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Sample records for bwr stability operating

  1. The BWR Stability Issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to supply general information about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) stability. The main concerned topics are: phenomenological aspects, experimental database, modelling features and capabilities, numerical models, three-dimensional modelling, BWR system performance during stability, stability monitoring and licensing aspects.

  2. BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valtonen, K.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to examine TVO-I oscillation incident, which occured in February 22.1987 and to find out safety implications of oscillations in ATWS incidents. Calculations have been performed with RAMONA-3B and TRAB codes. RAMONA-3B is a BWR transient analysis code with three-dimencional neutron kinetics and nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous thermal hydraulics. TRAB code is a one-dimencional BWR transient code which uses methods similar to RAMONA-3B. The results have shown that both codes are capable of analyzing of the oscillation incidents. Both out-of-phase and in-phase oscillations are possible. If the reactor scram fails (ATWS) during oscillations the severe fuel failures are always possible and the reactor core may exceed the prompt criticality

  3. BWR stability analysis at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1991-01-01

    Following the unexpected, but safely terminated, power and flow oscillations in the LaSalle-2 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) on March 9, 1988, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Offices of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) requested that the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) carry out BWR stability analyses, centered around fourteen specific questions. Ten of the fourteen questions address BWR stability issues in general and are dealt with in this paper. The other four questions address local, out-of-phase oscillations and matters of instrumentation; they fall outside the scope of the work reported here. It was the purpose of the work documented in this report to answer ten of the fourteen NRC-stipulated questions. Nine questions are answered by analyzing the LaSalle-2 instability and related BWR transients with the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA) and by performing an uncertainty assessment of the EPA predictions. The tenth question is answered on the basis of first principles. The ten answers are summarized

  4. Investigation of BWR stability in Forsmark 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, R.; Reisch, F.; Bergdahl, B.G.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.; Kellner, S.

    1988-01-01

    A series of noise measurements have been conducted at the Forsmark-2 reactor during its start-up operation after the revision in 1987. The main purpose was to investigate the BWR stability problem based on noise analysis, i.e. the problem of resonant power oscillation with frequency of about 0.5 Hz, which tends to arise at high power and low core flow condition. The noise analysis was performed to estimate the noise source which gives rise to the power oscillation, to evaluate the stability condition of the Forsmark-2 reactor in terms of the decay ratio (DR), as well as to investigate a safety related problem in connection with the BWR stability. The results indicate that the power oscillation is due to dynamic coupling between the neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics via void reactivity feedback. The DR reached as high as ≅ 0.7 at 63% of the rated power and 4100 kg/s of the total core flow. An investigation was made for the noise recording which represents a strong pressure oscillation with a peak frequency at 0.33 Hz. The result suggests that such pressure oscillation, if the peak frequency coincided with that of the resonant power oscillation, might become a cause of scram. The present noise analysis indicates the importance of a BWR on-line surveillance system with functions like stability condition monitoring and control system diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Toshio; Masuda, Hisao; Isono, Tomoyuki; Noji, Kunio; Togo, Toshiki

    1989-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) was established in April 1971 for the purpose of training the operators from all BWR utilities in Japan. Since April 1974, more than 2600 operators and 1000 shift teams have been trained with the full-scope simulators in BTC up to the end of March 1988. To get the satisfactory results of the training, BTC has been making every effort to improve the facilities, the training materials, the instruction methods and the curricula. In this paper, such a series of recent improvements in the instruction methods and the curricula are presented that are effective to expand the knowledge and to improve the skills of middle or senior class operators. (author)

  6. BWR-stability investigation at Forsmark 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergdahl, B.G.; Reisch, F.; Oguma, R.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1988-01-01

    A series of noise measurements have been conducted at Forsmark 1 during start-up operation after the revision summer '87. The main purpose was to investigate BWR-stability problems, i.e. resonant power oscillations of 0.5 Hz around 65% power and 4100 kg/s core flow, which tend to arise at high power and low core flow conditions. The analysis was performed to estimate the noise source which gives rise to the oscillation, to evaluate the measure of stability, i.e. the Decay Ratio (Dr) as well as to investigate other safety related problems. The result indicates that the oscillation is due to the dynamic coupling between the neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics via void reactivity feedback. The Dr ranged between values of 0.7 and > 0.9, instead of expected 0.6 (Dr=1 is defined as instability). These high values imply that the core cannot suppress oscillations fast enough and a small perturbation can cause scram. Further it was found that the entire core is oscillating in phase (LPRM's) with varying strength where any connection to the consequences of different fuel (8x8, 9x9) being present simultaneously cannot be excluded. This report elucidates the importance of an on-line BWR-stability surveillance system with functions like stability condition monitoring and control system diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. BWR stability using a reducing dynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J. M.; Blazquez Martinez, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical structure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations is non-linear. Simple parametric calculation of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author)

  8. BWR stability using a reduced dynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J.M.; Blazquez, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical struct-ure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations in non-linear. Simple parametric calculat-ion of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author). 7 refs

  9. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A; Wehle, F; Opel, S; Velten, R [AREVA, AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  10. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A.; Wehle, F.; Opel, S.; Velten, R.

    2008-01-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  11. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurisu, Takanori; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Harada, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Iwao.

    1988-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center was founded in April, 1971, and in April, 1974, training was begun, since then, 13 years elapsed. During this period, the curriculum and training facilities were strengthened to meet the training needs, and the new training techniques from different viewpoint were developed, thus the improvement of training has been done. In this report, a number of the training techniques which have been developed and adopted recently, and are effective for the improvement of the knowledge and skill of operators are described. Recently Japanese nuclear power stations have been operated at stable high capacity factor, accordingly the chance of experiencing the occurrence of abnormality and the usual start and stop of plants decreased, and the training of operators using simulators becomes more important. The basic concept on training is explained. In the standard training course and the short period fundamental course, the development of the guide for reviewing lessons, the utilization of VTRs and the development of the techniques for diagnosing individual degree of learning were carried out. The problems, the points of improvement and the results of these are reported. (Kako, I.)

  12. Assessment of the Prony's method for BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier; Castillo-Duran, Rogelio; Palacios-Hernandez, Javier C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper describes a method to determine the degree of stability of a BWR. → Performance comparison between Prony's and common AR techniques is presented. → Benchmark data and actual BWR transient data are used for comparison. → DR and f results are presented and discussed. → The Prony's method is shown to be a robust technique for BWR stability. - Abstract: It is known that Boiling Water Reactors are susceptible to present power oscillations in regions of high power and low coolant flow, in the power-flow operational map. It is possible to fall in one of such instability regions during reactor startup, since both power and coolant flow are being increased but not proportionally. One other possibility for falling into those areas is the occurrence of a trip of recirculation pumps. Stability monitoring in such cases can be difficult, because the amount or quality of power signal data required for calculation of the stability key parameters may not be enough to provide reliable results in an adequate time range. In this work, the Prony's Method is presented as one complementary alternative to determine the degree of stability of a BWR, through time series data. This analysis method can provide information about decay ratio and oscillation frequency from power signals obtained during transient events. However, so far not many applications in Boiling Water Reactors operation have been reported and supported to establish the scope of using such analysis for actual transient events. This work presents first a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results obtained by Prony's method and those results obtained by the participants of the Forsmark 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactor Stability Benchmark using diverse techniques. Then, a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results is performed for four real BWR transient event data, using Prony's method and two other techniques based on an autoregressive modeling. The four

  13. A simplified spatial model for BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Y.; Lederer, Y.; Meron, E.

    2012-01-01

    A spatial reduced order model for the study of BWR stability, based on the phenomenological model of March-Leuba et al., is presented. As one dimensional spatial dependence of the neutron flux, fuel temperature and void fraction is introduced, it is possible to describe both global and regional oscillations of the reactor power. Both linear stability analysis and numerical analysis were applied in order to describe the parameters which govern the model stability. The results were found qualitatively similar to past results. Doppler reactivity feedback was found essential for the explanation of the different regions of the flow-power stability map. (authors)

  14. PREDICTIVE METHODS FOR STABILITY MARGIN IN BWR

    OpenAIRE

    MELARA SAN ROMÁN, JOSÉ

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Power and flow oscillations in a BWR are very undesirable. One of the major concerns is to ensure, during power oscillations, compliance with GDC 10 and 12. GDC 10 requires that the reactor core be designed with appropriate margin to assure that specified acceptable fuel design limits will not be exceeded during any condition of normal operation, including the effects of anticipated operational occurrences. GDC 12 requires assurance that power oscillations which can result in conditions ...

  15. Improvement for BWR operator training, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noji, Kunio; Toeda, Susumu; Saito, Genhachi; Suzuki, Koichi

    1990-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) is conducting training for BWR plant operators using Full-scope Simulators. There are several courses for individual operators and one training course for shift crew (Family Training Course) in BTC. Family Training is carried out by all members of the operating shift-crew. BTC has made efforts to improve the Family Training in order to acquire more effective training results and contribute to up-grade team performance of all crews. This paper describes some items of our efforts towards Family Training improvement. (author)

  16. LAPUR5 BWR stability analysis in Kuosheng nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunlung Wu; Chunkuan Shih; Wang, J.R.; Kao, L.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Unstable oscillation of a nuclear power reactor core is one of the main reasons that causes minor core damage. Stability analysis needs to be performed to predict the potential problem as early as possible and to prevent core instability events from happening. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requests all BWR licensees to examine each core reload and to impose operating limitations, as appropriate, to ensure compliance with GDC 10 and 12. GDC 10 requires that the reactor core be designed with appropriate margin to assure that specified acceptable fuel design limits will not be exceeded during any condition of normal operation, including anticipated operational occurrences. GDC 12 requires assurance that power oscillations which can result in conditions exceeding specified acceptable fuel design limits are either not possible or can be reliably and readily detected and suppressed. Therefore, the core instability is directly related to the fuel design limits. The core and channel DR (decay ratio) calculation are commonly performed to determine system's stability when new fuel designs are introduced in the core. In order to establish the independent analysis technology for BWR licensees and verifications, the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) has obtained agreement from NRC and implemented the 'Methodology and Procedure for Calculation of Core and Channel Decay Ratios with LAPUR', which was developed by the IBERINCO in 2001. LAPUR5 uses a multi-nodal description of the neutron dynamics, together with a distributed parameter model of the core thermal hydrodynamics to produce a space-dependent representation of the dynamics of a BWR in the frequency domain for small perturbations around a steady state condition. From the output of LAPUR5, the following results are obtained: global core decay ratio, out-of phase core decay ratio, and channel decay ratio. They are key parameters in the determination of BWR core stability

  17. BWR stability: history and state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, George

    2014-01-01

    The paper briefly recalls the historical developments, reviews the important phenomena, the analytical and simulation tools that are used for the analysis of BWR stability focussing on the linear, frequency domain methods

  18. BWR and ABWR operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Kimio; Takayama, Yoshito; Shimizu, Shunichi

    1998-01-01

    The first commercial operation of a nuclear power plant in Japan was in 1969. At present, there are 52 nuclear power plants operating in the country, accounting for about 35% of the total electricity generated and about 20 % of the total capacity of electricity generation facilities in Japan. Moreover, Japan has had the highest facility utilization rate, which is an indicator of operational safety, among the top four nuclear-generation countries (U.S.A., France, Germany, and Japan) every year since 1993, and has maintained a utilization rate of more than 80% since 1995. Toshiba has supported plant operation and maintenance in 19 nuclear power plants. The overall facility utilization rate of these plants attained a record of 86.4% in fiscal 1996. Furthermore, the averaged rates over the past three fiscal years from 1995 to 1997 have been the highest in the world among plant constructors such as GE, WH, and Siemens. (author)

  19. BWR stability analysis: methodology of the stability analysis and results of PSI for the NEA/NCR benchmark task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, D.; Nechvatal, L.

    1996-09-01

    The report describes the PSI stability analysis methodology and the validation of this methodology based on the international OECD/NEA BWR stability benchmark task. In the frame of this work, the stability properties of some operation points of the NPP Ringhals 1 have been analysed and compared with the experimental results. (author) figs., tabs., 45 refs

  20. BWR stability using a reducing dynamical model; Estabilidad de un BWR con un modelo dinamico reducido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J M; Blazquez Martinez, J B

    1990-07-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical structure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations is non-linear. Simple parametric calculation of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author)

  1. A BWR Safety and Operability Improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, Craig D.

    1993-01-01

    The A BWR is the culmination of 30 years of design, development and operating experience of BWRs around the world. It represents across the board improvements is safety, operation and maintenance practices (O and M), economics, radiation exposure and rad waste generation. More than ten years and $20m5 went into the design and development of its new features, and it is now under construction in Japan. This paper concentrates on the safety and operability improvements. In the safety area, more than a decade improvement in core damage frequency (CDFR) has been assessed by formal PIRA techniques, with CDFR less than 10 -6 /year. Severe accident mitigation has also been formally addressed in the design. Plant operations were simplified by incorporation of better materials, optimum use of redundancy in mechanical and electrical equipment so that on-line maintenance can be performed, by better arrangements which account for required maintenance practices, and by an advanced control room

  2. Strategies of operation cycles in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, D.; Sendino, F.

    1996-01-01

    The article analyzes the operation cycles in BWR type reactors. The cycle size of operation is the consequence on the optimization process of the costs with the technical characteristics of nuclear fuel and the characteristics of demand and production. The authors analyze the cases of Garona NP and Cofrentes NP, both with BWR reactors. (Author)

  3. Development of long operating cycle simplified BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Maruya, T.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Narabayash, T.; Aritomi, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative plant concept for long operating cycle simplified BWR (LSBWR) In this plant concept, 1) Long operating cycle ( 3 to 15 years), 2) Simplified systems and building, 3) Factory fabrication in module are discussed. Designing long operating core is based on medium enriched U-235 with burnable poison. Simplified systems and building are realized by using natural circulation with bottom located core, internal CRD and PCV with passive system and an integrated reactor and turbine building. This LSBWR concept will have make high degree of safety by IVR (In Vessel Retention) capability, large water inventory above the core region and no PCV vent to the environment due to PCCS (Passive Containment Cooling System) and internal vent tank. Integrated building concept could realize highly modular arrangement in hull structure (ship frame structure), ease of seismic isolation capability and high applicability of standardization and factory fabrication. (authors)

  4. Advanced technology for BWR operator training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Akira; Fujita, Eimitsu; Nakao, Toshihiko; Nakabaru, Mitsugu; Asaoka, Kouchi.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plants which went into service recently. The simulator is a full scope replica type simulator which faithfully replicates the control room environment of the reference plant with six main control panels and twelve auxiliary ones. In comparison with earlier simulators, the scope of the simulation is significantly extended in both width and depth. The simulation model is also refined in order to include operator training according to sympton-based emergency procedure guidelines to mitigate the results in accident cases. In particular, the core model and the calculational model of the radiation intensity distribution, if radioactive materials were released, are improved. As for simulator control capabilities by which efficient and effective training can be achieved, various advanced designs are adopted allowing easy use of the simulators. (author)

  5. Recent technology for BWR operator training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Kato, Kanji; Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Asaoka, Koichi.

    1990-01-01

    As one of the important factors for maintaining the high capacity ratio in Japanese nuclear power stations, the contribution of excellent operators is pointed out. BWR Operation Training Center has trained many operators using two full scope simulators for operation training modeling BWRs. But in order to meet the demands of the recent increase of training needs and the upgrading of the contents, it was decided to install the third simulator, and Hitachi Ltd. received the order to construct the main part, and delivered it. This simulator obtained the good reputation as its range of simulation is wide, and the characteristics resemble very well those of the actual plants. Besides, various new designs were adopted in the control of the simulator, and its handling became very easy. Japanese nuclear power plants are operated at constant power output, and the unexpected stop is very rare, therefore the chance of operating the plants by operators is very few. Accordingly, the training using the simulators which can simulate the behavior of the plants with computers, and can freely generate abnormal phenomena has become increasingly important. The mode and positioning of the simulators for operation training, the full scope simulator BTC-3 and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Method of operating BWR type power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the operation efficiency of BWR type reactors by reducing the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start-up of the turbine and electrical generator, as well as decrease the pressure difference in each of the sections of the pressure vessel to thereby extend its life span. Method: The operation comprises switching the nuclear reactor from the shutdown mode to the start-up mode, increasing the reactor power to a predetermined level lower than a rated power while maintaining the reactor pressure to a predetermined level lower than a rated pressure, starting up a turbine and an electrical generator in the state of the predetermined reactor pressure and the reactor power to connect the electrical generator to the power transmission system and, thereafter, increasing the reactor pressure and the reactor power to the predetermined rated pressure and rated power respectively. This can shorten the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start of the power transmission system, whereby the operation efficiency of the power plant can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  7. Method of operating BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reactor control depending on any demanded loads by performing control by the insertion of control rods in addition to the control by the regulation of the flow rate of the reactor core water at high power operation of a BWR type reactor. Method: The power is reduced at high power operation by decreasing the flow rate of reactor core water from the starting time for the power reduction and the flow rate is maintained after the time at which it reaches the minimum allowable flow rate. Then, the control rod is started to insert from the above time point to reduce the power to an aimed level. Thus, the insufficiency in the reactivity due to the increase in the xenon concentration can be compensated by the withdrawal of the control rods and the excess reactivity due to the decrease in the xenon concentration can be compensated by the insertion of the control rods, whereby the reactor power can be controlled depending on any demanded loads without deviating from the upper or lower limit for the flow rate of the reactor core water. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Physical model of nonlinear noise with application to BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Perez, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of the present model it is shown that the BWR reactor cannot be unstable in the linear sense, but rather it executes limited power oscillations of a magnitude that depends on the operating conditions. The onset of these oscillations can be diagnosed by the decrease in stochasticity in the power traces and by the appearance of harmonics in the PSD

  9. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A.; Castlllo D, R.

    2006-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the Laguna Verde

  10. Operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadasu

    1988-01-01

    For the operation management of nuclear power stations with high reliability and safety, the role played by operators is very important. The effort of improving the man-machine interface in the central control rooms of nuclear power stations is energetically advanced, but the importance of the role of operators does not change. For the training of the operators of nuclear power stations, simulators have been used from the early stage. As the simulator facilities for operator training, there are the full scope simulator simulating faithfully the central control room of an actual plant and the small simulator mainly aiming at learning the plant functions. For BWR nuclear power stations, two full scope simulators are installed in the BWR Operator Training Center, and the training has been carried out since 1974. The plant function learning simulators have been installed in respective electric power companies as the education and training facilities in the companies. The role of simulators in operator training, the BTC No.1 simulator of a BWR-4 of 780 MWe and the BTC No.2 simulator of a BWR-5 of 1,100 MWe, plant function learning simulators, and the design of the BTC No.2 simulator and plant function learning simulators are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Material operating behaviour of ABB BWR control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebensdorff, B.; Bart, G.

    2000-01-01

    The BWR control rods made by ABB use boron carbide (B 4 C and hafnium as absorber material within a cladding of stainless steel. The general behaviour under operation has proven to be very good. ABB and many of their control rod customers have performed extensive inspection programs of control rod behaviour. However, due to changes in the material properties under fast and thermal neutron irradiation defects may occur in the control rods at high neutron fluences. Examinations of irradiated control rod materials have been performed in hot cell laboratories. The examinations have revealed the defect mechanism Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) to appear in the stainless steel cladding. For IASCC to occur three factors have to act simultaneously. Stress, material sensitization and an oxidising environment. Stress may be obtained from boron carbide swelling due to irradiation. Stainless steel may be sensitized to intergranular stress corrosion cracking under irradiation. Normally the reactor environment in a BWR is oxidising. The presentation focuses on findings from hot cell laboratory work on irradiated ABB BWR control rods and studies of irradiated control rod materials in the hot cells at PSI. Apart from physical, mechanical and microstructural examinations, isotope analyses were performed to describe the local isotopic burnup of boron. Consequences (such as possible B 4 C washout) of a under operation in a ABB BWR, after the occurrence of a crack is discussed based on neutron radiographic examinations of control rods operated with cracks. (author)

  12. Ranking of input parameters importance for BWR stability based on Ringhals-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajev, Ivan; Kozlowski, Tomasz; Xu, Yunlin; Downar, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Unstable behavior of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is known to occur during operation at certain power and flow conditions. Uncertainty calculations for BWR stability, based on the Wilks' formula, have been already done for the Ringhals-1 benchmark. In this work, these calculations have been used to identify and rank the most important parameters affecting the stability of the Ringhals-1 plant. The ranking has been done in two different ways and a comparison of these two methods has been demonstrated. Results show that the methods provide different, but meaningful evaluations of the ranking. (author)

  13. Stability analysis of BWR nuclear-coupled thermal-hyraulics using a simple model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karve, A.A.; Rizwan-uddin; Dorning, J.J. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A simple mathematical model is developed to describe the dynamics of the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulics in a boiling water reactor (BWR) core. The model, which incorporates the essential features of neutron kinetics, and single-phase and two-phase thermal-hydraulics, leads to simple dynamical system comprised of a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The stability boundary is determined and plotted in the inlet-subcooling-number (enthalpy)/external-reactivity operating parameter plane. The eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix of the dynamical system also are calculated at various steady-states (fixed points); the results are consistent with those of the direct stability analysis and indicate that a Hopf bifurcation occurs as the stability boundary in the operating parameter plane is crossed. Numerical simulations of the time-dependent, nonlinear ODEs are carried out for selected points in the operating parameter plane to obtain the actual damped and growing oscillations in the neutron number density, the channel inlet flow velocity, and the other phase variables. These indicate that the Hopf bifurcation is subcritical, hence, density wave oscillations with growing amplitude could result from a finite perturbation of the system even where the steady-state is stable. The power-flow map, frequently used by reactor operators during start-up and shut-down operation of a BWR, is mapped to the inlet-subcooling-number/neutron-density (operating-parameter/phase-variable) plane, and then related to the stability boundaries for different fixed inlet velocities corresponding to selected points on the flow-control line. The stability boundaries for different fixed inlet subcooling numbers corresponding to those selected points, are plotted in the neutron-density/inlet-velocity phase variable plane and then the points on the flow-control line are related to their respective stability boundaries in this plane.

  14. The noise analysis and the BWR operation map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazquez, J.; Ballestrin, J.

    1996-01-01

    An analytical expression for the Decay Ratio is obtained: DR = exp(-bW / P 1/2 ). The physics behind is also explained. It applies to a commercial BWR Operation Map, on the vicinity of the power instability. This functional form seems fitting to the structure of the Operation map. The power P and the coolant flow are measured straightforward; the Decay Ratio is obtained by neutron noise analysis techniques. The parameter b, depending on the void reactivity coefficient, is then calculated on line during the Reactor Operation. New DR value is now predicted for each new displacement on the Map, so unexpected instability events are more likely avoided. (authors)

  15. Simplified distributed parameters BWR dynamic model for transient and stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro; Vazquez-Rodriguez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a simplified model to perform transient and linear stability analysis for a typical boiling water reactor (BWR). The simplified transient model was based in lumped and distributed parameters approximations, which includes vessel dome and the downcomer, recirculation loops, neutron process, fuel pin temperature distribution, lower and upper plenums reactor core and pressure and level controls. The stability was determined by studying the linearized versions of the equations representing the BWR system in the frequency domain. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the wide application of the simplified BWR model. We concluded that this simplified model describes properly the dynamic of a BWR and can be used for safety analysis or as a first approach in the design of an advanced BWR

  16. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR; Estabilidad termohidraulica acoplada a la neutronica en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Mpio. Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico); Castlllo D, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gcm9acpp@cfe.gob.mx

    2006-07-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the

  17. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  18. Operating experience with BWR nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonsdorf, Magnus von.

    1986-01-01

    The two-unit nuclear power station in Olkiluoto on the western coast of Finland produces about 20 per cent of the electricity consumption of the country. The first unit, TVO-I was first connected to the national grid in September 1978 and TVO-II in February 1980. The original rated power output of each unit was 660 MWe, corresponding to the thermal power of 2000 MW from the reactor. Technical modifications allowed the power to be uprated by 8%. The operating statistics (load factors etc.) are given and the outage experience discussed. The radiological history shows very low radioactivity and dose levels have been maintained at the plant. (UK)

  19. BWR type reactor and its operating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuji, Niro.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To regulate the control rod extraction operation such that an assumed control rod drop accident, if should occur, may not lead to further serious accidents, as well as enable to improve the working life of the control rod. Method: A plurality of control rods disposed among a plurality of fuel assemblies constituting the reactor core for suppressing the reactor core reactivity are divided into two groups depending on the descending speed, and the number of rods with a faster descending speed is set to less than 1/4 of the total number of the control rods. Then, the control rods are arranged such that those rods of the faster descending speed may be set every one another in any of the vertical, lateral and orthogonal directions. Further, it is always judged as to the possibility of extracting the control rods with the faster descending speed by a fast control rod extraction judging circuit to issue a signal to a control rod extraction inhibition circuit, so that the extraction operation for the control rods with the faster descending speed is started after all of the control rods with the slow descending speed have been extracted. Accordingly, if a control rod dropping accident should occur, abrupt power change can be avoided to thereby minimize the development of the accident. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Sophistication of operator training using BWR plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshiro, Nobuo; Endou, Hideaki; Fujita, Eimitsu; Miyakita, Kouji

    1986-01-01

    In Japanese nuclear power stations, owing to the improvement of fuel management, thorough maintenance and inspection, and the improvement of facilities, high capacity ratio has been attained. The thorough training of operators in nuclear power stations also contributes to it sufficiently. The BWR operator training center was established in 1971, and started the training of operators in April, 1974. As of the end of March, 1986, more than 1800 trainees completed training. At present, in the BWR operator training center, No.1 simulator of 800 MW class and No.2 simulator of 1100 MW class are operated for training. In this report, the method, by newly adopting it, good result was obtained, is described, that is, the method of introducing the feeling of being present on the spot into the place of training, and the new testing method introduced in retraining course. In the simulator training which is apt to place emphasis on a central control room, the method of stimulating trainees by playing the part of correspondence on the spot and heightening the training effect of multiple monitoring was tried, and the result was confirmed. The test of confirmation on the control board was added. (Kako, I.)

  1. Core concept for long operating cycle simplified BWR (LSBWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouji, Hiraiwa; Noriyuki, Yoshida; Mikihide, Nakamaru; Hideaki, Heki; Masanori, Aritomi

    2002-01-01

    An innovative core concept for a long operating cycle simplified BWR (LSBWR) is currently being developed under a Toshiba Corporation and Tokyo Institute of Technology joint study. In this core concept, the combination of enriched uranium oxide fuels and loose-pitched lattice is adopted for an easy application of natural circulation. A combination of enriched gadolinium and 0.7-times sized small bundle with peripheral-positioned gadolinium rod is also adopted as a key design concept for 15-year cycle operation. Based on three-dimensional nuclear and thermal hydraulic calculation, a nuclear design for fuel bundle has been determined. Core performance has been evaluated based on this bundle design and shows that thermal performance and reactivity characteristics meet core design criteria. Additionally, a control rod operation plan for an extension of control rod life has been successfully determined. (author)

  2. BWR stability analysis: methodology of the stability analysis and results of PSI for the NEA/NCR benchmark task; SWR Stabilitaetsanalyse: Methodik der Stabilitaetsanalyse und PSI-Ergebnisse zur NEA/NCR Benchmarkaufgabe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, D.; Nechvatal, L. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-09-01

    The report describes the PSI stability analysis methodology and the validation of this methodology based on the international OECD/NEA BWR stability benchmark task. In the frame of this work, the stability properties of some operation points of the NPP Ringhals 1 have been analysed and compared with the experimental results. (author) figs., tabs., 45 refs.

  3. Upgrading BWR training simulators for annual outage operation training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakabe, K.; Nakajima, A.; Shiyama, H.; Noji, K.; Okabe, N.; Murata, F.

    2006-01-01

    Based upon the recently developed quality assurance program by the Japanese electric companies, BWR Operator Training Center (BTC) identified the needs to enhance operators' knowledge and skills for operations tasks during annual outage, and started to develop a dedicated operator training course specialized for them. In this paper, we present the total framework of the training course for annual outage operations and the associated typical three functions of our full-scope simulators specially developed and upgraded to conduct the training; namely, (1) Simulation model upgrade for the flow and temperature behavior concerning residual heat removal (RHR) system with shutdown cooling mode, (2) Addition of malfunctions for DC power supply equipment, (3) Simulation model upgrade for water filling operation for reactor pressurization (future development). We have implemented a trial of the training course by using the upgraded 800MW full-scope training simulator with functions (1) and (2) above. As the result of this trial, we are confident that the developed training course is effective for enhancing operators' knowledge and skills for operations tasks during annual outage. (author)

  4. Development of BWR computerized operator support system for emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, F.

    1984-01-01

    A BWR computerized operator support system (COSS) for emergency conditions has been under development for three years. The conceptual design of the system has been settled and some of the subsystems are in the detailed design or manufacturing stage. The principal functions are technical specification monitoring, diagnosis, guidance during emergency conditions, predictive simulation and safety monitoring. Before a reactor trip, alternative operational guidance for anomalous events is provided by utilization of the CTT (cause consequence tree) and FPS (failure propagation simulator). After the trip, operational guidance is based on event-oriented and symptom-oriented methods in association with the safety function monitor. The technical specification monitor controls the readiness monitor and performs surveillance tests of safety systems to maintain plant operational reliability and to ensure correct performance when initiated. The predictive simulator gives the future trends of significant plant parameters. These subsystems are expected to assist the operational personnel. The feasibility of the COSS functions is confirmed separately by off-line simulation. The paper considers the conceptual design, the functions of the subsystems and the off-line simulation results. Each subsystem has shown that useful information to operational personnel is provided. Henceforth these functions will be integrated into a single system and the feasibility will be thoroughly evaluated using a plant simulator which is being separately developed to verify the COSS. (author)

  5. Prediction of the stability of BWR reactors during the start-up process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz E, J.A.; Castillo D, R.; Blazquez M, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are susceptible of uncertainties of power when they are operated to low flows of coolant (W) and high powers (P), being presented this situation mainly in the start-up process. The start-up process could be made but sure if the operator knew the value of the stability index Decay reason (Dr) before going up power and therefore to guarantee the stability. The power and the flow are constantly measures, the index Dr could also be considered its value in real time. The index Dr depends on the power, flow and many other values, such as, the distribution of the flow axial and radial neutronic, the temperature of the feeding water, the fraction of holes and other thermohydraulic and nuclear parameters. A simple relationship of Dr is derived leaving of the pattern reduced of March-Leuba, where three independent variables are had that are the power, the flow and a parameter that it contains the rest of the phenomenology, that is to say all the other quantities that affect the value of Dr. This relationship developed work presently and verified its prediction with data of start-up of commercial reactors could be used for the design of a practical procedure practice of start-up, what would support to the operator to prevent this type of events of uncertainty. (Author)

  6. ZZ BWRSB-RINGHALS1, Stability Benchmark Data from BWR RINGHALS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Description of program or function: The purpose of this benchmark is to enable code developers to test their codes and also to validate the predictive capability of their respective codes and models for BWR stability analysis. Emphasis is put on the modelling of flow dynamics of the reactor core and in-vessel flow loop wit detailed neutronic and thermodynamic feedback. The secondary systems as well as the control and production systems will be neglected. Data provided comes from measurements in beginning of cycle (BOC) 14, 15, 16 and 17 and middle of cycle (MOC) 16 in the Swedish BWR reactor Ringhals 1. For these measurements complete data sets are given

  7. BWR core response to fluctuations in coolant flow and pressure, with implications on noise diagnosis and stability monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomstrand, J.H.; Andersson, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor dynamic tests, utilizing sinuosidal oscillations in pressure and recirculation flow, have been conducted in operating BWRs in Sweden and Finland. Test data recorded, as well as recordings of process noise, have been analyzed in terms of dynamic core properties. The results obtained show good qualitative agreement with model predictions of BWR core dynamics. Model studies can often support interpretation of dynamic information obtained from operating plants. Comparisons between model studies, dynamic tests and process noise may also provide improved understanding of test results and noise patterns; in this way it can be demonstrated that some neutron flux noise is caused by noise in coolant flow and steam flow. From reactor test data nd noise recordings, core stability parameters have been evaluated by a number of methods. These have been found to provide essentially the same results. The cores investigated were found to be very stable under normal operating conditions. In special operating points, outside the normal operating range, higher decay ratios may occur. The experience indicates that for BWR cores, operated at decay ratios above quarter damping, the stability parameters may be identified from the oscillatory behavior of the autocorrelation in the time domain of the neutron flux noise

  8. Stability analysis of a recycling circuit of a BWR type reactor. Theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas H, J.G.; Espinosa P, G.; Gonzalez M, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Technology, Regulation and Services Management of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards financed and in coordinate form with the I.P.H. Department of the Metropolitan Autonomous-Iztapalapa University developed the present project with the purpose of studying the effect of the recycling system on the linear stability of a BWR reactor whose reference central is the Laguna Verde power station. The present project forms part of a work series focused to the linear stability of the nuclear reactor of the Unit 1 at Laguna Verde power station. The components of the recycling system considered for the study of stability are the recycling external circuit (recycling pumps, valves) and the internal circuit (downcomer, jet pumps, lower full, driers, separators). The mathematical model is obtained applying mass balances and movement quantity in each one of the mentioned circuits. With respect to the nucleus model two regions are considered, the first one is made of a flow in one phase and the second one of a flow in two phases. For modelling the biphasic region it is considered homogenous flow. Generally it is studied the system behavior in the frequency domain starting from the transfer function applied to four operational states which correspond to the lower stability zone in the map power-flow of the Unit 1 of Laguna Verde power station. The Nyquist diagrams corresponding to each state as well as their characteristic frequency were determined. The results show that exists a very clear dependence of the power-flow relation on the stability of the system. It was found that the boiling length is an important parameter for the linear stability of the system. The obtained results show that the characteristic frequencies in unstability zones are similar to the reported data of the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde power station in the event of power oscillations carried out in January 1995. (Author)

  9. An advanced frequency-domain code for boiling water reactor (BWR) stability analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrooz, A.

    2008-01-01

    for a large reactor could reach 20 gigabytes) that it is not possible to load into RAM memory of an operating system with 32 bit architecture. A special procedure has been developed within the MATLAB environment to remove this memory limitation, and to invert such large matrices and finally obtain the reactor transfer functions that enable the study of system stability. Various applications of the present frequency-domain code to a typical BWR fuel assembly, a BWR core, and to a chemical reactor showed a good agreement with reference results. (author)

  10. Prediction of the stability of BWR reactors during the start-up process; Prediccion de la estabilidad de reactores BWR durante el proceso de arranque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz E, J.A.; Castillo D, R. [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Blazquez M, J.B. [Centro de Investigaciones Energetics, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are susceptible of uncertainties of power when they are operated to low flows of coolant (W) and high powers (P), being presented this situation mainly in the start-up process. The start-up process could be made but sure if the operator knew the value of the stability index Decay reason (Dr) before going up power and therefore to guarantee the stability. The power and the flow are constantly measures, the index Dr could also be considered its value in real time. The index Dr depends on the power, flow and many other values, such as, the distribution of the flow axial and radial neutronic, the temperature of the feeding water, the fraction of holes and other thermohydraulic and nuclear parameters. A simple relationship of Dr is derived leaving of the pattern reduced of March-Leuba, where three independent variables are had that are the power, the flow and a parameter that it contains the rest of the phenomenology, that is to say all the other quantities that affect the value of Dr. This relationship developed work presently and verified its prediction with data of start-up of commercial reactors could be used for the design of a practical procedure practice of start-up, what would support to the operator to prevent this type of events of uncertainty. (Author)

  11. Stability monitoring for BWR based on singular value decomposition method using artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Michishita, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    A new method for evaluating the decay ratios in a boiling water reactor (BWR) using the singular value decomposition (SVD) method had been proposed. In this method, a signal component closely related to the BWR stability can be extracted from independent components of the neutron noise signal decomposed by the SVD method. However, real-time stability monitoring by the SVD method requires an efficient procedure for screening such components. For efficient screening, an artificial neural network (ANN) with three layers was adopted. The trained ANN was actually applied to decomposed components of local power range monitor (LPRM) signals that were measured in stability experiments conducted in the Ringhals-1 BWR. In each LPRM signal, multiple candidates were screened from the decomposed components. However, decay ratios could be estimated by introducing appropriate criterions for selecting the most suitable component among the candidates. The estimated decay ratios are almost identical to those evaluated by visual screening in a previous study. The selected components commonly have the largest singular value, the largest decay ratio and the least squared fitting error among the candidates. By virtue of excellent screening performance of the trained ANN, the real-time stability monitoring by the SVD method can be applied in practice. (author)

  12. Application of noise analysis to stability determination of a natural circulation cooled BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Dam, H. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Nissen, W.H.M.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed on the Dodewaard natural circulation cooled BWR at different conditions. The absolute stability was determined by measuring system responses to control rod and steam flow valve steps. Changes in core stability were studied using the signal of an average power range monitor (APRM) in time domain (auto-correlation function and impulse response) and in frequency domain (power spectral density and peaking factor), the outlet void fraction and variations of the incore coolant velocity. It is shown that the reactor is very stable and that cooling by natural circulation improves load following. Stability monitoring can be performed by all mentioned methods but using APRM signals in frequency domain is preferred.

  13. Application of tearing modulus stability concepts to nuclear piping. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotter, K.H.; Chang, H.Y.; Zahoor, A.

    1982-02-01

    The recently developed tearing modulus stability concept was successfully applied to several boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems. Circumferentially oriented through-the-thickness cracks were postulated at numerous locations in each system. For each location, the simplified tearing stability methods developed in USNRC Report NUREG/CR-0838 were used to determine crack stability. The J-T diagram was used to present the results of the computations. The piping systems considered included Type 304 stainless steel as well as A106 carbon steel materials. These systems were analyzed using the piping analysis computer code MINK.

  14. Accident sequence analysis for a BWR [Boiling Water Reactor] during low power and shutdown operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, D.W.; Hake, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Most previous Probabilistic Risk Assessments have excluded consideration of accidents initiated in low power and shutdown modes of operation. A study of the risk associated with operation in low power and shutdown is being performed at Sandia National Laboratories for a US Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). This paper describes the proposed methodology for the analysis of the risk associated with the operation of a BWR during low power and shutdown modes and presents preliminary information resulting from the application of the methodology. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Time-dependent coolant velocity measurements in an operating BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbesmeyer, D.; Crowe, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method to measure time-dependent fluid velocities in BWR-bundle elements by noise analysis of the incore-neutron-detector signals is shown. Two application examples of the new method are given. The time behaviour of the fluid velocity in the bundle element during a scheduled power excursion of the plant. The change of power was performed by changing the coolant flow through the core The apparent change of the fluid velocity due to thermal elongation of the helix-drive of the TIP-system. A simplified mathematical model was derived for this elongation to use as a reference to check the validity of the new method. (author)

  16. A real-time BWR stability measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; King, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of a portable, real-time system used for nonperturbational measurements of stability in boiling water reactors. The algorithm used in this system estimates the closed-loop asymptotic decay ratio using only the naturally occurring neutron noise and it is based on the univariate autoregressive methodology. (author)

  17. Operational experiences with on line BWR condenser tube leak verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, R.A.; Duvall, W.E.; Kirkley, W.B.; Zavadoski, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Verifying condenser tube leaks at a boiling water reactor is, at best, a difficult task carried out in hot steamy water boxes with concurrent radiation exposure. For small apparent leaks with slight chemical changes there is always uncertainty of whether the problem is a condenser tube leak or a feedback from radwaste. Most conventional methods (e.g soap tests, Saran wrap suction, and helium tests) usually involve a load reduction to isolate the water boxes one at a time and hours of drain down on each box. The sensitivity of the most sensitive test (helium) is of the order of 7500 l per day per box. Sulfur hexafluoride has been successfully used at a BWR to identify one leaking water box out of four while the unit was at 100 % power. The actual tubes leakig in the water box were identified by injecting helium during drain down of the box and subsequent manifold testing. Additional tests with sulfur hexafluoride on the second BWR unit indicated tight water boxes to within the sensitivity of the measurement, i.e. less than 19 l per day for all four boxes. Problems encountered in both tests included sulfur hexafluoride carry over from the plume of the cooling towers and off gas considerations. In brief sulfur hexafluoride can be used to quickly identify which particular water box has a condenser tube leak or, just as quickly, establish the integrity of all the water boxes to a level not previously attainable. (author)

  18. BWR stability: analysis of cladding temperature for high amplitude oscillations - 146

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.; Wehle, F.

    2010-01-01

    Power oscillations associated with density waves in boiling water reactors (BWRs) have been studied widely. Industrial research in this area is active since the invention of the first BWR. Stability measurements have been performed in various plants during commissioning phase but especially the magnitude and divergent nature of the oscillations during the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant event on March 9, 1988, renewed concern about the state of knowledge on BWR instabilities and possible consequences to fuel rod integrity. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified stability tool, applicable for stability analysis in the non-linear regime, which extends to high amplitude oscillations where inlet reverse flow occurs. In case of high amplitude oscillations a cyclical dryout and rewetting process at the fuel rod may take place, which leads in turn to rapid changes of the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. The application of this stability tool allows for a conservative determination of the fuel rod cladding temperature in case of high amplitude oscillations during the dryout / re-wet phase. Moreover, it reveals in good agreement to experimental findings the stabilizing effect of the reverse bundle inlet flow, which might be obtained for large oscillation amplitudes. (authors)

  19. Development of a computerized operator support system for BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, K.; Sekimizu, K.; Sato, N.; Araki, T.; Mori, N.

    1985-01-01

    A computerized operator support system for BWR power plant has been developed since 1980 supported by the Japanese government. The main functions of the systems are post trip operational guidance, disturbance analysis, standby system management, operational margin monitoring and control rod operational guidance. The former two functions aim at protection against incidents during operation of nuclear power plants and the latter three functions aim at their prevention. As the final stage of the development, these functions are combined with the plant supervision function and are organized as an advanced man-machine interface for BWR power plant. During the above process, operator task analyses are performed to enable synthesis of these support functions for right fit to operator tasks and to realize a hierarchical structure for CRT displays for right fit to operators cognitive needs. (author)

  20. Analysis of a BWR direct cycle forced circulation power plants operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, G.G. de.

    1973-01-01

    First, it is established a general view over the operational problems of the BWR direct cycle forced circulation power plants, and then it is analysed the possibility of the utilization of the energy purged from the turbine as an additional energy for the electrical generation. To simulate the BWR power plant and to obtain the solution of the mathematical model it was developed a computer code named ATOR which shows the feasibility of the proposed method. In this way it is shown the possibility to get a better maneuvering allowance for the BWR power plant whenever it is permitted a convenient use of the vapor extracted from the turbine for the feedwater pre-heaters of the reactor. (author)

  1. Key Parameters for Operator Diagnosis of BWR Plant Condition during a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the key information needed from nuclear power plant instrumentation to guide severe accident management and mitigation for boiling water reactor (BWR) designs (specifically, a BWR/4-Mark I), estimate environmental conditions that the instrumentation will experience during a severe accident, and identify potential gaps in existing instrumentation that may require further research and development. This report notes the key parameters that instrumentation needs to measure to help operators respond to severe accidents. A follow-up report will assess severe accident environmental conditions as estimated by severe accident simulation model analysis for a specific US BWR/4-Mark I plant for those instrumentation systems considered most important for accident management purposes.

  2. Identification of process dynamics. Stability monitoring in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamsson, P.; Hallgren, P.

    1991-06-01

    Identification of process dynamics is used for stability monitoring in nuclear reactors (Boiling Water Reactor). This report treats the problem of estimating a damping factor and a resonance frequency from the neutron flux as measured in the reactor. A new parametric online method for identification is derived and presented, and is shown to meet the requirements of stability monitoring. The technique for estimating the process parameters is based on a recursive lattice filter algorithm. The problem of time varying parameters and offset, as well as offline experiments and signal processing are treated. All parts are implemented in a realtime program, using the language C. In comparison with earlier identifications, the new way of estimating the damping factor is shown to work well. Estimates of both the damping factor and the resonance frequency show a stable and reliable behavior. Future development and improvements are also indicated. (au)

  3. TRACE/PARCS analysis of the OECD/NEA Oskarshamn-2 BWR stability benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, T. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Downar, T.; Xu, Y.; Wysocki, A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ivanov, K.; Magedanz, J.; Hardgrove, M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Univ. Park, PA (United States); March-Leuba, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hudson, N.; Woodyatt, D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01

    On February 25, 1999, the Oskarshamn-2 NPP experienced a stability event which culminated in diverging power oscillations with a decay ratio of about 1.4. The event was successfully modeled by the TRACE/PARCS coupled code system, and further analysis of the event is described in this paper. The results show very good agreement with the plant data, capturing the entire behavior of the transient including the onset of instability, growth of the oscillations (decay ratio) and oscillation frequency. This provides confidence in the prediction of other parameters which are not available from the plant records. The event provides coupled code validation for a challenging BWR stability event, which involves the accurate simulation of neutron kinetics (NK), thermal-hydraulics (TH), and TH/NK. coupling. The success of this work has demonstrated the ability of the 3-D coupled systems code TRACE/PARCS to capture the complex behavior of BWR stability events. The problem was released as an international OECD/NEA benchmark, and it is the first benchmark based on measured plant data for a stability event with a DR greater than one. Interested participants are invited to contact authors for more information. (authors)

  4. TRACE/PARCS validation for BWR stability based on OECD/NEA Oskarshamn-2 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, T.; Roshan, S.; Lefvert, T.; Downar, T.; Xu, Y.; Wysocki, A.; Ivanov, K.; Magedanz, J.; Hardgrove, M.; Netterbrant, C.; March-Leuba, J.; Hudson, N.; Sandervag, O.; Bergman, A.

    2011-01-01

    On February 25, 1999, the Oskarshamn-2 NPP experienced a stability event, which culminated in diverging power oscillations with decay ratio greater than 1.3. The event was successfully modeled by TRACE/PARCS coupled code system and the details of the modeling and solution are described in the paper. The obtained results show excellent agreement with the plant data, capturing the entire behavior of the transient including onset of instability, growth of oscillation (decay ratio) and the oscillation frequency. The event allows coupled code validation for BWR with a real, challenging stability event, which challenges accuracy of neutron kinetics (NK), thermal-hydraulics (TH) and TH/NK coupling. The success of this work has demonstrated the ability of 3-D coupled code systems to capture the complex behavior of BWR stability events. The problem is released as an international OECD/NEA benchmark, and it is the first benchmark based on measured plant data for a stability event with a DR greater than one. Interested participants are invited to contact authors for more information. (author)

  5. Thermal-hydraulics stability of natural circulation BWR under startup. Flashing effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Rui; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2009-01-01

    To help achieve the necessary natural circulation flow, a fairly long chimney is installed in a boiling natural circulation reactor like the ESBWR. In such systems, thermal-hydraulic stability during low pressure start-up should be examined while considering the flashing induced by the pressure drop in the channel and the chimney due to gravity head. In this work, a BWR stability analysis code in the frequency domain, named FISTAB (Flashing-Induced STability Analysis for BWR), was developed to address the issue of flashing-induced instability. A thermal-hydraulics non-homogeneous equilibrium model (NHEM) based on a drift flux formulation along with a lumped fuel dynamics model is incorporated in the work. The vapor generation rate is derived from the mixture energy conservation equation while considering the effect of flashing. The functionality of the FISTAB code was confirmed by comparison to experimental results from SIRIUS-N facility at CRIEPI, Japan. Both stationary and perturbation results agree well with the experimental results. (author)

  6. On the Decay Ratio Determination in BWR Stability Analysis by Auto-Correlation Function Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.; Hennig, D.

