielectric particle in fluid by the optical tweezer using the series of laser pulses are investigated. The influence of the repetition period and number of laser pulses on the radial variance of particle and the so-called stable space-time pillar is simulated and discussed. (author)

  11. Application of gadolinia credit to cask transportation of BWR-STEP3 SFAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Tsukasa; Mitsuhashi, Ishi; Ito, Dai-ichiro; Nakamura, Yu

    2003-01-01

    Instead of the fresh-fuel assumption, the application of gadolinia credit to cask transportation of BWR SFAs is studied. Its efficacy for BWR-STEP2 SFAs had already been estimated. This paper reports on the application of gadolinia credit to cask transportation of BWR-STEP3 SFAs. (author)

  12. Peach Bottom Cycle 2 Low Flow Stability Tests analysis using RELAP5/PARCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.L.; Salah, A.B.; D'Auria, F.

    2004-01-01

    Nowadays, the coupled codes technique, which consists in incorporating threedimensional (3D) neutron modeling of the reactor core into system codes, is extensively used for simulating transients that involve core spatial asymmetric phenomena and strong feedback effects between core neutronics and reactor loop thermal-hydraulics. So, in this work, the coupled codes technique using RELAP5/3.3-PARCS is applied to simulate stability transients in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor). Validation has been performed against Peach Bottom-2 Low-Flow Stability Tests. In these transients dynamically complex neutron kinetics coupling with thermal-hydraulics events take place in response to a core pressure perturbation. The calculated coupled code results are herein compared against the available experimental data. (author)

  13. Radial optimization of a BWR fuel cell using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo M, C.; Carmona H, R.; Oropeza C, I.P.

    2006-01-01

    The development of the application of the Genetic Algorithms (GA) to the optimization of the radial distribution of enrichment in a cell of fuel of a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The optimization process it was ties to the HELIOS simulator, which is a transport code of neutron simulation of fuel cells that has been validated for the calculation of nuclear banks for BWRs. With heterogeneous radial designs can improve the radial distribution of the power, for what the radial design of fuel has a strong influence in the global design of fuel recharges. The optimum radial distribution of fuel bars is looked for with different enrichments of U 235 and contents of consumable poison. For it is necessary to define the representation of the solution, the objective function and the implementation of the specific optimization process to the solution of the problem. The optimization process it was coded in 'C' language, it was automated the creation of the entrances to the simulator, the execution of the simulator and the extraction, in the exit of the simulator, of the parameters that intervene in the objective function. The objective function includes four parameters: average enrichment of the cell, average gadolinia concentration o