    2002-11-01

    A novel auto-correlation function (ACF) method has been investigated for determining the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio in BWR stability analyses. The neutron signals are band-pass filtered to separate the oscillation peak in the power spectral density (PSD) from background. Two linear second-order oscillation models are considered. These models, corrected for signal filtering and including a background term under the peak in the PSD, are then least-squares fitted to the ACF of the previously filtered neutron signal, in order to determine the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio. Our method uses fast Fourier transform techniques with signal segmentation for filtering and ACF estimation. Gliding 'short-term' ACF estimates on a record allow the evaluation of uncertainties. Numerical results are given which have been obtained from neutron data of the recent Forsmark I and Forsmark II NEA benchmark project. Our results are compared with those obtained by other participants in the benchmark project. The present PSI report is an extended version of the publication K. Behringer, D. Hennig 'A novel auto-correlation function method for the determination of the decay ratio in BWR stability studies' (Behringer, Hennig, 2002)

  7. Radiation field control at the latest BWR plants -- design principle, operational experience and future subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Energy Research Lab., Ibaraki (Japan); Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie [Hitachi Works, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Improvements of operational procedures to control water chemistry, e.g., nickel/iron control, as well as application of hardware improvements for reducing radioactive corrosion products resulted in an extremely low occupational exposure of less than 0.5 man.Sv/yr without any serious impact on the radwaste system, for BWR plants involved in the Japanese Improvement and Standardization Program. Recently, {sup 60}C radioactively in the reactor water has been increasing due to less crud fixation on the two smooth surfaces of new type high performance fuels and to the pH drop caused by chromium oxide anions released from stainless steel structures and pipings. This increase must be limited by changes in water chemistry, e.g., applications of modified nickel/iron ratio control and weak alkali control. Controlled water chemistry to optimize three points, the plant radiation level and integrities of fuel and structural materials, is the primary future subject for BWR water chemistry.

  8. Characterization of sensitization and stress corrosion cracking behavior of stabilized stainless steels under BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilian, R.; Ilg, U.; Meier, V.; Teichmann, H.; Wachter, O.

    1995-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking occurs if the three parameters -- material condition, tensile stress and water chemistry -- are in a critical range. In this study the material conditions especially of Ti- and Nb-stabilized steels are considered. The purpose of this work is to show the influence of the degree of sensitization of Ti- and Nb-stabilized stainless steels on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility in BWR water chemistry. This is an on-going research program. Preliminary results will be presented. Different types of stabilized, and for comparison unstabilized, stainless steels are examined in various heat treatment conditions with regard to their sensitization behavior by EPR tests (double loop) and TEM. The results are plotted in sensitization diagrams. The sensitization behavior depends on many parameters such as carbon content, stabilization element, stabilization ratio and materials history, e.g. solution heat treatment or cold working. The obtained EPR sensitization diagrams are compared with the well known sensitization diagrams from the literature, which were determined by standard IC test according to e.g. German standard DIN 50914 (equivalent to ASTM A 262, Pract. E). Based on the obtained EPR sensitization diagrams material conditions for SSRT tests were selected. The EPR values (Ir/Ia x 100%) of the tested Ti-stabilized stainless steel are in the range of ∼ 0.1--20%. The SSRT tests are carried out in high-temperature water with 0.4 ppm O 2 , a conductivity of 0.5 microS/cm and a strain rate of 1x10 -6-1 . The test temperature is 280 C. Ti-stabilized stainless steel with Ir/Ia x 100% > 1% suffered intergranular stress corrosion cracking under these conditions. The SCC tests for Nb-stabilized stainless steel are still in progress. The correlation between EPR value, chromium depletion and SSRT result will be shown for a selected material condition of sensitized Ti-stabilized stainless steel

  9. Operation status display and monitoring system for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Yasuo; Hayakawa, Hiroyasu; Kawamura, Atsuo; Kaneda, Mitsunori.

    1982-01-01

    Lately, the development of the system has been made for BWR plants, which monitors the operating status not only in normal operation but also in abnormal state and also for plant safety. Recently, the improvement of man-machine interface has been tried through the practical use of technique which displays data collectively on a CRT screen relating them mutually. As one of those results, the practical use of an electronic computer and color CRT display for No. 1 unit in the Fukushima No. 2 Nuclear Power Station (2F-1), Tokyo Electric Power Co., is described. Also, new centralized control panels containing such systems were used for the 1100 MWe BWR nuclear power plants now under construction, No. 3 unit of the Fukushima No. 2 Power Station and No. 1 unit of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station (2F-3 and K-1, respectively). The display and monitoring system in 2F-1 plant is the first one in which a computer and color CRTs were practically employed for a BWR plant in Japan, and already in commercial operation. The advanced operating status monitoring system, to which the result of evaluation of the above system was added, was incorporated in the new centralized control panels presently under production for 2F-3 and K-1 plants. The outline of the system, the functions of an electronic computer, plant operating status monitor, surveillance test guide, the automation of plant operation and auxiliary operation guide are reported for these advanced monitoring system. It was confirmed that these systems are useful means to improve the man-machine communication for plant operation minitoring. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Operational experience of human-friendly control and instrumentation systems for BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, M.; Watanabe, T.; Suto, O.; Asahi, R.

    1987-01-01

    In recent BWR nuclear power plants in Japan, an advanced centralized monitoring and control system PODIA (Plant Operation by Displayed Information and Automation), which incorporates many operator aid functions, has been in operation since 1985. Main functions of the PODIA system as a computerized operator aid system are as follows. CRT displays for plant monitoring. Automatic controls and operation guides for plant operation. Stand-by status monitoring for engineered safety features during normal operation. Surveillance test procedure guides for engineered safety features. Integrated alarm display. The effectiveness of these functions have been proved through test and commercial operation. It has been obtained that operators have preferred PODIA much more than conventional monitoring and control systems

  11. Quantitative evaluation for training results of nuclear plant operator on BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Sato, Tatsuaki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Miyakita, Kohji; Mizuno, Toshiyuki

    1985-01-01

    Recently, the reliability of neclear power plants has largely risen, and the abnormal phenomena in the actual plants are rarely encountered. Therefore, the training using simulators becomes more and more important. In BWR Operator Training Center Corp., the training of the operators of BWR power plants has been continued for about ten years using a simulator having the nearly same function as the actual plants. The recent high capacity ratio of nuclear power plants has been mostly supported by excellent operators trained in this way. Taking the opportunity of the start of operation of No.2 simulator, effort has been exerted to quantitatively grasp the effect of training and to heighten the quality of training. The outline of seven training courses is shown. The technical ability required for operators, the items of quantifying the effect of training, that is, operational errors and the time required for operation, the method of quantifying, the method of collecting the data and the results of the application to the actual training are described. It was found that this method is suitable to quantify the effect of training. (Kako, I.)

  12. Applicability of best-estimate analysis TRACE in terms of natural circulation BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Masahiro; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Nishi, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    As a part of the international CAMP-Program of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the best-estimate code TRACE is validated with the stability database of SIRIUS-N Facility at high pressure. The TRACE code analyzed is version 5 patch level 2. The SIRIUS-N facility simulates thermal-hydraulics of the economic simplified BWR (ESBWR). The oscillation period correlates well with bubble transit time through the chimney region regardless of the system pressure, inlet subcooling and heat flux. Numerical results exhibits type-I density wave oscillation characteristics, since core inlet restriction shifts stability boundary toward the higher inlet subcooling, and chimney exit restriction enlarges instability region and oscillation amplitude. Stability maps in reference to the subcooling and heat flux obtained from the TRACE code agrees with those of the experimental data at 1 MPa. As the pressure increases from 2 MPa to 7.2 MPa, numerical results become much stable than the experimental results. This is because that two-phase frictional loss is underestimate, since the natural circulation flow rate of numerical results is higher by approximately 20% than that of experimental results. (author)

  13. ATRIUM™ 11 – Validation of performanceand value for BWR operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colet, S.; Garner, N.L.; Graebert, R.; Koch, R.; Mollard, P.

    2015-07-01

    AREVA’s ATRIUM™ 11 advanced fuel design for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is the result of a product development program designed to realize a strict set of performance and reliability objectives complying with the industry market demand. The validation of ATRIUM™ 11 performance is given by the now completed out of pile thermal hydraulic and mechanical tests, the results of poolside examinations of initiated lead fuel assembly programs as well as the results of fuel cycle analyses taking benefit of enhanced fuel reliability and operational flexibility. The coming three years will complete the in-service qualification program leading to the anticipated reload deliveries in Europe in 2018 and leading to reload readiness in the US in 2019. The ATRIUM™ 11 Lead Fuel Assembly program is running in Europe since 2012 and in the USA since 2015 and the first irradiation experience data give as-expected results in term of mechanical and thermal-mechanical behavior as well as levels of corrosion. The large gains in term of fuel cycle economy by switching from 10x10 fuel to ATRIUM™ 11 fuel are illustrated specifically for a 1300 MWe US type reactor featuring a symmetric lattice and operated on a 24 month basis. The analytical tools necessary to support cycle design and licensing were initiated in parallel with the product development and, where required by regulatory authorities, submitted for review in time to allow for approval in parallel with the completion of the in-service qualification program. (Author)

  14. Recent operating experience during startup testing at latest 1100 MWe BWR-5 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Akira; Tateishi, Mizuo; Kajikawa, Makoto; Hayase, Yuichi.

    1986-01-01

    In June and September 1985, the latest two 1100 Mwe BWR-5 nuclear power plants started commercial operation about ten days earlier than initially expected without any unscheduled shutdown. These latest plants, 2F-3 and K-1, are characterized by an improved core with new 8 x 8 fuel assemblies, highly reliable control systems, advanced control room system and turbine steam full bypass system for full load rejection (2F3). This paper describes the following operating experiences gained during their startup testing. 1) Continuous operation at full load rejection. 2) Stable operation at natural circulating flow condition. 3) 31 and 23 hour short time start up operation. 4) 100-75-100 %, 1-8-1-14 hours daily load following operation. (author)

  15. Method of operating control rods for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the danger such as fuel element failures due to rapid power increase and form a control rod pattern for obtaining a required power level in a relatively short time. Method: Control rods are disposed so as to vertically enter into and retract from the central region of each four fuel assemblies adjacent to each other respectively. Upon operation of the control rods, every other control rods in the lateral and longitudinal directions among the entire control rods that are inserted completely are extracted completely at the lower flow limit of coolants. Then, the control rods completely inserted are divided into groups inserted deeply and groups inserted less deeply. The less deeply inserted groups are extracted just before the excess of thermal limit value successively in the lower flow limit of the coolants and then the deeply inserted groups are extracted successively till a predetermined power level in the same manner. Therefore, the coolant flow to the reactor core is increased and the power level is raised. (Furukawa, Y.)

  16. Knowledge management method for knowledge based BWR Core Operation Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Yutaka; Fukuzaki, Takaharu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro

    1989-03-01

    A knowledge management method is proposed to support an except whose knowledge is stored in a knowledge base in the BWR Core Operation Management System. When the alterations in the operation plans are motivated by the expert after evaluating them, the method attempts to find the knowledge which must be modified and to give the expert guidances. In this way the resultant operation plans are improved by modifying values of referenced data. Using data dependency among data, which are defined and referred during inference, data to be modified are retrieved. In generating modification guidances, data reference and definition procedures are classified by syntactic analysis of knowledge. The modified data values are calculated with a sensitivity between the increment in the data to be modified and the resultant one in the performance of operation plans. The efficiency of the knowledge management by the proposed method, when applied to the knowledge based system including 500 pieces of knowledge for BWR control rod programming, is higher than that for interactive use of existing general purpose editors. (author).

  17. Knowledge management method for knowledge based BWR Core Operation Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yutaka; Fukuzaki, Takaharu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro

    1989-01-01

    A knowledge management method is proposed to support an except whose knowledge is stored in a knowledge base in the BWR Core Operation Management System. When the alterations in the operation plans are motivated by the expert after evaluating them, the method attempts to find the knowledge which must be modified and to give the expert guidances. In this way the resultant operation plans are improved by modifying values of referenced data. Using data dependency among data, which are defined and referred during inference, data to be modified are retrieved. In generating modification guidances, data reference and definition procedures are classified by syntactic analysis of knowledge. The modified data values are calculated with a sensitivity between the increment in the data to be modified and the resultant one in the performance of operation plans. The efficiency of the knowledge management by the proposed method, when applied to the knowledge based system including 500 pieces of knowledge for BWR control rod programming, is higher than that for interactive use of existing general purpose editors. (author)

  18. BWR 90: The ABB advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced fight water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and the total power generation costs have been low. In the development of BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to the reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher dim that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Thus, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The work is scheduled for completion in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with the 'evolutionary' design BWR 90+. The primary design goal is to develop the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is

  19. Evaluation of the radial design of fuel cells in an operation cycle of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez C, J.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2003-01-01

    This work is continuation of one previous in the one that the application of the optimization technique called Tabu search to the radial design of fuel cells of boiling water reactors (BWR, Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The objective function used in the optimization process only include neutron parameters (k-infinite and peak of radial power) considering the cell at infinite media. It was obtained to reduce the cell average enrichment completing the characteristics of reactivity of an original cell. The objective of the present work is to validate the objective function that was used for the radial design of the fuel cell (test cell), analyzing the operation of a one cycle of the reactor in which fuels have been fresh recharged that contain an axial area with the nuclear database of the cell designed instead of the original cell. For it is simulated it with Cm-Presto the cycle 10 of the reactor operation of the Unit 1 of the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (U1-CNLV). For the cycle evaluation its were applied so much the simulation with the Haling strategy, as the simulation of the one cycle with control rod patterns and they were evaluated the energy generation and several power limits and reactivity that are used as design parameters in fuel reloads of BWR reactors. The results at level of an operation cycle of the reactor, show that the objective function used in the optimization and radial design of the cell is adequate and that it can induce to one good use of the fuel. (Author)

  20. Computerized operator support system with new man-machine interface for BWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, K.; Naito, N.; Sugawara, M.; Sato, N.; Mori, N.; Tai, I.; Fukumoto, A.; Tsuchida, M.

    1984-01-01

    Improvement of the man-machine interface of nuclear power plants is an important contribution to the further enhancement of operational safety. In addition, recent advances in computer technology seem to offer the greatest opportunity to date for achieving improvement in the man-machine interface. The development of a computerized operator support system for BWRs has been undertaken since 1980 with the support of the Japanese Government. The conceptual design of this system is based on the role of the operators. The main functions are standby system management, disturbance analysis and post-trip operational guidance. The objective of the standby system management is to monitor the standby status of the engineered safety feature during normal operation to assure its proper functioning at the onset of emergency situations. The disturbance analysis system detects disturbances in the plant in their early stages and informs the plant operators about, for example, the cause of the disturbances, the plant status and possible propagations. Consequently, operators can take corrective actions to prevent unnecessary plant shutdown. The objective of the post trip operational guide is to support operators in diagnosis and corrective action after a plant trip. Its functions are to monitor the performance of the engineered safety feature, to identify the plant status and to guide the appropriate corrective action to achieve safe plant shutdown. The information from the computerized operator support system is supplied to operators through a colour CRT operator console. The authors have evaluated the performance of various new man-machine interfacing tools and proposed a new operator console design. A prototype system has been developed and verification/validation is proceeding with a BWR plant simulator. (author)

  1. Stability analysis of a recycling circuit of a BWR type reactor. Theoretical study; Analisis de estabilidad de un circuito de recirculacion de un reactor del tipo BWR. Estudio teorico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas H, J.G.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, 09000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez M, V.M. [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, 04000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The Technology, Regulation and Services Management of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards financed and in coordinate form with the I.P.H. Department of the Metropolitan Autonomous-Iztapalapa University developed the present project with the purpose of studying the effect of the recycling system on the linear stability of a BWR reactor whose reference central is the Laguna Verde power station. The present project forms part of a work series focused to the linear stability of the nuclear reactor of the Unit 1 at Laguna Verde power station. The components of the recycling system considered for the study of stability are the recycling external circuit (recycling pumps, valves) and the internal circuit (downcomer, jet pumps, lower full, driers, separators). The mathematical model is obtained applying mass balances and movement quantity in each one of the mentioned circuits. With respect to the nucleus model two regions are considered, the first one is made of a flow in one phase and the second one of a flow in two phases. For modelling the biphasic region it is considered homogenous flow. Generally it is studied the system behavior in the frequency domain starting from the transfer function applied to four operational states which correspond to the lower stability zone in the map power-flow of the Unit 1 of Laguna Verde power station. The Nyquist diagrams corresponding to each state as well as their characteristic frequency were determined. The results show that exists a very clear dependence of the power-flow relation on the stability of the system. It was found that the boiling length is an important parameter for the linear stability of the system. The obtained results show that the characteristic frequencies in unstability zones are similar to the reported data of the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde power station in the event of power oscillations carried out in January 1995. (Author)

  2. Leibstadt: a 950-MW(e) BWR/6 Mark-III in commercial operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.U.

    1985-01-01

    It may be somewhat premature to report on a plant that started up in 1984 as the first of General Electric's (GE's) BWR/6 Mark-III plants in the Western Hemisphere and commenced commercial operation on December 15, 1984. The theme of the session certainly applies to the overall Swiss nuclear program and the search for excellence has been our ambition out of economic and energy supply necessities. Leibstadt came on line just in time to cover the needs of the Swiss consumers during the winter of 84/85. It has provided reliable service from the outset and operated during the extreme European cold wave in January 1985 without interruption. In 1985 the plant is expected to cover approx.15% of the electricity needs of Switzerland. The encouraging start of commercial operation gives hope that with time Leibstadt will be able to approach the capacity factors of the other four Swiss nuclear power stations, which in 1984 were between 88.4 and 90.3%

  3. Operation with monosequences in ASEA-ATOM BWR. A way of reducing the impact of PCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, S.

    1981-01-01

    The energy loss due to PCI restrictions for a start-up after refuelling (or after sequence exchange) is about 18 EFPH (Effective Full Power Hours). All ASEA-ATOM BWRs are equipped with fine motion control rod drives (FMCRD), which makes it possible to withdraw control rods at full power in acceptably small steps (1.8 cm) from the PCI point of view. Thus burnup compensation can always be done without any energy loss due to PCI-restrictions. The ASEA-ATOM PCI-related operating restrictions are described and their implication on the operations of an ASEA-ATOM BWR is discussed. It was shown how the energy generation losses due to PCI-restrictions could be reduced to a minimum, by proper use of continuous motion screw-type control rod drives and high-capacity recirculation pumps, together with advanced use of burnable absorber, and refined refuelling schemes. Monosequence Operation (MSO) has reduced energy generation losses due to PCI-restrictions from about 1% to about 0.4%. MSO has been in routine use in Swedish BWRs since 1977 and during 1980 the fourteenth successful MSO-cycle has been completed

  4. 3D simulation of a core operation cycle of a BWR using Serpent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera Ch, M. A.; Del Valle G, E.; Gomez T, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This work had the main goal to develop a methodology to obtain the length of an operating cycle of the core of a BWR under different operating states using the Serpent code. The reactor core modeled in Serpent is composed of 444 fuel assemblies (120 with fresh fuels and 324 fuels from previous cycles), 109 cruciform control rods and light water as moderator and coolant. Once the core of the reactor was modeled in Serpent (Three-dimensional) without considering the cruciform control rods, a simulation was carried out with different steps of burning in the operational state with the average values of the fuel temperature (900 K), moderator temperature (600 K) and voids fraction equal to 0.4. In addition, the thermal power considered was 2017 MWt. This operational state was chosen because a previous analysis (not shown in this work) was carried out in 4 types of control cells. The first and second control cell has all of its natural uranium fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod respectively. The third and fourth control cell types have various types of enrichment, both natural uranium and gadolinium in their fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod. The conclusion of this previous analysis was that the behavior of the effective multiplication factor along the fuel burnout within the four control cell types was almost unaffected by the fuel temperature but was affected by the voids fraction. Thus, for this operating cycle in the operating state defined above, its length was 14,63052 GW t/Tm. In addition, at the end of this cycle, the decay heat obtained was equal to 116.71 MWt and the inventory of the most important isotopes to be considered was obtained, such as some isotopes of uranium, neptune, plutonium, americium and curio. (Author)

  5. Standard for assessment of fuel integrity under anticipated operational occurrences in BWR power plant:2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Suzuki, Riichiro; Komura, Seiichi; Kudo, Yoshiro; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Oomizu, Satoru; Kitamura, Hideya; Nagata, Yoshifumi

    2003-01-01

    To secure fuel integrity, a Light Water Reactor (LWR) core is designed so that no boiling transition (BT) should take place in fuel assemblies and excessive rise in fuel cladding temperature due to deteriorated that transfer should be avoided in Anticipated Operational Occurrences (AOO). In some AOO in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), however, the rise in reactor power could be limited by SCRAM or void reactivity effect. Recent studies have provided accumulated knowledge that even if BT takes place in fuel assemblies, the rise in fuel cladding temperature could be so small that it will not threat to fuel integrity, as long as the BT condition terminates within a short period of time. In addition, appropriate methods have been developed to evaluate the cladding temperature during dryout. This standard provides requirements in the assessment of fuel integrity under AOO in which limited-BT condition is temporarily reached and the propriety of reusing a fuel assembly that has experienced limited-BT condition. The standard has been approved by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan following deliberation by impartial members for two and half years. It is now expected that this standard will provide an effective measure for the rational expansion of fuel design and operational margin. (author)

  6. Experimental investigation of mixing of non-isothermal water streams at BWR operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergagio, Mattia, E-mail: bergagio@kth.se [AlbaNova University Center, Nuclear Reactor Technology Division, Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Anglart, Henryk, E-mail: henryk@kth.se [AlbaNova University Center, Nuclear Reactor Technology Division, Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 21/25 Nowowiejska Street, 00-665 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Temperatures are measured in the presence of mixing at BWR operating conditions. • The thermocouple support is moved along a pattern to extend the measurement region. • Uncertainty of 1.58 K for temperatures acquired at 1000 Hz. • Momenta of the hot streams and thermal stratification affect the data examined. • Unconventional spectral analysis is required to further study the data collected. - Abstract: In this experimental investigation, wall surface temperatures have been measured during mixing of three water streams in the annular gap between two coaxial stainless-steel tubes. The inner tube, with an outer diameter of 35 mm and a thickness of 5 mm, holds six K-type, ungrounded thermocouples with a diameter of 0.5 mm, which measured surface temperatures with a sampling rate of either 100 Hz or 1000 Hz. The tube was rotated from 0 to 360° and moved in a range of 387 mm in the axial direction to allow measurements of surface temperatures in the whole mixing region. The outer tube has an inner diameter of 80 mm and a thickness of 10 mm to withstand a water pressure of 9 MPa. A water stream at a temperature of either 333 K or 423 K and a Reynolds number between 1657 and 8410 rose vertically in the annular gap and mixed with two water streams at a temperature of 549 K and a Reynolds number between 3.56 × 10{sup 5} and 7.11 × 10{sup 5}. These two water streams entered the annulus radially on the same axial level, 180° apart. Water pressure was kept at 7.2 MPa. Temperature recordings were performed at five axial and eight azimuthal locations, for each set of boundary conditions. Each recording lasted 120 s to provide reliable data on the variance, intermittency and frequency of the surface temperature time series at hand. Thorough calculations indicate that the uncertainty in the measured temperature is of 1.58 K. The mixing region extends up to 0.2 m downward of the hot inlets. In most cases, measurements indicate non-uniform mixing in the

  7. ASTM standards associated with PWR and BWR power plant licensing, operation and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; McElroy, R.J.; Gold, R.; Lippincott, E.P.; Lowe, A.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers ASTM Standards that are available, under revision, and are being considered in support of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) licensing, regulation, operation, surveillance and life attainment. The current activities of ASTM Committee E10 and its Subcommittees E10.02 and current activities of ASTM Committee E10 and its Subcommittees E10.02 and E10.05 and their Task Groups (TG) are described. A very important aspect of these efforts is the preparation, revision, and balloting of standards identified in the ASTM E706 Standard on Master Matrix for Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessel (PV) Surveillance Standards. The current version (E706-87) of the Master Matrix identifies 21 ASTM LWR physics-dosimetry-metallurgy standards for Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Support Structure (SS) surveillance programs, whereas, for the next revision 34 standards are identified. The need for national and international coordination of Standards Technology Development, Transfer and Training (STDTT) is considered in this and other Symposium papers that address specific standards related physics-dosimetry-metallurgy issues. 69 refs

  8. 3D simulation of a core operation cycle of a BWR using Serpent; Simulacion 3D de un ciclo de operacion del nucleo de un BWR usando SERPENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera Ch, M. A.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: rionchez@icloud.com [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This work had the main goal to develop a methodology to obtain the length of an operating cycle of the core of a BWR under different operating states using the Serpent code. The reactor core modeled in Serpent is composed of 444 fuel assemblies (120 with fresh fuels and 324 fuels from previous cycles), 109 cruciform control rods and light water as moderator and coolant. Once the core of the reactor was modeled in Serpent (Three-dimensional) without considering the cruciform control rods, a simulation was carried out with different steps of burning in the operational state with the average values of the fuel temperature (900 K), moderator temperature (600 K) and voids fraction equal to 0.4. In addition, the thermal power considered was 2017 MWt. This operational state was chosen because a previous analysis (not shown in this work) was carried out in 4 types of control cells. The first and second control cell has all of its natural uranium fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod respectively. The third and fourth control cell types have various types of enrichment, both natural uranium and gadolinium in their fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod. The conclusion of this previous analysis was that the behavior of the effective multiplication factor along the fuel burnout within the four control cell types was almost unaffected by the fuel temperature but was affected by the voids fraction. Thus, for this operating cycle in the operating state defined above, its length was 14,63052 GW t/Tm. In addition, at the end of this cycle, the decay heat obtained was equal to 116.71 MWt and the inventory of the most important isotopes to be considered was obtained, such as some isotopes of uranium, neptune, plutonium, americium and curio. (Author)

  9. Model for the analysis of transitories and stability of a BWR reactor with fuel of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez C, A.; Espinosa P, G.; Francois L, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    In this work it is described the thermo hydraulic and neutronic pattern used to simulate the behavior of a nucleus of thorium-uranium under different conditions of operation. The analysed nucleus was designed with base to assemblies that operate under the cover-seed concept. The pattern was proven to conditions of stationary state and transitory state. Here it is only presented the simulation of the one SCRAM manual and it is compared in the behavior of a nucleus with UO 2 . Additionally one carries out an analysis of stability taking into account the four corners that define the area of stability of the map flow-power and to conditions of 100% of flow and 100% of power. The module of stability is based on the pattern of Lahey and Podowsky to estimate the drops of pressure during a perturbation. It is concludes that the behavior of this nucleus is not very different to the one shown by the nuclei loaded with the fuel of UO 2 . (Author)

  10. The BWR [Boiling Water Reactor] Emergency Operating Procedures Tracking System (EOPTS): Evaluation by control-room operating crews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurgin, A.J.; Orvis, D.D.; Spurgin, J.P.; Luna, C.J.

    1990-05-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Taiwan Power Company (TPC) and conducted by APG and TPC to perform evaluation of the Emergency Operating Procedures Tracking System (EOPTS). The EOPTS is an expert system employing artificial intelligence techniques developed by EPRI for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants based on emergency operating procedures (EOPs). EOPTS is a computerized decision aid used to assist plant operators in efficient and reliable use of EOPs. The main objective of this project was to evaluate the EOPTS and determine how an operator aid of this type could noticeably improve the response time and the reliability of control room crews to multi-failure scenarios. A secondary objective was to collect data on how crew performance was affected. Experiments results indicate that the EOPTS measurably improves crew performance over crews using the EOP flow charts. Time-comparison measurements indicate that crews using the EOPTS perform required actions more quickly than do those using the flowcharts. The results indicate that crews using the EOPTS are not only faster and more consistent in their actions but make fewer errors. In addition, they have a higher likelihood of recovering from the errors that they do make. Use of the EOPTS in the control room should result in faster termination and mitigation of accidents and reduced risk of power plant operations. Recommendations are made towards possible applications of the EOPTS to operator training and evaluation, and for the applicability of the evaluation methodology developed for this project to the evaluation of similar operator aides. 17 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs

  11. Sludge stabilization operability test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.S.

    1994-01-01

    Document provides the results of the Operability Test Procedure performed to test the operability of the HC-21C thermal stabilization process for sludge. The OTP assured all equipment functioned properly and established the baseline temperature profile for glovebox HC-21C

  12. Nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic nonlinear stability analysis using a novel BWR reduced order model. Pt. 1. The effects of using drift flux versus homogeneous equilibrium models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dokhane, A.; Henning, D.; Chawla, R.; Rizwan-Uddin

    2003-01-01

    BWR stability analysis at PSI, as at other research centres, is usually carried out employing complex system codes. However, these do not allow a detailed investigation of the complete manifold of all possible solutions of the associated nonlinear differential equation set. A novel analytical, reduced order model for BWR stability has been developed at PSI, in several successive steps. In the first step, the thermal-hydraulic model was used for studying the thermal-hydraulic instabilities. A study was then conducted of the one-channel nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic dynamics in a BWR by adding a simple point kinetic model for neutron kinetics and a model for the fuel heat conduction dynamics. In this paper, a two-channel nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic model is introduced to simulate the out-of phase oscillations in a BWR. This model comprises three parts: spatial mode neutron kinetics with the fundamental and fist azimuthal modes; fuel heat conduction dynamics; and thermal-hydraulics model. This present model is an extension of the Karve et al. model i.e., a drift flux model is used instead of the homogeneous equilibrium model for two-phase flow, and lambda modes are used instead of the omega modes for the neutron kinetics. This two-channel model is employed in stability and bifurcation analyses, carried out using the bifurcation code BIFDD. The stability boundary (SB) and the nature of the Poincare-Andronov-Hopf bifurcation (PAF-B) are determined and visualized in a suitable two-dimensional parameter/state space. A comparative study of the homogeneous equilibrium model (HEM) and the drift flux model (DFM) is carried out to investigate the effects of the DFM parameters the void distribution parameter C 0 and the drift velocity V gi -on the SB, the nature of PAH bifurcation, and on the type of oscillation mode (in-phase or out-of-phase). (author)

  13. Simulation of the operational monitoring of a BWR with Simulate-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez F, J. O.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    This work was developed in order to describe the methodology for calculating the fuel burned of nuclear power reactors throughout the duration of their operating cycle and for each fuel reload. In other words, simulate and give monitoring to the main operation parameters of sequential way along its operation cycles. For this particular case, the operational monitoring of five consecutive cycles of a reactor was realized using the information reported by their processes computer. The simulation was performed with the Simulate-3 software and the results were compared with those of the process computer. The goal is to get the fuel burned, cycle after cycle for obtain the state conditions of the reactor needed for the fuel reload analyses, stability studies and transients analysis, and the development of a methodology that allows to manage and resolve similar cases for future fuel cycles of the nuclear power plant and explore the various options offered by the simulator. (Author)

  14. Performance of iron–chromium–aluminum alloy surface coatings on Zircaloy 2 under high-temperature steam and normal BWR operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Weicheng; Mouche, Peter A.; Han, Xiaochun [University of Illinois, Department of Nuclear, Radiological, and Plasma Engineering, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Heuser, Brent J., E-mail: bheuser@illinois.edu [University of Illinois, Department of Nuclear, Radiological, and Plasma Engineering, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Was, Gary S. [University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) coatings deposited on Zircaloy 2 (Zy2) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by magnetron sputtering have been tested with respect to oxidation weight gain in high-temperature steam. In addition, autoclave testing of FeCrAl-coated Zy2 coupons under pressure-temperature-dissolved oxygen coolant conditions representative of a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment has been performed. Four different FeCrAl compositions have been tested in 700 °C steam; compositions that promote alumina formation inhibited oxidation of the underlying Zy2. Parabolic growth kinetics of alumina on FeCrAl-coated Zy2 is quantified via elemental depth profiling. Autoclave testing under normal BWR operating conditions (288 °C, 9.5 MPa with normal water chemistry) up to 20 days demonstrates observable weight gain over uncoated Zy2 simultaneously exposed to the same environment. However, no FeCrAl film degradation was observed. The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe–Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system. - Graphical abstract: Weight gain normalized to total sample surface area versus time during 700 °C steam exposure for FeCrAl samples with different composition (A) and Fe/Cr/Al:62/4/34 (B). In both cases, the responses of uncoated Zry2 (Zry2-13A and Zry2-19A) are shown for comparison. This uncoated Zry2 response shows the expected pre-transition quasi-cubic kinetic behavior and eventual breakaway (linear) kinetics. Highlights: • FeCrAl coatings deposited on Zy2 have been tested with respect to oxidation in high-temperature steam. • FeCrAl compositions promoting alumina formation inhibited oxidation of Zy2 and delay weight gain. • Autoclave testing to 20 days of coated Zy2 in a simulated BWR environment demonstrates minimal weight gain and no film degradation. • The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe-Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system.

  15. Detecting long-range correlation with detrended fluctuation analysis: Application to BWR stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico)]. E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico); Vazquez, Alejandro [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico)

    2006-11-15

    The aim of this paper is to explore the application of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to study boiling water reactor stability. DFA is a scaling method commonly used for detecting long-range correlations in non-stationary time series. This method is based on the random walk theory and was applied to neutronic power signal of Forsmark stability benchmark. Our results shows that the scaling properties breakdown during unstable oscillations.

  16. Detecting long-range correlation with detrended fluctuation analysis: Application to BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Vazquez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the application of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to study boiling water reactor stability. DFA is a scaling method commonly used for detecting long-range correlations in non-stationary time series. This method is based on the random walk theory and was applied to neutronic power signal of Forsmark stability benchmark. Our results shows that the scaling properties breakdown during unstable oscillations

  17. Power oscillations in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa P, G.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main problems in the operation of BWR type reactors is the instability in power that these could present. One type of oscillations and that is the objective of this work is the named density wave, which is attributed to the thermohydraulic processes that take place in the reactor core. From the beginnings of the development of BWR reactors, the stability of these has been an important aspect in their design, due to its possible consequences on the fuel integrity. The reactor core operates in two phase flow conditions and it is observed that under certain power and flow conditions, power instabilities appear. Studying this type of phenomena is complex, due to that a reactor core is constituted approximately by 27,000 fuel bars with different distributions of power and flow. The phenomena that cause the instability in BWR reactors continue being matter of scientific study. In the literature mainly in nuclear subject, it can be observed that exist different methods and approximations for studying this type of phenomena, nevertheless, their results are focused to establish safety limits in the reactor operation, instead of studying in depth of the knowledge about. Also in this line sense of the reactor data analysis, the oscillations characteristic frequencies are obtained for trying to establish if the power is growing or decreasing. In addition to that before mentioned in this paper it is presented a rigorous study applying the volumetric average method, for obtaining the vacuum waves propagation velocities and its possible connection with the power oscillations. (Author)

  18. Simulation of the operational monitoring of a BWR with Simulate-3; Simulacion del seguimiento operacional de un reactor BWR con Simulate-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez F, J. O.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: ace.jo.cu@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    This work was developed in order to describe the methodology for calculating the fuel burned of nuclear power reactors throughout the duration of their operating cycle and for each fuel reload. In other words, simulate and give monitoring to the main operation parameters of sequential way along its operation cycles. For this particular case, the operational monitoring of five consecutive cycles of a reactor was realized using the information reported by their processes computer. The simulation was performed with the Simulate-3 software and the results were compared with those of the process computer. The goal is to get the fuel burned, cycle after cycle for obtain the state conditions of the reactor needed for the fuel reload analyses, stability studies and transients analysis, and the development of a methodology that allows to manage and resolve similar cases for future fuel cycles of the nuclear power plant and explore the various options offered by the simulator. (Author)

  19. A real-time BWR [boiling water reactor] stability measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; King, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of a portable, real-time system used for nonperturbational measurements of stability in boiling water reactors. The algorithm used in this system estimates the closed-loop asymptotic decay ratio using only the naturally occurring neutron noise and it is based on the univariate autoregressive methodology

  20. On-line prediction of BWR transients in support of plant operation and safety analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    A combination of advanced modeling techniques and modern, special-purpose peripheral minicomputer technology is presented which affords realistic predictions of plant transient and severe off-normal events in LWR power plants through on-line simulations at a speed ten times greater than actual process speeds. Results are shown for a BWR plant simulation. The mathematical models account for nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous two-phase flow effects in the coolant, for acoustical effects in the steam line and for the dynamics of the recirculation loop and feed-water train. Point kinetics incorporate reactivity feedback for void fraction, for fuel temperature, and for coolant temperature. Control systems and trip logic are simulated for the nuclear steam supply system

  1. State of the art report on boiling water reactor stability (SOAR on BWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Starting issues of this SOAR are BWR plant descriptions including peculiarities relevant to stability and the manifestation of instabilities during operation. The report continues with the characterization of instabilities from various experiments, the features and the capabilities of relevant codes and models, BWR core instrumentation and control, the stability behaviour of operating BWR plants and the regulatory approach to the stability issue. The main conclusion is that the BWR stability should not be considered as a safety issue; however R and D in specific areas is recommended

  2. BWR 90 and BWR 90+: Two advanced BWR design generations from ABB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced light water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and total power generation costs have been low. When developing the BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to a reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher than that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Hence, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The review work was completed in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with an 'evolutionary' design called BWR 90+, which aims at developing the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is performed by ABB Atom

  3. Development of advanced BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Masatoshi

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese technology and domestic production of BWR type nuclear power plants have been established through the experiences in the construction and operation of BWRs in addition to the technical agreement with the General Electric Co. In early days, the plants experienced some trouble such as stress corrosion cracking and some inconvenience in the operation and maintenance. The government, electric power companies and BWR manufacturers have endeavored to standardize and improve the design of LWRs for the purpose of improving the safety, reliability and the rate of operation and reducing the radiation exposure dose of plant workers. The first and second stages of the standardization and improvement of LWRs have been completed. Five manufacturers of BWRs in the world have continued the conceptual design of a new version of BWR power plants. It was concluded that this is the most desirable version of BWR nuclear power stations, but the technical and economic evaluation must be made before the commercial application. Six electric power companies and three manufacturers of BWRs in Japan set up the organization to develop the technology in cooperation. The internal pump system, the new control rod drive mechanism and others are the main features. (Kako, I.)

  4. Dynamics of a BWR with inclusion of boiling nonlinearity, clad temperature and void-dependent core power removal: Stability and bifurcation characteristics of advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Dinkar, E-mail: dinkar@iitk.ac.in [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Program, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India); Kalra, Manjeet Singh, E-mail: drmanjeet.singh@dituniversity.edu.in [DIT University, Dehradun 248 009 (India); Wahi, Pankaj, E-mail: wahi@iitk.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Simplified models with inclusion of the clad temperature are considered. • Boiling nonlinearity and core power removal have been modeled. • Method of multiple time scales has been used for nonlinear analysis to get the nature and amplitude of oscillations. • Incorporation of modeling complexities enhances the stability of system. • We find that reactors with higher nominal power are more desirable from the point of view of global stability. - Abstract: We study the effect of including boiling nonlinearity, clad temperature and void-dependent power removal from the primary loop in the mathematical modeling of a boiling water reactor (BWR) on its dynamic characteristics. The advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR) is taken as a case study. Towards this end, we have analyzed two different simplified models with different handling of the clad temperature. Each of these models has the necessary modifications pertaining to boiling nonlinearity and power removal from the primary loop. These simplified models incorporate the neutronics and thermal–hydraulic coupling. The effect of successive changes in the modeling assumptions on the linear stability of the reactor has been studied and we find that incorporation of each of these complexities in the model increases the stable operating region of the reactor. Further, the method of multiple time scales (MMTS) is exploited to carry out the nonlinear analysis with a view to predict the bifurcation characteristics of the reactor. Both subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations are present in each model depending on the choice of operating parameters. These analytical observations from MMTS have been verified against numerical simulations. A parametric study on the effect of changing the nominal reactor power on the regions in the parametric space of void coefficient of reactivity and fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity with sub- and super-critical Hopf bifurcations has been performed for all

  5. BWR level estimation using Kalman Filtering approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, G.; Divakaruni, S.M.; Meyer, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Work is in progress on development of a system for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) vessel level validation and failure detection. The levels validated include the liquid level both inside and outside the core shroud. This work is a major part of a larger effort to develop a complete system for BWR signal validation. The demonstration plant is the Oyster Creek BWR. Liquid level inside the core shroud is not directly measured during full power operation. This level must be validated using measurements of other quantities and analytic models. Given the available sensors, analytic models for level that are based on mass and energy balances can contain open integrators. When such a model is driven by noisy measurements, the model predicted level will deviate from the true level over time. To validate the level properly and to avoid false alarms, the open integrator must be stabilized. In addition, plant parameters will change slowly with time. The respective model must either account for these plant changes or be insensitive to them to avoid false alarms and maintain sensitivity to true failures of level instrumentation. Problems are addressed here by combining the extended Kalman Filter and Parity Space Decision/Estimator. The open integrator is stabilized by integrating from the validated estimate at the beginning of each sampling interval, rather than from the model predicted value. The model is adapted to slow plant/sensor changes by updating model parameters on-line

  6. Construction of an external electrode for determination of electrochemical corrosion potential in normal operational conditions of an BWR type reactor for hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar T, J.A.; Rivera M, H.; Hernandez C, R.

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of the corrosion processes at high temperature requires of external devices that being capable to resist a temperature of 288 Centigrade and a pressure of 80 Kg/cm 2 , to give stable and reproducible results of some variable and resisting physically and chemically the radiation. The external electrode of Ag/AgCl fulfils all the requirements in the determination of the electrochemical corrosion potential under normal operational conditions of a BWR type reactor in hot cells. (Author)

  7. The Doctrinal Basis for Medical Stability Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    lead actor, preferably a HN agency, but sometimes the military must take the lead in medical stability operations when overwhelming violence prevents...34 Assessment Tasks Administration of hospital Communications Obstetrics , Pediatrics, Emergency room. Operating room Nursing procedures Medical supply

  8. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part I: BWR/NWC conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.; Devrient, B.; Roth, A.; Ehrnsten, U.; Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M.; Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.

    2004-01-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWR) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It was focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of EAC crack growth behaviour/mechanism of LAS in high-temperature water under steady-state power operation (constant load) and transient operating conditions (e.g., start-up/shut-down, transients in water chemistry and load). Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurised water reactor (VVER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (VVER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarises the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated BWR/NWC conditions. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  9. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part I: BWR/NWC conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Devrient, B.; Roth, A. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Ehrnsten, U. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T. [Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt, MPA, Stuttgart (Germany); Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWR) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It was focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of EAC crack growth behaviour/mechanism of LAS in high-temperature water under steady-state power operation (constant load) and transient operating conditions (e.g., start-up/shut-down, transients in water chemistry and load). Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurised water reactor (VVER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (VVER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarises the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated BWR/NWC conditions. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  10. Methyl Iodide Decomposition at BWR Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Mike; Bell, Merl

    2012-09-01

    Based on favourable results from short-term testing of methanol addition to an operating BWR plant, AREVA has performed numerous studies in support of necessary Engineering and Plant Safety Evaluations prior to extended injection of methanol. The current paper presents data from a study intended to provide further understanding of the decomposition of methyl iodide as it affects the assessment of methyl iodide formation with the application of methanol at BWR Plants. This paper describes the results of the decomposition testing under UV-C light at laboratory conditions and its effect on the subject methyl iodide production evaluation. The study as to the formation and decomposition of methyl iodide as it is effected by methanol addition is one phase of a larger AREVA effort to provide a generic plant Safety Evaluation prior to long-term methanol injection to an operating BWR. Other testing phases have investigated the compatibility of methanol with fuel construction materials, plant structural materials, plant consumable materials (i.e. elastomers and coatings), and ion exchange resins. Methyl iodide is known to be very unstable, typically preserved with copper metal or other stabilizing materials when produced and stored. It is even more unstable when exposed to light, heat, radiation, and water. Additionally, it is known that methyl iodide will decompose radiolytically, and that this effect may be simulated using ultra-violet radiation (UV-C) [2]. In the tests described in this paper, the use of a UV-C light source provides activation energy for the formation of methyl iodide. Thus is similar to the effect expected from Cherenkov radiation present in a reactor core after shutdown. Based on the testing described in this paper, it is concluded that injection of methanol at concentrations below 2.5 ppm in BWR applications to mitigate IGSCC of internals is inconsequential to the accident conditions postulated in the FSAR as they are related to methyl iodide formation

  11. Evaluation of the radial design of fuel cells in an operation cycle of a BWR reactor; Evaluacion del diseno radial de celdas de combustible en un ciclo de operacion de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez C, J.; Martin del Campo M, C. [Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jgco@ver.megared.net.mx

    2003-07-01

    This work is continuation of one previous in the one that the application of the optimization technique called Tabu search to the radial design of fuel cells of boiling water reactors (BWR, Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The objective function used in the optimization process only include neutron parameters (k-infinite and peak of radial power) considering the cell at infinite media. It was obtained to reduce the cell average enrichment completing the characteristics of reactivity of an original cell. The objective of the present work is to validate the objective function that was used for the radial design of the fuel cell (test cell), analyzing the operation of a one cycle of the reactor in which fuels have been fresh recharged that contain an axial area with the nuclear database of the cell designed instead of the original cell. For it is simulated it with Cm-Presto the cycle 10 of the reactor operation of the Unit 1 of the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (U1-CNLV). For the cycle evaluation its were applied so much the simulation with the Haling strategy, as the simulation of the one cycle with control rod patterns and they were evaluated the energy generation and several power limits and reactivity that are used as design parameters in fuel reloads of BWR reactors. The results at level of an operation cycle of the reactor, show that the objective function used in the optimization and radial design of the cell is adequate and that it can induce to one good use of the fuel. (Author)

  12. Stability Operations: Policy and Doctrine Awaiting Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    periods move through offense and defense (or reverse ) sequentially while stability is presented throughout the rotation. This causes stability to...The author’s personal experience in Afghanistan and having studied the complex nature of stability operations suggests the reverse is true. June...climate change, Euro/EU collapse, a democratic or collapsed China, a reformed Iran, nuclear war or WMD/cyber-attack, solar geomagnetic storms, U.S

  13. WEOD-S: Westinghouse expanded operating domain stability solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotander, C.; Blaisdell, J.; Anderson, D.; Kumar, V.; Stier, D.; Chu, E.

    2014-01-01

    As Extended Power up-rates (EPUs) are implemented in BWR plants, the flow window at full power decreases due to the extension of the rod line. It is thus desirable to raise load line limits to realize increased power generation at a wider flow range offering operational flexibility and fuel cycle efficiency. However, when load lines are raised, the power/flow operating map is changed in a direction that can cause core power instability at its lower left corner (high power/low flow) if a flow reduction transient (i.e. pump trip) occurs. Unstable operation of the reactor core can result in diverging neutron flux (and power) oscillations, and through the thermal hydraulic/neutronic feedback challenge the Safety Limit Minimum Critical Power Ratio (SLMCPR). In many BWRs the SLMCPR in a power oscillation event is already protected by a detect and suppress system. The methodology to determine the set point of this system, the DIVOM methodology (Delta CPR over Initial MCPR versus Oscillation Magnitude), is defined and applicable up to, but not beyond, the thermal hydraulic stability limit. The DIVOM methodology is used to determine the channel power oscillation magnitude that will challenge the SLMCPR. It is defined as the relationship between ΔCPR/ICPR and the Hot Channel Oscillation Magnitude (HCOM). The DIVOM calculations are typically performed at the end state following a design basis two pump trip from rated power and minimum flow. When approaching the thermal hydraulic (T/H) instability limit, the DIVOM curve can become chaotic and the DIVOM approach breaks down. At T/H-instability, small power fluctuations give rise to large flow oscillations and the non-linear dynamic properties emerge. The newly developed Westinghouse Expanded Operating Domain Stability (WEOD-S) solution proactively prevents entry into the regions of the power/flow map that are vulnerable to thermal hydraulic instability. This is achieved automatically, without any dependence on operator action

  14. Concept of the core for a small-to-medium-sized BWR that does not use control rods during normal operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakadozono, N.; Ikegawa, T., E-mail: naoyuki.nakadozono.st@hitachi.com [Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi Research Lab., Ibaraki (Japan); Nishida, K. [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    A small-to-medium-sized boiling water reactor (BWR) with a natural circulation system is being developed for countries where initial investment funds for construction are limited and electricity transmission networks have not been fully constructed. To lighten operators' work load, a core that does not use control rods during normal operation (control rod-free core) was developed by using a neutronics calculation system coupled with core flow evaluation. The control rod-free core had large core power fluctuation with conventional burnable poison design. The target of core power fluctuation was set to less than 10% and was achieved by optimization of burnable poison arrangement. (author)

  15. Concept of the core for a small-to-medium-sized BWR that does not use control rods during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakadozono, N.; Ikegawa, T.; Nishida, K.

    2013-01-01

    A small-to-medium-sized boiling water reactor (BWR) with a natural circulation system is being developed for countries where initial investment funds for construction are limited and electricity transmission networks have not been fully constructed. To lighten operators' work load, a core that does not use control rods during normal operation (control rod-free core) was developed by using a neutronics calculation system coupled with core flow evaluation. The control rod-free core had large core power fluctuation with conventional burnable poison design. The target of core power fluctuation was set to less than 10% and was achieved by optimization of burnable poison arrangement. (author)

  16. Simulation of BWR stability following an ATWS with boron injection using TRAC-BF1 with one-dimensional kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lider, S.; Maclan, R.; Baratta, A.J.; Mahaffy, J.; Robinson, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    The scenario following an ATWS is characterized by the necessity to reduce the power in the reactor as fast as possible. The only means to insert a significant amount of negative reactivity in a BWR during an ATWS are the natural reactor negative void coefficient, and the injection of highly enriched boron through the SLCS. The ATWS management strategy suggested by BWR owner's group contemplates an initial rapid decrease in power as a result of the recirculation pump trip. This is followed by lowering of vessel water level and the injection of borated water into the lower plenum. A recent paper of Dias, et al. reports that reducing core power and lowering water level causes a reduction in boron mixing efficiency and the net effect is a longer time to shut down and an increase in Suppression Pool (SP) temperature. In the present paper, a series of analyses are made to address this issue. The preliminary results for the water level positions at TAF, TAF+1.5 m (TAF+5') and TAF+3 m (TAF+10') support the similar findings of Dias, et al. (author)

  17. Boiling water reactors with uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. Report 5: Analysis of the reactivity coefficients and the stability of a BWR loaded with MOx fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires

    2000-01-01

    This report is a part of the project titled 'Boiling Water Reactors With Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide (MOx) Fuel'. The aim of this study is to model the impact of a core loading pattern containing MOx bundles upon the main characteristics of a BWR (reactivity coefficients, stability, etc.). For this purpose, the Core Management System (CMS) codes of Studsvik Scandpower are used. This package is constituted by CASMO-4/TABLES-3/SIMULATE-3. It has been shown in previous reports that these codes are able to accurately represent and model MOx bundles. This report is thus devoted to the study of BWR cores loaded (partially or totally) with MOx bundles. The plutonium quality used is the Pu type 2016 (mostly Pu-239, 56 %, and Pu-240, 26 %), but a variation of the plutonium isotopic vector was also investigated, in case of a partial MOx loading. One notices that the reactivity coefficients do not present significant changes in comparison with a full UOx loading. Nevertheless, two main problems arise: the shutdown margin at BOC is lower than 1 % and the stability to in-phase oscillations is slightly decreased. (The SIMULATE-3 version used for this study does not contain the latest MOx enhancements described in literature, since these code developments have not been provided to the department. Nevertheless, as the nominal average enrichment of the MOx bundles is 5.41 % (total amount of plutonium), which can still be considered as a relatively low enrichment, the accuracy of the CMS codes is acceptable without the use of the MOx improvements for this level of Pu enrichment.

  18. Operation and maintenance support expert systems for BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Hayakawa, Hiroyasu; Fukutomi, Shigeki

    1990-01-01

    Toshiba has been developing expert systems for operation and maintenance support in BWRs. These expert systems are designed to be integrated with conventional plant monitoring systems, and maintenance management systems to provide both comprehensive and powerful support capabilities. Some of these expert systems are already being used on a trial basis both within Toshiba and in electric power utility companies. This paper describes expert systems for the support of plant and equipment monitoring, maintenance scheduling, and maintenance work procedure planning. (author)

  19. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  20. Effect of a Sulphate Transient on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Test 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H. P

    2002-03-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5th EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. Within WP 3 of this project, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) investigates the effect of water chemistry transients on the EAC crack growth behaviour under periodical partial unloading (PPU) conditions. The present report is a summary of the first PSI test of WP 3 with a Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} transient. In the first part of the report, the theoretical background on crack growth mechanisms, crack chemistry, mass transport and water chemistry transients as well as a brief literature survey on other water chemistry transient investigations is given. Furthermore, the experimental equipment and test procedure is presented, followed by a summary of the results of PSI test 1 of WP 3. Finally the results are discussed in detail and compared to literature data. In the first part of the experiment, an actively growing EAC crack was generated by PPU in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 288 {sup o}C, DO = 8 ppm, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} < 0.6 ppb). Then a sulphate transient was applied. The duration ({approx} 300 h) and the amount of sulphate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = 368 ppb) of the applied sulphate transient conservatively covered all sulphate transients, which might occur in BWR/normal water chemistry (NWC) practice. After the transient, outlet conductivity was lowered from ca. 1 {mu}S/cm to less than 0.15 {mu}S/cm within 2.6 h by a 'two-loop technique'. No accelerating effect of the sulphate transient on the EAC crack growth of both tested fracture mechanics specimens under highly oxidising BWR/NWC conditions was observed, making it impossible to deterrnine incubation or delay times. The EAC crack growth rates (CGR) before, during and after the

  1. The Impact of Operating Parameters and Correlated Parameters for Extended BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Marshall, William B. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowman, Stephen M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Applicants for certificates of compliance for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) transportation and dry storage systems perform analyses to demonstrate that these systems are adequately subcritical per the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Parts 71 and 72. For pressurized water reactor (PWR) SNF, these analyses may credit the reduction in assembly reactivity caused by depletion of fissile nuclides and buildup of neutron-absorbing nuclides during power operation. This credit for reactivity reduction during depletion is commonly referred to as burnup credit (BUC). US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff review BUC analyses according to the guidance in the Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3, Burnup Credit in the Criticality Safety Analyses of PWR Spent Fuel in Transportation and Storage Casks.

  2. BWR internals life assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, M.L.; Stancavage, P.P.

    1988-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) internal components play an important role in power plant life extension. Many important internals were not designed for easy removal and changes in material properties and local environmental effects due to high radiation makes stress corrosion cracking more likely and more difficult to correct. Over the past several years, operating experience has shown that inspection, monitoring and refurbishment can be accomplished for internal structures with existing technology. In addition, mitigation techniques which address the causes of degradation are available to assure that life extension targets can be met. This paper describes the many considerations and aspects when evaluating life extension for reactor vessel internals

  3. BWR Services maintenance training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.H.; Chittenden, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    BWR Services has implemented a five-phase program to increase plant availability and capacity factor in operating BWR's. One phase of this program is establishing a maintenance training program on NSSS equipment; the scope encompasses maintenance on both mechanical equipment and electrical control and instrumentation equipment. The program utilizes actual product line equipment for practical Hands-on training. A total of 23 formal courses will be in place by the end of 1979. The General Electric Company is making a multimillion dollar investment in facilities to support this training. These facilities are described

  4. Panorama of the BWR reactors - Evolution of the concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, C.; Uhrig, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Safety Engineering Department - PEPS-G (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Nowadays, a fleet of more than 50 boiling water reactors (BWR) are in operation in the world. This article gives a short overview on the developments of nuclear power plants of the BWR type, with a focus on the European builds. It describes the technical bases from the early designs in the fifties, sketches the innovations of the sixties and seventies in the types BWR 69 and 72 (Baulinie 69 and 72) and gives an outlook of a possible next generation BWR. A promising approach in recent BWR developments is the the combination of passive safety systems with established design basis

  5. A novel auto-correlation function method and FORTRAN codes for the determination of the decay ratio in BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.

    2001-08-01

    A novel auto-correlation function (ACF) method has been investigated for determining the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio in BWR stability analyses. The report describes not only the method but also documents comprehensively the used and developed FORTRAN codes. The neutron signals are band-pass filtered to separate the oscillation peak in the power spectral density (PSD) from background. Two linear second-order oscillation models are considered. The ACF of each model, corrected for signal filtering and with the inclusion of a background term under the peak in the PSD, is then least-squares fitted to the ACF estimated on the previously filtered neutron signals, in order to determine the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio. The procedures of filtering and ACF estimation use fast Fourier transform techniques with signal segmentation. Gliding 'short-time' ACF estimates along a signal record allow the evaluation of uncertainties. Some numerical results are given which have been obtained from neutron signal data offered by the recent Forsmark I and Forsmark II NEA benchmark project. They are compared with those from other benchmark participants using different other analysis methods. (author)

  6. A novel auto-correlation function method and FORTRAN codes for the determination of the decay ratio in BWR stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behringer, K

    2001-08-01

    A novel auto-correlation function (ACF) method has been investigated for determining the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio in BWR stability analyses. The report describes not only the method but also documents comprehensively the used and developed FORTRAN codes. The neutron signals are band-pass filtered to separate the oscillation peak in the power spectral density (PSD) from background. Two linear second-order oscillation models are considered. The ACF of each model, corrected for signal filtering and with the inclusion of a background term under the peak in the PSD, is then least-squares fitted to the ACF estimated on the previously filtered neutron signals, in order to determine the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio. The procedures of filtering and ACF estimation use fast Fourier transform techniques with signal segmentation. Gliding 'short-time' ACF estimates along a signal record allow the evaluation of uncertainties. Some numerical results are given which have been obtained from neutron signal data offered by the recent Forsmark I and Forsmark II NEA benchmark project. They are compared with those from other benchmark participants using different other analysis methods. (author)

  7. Stabilisation and stability operations : a Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Fitz-Gerald, AM; Blair, S

    2010-01-01

    ‘Stabilisation’, ‘stability operations’ and ‘instability’ are relatively new terms in the conflict transformation lexicon and the literature on these areas has grown significantly over a fairly short time period. For better or for worse, knowledge in this area has been shaped predominantly by the formative experiences in Afghanistan and Iraq. These operations are based on a view that weak and failing states pose a direct threat to wider international and national security. T...

  8. BWR type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toru.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain reactor core characteristics with less changes in the excess reactivity due to fuel burnup even when the operation period varies. Constitution: In a BWR type reactor where fuel assemblies containing fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons are arranged, the fuel assemblies are grouped into first fuel assemblies and second fuel assemblies. Then, the number of fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons within the first fuel assemblies is made greater than that of the second fuel rods, while the concentration of the burnable poisons in the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the first fuel assemblies is made lower than that of the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the second fuel assemblies. In the BWR type reactor constituted in this way, the reactor core characteristics can be improved by changing the ratio between the first fuel assemblies and the second fuel assemblies charged to the reactor core, thereby decreasing the changes in the burnup of the excess reactivity. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. BWR zinc addition Sourcebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Alfred J.

    2014-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have been injecting zinc into the primary coolant via the reactor feedwater system for over 25 years for the purpose of controlling primary system radiation fields. The BWR zinc injection process has evolved since the initial application at the Hope Creek Nuclear Station in 1986. Key transitions were from the original natural zinc oxide (NZO) to depleted zinc oxide (DZO), and from active zinc injection of a powdered zinc oxide slurry (pumped systems) to passive injection systems (zinc pellet beds). Zinc addition has continued through various chemistry regimes changes, from normal water chemistry (NWC) to hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC with noble metals (NobleChem™) for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of reactor internals and primary system piping. While past reports published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) document specific industry experience related to these topics, the Zinc Sourcebook was prepared to consolidate all of the experience gained over the past 25 years. The Zinc Sourcebook will benefit experienced BWR Chemistry, Operations, Radiation Protection and Engineering personnel as well as new people entering the nuclear power industry. While all North American BWRs implement feedwater zinc injection, a number of other BWRs do not inject zinc. This Sourcebook will also be a valuable resource to plants considering the benefits of zinc addition process implementation, and to gain insights on industry experience related to zinc process control and best practices. This paper presents some of the highlights from the Sourcebook. (author)

  10. BWR fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baily, W.E.; Armijo, J.S.; Jacobson, J.; Proebstle, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The General Electric experience base on BWR fuel includes over 29,000 fuel assemblies which contain 1,600,000 fuel rods. Over the last five years, design, process and operating changes have been introduced which have had major effects in improving fuel performance. Monitoring this fuel performance in BWRs has been accomplished through cooperative programs between GE and utilities. Activities such as plant fission product monitoring, fuel sipping and fuel and channel surveillance programs have jointly contributed to the value of this extensive experience base. The systematic evaluation of this data has established well-defined fuel performance trends which provide the assurance and confidence in fuel reliability that only actual operating experience can provide

  11. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennard, M W [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Pleasantville, NY (United States); Harbottle, J E [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Thornbury, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B{sub 4}C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  12. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennard, M.W.; Harbottle, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B 4 C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  13. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR system on a

  14. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR

  15. OPERATING STABILITY OF MINERAL WOOL PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perfilov Vladimir Aleksandrovich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Creating an effective insulation envelope of the building is possible only using high-quality materials, preserving their characteristics both in the early stages of operation, and for the whole billing period. It is an important opportunity to assess the thermal insulation properties and predict its changes over time directly in the conditions of the construction site. The products based on mineral fibers (rock and glass wool, basalt fiber are the most widely used type of insulating materials in the domestic construction. Therefore, the operational stability valuation methods must be primarily created for this group of products. The methodology for assessing the thermal insulation properties includes two main components: testing equipment and methodology for assessing the operational stability. The authors tested the methodology of the accelerated testing and prediction of durability for mineral wool products of laminated, corrugated and volume-oriented structures. The test results give good convergence with the methods recommended by the building regulations. Application of thermal insulation materials are an effective way to form the thermal envelope of the building, reducing energy costs and increasing the durability of building structures. The material properties are determined by their structure, which is formed during the technological impacts.

  16. Model for the analysis of transitories and stability of a BWR reactor with fuel of thorium; Modelo para el analisis de transitorios y de estabilidad de un reactor BWR con combustible de torio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez C, A. [CNSNS, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: anunezc@cnsns.gob.mx; Espinosa P, G. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois L, J.L. [Fac. de Ingenieria, UNAM 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In this work it is described the thermo hydraulic and neutronic pattern used to simulate the behavior of a nucleus of thorium-uranium under different conditions of operation. The analysed nucleus was designed with base to assemblies that operate under the cover-seed concept. The pattern was proven to conditions of stationary state and transitory state. Here it is only presented the simulation of the one SCRAM manual and it is compared in the behavior of a nucleus with UO{sub 2}. Additionally one carries out an analysis of stability taking into account the four corners that define the area of stability of the map flow-power and to conditions of 100% of flow and 100% of power. The module of stability is based on the pattern of Lahey and Podowsky to estimate the drops of pressure during a perturbation. It is concludes that the behavior of this nucleus is not very different to the one shown by the nuclei loaded with the fuel of UO{sub 2}. (Author)

  17. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  18. Making Stability Operations Less Complex While Improving Interoperability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chaum, Erik; Christman, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Military support for stability, security, transition, and reconstruction as well as humanitarian assistance / disaster relief operations is as important and complex an endeavor as is major combat operations...

  19. Pipe rupture test results; 4 inch pipe whip tests under BWR operational condition-clearance parameter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Syuzo; Isozaki, Toshikuni; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Kurihara, Ryoichi; Kato, Rokuro; Saito, Kazuo; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1981-05-01

    The purpose of pipe rupture studies in JAERI is to perform the model tests on pipe whip, restraint behavior, jet impingement and jet thrust force, and to establish the computational method for analyzing these phenomena. This report describes the experimental results of pipe whip on the pipe specimens of 4 inch in diameter under BWR condition on which the pressure is 6.77 MPa and the temperature is 285 0 C. The pipe specimens were 114.3 mm (4 inch) in diameter and 8.6 mm in thickness and 4500 mm in length. Four pipe whip restraints used in the tests were the U-bar type of 8 mm in diameter and fabricated from type 304 stainless steel. The experimental parameter was the clearance (30, 50 and 100 mm). The dynamic strain behavior of the pipe specimen and the restraints was investigated by strain gages and their residual deformation was obtained by measuring marking points provided on their surface. The Pressure-time history in the pipe specimens was also obtained by pressure gages. The maximum pipe strain is caused near the restraints and increases with increase of the clearance. The experimental results of pipe whip tests indicate the effectiveness of pipe whip restraints. The ratio of absorbed strain energy of the pipe specimen to that of the restraints is nearly constant for different clearances at the overhang length of 400 mm. (author)

  20. Development of next BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke

    1995-01-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.)

  1. Development of next BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works

    1995-04-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.).

  2. Compact modular BWR (CM-BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennern, Larry; Boardman, Charles; Carroll, Douglas G.; Hida, Takahiko

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary assessment has shown that a small 350 MWe BWR reactor can be placed within a close fitting steel containment vessel that is 7.1 meters inside diameter. This allows the technology and manufacturing capability currently used to fabricate large ABWR reactor vessels to be used to provide a factory fabricated containment vessel for a 350 MWe BWR. When a close fitted steel containment is combined with a passive closed loop isolation condenser system and a natural circulating reactor system that contains a large water inventory, primary system leaks cannot uncover the core. This eliminates many of the safety systems needed in response to a LOCA that are common to large, conventional plant designs including. Emergency Core Flooding, Automatic Depressurization System, Active Residual Heat Removal, Safety Related Auxiliary Cooling, Safety Related Diesel Generators, Hydrogen Re-Combiners, Ex-vessel Core Retention and Cooling. By fabricating the containment in a factory and eliminating most of the conventional safety systems, the construction schedule is shortened and the capital cost reduced to levels that would not otherwise be possible for a relatively small modular BWR. This makes the CM-BWR a candidate for applications where smaller incremental power additions are desired relative to a large ALWR or where the local infrastructure is not able to accommodate a conventional ALWR plant rated at 1350 MWe or more. This paper presents a preliminary design description of a Compact Modular BWR (CM-BWR) whose design features dramatically reduce the size and cost of the reactor building and associated safety systems. (author)

  3. MHD stability, operational limits and disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The present physics understandings of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of tokamak plasmas, the threshold conditions for onset of MHD instability, and the resulting operational limits on attainable plasma pressure (beta limit) and density (density limit), and the consequences of plasma disruption and disruption related effects are reviewed and assessed in the context of their application to a future DT burning reactor prototype tokamak experiment such as ITER. The principal considerations covered within the MHD stability and beta limit assessments are (i) magnetostatic equilibrium, ideal MHD stability and the resulting ideal MHD beta limit; (ii) sawtooth oscillations and the coupling of sawtooth activity to other types of MHD instability; (iii) neoclassical island resistive tearing modes and the corresponding limits on beta and energy confinement; (iv) wall stabilization of ideal MHD instabilities and resistive wall instabilities; (v) mode locking effects of non-axisymmetric error fields; (vi) edge localized MHD instabilities (ELMs, etc.); and (vii) MHD instabilities and beta/pressure gradient limits in plasmas with actively modified current and magnetic shear profiles. The principal considerations covered within the density limit assessments are (i) empirical density limits; (ii) edge power balance/radiative density limits in ohmic and L-mode plasmas; and (iii) edge parameter related density limits in H-mode plasmas. The principal considerations covered in the disruption assessments are (i) disruption causes, frequency and MHD instability onset; (ii) disruption thermal and current quench characteristics; (iii) vertical instabilities (VDEs), both before and after disruption, and plasma and in-vessel halo currents; (iv) after disruption runaway electron formation, confinement and loss; (v) fast plasma shutdown (rapid externally initiated dissipation of plasma thermal and magnetic energies); (vi) means for disruption avoidance and disruption effect mitigation; and

  4. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to remove water not by way of mechanical operation in a reactor core and improve the fuel economy in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A hollow water removing rod of a cross-like profile made of material having a smaller neutron absorption cross section than the moderator is disposed to the water gap for each of unit structures composed of four fuel assemblies, and water is charged and discharged to and from the water removing rod. Water is removed from the water removing rod to decrease the moderators in the water gap to carry out neutron spectrum shift operation from the initial to the medium stage of reactor core cycles. At the final stage of the cycle, airs in the water removing rod are extracted and the moderator is introduced. The moderator is filled and the criticality is maintained with the accumulated nuclear fission materials. The neutron spectrum shift operation can be attained by eliminating hydrothermodynamic instability and using a water removing rod of a simple structure. (Horiuchi, T.)

  5. Results of VGB research work with respect to operation of BWR pipes made of austenitic SS; Ergebnisse des VGB-Forschungsvorhabens zur Absicherung des Betriebsverhaltens austenitischer Staehle in SWR-Rohrleitungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, R [Siemens AG Energieerzeugung KWU, Erlangen (Germany); Bruemmer, G [Hamburgische Electricitaets-Werke AG, Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The VGB research project was to examine and characterize various, operation-induced impacts on the crack formation in stabilized austenitic steels, caused by intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking as a result of sensitization after chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The results of this project as well as available operating experience show that the measures taken so far for the future operation of the German BWR plants, for avoiding in these plants intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking, correspond to the state of the art and achieve the wanted purpose. These measures are: use of optimized material W-No. 1.4550 with reduced carbon contents; use of optimized welding techniques for reducing the heat input and the welding shrinkage (cold deformation.); optimized preparation of welding work in order to avoid shape defects during welding (eg. edge misalignment, defective mash welds); reduction of tensile stresses occurring during welding; compliance with the recent VGB water chemistry code. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Das VGB-Forschungsvorhaben sollte verschieden gelagerte Einfluesse auf die Rissbildung im Betrieb von stabilisierten austenitischen Staehlen, verursacht durch interkristalline Spannungsrisskorrosion infolge Sensbilisierung durch Chromverarmung an den Korngrenzen, systematisch erfassen. Aus den Forschungsergebnissen dieses VGB-Programms sowie den bisher vorliegenden Betriebserfahrungen ist festzuhalten, dass die bisher durchgefuehrten Massnahmen fuer den zukuenftigen Betrieb der deutschen SWR-Anlagen zur Vermeidung von interkristalliner Spannungsrisskorrosion zielgerichtet waren und dem heutigen Wissensstand entsprechen. Diese Massnahmen sind: 1. Einsatz von optimiertem Werkstoff W.-Nr. 1.4550 mit abgesenktem Kohlenstoffgehalt; 2. Einsatz von optimierten Schweissverfahren zur Verminderung der Waermeeinbringung und zur Verringerung des Schweissschrumpfes (Kaltverformung.); 3. Durchfuehrung einer optimierten Schweissnahtvorbereitung zur Vermeidung

  6. Stability monitoring of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Stability monitoring is of great importance for optimal plant performance. Decay ratios for several operating conditions show that the Dodewaard BWR is very stable and that pressure lowering, power increase and flux peaking lead to a higher decay ratio (worse stability). 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 ref

  7. ABB advanced BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Helmersson, S.; Andersson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel designed and fabricated by ABB is now operating in 40 PWRs and BWRs in Europe, the United States and Korea. An excellent fuel reliability track record has been established. High burnups are proven for both BWR and PWR. Thermal margin improving features and advanced burnable absorber concepts enable the utilities to adopt demanding duty cycles to meet new economic objectives. In particular we note the excellent reliability record of ABB PWR fuel equipped with Guardian TM debris filter, proven to meet the -6 rod-cycles fuel failure goal, and the out-standing operating record of the SVEA 10x10 BWR fuel, where ABB is the only vendor to date with multi batch experience to high burnup. ABB is dedicated to maintain high fuel reliability as well as continually improve and develop a broad line of BWR and PWR products. ABB's development and fuel follow-up activities are performed in close co-operation with its customers. (orig.)

  8. Effect of a Chloride Transient on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Test 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.-P.

    2002-11-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5 t h EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. The present report is a summary of the second test of working package (WP) 3 with a NaCl transient, performed at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). In the first part of the experiment, an actively growing EAC crack with a crack growth rate (CGR) in the range of the 'low-sulphur SCC line' of the GE-model was generated by periodical partial unloading (PPU) in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 288 o C, DO = 8 ppm). Then a chloride transient of 49 ppb Cl - was applied for ∼40 h. After this transient, the load level was reduced and the loading conditions were changed to pure cyclic loading. Thereupon a second transient with a chloride concentration of 49 ppb was applied. In both RPV steels, the first chloride transient of 49 ppb Cl - resulted in an acceleration of the EAC crack growth by more than one order of magnitude and in fast, stationary SCC crack growth during the constant load phase of the PPU cycles at K I values 1/2 . 3 h after adding chloride to the high-purity water, the EAC CGR started to increase in the high-sulphur RPV steel during the constant load phase of a PPU cycle and after 20 h a stationary EAC CGR value in the range of the 'high-sulphur SCC curve' of the GE-model was reached. After 5 h in high-purity water, the crack growth began to slow down after a partial unloading cycle and 15 h later it reached again a stationary CGR value in the range of the 'low-sulphur SCC curve' of the GE-model. The second chloride transient did not result in an acceleration of the crack growth in both investigated specimens. This was explained by crack closure effects, which occurred in both specimens after the reduction of the load. The CGR

  9. BWR emergency procedure guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, J.S.; Karner, E.F.; Stratman, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes plans for dealing with reactor accidents developed by the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Owners' Group in response to post-Three Mile Island US NRC requirements. The devised Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs), applicable to all BWRs, are symptom-based rather than event-based. According to the EPGs, the operator does not need to identify what event is occurring in the plant in order to decide what action to take, but need only observe the symptoms (values and trends of key control parameters) which exist and take appropriate action to control these symptoms. The original objective was to provide reactor operator guidance in responding to a small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), but subsequent revisions have included other types of reactor accidents. Topics considered include the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) control guideline, the primary containment control guideline, the secondary containment control guideline, the radioactivity release control guideline, multiple failures vs. the design basis, safe limits vs. technical specifications, the technical status, licensing, and implementation. The EPGs are based upon maintaining both adequate core cooling and primary containment integrity

  10. BWR radiation exposure--experience and projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, C.F.; Wilkinson, C.D.; Hollander, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    The BWR/6 Mark III radiation exposures are projected to be about half of those of current average operating experience of 725 man-rem. These projections are said to be realistic and based on current achievements and not on promises of future development. The several BWRs operating with low primary system radiation levels are positive evidence that radiation sources can be reduced. Improvements have been made in reducing the maintenance times for the BWR/6, and further improvements can be made by further attention to cost-effective plant arrangement and layout during detail design to improve accessibility and maintainability of each system and component

  11. BWR power oscillation evaluation methodologies in core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Akitoshi

    1995-01-01

    At the initial stage of BWR development, the power oscillation due to the nuclear-thermal interaction originated in random boiling phenomena and nuclear void feedback was feared. But it was shown that under the high pressure condition in the normal operation of recent commercial BWRs, the core is in very stable state. However, power oscillation events have been observed in actual machines, and it is necessary to do the stability evaluation that sufficiently reflects the detailed operation conditions of actual plants. As the cause of power oscillation events, the instability of control system and nuclear-thermal coupling instability are important, and their mechanisms are explained. As the model for analyzing the stability of BWR core, the nuclear-thermal coupling model in frequency domain is the central existence. As the information for the design, the parameters of fuel assemblies, and the nuclear parameters and the thermohydraulic parameters of cores are enumerated. LAPUR-TSI is a nuclear-thermal coupling model. The analysis system in the software of Tokyo Electric Power Co. is outlined, and the analysis model was verified. (K.I.)

  12. Local stabilizer codes in three dimensions without string logical operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haah, Jeongwan

    2011-01-01

    We suggest concrete models for self-correcting quantum memory by reporting examples of local stabilizer codes in 3D that have no string logical operators. Previously known local stabilizer codes in 3D all have stringlike logical operators, which make the codes non-self-correcting. We introduce a notion of ''logical string segments'' to avoid difficulties in defining one-dimensional objects in discrete lattices. We prove that every stringlike logical operator of our code can be deformed to a disjoint union of short segments, each of which is in the stabilizer group. The code has surfacelike logical operators whose partial implementation has unsatisfied stabilizers along its boundary.

  13. Progressive Reconstruction: A Methodology for Stabilization and Reconstruction Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohr, Karl C

    2006-01-01

    ... these nations in accordance with stated United States' goals. The argument follows closely current and developing United States military doctrine on stabilization, reconstruction, and counterinsurgency operations...

  14. Toward the Effective Use of Military Veterinarians in Stability Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Melinda; Fisher, Gail

    2008-01-01

    .... Within the context of stability operations, military veterinarians can contribute to U.S. strategic goals of economic development and humanitarian assistance, especially related to the agriculture sector...

  15. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  16. Toward the Effective Use of Military Veterinarians in Stability Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Melinda; Fisher, Gail

    2008-01-01

    ... operations, all core missions and of equal importance. In active theaters such as Afghanistan and Iraq, medical civil-military stability operations figure prominently and include activities carried out by military veterinarians...

  17. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  18. Stability, Security, Transition and Reconstruction Operations Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    integration and measureable outcome of security, stability and prosperity. Introduction 4 • Background • Nature of Non-permissive environments...stage, And all the men and women merely players – William Shakespeare • Sharing the Experience • Reinventing the wheel 11 Conclusion – The

  19. Development and operational experiences of an automated remote inspection system for interior of primary containment vessel of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, N.; Chikara, S.; Fumio, T.; Katsuhiro, M.; Katsutoshi, S.; Ken-Ichiro, S.; Masaaki, F.; Masayoshi, S.

    1983-01-01

    A prototype was developed for an automated remote inspection system featuring continuous monitoring of the working status of major components inside the primary containment vessel of a boiling water reactor. This inspection system consists of four units, or vehicles, which are towed by a trolley chain along a monorail; a complex coaxial cable for data transmission and for power supply; and an operator's console. A TV camera, microphone, thermometer, hygrometer, and ionization chamber are mounted on the various units. After several months' testing under high-ambient temperature, the system was installed in the Tokai-2 power station of Japan Atomic Power Company for in situ tests

  20. Structuring Economic Power for Stability Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallen, Andrew T

    2006-01-01

    .... By their nature, these operations have a strong economic context. This thesis provides a methodology for evaluating current institutional structures and economic doctrines being forged among various government agencies...

  1. BWR vessel and internals project (BWRVIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilanin, W.J.; Dyle, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) inspections indicate that Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) is a significant technical issue for some BWR internals. IN response, the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) was formed by an associated of domestic and international utilities which own and operate BWRs. The project is identifying or developing generic, cost-effective strategies for managing degradation of reactor internals from which each utility can select the alternative most appropriate for their plant. The Electric Power Research Institute manages the technical program, implementing the utility defined programs. The BWRVIP is organized into four technical tasks: Assessment, Inspection, Repair and Mitigation. An Integration task coordinates the work. The goal of the Assessment task is to develop methodologies for evaluation of vessel and internal components in support of decisions for operation, inspection, mitigation or repair. The goal of the Inspection task is to develop and assess effective and predictable inspection techniques which can be used to determine the condition of BWR vessel and internals that are potentially susceptible to service-related SCC degradation. The goal of the Repair task is to assure the availability of cost-effective repair/replacement alternatives. The goal of the Mitigation task is to develop and demonstrate countermeasures for SCC degradation. This paper summarizes the BWRVIP approach for addressing BWR internals SCC degradation and illustrates how utilities are utilizing BWRVIP products to successfully manage the effect of SCC on core shrouds

  2. Development of new irradiation facility for BWR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yuji; Magome, Hirokatsu; Iida, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    In JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), about the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel and the stress corrosion cracking of reactor core composition apparatus concerning the long-term use of the light water reactor (BWR), in order to check the influence of the temperature, pressure, and water quality, etc on BWR condition. The water environmental control facility which performs irradiation assisted stress corrosion-cracking (IASCC) evaluation under BWR irradiation environment was fabricated in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor). This report is described the outline of manufacture of the water environmental control facility for doing an irradiation test using the saturation temperature capsule after JMTR re-operation. (author)

  3. A Methodology to Efficiently Compare Operating System Stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kouwe, E.; Giuffrida, C.; Ghitulete, R.; Tanenbaum, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in software engineering, operating systems (OSes) are still plagued by crashes due to software faults, calling for techniques to improve OS stability when faults occur. Evaluating such techniques requires a way to compare the stability of different OSes that is both

  4. STABILITY OF WHEELED VEHICLES AS COMPLEX OPERATIONAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Artemov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Different views on the definition of «stability of wheeled vehicles» are considered and the author’s own definition is offered. A version of the structure of stability properties as a complex op-erational property is offered.

  5. Modeling Methodologies for Representing Urban Cultural Geographies in Stability Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferris, Todd P

    2008-01-01

    ... 2.0.0, in an effort to provide modeling methodologies for a single simulation tool capable of exploring the complex world of urban cultural geographies undergoing Stability Operations in an irregular warfare (IW) environment...

  6. Stability Operations and Government: An Inherently Military Function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hula, Russell R

    2008-01-01

    Since the end of major combat operations in Iraq over 5 years ago, the United States has been playing catch-up trying to stabilize Iraq and transition authority to a new democratically elected government...

  7. Crud deposition modeling on BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucuk, Aylin; Cheng, Bo; Potts, Gerald A.; Shiralkar, Bharat; Morgan, Dave; Epperson, Kenny; Gose, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of boiling water reactor (BWR) system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance-limiting conditions in a number of plants. The operational impact of performance-limiting conditions involving crud deposition can be detrimental to a BWR operator, resulting in unplanned or increased frequency of fuel inspections, fuel failure and associated radiological consequences, operational restrictions including core power derate and/or forced shutdowns to remove failed fuel, premature discharge of individual bundles or entire reloads, and/or undesirable core design restrictions. To facilitate improved management of crud-related fuel performance risks, EPRI has developed the CORAL (Crud DepOsition Risk Assessment ModeL) tool. This paper presents a summary of the CORAL elements and benchmarking results. Applications of CORAL as a tool for fuel performance risk assessment are also discussed. (author)

  8. Advanced Best-Estimate Methodologies for Thermal-Hydraulics Stability Analyses with TRACG code and Improvements on Operating Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedovi, J.; Trueba, M.; Ibarra, L; Espino, M.; Hoang, H.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years GE Hitachi has introduced two advanced methodologies to address the thermal-hydraulics instabilities in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs); the “Detect and Suppress Solution - Confirmation Density (DSS-CD)” and the “GEH Simplified Stability Solution (GS3).” These two methodologies are based on Best-Estimate Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) analyses and provide significant improvement on safety, plant maneuvering and fuel economics with respect to existing solutions. DSS-CD and GS3 solutions have been recently approved by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper describes the main characteristics of these two stability methodologies and shares the experience of their recent implementation in operating BWRs. The BEPU approach provided a much deeper understanding of the parameters affecting instabilities in operating BWRs and allowed for better calculation of plant setpoints by improving plant manoeuvring restrictions and reducing manual operator actions. DSS-CD and GS3 methodologies are both based on safety analyses performed with the best-estimate system code TRACG. The assessment of uncertainty is performed following the Code Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU) methodology documented in NUREG/CR-5249. The two solutions have been already implemented in a combined 18 BWR units with 7 more units in the process of transitioning. The main results demonstrate a significant decrease (>0.1) in the stability based Operating Limit Minimum Critical Power Ratio (OLMCPR), which possibly results in significant fuel savings and the increase in allowable stability plant setpoints that address instability events such as the one occurred at the Fermi 2 plant in 2015 and can help prevent unnecessary Scrams. The paper also describes the advantages of reduced plant manoeuvring as a result to transitioning to these solutions; in particular the history of a BWR/6 transition to DSS-CD is discussed.

  9. Boiling water system of nuclear power plants (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martias Nurdin

    1975-01-01

    About 85% of the world electric generators are light water reactors. It shows that LWR is technologically and economically competitive with other generators. The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is one of the two systems in the LWR group. The techniques of BWR operation in several countries, especially low and moderate power BWR, are presented. The discussion is made in relation with the interconnection problems of electric installation in developing countries, including Indonesia, where the total electric energy installation is low. The high reliability and great flexibility of the operation of a boiling water reactor for a sufficiently long period are also presented. Component standardization for BWR system is discussed to get a better technological and economical performance for further development. (author)

  10. Common Cause Failure Analysis of Control Rods and Drives in the Swedish and Finnish BWR Plants. Operating Experiences in 1983 - 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankamo, Tuomas [Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-11-15

    The control rod and drives in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) constitute a highly redundant system. The reliability of the system is determined by how well the design withstands dependencies, as Common Cause Failures (CCFs). This report upgrades an earlier data collection on CCFs of control rod and drives (SKI Report 1996:77) to more recent years, with the objective to report the data to ICDE project (International Common Cause Failure Data Exchange) and to the safety analysts in the Nordic countries. The operating experiences were analyzed at the BWRs of former Asea-Atom design, comprising 9 units in Sweden and Olkiluoto 1 and 2 in Finland, covering years 1983 - 2003. A new logical scheme was developed to classify interconnected failure modes of the two redundant functions for reactivity shutdown, fast hydraulic insertion and slower screw insertion of control rods. The scheme makes an explicit distinction between the different attributes of the failure event: - affected function - affected movement direction - detectability - criticality, i.e. inoperable control rod function versus only degraded functionality Another novel idea emerged for grouping the events according to generic failure mechanism. The generic classes will help to organize and structure the information efficiently, because in most cases within a class, the failure modes prove to be same, or there are only a few alternatives to chose from. From the set of 72 candidate cases, altogether 27 actual or more significant potential CCFs were screened out. Special emphasis was placed to identify any multiple failure or degradation indicating that adjacent rods would be more vulnerable to failure, because such phenomena are far more critical for reactivity shutdown as compared to failure of randomly placed rods. Only slight tendency of position dependence could be determined. Another positive insight is that the events, where foreign objects caused the jamming of rod insertion, were separated by both

  11. Establishing operational stability--developing human infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Max A; Byers, Ernest J; Stingley, Preston; Sheridan, Robert M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2010-12-01

    Over the past year, Toyota has come under harsh scrutiny as a result of several recalls. These well publicized mishaps have not only done damage to Toyota's otherwise sterling reputation for quality but have also called into question the assertions from a phalanx of followers that Toyota's production system (generically referred to as TPS or Lean) is the best method by which to structure one's systems of operation. In this article, we discuss how Toyota, faced with the pressure to grow its business, did not appropriately cadence this growth with the continued development and maintenance of the process capabilities (vis a vis the development of human infrastructure) needed to adequately support that growth. We draw parallels between the pressure Toyota faced to grow its business and the pressure neurointerventional practices face to grow theirs, and offer a methodology to support that growth without sacrificing quality.

  12. BWR Radiation Assessment and Control Program: assessment and control of BWR radiation fields. Volume 1. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.

    1983-05-01

    This report covers work on the BWR Radiation Assessment and Control (BRAC) Program from 1978 to 1982. The major activities during this report period were assessment of the radiation-level trends in BWRs, evaluation of the effects of forward-pumped heater drains on BWR water quality, installation and operation of a corrosion-product deposition loop in an operating BWR, and analyzation of fuel-deposit samples from two BWRs. Radiation fields were found to be controlled by cobalt-60 and to vary from as low as 50 mr/hr to as high as 800 mr/hr on the recirculation-system piping. Detailed information on BWR corrosion films and system deposits is presented in the report. Additionally, the results of an oxygen-injection experiment and recontamination monitoring studies are provided

  13. Automatic stabilization of underwater robots in the time manipulation operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filaretov, V.F.; Koval, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    When carrying out underwater technical works by means of an underwater vehicles having a manipulator it is desirable to perform manipulation operations in the regime of the underwater vehicle hovering above the object without durable and complicated operations up its rigid fixation. Underwater vehicle stabilization is achieved by compensation all the effects on the vehicle caused by the operating manipulator in water medium. This automatic stabilization is formed due to input of the required control signals into corresponding vehicle propellers proportional to calculated components of the generalized forces and moments. The propellers should form stops reacting against effects

  14. Scaling and uncertainty in BWR instability problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Auria, F.; Pellicoro, V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with a critical review of activities, performed at the DCMN of Pisa University, in relation to the thermo-hydraulic oscillations in two-phase systems. Stability analyses, including model development and achievement of experimental data, are generally performed for BWRs in order to achieve the following objectives: to reach a common understanding in relation to the predictive capabilities of system codes and to the influence of various parameters on the instability; to establish a data base for the qualification of the analytical tools already or becoming available; to set-up qualified tools (code/models + nodalization + user assumption) suitable for predicting the unstable behaviour of the nuclear plants of interest (current BWR, SBWR, ABWR and RBMK). These considerations have been the basis for the following researches: 1) proposal of the Boiling Instability Program (BIP) (1) 2) evaluation of stability tests in PIPER-ONE apparatus (2) 3) coupled thermal-hydraulic and neutronic instabilities in the LaSalle-2 BWR plant (3) 4) participation to the NEA-OECD BWR Benchmark (4) The RELAP/MOD2 and RELAP5/MOD3 codes have been used. (author)

  15. TRAC-BWR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.L.; Rouhani, S.Z.

    1983-01-01

    The TRAC-BD1/MOD1 code containing many new or improved models has been assembled and is undergoing developmental assessment and testing and should be available shortly. The preparation of the manual for this code version is underway and should be available to the USNRC and their designated contractors by April of 1984. Finally work is currently underway on a fast running version of TRAC-BWR which will contain a one-dimensional neutron kinetics model

  16. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I

  17. Improving Small Signal Stability through Operating Point Adjustment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Ning; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chen, Yousu; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mittelstadt, William; Hauer, John F.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2010-09-30

    ModeMeter techniques for real-time small signal stability monitoring continue to mature, and more and more phasor measurements are available in power systems. It has come to the stage to bring modal information into real-time power system operation. This paper proposes to establish a procedure for Modal Analysis for Grid Operations (MANGO). Complementary to PSS’s and other traditional modulation-based control, MANGO aims to provide suggestions such as increasing generation or decreasing load for operators to mitigate low-frequency oscillations. Different from modulation-based control, the MANGO procedure proactively maintains adequate damping for all time, instead of reacting to disturbances when they occur. Effect of operating points on small signal stability is presented in this paper. Implementation with existing operating procedures is discussed. Several approaches for modal sensitivity estimation are investigated to associate modal damping and operating parameters. The effectiveness of the MANGO procedure is confirmed through simulation studies of several test systems.

  18. Advances in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Mary L.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water chemistry control with examples of plant experiences at U.S. designed BWRs. Water chemistry advances provide some of the most effective methods for mitigating materials degradation, reducing fuel performance concerns and lowering radiation fields. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials remains a high priority and improved techniques that have been demonstrated in BWRs will be reviewed, specifically hydrogen injection combined with noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and the newer on-line noble metal application process (OLNC). Hydrogen injection performance, an important part of SCC mitigation, will also be reviewed for the BWR fleet, highlighting system improvements that have enabled earlier injection of hydrogen including the potential for hydrogen injection during plant startup. Water chemistry has been significantly improved by the application of pre-filtration and optimized use of ion exchange resins in the CP (condensate polishing) and reactor water cleanup (RWCU) systems. EPRI has monitored and supported water treatment improvements to meet water chemistry goals as outlined in the EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines, particularly those for SCC mitigation of reactor internals and piping, minimization of fuel risk due to corrosion and crud deposits and chemistry control for radiation field reduction. In recent years, a significant reduction has occurred in feedwater corrosion product input, particularly iron. A large percentage of plants are now reporting <0.1 ppb feedwater iron. The impacts to plant operation and chemistry of lower feedwater iron will be explored. Depleted zinc addition is widely practiced across the fleet and the enhanced focus on radiation reduction continues to emphasize the importance of controlling radiation source term. In addition, shutdown chemistry control is necessary to avoid excessive release of activated corrosion products from fuel

  19. Best-estimate analysis development for BWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Kalra, S.P.; Beckner, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Program is a three pronged approach to the development of best-estimate analysis capability for BWR systems. An experimental program in the FIST BWR system simulator facility extends the LOCA data base and adds operational transients data. An analytical method development program with the BWR-TRAC computer program extends the modeling of BWR specific components and major interfacing systems, and improves numerical techniques to reduce computer running time. A method qualification program tests TRAC-B against experiments run in the FIST facility and extends the results to reactor system applications. With the completion and integration of these three activities, the objective of a best-estimate analysis capability has been achieved. (author)

  20. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schardt, J.F. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  1. The HAMBO BWR simulator of HAMMLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Tommy; Jokstad, Haakon; Meyer, Brita D.; Nihlwing, Christer; Norrman, Sixten; Puska, Eija Karita; Raussi, Pekka; Tiihonen, Olli

    2001-02-01

    Modernisation of control rooms of the nuclear power plants has been a major issue in Sweden and Finland the last few years, and this will continue in the years to come. As an aid in the process of introducing new technology into the control rooms, the benefit of having an experimental simulator where proto typing of solutions can be performed, has been emphasised by many plants. With this as a basis, the BWR plants in Sweden and Finland decided to fund, in co-operation with the Halden Project, an experimental BWR simulator based on the Forsmark 3 plant in Sweden. The BWR simulator development project was initiated in January 1998. VTT Energy in Finland developed the simulator models with the aid of their APROS tool, while the operator interface was developed by the Halden Project. The simulator was thoroughly tested by experienced HRP personnel and professional Forsmark 3 operators, and accepted by the BWR utilities in June 2000. The acceptance tests consisted of 19 well-defined transients, as well as the running of the simulator from full power down to cold shutdown and back up again with the use of plant procedures. This report describes the HAMBO simulator, with its simulator models, the operator interface, and the underlying hardware and software infrastructure. The tools used for developing the simulator, APROS, Picasso-3 and the Integration Platform, are also briefly described. The acceptance tests are described, and examples of the results are presented, to illustrate the level of validation of the simulator. The report concludes with an indication of the short-term usage of the simulator. (Author)

  2. From the Balkans to Iraq - A Strategic Policy Outline for Integrated Stability Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Botters, Jr, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    .... Although the Department of Defense is conducting stability operations however, there is a void in joint doctrine between stability operations strategy development, campaign planning, and campaign execution...

  3. Analysis of BWR out-of-phase instabilities in the frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farawila, Y.M.; Pruitt, D.W.; Kreuter, D.

    1992-01-01

    During startup or because of an inadvertent recirculation pump trip, a boiling water reactor (BWR) may operate at relatively low flow and high power conditions. At these conditions, a BWR is susceptible to coupled flow and power oscillations that could result in undesirable reactor scram unless appropriate countermeasures are taken. This contribution to analytical methods has been developed to address in part a general industrywide and regulatory concern about BWR stability initiated by the LaSalle 2 instability event in March 1988. This work is designed to extend the capability of the one-dimensional parallel channel frequency domain code STAIF to predict the regional oscillation decay ratio. The basic theory follows that developed by March-Leuba and Blakeman, where the oscillation mechanism is identified as the excitation of a subcritical neutronic mode with a constant core pressure drop boundary condition. The improvements to the basic theory include applying the theory to one-dimensional neutronics instead of point kinetics and taking account of the actual three-dimensional harmonic flux distribution

  4. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  5. Remarks on boiling water reactor stability analysis. Pt. 2. Stability monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Carsten; Hennig, Dieter; Hurtado, Antonio [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Chair of Hydrogen and Nuclear Energy; Schuster, Roland [Kernkraftwerk Brunsbuettel GmbH und Co. oHG, Brunsbuettel (Germany); Lukas, Bernard [EnBW Kernkraft GmbH, Philippsburg (Germany). Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg; Aguirre, Carlos [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt AG, Aargau (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    In part 1 of this article we explained the partly relative complex solution manifold of the differential equations describing the stability behaviour of a BWR, in particular the coexistence of different types of solutions, such as the coexistence of unstable limit cycles and stable fixed points are of interest from the operational safety point of view. The part 2 is devoted to the surveillance of the stability behaviour. We summarize some stability monitoring methods and suggest to support stability tests by RAM-ROM analyses in order to reveal in advance the stability 'landscape' of the BWR in a parameter region high sensitive for appearing of linear unstable states. The analysis of an especial stability test, performed at NPP Leibstadt (KKL), makes it clear that the measurement results can only be interpreted by application of bifurcation analysis. (orig.)

  6. Stabilization diagrams using operational modal analysis and sliding filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter; Juul, Martin Ørum Ørhem; Tarpø, Marius Glindtvad

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a filtering technique for doing effective operational modal analysis. The result of the filtering method is construction of stabilization diagram that clearly separates physical poles from spurious noise poles needed for unbiased fitting. A band pass filter is moved slowly over...

  7. BWR condensate filtration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.A.; Pasricha, A.; Rekart, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Poor removal of particulate corrosion products (especially iron) from condensate is one of the major problems in BWR systems. The presence of activated corrosion products creates ''hot spots'' and increases piping dose rates. Also, fuel efficiency is reduced and the risk of fuel failure is increased by the deposit of corrosion products on the fuel. Because of these concerns, current EPRI guidelines call for a maximum of 2 ppb of iron in the reactor feedwater with a level of 0.5 ppb being especially desirable. It has become clear that conventional deep bed resins are incapable of meeting these levels. While installation of prefilter systems is an option, it would be more economical for plants with naked deep beds to find an improved bead resin for use in existing systems. BWR condensate filtration technologies are being tested on a condensate side stream at Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station. After two years of testing, hollow fiber filters (HFF) and fiber matrix filters (FMF), and low crosslink cation resin, all provide acceptable results. The results are presented for pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and water quality measurements. The costs are compared for backwashable non-precoat HFF and FMF. Results are also presented for full deep bed vessel tests of the low crosslink cation resin

  8. THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE AUTOMATIC FISCAL STABILIZERS OPERATING MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondor Mihaela

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of Automatic Fiscal Stabilizers (AFS for stabilizing the cyclical fluctuations of macroeconomic output as an alternative to discretionary fiscal policy, admitting its huge potential of being an anti crisis solution. The objectives of the study are the identification of the general features of the concept of automatic fiscal stabilizers and the logical assessment of them from economic perspectives. Based on the literature in the field, this paper points out the disadvantages of fiscal discretionary policy and argue the need of using Automatic Fiscal Stabilizers in order to provide a faster decision making process, shielded from political interference, and reduced uncertainty for households and business environment. The paper conclude about the need of using fiscal policy for smoothing the economic cycle, but in a way which includes among its features transparency, responsibility and clear operating mechanisms. Based on the research results the present paper assumes that pro-cyclicality reduces de effectiveness of the Automatic Fiscal Stabilizer and as a result concludes that it is very important to avoid the pro-cyclicality in fiscal rule design. Moreover, by committing in advance to specific fiscal policy action contingent on economic developments, uncertainty about the fiscal policy framework during a recession should be reduced. Being based on logical analysis and not focused on empirical, contextualized one, the paper presents some features of AFS operating mechanism and also identifies and systematizes the factors which provide its importance and national individuality. Reaching common understanding on the Automatic Fiscal Stabilizer concept as a institutional device for smoothing the gap of the economic cycles across different countries, particularly for the European Union Member States, will facilitate efforts to coordinate fiscal policy responses during a crisis, especially in the context of the fiscal

  9. Stability monitoring of a natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for monitoring the stability of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are discussed. Surveillance of BWR stability is of importance as problems were encountered in several large reactors. Moreover, surveying stability allows plant owners to operate at high power with acceptable stability margins. The results of experiments performed on the Dodewaard BWR (the Netherlands) are reported. This type reactor is cooled by natural circulation, a cooling principle that is also being considered for new reactor designs. The stability of this reactor was studied both with deterministic methods and by noise analysis. Three types of stability are distinguished and were investigated separately: reactor-kinetic stability, thermal-hydraulic stability and total-plant stability. It is shown that the Dodewaard reactor has very large stability margins. A simple yet reliable stability criterion is introduced. It can be derived on-line from thhe noise signal of ex-vessel neutron detectors during normal operation. The sensitivity of neutron detectors to in-core flux perturbations - reflected in the field-of-view of the detector - was calculated in order to insure proper stability surveillance. A novel technique is presented which enables the determination of variations of the in-core coolant velocity by noise correlation. The velocity measured was interpreted on the basis of experiments performed on the air/water flow in a model of a BWR coolant channel. It appeared from this analysis that the velocity measured was much higher than the volume-averaged water and air velocities and the volumetric flux. The applicability of the above-mentioned technique to monitoring of local channel-flow stability was tested. It was observed that stability effects on the coolant velocity are masked by other effects originating from the local flow pattern. Experimental and theoretical studies show a shorter effective fuel time constant in a BWR than was assumed. (author). 118 refs.; 73 figs.; 21 tabs

  10. Recycling systems for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Akio; Yamamoto, Fumiaki; Fukumoto, Ryuji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To stabilize the coolant flowing characteristics and reactor core reactivity. Constitution: The recycling system in a BWR type reactor comprises a recycling pump disposed to the outside of a reactor pressure vessel, a ring header connected to the recycling pump through main pipe ways, and a plurality of pipes branched from and connected with the ring header and connected to a plurality of jet pumps within the pressure vessel. Then, by making the diameter for the pipeways of each of the branched pipes different from each other, the effective cross-sectional area is varied to thereby average the coolant flow rate supplied to each of the jet pumps. (Seki, T.)

  11. Development of NUFREQ-N, an analytical model for the stability analysis of nuclear coupled density-wave oscillations in boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    A state-of-the-art one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic model has been developed to be used for the linear analysis of nuclear-coupled density-wave oscillations in a boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR). The model accounts for phasic slip, distributed spacers, subcooled boiling, space/time-dependent power distributions and distributed heated wall dynamics. In addition to a parallel channel stability analysis, a detailed model was derived for the BWR loop analysis of both the natural and forced circulation modes of operation. In its final form, this model constitutes a multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) linear system, which features a general nodal neutron kinetics model. Kinetics parameters for use in the kinetics model have been obtained by utilizing self-consistent nodal data and power distributions. The stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4 has been investigated with the Nyquist criterion. The computer implementation of this mode, NUFREQ-N, was used for the parametric study of a typical BWR/4 and comparison were made with existing in-core and out-of-core data. Also, NUFREQ-N was used to analyze the expected stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4. The parametric results revealed important factors influencing BWR stability margin. It was found that NUFREQ-N generally agreed well with out-of-core data. This was especially true for the predicted power-to-flow transfer function, which is the most important transfer function in thermal-hydraulic stability analysis

  12. Utility experience with BWR-PSMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The BWR Power Shape Monitoring System (BWR-PSMS) has proven to be an effective and versatile tool for core monitoring. GPU Nuclear Corporation's (GPUN) Oyster Creek plant has been involved in the PSMS development since its inception, having been selected by EPRI as the initial demonstration site. Beginning with Cycle 10, Oyster Creek has been applying the BWR-PSMS as the primary core monitoring tool. Although the system has been in operation at Oyster Creek for the past several cycles, this is the first time the PSMS was used to monitor compliance to the plant technical specifications, to guide adherence to vendore fuel maneuvering recommendations and to develop data for certain performance records such as fuel burnup, isotopic accounting, etc. This paper will discuss the bases for the decision to apply PSMS as the fundamental core monitoring system, the experience in implementing the PSMS in this mode, activities currently underway or planned related to PSMS, and potential future extensions and applications of PSMS at Oyster Creek

  13. BWR recirculation pump diagnostic expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, S.C.; Morimoto, C.N.; Torres, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    At General Electric (GE), an on-line expert system to support maintenance decisions for BWR recirculation pumps for nuclear power plants has been developed. This diagnostic expert system is an interactive on-line system that furnishes diagnostic information concerning BWR recirculation pump operational problems. It effectively provides the recirculation pump diagnostic expertise in the plant control room continuously 24 hours a day. The expert system is interfaced to an on-line monitoring system, which uses existing plant sensors to acquire non-safety related data in real time. The expert system correlates and evaluates process data and vibration data by applying expert rules to determine the condition of a BWR recirculation pump system by applying knowledge based rules. Any diagnosis will be automatically displayed, indicating which pump may have a problem, the category of the problem, and the degree of concern expressed by the validity index and color hierarchy. The rules incorporate the expert knowledge from various technical sources such as plant experience, engineering principles, and published reports. These rules are installed in IF-THEN formats and the resulting truth values are also expressed in fuzzy terms and a certainty factor called a validity index. This GE Recirculation Pump Expert System uses industry-standard software, hardware, and network access to provide flexible interfaces with other possible data acquisition systems. Gensym G2 Real-Time Expert System is used for the expert shell and provides the graphical user interface, knowledge base, and inference engine capabilities. (author)

  14. 2007 Stability, Security, Transition and Reconstruction Operations Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-28

    narcotics Foster sustainable economy U.S.PRT tasks Jalalabad June 2007 Who can respond to which challeges ? 2. Battlespace or Humanitarian Space...Education Integrated Interagency Stabilization and Reconstruction Training Plug and Play System Lessons Learned from the Field USAID NGOs World Bank ...World Bank , IMF? Expanding the Focus… At the US and NATO Strategic/Operational Level Enhanced/new structures and procedures to improve: Interaction

  15. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ryoichi; Sato, Takashi; Osaki, Masahiko; Hirayama, Fumio; Watabe, Atsushi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively eliminate radioactive substances released upon loss of coolant accidents in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A high pressure gas jetting device having a plurality of small aperture nozzles is provided above a spray nozzle, that is, at the top of a dry well. The jetting device is connected to a vacuum breaker provided in a pressure suppression chamber. Upon loss of coolant accident, coolants are sprayed from the spray nozzle and air or nitrogen is jetted from the gas jetting device as well. Then, the gases in the dry well are disturbed, whereby radioactive iodine at high concentration liable to be accumulated in the dry well is forced downwardly, dissolved in the spray water and eliminated. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Locality-preserving logical operators in topological stabilizer codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Paul; Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2018-01-01

    Locality-preserving logical operators in topological codes are naturally fault tolerant, since they preserve the correctability of local errors. Using a correspondence between such operators and gapped domain walls, we describe a procedure for finding all locality-preserving logical operators admitted by a large and important class of topological stabilizer codes. In particular, we focus on those equivalent to a stack of a finite number of surface codes of any spatial dimension, where our procedure fully specifies the group of locality-preserving logical operators. We also present examples of how our procedure applies to codes with different boundary conditions, including color codes and toric codes, as well as more general codes such as Abelian quantum double models and codes with fermionic excitations in more than two dimensions.

  17. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez S, A.

    2004-01-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  18. Decay ratio studies in BWR and PWR using wavelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, Oe.

    1996-10-01

    The on-line stability of BWR and PWR is studied using the neutron noise signals as the fluctuations reflect the dynamic characteristics of the reactor. Using appropriate signal modeling for time domain analysis of noise signals, the stability parameters can be directly obtained from the system impulse response. Here in particular for BWR, an important stability parameter is the decay ratio (DR) of the impulse response. The time series analysis involves the autoregressive modeling of the neutron detector signal. The DR determination is strongly effected by the low frequency behaviour since the transfer function characteristic tends to be a third order system rather than a second order system for a BWR. In a PWR low frequency behaviour is modified by the Boron concentration. As a result of these phenomena there are difficulties in the consistent determination of the DR oscillations. The enhancement of the consistency of this DR estimation is obtained by wavelet transform using actual power plant data from BWR and PWR. A comparative study of the Restimation with and without wavelets are presented. (orig.)

  19. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor; Identificacion de modelos de orden reducido de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez S, A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: augusto@correo.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  20. Effect of Loading Transients on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Tests 3 and 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.-P

    2003-04-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5{sup t}h EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. The present report is a summary of the third and fourth test of working package (WP) 3 with loading transients, performed at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Two different low-alloy steels (20 MnMoNi 5 5, 0.015 wt.% S and 22 NiMoCr 3 7, 0.007 wt. %S) were investigated in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 240 {sup o}C, DO = 400 ppb) in a daisy chain at two different load ratios (R = 0.8 and 0.2). In the first part of the experiments, asymmetrical saw tooth loading with different rise times {delta}t{sub R} of the load and different loading frequencies were applied. Then the loading conditions were changed to an asymmetrical trapezoid waveform loading (periodical partial unloading, PPU) and the hold time {delta}t{sub H} at maximum load was varied. In the final phase of WP 3 PSI tests 3 and 4 the SCC behaviour was investigated under constant load. With decreasing loading frequency the corrosion fatigue (CF) crack advance per cycle {delta}a/{delta}N{sub EAC} of material A increased. Sustained EAC crack growth could be maintained down to low frequencies of 10{sup -5} Hz. The time-based crack growth rate (CGR) da/dt{sub EAC} decreased with decreasing frequency. In material B no effect of the loading frequency could be resolved. Up to a hold time of 1 h at maximum constant load the CGR da/dt{sub EAC} seemed to be independent of the hold time. Above hold times of 1 h the CGR decreased and dropped down to CGR values in the range or below the BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines. This behaviour was observed in both investigated materials. The cycle-based CGR {delta}a/{delta}N{sub EAC} remained approximately constant with increasing hold time. The

  1. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  2. AREVA 10x10 BWR fuel experience feedback and on going upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, Hans Joachim; Rentmeister, Thomas; Garner, Norman; Tandy, Jay; Mollard, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Established with engineering and manufacturing operations in the US and Europe, AREVA NP has been and is supplying nuclear fuel assemblies and associated core components to boiling water reactors worldwide, representing today more than 63 000 fuel assemblies. The evolution of BWR fuel rod arrays from early 6x6 designs to the 10x10 designs first introduced in the mid 1990's yielded significant improvements in thermal mechanical operating limits, critical power level, cold shutdown margin, discharge burnup, as well as other key operational capabilities. Since first delivered in 1992, ATRIUM T M 1 0 fuel assemblies have now been supplied to a total of 32 BWR plants in the US, Europe, and Asia resulting in an operating experience over 20 000 fuel assemblies. This article presents in detail the operational experience consolidated by these more than 20 000 ATRIUM T M 1 0 BWR assemblies already supplied to utilities. Within the different 10x10 fuel assemblies available, the Fuel Assembly design is chosen and tailored to the operating strategies of each reactor. Among them, the latest versions of ATRIUM T M a re ATRIUM T M 1 0XP and ATRIUM T M 1 0XM fuel assemblies which have been delivered to several utilities worldwide. The article details key aspects of ATRIUM T M 1 0 fuel assemblies in terms of reliability and performance. Special attention is paid to key proven features, ULTRAFLOW T M s pacer grids, the use of part length fuel rods (PLFRs) and their geometrical optimization, water channel and load chain, upgraded features available for inclusion with most advanced designs. Regular upgrading of the product has been made possible thanks to a continuous improvement process with the aim of further upgrading BWR fuel assembly performance and reliability. Regarding thermal mechanical behavior of fuel rods, chromia (Cr2O3) doped fuel pellets, described in Reference 1, well illustrate this improvement strategy to reduce fission gas release, increase power thresholds for PCI

  3. Stability of the matrix model in operator interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuta Sakai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The IIB matrix model is one of the candidates for nonperturbative formulation of string theory, and it is believed that the model contains gravitational degrees of freedom in some manner. In some preceding works, it was proposed that the matrix model describes the curved space where the matrices represent differential operators that are defined on a principal bundle. In this paper, we study the dynamics of the model in this interpretation, and point out the necessity of the principal bundle from the viewpoint of the stability and diffeomorphism invariance. We also compute the one-loop correction which yields a mass term for each field due to the principal bundle. We find that the stability is not violated.

  4. BWR plant dynamic analysis code BWRDYN user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokobayashi, Masao; Yoshida, Kazuo; Fujiki, Kazuo

    1989-06-01

    Computer code BWRDYN has been developed for thermal-hydraulic analysis of a BWR plant. It can analyze the various types of transient caused by not only small but also large disturbances such as operating mode changes and/or system malfunctions. The verification of main analytical models of the BWRDYN code has been performed with measured data of actual BWR plant. Furthermore, the installation of BOP (Balance of Plant) model has made it possible to analyze the effect of BOP on reactor system. This report describes on analytical models and instructions for user of the BWRDYN code. (author)

  5. Modern technology applied in the advanced BWR (ABWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hucik, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) represents the next generation of light water reactors (LWR) to be introduced into commercial operation in the 1990's. The ABWR is the result of the continuing evolution of the BWR, incorporating state-of-the-art technology and improvements based on worldwide experience, and extensive design and test and development programs. This paper discusses how the ABWR development objective focused on an optimized selection of advanced technologies and proven BWR technologies. A technical evaluation of the ABWR shows its superiority in terms of performance characteristics and economics relative to current LWR designs

  6. The BWR owners' group planning guide for life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.K.; Lehnert, D.F.; Locke, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Extending the operating life of a commercial nuclear power plant has been shown to be economically beneficial to both the utility and the electric customer. As such, many utilities are planning and implementing plant life extension (PLEX) programs. A document has been developed which provides guidance to utilities in formulating a PLEX program plant for one or more boiling water reactor (BWR) plants. The guide has been developed by the BWR Owners' Group Plant Life Extension Committee. The principal bases for this guide were the BWR Pilot and Lead Plant Programs. These programs were used as models to develop the 'base plan' described in this guide. By formulating their program plant utilizing the base plan, utilities will be able to maximize the use of existing evaluations and results. The utility planner will build upon the base plan by adding any tasks or features that are unique to their programs. (author)

  7. BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Shigeru.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, control rod drives are disposed in the upper portion of a reactor pressure vessel, and a control rod guide tube is disposed in adjacent with a gas/liquid separator at a same height, as well as a steam separator is disposed in the control rod guide tube. The length of a connection rod can be shortened by so much as the control rod guide tube and the gas/liquid separator overlapping with each other. Since the control rod guide tube and the gas/liquid separator are at the same height, the number of the gas/liquid separators to be disposed is decreased and, accordingly, even if the steam separation performance by the gas/liquid separator is lowered, it can be compensated by the steam separator of the control rod guide tube. In view of the above, since the direction of emergent insertion of the control rod is not against gravitational force but it is downward direction utilizing the gravitational force, reliability for the emergent insertion of the control rod can be further improved. Further, the length of the connection rod can be minimized, thereby enabling to lower the height of the reactor pressure vessel. The construction cost for the nuclear power plant can be reduced. (N.H.)

  8. Safety analysis of thorium-based fuels in the General Electric Standard BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, M.J.; Townsend, D.B.; Kunz, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    A denatured (U-233/Th)O 2 fuel assembly has been designed which is energy equivalent to and hardware interchangeable with a modern boiling water reactor (BWR) reference reload assembly. Relative to the reference UO 2 fuel, the thorium fuel design shows better performance during normal and transient reactor operation for the BWR/6 product line and will meet or exceed current safety and licensing criteria. Power distributions are flattened and thermal operating margins are increased by reduced steam void reactivity coefficients caused by U-233. However, a (U-233/Th)O 2 -fueled BWR will likely have reduced operating flexibility. A (U-235/Th)O 2 -fueled BWR should perform similar to a UO 2 -fueled BWR under all operating conditions. A (Pu/Th)O 2 -fueled BWR may have reduced thermal margins and similar accident response and be less stable than a UO 2 -fueled BWR. The assessment is based on comparisions of point model and infinite lattice predictions of various nuclear reactivity parameters, including void reactivity coefficients, Doppler reactivity coefficients, and control blade worths

  9. New tools for the stability control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melera, J.; Albendea, M.; Escriva, A.; Munoz-Cobos, L. L.; Montesinos

    2006-01-01

    IBERDROLA INGENIERIA y CONSTRUCCION, IBERDROLA GENERACION and the polytechnical Univisty of Valencia, are carrying out a project of R and D called DROP (Decay Ratio on-line Predictor) whose objective is to create a tool (predictor and monitor) for on-line monitoring of the thermal-hydraulic stability during the operation of BWR reactors. DROP is intended to be integrated in CAPRICOPE; the Core Monitoring System of Cofrentes NPP, to allow supervisors to known stability margins during the operation, simplifying reactor start-up and shutdown. In transient conditions, the knowledge of reactor stability will avoid reactor unplanned shutdowns. (Author) 11 refs

  10. Water chemistry control practices and data of the European BWR fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellwag, B.; Laendner, A.; Weiss, S.; Huettner, F.

    2010-01-01

    Nineteen BWR plants are in operation in Europe, nine built by ASEA Atom, six by Siemens KWU and four by General Electric. This paper gives an overview of water chemistry operation practices and parameters of the European BWR plants. General design characteristics of the plants are described. Chemistry control strategies and underlying water chemistry guidelines are summarized. Chemistry data are presented and discussed with regard to plant design characteristics. The paper is based on a contract of the European BWR Forum with AREVA on a chemistry sourcebook for member plants. The survey of chemistry data was conducted for the years 2002 to 2008. (author)

  11. The armenian power system operation stability investigation accounting putting new power systems into operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeghiazaryan, L.V.; Hakobyan, S.G.; Gharibyan, G.V.; Harutyunyan, G.S.; Galstyan, G.H.

    2010-01-01

    The description of the power systems operation stability failure caused by the system significant emergency states occurred during the last working period in Armenian and USA power systems is performed. With the use of PSSTME-31 software portfolio of Siemens Firm a design model is developed and transient electromechanical process calculations for Armenian power system are performed. The accuracy of the model is checked by comparing real-time transient state parameters and their reproduction calculation results.The Armenia - Iran current power transmission lines permissible limit under the condition of the static and dynamic stability requirements and in case of the new thermal power units maintenance are defined

  12. State of the art of second international exercise on benchmarks in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdu, G.; Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Palomo, M. J.; Escriva, A.; Ginestar, D.

    1998-01-01

    This is a second in series of Benchmarks based on data from operating Swedish BWRs. The first one concerned measurements made in cycles 14,15 16 and 17 at Ringhals 1 Nuclear Power Plant and addressed predictive power of analytical tools used in BWR stability analysis. Part of the data was disclosed only after participants had provided their results. This work has been published in the report: NEA/NSC/DOC(96)22, November 1996. In this report it was recognised that there is a need for better qualification of the applied noise analysis methods. A follow up Benchmark was thus proposed dedicated to the analysis of time series data and including the evaluation of both global and regional stability of Forsmarks 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Plant. In this second Benchmark have participated Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB,NEA Nuclear Science Committee, CSN Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear and Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering of Polytechnic University of Valencia. (Author)

  13. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karjunen, T.; Laitinen, T.; Piippo, J.; Sirkiae, P.

    1996-01-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR's as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs

  14. Design of a redundant meteorological station for a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, R.; Celis del Angel, L.; Bucio, F.; Rivero, T.; Palacios, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the design of a meteorological station for a reactor type BWR is proposed. Two independent channels of data acquisition that allow him to have a bigger readiness is exposed. It is incorporate sensors without mobile parts to measure speed, wind direction and pluvial precipitation. It also counts, with sensors of global solar radiation, net radiation, barometric pressure, relative humidity and ambient temperature; with them they are possible to be calculated, moreover, other variables as temperature differential, dew point and atmospheric stability. The sensors are placed on a tower to different heights and send their information (each second) to a local registration system, the one which in turn, it remits the data to the monitoring office so that a computer is linked with the system, display and management the information in real time and automatic way. The redundant structure allows that in the event of maintenance the data acquisition is not interrupted, even if the information is transferred to another place. In all the station sections it is used protocols of standard communication to allow that a great quantity of devices can be connected without major problem. The above-mentioned would allow to the operators in the control room to have reliable information during the whole time of the reactor operation. (Author)

  15. Experiences in stability testing of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Otaduy, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize experiences with boiling water reactor (BWR) stability testing using noise analysis techniques. These techniques have been studied over an extended period of time, but it has been only recently that they have been well established and generally accepted. This paper contains first a review of the problem of BWR neutronic stability, focusing on its physical causes and its effects on reactor operation. The paper also describes the main techniques used to quantify, from noise measurements, the reactor's stability in terms of a decay ratio. Finally, the main results and experiences obtained from the stability tests performed at the Dresden and the Browns Ferry reactors using noise analysis techniques are summarized

  16. Hydrogen injection device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the increasing ratio of main steam system dose rate due to N-16 activity due to excess hydrogen injection in the hydrogen injection operation of BWR type reactors. Constitution: There are provided a hydrogen injection mechanism for injecting hydrogen into primary coolants of a BWR type reactor, and a chemical injection device for injecting chemicals such as methanol, which makes nitrogen radioisotopes resulted in the reactor water upon hydrogen injection non-volatile, into the pressure vessel separately from hydrogen. Injected hydrogen and the chemicals are not reacted in the feedwater system, but the reaction proceeds due to the presence of radioactive rays after the injection into the pressure vessel. Then, hydrogen causes re-combination in the downcomer portion to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration. Meanwhile, about 70 % of the chemicals is supplied by means of a jet pump directly to the reactor core, thereby converting the chemical form of N-16 in the reactor core more oxidative (non-volatile). (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P. [ABB Atom, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions.

  18. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P.

    1997-01-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions

  19. BWR fuel experience with zinc injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.A.; Garcia, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    In 1982 a correlation between low primary recirculation system dose rates in BWR's and the presence of ionic zinc in reactor water was identified. The source of the zinc was primarily from Admiralty brass condensers. Plants with brass condensers are called ''natural zinc'' plants. Brass condensers were also a source of copper that was implicated in crude induced localized corrosion (CILC) fuel failures. In 1986 the first BWR intentionally injected zinc for the benefits of dose rate control. Although zinc alone was never implicated in fuel degradation of failures, a comprehensive fuel surveillance program was initiated to monitor fuel performance. Currently there are 14 plants that are injecting zinc. Six of these plants are also on hydrogen water chemistry. This paper describes the effect on both Zircaloy corrosion and the cruding characteristics as a result of these changes in water chemistry. Fuel rod corrosion was found to be independent of the specific water chemistry of the plants. The corrosion behavior was the same with the additions of zinc alone or zinc plus hydrogen and well within the operating experience for fuel without either of these additions. No change was observed in the amounts of crude deposited on the fuel rods, both for the adherent and loosely held deposits. One of the effects of the zinc addition was the trend to form more of the zinc rich iron spinel in the fuel deposits rather than the hematite deposits that are predominantly formed with non additive water chemistry

  20. Fast measurements of the in-core coolant velocity in a BWR by neutron noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A method to determine in-core coolant velocities from neutron noise within short time intervals has been developed. The accuracy of the method was determined by using a simulation set-up and by using signals of a twin self-powered neutron detector installed in the core of the Dodewaard BWR in the Netherlands. In-core coolant velocities can be estimated within 2.5 s with a standard deviation (due to statistics) less than 2.1%. The method is suitable for velocity monitoring as is shown by the application to a stepwise velocity change of the coolant in a model of a coolant channel of a BWR. The presented technique was applied to determine the variations of the coolant velocity in the Dodewaard core during normal operation and during pressure steps. Only minor variations of the coolant velocity were detected during normal reactor conditions. An increase of those variations with pressure lowering - indicating a lower thermal hydraulic stability - could be detected. A clear velocity response to pressure steps could be determined which was also reflected in the cross-spectrum of the velocity with the vessel pressure and with the in-core neutron flux. (author)

  1. Transmutation of minor actinide using thorium fueled BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susilo, Jati

    2002-01-01

    One of the methods to conduct transmutation of minor actinide is the use of BWR with thorium fuel. Thorium fuel has a specific behaviour of producing a little secondary minor actinides. Transmutation of minor actinide is done by loading it in the BWR with thorium fuel through two methods, namely close recycle and accumulation recycle. The calculation of minor actinide composition produced, weigh of minor actinide transmuted, and percentage of reminder transmutation was carried SRAC. The calculations were done to equivalent cell modeling from one fuel rod of BWR. The results show that minor actinide transmutation is more effective using thorium fuel than uranium fuel, through both close recycle and accumulation recycle. Minor actinide transmutation weight show that the same value for those recycle for 5th recycle. And most of all minor actinide produced from 5 unit BWR uranium fuel can transmuted in the 6 t h of close recycle. And, the minimal value of excess reactivity of the core is 12,15 % Δk/k, that is possible value for core operation

  2. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the control rod exchanging frequency by increasing the working life of control rods for ordinary operation with large neutron irradiation dose, to thereby decrease the exposure dose for operators performing exchanging work, as well as decrease the amount of radioactive wastes resulted upon exchange of the control rods. Constitution: Hafnium solid metal is employed as the neutron absorber of control rods for usual operation inserted into and withdrawn from fuel assemblies for the reactor power control over the entire cycle of the ordinary reactor operation and boron carbide powder is employed as the neutron absorber for emergency control rods to be inserted between the fuel assemblies only upon reactor scram or shutdown, whereby the working life of the control rods for ordinary reactor operation with greater neutron irradiation dose can be improved. Accordingly, the control rod exchanging frequency can be reduced to decrease the exposure dose to the operator for conducting the exchanging work. (Yoshihara, H.)

  3. 14 CFR 27.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... power-operated systems. 27.672 Section 27.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 27.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If the functioning of stability augmentation or other automatic or power-operated systems is necessary to show...

  4. 14 CFR 25.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... power-operated systems. 25.672 Section 25.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 25.672 Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. If the functioning of stability augmentation or other automatic or power-operated systems is necessary to show...

  5. 14 CFR 29.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... power-operated systems. 29.672 Section 29.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 29.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If the functioning of stability augmentation or other automatic or power-operated system is necessary to show...

  6. Stability of abstract nonlinear nonautonomous differential-delay equations with unbounded history-responsive operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil', M. I.

    2005-08-01

    We consider a class of nonautonomous functional-differential equations in a Banach space with unbounded nonlinear history-responsive operators, which have the local Lipshitz property. Conditions for the boundedness of solutions, Lyapunov stability, absolute stability and input-output one are established. Our approach is based on a combined usage of properties of sectorial operators and spectral properties of commuting operators.

  7. BWR reactor management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Kakuji; Kawamura, Atsuo; Yoshioka, Ritsuo; Neda, Toshikatsu.

    1979-01-01

    It is necessary to grasp the delicate state of operation in reactor cores in view of the control of burn-up and power output at the time of the operation management of BWRs. Enormous labor has been required for the collection, processing and evaluation of the data. It is desirable to obtain the safer, more efficient and faster method of operation control by predicting the states in cores including the change of xenon and reflecting them to operation plans as well as by tracing with high accuracy the past burn-up history for a long period. At present, the on-line evaluation of the states in cores is carried out with the process computers attached to respective units, but the amount of data required for core operation management of high degree far exceeds their capacity. From such viewpoints, the research and development on the reactor management system were carried out. The data processing concerning core operation management is performed with newly installed computers utilizing the data from existing process computers, and the operation of reactor cores, the qualitative improvement of management works, labor saving, and fast, efficient operation control are feasible with it. This system was installed in an actual plant in October, 1977. The composition of the system, the prediction of the change in local output distribution accompanying control rod operation, the prediction of the change in the states in cores due to the flow rate of coolant, and the function of collecting plant data are explained. (Kako, I.)

  8. Synergistic failure of BWR internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A. G.; Chang, T.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components

  9. Metallurgical factors that contribute to cracking in BWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    During the fall of 1974 and early winter of 1975, cracks have been discovered in the 4 in. bypass lines of several Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) in the United States. Further, similar cracks were discovered at two BWR's in Japan during the same period. More recently, cracks have been discovered in the core spray piping and in a furnace-sensitized ''safe end'' and adjacent ''dutchman'' at the Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 2. Although inspections at all other U.S. BWR's have not disclosed further instances of cracking in core spray piping, leaking cracks have been found in the core spray piping of two BWR's overseas. Metallurgical examinations of these cracks are not yet complete. The following observations have been made to date. All cracks (except those in the furnace-sensitized safe end and dutchman) occurred in seamless type 304 stainless steel piping or in elbows fabricated from such piping, in the outer heat affected zone of either field or shop welds, in lines isolated from the main primary coolant flow during full power operation, except for the not yet examined cracks in the Monticello bypass lines. The cracks are exclusively intergranular, and occur in metal that has been lightly sensitized by the welding process, with only intermittent grain boundary carbides. They developed in the areas of peak axial residual stresses from welding rather than in the most heavily sensitized areas. No fatigue striations have been found on the fracture surfaces. The evidence received to date strongly indicates that these cracks were caused by intergranular stress corrosion of weld-sensitized stainless steel by BWR water containing greater than 0.2 ppM oxygen. The possible role of fatigue or alternating stresses in this corrosion is not clear. Further, not all the cracks detected to date necessarily have occurred by the same mechanism

  10. Do Crisis Response Operations Affect Political and Economic Stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    military presence itself actually affects overall levels of political and economic stability is still an open question. We look at the following two...relationship between military actions and political and economic stability . In this paper, we focus only on the crisis response piece of the overseas presence issue.

  11. CCF analysis of BWR reactor shutdown systems based on the operating experience at the TVO I/II in 1981-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankamo, T.

    1996-04-01

    The work constitutes a part of the project conducted within the research program of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate SKI, aimed to develop the methods and data base for the Common Cause Failure (CCF) analysis of highly redundant reactor scram systems. The data analysis for the TVO I/II plant is focused on the hydraulic scram system, and control rods and drives. It covers operating experiences from 1981 through 1993. (9 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.)

  12. Level controlling system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joge, Toshio; Higashigawa, Yuichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reasonably attain fully automatic water level control in the core of BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: A feedwater flow regulation valve for reactor operation and a feedwater flow regulation valve for starting are provided at the outlet of a motor-driven feedwater pump in a feedwater system, and these valves are controlled by a feedwater flow rate controller. While on the other hand, a damp valve for reactor clean up system is controlled either in ''computer'' mode or in ''manual'' mode selected by a master switch, that is, controlled from a computer or the ON-OFF switch of the master switch by way of a valve control analog memory and a turn-over switch. In this way, the water level in the nuclear reactor can be controlled in a fully automatic manner reasonably at the starting up and shutdown of the plant to thereby provide man power saving. (Seki, T.)

  13. Evaluation of internal flooding in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, K.; Papazoglou, I.A.; Sun, Y.H.; Anavim, E.; Ilberg, D.

    1985-01-01

    Flooding inside a nuclear power station is capable of concurrently disabling redundant safety systems. This paper presents the results of a recent review study performed on internally-generated floods inside a boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor building. The study evaluated the flood initiator frequency due to either maintenance or ruptures using Markovian models. A time phased event tree approach was adopted to quantify the core damage frequency based on the flood initiator frequency. It is found in the study that the contribution to the total core damage due to internal flooding events is not insignificant and is comparable to other transient contributors. The findings also indicate that the operator plays an important role in the prevention as well as the mitigation of a flooding event

  14. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data

  15. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake [ISOGO Nuclear Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data.

  16. BWR alloy 182 stress Corrosion Cracking Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, R.M.; Hickling, J.

    2002-01-01

    Modern Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) have successfully operated for more than three decades. Over that time frame, different materials issues have continued to arise, leading to comprehensive efforts to understand the root cause while concurrently developing different mitigation strategies to address near-term, continued operation, as well as provide long-term paths to extended plant life. These activities have led to methods to inspect components to quantify the extent of degradation, appropriate methods of analysis to quantify structural margin, repair designs (or strategies to replace the component function) and improved materials for current and future application. The primary materials issue has been the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). While this phenomenon has been primarily associated with austenitic stainless steel, it has also been found in nickel-base weldments used to join piping and reactor internal components to the reactor pressure vessel consistent with fabrication practices throughout the nuclear industry. The objective of this paper is to focus on the history and learning gained regarding Alloy 182 weld metal. The paper will discuss the chronology of weld metal cracking in piping components as well as in reactor internal components. The BWR industry has pro-actively developed inspection processes and procedures that have been successfully used to interrogate different locations for the existence of cracking. The recognition of the potential for cracking has also led to extensive studies to understand cracking behavior. Among other things, work has been performed to characterize crack growth rates in both oxygenated and hydrogenated environments. The latter may also be relevant to PWR systems. These data, along with the understanding of stress corrosion cracking processes, have led to extensive implementation of appropriate mitigation measures. (authors)

  17. A BWR 24-month cycle analysis using multicycle techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel cycle design analyses have become increasingly challenging in the past several years. As utilities continue to seek improved capacity factors, reduced power generation costs, and reduced outage costs, longer cycle lengths and fuel design optimization become important considerations. Accurate multicycle analysis techniques are necessary to determine the viability of fuel designs and cycle operating strategies to meet reactor operating requirements, e.g., meet thermal and reactivity margin constraints, while minimizing overall fuel cycle costs. Siemens Power Corporation (SPC), Nuclear Division, has successfully employed multi-cycle analysis techniques with realistic rodded cycle depletions to demonstrate equilibrium fuel cycle performance in 24-month cycles. Analyses have been performed by a BWR/5 reactor, at both rated and uprated power conditions

  18. Condensate polishing guidelines for PWR and BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, P.; Crinigan, P.; Graham, B.; Kohlmann, R.; Crosby, C.; Seager, J.; Bosold, R.; Gillen, J.; Kristensen, J.; McKeen, A.; Jones, V.; Sawochka, S.; Siegwarth, D.; Keeling, D.; Polidoroff, T.; Morgan, D.; Rickertsen, D.; Dyson, A.; Mills, W.; Coleman, L.

    1993-03-01

    Under EPRI sponsorship, an industry committee, similar in form and operation to other guideline committees, was created to develop Condensate Polishing Guidelines for both PWR and BWR systems. The committee reviewed the available utility and water treatment industry experience on system design and performance and incorporated operational and state-of-the-art information into document. These guidelines help utilities to optimize present condensate polisher designs as well as be a resource for retrofits or new construction. These guidelines present information that has not previously been presented in any consensus industry document. The committee generated guidelines that cover both deep bed and powdered resin systems as an integral part of the chemistry of PWR and BWR plants. The guidelines are separated into sections that deal with the basis for condensate polishing, system design, resin design and application, data management and performance and management responsibilities

  19. Range of the radiation monitor for the rigid vent of primary containment during normal and emergency operation for a BWR-5 in Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijerina S, F.; Pozos S, A. M.; Cabrera U, S.; Mata A, J. A.; Sandoval V, S.; Ovando C, R.; Vargas A, A.; Gallardo R, I.; Cruz G, M.; Amador C, C.

    2014-10-01

    The earthquake followed by a tsunami, happened in March, 2011 in the coasts of oriental Japan, caused damages in the nuclear power plants 1 at 4 of Fukushima Daiichi leading to damage of the fuel in three of the reactors and to the radiation liberation to the exterior. As consequence of those events, the regulations requires that the power plants with Primary Containment type Mark I and II evaluate to have a system of rigid vent with a monitoring equipment of radiation effluents. The present work covers the rigid vent of diameter 12 of the Primary Containment, type Mark-II, of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in conditions of severe accident and normal operation, low regime of Extended Power Up rate (EPU - 2317 MWt), using the codes MAAP3B, MICROSHILED 5.05 and the Bardach Black Boxes methodology. As a result the measurement range of the radiation monitor that is required for monitoring the gassy liberation to the atmosphere was determined. The conclusion is that the superior limit of the range of the radiation meter during a Severe Accident is of 8.55 E + 05 R/h (8.55 E + 08 m R/h) and the superior limit in normal operation of 1.412 E-11 at 2.540 E-7 R/h (1.412 E-14 at 2.540 E-10 m R/h). (Author)

  20. Stability Operations and State-Building: Continuities and Contingencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Browder, Dewey A; Kaufmann, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this academic colloquium was to identify principles and supporting policies of state-building that will enhance America's ability "to win the peace" while stabilizing chaotic regions...

  1. TVA experience in BWR reload design and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    TVA has developed and implemented the capability to perform BWR reload core design and licensing analyses. The advantages accruing from this capability include the tangible cost-savings from performing reload analyses in-house. Also, ''intangible'' benefits such as increased operating flexibility and the ability to accommodate multivendor fuel designs have been demonstrated. The major disadvantage with performing in-house analyses is the cost associated with development and maintenance of the analytical methods and staff expertise

  2. Peach bottom cycle 2 stability analysis using RELAP5/PARCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggini, F.; D'Auria, F.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.; Ginestar, D.

    2003-01-01

    Boiling channels and systems may oscillate owing to the behaviour of the liquid-steam mixture used for removing the thermal power. A thermal-hydraulic system may be unstable under particular operating conditions. Two kinds of power oscillation have been observed in BWR cores. One is an in-phase (core-wide) and the other is an out-of-phase (regional) oscillation. Since the above feature can make detection more difficult, the latter oscillation is potentially more severe. The problem is well known since the design of the first BWR system. However, to improve the safety systems of these reactors, it is necessary to be able to detect in a reliable way these oscillations from the neutronic signals. The purpose of this work is to characterize the unstable behaviour of a BWR. Within this study, it has been performed a number of perturbation analysis. The coupled codes RELAP5-Mod3.3/PARCS have used for the simulation of the transients. Validation has been performed against Peach Bottom-2 Low-Flow Stability Test PT3. Three dimensional time domain BWR stability analysis were performed on test point 3 for the core wide oscillation mode. In this transient dynamically complex events take place, i.e., neutron kinetics is coupled with thermal-hydraulics and an in-phase oscillation has been developed. The calculated results are compared against the available experimental data. (author)

  3. BWR Steam Dryer Alternating Stress Assessment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hambric, S. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ziada, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an overview of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) steam dryer design; the fatigue cracking failures that occurred at the Quad Cities (QC) plants and their root causes; a history of BWR Extended Power Uprates (EPUs) in the USA; and a discussion of steam dryer modifications/replacements, alternating stress mechanisms on steam dryers, and structural integrity evaluations (static and alternating stress).

  4. BWR chromium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, V.F.; Indig, M.E.; Skarpelos, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This report addresses the concern about higher total specific conductivity in the reactor recirculation loop water due to the chromate ion. This concern is particularly high at plants where all other ionic species have been reduced through careful attention to makeup and condensate polisher operations. An EPRI Chromate Workshop was held in November 1990 to consider the issues raised by observed levels of chromate ion (generally 5 to 50 ppB). While BWRs on normal water chemistry were the only ones observing chromate, even plants on hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) observe sharp spikes of conductivity due to chromate whenever the hydrogen supply was interrupted after a reasonably long HWC operational period. The consensus of the workshop attendees was that chromate was not a concern as an agent causing pipe cracking compared to the more common species such as chloride and sulfate. However, the data are somewhat ambiguous for levels of chromate above 50 ppB. Adjustments to the weighing factors for the various ionic species in the industry chemistry performance index are suggested to allow for the known relative higher aggressiveness of other species relative to that of chromate

  5. Robust Stability and H∞ Stabilization of Switched Systems with Time-Varying Delays Using Delta Operator Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problems of the robust stability and robust H∞ controller design for time-varying delay switched systems using delta operator approach. Based on the average dwell time approach and delta operator theory, a sufficient condition of the robust exponential stability is presented by choosing an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional candidate. Then, a state feedback controller is designed such that the resulting closed-loop system is exponentially stable with a guaranteed H∞ performance. The obtained results are formulated in the form of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs. Finally, a numerical example is provided to explicitly illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Stability Operations and State-Building: Continuities and Contingencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    create previously unimaginable economic opportunity for themselves, their families, and their employees . Without any tools whatsoever, empirical...security, order, law, limits, and stability; (3) Belongingness and Love needs, e.g., work group, family, affection, and relationships; (4) Esteem needs

  7. Operational Stability of Organic Field‐Effect Transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, P.A.; Sharma, A.; Matthijssen, S.J.G.; Kemerink, M.; de Leeuw, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are considered in technological applications for which low cost or mechanical flexibility are crucial factors. The environmental stability of the organic semiconductors used in OFETs has improved to a level that is now sufficient for commercialization.

  8. Specifications of the BWR simulator for HAMMLAB 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grini, Rolf-Einar; Miettinen, Jaakko; Nurmilaukas, Pekka; Raussi; Pekka; Saarni, Ray; Stokke; Egil; Soerensen, Aimar; Tiihonen, Olli

    1998-02-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) simulator for HAMMLAB 2000 will be a model of the Swedish plant Forsmark-3. This report gives the specifications of the BWR simulator. The bulk of the report is a copy of the relevant addendum to the contract with the developer, and to the contract with the group of utilities and with ABB Atom. After a general overview, each plant system is described one after the other (using the reference plant system coding), and the simulation of each system is specified. Even the systems that shall not be simulated are included; in those cases the specification is: It is not required that ... is simulated. A list of malfunctions is given, as well as a list of validation transients. Finally the operator interface is specified. (author)

  9. Initiation model for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWR pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, Mamoru; Kawakubo, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yuji; Arii, Mitsuru.

    1981-01-01

    Discussions were made on the keys of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature water in laboratories and stress corrosion cracking incidents in operating plants. Based on these discussions, a model was set up of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation in BWR pipes. Regarding the model, it was presumed that the intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiates during start up periods whenever heat-affected zones in welded pipes are highly sensitized and suffer dynamic strain in transient water containing dissolved oxygen. A series of BWR start up simulation tests were made by using a flowing autoclave system with slow strain rate test equipment. Validity of the model was confirmed through the test results. (author)

  10. Study on thermal performance and margins of BWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stosic, Zoran

    1999-01-01

    This paper contributes to developing a methodology of predicting and analyzing thermal performance and margins of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies under conditions of reaching high quality Boiling Crisis and subsequent post-dryout thermal hydraulics causing temperature excursion of fuel cladding. Operational margins against dryout and potential for increasing fuel performance with appropriate benefits are discussed. The philosophy of modeling with its special topics are demonstrated on the HECHAN (HEated CHannel ANalyzer) model as the state-of-art for thermal-hydraulics analysis of BWR fuel assemblies in pre- and post-dryout two-phase flow regimes. The scope of further work either being or has to be performed concerning implementation of new physical aspects, including domain extension of HECHAN model applications to the Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), is discussed. Finally, a comprehensive overview of the literature dealing with development of the model is given. (author)

  11. BWR NSSS design basis documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vij, R.S.; Bates, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    programs that GE has participated in and describes the different options and approaches that have been used by various utilities in their design basis programs. Some of these variations deal with the scope and depth of coverage of the information, while others are related to the process (how the work is done). Both of these topics can have a significant effect on the program cost. Some insight into these effects is provided. The final section of the paper presents a set of lessons learned and a recommendation for an optimum approach to a design basis information program. The lessons learned reflect the knowledge that GE has gained by participating in design basis programs with nineteen domestic and international BWR owner/operators. The optimum approach described in this paper is GE's attempt to define a set of information and a work process for a utility/GE NSSS Design Basis Information program that will maximize the cost effectiveness of the program for the utility. (author)

  12. BWR type reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Shin-ichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the internal structure in a reactor by rapidly and efficiently transferring heat generated in a reactor core out of the reactor and eliminating the danger of radiation exposure. Constitution: Steam generated in a pressure vessel is introduced into heat pipe group by inserting the heat pipe group into the steam dome of the pressure vessel. The introduced steam is condensed in the heat pipes to transfer the heat of the steam to the heat pipe group. The transferred heat is transmitted to a heat exchanger provided out of a containment vessel to generate steam to operate a turbine. Thus, it is not necessary to introduce the steam including radioactive substance externally and can remove only the heat so as to carry out the desired purpose. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  14. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  15. BWR water chemistry impurity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Korhonen, S.; Renstroem, K.; Hofling, C.G.; Rebensdorff, B.

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory studies were made on the effect of water impurities on environmental cracking in simulated BWR water of stainless steel, low alloy steel and nickel-base alloys. Constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests were run in simulated normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or start-up environment. Sulfate, chloride and copper with chloride added to the water at levels of a fraction of a ppM were found to be extremely deleterious to all kinds of materials except Type 316 NG. Other detrimental impurities were fluoride, silica and some organic acids, although acetic acid was beneficial. Nitrate and carbon dioxide were fairly inoccuous. Corrosion fatigue and constant load tests on compact tension specimens were run in simulated normal BWR water chemistry (NWC) or hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), without impurities or with added sulfate or carbon dioxide. For sensitized Type 304 SS in NWC, 0.1 ppM sulfate increased crack propagation rates in constant load tests by up to a factor of 100, and in fatigue tests up to a factor of 10. Also, cracking in Type 316 nuclear grade SS and Alloy 600 was enhanced, but to a smaller degree. Carbon dioxide was less detrimental than sulfate. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Operator Representations of Frames: Boundedness, Duality, and Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Hasannasab, Marzieh

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to analyze frames (Formula presented.) having the form (Formula presented.) for some linear operator (Formula presented.). A key result characterizes boundedness of the operator T in terms of shift-invariance of a certain sequence space. One of the consequences is a ch...... in frame theory. Various ways of avoiding this problem will be discussed. Throughout the paper the results will be connected with the operators and function systems appearing in applied harmonic analysis, as well as with general group representations.......The purpose of the paper is to analyze frames (Formula presented.) having the form (Formula presented.) for some linear operator (Formula presented.). A key result characterizes boundedness of the operator T in terms of shift-invariance of a certain sequence space. One of the consequences...... is a characterization of the case where the representation (Formula presented.) can be achieved for an operator T that has an extension to a bounded bijective operator (Formula presented.) In this case we also characterize all the dual frames that are representable in terms of iterations of an operator V; in particular...

  17. Operational stability prediction in milling based on impact tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Adam K.; Hajdu, David; Bachrathy, Daniel; Stepan, Gabor

    2018-03-01

    Chatter detection is usually based on the analysis of measured signals captured during cutting processes. These techniques, however, often give ambiguous results close to the stability boundaries, which is a major limitation in industrial applications. In this paper, an experimental chatter detection method is proposed based on the system's response for perturbations during the machining process, and no system parameter identification is required. The proposed method identifies the dominant characteristic multiplier of the periodic dynamical system that models the milling process. The variation of the modulus of the largest characteristic multiplier can also be monitored, the stability boundary can precisely be extrapolated, while the manufacturing parameters are still kept in the chatter-free region. The method is derived in details, and also verified experimentally in laboratory environment.

  18. Operation control equipment for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Masayuki; Takeda, Renzo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the temperature balance in a feedwater heater by obtaining the objective value of a feedwater enthalpy upon calculation of respective measured values and controlling the opening or closing of an extraction valve so that the objective value may coincide with the measured value, thereby averaging the axial power distribution. Constitution: A plurality of stages of extraction lines are connected to a turbine, and extraction valves are respectively provided at the lines. By calculating the measured values of ractor pressure, reactor core flow rate, vapor flow rate and reactor core inlet enthalpy determined to predetermined value using heat balance the objective feedwater enthalpy is obtained, is fed as an extraction valve opening or closing signal from a control equipment, the extraction stages of the turbine extraction are altered in accordance with this signal, and the feedwater enthalpy is controlled. (Sekiya, K.)

  19. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  20. Power generator in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to perform stable and dynamic conditioning operation for nuclear fuels in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The conditioning operation for the nuclear fuels is performed by varying the reactor core thermal power in a predetermined pattern by changing the predetermined power changing pattern of generator power, the rising rate of the reactor core thermal power and the upper limit for the rising power of the reactor core thermal power are calculated and the power pattern for the generator is corrected by a power conditioning device such that the upper limit for the thermal power rising rate and the upper limit for the thermal power rising rate are at the predetermined levels. Thus, when the relation between the reactor core thermal power and the generator electrical power is fluctuated, the fluctuation is detected based on the variation in the thermal power rising rate and the limit value for the thermal power rising rate, and the correction is made to the generator power changing pattern so that these values take the predetermined values to thereby perform the stable conditioning operation for the nuclear fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Stability and Reconstruction Operations Planning: Embrace Before Pursuing the Interagency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pazos, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    .... government was the cause of poor SRO planning and execution. However, detailed analysis of the nature of military operations, the military's responsibilities, and the limited capacity of agencies within the U.S...

  2. Preparing the Army for Stability Operations: Doctrinal and Interagency Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Szayna, Thomas S; Eaton, Derek; Richardson, Amy

    2007-01-01

    ...) operations are conducted. The primary emphasis of the changes was on ensuring a common U.S. strategy rather than a collection of individual departmental and agency efforts and on mobilizing and involving all available...

  3. Stability Analysis for Operation of DG Units in Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouresmaeil, Edris; Shaker, Hamid Reza; Mehrasa, Majid

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multifunction control strategy for the stable operation of Distributed Generation (DG) units during grid integration. The proposed control model is based on Direct Lyapunov Control (DLC) theory and provides a stable region for the appropriate operation of DG units during grid....... Application of this concept can guarantee to reduce the stress on the grid during the energy demand peak. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the proficiency and performance of the proposed DLC technique in DG technology....

  4. Stabilizing operation point technique based on the tunable distributed feedback laser for interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuefeng; Zhou, Xinlei; Yu, Qingxu

    2016-02-01

    We describe a stabilizing operation point technique based on the tunable Distributed Feedback (DFB) laser for quadrature demodulation of interferometric sensors. By introducing automatic lock quadrature point and wavelength periodically tuning compensation into an interferometric system, the operation point of interferometric system is stabilized when the system suffers various environmental perturbations. To demonstrate the feasibility of this stabilizing operation point technique, experiments have been performed using a tunable-DFB-laser as light source to interrogate an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric vibration sensor and a diaphragm-based acoustic sensor. Experimental results show that good tracing of Q-point was effectively realized.

  5. The mechanical structure of the SVEA BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nylund, O.; Johansson, A.; Junkrans, S.

    1985-01-01

    The SVEA BWR fuel assembly design is characterized by a double-wall cruciform internal structure forming an internal water gap and dividing the assembly into 4 subbundles. The effect is a favourable distribution of fuel and moderator, a minimum amount of structural material in active core, a combination of structural stability and flexibility for minimum control rod friction in reduced gaps and a reduced creep deformation of the fuel assembly. The results of a laboratory test program confirm the much lower friction force obtained with the SVEA fuel assemblies while withdrawing and inserting the control rod. (RF)

  6. Actively-stabilized photomultiplier tube base for vacuum operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, M.A; Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    An actively stabilized photomultiplier tube (PMT) base design for an Amperex XP-2262B PMT is described. Positive-negative-positive transistors are used as low-impedance current sources to maintain constant voltages on the last three dynodes. This technique results in a highly stable, low-power tube base ideal for use with low-duty-factor beams, such as those found at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Furthermore, because of the low power usage of this large design, these bases can be sealed in a heat-conductive, electrically insulating material and used in a vacuum

  7. 14 CFR 23.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... power-operated systems. 23.672 Section 23.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... and power-operated systems. If the functioning of stability augmentation or other automatic or power-operated systems is necessary to show compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part...

  8. The BWR vessel and internals project - 2001 and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagoner, V.; Mulford, T.

    2001-01-01

    The BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) is an international association of utilities owning boiling water reactors (BWRs). Figure 1 contains a list of current BWRVIP member utilities. The association was formed in 1994 with the following objectives: to lead the BWR industry toward generic resolution of reactor pressure vessel and internals material condition issues; to identify or develop generic, cost-effective strategies from which each operating plant will select the most appropriate alternative; to serve as the focal point for the regulatory interface with the industry on BWR vessel and internals issues; and to share information and promote communication and cooperation among participating utilities. The initial issue faced by the BWRVIP was core shroud cracking that had been observed in a number of BWRs. The BWRVIP reacted by quickly developing a set of industry guidelines to assist utilities in inspecting, evaluating, and, if necessary, repairing cracked shrouds. Subsequently, the BWRVIP pro-actively developed a comprehensive set of guidelines for managing degradation in other reactor internal components, including the reactor pressure vessel itself. The major components addressed by the BWRVIP are included. (author)

  9. The BWR vessel and internals project - 2001 and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, V. [Carolina Power and Light, Progress Energy Building, NC (United States); Mulford, T. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) is an international association of utilities owning boiling water reactors (BWRs). Figure 1 contains a list of current BWRVIP member utilities. The association was formed in 1994 with the following objectives: to lead the BWR industry toward generic resolution of reactor pressure vessel and internals material condition issues; to identify or develop generic, cost-effective strategies from which each operating plant will select the most appropriate alternative; to serve as the focal point for the regulatory interface with the industry on BWR vessel and internals issues; and to share information and promote communication and cooperation among participating utilities. The initial issue faced by the BWRVIP was core shroud cracking that had been observed in a number of BWRs. The BWRVIP reacted by quickly developing a set of industry guidelines to assist utilities in inspecting, evaluating, and, if necessary, repairing cracked shrouds. Subsequently, the BWRVIP pro-actively developed a comprehensive set of guidelines for managing degradation in other reactor internal components, including the reactor pressure vessel itself. The major components addressed by the BWRVIP are included. (author)

  10. Advanced chemistry management system to optimize BWR chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, K.; Nagasawa, K.

    2002-01-01

    BWR plant chemistry control has close relationships among nuclear safety, component reliability, radiation field management and fuel integrity. Advanced technology is required to improve chemistry control [1,3,6,7,10,11]. Toshiba has developed TACMAN (Toshiba Advanced Chemistry Management system) to support BWR chemistry control. The TACMAN has been developed as response to utilities' years of requirements to keep plant operation safety, reliability and cost benefit. The advanced technology built into the TACMAN allows utilities to make efficient chemistry control and to keep cost benefit. TACMAN is currently being used in response to the needs for tools those plant chemists and engineers could use to optimize and identify plant chemistry conditions continuously. If an incipient condition or anomaly is detected at early stage, root causes evaluation and immediate countermeasures can be provided. Especially, the expert system brings numerous and competitive advantages not only to improve plant chemistry reliability but also to standardize and systematize know-how, empirical knowledge and technologies in BWR chemistry This paper shows detail functions of TACMAN and practical results to evaluate actual plant. (authors)

  11. BANKING SYSTEM STABILITY: COMMERCIAL AND CO-OPERATIVE BANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru-Cristian OANEA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Commercial banks and co-operative banks are credit institutions, but there are some differences between the main operations proceeded by each of them. Based on these specific characteristics, we want to identify the manner in which financial crisis affected their activity. As we all know, the financial crisis had a major impact in the United States, the “natal” country of the crisis, because great banks such as Lehman Brothers or Merrill Lynch have bankrupted. Even if the Romanian banking system was not affected by such catastrophic situations, surely the financial crisis had a significant impact on it. This topic is worth to be analysed, because we would be able to identify the risk differences between these two types of business: commercial banks versus co-operative banks.

  12. Stabilization Operations Through Military Capacity Building-Integration Between Danish Conventional Forces and Special Operations Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT Due to instability in Africa and the Middle East, Denmark’s political commitment to deploy troops to stabilize ...Denmark’s political commitment to deploy troops to stabilize fragile regions is not expected to decrease in the near future. The political ambition for...fragile regions is not expected to decrease in the near future. The political ambition for Denmark is to conduct stabilization efforts through

  13. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  14. BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kosuke.

    1991-01-01

    In a BWR type nuclear power plant in which reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel can be drained to a waste processing system by way of reactor recycling pipeways and remaining heat removal system pipeways, a pressurized air supply device is disposed for supplying air for pressurizing reactor water to the inside of the reactor pressure vessel by way of an upper head. With such a constitution, since the pressurized air sent from the pressurized air supply device above the reactor pressure vessel for the reactor water discharging pressure upon draining, the water draining pressure is increased compared with a conventional case and, accordingly, the amount of drained water is not reduced even in the latter half of draining. Accordingly, the draining efficiency can be improved and only a relatively short period of time is required till the completion of the draining, which can improve safety and save labors. (T.M.)

  15. BWR chemistry control status: a summary of industry chemistry status relative to the BWR water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.E.; Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The EPRI Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Water Chemistry Guidelines were revised and issued in October 2008. The 2008 Revision of the Guidelines continues to focus on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), which can limit the service life of susceptible materials and components exposed to water chemistry environments. The 2008 Revision also places increased emphasis on fuel performance and meeting the industry goal of zero fuel failures by 2010. As an industry consensus document, the Guidelines were created to provide proactive water chemistry control strategies for mitigating IGSCC, maintaining fuel integrity and controlling radiation fields. The Guidelines provide a technically-based framework for an effective BWR water chemistry program. This paper provides an overview of industry experience relative to the Guidelines. Over the past few years, many BWR units have implemented noble metal chemical application technologies either during plant hot or cold shutdown or at normal power operating conditions. This paper explores plant experience with optimized water chemistry, implementation of various additive chemistries such as noble metal application and zinc addition, and compliance with the Guidelines recommendations. Depleted zinc oxide addition has been broadly applied across the BWR fleet since the 1980s. The guidance for zinc addition has been revised in the Guidelines to reflect concerns with fuel performance. While zinc addition is a successful method for shutdown dose rate control, concerns still exist for high zinc deposition on fuel surfaces, especially when feedwater iron is elevated and as fuel cores are being driven to provide maximum power output over longer fuel cycles. Recent plant experience has shown that the utilization of online noble metal application and continued zinc addition may provide additional benefits for radiation control. Dose rate experiences at plants utilizing the online noble metal application technology and zinc addition

  16. BWR chemistry control status: a summary of industry chemistry status relative to the BWR water chemistry guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.E., E-mail: sgarcia@epri.com [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, M.L., E-mail: jgiannelli@finetech.com [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, NJ (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The EPRI Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Water Chemistry Guidelines were revised and issued in October 2008. The 2008 Revision of the Guidelines continues to focus on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), which can limit the service life of susceptible materials and components exposed to water chemistry environments. The 2008 Revision also places increased emphasis on fuel performance and meeting the industry goal of zero fuel failures by 2010. As an industry consensus document, the Guidelines were created to provide proactive water chemistry control strategies for mitigating IGSCC, maintaining fuel integrity and controlling radiation fields. The Guidelines provide a technically-based framework for an effective BWR water chemistry program. This paper provides an overview of industry experience relative to the Guidelines. Over the past few years, many BWR units have implemented noble metal chemical application technologies either during plant hot or cold shutdown or at normal power operating conditions. This paper explores plant experience with optimized water chemistry, implementation of various additive chemistries such as noble metal application and zinc addition, and compliance with the Guidelines recommendations. Depleted zinc oxide addition has been broadly applied across the BWR fleet since the 1980s. The guidance for zinc addition has been revised in the Guidelines to reflect concerns with fuel performance. While zinc addition is a successful method for shutdown dose rate control, concerns still exist for high zinc deposition on fuel surfaces, especially when feedwater iron is elevated and as fuel cores are being driven to provide maximum power output over longer fuel cycles. Recent plant experience has shown that the utilization of online noble metal application and continued zinc addition may provide additional benefits for radiation control. Dose rate experiences at plants utilizing the online noble metal application technology and zinc addition

  17. Advanced Construction of Compact Containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Maruyama, T.; Mori, H.; Hoshino, K.; Hijioka, Y.; Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Hoshi, T.

    2006-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a mid/small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. Compact Containment BWR (CCR) is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified safety system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in case of design base accidents including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. CCR's specific self-standing steel high pressure resistible PCV is designed to contain minimum piping and valves inside with reactor pressure vessel (RPV), only 13 m in diameter and 24 m in height. This compact PCV makes it possible to

  18. Stabilized operation of the Spallation Neutron Source radio-frequency quadrupole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-ho Kim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ had resonance control instabilities at duty factors higher than approximately 4%. Systematic investigations have been carried out to understand the cause of the instability and to ensure the operational stability of the RFQ. The most critical source of the instability is revealed to be an interaction between hydrogen released by beam bombardments and the RFQ rf field resulting in a discharge, which consumes additional rf power and could cause the RFQ to operate in an unstable region. This paper reports improvement of the SNS RFQ operational stability based on the findings during the SNS operation.

  19. Stability analysis of supercritical-pressure light water-cooled reactor in constant pressure operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhwan, JI; Shirahama, H.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic and the thermal-nuclear coupled stabilities of a supercritical pressure light water-cooled reactor. A stability analysis code at supercritical pressure is developed. Using this code, stabilities of full and partial-power reactor operating at supercritical pressure are investigated by the frequency-domain analysis. Two types of SCRs are analyzed; a supercritical light water reactor (SCLWR) and a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor (SCFR). The same stability criteria as Boiling Water Reactor are applied. The thermal-hydraulic stability of SCLWR and SCFR satisfies the criteria with a reasonable orifice loss coefficient. The decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability in SCFR is almost zero because of a small coolant density coefficient of the fast reactor. The evaluated decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability is 3,41 ∼ 10 -V at 100% power in SCFR and 0,028 at 100% power in SCLWR. The sensitivity is investigated. It is found that the thermal-hydraulic stability is sensitive to the mass flow rate strongly and the thermal-nuclear coupled stability to the coolant density coefficient. The bottom power peak distribution makes the thermal-nuclear stability worse and the thermal-nuclear stability better. (author)

  20. Application of Arma Technique For Operation Stability of RSG-Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djudjuratisbela, Udju

    2000-01-01

    Application Of Arma Technique For Operation Stability Of RSG-Gas. Application of Fast Fourier Transport (FFT) method in the noise experiments data had been conducted to reactor kinetic parameter determination of RSG-Gas. Reactor stability that has closed relation to operation safety has not been measured yet. Noise analysis method and ARMA (Auto Regressive Moving Average) technique that has capability to identify mathematical model of the noise experimental data can be used for determination of kinetic/dynamic characteristic equation and its roots. From the roots of reactor characteristic equation, magnitude of natural frequency (fn), damping ratio (xi), damping frequency (fd), decay ratio (delta) and then reactor stability can be calculated

  1. Development status of compact containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Mori, H.; Sekiguchi, K.; Kuroki, M.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2005-01-01

    In Japan, increase of nuclear plant unit capacity has been promoted to take advantage of economies of scale while further enhancing safety and reliability. As a result, more than 50 units of nuclear power plants are playing important role in electric power generation. However, the factors, such as stagnant growth in the recent electricity demand, limitation in electricity grid capacity and limited in initial investment avoiding risk, will not be in favor of large plant outputs. The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response

  2. Experience on a BWR plant diagnosis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, A.; Kawai, K.; Hashimoto, Y.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to watch plant dynamics and equipment condition for avoiding a big transient or avoiding damage to a system by equipment failure. After the TMI accident the necessity of a diagnosis system has been recognized and such development activities have become of primary importance in many organizations. A diagnosis system has two kinds of function. One is the early detection of an anomaly before detection by a conventional instrumentation system. The other is appropriate instruction after alarm or scram has occurred. The authors have been developing the former system by a noise analysis technique and a feasibility study has been undertaken in recent years as a joint research programme of several electric power companies and the Toshiba Corporation. A prototype diagnosis system has been installed on a BWR plant in Japan. This diagnosis system concerns reactor core, jet pumps and three main control systems. Many data from normal operation have been accumulated using this system and a variation pattern of normal noise data is clarified. On this basis, anomally detection criteria have been determined using statistical decision theory. It is confirmed that this system performance is satisfactory, and that the system will be of great use for surveillance of core and control systems without artificial disturbances. (author)

  3. Power control system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yasuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To control the reactor power so that the power distribution can satisfy the limiting conditions, by regulating the reactor core flow rate while monitoring the power distribution in the reactor core of a BWR type reactor. Constitution: A power distribution monitor determines the power distribution for the entire reactor core based on the data for neutron flux, reactor core thermal power, reactor core flow rate and control rod pattern from the reactor and calculates the linear power density distribution. A power up ratio computing device computes the current linear power density increase ratio. An aimed power up ratio is determined by converting the electrical power up ratio transferred from a load demand input device into the reactor core thermal power up ratio. The present reactor core thermal power up ratio is subtracted from the limiting power up ratio and the difference is sent to an operation amount indicator and the reactor core flow rate is changed in a reactor core flow rate regulator, by which the reactor power is controlled. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Fuel assemblies for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Takao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable effective failed fuel detection by the provision of water rod formed with a connecting section connected to a warmed water feed pipe of a sipping device at the lower portion and with a warmed water jetting port in the lower portion in a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor to thereby carry out rapid sipping. Constitution: Fuel rods and water rods are contained in the channel box of a fuel assembly, and the water rod is provided at its upper portion with a connecting section connected to the warmed water feed pipe of the sipping device and formed at its lower portion with a warmed water jetting port for jetting warmed water fed from the warmed water feed pipe. Upon detection of failed fuels, the reactor operation is shut down and the reactor core is immersed in water. The cover for the reactor container is removed and the cap of the sipping device is inserted to connect the warmed water feed pipe to the connecting section of the water rod. Then, warmed water is fed to the water rod and jetted out from the warmed water jetting port to cause convection and unify the water of the channel box in a short time. Thereafter, specimen is sampled and analyzed for the detection of failed fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Feedwater control system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, Jun-ichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the water level control performance in BWR type reactor by regulating the water level set to the reactor depending on the rate of change in the recycling amount of coolant to thereby control the fluctuations in the water level resulted in the reactor within an aimed range even upon significant fluctuations in the recycling flow rate. Constitution: The recycling flow rate of coolant in the reactor is detected and the rate of its change with time is computed to form a rate of change signal. The rate of change signal is inputted to a reactor level setter to amend the actual reactor water level demand signal and regulate the water level set to the reactor water depending on the rate of change in the recycling flow rate. Such a regulation method for the set water level enables to control the water level fluctuation resulted in the reactor within the aimed range even upon the significant fluctuation in the recycling flow rate and improve the water level control performance of the reactor, whereby the operationability for the reactor is improved to enhance the operation rate. (Moriyama, K.)

  6. Development and Evaluation of cooperative control system for an HVDC transmission system connected with an isolated BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Susumu; Hara, Tsukusi; Matori, Iwao; Hirayama, Kaiichirou.

    1987-01-01

    In the cooperative control system developed for an HVDC transmission system connected with an isolated BWR power plant, the equilibrium state between power plant output and DC transmission power is examined by way of the detection of the generator frequency. And, thereby start-up and shutdown of the DC system and controlling of the transmission power are made, so that the signal transmission with the power plant becomes unnecessary, enabling the easy cooperative operation. In order to investigate validity of this control system, various digital simulation and simulator test with the control system were carried out. In this way, behavior of the power plant and stability of the DC transmission system were evaluated in the connection to the DC system at power plant start-up, follow of the transmission power in change of the power plant output and in various system failures. (Mori, K.)

  7. Advanced BWR core component designs and the implications for SFD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    Prior to the DF-4 boiling water reactor (BWR) severe fuel damage (SFD) experiment conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories in 1986, no experimental data base existed for guidance in modeling core component behavior under postulated severe accident conditions in commercial BWRs. This paper will present the lessons learned from the DF-4 experiment (and subsequent German CORA BWR SFD tests) and the impact on core models in the current generation of SFD codes. The DF-4 and CORA BWR test assemblies were modeled on the core component designs circa 1985; that is, the 8 x 8 fuel assembly with two water rods and a cruciform control blade constructed of B 4 C-filled tubelets. Within the past ten years, the state-of-the-art with respect to BWR core component development has out-distanced the current SFD experimental data base and SFD code capabilities. For example, modern BWR control blade design includes hafnium at the tips and top of each control blade wing for longer blade operating lifetimes; also water rods have been replaced by larger water channels for better neutronics economy; and fuel assemblies now contain partial-length fuel rods, again for better neutronics economy. This paper will also discuss the implications of these advanced fuel assembly and core component designs on severe accident progression and on the current SFD code capabilities

  8. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, L.R. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming {open_quotes}World Class{close_quotes} performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance.

  9. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming open-quotes World Classclose quotes performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance

  10. Ractor stability monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Yutaka.

    1991-01-01

    A stability monitor for a BWR type reactor determines the index of stability by statistic processing of signals from an average power region monitor or the like, but it takes much time and the reliability thereof is not always high. Then, parameters such as reactor core power are measured on every sampling periods as observation data and pretreatments such as normalization are applied successively, to obtain monitored amount and store them successively. Differentiation coefficient relative to time are calculated by using the observed amount at present and that one sample period before, to evaluate on a phasal plane using the amount of observation and the differentiation coefficient with time on the axes of coordinate. As a result, information relative to the stability can be represented accurately, thereby enabling to monitor the stability at a high accuracy. Further, judgement for the condition considering the amplitude is conducted upon oscillation, thereby enabling to conduct control operation certainly. The operation in a region where it has been limited under great caution can be conducted appropriately and safely, enabling to conduct controlled operation of excellent economical property. (N.H.)

  11. An analysis of instabilities of nuclear-coupled density-wave in BWR using modern frequency-domain control theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yangping; Gao Huahun; Fu Longzhou

    1991-01-01

    A state-of-the-art multi-variable frequency-domain model has been developed for analysis of instabilities of nuclear-coupled density-wave in BWR core. The characteristic locus method is used for analysing the stability of BWR. A computer code-NUCTHIA has been derived. The model has been tested against the existing experimental data and compared with results of past single-variable analyses. By using the NUCTHIA code, the investigations of effects of main system parameters on BWW core stability have also been made. All the results are consistent with the experimental data

  12. Stability and voltage rise at operating frequency in ehv networks at 500 to 700 kV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glavitsch, H

    1964-01-01

    The importance of stability is stressed in the case of long transmission lines interconnecting different systems. To achieve better stability one requires improvement of network stability and generator stability. The methods of excitation and electric braking for improving the dynamic stability of generators are described. The stability of two networks connected by a line is examined theoretically. The various causes of voltage rises at operating frequency, e.g., loading, load dropping etc., and the usual types of transients are discussed.

  13. RETRAN experience with BWR transients at Yankee Atomic Electric Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, A.A.F.; Cronin, J.T.; Slifer, B.C.

    1981-01-01

    Yankee Atomic Electric Company is actively involved in the development of licensing methods for BWR's. The computer code chosen for analyzing system response under transient conditions is RETRAN. This paper describes the RETRAN model developed for Vermont Yankee, and the results of the RETRAN checkout and qualification that has been achieved at YAEC through comparison of RETRAN predictions to the startup test results performed at the plant as part of the 100% power startup test program. In addition, abnormal operational transients typically analyzed for licensing are also presented

  14. Neutron dosimetry. Environmental monitoring in a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavera D, L.; Camacho L, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The measurements carried out on reactor dosimetry are applied mainly to the study on the effects of the radiation in 108 materials of the reactor; little is on the environmental dosimetry outside of the primary container of BWR reactors. In this work the application of a neutron spectrometer formed by plastic detectors of nuclear traces manufactured in the ININ, for the environmental monitoring in penetrations around the primary container of the unit I of the Laguna Verde central is presented. The neutron monitoring carries out with purposes of radiological protection, during the operational tests of the reactor. (Author)

  15. Decontamination and materials corrosion concerns in the BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.; Gordon, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    The qualification of chemical decontamination processes to decontaminate complete systems or individual components in essential if effective inspection, maintenance, repair or replacement of plant components is to be achieved with minimum exposure of workers to ionizing radiation. However, it is critical that the benefits of decontamination processes are not overshadowed by deleterious materials/ corrosion side effects during the application of the process or during subsequent operation. This paper discusses such potential corrosion/materials problems in the BWR and presents relevant available corrosion data for the various commercial decontamination processes. (author)

  16. Prony's method application for BWR instabilities characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Ramírez, J. Ramón, E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Alonso, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.alonso@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Ed. 9, Lindavista, D.F. 07300 (Mexico); Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier, E-mail: javier.ortiz@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Prony's method application for BWR instability events. • Several BWR instability benchmark are assessed using this method. • DR and frequency are obtained and a new parameter is proposed to eliminate false signals. • Adequate characterization of in-phase and out-of-phase events is obtained. • The Prony's method application is validated. - Abstract: Several methods have been developed for the analysis of reactor power signals during BWR power oscillations. Among them is the Prony's method, its application provides the DR and the frequency of oscillations. In this paper another characteristic of the method is proposed to determine the type of oscillations that can occur, in-phase or out-of-phase. Prony's method decomposes a given signal in all the frequencies that it contains, therefore the DR of the fundamental mode and the first harmonic are obtained. To determine the more dominant pole of the system a normalized amplitude W of the system is calculated, which depends on the amplitude and the damping coefficient. With this term, it can be analyzed which type of oscillations is present, if W of the fundamental mode frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is in-phase, if W of the first harmonic frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is out-of-phase. The method is applied to several stability benchmarks to assess its validity. Results show the applicability of the method as an alternative analysis method to determine the type of oscillations occurred.

  17. Prony's method application for BWR instabilities characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Rogelio; Ramírez, J. Ramón; Alonso, Gustavo; Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Prony's method application for BWR instability events. • Several BWR instability benchmark are assessed using this method. • DR and frequency are obtained and a new parameter is proposed to eliminate false signals. • Adequate characterization of in-phase and out-of-phase events is obtained. • The Prony's method application is validated. - Abstract: Several methods have been developed for the analysis of reactor power signals during BWR power oscillations. Among them is the Prony's method, its application provides the DR and the frequency of oscillations. In this paper another characteristic of the method is proposed to determine the type of oscillations that can occur, in-phase or out-of-phase. Prony's method decomposes a given signal in all the frequencies that it contains, therefore the DR of the fundamental mode and the first harmonic are obtained. To determine the more dominant pole of the system a normalized amplitude W of the system is calculated, which depends on the amplitude and the damping coefficient. With this term, it can be analyzed which type of oscillations is present, if W of the fundamental mode frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is in-phase, if W of the first harmonic frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is out-of-phase. The method is applied to several stability benchmarks to assess its validity. Results show the applicability of the method as an alternative analysis method to determine the type of oscillations occurred

  18. Automatic refueling platform and CRD remote handling device for BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Takagi, Kaoru

    1978-01-01

    In BWR plants, machines for replacing fuel assemblies and control rod drives are usually operated directly by personnel. An automatic refueling platform and a CRD remote handling device aiming at radiation exposure reduction and handling perfectness are described, which are already used in BWR plants. Automation of the former is achieved in transporting fuel assemblies between a reactor pressure vessel and a fuel storage pool, shuffling fuel assemblies in a reactor core and moving fuel assemblies in a fuel storage pool. In the latter, replacement of CRDs is nearly all performed remotely. (Mori, K.)

  19. Complete BWR--EM LOCA analysis using the WRAP--EM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmeyer, R.R.; Gregory, M.V.; Buckner, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Water Reactor Analysis Package, Evaluation Model (WRAP--EM), provides a complete analysis of postulated loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA's) in light--water nuclear power reactors. The system is being developed at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to interpret and evaluate reactor vendor, evaluation model (EM) analyses. The initial version of the WRAP--EM system for analysis of boiling water reactors (BWR's) is operational. To demonstrate the complete capability of the WRAP--BWR--EM system, a LOCA analysis has been performed for the Hope Creek Plant

  20. BWR full integral simulation test (FIST) pretest predictions with TRACBO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.

    1984-01-01

    The Full Integral Simulation Test program is a three pronged approach to the development of best-estimate analysis capability for BWR systems. An analytical method development program is underway to extend the BWR-TRAC computer code to model reactor kinetics and major interfacing systems, including balance-of-plant, to improve application modeling flexibility, and to reduce computer running time. An experimental program is underway in a new single bundle system test facility to extend the large break loss-of-coolant accident LOCA data base to small breaks and operational transients. And a method qualification program is underway to test TRACBO2 against experiments in the FIST facility. The recently completed Phase 1 period included a series of LOCA and power transient tests, and successful pretest analysis of the large and small break LOCA tests with TRACBO2. These comparisons demonstrate BWR-TRAC capability for small and large break analysis, and provide detailed understanding of the phenomena

  1. BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1993 Revision, Normal and hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, G.; Goddard, C.; Fitzpatrick, S.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of water chemistry control is to extend the operating life of the reactor and rector coolant system, balance-of-plant components, and turbines while simultaneously controlling costs to safeguard the continued economic viability of the nuclear power generation investment. To further this goal an industry committee of chemistry personnel prepared guidelines to identify the benefits, risks, and costs associated with water chemistry in BWRs and to provide a template for an optimized water chemistry program. This document replaces the BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines - 1986 Revision and the BWR Hydrogen Water Chemistry Guidelines -- 1987 Revision. It expands on the previous guidelines documents by covering the economic implications of BWR water chemistry control

  2. Noise analysis of Forsmark 1 data to investigate BWR core local instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, R.

    1998-04-01

    BWR core local instability was experienced at Forsmark 1 (F1) during reactor operation in cycle 16. The event has been studied by applying noise analysis and stability calculations to get insight into the event as well as to identify the cause of local instability. The present report is concerned with noise analysis of data collected during start-up in cycle 17. The results of the current study indicates: The F1 core is quite stable in cycle 17. The max. decay ratio (DR) value of 0.37 was obtained from the stability evaluation of an APRM (average power range monitor) and LPRM (local power range monitor) signals measured at 66% (APRM) of reactor power and 4252 Kg/s (SA-HC) of core flow. Compared with the power profile in cycle 17 (as well as in reactor F2), the core in cycle 16 had an extreme power profile with high power and bottom-shifted axial peak in the core periphery esp. at the four quadrant corners. Such a profile decreases the stability margin in the region. It is a common observation that the DR obtained from APRM tends to be higher than that from LPRM if the global instability mechanism is dominant in the core, and vice versa. The comparison of global and local DR values should be an effective method for detecting local instability during the reactor operation. In order to detect the local instability it is important to evaluate the core stability with sufficient number of LPRMs so as to cover the whole core cross section together with APRMs

  3. Stabilization of ion source operation for the ''EG-2.5'' electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, V.A.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1980-01-01

    A system for stabilization of operating conditions of an electrostatic accelerator ion source is described. The system is the first stage of stabilizing the ion current on a target. The current of the beam escaping from a source is equal to the difference between the currents in the source anode and cathode circuits. In the anode circuit the current is stabilized by changing the HF-generator anode voltage, and the cathode current is stabilized by a special automatic device. This ensures the constancy of the current for a beam which escapes from the source and thus increases the stability of ion currents on a target. The range of current control in the source anode circuit constitutes 15-110 μA, current oscillations do not exceed 0.5% during two hours [ru

  4. Game theory and the warrior diplomat interagency cooperation in stability and reconstruction operations

    OpenAIRE

    Irmischer, Drew M.

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The U.S. has become increasingly involved with failed and failing states since the end of the Cold War in the 1990s. Further, failed and failing states are forecast to remain a national security issue well into the future. United States involvement with failed and failing states has primarily focused around reconstruction and stability operations, and crisis management efforts. Previous reconstruction and stability efforts have ...

  5. Prediction of BWR performance under the influence of Isolation Condenser-using RAMONA-4 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, H.J.; Cheng, H.S.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Isolation Condenser (IC) is to passively control the reactor pressure by removing heat from the system. This type of control is expected to reduce the frequency of opening and closing of the Safety Relief Valves (SRV). A comparative analysis is done for a BWR operating with and without the influence of an IC under Main Steam Isolation Valve (MSIV) closure. A regular BWR, with forced flow and high thermal power, has been considered for analysis. In addition, the effect of ICs on the BWR performance is studied for natural convection flow at lower power and modified riser geometry. The IC is coupled to the steam dome for the steam inlet flow and the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) near the feed water entrance for the condensate return flow. Transient calculations are performed using prescribed pressure set points for the SRVs and given time settings for MSIV closure. The effect of the IC on the forced flow is to reduce the rate of pressure rise and thereby decrease the cycling frequency ofthe SRVS. This is the primary objective of any operating IC in a BWR (e.g. Oyster Creek). The response of the reactor thermal and fission power, steam flow rate, collapsed liquid level, and core average void fraction are found to agree with the trend of pressure. The variations in the case of an active IC can be closely related to the creation of a time lag and changes in the cycling frequency of the SRVS. An analysis for natural convection flow in a BWR indicates that the effect of an IC on its transient performance is similar to that for the forced convection system. In this case, the MSIV closure, has resulted in a lower peak pressure due to the magnitude of reduced power. However, the effect of reduced cycling frequency of the SRV due to the IC, and the time lag between the events, are comparable to that for forced convection

  6. Effect of the inlet throttling on the thermal-hydraulic instability of the natural circulation BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Masahiro; Inada, Fumio; Yoneda, Kimitoshi

    1997-01-01

    Although it is well-established that inlet restriction has a stabilizing for forced circulation BWR, the effect of inlet on the thermal-hydraulic stability of natural circulation BWR remains unknown since increasing inlet restriction affect thermal-hydraulic stability due to reduction of the recirculation flow rate. Therefore experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of inlet restriction on the thermal-hydraulic stability. A test facility used in this experiments was designed and constructed to have non-dimensional values which are nearly equal to those of natural circulation BWR. Experimental results showed that driving force of the natural circulation was described as a function of heat flux and inlet subcooling independent of inlet restriction. Stability maps in reference to the channel inlet subcooling, heat flux were presented for various inlet restriction which were carried out by an analysis based on the homogeneous flow various using this function. Instability region during the inlet subcooling shifted to the higher inlet subcooling with increasing inlet restriction and became larger with increasing heat flux. (author)

  7. Neutron dosimetry. Environmental monitoring in a BWR type reactor; Dosimetria de neutrones. Monitoreo ambiental en un reactor del tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavera D, L; Camacho L, M E

    1991-01-15

    The measurements carried out on reactor dosimetry are applied mainly to the study on the effects of the radiation in 108 materials of the reactor; little is on the environmental dosimetry outside of the primary container of BWR reactors. In this work the application of a neutron spectrometer formed by plastic detectors of nuclear traces manufactured in the ININ, for the environmental monitoring in penetrations around the primary container of the unit I of the Laguna Verde central is presented. The neutron monitoring carries out with purposes of radiological protection, during the operational tests of the reactor. (Author)

  8. Artificial neural networks versus conventional methods for boiling water reactor stability monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    1995-01-01

    The application of an artificial neural network (ANN) for boiling water reactor (BWR) stability monitoring was studied. A three-layer perceptron was trained on synthetic autocorrelation functions to estimate the decay ratio and the resonance frequency from measured neutron noise. Training of the ANN was improved by adding noise to the training patterns and by applying nonconventional error definitions in the generalized delta rule. The performance of the developed ANN was compared with those of conventional stability monitoring techniques. Explicit care was taken for generating unbiased test data. It is found that the trained ANN is capable of monitoring the stability of the Dodewaard BWR for four specific cases. By comparing properties such as the false alarm ratio, the alarm failure ratio, and the average time to alarm, it is shown that it performs worse than model-based methods in stability monitoring of exact second-order systems but that it is more robust (better resistant to corruptions of the input data and to deviations of the system at issue from an exact second-order system) than other methods. The latter explains its good performance on the Dodewaard BWR and is promising for the application of an ANN for stability monitoring of other reactors and for other operating conditions

  9. Identification of dose-reduction techniques for BWR and PWR repetitive high-dose jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of concern about the apparent increase in collective radiation dose to workers at nuclear power plants, this project will provide information to industry in preplanning for radiation protection during maintenance operations. This study identifies Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) repetitive jobs, and respective collective dose trends and dose reduction techniques. 3 references, 2 tables

  10. System control model of a turbine for a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas O, Y.; Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R.; Delfin L, A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work is presented a design of a control system of a turbine for a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model seeks to implement later on at thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The model is developed for control and protection of turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control could be employed for one or several turbines in series. The quality of present designs of control pattern of turbine it is that it considers the parameters more important in the operation of a turbine besides that is has incorporated at control the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a model more detailed. The development of control model of a turbine will be good in short and medium term to realize analysis about the operation of turbine with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction specific steps of turbine to feed other equipment s, besides analyzing the separate effect and integrated effect. (Author)

  11. Logical model for the control of a BWR turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas O, Y.; Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work a design of a logical model is presented for the turbine control of a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model is sought to implement later on inside the thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The logical model is developed for the control and protection of the turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control will be been able to use for one or several turbines in series. The quality of the present design of the logical model of the turbine control is that it considers the most important parameters in the operation of a turbine, besides that they have incorporated to the logical model the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a detailed model. The development of the logical model of a turbine will be of utility in the short and medium term to carry out analysis on the turbine operation with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction, specific steps of the turbine to feed other equipment s, in addition to analyze the separate and the integrated effect. (Author)

  12. The BWR VIP role in license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyle, R.

    2001-01-01

    The full text follows. The Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) was started in response to an increase in the occurrence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in BWR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internal components. The BWRVIP first evaluated the internals to determine which components were necessary to assure safe operation. An assessment of the relative significance of the internals was then performed to establish the priority in which components would be evaluated. Once this was determined, each safety-related component was evaluated to determine what, if any, inspections or tests were necessary to assure component integrity. Although IGSCC was the initial degradation mechanism of concern for RPV internals, the individual component evaluations considered all known modes of failure (fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, neutron embrittlement, etc). The component evaluations also considered all potential failure locations and the susceptibility to degradation. Once the potential failure locations and mechanisms were identified, the BWRVIP developed inspection criteria to assess component condition. The BWRVIP also developed flaw evaluation methodologies that could be used to determine the integrity and remaining life of each component. All of this information was consolidated into a document called an Inspection and Flaw Evaluation (IE) Guideline for each component. At the same time the BWRVIP was developing its program to assure internals integrity, utilities began to seriously consider measures necessary to extend the life of the plants. In the United States, the USNRC promulgated rules to allow the renewal of a license to allow plant operation for an additional 20 years. One aspect of the rule was that management of age-related degradation in the renewal period must be performed. The timing of this ''license renewal rule'' was advantageous in that it allowed the BWRVIP to address the requirements of the rule in the development

  13. Impact of advanced BWR core physics method on BWR core monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, H; Wells, A [Siemens Power Corporation, Richland (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Siemens Power Corporation recently initiated development of POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III for delivery to the Grand Gulf Nuclear Power Station. The main change introduced in POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III as compared to its predecessor POWERPLEX{sup TM}-II is the incorporation of the advances BWR core simulator MICROBURN-B2. A number of issues were identified and evaluated relating to the implementation of MICROBURN-B2 and its impact on core monitoring. MICROBURN-B2 demands about three to five times more memory and two to three times more computing time than its predecessor MICROBURN-B in POWERPLEX {sup TM}-II. POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III will improve thermal margin prediction accuracy and provide more accurate plant operating conditions to operators than POWERPLEX{sup TM}-II due to its improved accuracy in predicted TIP values and critical k-effective. The most significant advantage of POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III is its capability to monitor a relaxed rod sequence exchange operation. (authors)

  14. BWR Refill-Reflood Program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.L.

    1983-09-01

    The BWR Refill-Reflood Program is part of the continuing Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) research in the United States which is jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Electric Power Research Institute, and the General Electric Company. The current program expanded the focus of this research to include full scale experimental evaluations of multidimensional and multichannel effects during system refill. The program has also made major contributions to the BWR version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) which has been developed cooperatively with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for application to BWR transients. A summary description of the complete program is provided including the principal findings and main conclusions of the program. The results of the program have shown that multidimensional and parallel channel effects have the potential to significantly improve the system response over that observed in single channel tests

  15. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research, and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are shown. After a short outline of historical developments the basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are dealt with. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies, which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurements on a BWR in The Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  16. Training for Operations Other Than War (Stability Operations): Front End Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salter, Margaret

    1996-01-01

    An Army Research Institute Infantry Forces Research Unit work program on Improving Light Forces Low Intensity Conflict Training for Operations Other Than War was planned as research on Civil Affairs...

  17. System control model of a turbine for a BWR; Modelo del sistema de control de una turbina para un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas O, Y. [Universidad del Valle de Mexico, Campus Toluca, Av. Las Palmas No. 136, Col. San Jorge Pueblo Nuevo, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R.; Delfin L, A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: rodolfo.amador@inin.gob.mx

    2009-10-15

    In this work is presented a design of a control system of a turbine for a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model seeks to implement later on at thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The model is developed for control and protection of turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control could be employed for one or several turbines in series. The quality of present designs of control pattern of turbine it is that it considers the parameters more important in the operation of a turbine besides that is has incorporated at control the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a model more detailed. The development of control model of a turbine will be good in short and medium term to realize analysis about the operation of turbine with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction specific steps of turbine to feed other equipment s, besides analyzing the separate effect and integrated effect. (Author)

  18. General Electric's training program for BWR chemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.N.; Lim, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the General Electric boiling water reactor chemistry training program from 1959 to the present. The original intention of this program was to provide practical hands on type training in radiochemistry to BWR chemistry supervisors with fossil station experience. This emphasis on radiochemistry has not changed through the years, but the training has expanded to include the high purity water chemistry of the BWR and has been modified to include new commission requirements, engineering developments and advanced instrumentation. Student and instructor qualifications are discussed and a description of the spin off courses for chemistry technicians and refresher training is presented

  19. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Wulff, W.; Mallen, A.N.; Lekach, S.V.; Stritar, A.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced technology for high-speed interactive nuclear power plant simulations is of great value for timely resolution of safety issues, for plant monitoring, and for computer-aided emergency responses to an accident. Presented is the methodology employed at BNL to develop a BWR plant analyzer capable of simulating severe plant transients at much faster than real-time process speeds. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is given for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computers to achieve the very high simulation speeds. Typical results are shown to demonstrate the modeling fidelity of the BWR plant analyzer

  20. The BWR Hybrid 4 control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, H.; Fuchs, H.P.; Lippert, H.J.; Dambietz, W.

    1988-01-01

    The service life of BWR control rods designed in the past has been unsatisfactory. The main reason was irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of B 4 C rods caused by external swelling of the B 4 C powder. By this reason KWU developed an improved BWR control rod (Hybrid 4 control rod) with extended service life and increased control rod worth. It also allows the procedure for replacing and rearranging fuel assemblies to be considerably simplified. A complete set of Hydbrid 4 control rods is expected to last throughout the service life of a plant (assumption: ca. 40 years) if an appropriate control rod reshuffling management program is used. (orig.)

  1. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR`s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karjunen, T [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Laitinen, T; Piippo, J; Sirkiae, P [VTT Manufacturing Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR`s as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs.

  2. Developing and modeling of the 'Laguna Verde' BWR CRDA benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis-Rodarte, J.; Fu, H.; Ivanov, K.N.; Matsui, Y.; Hotta, A.

    2002-01-01

    Reactivity initiated accidents (RIA) and design basis transients are one of the most important aspects related to nuclear power reactor safety. These events are re-evaluated whenever core alterations (modifications) are made as part of the nuclear safety analysis performed to a new design. These modifications usually include, but are not limited to, power upgrades, longer cycles, new fuel assembly and control rod designs, etc. The results obtained are compared with pre-established bounding analysis values to see if the new core design fulfills the requirements of safety constraints imposed on the design. The control rod drop accident (CRDA) is the design basis transient for the reactivity events of BWR technology. The CRDA is a very localized event depending on the control rod insertion position and the fuel assemblies surrounding the control rod falling from the core. A numerical benchmark was developed based on the CRDA RIA design basis accident to further asses the performance of coupled 3D neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulics codes. The CRDA in a BWR is a mostly neutronic driven event. This benchmark is based on a real operating nuclear power plant - unit 1 of the Laguna Verde (LV1) nuclear power plant (NPP). The definition of the benchmark is presented briefly together with the benchmark specifications. Some of the cross-sections were modified in order to make the maximum control rod worth greater than one dollar. The transient is initiated at steady-state by dropping the control rod with maximum worth at full speed. The 'Laguna Verde' (LV1) BWR CRDA transient benchmark is calculated using two coupled codes: TRAC-BF1/NEM and TRAC-BF1/ENTREE. Neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics models were developed for both codes. Comparison of the obtained results is presented along with some discussion of the sensitivity of results to some modeling assumptions

  3. Military Police Operational Harmonisation: The “Golden Hour” of Stability Deployments

    OpenAIRE

    Gary L. Jones

    2017-01-01

    When the threat level of foreign stability operations increases, military police units can make an effective contribution, especially when conducted with the Australian Federal Police. It is argued that, if Australian military police can apply police harmonisation techniques and improve their ability to conduct civilian-like policing duties, then their role in future rule-of-law operations are likely to be more effective.

  4. Protecting AREVA ATRIUM™ BWR fuel from debris fretting failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Steven E.; Garner, Norman L.; Lippert, Hans-Joachim; Graebert, Rüdiger; Mollard, Pierre; Hahn, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, debris fretting has been the leading cause of fuel rod failure in BWR fuel assemblies, costing the industry millions of dollars in lost generation and negatively impacting the working area of plant site personnel. In this paper the focus will be on recent BWR fuel product innovation designed to eliminate debris related failures. Experience feedback from more than three decades of operation history with non-line-of-sight FUELGUARD™ lower tie plate debris filters will be presented. The development and relative effectiveness of successive generations of filtration technology will be discussed. It will be shown that modern, state of the art debris filters are an effective defense against debris fretting failure. Protective measures extend beyond inlet nozzle debris filters. The comprehensive debris resistance features built into AREVA’s newest fuel design, the ATRIUM™ 11, reduce the overall risk of debris entrapment as well as providing a degree of protection from debris that may fall down on the fuel assembly from above, e.g., during refueling operations. The positive recent experience in a debris sensitive plant will be discussed showing that the combination of advanced fuel technology and a robust foreign material exclusion program at the reactor site can eliminate the debris fretting failure mechanism. (author)

  5. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development.

  6. A study of heat capacity temperature limit of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shih-Jen; Chen, Jyh-Jun; Chien, Chun-Sheng; Teng, Jyh-Tong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The purpose of this study is to verify the HCTL. ► MAAP4 was used as code to generate a realistic and convenient HCTL. ► The current HCTL curve causes confusing in reading data. ► The revised HCTL curves developed in this study. ► Users can obtain important parameters from the revised HCTL without confusion and interpolation. - Abstract: Heat capacity temperature limit (HCTL) is an important parameter for operation of BWR. Current version of the HCTL was derived, based on simple model of computation aids (CA) of BWR owners’ group (BWROG). However, some parts of the current HCTL are confusing to the users in reading data. The purpose of this study is to verify the HCTL by applying the MAAP4 code to the field of emergency operating procedure (EOP). The trends of HCTL generated by MAAP4 code are consistent with those obtained from CA. A series of revised HCTL evaluated at various times after scram are provided and the confusing part is eliminated.

  7. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development

  8. Safety evaluation of BWR off-gas treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, R.J.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    Some of the results of a safety evaluation performed on current generic types of BWR off-gas treatment systems including cooled and ambient temperature adsorber beds and cryogenics are presented. The evaluation covered the four generic types of off-gas systems and the systems of five major vendors. This study was part of original work performed under AEC contract for the Directorate of Regulatory Standards. The analysis techniques employed for the safety evaluation of these systems include: Fault Tree Analysis; FMECA (Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis); general system comparisons, contaminant, system control, and design adequacy evaluations; and resultant Off-Site Dose Calculations. The salient areas presented are some of the potential problem areas, the approach that industry has taken to mitigate or design against potential upset conditions, and areas where possible deficiencies still exist. Potential problem areas discussed include hydrogen detonation, hydrogen release to equipment areas, operator/automatic control interface, and needed engineering evaluation to insure safe system operation. Of the systems reviewed, most were in the category of advanced or improved over that commonly in use today, and a conclusion from the study was that these systems offer excellent potential for noble gas control for BWR power plants where more stringent controls may be specified -- now or in the future. (U.S.)

  9. A study of heat capacity temperature limit of BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shih-Jen, E-mail: sjenwang@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), 1000, Wunhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jyh-Jun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200, Chung Pei Rd., Chung Li City, Taoyuan County 32023, Taiwan (China); Chien, Chun-Sheng [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), 1000, Wunhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China); Teng, Jyh-Tong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200, Chung Pei Rd., Chung Li City, Taoyuan County 32023, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purpose of this study is to verify the HCTL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAAP4 was used as code to generate a realistic and convenient HCTL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The current HCTL curve causes confusing in reading data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The revised HCTL curves developed in this study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Users can obtain important parameters from the revised HCTL without confusion and interpolation. - Abstract: Heat capacity temperature limit (HCTL) is an important parameter for operation of BWR. Current version of the HCTL was derived, based on simple model of computation aids (CA) of BWR owners' group (BWROG). However, some parts of the current HCTL are confusing to the users in reading data. The purpose of this study is to verify the HCTL by applying the MAAP4 code to the field of emergency operating procedure (EOP). The trends of HCTL generated by MAAP4 code are consistent with those obtained from CA. A series of revised HCTL evaluated at various times after scram are provided and the confusing part is eliminated.

  10. Operational electrochemical stability of thiophene-thiazole copolymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, Jessica; Wood, Sebastian; Kim, Ji-Seon, E-mail: ji-seon.kim@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Beatrup, Daniel; Hurhangee, Michael; McCulloch, Iain; Durrant, James R. [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Bronstein, Hugo [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-28

    We report on the electrochemical stability of hole polarons in three conjugated polymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The materials considered are all isostructural to poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, where thiazole units have been included to systematically deepen the energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). We demonstrate that increasing the thiazole content planarizes the main conjugated backbone of the polymer and improves the electrochemical stability in the ground state. However, these more planar thiazole containing polymers are increasingly susceptible to electrochemical degradation in the polaronic excited state. We identify the degradation mechanism, which targets the C=N bond in the thiazole units and results in disruption of the main polymer backbone conjugation. The introduction of thiazole units to deepen the HOMO energy level and increase the conjugated backbone planarity can be beneficial for the performance of certain optoelectronic devices, but the reduced electrochemical stability of the hole polaron may compromise their operational stability.

  11. Recovery of Metals and Stabilization of Arsenic from (Bio-)Leaching Operations by Engineered Biological Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Contreras, P.A.; weghuis, M.O.; Weijma, J.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the application of biotechnological stabilization of arsenic from (bio-) leaching operations. One of the latest applications of the Thioteq technology is arsenic immobilization. The Thioteq-scorodite biorecovery reactor is an aerobic system to immobilise arsenic in

  12. Stability of the Markov operator and synchronization of Markovian random products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Lorenzo J.; Matias, Edgar

    2018-05-01

    We study Markovian random products on a large class of ‘m-dimensional’ connected compact metric spaces (including products of closed intervals and trees). We introduce a splitting condition, generalizing the classical one by Dubins and Freedman, and prove that this condition implies the asymptotic stability of the corresponding Markov operator and (exponentially fast) synchronization.

  13. Investigation of the Adaptability of Transient Stability Assessment Methods to Real-Time Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weckesser, Johannes Tilman Gabriel; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Sommer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an investigation of the adaptability of available transient stability assessment methods to real-time operation and their real-time performance is carried out. Two approaches based on Lyapunov’s method and the equal area criterion are analyzed. The results allow to determine...

  14. Prosperity or Perdition: Do Lines of Operations Apply in Stability Operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    evolution of military theory and practice. One such phase is “lines of operations.” The etymology of the term “lines of operations” reveals that it has been...interrelationships and overlap between separate disciplines (i.e. chemistry , physics, biology, as well as philosophy, economics

  15. Study of transient turbine shot without bypass in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    The study and analysis of operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-terms events and the impact that would cause this transition. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could result in an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis of results of a turbine shot transient, which is not taken into operation the bypass is presented. The study is realized for a BWR of 2027 MWt, to an intermediate cycle life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a depressurization stage of the vessel is created which shows the response of other security systems and gives a coherent prediction to the event presented type. (Author)

  16. Flow rate control systems for coolants for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase spontaneous recycling flow rate of coolants in BWR type reactors when the water level in the reactor decreases, by communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum. Constitution: An opening is provided to the back plate disposed at the lower end of a reactor core shroud for communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum, and an ON-OFF valve actuated by an operation rod is provided to the opening. When abnormal water level or pressure in the reactor is detected by a level metal or pressure meter, the operation rod is driven to open the ON-OFF valve, whereby coolants fed from a jet pump partially flows through the opening to increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants. This can increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants upon spontaneous recycling operation, thereby maintaining the reactor safety and the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  17. Availability analysis of United States BWR IV electrical generation plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renick, D.H.; Li, F.; Todreas, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    Availability, as quantified by power output levels, from all active U.S. BWR IV plants were analyzed over a seven and a half year period to determine the operational characteristics of these plants throughout an operating cycle. The operational data were examined for infant mortality, end of cycle decreased availability, and seasonal availability variations. Scheduled outages were also examined to determine the industry's current approach to planning maintenance outages. The results of this study show that nuclear power plants do suffer significant infant mortality following a refueling outage. And while they do not suffer an end of cycle decrease in availability, a mid-cycle period of decreased availability is evident. This period of decreased availability is due to a combination of increased forced unavailability and seasonally scheduled maintenance and refueling outages. These findings form the start of a rational approach to increasing plant availability. (author)

  18. Moderator temperature coefficient in BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka

    1977-01-01

    Temperature dependences of infinite multiplication factor k sub(infinity) and neutron leakage from the core must be examined for estimation of moderator temperature coefficient. Temperature dependence on k sub(infinity) has been investigated by many researchers, however, the dependence on neutron leakage of a BWR with cruciformed control rods has hardly been done. Because there are difficulties and necessity on calculations of three space dimensional and multi-energy groups neutron distribution in a BWR core. In this study, moderator temperature coefficients of JPDR-II (BWR) core were obtained by calculation with DIFFUSION-ACE, which is newly developed three-dimensional multi-group computer code. The results were compared with experimental data measured from 20 to 275 0 C of the moderator temperature and the good agreement was obtained between calculation and measurement. In order to evaluate neutron leakage from the core, the other two calculations were carried out, adjusting criticality by uniform absorption rate and by material buckling. The former underestimated neutron leakage and the latter overestimated it. Discussion on the results shows that in order to estimate the temperature coefficient of BWR, neutron leakage must be evaluated precisely, therefore the calculation at actual pattern of control rods is necessary. (auth.)

  19. Secondary systems of PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, N.

    1981-01-01

    The secondary systems of a nuclear power plant comprises the steam, condensate and feedwater cycle, the steam plant auxiliary or ancillary systems and the cooling water systems. The presentation gives a general review about the main systems which show a high similarity of PWR and BWR plants. (orig./RW)

  20. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs

  1. A qualitative content analysis of global health engagements in Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute's stability operations lessons learned and information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nang, Roberto N; Monahan, Felicia; Diehl, Glendon B; French, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Many institutions collect reports in databases to make important lessons-learned available to their members. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences collaborated with the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute to conduct a descriptive and qualitative analysis of global health engagements (GHEs) contained in the Stability Operations Lessons Learned and Information Management System (SOLLIMS). This study used a summative qualitative content analysis approach involving six steps: (1) a comprehensive search; (2) two-stage reading and screening process to identify first-hand, health-related records; (3) qualitative and quantitative data analysis using MAXQDA, a software program; (4) a word cloud to illustrate word frequencies and interrelationships; (5) coding of individual themes and validation of the coding scheme; and (6) identification of relationships in the data and overarching lessons-learned. The individual codes with the most number of text segments coded included: planning, personnel, interorganizational coordination, communication/information sharing, and resources/supplies. When compared to the Department of Defense's (DoD's) evolving GHE principles and capabilities, the SOLLIMS coding scheme appeared to align well with the list of GHE capabilities developed by the Department of Defense Global Health Working Group. The results of this study will inform practitioners of global health and encourage additional qualitative analysis of other lessons-learned databases. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Stabilization and reconstruction operations: the role of the US Army Veterinary Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John C

    2007-01-01

    Stabilization and reconstruction operations in failed or failing states are vital to US security interests. These operations require a bottom-up approach, focusing on the population as the strategic center of gravity. This bottom-up approach must address the population's basic needs, as defined by Dr Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs, and provide a long-term means of self-sufficiency, rather than creating an "aid dependent economy." Focusing operations on agricultural projects provides relief from donor dependency, stimulates economic growth, and thwarts the power of spoilers. US Army Veterinary Corps personnel provide essential services ensuring the procurement of safe and wholesome subsistence and provision of medical care to government-owned animals. Veterinary Corps officers are also uniquely qualified to design and implement agricultural stabilization and reconstruction programs in conjunction with host-state ministries and agencies across the full range of military operations. Early, sustained engagement by veterinarians stimulates agricultural productivity, improves animal and human health, directly supports the population's hierarchy of needs on all levels, and accelerates stabilization operations by reducing the population's susceptibility to spoilers.

  3. Improving the phase stability of the SLAC rf driveline network for SLC operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, J.N.; Hogg, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    Successful operation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will require greater phase stability from the two-mile long rf drive network than previous linac operation did. This paper discusses four proposed modifications of the present system that should help achieve the general objective to reduce all long term temperature and atmospheric pressure induced phase variations to less than 20 0 at 2856 MHz, so that the phase/amplitude detector subsystems, which will control the network output phases relative to a beam reference, will operate within their most accurate ranges

  4. Stable tokamak access to, and operation in, the second stability region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, A.M.M.; Phillips, M.; Chance, M.; Manickam, J.; Pomphrey, N.

    1987-01-01

    Tokamak operation in the second region of stability to ballooning modes holds promise for economic fusion reactor operation. A second region of stability is confirmed to exist in circular tokamaks with a nearby conducting shell for εβθ>1. In addition to ballooning instabilities with high toroidal mode number n, the presence of low n internal pressure driven modes in low shear regions can pose serious problems for access to the second region. These modes can be present even when ballooning modes with infinite n are stable. Stable access to the second region for all ideal modes is demonstrated with current profile programming that raises the safety factor on axis above unity. Present calculations for stable access using this technique indicate that a conducting wall must be located close to the plasma edge (∼ 0.1 plasma minor radius) to stabilize external modes. Pressure and shear profile optimization could be used to increase this value. As εβθ is raised above unity, the stabilizing wall can be moved to progressively larger major radii. This behaviour is attributed to restabilization of the pressure driven component in low n kink modes. Finally, it is shown that poloidally discontinuous conducting structures are effective in stabilizing low n external kink modes. (author)

  5. Analysis of natural circulation BWR dynamics with stochastic and deterministic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanderHagen, T.H.; Van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Kleiss, E.B.J.; Nissen, W.H.M.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Reactor kinetic, thermal hydraulic and total plant stability of a natural convection cooled BWR was studied using noise analysis and by evaluation of process responses to control rod steps and to steamflow control valve steps. An estimate of the fuel thermal time constant and an impression of the recirculation flow response to power variations was obtained. A sophisticated noise analysis method resulted in more insight into the fluctuations of the coolant velocity

  6. Linear and nonlinear stability analysis in BWRs applying a reduced order model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera G, O. A.; Espinosa P, G.; Prieto G, A., E-mail: omar_olverag@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) stability studies are generally conducted through nonlinear reduced order models (Rom) employing various techniques such as bifurcation analysis and time domain numerical integration. One of those models used for these studies is the March-Leuba Rom. Such model represents qualitatively the dynamic behavior of a BWR through a one-point reactor kinetics, a one node representation of the heat transfer process in fuel, and a two node representation of the channel Thermal hydraulics to account for the void reactivity feedback. Here, we study the effect of this higher order model on the overall stability of the BWR. The change in the stability boundaries is determined by evaluating the eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix. The nonlinear model is also integrated numerically to show that in the nonlinear region, the system evolves to stable limit cycles when operating close to the stability boundary. We also applied a new technique based on the Empirical Mode Decomposition (Emd) to estimate a parameter linked with stability in a BWR. This instability parameter is not exactly the classical Decay Ratio (Dr), but it will be linked with it. The proposed method allows decomposing the analyzed signal in different levels or mono-component functions known as intrinsic mode functions (Imf). One or more of these different modes can be associated to the instability problem in BWRs. By tracking the instantaneous frequencies (calculated through Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT) and the autocorrelation function (Acf) of the Imf linked to instability. The estimation of the proposed parameter can be achieved. The current methodology was validated with simulated signals of the studied model. (Author)

  7. Linear and nonlinear stability analysis in BWRs applying a reduced order model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olvera G, O. A.; Espinosa P, G.; Prieto G, A.

    2016-09-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) stability studies are generally conducted through nonlinear reduced order models (Rom) employing various techniques such as bifurcation analysis and time domain numerical integration. One of those models used for these studies is the March-Leuba Rom. Such model represents qualitatively the dynamic behavior of a BWR through a one-point reactor kinetics, a one node representation of the heat transfer process in fuel, and a two node representation of the channel Thermal hydraulics to account for the void reactivity feedback. Here, we study the effect of this higher order model on the overall stability of the BWR. The change in the stability boundaries is determined by evaluating the eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix. The nonlinear model is also integrated numerically to show that in the nonlinear region, the system evolves to stable limit cycles when operating close to the stability boundary. We also applied a new technique based on the Empirical Mode Decomposition (Emd) to estimate a parameter linked with stability in a BWR. This instability parameter is not exactly the classical Decay Ratio (Dr), but it will be linked with it. The proposed method allows decomposing the analyzed signal in different levels or mono-component functions known as intrinsic mode functions (Imf). One or more of these different modes can be associated to the instability problem in BWRs. By tracking the instantaneous frequencies (calculated through Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT) and the autocorrelation function (Acf) of the Imf linked to instability. The estimation of the proposed parameter can be achieved. The current methodology was validated with simulated signals of the studied model. (Author)

  8. Assessment of boiling transition analysis code against data from NUPEC BWR full-size fine-mesh bundle tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuno, Hideaki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Masuhara, Yasuhiro; Kasahara, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Transient BT analysis code TCAPE based on mechanistic methods coupled with subchannel analysis has been developed for the evaluation on fuel integrity under abnormal operations in BWR. TCAPE consisted mainly of the drift-flux model, the cross-flow model, the film model and the heat transfer model. Assessment of TCAPE has been performed against data from BWR full-size fine-mesh bundle tests (BFBT), which consisted of two major parts: the void distribution measurement and the critical power measurement. Code and data comparison was made for void distributions with varying number of unheated rods in simulated actual fuel assembly. Prediction of steady-state critical power was compared with the measurement on full-scale bundle under a range of BWR operational conditions. Although the cross-sectional averaged void fraction was underestimated when it became lower, the accuracy was obtained that the averaged ratio 0.910 and its standard deviation 0.076. The prediction of steady-state critical power agreed well with the data in the range of BWR operations, where the prediction accuracy was obtained that the averaged ratio 0.997 and its standard deviation 0.043. These results demonstrated that TCAPE is well capable to predict two-phase flow distribution and liquid film dryout phenomena occurring in BWR rod bundles. Part of NUPEC BFBT database will be made available for an international benchmark exercise. The code assessment shall be continued against the OECD/NRC benchmark based on BFBT database. (author)

  9. Automatic approach to stabilization and control for multi robot teams by multilayer network operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diveev Askhat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a novel methodology for synthesis a high-level control of autonomous multi robot teams. The approach is based on multilayer network operator method that belongs to a symbolic regression class. Synthesis is accomplished in three steps: stabilizing robots about some given position in a state space, finding optimal trajectories of robots’ motion as sets of stabilizing points and then approximating all the points of optimal trajectories by some multi-dimensional function of state variables. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach is verified on simulations of the task of control synthesis for three mobile robots parking in the constrained space.

  10. Study of the Utilization BWR Type Nuclear Power Reactor for Desalination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itjeu Karliana; Sumijanto; Dhandhang Purwadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The needs of fresh water increased by rapid population growth and industrials expansion, but these demands can not be prepared naturally. Following this case, seawater desalination becomes the primer option which can fulfill the need through the nuclear desalination technology. The coupled nuclear power reactor enables to supply thermal energy for auxiliary equipment and pumps operation. The utilization study of power reactor type BWR coupled with desalination process has been performed. The goal of study is to obtain characteristic data of desalted water specification which desalination system coupling with nuclear power plant produced energy for desalination process. The study is carried out by browsing data and information, and comprehensive review of thermal energy correlation between NPP with desalination process installation. According to reviewing are found that the thermal energy and electric power utilization from the nuclear power reactor are enable to remove the seawater to produce desalted water and also to operate auxiliary equipments. The assessment results is VK-300 reactor prototype, BWR type 250 MW(e) power are cogeneration unit can supplied hot steam temperature 285 °C to the extraction turbine to empower 150 MW electric power, and a part of hot steam 130 °C is use to operate desalination process and remind heat is distribute to the municipal and offices at that region. The coupled of VK-300 reactor power type BWR with desalination installation of MED type enable to produce desalted water with high quality distillate. Based on the economic calculation that the VK-300 reactor power of BWR type produced water distillate capacity is 300.000 m 3 /hour with cost US$ 0.58/m 3 . The coupling VK-300 reactor power type BWR with MED desalination plant is competitive economically. (author)

  11. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor; Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, F.J. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Fuentes C, P. [ITT, Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fjmc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  12. An ecological interface design for BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, K.; Itoh, J.

    1992-01-01

    An ecological interface design was applied to realize the support function for the operator's direct perception and analytical reasoning in the development of an intelligent man-machine system for BWR nuclear power plants. The abstraction-aggregation functional hierarchy representation of the work domain is a base of the ecological interface design. Another base is the concept of the level of cognitive control. The former was mapped into the interface to externalize the operator's normative mental model of the plants, which will reduce his/her cognitive work load and support knowledge-based problem solving. In addition, the same framework can be used for the analytical evaluation of man-machine interfaces. The information content and structure of a prototype interface were evaluated. This approach seems promising from these experiences. (author)

  13. Flow-induced vibration characteristics of the BWR/5-201 jet pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaCroix, L.V.

    1982-09-01

    A General Electric boiling water reactor BWR/5-201 jet pump was tested for flow-induced vibration (FIV) characteristics in the Large Steam Water Test Facility at Moss Landing, CA, during the period June-July 1978. High level periodic FIV were observed at reactor operating conditions (1027 psia, 532 0 F and prototypical flow rates) for the specific single jet pump assembly tested. High level FIV of similar amplitude and character have been shown capable of damaging jet pump components and associated support hardware if allowed to continue unchecked. High level FIV were effectively suppressed in two special cases tested: (1) lateral load (>500 lb) at the mixer to diffuser slip joint; and (2) a labyrinth seal (5 small, circumferential grooves) on the mixer at the slip joint. Stability criteria for the particular jet pump tested were developed from test data. A cause-effect relationship between the dynamic pressure within the slip joint and the jet pump vibration was established

  14. Boiling transition phenomenon in BWR fuel assemblies effect of fuel spacer shape on critical power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Morooka, Shin-ichi; Mitsutake, Toru; Yokobori, Seiichi; Kimura, Jiro.

    1996-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena near fuel spacer is necessary for the accurate prediction of the critical power of BWR fuel assemblies, and is thus essential for effective developments of a new BWR fuel assembly. The main purpose of this study is to develop an accurate method for predicting the effect of spacer shapes on critical power. Tests have been conducted under actual BWR operating conditions, using an annulus flow channel consisting of a heated rod and circular-tube channel, and BWR simulated 4x4 rod bundles with heater rods unheated just upsteam of spacer. The effect of spacer shapes on critical power was predicted analytically based on the droplet deposition rate estimation. The droplet deposition rate for different spacer shapes was calculated using a single-phase flow model. The prediction results were compared with the test results for the annulus flow channel using ring-type spacers. Analytical results of critical power agreed with measured critical power from point of the effects of changes in the rod-spacer clearance and the spacer thickness on critical power. (author)

  15. Reducing BWR O and M costs through on-line performance monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, T.; Gross, R.; Logback, F.; Josyula, R.

    1995-01-01

    Competition in the electric power industry has placed significant emphasis on reducing operating and maintenance (O and M) costs at nuclear facilities. Therefore, on-line performance monitoring to locate power losses for boiling water reactor (BWR) plants is creating tremendous interest. In addition, the ability to automate activities such as data collection, analysis, and reporting increases the efficiency of plant engineers and gives them more time to concentrate on solving plant efficiency problems. This capability is now available with a unique software product called GEBOPS. GE Nuclear Energy, in conjunction with Joint Venture partner Black and Veatch, has undertaken development of the General Electric/Black and Veatch On-line Performance System (GEBOPS), an on-line performance monitoring system for BWR plants. The experience and expertise of GE Nuclear Energy with BWR plants, coupled with the proven on-line monitoring software development experience and capability of Black and Veatch, provide the foundation for a unique product which addresses the needs of today's BWR plants

  16. Development and recent trend of design of BWR nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kani, J [Tokyo Shibaura Electric Co. Ltd., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1977-11-01

    Many improvements have been carried out in BWR nuclear power plants from BWR-1, represented by Dresden No. 1 plant, to the present BWR-6 as the capacity has increased. In Japan, the plants up to BWR-5 have been constructed. In addition, further fine design improvements are being performed in the complete domestic manufacturing of BRWs based on the operational experiences to date. A variety of investigations on the standardization of nuclear power facilities have been progressing under the leadership of Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry since 1975. In this standardization, it is intended to forward the plant design taking eight concrete items into consideration, mainly aiming at carrying cut unerringly the maintenance and inspection, reduction of exposure of employees to radiation, and improvements of the rate of operation of plants and equipment reliability. The containment vessel has been developed in three forms, from Mark 1 through 3, adopting the pressure control system consistently since BWR-2. Mark 1 and 2 were constructed in Japan. However, these designs sacrificed the workability and increased radiation exposure during maintenance as a result of placing emphasis on the safety facilities, therefore Toshiba Electric has investigated the advanced Mark 1 type. Its features are the design for improving the work efficiency in a containment vessel, reducing the radiation exposure of workers, shortening plant construction period, and considering the aseismatic capability. In addition, the following themes are being planned as future standardization: (1) electrically driven control rod driving system, (2) improved design of reactor core, and (3) internal pump system as compared with external re-circulation.

  17. Development and recent trend of disign of BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kani, Jiro

    1977-01-01

    Many improvements have been carried out in BWR nuclear power plants from BWR-1, represented by Dresden No. 1 plant, to the present BWR-6 as the capacity has increased. In Japan, the plants up to BWR-5 have been constructed. In addition, further fine design improvements are being performed in the complete domestic manufacturing of BRWs based on the operational experiences to date. A variety of investigations on the standardization of nuclear power facilities have been progressing under the leadership of Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry since 1975. In this standardization, it is intended to forward the plant design taking eight concrete items into consideration, mainly aiming at carrying cut unerringly the maintenance and inspection, reduction of exposure of employees to radiation, and improvements of the rate of operation of plants and equipment reliability. The containment vessel has been developed in three forms, from Mark 1 through 3, adopting the pressure control system consistently since BWR-2. Mark 1 and 2 were constructed in Japan. However, these designs sacrificed the workability and increased radiation exposure during maintenance as a result of placing emphasis on the safety facilities, therefore Toshiba Electric has investigated the advanced Mark 1 type. Its features are the design for improving the work efficiency in a containment vessel, reducing the radiation exposure of workers, shortening plant construction period, and considering the aseismatic capability. In addition, the following themes are being planned as future standardization: (1) electrically driven control rod driving system, (2) improved design of reactor core, and (3) internal pump system as compared with external re-circulation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. The use of stability indices in predicting asphaltene problems in upstream and downstream oil operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asomaning, S. [Baker Petrolite, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2003-07-01

    A series of test methods have been developed to determine the stability of asphaltenes in crude oils. They were developed due to the high cost of remediating asphaltene deposition in offshore operations. This study described the characteristics of the Oliensis Spot Test, two saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes (SARA)-based screens (the Colloidal Instability Index and Asphaltene-Resin ratio), a solvent titration method with near infrared radiation (NIR) solids detection, and live oil depressurization. Each method is used to predict the stability of asphaltenes in crude oils with different API gravity. A complete description of the test methods was provided along with experimental data. The effectiveness of the different tests in predicting the stability of asphaltenes in crude oils was also assessed. Results indicate that the prediction of a crude oil's tendency towards asphaltene precipitation was more accurate with the Colloidal Instability Index and the solvent titration method. Live oil depressurization proved to be very effective in predicting the stability of asphaltenes for light oils, where most stability tests fail. tabs., figs.

  19. INEL Operable Unit 7-13 containment and stabilization configuration option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raivo, B.D.; Richardson, J.G.; Nickelson, D.F.

    1993-05-01

    A containment and stabilization configuration option has been developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area Operable Unit 7-13, the transuranic (TRU)-contaminated waste pits and trenches. The configuration option is presented as an end-to-end system block diagram. Functional subelements are separately discussed, and technical background information, assumptions, input, high-level subelement requirements, and output are presented for each option

  20. Investigation of the Adaptability of Transient Stability Assessment Methods to Real-Time Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Weckesser, Johannes Tilman Gabriel; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Sommer, Stefan; Østergaard, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an investigation of the adaptability of available transient stability assessment methods to real-time operation and their real-time performance is carried out. Two approaches based on Lyapunov’s method and the equal area criterion are analyzed. The results allow to determine the runtime of each method with respect to the number of inputs. Furthermore, it allows to identify, which method is preferable in case of changes in the power system such as the integration of distributed ...

  1. The Freedmen’s Bureau, Politics, and Stability Operations during Reconstruction in the South

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-12

    Movement in the 1960s. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Freedmen‘s Bureau, Stability Operations, Andrew Johnson, Reconstruction 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...Mercer Langston (1829-1897) [on-line]; available from http://www. oberlin.edu /external/ EOG /OYTT-images/JMLangston.html; Internet; accessed 26 March...by sentiment more in line with the South‘s old ruling class view of labor, society, and governance. 53 Democratic victories of 1874 signaled a

  2. Stability and Support Operations, Intervening Armed Forces and the Population They Serve: Defining a Doctrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-24

    Chauvancy, Le moral du soldat occidental dans les nouveaux contextes d’intervention » (The Western Soldier Moral In The New Intervention Environment). MARS...Lawrence A. “Military Stability and Support Operations: Analogies, Patterns And Recurring Themes”. Military Review 4 (July-august 1997): 51. WEB SITES...And General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, 1967. BOOKS IN FRENCH Corvisier, André. Histoire militaire de la France, 4. de 1940 à nos jours

  3. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF POWER CONSUMPTION FOR SOME OIL PIPE-LINE SECTIONS WITH POOR OPERATIONAL STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Kolesnik

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical model of power consumption for technologically completed and non-completed oil pipe-line sections with poor operational stability has been developed on the basis of daily indices concerning oil transportation regimes. The model permits to take into account tendencies in power consumption under various time prediction cycles and ranges of oil freight turnover, changes in the bulk and characteristics of the transported oil, configuration and design parameters of oil pipe-line.

  4. Operational stability of a compact 600-W KrF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, V M; Vinokhodov, A Yu; Vodchits, V A; El'tsov, A V; Basting, D; Stamm, U; Voss, F

    1998-01-01

    The problem of the operational stability of a KrF laser with an average output power of at least 600 W was investigated. An experimental study was made of the dependences of the rms deviation σ of the output energy on the charging voltage, on the pulse repetition rate, and on the operating time. The value of σ varied from 1.2% to 6.0%, depending on the experimental conditions. For an average power of ∼ 600 W, the deviation σ did not exceed 3.2%. (lasers and amplifiers)

  5. Development of a BWR core burn-up calculation code COREBN-BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Yuichi; Okumura, Keisuke

    1992-05-01

    In order to evaluate core performances of BWR type reactors, the three dimensional core burnup calculation code COREBN-BWR and the fuel management code HIST-BWR have been developed. In analyses of BWR type reactors, thermal hydraulics calculations must be coupled with neutronics calculations to evaluate core performances, because steam void distribution changes according to the change of the power distribution. By installing new functions as follows to the three dimensional core burnup code COREBN2 developed in JAERI for PWR type reactor analyses, the code system becomes to be applicable to burnup analyses of BWR type reactors. (1) Macroscopic cross section calculation function taking into account of coolant void distribution. (2) Thermal hydraulics calculation function to evaluate core flow split, coolant void distribution and thermal margin. (3) Burnup calculation function under the Haling strategy. (4) Fuel management function to incorporate the thermal hydraulics information. This report consists of the general description, calculational models, input data requirements and their explanations, detailed information on usage and sample input. (author)

  6. BWR radiation buildup control with ionic zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marble, W.J.; Wood, C.J.; Leighty, C.E.; Green, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    In 1983 a hypothesis was disclosed which suggested that the presence of ionic zinc in the reactor water of the BWR could reduce radiation buildup. This hypothesis was developed from correlations of plant data, and subsequently, from laboratory experiments which demonstrated clearly that ionic zinc inhibits the corrosion of stainless steel. The benefits of zinc addition have been measured at the Vallecitos Nuclear Center under and EPRI/GE project. Experimentation and analyses have been performed to evaluate the impact of intentional zinc addition on the IGSCC characteristics of primary system materials and on the performance of the nuclear fuel. It has been concluded that no negative effects are expected. The author conclude that the intentional addition of ionic zinc to the BWR reactor water at a concentration of approximately 10 ppb will provide major benefits in controlling the Co-60 buildup on primary system stainless steel surfaces. The intentional addition of zinc is now a qualified technique for use in BWRs

  7. BWR mechanics and materials technology update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses technical results obtained from a variety of important programs underway at General Electric's Nuclear Engineering Division. The principal objective of these programs is to qualify and improve BWR product related technologies that fall broadly under the disciplines of Applied Mechanics and Materials Engineering. The paper identifies and deals with current technical issues that are of general importance to the LWR industry albeit the specific focus is directed to the development and qualification of analytical predictive methods and criteria, and improved materials for use in the design of the BWR. In this paper, specific results and accomplishments are summarized to provide a braod perspective of technology advances. Results are presented in sections which discuss: dynamic analysis and modeling; fatigue and fracture evaluation; materials engineering advances; and flow induced vibration. (orig.)

  8. Parallel channel effects under BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Hatamiya, S.; Murase, M.

    1988-01-01

    Due to parallel channel effects, different flow patterns such as liquid down-flow and gas up-flow appear simultaneously in fuel bundles of a BWR core during postulated LOCAs. Applying the parallel channel effects to the fuel bundle, water drain tubes with a restricted bottom end have been developed in order to mitigate counter-current flow limiting and to increase the falling water flow rate at the upper tie plate. The upper tie plate with water drain tubes is an especially effective means of increasing the safety margin of a reactor with narrow gaps between fuel rods and high steam velocity at the upper tie plate. The characteristics of the water drain tubes have been experimentally investigated using a small-scaled steam-water system simulating a BWR core. Then, their effect on the fuel cladding temperature was evaluated using the LOCA analysis program SAFER. (orig.)

  9. Eulerian fluid-structure analysis of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, W.H.

    1979-05-01

    A fluid-structure-interaction algorithm is developed for the analysis of the dynamic response of a BWR pressure-suppression pool and containment structure. The method is incorporated into a two-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics code, PELE-IC, for the solution of incompressible flow coupled to flexible structures. The fluid, structure, and coupling algorithms have been verified by calculation of solved problems from the literature and by comparison with air and steam blowdown experiments

  10. IFPE/IFA-432, Fission Gas Release, Mechanical Interaction BWR Fuel Rods, Halden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Description: It contains data from experiments that have been performed at the IFE/OECD Halden Reactor Project, available for use in fuel performance studies. It covers experiments on thermal performance, fission product release, clad properties and pellet clad mechanical interaction. It includes also experimental data relevant to high burn-up behaviour. IFA-432: Measurements of fuel temperature response, fission gas release and mechanical interaction on BWR-type fuel rods up to high burn-ups. The assembly featured several variations in rod design parameters, including fuel type, fuel/cladding gap size, fill gas composition (He and Xe) and fuel stability. It contained 6 BWR-type fuel rods with fuel centre thermocouples at two horizontal planes, rods were also equipped with pressure transducers and cladding extensometers. Only data from 6 rods are compiled here

  11. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  12. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  13. Economic analysis of hydride fueled BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganda, F.; Shuffler, C.; Greenspan, E.; Todreas, N.

    2009-01-01

    The economic implications of designing BWR cores with hydride fuels instead of conventional oxide fuels are analyzed. The economic analysis methodology adopted is based on the lifetime levelized cost of electricity (COE). Bracketing values (1970 and 3010 $/kWe) are used for the overnight construction costs and for the power scaling factors (0.4 and 0.8) that correlate between a change in the capital cost to a change in the power level. It is concluded that a newly constructed BWR reactor could substantially benefit from the use of 10 x 10 hydride fuel bundles instead of 10 x 10 oxide fuel bundles design presently in use. The cost saving would depend on the core pressure drop constraint that can be implemented in newly constructed BWRs - it is between 2% and 3% for a core pressure drop constraint as of the reference BWR, between 9% and 15% for a 50% higher core pressure drop, and between 12% and 21% higher for close to 100% core pressure. The attainable cost reduction was found insensitive to the specific construction cost but strongly dependent on the power scaling factor. The cost advantage of hydride fuelled cores as compared to that of the oxide reference core depends only weakly on the uranium and SWU prices, on the 'per volume base' fabrication cost of hydride fuels, and on the discount rate used. To be economically competitive, the uranium enrichment required for the hydride fuelled core needs to be around 10%.

  14. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for the management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after-core degradation has occurred) of postulated boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities, and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for further assessment. The first was a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertained to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose was to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies were performed during 1991 and this paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies, and the potential for their success. ((orig.))

  15. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1982-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are touched on. The basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are treated. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurement of the reactor transfer function, which is demonstrated by results from measurements on a BWR in the Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  16. BWR SFAT, gross-defect verification of spent BWR fuel. Final report on Task FIN A563 on the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards including BWR SFAT User Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarvainen, M.; Paakkunainen, M.; Tiitta, A.; Sarparanta, K.

    1994-04-01

    A measurement instrument called Spent Fuel Attribute Tester, SFAT, has been designed, fabricated and taken into use by the IAEA in gross defect verification of spent BWR fuel assemblies. The equipment consists of an underwater measurement head connected with cables to a control unit on the bridge of the fuel handling machine as well as to a PMCA for measurement of the gamma spectra. The BWR SFAT is optimized for the AFR interim storage, TVO KPA-STORE, of the TVO Power Company in Olkiluoto, Finland. It has a shape and it is moved like a fuel assembly using the fuel handling machine. No fuel movements are needed. Spent fuel specific radiation from the fission product 137 Cs at the gamma-ray energy of 662 keV is detected above the assemblies in the storage rack using a NaI(Tl) detector. In the design and in licensing the requirements of the IAEA, operator and the safety authority have been taken into account. The BWR SFAT allows modifications for other LWR fuel types with minor changes. The work has been carried out under the task FIN A 563 of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards. (orig.) (9 refs., 22 figs.)

  17. Stability Analysis and Trigger Control of LLC Resonant Converter for a Wide Operational Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijian Fang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The gain of a LLC resonant converter can vary with the loads that can be used to improve the efficiency and power density for some special applications, where the maximum gain does not apply at the heaviest loads. However, nonlinear gain characteristics can make the converters unstable during a major disturbance. In this paper, the stability of an LLC resonant converter during a major disturbance is studied and a trigger control scheme is proposed to improve the converter’s stability by extending the converter’s operational range. Through in-depth analysis of the gain curve of the LLC resonant converter, we find that the switching frequency range is one of the key factors determining the system’s stability performance. The same result is also obtained from a mathematical point of view by utilizing the mixed potential function method. Then a trigger control method is proposed to make the LLC resonant converter stable even during a major disturbance, which can be used to extend the converter’s operational range. Finally, experimental results are given to verify the analysis and proposed control scheme.

  18. BWR Refill-Reflood Program, Task 4.7 - model development: TRAC-BWR component models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Y.K.; Parameswaran, V.; Shaug, J.C.

    1983-09-01

    TRAC (Transient Reactor Analysis Code) is a computer code for best-estimate analysis for the thermal hydraulic conditions in a reactor system. The development and assessment of the BWR component models developed under the Refill/Reflood Program that are necessary to structure a BWR-version of TRAC are described in this report. These component models are the jet pump, steam separator, steam dryer, two-phase level tracking model, and upper-plenum mixing model. These models have been implemented into TRAC-B02. Also a single-channel option has been developed for individual fuel-channel analysis following a system-response calculation

  19. Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation experience with BWR and PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reparaz, A.; Smith, M.H.; Stephens, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    The large data base of fuel performance parameters available to Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP), and the excellent track record of innovation and fuel reliability accumulated over the last twenty-three years, allows SNP to have a clear insight on the characteristics of future developments in the area of fuel design. Following is a description of some of SNP's recent design innovations to prevent failures and to extend burnup capabilities. A goal paramount to the design and manufacture of BWR and PWR fuel is that of zero defects from any case during its operation in the reactor. Progress has already been made in achieving this goal. This paper summarized the cumulative failure rate of SNP fuel rod through January 1992

  20. Influence of local regulations on TN dual purpose BWR casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, P.; Neider, T.

    1999-01-01

    Transnucleaire (Paris, France) and Transnuclear, Inc. (Hawthorne, New York, United Sates) have both developed Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel casks for storage and transport purposes. The products are supplied in Europe by Transnucleaire and in the United States by Transnuclear, Inc. Now the TN Group is working on a design for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) spent fuel assemblies: the TN 52 L cask is designed for transport and storage is Switzerland, the TN 68 cask is designed for transport and storage in the United States. For storage purpose, national regulatory requirements have to be met: each country has specific demands and criteria. As a consequence, differences between the TN 52 L design and the TN 68 design for rather similar contents appear in several fields: the design work, the licensing process, the manufacturing and the operational life. (author)

  1. Operating the plant, quality assurance, and the job of the operating staff, Volume Twelve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes operating the plant (the role of the operator, the control room, plant technical specifications, plant operating procedures, initial startup program, BWR/PWR plant startup, BWR/PWR steady state power operation, BWR/PWR transient operation, emergency operation), quality assurance (what is quality, what is quality control, quality assurance includes quality control, government regulation and quality assurance, administrative controls for nuclear power plants, the necessity of reviews and audits, practical quality assurance), and the job of the operating staff (the plant operating staff, plant safety, first aid and resuscitation, general plant hazards, personnel protective equipment, handling chemicals, handling compressed gas, equipment repair and maintenance, communicating with others

  2. FIST/6IB1, BWR/6 System Responses to Intermediate Break in Recirculation Suction Line LINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: BWR/6-218 standard plant. A full size bundle with electrically heated rods is used to simulate the reactor core. A scaling ratio of 1/624 is applied in the design of the system components. Key features of the FIST facility include: (1) Full height test vessel and internals; (2) correctly scaled fluid volume distribution; (3) simulation of ECCS, S/RV, and ADS; (4) level trip capability; (5) heated feedwater supply system, which provides the capability for steady state operation. 2 - Description of test: Test 6IB1 investigates system responses to an intermediate break in the recirculation suction line. BWR system licensing evaluations for various size recirculation break LOCA's indicates that a break size of about 0.2 sq.ft., without LPCS operation, is the highest PCT case for the intermediate break LOCA. Test 6IB1 simulates this event

  3. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  4. Sensitiaztion of austenitic stainless steels and its significance as regards stress-corrosion cracking of BWR pipe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.; Otterberg, R.

    1984-05-01

    A critical literature evaluation dealing with sensitization of austenitic stainless steels and its importance in the context of intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in high-temperature, oxygenated water is presented. The factors influencing the degree of sensitization are discussed, principally for type-304 stainless steels, both as regards sensitization arising as a result of isothermal holding within the critical temperature range and weld sensitization. The phenomenon of low-temperature sensitization is described and its potential significance under BWR operating conditions speculated upon. The principal features of and mechanisms controlling IGSCC of sensitized 304 steels in BWR-type environments are reviewed and some thoughts are given to the relevance of laboratory SCC testing in predicting the occurrence of cracking in actual BWR systems. Finally various countermeasures against IGSCC in existing and projected reactors are presented and discussed. (Author)

  5. Water chemistry control and decontamination experience with TEPCO BWR`s and the measures planned for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, N.; Miyamaru, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The new TEPCO BWR`s are capable of having the occupational radiation exposure controlled successfully at a low level by selecting low cobalt steel, using corrosion-resistant steel, employing dual condensate polishing systems, and controlling Ni/Fe ratio during operation. The occupational radiation exposure of the old BWR`s, on the other hand, remains high though reduced substantially through the use of low cobalt replacement steel and the partial addition of a filter in the condensate polishing system. Currently under review is the overall decontamination procedure for the old BWR`s to find out to measures needed to reduce the amount of crud that is and has been carried over into the nuclear reactor. The current status of decontamination is reported below.

  6. Analysis of Kinetic Parameter Effect on Reactor Operation Stability of the RSG-GAS Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokhmadi

    2007-01-01

    Kinetic parameter has influence to behaviour on RSG-GAS reactor operation. In this paper done is the calculation of reactivity curve, period-reactivity relation and low power transfer function in silicide fuel. This parameters is necessary and useful for reactivity characteristic analysis and reactor stability. To know the reactivity response, it was done reactivity insertion at power 1 watt using POKDYN code because at this level of power no feedback reactivity so important for reactor operation safety. The result of calculation showed that there is no change of significant a period-reactivity relation and transfer function at low power for 2.96 gU/cc, 3.55 gU/cc and 4.8 gU/cc density of silicide fuels. The result of the transfer function at low power showed that the reactor is critical stability with no feedback. The result of calculation also showed that reactivity response no change among three kinds of fuel densities. It can be concluded that from kinetic parameter point of view period-reactivity relation, transfer function at low power, and reactivity response are no change reactor operation from reactivity effect when fuel exchanged. (author)

  7. Stability Analysis and Stabilization of T-S Fuzzy Delta Operator Systems with Time-Varying Delay via an Input-Output Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixiong Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The stability analysis and stabilization of Takagi-Sugeno (T-S fuzzy delta operator systems with time-varying delay are investigated via an input-output approach. A model transformation method is employed to approximate the time-varying delay. The original system is transformed into a feedback interconnection form which has a forward subsystem with constant delays and a feedback one with uncertainties. By applying the scaled small gain (SSG theorem to deal with this new system, and based on a Lyapunov Krasovskii functional (LKF in delta operator domain, less conservative stability analysis and stabilization conditions are obtained. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the advantages of the proposed method.

  8. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino C, F.J.; Fuentes C, P.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  9. Efficient method for simulation of BWR severe accident sequence events before core uncovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    BWR-LACP has been a versatile tool for the ORNL SASA program. The development effort was minimal, and the code is fast running and economical. Operator actions are easily simulated and the complete scope of both reactor vessel and primary containment are modeled. Valuable insights have been gained into accident sequences. A Fortran version is under development and it will be modified for application to Mark II plants

  10. Modeling of SCC initiation and propagation mechanisms in BWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Hans, E-mail: Hans.Hoffmeister@hsu-hh.de [Institute for Failure Analysis and Failure Prevention ISSV e.V., c/o Helmut Schmidt University of the Federal Armed Forces, D-22039 Hamburg (Germany); Klein, Oliver [Institute for Failure Analysis and Failure Prevention ISSV e.V., c/o Helmut Schmidt University of the Federal Armed Forces, D-22039 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that SSC in BWR environments includes anodic crack propagation and hydrogen assisted cracking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen cracking is triggered by crack tip acidification following local impurity accumulations and subsequent phase precipitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We calculate effects of pH, chlorides, potentials and stress on crack SCC growth rates at 288 Degree-Sign C. - Abstract: During operation of mainly BWRs' (Boiling Water Reactors) excursions from recommended water chemistries may provide favorite conditions for stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Maximum levels for chloride and sulfate ion contents for avoiding local corrosion are therefore given in respective water specifications. In a previously published deterministic 288 Degree-Sign C - corrosion model for Nickel as a main alloying element of BWR components it was demonstrated that, as a theoretically worst case, bulk water chloride levels as low as 30 ppb provide local chloride ion accumulation, dissolution of passivating nickel oxide and precipitation of nickel chlorides followed by subsequent local acidification. In an extension of the above model to SCC the following work shows that, in a first step, local anodic path corrosion with subsequent oxide breakdown, chloride salt formation and acidification at 288 Degree-Sign C would establish local cathodic reduction of accumulated hydrogen ions inside the crack tip fluid. In a second step, local hydrogen reduction charges and increasing local crack tip strains from increasing crack lengths at given global stresses are time stepwise calculated and related to experimentally determined crack critical cathodic hydrogen charges and fracture strains taken from small scale SSRT tensile tests pieces. As a result, at local hydrogen equilibrium potentials higher than those of nickel in the crack tip solution, hydrogen ion reduction initiates hydrogen crack propagation that is enhanced with

  11. Methods for improving power system security by certifying dynamic stability in island operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granfors, S.; Krantz, N. [Solvina, Goteborg (Sweden)

    2007-07-01

    In response to concerns regarding the vulnerability of power systems around the world to major blackouts, a study was conducted to test island operation capability at power plants. Island operation refers to cases where one or more generators are connected to a limited power grid where there is no external voltage or frequency reference. In island operation, each generator is large enough to have a significant impact on the frequency and voltage in the grid. The ability to operate an isolated island grid can be beneficial for industries or hospitals, as well as for different rural areas. This study identified control parameters and evaluated power plant processes through step responses and frequency analysis. A hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation technique was proposed for island operation/power restoration testing. The proposed method made it possible to perform safe field studies of power stations that were synchronized to the main grid. More than 40 frequency control tests were conducted on different kinds of power plants in Sweden during normal operation. Most errors were found to be caused by improper operation and unstable conditions. Nearly all machines were stabilized after tuning. It was shown that newly built, identically designed and tuned turbines behave differently due to individual components. This paper addressed issues such as mechanical backlash, unsatisfying calibration of measuring equipment and improper tuning of controllers. In order to tune and optimize frequency control the choice of control algorithm is critical. Several different implementations were used during the tests, but the most successful was based on a separate control mode for island operation including gate-opening feedback for calculating droop. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  12. GPE-BWR and the containment venting and filtering issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, J.; Santiago, J. de

    1988-01-01

    The Spanish Boiling Water Reactor Owner's Group (GPE-BWR) is formed by three utilities, owning four units: Santa Maria de Garona (46 MWe, BWR3, Mark I containment), Cofrentes (975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) and Valdecaballeros (2x975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) - all of the reactors having been supplied by General Electric. One of the GPE-BWR's several committees is the Safety and Licensing Committee, which follows up the evolution of severe accident topics and particularly the containment venting and filtering issue. In September 1987, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), the Spanish Regulatory Body, asked the GPE-BWR to define its position on the installation of a containment venting system. The GPE-BWR created a Working Group which presented a Report on Containment Venting to the CSN in January 1987 gathered from: the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); some US utilities; and several European countries, especially France, Germany and Sweden. CSN's review of the containment venting Report and the Action Plan proposed by the GPE-BWR finished in April 1988. The conclusion of the Report and the proposed Action Plan take into account the US NRC's identified open items on severe accidents and the R and D programs scheduled to close these items

  13. NDE and fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom-head weld indications in a BWR reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B [Swedish Plant Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the Non Destructive Examination (NDE) and the fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom head welds in a BWR. The NDE equipment is presented, together with the geometry of evaluated flaw regions. After the fracture mechanics evaluation, it appeared that the plant results fulfilled the usual conditions, and the plant was allowed to operate one more year. (TEC).

  14. Range of the radiation monitor for the rigid vent of primary containment during normal and emergency operation for a BWR-5 in Laguna Verde; Rango del monitor de radiacion para el venteo rigido de la contencion primaria durante operacion normal y emergencia para un reactor BWR-5 en Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Pozos S, A. M.; Cabrera U, S.; Mata A, J. A.; Sandoval V, S.; Ovando C, R.; Vargas A, A.; Gallardo R, I.; Cruz G, M.; Amador C, C., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Km 44.5 Carretera Cardel-Nautla, 91476 Laguna Verde, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The earthquake followed by a tsunami, happened in March, 2011 in the coasts of oriental Japan, caused damages in the nuclear power plants 1 at 4 of Fukushima Daiichi leading to damage of the fuel in three of the reactors and to the radiation liberation to the exterior. As consequence of those events, the regulations requires that the power plants with Primary Containment type Mark I and II evaluate to have a system of rigid vent with a monitoring equipment of radiation effluents. The present work covers the rigid vent of diameter 12 of the Primary Containment, type Mark-II, of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in conditions of severe accident and normal operation, low regime of Extended Power Up rate (EPU - 2317 MWt), using the codes MAAP3B, MICROSHILED 5.05 and the Bardach Black Boxes methodology. As a result the measurement range of the radiation monitor that is required for monitoring the gassy liberation to the atmosphere was determined. The conclusion is that the superior limit of the range of the radiation meter during a Severe Accident is of 8.55 E + 05 R/h (8.55 E + 08 m R/h) and the superior limit in normal operation of 1.412 E-11 at 2.540 E-7 R/h (1.412 E-14 at 2.540 E-10 m R/h). (Author)

  15. Assessment of severe accident prevention and mitigation features: BWR, Mark II containment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.R.; Hsu, C.J.; Eltawila, F.; Perkins, K.R.; Luckas, W.J.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Pratt, W.T.

    1988-07-01

    Plant features and operator actions, which have been found to be important in either preventing or mitigating severe accidents in BWRs with Mark II containments (BWR Mark II's) have been identified. These features and actions were developed from insights derived from reviews of in-depth risk assessments performed specifically for the Limerick and Shoreham plants and from other relevant studies. Accident sequences that dominate the core-damage frequency and those accident sequences that are of potentially high consequence were identified. Vulnerabilities of the BWR Mark II to severe-accident containment loads were also noted. In addition, those features of a BWR Mark II, which are important for preventing core damage and are available for mitigating fission-product release to the environment were also identified. This report is issued to provide focus to an analyst examining an individual plant. This report calls attention to plant features and operator actions and provides a list of deterministic attributes for assessing those features and actions found to be helpful in reducing the overall risk for Mark II plants. Thus, the guidance is offered as a resource in examining the subject plant to determine if the same, or similar, plant features and operator actions will be of value in reducing overall plant risk. This report is intended to serve solely as guidance

  16. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Findlay, J.A.; Hwang, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation

  17. Genusa Bepu methodologies for the safety analysis of BWRs; Metodologias Bepu de Genusa para el analisis de seguridad de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, M.; Garcia, J.; Goodson, C.; Ibarra, L.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the BEPU methodologies developed by General Electric-Hitachi (GEH) for the evaluation of the BWR reactor safety analysis based on the TRACG best-estimate code. These methodologies are applicable to a wide range of events, operational transients (AOO), anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and instability events; to different BWR types operating commercially. General Electric (GE( designs and other vendors, including Generation III+ESBWR; to the new operation strategies, and to all types of BWR fuel. Their application achieves, among other benefits, a better understanding of the overall plant response and an improvement in margins to the operating limits; thus, the increase of flexibility in reactor operation and reduction in generation costs. (Author)

  18. Development of methodology for early detection of BWR instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandro Petruzzi; Shin Chin; Kostadin Ivanov; Asok Ray; Fan-Bill Cheung

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The objective of the work presented in this paper research, which is supported by the US Department of Energy under the NEER program, is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology in order to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, based on the US NRC coupled code TRACE/PARCS, is being utilized as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The concept of the methodology is based on the fact that nonlinear systems show bifurcation, which is a change in the qualitative behavior as the system parameters vary. Some of these parameters may change on their own accord and account for the anomaly, while certain parameters can be altered in a controlled fashion. The non-linear, non-autonomous BWR system model considered in this research exhibits phenomena at two time scales. Anomalies occur at the slow time scale while the observation of the dynamical behavior, based on which inferences are made, takes place at the fast time scale. It is assumed that: (i) the system behavior is stationary at the fast time scale; and (ii) any observable non-stationary behavior is associated with parametric changes evolving at the slow time scale. The goal is to make inferences about evolving anomalies based on the asymptotic behavior derived from the computer simulation. However, only sufficient changes in the slowly varying parameter may lead to detectable difference in the asymptotic behavior. The need to detect such small changes in parameters and hence early detection of an anomaly motivate the utilized stimulus-response approach. In this approach, the model

  19. Improvement of operational stability of Ogataea minuta carbonyl reductase for chiral alcohol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Kohsuke; Inoue, Mizuha; Ono, Tomohiro; Okano, Kenji; Dekishima, Yasumasa; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Directed evolution of enantio-selective carbonyl reductase from Ogataea minuta was conducted to improve the operational stability of the enzyme. A mutant library was constructed by an error-prone PCR and screened using a newly developed colorimetric assay. The stability of a mutant with two amino acid substitutions was significantly higher than that of the wild type at 50°C in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis showed that the improved stability of the enzyme can be attributed to the amino acid substitution of V166A. The half-lives of the V166A mutant were 11- and 6.1-times longer than those of the wild type at 50°C in the presence and absence, respectively, of 20% (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide. No significant differences in the substrate specificity and enantio-selectivity of the enzyme were observed. The mutant enzyme converted 60 mM 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone to (R)-(-)-α-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol in a molar yield of 71% whereas the conversion yield with an equivalent concentration of the wild-type enzyme was 27%. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Evolving Contingency Contracting Market: Private Sector Self regulation and United States Government Monitoring of Procurement of Stability Operations Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    statements of work would be useful in ensuring ethical govern- ment procurement practices. Conclusions The United States conducts diplomatic, defense...THE EVOLVING CONTINGENCY CONTRACTING MARKET: PRIVATE SECTOR SELF-REGULATION AND UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT MONITORING OF PROCUREMENT OF STABILITY...MARKET: PRIVATE SECTOR SELF-REGULATION AND UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT MONITORING OF PROCUREMENT OF STABILITY OPERATIONS SERVICES Whitney Grespin January

  1. BWR regional instability model and verification on ringhals-1 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Akitoshi; Suzawa, Yojiro

    1996-01-01

    Regional instability is known as one type of the coupled neutronic-thermohydraulic phenomena of boiling water reactors (BWRs), where the thermohydraulic density wave propagation mechanism is predominant. Historically, it has been simulated by the three-dimensional time domain code in spite of its significant computing time. On the other hand, there have been proposals to apply the frequency domain models in regional instability considering the subcriticality of the higher neutronic mode. However, their application still remains in corewide instability mainly because of the lack of more detailed methodological and empirical studies. In this study, the current version of the frequency domain model was extended and verified based on actual core regional instability measurement data. The mathematical model LAPUR, the well-known frequency domain stability code, was reviewed from the standpoint of pure thermohydraulics and neutronic-thermohydraulic interaction mechanisms. Based on the ex-core loop test data, the original LAPUR mixed friction and local pressure loss model was modified, taking into account the different dynamic behavior of these two pressure-loss mechanisms. The perturbation term of the two-phase friction multiplier, which is the sum of the derivative of void fraction and subcool enthalpy, was adjusted theoretically. The adequacy of the instability evaluation system was verified based on the Ringhals unit 1 test data, which were supplied to participants of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency BWR Stability Benchmark Project

  2. A New Method for Early Anomaly Detection of BWR Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.N.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the performed research is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the anomalies as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small anomalies. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on anomaly detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.

  3. Application of process computers and colour CRT displays in the plant control room of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, M.; Hayakawa, H.; Kawahara, H.; Neda, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The recent application of a CRT display system in an 1100-MW(e) BWR plant control room and the design features of a new control room whose installation is planned for the next generation are discussed. As reactor unit capacity and the need for plant safety and reliability continue to increase, instrumentation and control equipment is growing in number and complexity. In consequence, control and supervision of plant operations require improvement. Thus, because of recent progress in the field of process computers and display equipment (colour CRTs), efficient improvements of the control room are under way in the Japanese BWR plant. In the recently constructed BWR plant (1100 MW(e)), five CRTs on the bench board and two process computers were additionally installed in the control room during the construction stage to improve plant control and supervisory functions by implementing the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident. The major functions of the new computers and display systems are to show integrated graphic displays of the plant status, to monitor the standby condition of the safety system, to show the condition of the integrated alarm system, etc. In practice, in the actual plant, this newly installed system performs well. On the basis of the experience gained in these activities, a new computerized control and monitoring system is now being designed for subsequent domestic BWR plants. This advanced system will incorporate not only the functions already mentioned, but also a surveillance guide system and plant automation. For future plants, a diagnostic system and an instructional system that can analyse a disturbance and give operational guidance to the plant operator are being developed in a government-sponsored programme. (author)

  4. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Tobin, S.J.; Favalli, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hu, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) (Sweden); Trellue, H.; Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-11

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 134}Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  5. Remote operation of the vertical plasma stabilization @ the GOLEM tokamak for the plasma physics education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, V., E-mail: svoboda@fjfi.cvut.cz [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Kocman, J.; Grover, O. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Krbec, J.; Stöckel, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, CZ-182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: * Understandable remote operation of a vertical plasma position control system in the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes.* Two combinable modes of real-time plasma position control: position based feedback and a pre-defined waveform.* More than 20% plasma life prolongation with plasma position control in feedback mode. - Highlights: • Understandable remote operation of a vertical plasma position control system in the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes. • Two combinable modes of real-time plasma position control: position based feedback and a pre-defined waveform. • More than 20% plasma life prolongation with plasma position control in feedback mode. - Abstract: The GOLEM tokamak at the Czech Technical University has been established as an educational tokamak device for domestic and foreign students. Remote participation in the scope of several laboratory practices, plasma physics schools and workshops has been successfully performed from abroad. A new enhancement allowing understandable remote control of vertical plasma position in two modes (i) predefined and (ii) feedback control is presented. It allows to drive the current in the stabilization coils in any time-dependent scenario, which can include as a parameter the actual plasma position measured by magnetic diagnostics. Arbitrary movement of the plasma column in a vertical direction, stabilization of the plasma column in the center of the tokamak vessel as well as prolongation/shortening of plasma life according to the remotely defined request are demonstrated.

  6. Evaluation of enhanced thermostability and operational stability of carbonic anhydrase from Micrococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Shrivastava, Ankita; Sharma, Anjana

    2013-06-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) was purified from Micrococcus lylae and Micrococcus luteus with 49.90 and 53.8 % yield, respectively, isolated from calcium carbonate kilns. CA from M. lylae retained 80 % stability in the pH and temperature range of 6.0-8.0 and 35-45 °C, respectively. However, CA from M. luteus was stable in the pH and temperature range of 7.5-10.0 and 35-55 °C, respectively. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) raised the transition temperature of M. lylae and M. luteus CA up to 67.5 and 74.0 °C, while the operational stability (T(1/20) of CA at 55 °C was calculated to be 7.7 and 12.0 h, respectively. CA from both the strains was found to be monomeric in nature with subunit molecular weight and molecular mass of 29 kDa. Ethoxozolamide was identified as the most potent inhibitor based on both IC(50) values and inhibitory constant measurement (K(i)). The K(m) and V(max) for M. lylae CA (2.31 mM; 769.23 μmol/mg/min) and M. luteus CA (2.0 mM; 1,000 μmol/mg/min) were calculated from Lineweaver-Burk plots in terms of esterase activity. Enhanced thermostability of CLEAs alleviates its role in operational stability for application at an on-site scrubber. The characteristic profile of purified CA from Micrococcus spp. advocates its effective application in biomimetic CO(2) sequestration.

  7. BWR hydrogen addition for IGSCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in austenitic stainless steel piping and other components exposed to the primary coolant in boiling water reactors has become a major industry challenge. Hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) has become a very popular recommended method of slowing the propagation of IGSCC and is a desirable alternative to material replacement. Although HWC is a reasonable solution for controlling IGSCC, it is not without significant drawbacks for some plants. Carolina Power and Light's (CP and L's) Brunswick Unit 2 is one of these plants where the use of HWC for the mitigation of IGSCC could have a major impact on the current operating philosophy

  8. Level 2 PRA for a German BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassen, F.; Rapp, W.; Tietsch, W.; Roess, P.

    2007-01-01

    A concept for a Level 2 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (L2 PRA) for a German Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) has been developed taking into account the role of L2 PRA within the German regulatory landscape. According to this concept, a plant specific evaluation of the severe accident phenomenology as well as analyses of the accident progression for the severe accident scenarios has been performed. Furthermore a plant specific MELCOR 1.8.6 model has been developed and special MELCOR source term calculations have been performed for the different release paths. This paper will present examples from the different areas described above. (author)

  9. Maintenance of BWR control rod drive mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) replacement and rebuilding is one of the highest dose, most physically demanding, and complicated maintenance activities routinely accomplished by BWR utilities. A recent industry workshop sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which dealt with the effects of CRDM aging, revealed enhancements in maintenance techniques and tooling which have reduced ALARA, improved worker comfort and productivity, and have provided revised guidelines for CRDM changeout selection. Highlights of this workshop and ongoing research on CRDM aging are presented in this paper

  10. 1100 MW BWR power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Now, the start-up test of No. 2 plant in Fukushima No. 2 Nuclear Power Station is smoothly in progress, and the start of its commercial operation is scheduled at the beginning of 1984. Here, the main features of No. 2 plant including piping design are explained. For No. 2 plant, many improving measures were adopted as the base plant of the improvement and standardization project of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, such as the adoption of Mark-2 improved PCV, the adoption of an intermediate loop in the auxiliary cooling system, one-body forging of the lower end cover of the reactor pressure vessel, the adoption of many curved pipes, the adoption of large one-body structural components in reactor recirculation system piping and so on, which are related to the reduction of radiation exposure and the improvement of plant reliability in operation and regular inspection. Also, in order to do general adjustment in the arrangement of equipment and piping and in route design, and to establish the rational construction work plan, model engineering was adopted. In No. 2 plant, a remote-controlled automatic and semiautomatic ultrasonic flaw detection system was adopted to reduce radiation exposure in in-service inspection. Automatic welding was adopted to improve the quality. (Kako, I.)

  11. Valuation of power oscillations in a BWR after control rod banks withdrawal events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A. L.; Pereira, C.; Da Silva, C. A. M.; Veloso, M. A. F.

    2009-01-01

    The out-of-phase mode of oscillation is a very challenging type of instability occurring in BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) and its study is relevant because of the safety implications related to the capability to promptly detect any such inadvertent occurrence by in-core neutron detectors, thus triggering the necessary countermeasures in terms of selected rod insertion or even reactor shutdown. In this work, control rod banks (CRB) withdrawal transient was considered to study the power instability occurring in a BWR. To simulate this transient, the control rod banks were continuously removed from the BWR core in different cases. The simulation resulted in a very large increase of power. To perform the instability simulations, the RELAP5/MOD3.3 thermal hydraulic system code was coupled with the PARCS/2.4 3D neutron kinetic code. Data from a real BWR, the Peach Bottom, have been used as reference conditions and reactor parameters. The trend of the mass flow rate, pressure, coolant temperature and the void fraction to four thermal hydraulic channels symmetrically located in the core with respect to the core centre, were taken. It appears that the velocity of the rod bank withdrawal is a very important aspect for reactor stability. The slowest CRB withdrawal (180 s) did not cause power perturbation while the fast removal (20 s) triggered a slow power oscillation that little by little amplified to reach levels of more 100% of the initial power after about 210 s. The investigation of the related thermo hydraulic parameters showed that the mass flow rate, the void fraction and also the coolant temperature began to oscillate at approximately the same time interval

  12. European BWR R and D cluster for innovative passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicken, E.F.; Lensa, W. von

    1996-01-01

    The main technological innovation trends for future nuclear power plants tend towards a broader use of passive safety systems for the prevention, mitigation and managing of severe accident scenarios. Several approaches have been undertaken in a number of European countries to study and demonstrate the feasibility and charateristics of innovative passive safety systems. The European BWR R and D Cluster combines those experimental and analytical efforts that are mainly directed to the introduction of passive safety systems into boiling water reactor technology. The Cluster is grouped around thermohydraulic test facilities in Europe for the qualification of innovative BWR safety systems, also taking into account especially the operating experience of the nuclear power plant Dodewaard and other BWRs, which already incorporated some passive safety features. The background, the objectives, the structure of the project and the work programme are presented in this paper as well as an outline of the significance of the expected results. (orig.) [de

  13. Development of a BWR loading pattern design system based on modified genetic algorithms and knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-del-Campo, Cecilia; Francois, Juan Luis; Avendano, Linda; Gonzalez, Mario

    2004-01-01

    An optimization system based on Genetic Algorithms (GAs), in combination with expert knowledge coded in heuristics rules, was developed for the design of optimized boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel loading patterns. The system was coded in a computer program named Loading Pattern Optimization System based on Genetic Algorithms, in which the optimization code uses GAs to select candidate solutions, and the core simulator code CM-PRESTO to evaluate them. A multi-objective function was built to maximize the cycle energy length while satisfying power and reactivity constraints used as BWR design parameters. Heuristic rules were applied to satisfy standard fuel management recommendations as the Control Cell Core and Low Leakage loading strategies, and octant symmetry. To test the system performance, an optimized cycle was designed and compared against an actual operating cycle of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant, Unit I

  14. Fission product model for BWR analysis with improved accuracy in high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Munenari; Ando, Yoshihira

    1998-01-01

    A new fission product (FP) chain model has been studied to be used in a BWR lattice calculation. In attempting to establish the model, two requirements, i.e. the accuracy in predicting burnup reactivity and the easiness in practical application, are simultaneously considered. The resultant FP model consists of 81 explicit FP nuclides and two lumped pseudo nuclides having the absorption cross sections independent of burnup history and fuel composition. For the verification, extensive numerical tests covering over a wide range of operational conditions and fuel compositions have been carried out. The results indicate that the estimated errors in burnup reactivity are within 0.1%Δk for exposures up to 100GWd/t. It is concluded that the present model can offer a high degree of accuracy for FP representation in BWR lattice calculation. (author)

  15. Investigations on the thermal-hydraulics of a natural circulation cooled BWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, H.V.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Mudde, R.F. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-09-01

    A scaled natural circulation loop facility has been built after the Dodewaard Boiling Water Reactor, which is the only operating natural circulation cooled BWR in the world. The loop comprises one fuel assembly, a riser with a downcomer and a condenser with a cooling system. Freon-12 is used as a scaling liquid. This paper reports on the first measurements done with this facility. Quantities like the circulation flow, carry-under and the void-fraction have been measured as a function of power, pressure, liquid level, riser length, condensate temperature and friction factors. The behavior of the circulation flow can be understood by considering the driving force. Special attention has been paid to the carry-under, which has been shown to have a very important impact on the dynamics of a natural circulation cooled BWR.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrey Ioilev; Maskhud Samigulin; Vasily Ustinenko; Simon Lo; Adrian Tentner

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The goal of this project is to develop an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle under various operating conditions. This code will include more fundamental physical models than the current generation of sub-channel codes and advanced numerical algorithms for improved computational accuracy, robustness, and speed. It is highly desirable to understand the detailed two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for the analysis of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is still too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Recent progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), coupled with the rapidly increasing computational power of massively parallel computers, shows promising potential for the fine-mesh, detailed simulation of fuel assembly two-phase flow phenomena. However, the phenomenological models available in the commercial CFD programs are not as advanced as those currently being used in the sub-channel codes used in the nuclear industry. In particular, there are no models currently available which are able to reliably predict the nature of the flow regimes, and use the appropriate sub-models for those flow regimes. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD Code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. The paper describes the model development strategy which has been adopted by the development team for the

  17. BWR nuclear plant maintenance simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, I.F.

    1985-01-01

    As early as 1977, the General Electric Company, USA, Nuclear Energy Operation was making plans to construct a maintenance-type simulator to support Training and Services. The Company's pioneering experience with control room simulators started in 1968 with the Dresden simulator and showed clearly the benefits of having such facilities for training, checkout of procedures and, in the case of maintenance, match-up of equipment or tools as needed. Since the dedication of the facility, it has proved to be an invaluable resource in the training of refuelling and servicing crews. The facility has also been extensively used as developmental and test facility for in-vessel servicing equipment and procedures. (author)

  18. Long-term Stabilization of Disturbed Slopes Resulting from Construction Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Highway construction disturbs soil, which must be stabilized to prevent migration of soil particles into water bodies. Stabilization is enforced by law, regulation, and a permit system. Stabilization is most efficiently attained by reestablishment of...

  19. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  20. Phenomenology of BWR fuel assembly degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Masaki; Barrachin, Marc; Haste, Tim; Steinbrueck, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) which required an immediate re-examination of fuel degradation phenomenology. The present paper reviews the updated knowledge on the phenomenology of the fuel degradation, focusing mainly on the BWR fuel assembly degradation at the macroscopic scale and that of the individual interactions at the meso-scale. Oxidation of boron carbide (B4C) control rods potentially generates far larger amounts of heat and hydrogen under BWR accident conditions. All integral tests with B4C control rods or control blades have shown early failure, liquefaction, relocation and oxidation of B4C starting at temperatures around 1250 °C, well below the significant interaction temperatures of UO2-Zry. These interactions or reactions potentially influence the progress of fuel degradation in the early phase. The steam-starved conditions, which are being discussed as a likely scenario at the FDNPS accident, highly influence the individual interactions and potentially lead the fuel degradation in non-prototypical directions. The detailed phenomenology of individual interactions and their influence on the transient and on the late phase of the severe accidents are also discussed.

  1. BWR normal water chemistry guidelines: 1986 revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) have experienced stress corrosion cracking in the reactor cooling system piping resulting in adverse impacts on plant availability and personnel radiation exposure. The BWR Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major research and development program to provide remedies for this stress corrosion cracking problem. This work shows that the likelihood of cracking depends on the plant's water chemistry performance (environment) as well as on material condition and stress level. Plant experience and other research demonstrate that water quality also affects fuel performance and radiation field buildup in BWRs. This report,''BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1986 Revision,'' presents suggested generic water chemistry specifications, justifies the proposed water chemistry limits, suggests responses to out-of-specification water chemistry, discusses available chemical analysis methods as well as data management and surveillance schemes, and details the management philosophy required to successfully implement a water chemistry control program. An appendix contains recommendations for water quality of auxiliary systems. 73 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs

  2. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, G. Ivan; Christenson, John M.; Renier, J.P.; Marcille, T.F.; Casal, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs). A top-level objective of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis program element of the DOE NERI program is to investigate spent fuel treatment and recycling options for current light water reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, this project targets to expand the traditional scope of nuclear fuel management optimization into the following two complementary specific objectives: (1) To develop a direct coupling between the pin-by-pin within-bundle loading control variables and core-wide (bundle-by-bundle) optimization objectives, (2) to extend the methodology developed to explicitly encompass control variables, objectives, and constraints designed to maximize minor actinide incineration in BWR bundles and cycles. The first specific objective is projected to 'uncover' dormant thermal margin made available by employing additional degrees of freedom within the optimization process, while the addition of minor actinides is expected to 'consume' some of the uncovered thermal margin. Therefore, a key underlying goal of this project is to effectively invest some of the uncovered thermal margin into achieving the primary objective.

  3. Recent BWR fuel management reactor physics advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, R.L.; Congdon, S.P.; Crawford, B.W.; Kang, C.M.; Martin, C.L.; Reese, A.P.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Welchly, R.

    1982-01-01

    Improvements in BWR fuel management have been under development to reduce uranium and separative work (SWU) requirements and reduce fuel cycle costs, while also maintaining maximal capacity factors and high fuel reliability. Improved reactor physics methods are playing an increasingly important role in making such advances feasible. The improved design, process computer and analysis methods both increase knowledge of the thermal margins which are available to implement fuel management advance, and improve the capability to reliably and efficiently analyze and design for fuel management advances. Gamma scan measurements of the power distributions of advanced fuel assembly and advanced reactor core designs, and improved in-core instruments also are important contributors to improving 3-d predictive methods and to increasing thermal margins. This paper is an overview of the recent advances in BWR reactor physics fuel management methods, coupled with fuel management and core design advances. The reactor physics measurements which are required to confirm the predictions of performance fo fuel management advances also are summarized

  4. CECP, Decommissioning Costs for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Cost Estimating Computer Program CECP, designed for use on an IBM personal computer or equivalent, was developed for estimating the cost of decommissioning boiling water reactor (BWR) and light-water reactor (PWR) power stations to the point of license termination. 2 - Method of solution: Cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial volume and costs; and manpower staffing costs. Using equipment and consumables costs and inventory data supplied by the user, CECP calculates unit cost factors and then combines these factors with transportation and burial cost algorithms to produce a complete report of decommissioning costs. In addition to costs, CECP also calculates person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is designed for a specific waste charge structure. The waste cost data structure cannot handle intermediate waste handlers or changes in the charge rate structures. The decommissioning of a reactor can be divided into 5 periods. 200 different items for special equipment costs are possible. The maximum amount for each special equipment item is 99,999,999$. You can support data for 10 buildings, 100 components each; ESTS1071/01: There are 65 components for 28 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (BWR). ESTS1071/02: There are 75 components for 25 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (PWR)

  5. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C.; Arai, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  6. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Arai, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  7. Core followup studies of the Tarapur Reactors with the three dimensional BWR simulator COMTEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, S. R.; Jagannathan, V.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Srinivasan, K. R.; Rastogi, B. P.

    1976-07-01

    Both the units of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station started operation in the year 1969. Since then, these units have completed three cycles. For efficient operation and fuel management of these reactors, a three dimensional BWR simulator COMETG has been developed. The reactors are closely being followed using the simulator. The detailed analyses for cycle 3/4 operation of both the units are described in the paper. The results show very good agreement between calculated and measured values. It is concluded that reactor core behaviour could be predicted in a satisfactory manner with the core simulator COMETG.

  8. Stability of operational taxonomic units: an important but neglected property for analyzing microbial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Caporaso, J Gregory; Jiang, Xiao-Tao; Sheng, Hua-Fang; Huse, Susan M; Rideout, Jai Ram; Edgar, Robert C; Kopylova, Evguenia; Walters, William A; Knight, Rob; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The operational taxonomic unit (OTU) is widely used in microbial ecology. Reproducibility in microbial ecology research depends on the reliability of OTU-based 16S ribosomal subunit RNA (rRNA) analyses. Here, we report that many hierarchical and greedy clustering methods produce unstable OTUs, with membership that depends on the number of sequences clustered. If OTUs are regenerated with additional sequences or samples, sequences originally assigned to a given OTU can be split into different OTUs. Alternatively, sequences assigned to different OTUs can be merged into a single OTU. This OTU instability affects alpha-diversity analyses such as rarefaction curves, beta-diversity analyses such as distance-based ordination (for example, Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA)), and the identification of differentially represented OTUs. Our results show that the proportion of unstable OTUs varies for different clustering methods. We found that the closed-reference method is the only one that produces completely stable OTUs, with the caveat that sequences that do not match a pre-existing reference sequence collection are discarded. As a compromise to the factors listed above, we propose using an open-reference method to enhance OTU stability. This type of method clusters sequences against a database and includes unmatched sequences by clustering them via a relatively stable de novo clustering method. OTU stability is an important consideration when analyzing microbial diversity and is a feature that should be taken into account during the development of novel OTU clustering methods.

  9. Dose rate reduction method for NMCA applied BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Aizawa, Motohiro; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Varela, Juan; Caine, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    results showed that the Co-60 amount on the coupon with Pt was about 40 % smaller than on the coupon without Pt at 500 hours under no hydrogen peroxide addition case. Hydrogen peroxide had a tendency to accelerate the Co-60 deposition even under low concentration of below 5 ppb. Nevertheless, the presence of Pt on a surface caused a reduction of about 50% in the Co-60 deposition. The above results suggest that recontamination after chemical decontamination is reduced by the presence Pt on these surfaces. This idea is consistent with in-plant tests. In these tests coupons pre-filmed under the NWC conditions were set in a plant's MMS (Mitigation Monitoring System) along with coupons that had been treated by the HOP method. Both of these coupons were inserted on the MMS just before OLNC applications were performed in two BWR plants; Cooper and River Bend. These coupons were removed from the MMS after about 7 months from the installation. Co-60 on the coupon surfaces were dissolved and quantified. Though the absolute value of Co-60 amount was not equal in the coupons from the two plants, in both sets of coupons the amount of Co-60 on the decontaminated coupons was about half of the Co-60 measured on the pre-filmed coupons. These results indicate that the presence of platinum before an oxide layer is generated reduces the amount of Co-60 incorporation. The Co deposition coefficient calculated from the Co-60 amounts of the decontaminated coupons, Co-60 concentration in the reactor water and the deposition term was very small compared to that calculated from many plants data. The combination of chemical decontamination followed by the Pt deposition before operation and Zn injection under HWC condition was considered to be effective method to accomplish the low BRAC dose rate in NMCA applied BWR plants based on the laboratory experiments and in-plant tests. (authors)

  10. Residual stress analysis in BWR pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Leung, C.P.; Pont, D.

    1992-06-01

    Residual stresses from welding processes can be the primary driving force for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR components. Thus, a better understanding of the causes and nature of these residual stresses can help assess and remedy SCC. Numerical welding simulation software, such as SYSWELD, and material property data have been used to quantify residual stresses for application to SCC assessments in BWR components. Furthermore, parametric studies using SYSWELD have revealed which variables significantly affect predicted residual stress. Overall, numerical modeling techniques can be used to evaluate residual stress for SCC assessments of BWR components and to identify and plan future SCC research

  11. Stability of Switched Feedback Time-Varying Dynamic Systems Based on the Properties of the Gap Metric for Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. De la Sen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The stabilization of dynamic switched control systems is focused on and based on an operator-based formulation. It is assumed that the controlled object and the controller are described by sequences of closed operator pairs (L,C on a Hilbert space H of the input and output spaces and it is related to the existence of the inverse of the resulting input-output operator being admissible and bounded. The technical mechanism addressed to get the results is the appropriate use of the fact that closed operators being sufficiently close to bounded operators, in terms of the gap metric, are also bounded. That philosophy is followed for the operators describing the input-output relations in switched feedback control systems so as to guarantee the closed-loop stabilization.

  12. Product Evaluation Task Force Phase Two report for BWR/PWR dissolver wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed that all Intermediate Level Wastes arising at Sellafield should be encapsulated prior to ultimate disposal. The Product Evaluation Task Force (PETF) was set up to investigate possible encapsulants and to produce an adequate data base to justify the preferred matrices. This report details the work carried out, under Phase 2 of the Product Evaluation Task Force programme, on BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes. Three possible types of encapsulants for BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes:- Inorganic cements, Polymer cements and Polymers are evaluated using the Kepner Tregoe decision analysis technique. This technique provides a methodology for scoring and ranking alternative options and evaluating any risks associated with an option. The analysis shows that for all four stages of waste management operations ie Storage, Transport, handling and emplacement, Disposal and Process, cement matrices are considerably superior to other potential matrices. A matrix, consisting of three parts Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) to one part Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), is recommended for Phase 3 studies on BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes. (author)

  13. BWR control rod drive scram pilot valve monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soden, R.A.; Kelly, V.

    1984-01-01

    The control rod drive system in a Boiling Water Reactor is the most important safety system in the power plant. All components of the system can be verified except the solenoid operated, scram pilot valves without scramming a rod. The pilot valve mechancial works is the weak link to the control rod drive system. These pilot valves control the hydraulic system which applies pressure to the ''insert'' side of the control rod piston and vents the ''withdraw'' side of the piston causing the rods to insert during a scam. The only verification that the valve is operating properly is to scram the rod. The concern for this portion of the system is demonstrated by the high number of redundant components and complete periodic testing of the electrical circuits. The pilot valve can become hung-up through wear, fracture of internal components, mechanical binding, foreign material or chemicals left in the valve during maintenance, etc. If the valve becomes hung-up the electrical tests performed will not indicate this condition and scramming the rod is in jeopardy. Only an attempt to scram a rod will indicate the hung-up valve. While this condition exists the rod is considered inoperative. This paper describes a system developed at a nuclear power plant that monitors the pilot valves on the control rod drive system. This system utilizes pattern recognition to assure proper internal workings of the scram pilot valves to plant operators. The system is totally automatic such that each time the valve is operated on a ''half scram'', a printout is available to the operator along with light indication that each of the 370 valves (on one unit of a BWR) is operating properly. With this monitoring system installed, all components of the control rod drive system including the solenoid pilot valves can be verified as operational without scramming any rods

  14. BWR control rod drive scram pilot valve monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soden, R.A.; Kelly, V.

    1986-01-01

    The control rod drive system in a Boiling Water Reactor is the most important safety system in the power plant. All components of the system can be verified except the solenoid operated, scram pilot valves without scramming a rod. The pilot valve mechanical works is the weak link to the control rod drive system. These pilot valves control the hydraulic system which applies pressure to the insert side of the control rod piston and vents the withdraw side of the piston causing the rods to insert during a scram. The only verification that the valve is operating properly is to scram the rod. The concern for this portion of the system is demonstrated by the high number of redundant components and complete periodic testing of the electrical circuits. The pilot valve can become hung-up through wear, fracture of internal components, mechanical binding, foreign material or chemicals left in the valve during maintenance, etc. If the valve becomes hung-up the electrical tests performed will not indicate this condition and scramming the rod is in jeopardy. Only an attempt to scram a rod will indicate the hung-up valve. While this condition exists the rod is considered inoperative. This paper describes a system developed at a nuclear power plant that monitors the pilot valves on the control rod drive system. This system utilizes pattern recognition to assure proper internal workings of the scram pilot valves to plant operators. The system is totally automatic such that each time the valve is operated on a half scram, a printout is available to the operator along with light indication that each of the 370 valves (on one unit of a BWR) is operating properly. With this monitoring system installed, all components of the control rod drive system including the solenoid pilot valves can be verified as operational without scramming any rods

  15. A non-linear reduced order methodology applicable to boiling water reactor stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prill, Dennis Paul

    2013-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic coupling between power, flow rate and density, intensified by neutronics feedback are the main drivers of boiling water reactor (BWR) stability behavior. High-power low-flow conditions in connection with unfavorable power distributions can lead the BWR system into unstable regions where power oscillations can be triggered. This important threat to operational safety requires careful analysis for proper understanding. Analyzing an exhaustive parameter space of the non-linear BWR system becomes feasible with methodologies based on reduced order models (ROMs), saving computational cost and improving the physical understanding. Presently within reactor dynamics, no general and automatic prediction of high-dimensional ROMs based on detailed BWR models are available. In this thesis a systematic self-contained model order reduction (MOR) technique is derived which is applicable for several classes of dynamical problems, and in particular to BWRs of any degree of details. Expert knowledge can be given by operational, experimental or numerical transient data and is transfered into an optimal basis function representation. The methodology is mostly automated and provides the framework for the reduction of various different systems of any level of complexity. Only little effort is necessary to attain a reduced version within this self-written code which is based on coupling of sophisticated commercial software. The methodology reduces a complex system in a grid-free manner to a small system able to capture even non-linear dynamics. It is based on an optimal choice of basis functions given by the so-called proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Required steps to achieve reliable and numerical stable ROM are given by a distinct calibration road-map. In validation and verification steps, a wide spectrum of representative test examples is systematically studied regarding a later BWR application. The first example is non-linear and has a dispersive character

  16. ECP measurements in the BWR-1 water loop relative to water composition changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kus, P.; Vsolak, R.; Kysela, J., E-mail: ksp@ujv.cz [Nuclear Research Inst. Rez plc, Husinec - Rez (Czech Republic); Hanawa, S.; Nakamura, T.; Uchida, S., E-mail: hanawa.satoshi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the usage of ECP sensors in nuclear power plants. ECP sensors were tested using the LVR-15 reactor at the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (NRI) in the Czech Republic. The experiment took place on the BWR-1 loop, which was designed for investigating the behaviour of structural materials and radioactivity transport under BWR conditions. The BWR-1 loop facilitates irradiation experiments within a wide range of operating parameters (max. pressure of 10 MPa, max. temperature of 573 K and a neutron flux of 1.0* 10{sup 18} n/m{sup 2}s). This study involves the measurement of electrochemical potential (ECP). Corrosion potential is the main parameter for monitoring of water composition changes in nuclear power plants (NPP). The electrochemical potentials of stainless steel were measured under high temperatures in a test loop (BWR-1) under different water composition conditions. Total neutron flux was ∼10{sup -3} to ∼10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}s (>0.1 MeV) at a temperature of 560K, neutral pH, and water resistivity of 18.2 MOhm. ECP sensor response related to changes in water composition was monitored. Switching from NWC (normal water conditions) to HWC (hydrogen water conditions) was controlled using oxygen dosage. Water chemistry was monitored approx. 50 meters from the active channel. The active channel temperature was maintained within a range of 543 - 561 K from the start of irradiation for the entire duration of the experiment. A total of 24 reference electrodes composed of platinum (Pt), silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) and a zircon membrane containing silver oxide (Ag{sub 2}O) powder were installed inside the active channel of the LVR-15 test reactor. The active channel (Field tube) was divided into four zones, with each zone containing six sensors. A mathematical radiolysis code model was created in cooperation with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  17. Stability of ideal MHD configurations. I. Realizing the generality of the G operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppens, R.; Demaerel, T.

    2016-12-01

    A field theoretical approach, applied to the time-reversible system described by the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, exposes the full generality of MHD spectral theory. MHD spectral theory, which classified waves and instabilities of static or stationary, usually axisymmetric or translationally symmetric configurations, actually governs the stability of flowing, (self-)gravitating, single fluid descriptions of nonlinear, time-dependent idealized plasmas, and this at any time during their nonlinear evolution. At the core of this theory is a self-adjoint operator G , discovered by Frieman and Rotenberg [Rev. Mod. Phys. 32, 898 (1960)] in its application to stationary (i.e., time-independent) plasma states. This Frieman-Rotenberg operator dictates the acceleration identified by a Lagrangian displacement field ξ , which connects two ideal MHD states in four-dimensional space-time that share initial conditions for density, entropy, and magnetic field. The governing equation reads /d 2 ξ d t 2 = G [ ξ ] , as first noted by Cotsaftis and Newcomb [Nucl. Fusion, Suppl. Part 2, 447 and 451 (1962)]. The time derivatives at left are to be taken in the Lagrangian way, i.e., moving with the flow v. Physically realizable displacements must have finite energy, corresponding to being square integrable in the Hilbert space of displacements equipped with an inner product rule, for which the G operator is self-adjoint. The acceleration in the left-hand side features the Doppler-Coriolis operator v . ∇ , which is known to become an antisymmetric operator when restricting attention to stationary equilibria. Here, we present all derivations needed to get to these insights and connect results throughout the literature. A first illustration elucidates what can happen when self-gravity is incorporated and presents aspects that have been overlooked even in simple uniform media. Ideal MHD flows, as well as Euler flows, have essentially 6 + 1 wave types, where the 6 wave modes

  18. Performance, stability and operation voltage optimization of screen-printed aqueous supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtimäki, Suvi; Railanmaa, Anna; Keskinen, Jari; Kujala, Manu; Tuukkanen, Sampo; Lupo, Donald

    2017-04-06

    Harvesting micropower energy from the ambient environment requires an intermediate energy storage, for which printed aqueous supercapacitors are well suited due to their low cost and environmental friendliness. In this work, a systematic study of a large set of devices is used to investigate the effect of process variability and operating voltage on the performance and stability of screen printed aqueous supercapacitors. The current collectors and active layers are printed with graphite and activated carbon inks, respectively, and aqueous NaCl used as the electrolyte. The devices are characterized through galvanostatic discharge measurements for quantitative determination of capacitance and equivalent series resistance (ESR), as well as impedance spectroscopy for a detailed study of the factors contributing to ESR. The capacitances are 200-360 mF and the ESRs 7.9-12.7 Ω, depending on the layer thicknesses. The ESR is found to be dominated by the resistance of the graphite current collectors and is compatible with applications in low-power distributed electronics. The effects of different operating voltages on the capacitance, leakage and aging rate of the supercapacitors are tested, and 1.0 V found to be the optimal choice for using the devices in energy harvesting applications.

  19. On Stability of Open-Loop Operation without Rotor Information for Brushless DC Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Open-loop operation mode is often used to control the Brushless DC Motors (BLDCMs without rotor position sensors when the back electromotive force (EMF is too weak due to the very low rotor velocity. The rotor position information is not necessary in this mode and the stator windings are supplied with voltages under a certain ratio of the amplitude to the frequency. However, the rotor synchronization will be destroyed once if the commutation instant is inappropriate. In order to improve the reliability of the open-loop operation mode, a dynamic equation is established to represent the synchronization error between the rotor and the stator. Thereafter, the stability of the open-loop control mode is analyzed by using Lyapunov indirect method. Theoretical analysis indicates that the open-loop control mode is asymptotically stable only when the commutation instant of the stator current lags behind the ideal one suitably. Finally, theoretical analysis is verified through the experimental results of a certain BLDCM.

  20. Experience and development of on-line BWR surveillance system at Onagawa nuclear power station unit-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, A.; Chiba, K.; Kato, K.; Ebata, S.; Ando, Y.; Sakamoto, H.

    1986-01-01

    ONAGAWA nuclear power station Unit-1 (Tohoku Electric Power Co.) is a BWR-4 nuclear power station of 524 MW electric power which started commercial operation in June 1984. To attain high reliability and applicability for ONAGAWA-1, Tohoku Electric Power Co. and Toshiba started a Research and Development project on plant surveillance and diagnosis from April 1982. Main purposes of this project are to: (1) Develop an on-line surveillance system and acquire its operating experience at a commercial BWR, (2) Assist in plant operation and maintenance by data acquisition and analysis, (3) Develop a new technique for plant surveillance and diagnosis. An outline of the project, operating experience gained from the on-line surveillance system and an introduction to new diagnosis techniques are reported in this paper. (author)

  1. Pressure vessel for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the retention of low temperature water and also prevent the thermal fatigue of the pressure vessel by making large the curvature radius of a pressure vessel of a feed water sparger fitting portion and accelerating the mixing of low-temperature water at the feed water sparger base and in-pile hot water. Constitution: The curvature radius of the corner of the feed water sparger fitting portion in a pressure vessel is formed largely. In-pile circulating water infiltrates up to the base portion of the feed water sparger to carry outside low-temperature water at the base part, which is mixed with in-pile hot water. Accordingly, low temperature water does not stay at the base portion of the feed water sparger and generation of thermal fatigue in the pressure vessel can be prevented and the safety of the BWR type reactor can be improved. (Yoshino, Y.)

  2. BWR plant advanced central control panel PODIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Neda, T.; Suto, O.; Takamiya, S.

    1983-01-01

    BWR plant central control panels have become more and more enlarged and complicated recently due to the magnification of the scale of a plant and the requirement to reinforce safety. So, it is important to make communication between men and the complicated central control panel smooth. Toshiba has developed an advanced central control panel, named PODIA, which uses many computers and color CRTs, and PODIA is now in the stage of application to practical plants. In this article, the writers first touch upon control functions transition in the central control room, the PODIA position concerning the world-wide trend in this technology phase and the human engineering on the design. Then they present concrete design concepts for the control board and computer system which constitute PODIA

  3. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.E.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Chen, J.C.; Lappa, D.A.; Chuang, T.Y.; Murray, R.C.; Johnson, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The simplified seismic risk methodology developed in the USNRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant (PWR). The simplified seismic risk methodology was developed to reduce the costs associated with a seismic risk analysis while providing adequate results. A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models, was developed and used in assessing the seismic risk of the Zion nuclear power plant (FSAR). The simplified seismic risk methodology was applied to the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant, a BWR; to further demonstrate its applicability, and if possible, to provide a basis for comparing the seismic risk from PWRs and BWRs. (orig./HP)

  4. Manufacturing technology and process for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    Following recent advanced technologies, processes and requests of the design changes of BWR fuel, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) has upgraded the manufacturing technology and honed its own skills to complete its brand-new automated facility in Tokai in the latter half of 1980's. The plant uses various forms of automation throughout the manufacturing process: the acceptance of uranium dioxide powder, pelletizing, fuel rod assembling, fuel bundle assembling and shipment. All processes are well computerized and linked together to establish the integrated control system with three levels of Production and Quality Control, Process Control and Process Automation. This multi-level system plays an important role in the quality assurance system which generates the highest quality of fuels and other benefits. (author)

  5. Facility of BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Mitsuji

    1998-01-01

    A condensate filtering device for cleaning condensate flown from a low pressure turbine and a condensate desalting device are connected by way of a condensate pipeline. Control rod drives (CRD) are disposed to the lower portion of BWR. A CRD pump and one end of a CRD feedwater pipeline are connected in series to the upstream of CRD. The other end of the CRD feedwater pipeline is connected to a CRD water taking pipeline branched from the condensate pipeline. Water is taken to the CRD from downstream of the condensate filtering device and upstream of a connecting portion between a low pressure heater drain pipeline and the condensate pipeline. Flow of impurities leached out of the condensate desalting device to the reactor can be suppressed, and rising of temperature of CRD water by the low pressure heater drain water is prevented. In addition, flowing of dissolved oxygen to the CRD system can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  6. Crud separation from equipment drain of BWR atomic power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Hisashi; Moriya, Yasuhiro; Koshiba, Yukihiko; Ota, Yoshiharu.

    1977-01-01

    In the primary cooling systems of BWR nuclear power stations, radioactive crud is generated and accumulates in reactors and circulating systems, which causes the radiation exposure of workers at the time of the inspection and maintenance of reactors. The chemical composition and grain size distribution of crud differ largely according to the construction of primary systems, the operational conditions of reactors, and the process of operation. The study on the application of nuclear pore membrane filter NPMF to the separation of crud in the waste water from equipment drain systems has been carried out. With the NPMF, clarified filtrate can be obtained without any filter aid, therefore the secondary waste of filter sludge is not generated. When the filter is clogged, the filtration capability can be regenerated by reverse flow washing, and continuous filtration is possible actually because the regeneration takes only short time. The NPMF is the polycarbonate membrane of about 10 μm thick, to which charged particles are irradiated vertically, and the flight tracks are etched with alkali solution, thus the required pore treatment is applied. The basic investigation of waste liquid, the endurance test of actual filters, the filtration test with the pilot apparatus, the demonstration test with an actual equipment, and the design of the actual equipment have been carried out for three years. (Kako, I.)

  7. Development of power change maneuvering method for BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzaki, Takaharu; Yamada, Naoyuki; Kiguchi, Takashi; Sakurai, Mikio.

    1985-01-01

    A power change maneuvering method for BWR has been proposed to generate an optimal power control maneuver, which realizes the power change operation closest to a power change demand pattern under operating constraints. The method searches for the maneuver as an optimization problem, where the variables are thermal power levels sampled from the demand pattern, the performance index is defined to express the power mismatch between demand and feasible patterns, and the constraints are limit lines on the thermal power-core flow rate map and limits on keeping fuel integrity. The usable feasible direction method is utilized as the optimization algorithm, with newly developed techniques for initial value generation and step length determination, which apply one-dimensional search and inverse-interpolation methods, respectively, to realize the effective search of the optimal solution. Simulation results show that a typical computing time is about 5 min by a general purpose computer and the method has been verified to be practical even for on-line use. (author)

  8. Artificial intelligence applied to fuel management in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz S, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work two techniques of artificial intelligence, neural networks and genetic algorithms were applied to a practical problem of nuclear fuel management; the determination of the optimal fuel reload for a BWR type reactor. This is an important problem in the design of the operation cycle of the reactor. As a result of the application of these techniques, comparable or even better reloads proposals than those given by expert companies in the subject were obtained. Additionally, two other simpler problems in reactor physics were solved: the determination of the axial power profile and the prediction of the value of some variables of interest at the end of the operation cycle of the reactor. Neural networks and genetic algorithms have been applied to solve many problems of engineering because of their versatility but they have been rarely used in the area of fuel management. The results obtained in this thesis indicates the convenience of undertaking further work on this area and suggest the application of these techniques of artificial intelligence to the solution of other problems in nuclear reactor physics. (Author)

  9. Beta and gamma dose calculations for PWR and BWR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, D.B.

    1989-07-01

    Analyses of gamma and beta dose in selected regions in PWR and BWR containment buildings have been performed for a range of fission product releases from selected severe accidents. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that safety-related equipment could experience during the selected severe accident sequences. The resulting dose calculations demonstrate the extent to which design basis accident qualified equipment could also be qualified for the severe accident environments. Surry was chosen as the representative PWR plant while Peach Bottom was selected to represent BWRs. Battelle Columbus Laboratory performed the source term release analyses. The AB epsilon scenario (an intermediate to large LOCA with failure to recover onsite or offsite electrical power) was selected as the base case Surry accident, and the AE scenario (a large break LOCA with one initiating event and a combination of failures in two emergency cooling systems) was selected as the base case Peach Bottom accident. Radionuclide release was bounded for both scenarios by including spray operation and arrested sequences as variations of the base scenarios. Sandia National Laboratories used the source terms to calculate dose to selected containment regions. Scenarios with sprays operational resulted in a total dose comparable to that (2.20 x 10 8 rads) used in current equipment qualification testing. The base case scenarios resulted in some calculated doses roughly an order of magnitude above the current 2.20 x 10 8 rad equipment qualification test region. 8 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs

  10. Two-loop feed water control system in BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Takashi; Watanabe, Takao; Hirose, Masao.

    1982-01-01

    In the process of the start-up and shutdown of BWR plants, the operation of changing over feed pumps corresponding to plant output is performed. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the automatic changeover system for feed pumps, which minimizes the variation of water level in reactors and is easy to operate. The three-element control system with the water level in reactors, the flow rate of main steam and the flow rate of feed water as the input is mainly applied, but long time is required for the changeover of feed pumps. The two-loop feed control system can control simultaneously two pumps being changed over, therefore it is suitable to the automatic changeover control system for feed pumps. Also it is excellent for the control of the recirculating valves of feed pumps. The control characteristics of the two-loop feed water control system against the external disturbance which causes the variation of water level in reactors were examined. The results of analysis by simulation are reported. The features of the two-loop feed water control system, the method of simulation and the evaluation of the two-loop feed water control system are described. Its connection with a digital feed water recirculation control system is expected. (Kako, I.)

  11. The design and use of proficiency based BWR reactor maintenance and refuelling training mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the ABB experience with the design and use of boiling water reactor training facilities. The training programs were developed and implemented in cooperation with the nuclear utilities. ABB operates two facilities, the ABB ATOM Light Water Reactor Service Center located in Vasteras, Sweden, and the ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations BWR Training Center located in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA. The focus of the training centers are reactor maintenance and refueling activities plus the capability to develop and qualify tools, procedures and repair techniques

  12. Logical model for the control of a BWR turbine;Modelo logico para el control de una turbina de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas O, Y. [Universidad del Valle de Mexico, Campus Toluca, Av. Las Palmas No. 136, Col. San Jorge Pueblo Nuevo, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R., E-mail: yonaeton@hotmail.co [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    In this work a design of a logical model is presented for the turbine control of a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model is sought to implement later on inside the thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The logical model is developed for the control and protection of the turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control will be been able to use for one or several turbines in series. The quality of the present design of the logical model of the turbine control is that it considers the most important parameters in the operation of a turbine, besides that they have incorporated to the logical model the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a detailed model. The development of the logical model of a turbine will be of utility in the short and medium term to carry out analysis on the turbine operation with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction, specific steps of the turbine to feed other equipment s, in addition to analyze the separate and the integrated effect. (Author)

  13. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    A recently completed Oak Ridge effort proposes two management strategies for mitigation of the events that might occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage in a BWR severe accident. While the probability of such an accident is low, there may be effective yet inexpensive mitigation measures that could be implemented employing the existing plant equipment and requiring only additions to the plant emergency procedures. In this spirit, accident management strategies have been proposed for use of a borated solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and for containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if injection systems cannot be restored. The proposed strategy for poisoning of the water used for vessel reflood should injection systems be restored after control blade damage has occurred has great promise, using only the existing plant equipment but employing a different chemical form for the boron poison. The dominant BWR severe accident sequence is Station Blackout and without means for mechanical stirring or heating of the storage tank, the question of being able to form the poisoned solution under accident conditions becomes of supreme importance. On the other hand, the proposed strategy for drywell flooding to cool the reactor vessel bottom head and prevent the core and structure debris from escaping to the drywell holds less promise. This strategy does, however, have potential for future plant designs in which passive methods might be employed to completely submerge the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions without the need for containment venting

  14. Seismic PRA of a BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masahide; Fujimoto, Haruo

    2014-01-01

    Since the occurrence of nuclear power plant accidents in the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power station, the regulatory framework on severe accident (SA) has been discussed in Japan. The basic concept is to typify and identify the accident sequences leading to core/primary containment vessel (PCV) damage and to implement SA measures covering internal and external events extensively. As Japan is an earthquake-prone country and earthquakes and tsunami are important natural external events for nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, JNES performed the seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) on a typical nuclear power plant and evaluated the dominant accident sequences leading to core/PCV damage to discuss dominant scenarios of severe accident (SA). The analytical models and the results of level-1 seismic PRA on a 1,100 MWe BWR-5 plant are shown here. Seismic PRA was performed for a typical BWR5 plant. Initiating events with large contribution to core damage frequency are the loss of all AC powers (station blackout) and the large LOCA. The top of dominant accident sequences is the simultaneous occurrence of station blackout and large LOCA. Important components to core damage frequency are electric power supply equipment. It needs to keep in mind that the results are influenced on site geologic characteristic to a greater or lesser. In the process of analysis, issues such as conservative assumptions related to damages of building or structure and success criteria for excessive LOCA are left to be resolved. These issues will be further studied including thermal hydric analysis in the future. (authors)

  15. BWR startup and shutdown activity transport control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.E., E-mail: sgarcia@epri.com [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, A.J., E-mail: jgiannelli@finetech.com, E-mail: ajarvis@finetech.com [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, New Jersey (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper summarizes BWR industry experience on good practices for controlling the transport of corrosion product activity during shutdowns, particularly refueling outages, and for startup chemistry control to minimize IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking). For shutdown, overall goals are to minimize adverse impacts of crud bursts and the time required to remove activated corrosion products from the reactor coolant during the shutdown process prior to refueling, and to assist plants in predicting and controlling radiation exposure during outages. For startup, the overall goals are to highlight conditions during early heatup and startup when sources of reactor coolant oxidants are high, when there is a greater likelihood for chemical excursions associated with refueling outage work activities, and when hydrogen injection is not available to mitigate IGSCC due to system design limitations. BWR water chemistry has changed significantly in recent years with the adoption of hydrogen water chemistry, zinc addition and noble metal chemical applications. These processes have, in some instances, resulted in significant activity increases during shutdown evolutions, which together with reduced time for cleanup because of shorter outages, has consequently increased outage radiation exposure. A review several recent outages shows that adverse effects from these conditions can be minimized, leading to the set of good practice recommendations for shutdown chemistry control. Most plants lose the majority of their hydrogen availability hours during early startup because feedwater hydrogen injection systems were not originally designed to inject hydrogen below 20% power. Hydrogen availability has improved through modifications to inject hydrogen at lower power levels, some near 5%. However, data indicate that IGSCC is accelerated during early startup, when dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide levels are high and reactor coolant temperatures are in the 300 to 400 {sup o

  16. Potential effects of desalinated water quality on the operation stability of wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Beni; Cochva, Malka; Lahav, Ori

    2009-03-15

    Desalinated water is expected to become the major source of drinking water in many places in the near future, and thus the major source of wastewater to arrive at wastewater treatment plants. The paper examines the effect of the alkalinity value with which the water is released from the desalination plant on the alkalinity value that would develop within the wastewater treatment process under various nitrification-denitrification operational scenarios. The main hypothesis was that the difference in the alkalinity value between tap water and domestic wastewater is almost exclusively a result of the hydrolysis of urea (NH(2)CONH(2), excreted in the human urine) to ammonia (NH(3)), regardless of the question what fraction of NH(3(aq)) is transformed to NH(4)(+). Results from a field study show that the ratio between the alkalinity added to tap water when raw wastewater is formed (in meq/l units) and the TAN (total ammonia nitrogen, mole/l) concentration in the raw wastewater is almost 1:1 in purely domestic sewage and close to 1:1 in domestic wastewater streams mixed with light industry wastewaters. Having established the relationship between TAN and total alkalinity in raw wastewater the paper examines three theoretical nitrification-denitrification treatment scenarios in the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The conclusion is that if low-alkalinity desalinated water constitutes the major water source arriving at the WWTP, external alkalinity will have to be added in order to avoid pH drop and maintain process stability. The results lead to the conclusion that supplying desalinated water with a high alkalinity value (e.g. > or =100 mg/l as CaCO(3)) would likely prevent the need to add costly basic chemicals in the WWTP, while, in addition, it would improve the chemical and biological stability of the drinking water in the distribution system.

  17. PWR and BWR light water reactor systems in the USA and their fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    Light water reactor operating experience in the USA can be considered to date from the choice of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) for use in the naval reactor program and the subsequent construction and operation of the nuclear power plant at Shippingport, Pennsylvania in 1957. The development of the boiling water reactor (BWR) in 1954 and its selection for the plant at Dresden, Illinois in 1959 established this concept as the other major reactor type in the US nuclear power program. The subsequent growth profile is presented, leading to 31 PWR's and 23 BWR's currently in operation as well as to plants in the planning and construction phase. A significant operating record has been accumulated concerning the availability of each of these reactor types as determined by: (1) outage for refueling, (2) component reliability, (3) maintenance requirements, and (4) retrofitting required by government regulation. In addition, the use and performance of BWR's and PWR's in meeting system load requirements is discussed. The growing concern regarding possible terrorist activities and other potential threats has resulted in systems and procedures designed to assure effective safeguards at nuclear power installations. Safeguards measures currently in place are described. Environmental effects of operating plants are subject to both radiological and non-radiological monitoring to verify that results are within the limits established in the licensing process. The operating results achieved and the types of modifications that have been required of operating plants by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are reviewed. The PWR and BWR Fuel Cycle is examined in terms of: (1) fuel burnup experience and prospects for improvement, (2) the status and outlook for natural uranium resources, (3) enrichment capacity, (4) reprocessing and recycle, and the interrelationships among the latter three factors. High level waste management currently involving on-site storage of spent fuel is discussed

  18. Chemistry in water reactors: operating experience and new developments. 2 volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    These proceedings of the International conference on chemistry in water reactors (Operating experience and new developments), Volume 1, are divided into 8 sessions bearing on: (session 1) Primary coolant activity, corrosion products (5 conferences), (session 2) Dose reduction (4 conferences), (session 3) New developments (4 conferences), poster session: Primary coolant chemistry (16 posters), (session 4) Decontamination (5 conferences), poster session (2 posters), (session 5) BWR-Operating experience (3 conferences), (session 6) BWR-Modelling of operating experience (4 conferences), (session 7) BWR-Basic studies (4 conferences), (session 8) BWR-New technologies (3 conferences)

  19. Behaviour of the reactivity for BWR fuel cells; Comportamiento de la reactividad para celdas de combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Delfin, A.; Vargas, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: galonso@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the behaviour of the reactivity of a fuel assembly type BWR was studied, the objective is to obtain some expressions that consider the average enrichment of U-235 and the gadolinium concentration like a function of the fuel cells burnt. Also, the applicability of the lineal reactivity model was analyzed for fuel cells type BWR. The analysis was carried out with the CASMO-4 code. (Author)

  20. The Development of the J9: An Operational Level Directorate for Stability and Security Operations for the Military

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheffe, Richard C

    2007-01-01

    .... Many historical case studies suggest that this is a result of not having an ever-present, multi-disciplined staff at the operational level devoted to monitoring and planning for potential SSTR operations...

  1. Development of a numerical code for the analysis of the linear stability of the U1 and U2 reactors of the CNLV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa P, G.; Estrada P, C.E.; Nunez C, A.; Amador G, R.

    2001-01-01

    The computer code ANESLI-1 developed by the CNSNS and UAM-I, has the main goal of making stability analysis of nuclear reactors of the BWR type, more specifically, the reactors of the U1 and U2 of the CNLV. However it can be used for another kind of applications. Its capacity of real time simulator, allows the prediction of operational transients, and conditions of dynamic steady states. ANESLI-1 was developed under a modular scheme, which allows to extend or/and to improve its scope. The lineal stability analysis predicts the instabilities produced by the wave density phenomenon. (Author)

  2. Development of a detailed BWR core thermal-hydraulic analysis method based on the Japanese post-BT standard using a best-estimate code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, H.; Mototani, A.; Kawamura, S.; Abe, N.; Takeuchi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The post-BT standard is a new fuel integrity standard or the Atomic Energy Society of Japan that allows temporary boiling transition condition in the evaluation for BWR anticipated operational occurrences. For application of the post-BT standard to BWR anticipated operational occurrences evaluation, it is important to identify which fuel assemblies and which axial, radial positions of fuel rods have temporarily experienced the post-BT condition and to evaluates how high the fuel cladding temperature rise was and how long the dryout duration continued. Therefore, whole bundle simulation, in which each fuel assembly is simulated independently by one thermal-hydraulic component, is considered to be an effective analytical method. In the present study, a best-estimate thermal-hydraulic code, TRACG02, has been modified to extend it predictive capability by implementing the post-BT evaluation model such as the post-BT heat transfer correlation and rewetting correlation and enlarging the number of components used for BWR plant simulation. Based on new evaluation methods, BWR core thermal-hydraulic behavior has been analyzed for typical anticipated operational occurrence conditions. The location where boiling transition occurs and the severity of fuel assembly in the case of boiling transition conditions such as fuel cladding temperature, which are important factors in determining whether the reuse of the fuel assembly can be permitted, were well predicted by the proposed evaluation method. In summary, a new evaluation method for a detailed BWR core thermal-hydraulic analysis based on the post-BT standard of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan has been developed and applied to the evaluation of the post-BT standard during the actual BWR plant anticipated operational occurrences. (author)

  3. Design study of Thorium-232 and Protactinium-231 based fuel for long life BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trianti, N.; Su' ud, Z.; Riyana, E. S. [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division Department of Physics - Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) Jalan Ganeca 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-06

    A preliminary design study for the utilization of thorium added with {sup 231}Pa based fuel on BWR type reactor has been performed. In the previous research utilization of fuel based Thorium-232 and Uranium-233 show 10 years operation time with maximum excess-reactivity about 4.075% dk/k. To increase reactor operation time and reduce excess-reactivity below 1% dk/k, Protactinium (Pa-231) is used as Burnable Poison. Protactinium-231 has very interesting neutronic properties, which enable the core to reduce initial excess-reactivity and simultaneously increase production of {sup 233}U to {sup 231}Pa in burn-up process. Optimizations of the content of {sup 231}Pa in the core enables the BWR core to sustain long period of operation time with reasonable burn-up reactivity swing. Based on the optimization of fuel element composition (Th and Pa) in various moderation ratio we can get reactor core with longer operation time, 20 {approx} 30 years operation without fuel shuffling or refuelling, with average power densities maximum of about 35 watt/cc, and maximum excess-reactivity 0.56% dk/k.

  4. Thermal hydraulic analysis of BWR containment venting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baburajan, P.K.; Sharma, Prashant; Paul, U.K.; Gaikwad, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Installation of additional containment filtered venting system (CFVS) is necessary to depressurize the containment to maintain its mechanical integrity due to over pressurization during severe accident condition. A typical venting system for BWR is modelled using RELAP5 and analysed to investigate the effect of various thermal hydraulic parameters on the operational parameters of the venting system. The venting system consists of piping from the containment to the scrubber tank and exit line from the scrubber tank. The scrubber tank is partially filled with water to enable the scrubbing action to remove the particulate radionuclides from the incoming containment air. The pipe line from the containment is connected to the venturi inlet and the throat of the venturi is open to the scrubber tank water inventory at designed submergence level. The exit of the venturi is open to scrubber tank water. Filters are used in the upper air space of the scrubber tank as mist separator before venting out the air into the atmosphere through the exit vent line. The effect of thermal hydraulic parameters such as inlet fluid temperature, inlet steam content and venturi submergence in the scrubber tank on the venting flow rate, exit steam content, scrubber tank inventory, overflow line and siphon breaker flow rate is analysed. Results show that inlet steam content and the venturi nozzle submergence influence the venting system parameters. (author)

  5. Identification of BWR feedwater control system using autoregressive integrated model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, Shigeru; Andoh, Yasumasa; Yamamoto, Fumiaki; Idesawa, Masato; Itoh, Kazuo.

    1983-01-01

    With the view of contributing toward more reliable interpretation of noise behavior under normal operating conditions, which is essential for correct detection and/or diagnosis of incipient anomalies in nuclear power plants by noise analysis technique, studies has been undertaken of the noise behavior in a BWR feedwater control system, with use made of a multivariate autoregressive modeling technique. Noise propagation mechanisms as well as open- and closed-loop responses in the system are identified from noise data by a method in which an autoregressive integrated model is introduced. The closed-loop responses obtained with this method are compared with transient data from an actual test, and confirmed to be reliable in estimating semi-quantitative features. Other analyses performed with this model also yield results that appear most reasonable in their physical characteristics. These results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the noise analyses technique based on the autoregressive integrated model for evaluating and diagnosing the performance of feedwater control systems. (author)

  6. Turbine protecting device in a BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, Hajime; Oka, Yoko.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent highly humid steams from flowing into the turbine upon abnormal reduction in the reactor water level in order to ensure the turbine soundness, as well as in order to trip the turbine with no undesired effect on the reactor. Constitution: A protection device comprising a judging device and a timer are disposed in a BWR type reactor, in order to control a water level signal from a reactor water level gage. If the reactor water level is reduced during rated power operation, steams are kept to be generated due to decay heat although reactor is scramed. When a signal from the reactor water level detector is inputted to the protection device, a trip signal is outputted by way of a judging device after 15 second by means of the timer, when the main steam check valve is closed to trip the turbine. With this delay of time, abrupt increase in the pressure of the reactor due to sudden shutdown can be prevented. (Nakamoto, H)

  7. A roll-to-roll process to flexible polymer solar cells: model studies, manufacture and operational stability studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Gevorgyan, Suren; Alstrup, Jan

    2009-01-01

    An inverted polymer solar cell geometry comprising a total of five layers was optimized using laboratory scale cells and the operational stability was studied under model atmospheres. The device geometry was substrate-ITO-ZnO-(active layer)-PEDOT:PSS-silver with P3HT-PCBM as the active layer. The...

  8. Study of transient rod extraction failure without RBM in a BWR; Estudio del transitorio error de extraccion de barra sin RBM en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: amhed_jvq@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The study and analysis of the operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-term events and the impact that would cause this transient. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could cause an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis results of the transient rod extraction failure in which not taken into operation the RBM is presented. The study was conducted for a BWR of 2027 MWt, in an intermediate cycle of its useful life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a scenario of anomalies was created in the core reactivity which gave a coherent prediction to the type of presented event. (Author)

  9. Study of transient turbine shot without bypass in a BWR; Estudio del transitorio disparo de turbina sin bypass en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: amhed_jvq@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The study and analysis of operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-terms events and the impact that would cause this transition. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could result in an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis of results of a turbine shot transient, which is not taken into operation the bypass is presented. The study is realized for a BWR of 2027 MWt, to an intermediate cycle life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a depressurization stage of the vessel is created which shows the response of other security systems and gives a coherent prediction to the event presented type. (Author)

  10. Status update of the BWR cask simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Durbin, Samuel G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are typically evaluated through detailed numerical analysis of the system's thermal performance. These modeling efforts are performed by the vendor to demonstrate the performance and regulatory compliance and are independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Numerous studies have been previously conducted. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have moved the storage location from above ground to below ground and significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the canister helium pressure. Previous cask performance validation testing did not capture these parameters. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern dry casks. These modern cask designs utilize elevated helium pressure in the sealed canister or are intended for subsurface storage. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above ground and below ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the canister. The symmetric single assembly geometry with well-controlled boundary conditions simplifies interpretation of results. Various configurations of outer concentric ducting will be used to mimic conditions for above and below ground storage configurations

  11. Impact of modeling Choices on Inventory and In-Cask Criticality Calculations for Forsmark 3 BWR Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S.; Ade, Brian J.; Bowman, Stephen M.; Gauld, Ian C.; Ilas, Germina; Marshall, William BJ J.

    2015-01-01

    Simulation of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel depletion poses a challenge for nuclide inventory validation and nuclear criticality safety analyses. This challenge is due to the complex operating conditions and assembly design heterogeneities that characterize these nuclear systems. Fuel depletion simulations and in-cask criticality calculations are affected by (1) completeness of design information, (2) variability of operating conditions needed for modeling purposes, and (3) possible modeling choices. These effects must be identified, quantified, and ranked according to their significance. This paper presents an investigation of BWR fuel depletion using a complete set of actual design specifications and detailed operational data available for five operating cycles of the Swedish BWR Forsmark 3 reactor. The data includes detailed axial profiles of power, burnup, and void fraction in a very fine temporal mesh for a GE14 (10x10) fuel assembly. The specifications of this case can be used to assess the impacts of different modeling choices on inventory prediction and in-cask criticality, specifically regarding the key parameters that drive inventory and reactivity throughout fuel burnup. This study focused on the effects of the fidelity with which power history and void fraction distributions are modeled. The corresponding sensitivity of the reactivity in storage configurations is assessed, and the impacts of modeling choices on decay heat and inventory are addressed.

  12. Does the Future Engineer Force Transition Engineer Units between Offensive and Stability Operations in Ways That Achieve Responsiveness, Versatility, Agility, Effectiveness, and Efficiency?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    London, David T

    2005-01-01

    .... The main question is as follows: Does the FEF transition engineer units between offensive and stability operations in ways that achieve responsiveness, versatility, agility, effectiveness, and efficiency...

  13. Numerical simulation of boron injection in a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinoco, Hernan, E-mail: htb@forsmark.vattenfall.s [Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB, SE-742 03 Osthammar (Sweden); Buchwald, Przemyslaw [Reactor Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Frid, Wiktor, E-mail: wiktor@reactor.sci.kth.s [Reactor Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    The present study constitutes a first step to understand the process of boron injection, transport and mixing in a BWR. It consists of transient CFD simulations of boron injection in a model of the downcomer of Forsmark's Unit 3 containing about 6 million elements. The two cases studied are unintentional start of boron injection under normal operation and loss of offsite power with partial ATWS leaving 10% of the core power uncontrolled. The flow conditions of the second case are defined by means of an analysis with RELAP5, assuming boron injection start directly after the first ECCS injection. Recent publications show that meaningful conservative results may be obtained for boron or thermal mixing in PWRs with grids as coarse as that utilized here, provided that higher order discretization schemes are used to minimize numerical diffusion. The obtained results indicate an apparently strong influence of the scenario in the behavior of the injection process. The normal operation simulation shows that virtually all boron solution flows down to the Main Recirculation Pump inlet located directly below the boron inlet nozzle. The loss of offsite power simulation shows initially a spread of the boron solution over the entire sectional area of the lower part of the downcomer filled with colder water. This remaining effect of the ECCS injection lasts until all this water has left the downcomer. Above this region, the boron injection jet develops in a vertical streak, eventually resembling the injection of the normal operation scenario. Due to the initial spread, this boron injection will probably cause larger temporal and spatial concentration variations in the core. In both cases, these variations may cause reactivity transients and fuel damage due to local power escalation. To settle this issue, an analysis using an extended model containing the downcomer, the MRPs and the Lower Plenum will be carried out. Also, the simulation time will be extended to a scale of

  14. Numerical simulation of boron injection in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Hernan; Buchwald, Przemyslaw; Frid, Wiktor

    2010-01-01

    The present study constitutes a first step to understand the process of boron injection, transport and mixing in a BWR. It consists of transient CFD simulations of boron injection in a model of the downcomer of Forsmark's Unit 3 containing about 6 million elements. The two cases studied are unintentional start of boron injection under normal operation and loss of offsite power with partial ATWS leaving 10% of the core power uncontrolled. The flow conditions of the second case are defined by means of an analysis with RELAP5, assuming boron injection start directly after the first ECCS injection. Recent publications show that meaningful conservative results may be obtained for boron or thermal mixing in PWRs with grids as coarse as that utilized here, provided that higher order discretization schemes are used to minimize numerical diffusion. The obtained results indicate an apparently strong influence of the scenario in the behavior of the injection process. The normal operation simulation shows that virtually all boron solution flows down to the Main Recirculation Pump inlet located directly below the boron inlet nozzle. The loss of offsite power simulation shows initially a spread of the boron solution over the entire sectional area of the lower part of the downcomer filled with colder water. This remaining effect of the ECCS injection lasts until all this water has left the downcomer. Above this region, the boron injection jet develops in a vertical streak, eventually resembling the injection of the normal operation scenario. Due to the initial spread, this boron injection will probably cause larger temporal and spatial concentration variations in the core. In both cases, these variations may cause reactivity transients and fuel damage due to local power escalation. To settle this issue, an analysis using an extended model containing the downcomer, the MRPs and the Lower Plenum will be carried out. Also, the simulation time will be extended to a scale of several

  15. Description of the power plant model BWR-plasim outlined for the Barsebaeck 2 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, P. la Cour.

    1979-08-01

    A description is given of a BWR power plant model outlined for the Barsebaeck 2 plant with data placed at our disposal by the Swedish Power Company Sydkraft A/B. The basic operations are derived and simplifications discussed. The model is implemented with a simulation system DYSYS which assures reliable solutions and easy programming. Emphasis has been placed on the models versatility and flexibility so new features are easy to incorporate. The model may be used for transient calculations for both normal plant conditions and for abnormal occurences as well as for control system studies. (author)

  16. Observations of crud deposits, corrosion and erosion of BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, H.

    1983-01-01

    The BWR experience is limited to one reactor but the PWR experience covers a wide range of successive generations of power plants (7 in total). The systems are described and their water chemistry briefly commented. Some R and D performed on the effects of the operating regimes (steady state and transients) are summarized. Observations made by pool-side inspections and postirradiation examinations of fuel are outlined concerning water chemistry effects (crud deposits and corrosion) and ''mechanical'' coolant-cladding interaction (chip deposits and baffle jetting). (author)

  17. Making the Spoon: Analyzing and Employing Stability Power in Counterinsurgency Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-11

    GWOT then organizations that are best suited to 115On a Maslow’s Scale of Physiological, Safety, Love, Esteem , and Self Actualization essential services...Economic Effects of 9/11:A Retrospective Assessment. Report to Congress: Specialist in Economic Policy, 2002. Maslow , Abraham H., and Robert Frager...Stability Power: The Requirement of Self Securing Elements of National Introducing Stability Power

  18. Water level measurement uncertainty during BWR instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, R.C.; Derbidge, T.C.; Healzer, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the performance of the water-level measurement system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) during severe instability oscillations which, under some circumstances, can occur during an anticipated transient without SCRAM (ATWS). Test data from a prototypical mock-up of the water-level measurement system was used to refine and calibrate a water-level measurement system model. The model was then used to predict level measurement system response, using as boundary conditions vessel pressures calculated by ppercase RETRAN for an ATWS/instability event.The results of the study indicate that rapid pressure changes in the reactor pressure vessel which cause oscillations in downcomer water level, coupled with differences in instrument line lengths, can produce errors in the sensed water level. Using nominal parameters for the measurement system components, a severe instability transient which produced a 0.2 m peak-to-minimum water-level oscillation in the vessel downcomer was predicted to produce pressure difference equivalent to a 0.7 m level oscillation at the input to the differential pressure transmitter, 0.5 m oscillation at the output of the transmitter, and an oscillation of 0.3 m on the water-level indicator in the control room. The level measurement system error, caused by downcomer water-level oscillations and instrument line length differential, is mitigated by damping both in the differential pressure transmitter used to infer level and in the control room display instrument. ((orig.))

  19. BWR fuel clad behaviour following LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Vyas, K.N.; Dinesh Babu, R.

    1996-01-01

    Flow and pressure through the fuel coolant channel reduce rapidly following a loss of coolant accident. Due to stored energy and decay heat, fuel and cladding temperatures rise rapidly. Increase in clad temperature causes deterioration of mechanical properties of clad material. This coupled with increase of pressure inside the cladding due to accumulation of fission gases and de-pressurization of coolant causes the cladding to balloon. This phenomenon is important as it can reduce or completely block the flow passages in a fuel assembly causing reduction of emergency coolant flow. Behaviour of a BWR clad is analyzed in a design basis LOCA. Fuel and clad temperatures following a LOCA are calculated. Fission gas release and pressure is estimated using well established models. An elasto-plastic analysis of clad tube is carried out to determine plastic strains and corresponding deformations using finite-element technique. Analysis of neighbouring pins gives an estimate of flow areas available for emergency coolant flow. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  20. Primary coolant system of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Masanori; Aoki, Yasuko

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a water quality control system for preventing corrosion and for extending working life of structural materials of a BWR-type reactor. Namely, a sensor group 1 and a sensor group 2 are disposed at different positions such as in a feedwater system, a recycling system, main steam pipes, and a pressure vessel, respectively. Each sensor group can record and generate alarms independently. The sensor group 1 for usual monitoring is connected to a calculation device by way of a switch to confirm that the monitored values are within a proper range by the injection of a water quality moderating agent. The sensor group 2 is caused to stand alone or connected with the calculation device by way of a switch optionally. When abnormality should occur in the sensor group 1, the sensor group 2 determines the limit for the increase/decrease of controlling amount of the moderating agent at a portion where the conditions are changed to the most severe direction by using data base. The moderating agent is injected and controlled based on the controlling amount. The system of the present invention can optionally cope with a new sensor and determination for new water quality standards. Then the evaluation/control accuracy of the entire system can be improved while covering up the errors of each sensor. (I.S.)

  1. Siemens experience on linear and nonlinear analyses of out-of-phase BWR instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuter, D.; Wehle, F.

    1995-01-01

    The Siemens design code STAIF has been applied extensively for linear analysis of BWR instabilities. The comparison between measurements and STAIF calculations for different plants under various conditions has shown good agreement for core-wide and regional instabilities. Based on the high quality of STAIF, the North German TUeV has decided to replace the licensing requirement of extensive stability measurements by predictive analyses with the code STAIF. Nonlinear stability analysis for beyond design boundary conditions with RAMONA has shown dryout during temporarily reversed flow at core inlet in case of core-wide oscillations. For large out-of-phase oscillations, dryout occurs already for small, still positive channel inlet flow. (orig.)

  2. Grid frequency control capability of a modern BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemst, Paul van

    If a large generating units is tripped or if an intertie with a large amount of imported power is disconnected, the other units in the grid are firstly required to withstand the disturbance. The rapid restoration of the balance between energy production and consumption constitutes the second requirement. Tests performed on the Scandinavian grid have shown that the frequency minimum is reached about five seconds after a load rejection. The amplitude of the frequency drop depends on the load rejected and the grid power: 800 MWe in a 22,000 MWe grid yields 0.5 Hz drop. The grid frequency then returns to a value just under nominal in another 10 to 15 seconds. These figures agree well with calculations made by the Swedish State Power Board. The tests have also shown that the turbine generator should not be automatically and immediately disconnected after a reactor scram. This is in close agreement with and confirms traditional ASEA ATOM design policy and is in effect in all ASEA ATOM designed plants. The stored energy and residual power in the turbine and reactor cause the energy production to decrease with a time constant of 5 to 10 seconds. This, in turn, means that the minimum grid frequency is reached after more than 10 seconds and thus doubles the time available for other generating units to incease their power in order to compensate for the production loss and restore grid frequency. To minimize the frequency deviation and to improve network stability, a rapid increase in power production from those units that participate in grid frequency control may be necessary. The BWR has proved to be excellent for this purpose. A rapid increase of the electric power can be obtained by simultaneously decreasing the pressure, using some of energy stored in the reactor, and rapidly increasing recirculation flow

  3. BWR water chemistry guidelines and PWR primary water chemistry guidelines in Japan – Purpose and technical background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka, E-mail: kawamuh@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Hirano, Hideo [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Katsumura, Yousuke [University of Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Shunsuke [Tohoku University (Japan); Mizuno, Takayuki [Mie University (Japan); Kitajima, Hideaki; Tsuzuki, Yasuo [Japan Nuclear Safety Institute (Japan); Terachi, Takumi [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (Japan); Nagase, Makoto; Usui, Naoshi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan); Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Shoda, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Takao [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Framework of BWR/PWR water chemistry Guidelines in Japan are presented. • Guideline necessity, definitions, philosophy and technical background are mentioned. • Some guideline settings for control parameters and recommendations are explaines. • Chemistry strategy is also mentioned. - Abstract: After 40 years of light water reactor (LWR) operations in Japan, the sustainable development of water chemistry technologies has aimed to ensure the highest coolant system component integrity and fuel reliability performance for maintaining LWRs in the world; additionally, it aimed to achieve an excellent dose rate reduction. Although reasonable control and diagnostic parameters are utilized by each boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) owner, it is recognized that specific values are not shared among everyone involved. To ensure the reliability of BWR and PWR operation and maintenance, relevant members of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish guidelines for water chemistry. The Japanese BWR and PWR water chemistry guidelines provide strategies to improve material and fuel reliability performance as well as to reduce dosing rates. The guidelines also provide reasonable “control values”, “diagnostic values” and “action levels” for multiple parameters, and they stipulate responses when these levels are exceeded. Specifically, “conditioning parameters” are adopted in the Japanese PWR primary water chemistry guidelines. Good practices for operational conditions are also discussed with reference to long-term experience. This paper presents the purpose, technical background and framework of the preliminary water chemistry guidelines for Japanese BWRs and PWRs. It is expected that the guidelines will be helpful as an introduction to achieve safety and reliability during operations.

  4. Burnup credit feasibility for BWR spent fuel shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent of fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Analyses 1 have shown the feasibility estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This paper summarizes the extension of the previous PWR feasibility assessments to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. As with the PWR analysis, the purpose was not verification of burnup credit (see ref. 2 for ongoing work in this area) but a reasonable assessment of the feasibility and potential gains from its use in BWR applications. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. The method includes characterization of a typical pin-cell spectrum, using a one-dimensional (1-D) model of a BWR assembly. The calculated spectrum allows burnup-dependent few-group material constants to be generated. Point depletion methods were then used to obtain the time-varying characteristics of the fuel. These simple methods were validated, where practical, with multidimensional methods. 6 refs., 1 tab

  5. An interactive simulation-based education system for BWR emergency, procedure guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanikawa, Naoshi; Shida, Touichi [Hitachi Ltd (Japan). Hitachi Works; Ujita, Hiroshi; Yokota, Takeshi; Kato, Kanji [Hitachi Ltd, (Japan). Energy Research Lab.

    1994-12-31

    When applying EPGs (Emergency Procedure Guidelines), an operator decides the operational procedure by predicting the change of parameters from the plant status, because EPGs are described in a symptom style for emergency conditions. Technical knowledge of the plant behavior and its operation are necessary for operator to understand the EPGs. An interactive simulation-based education system, EPG-ICAI (Intelligent Computer Assisted Instruction), has been developed for BWR plant operators to acquire the knowledge of EPGs. EPG-ICAI is designed to realize an effective education by the step-by-step study by using an interactive real time simulator and an individual education by applying an intelligent tutoring function. (orig.) (2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.).

  6. An interactive simulation-based education system for BWR emergency, procedure guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanikawa, Naoshi; Shida, Touichi; Ujita, Hiroshi; Yokota, Takeshi; Kato, Kanji

    1994-01-01

    When applying EPGs (Emergency Procedure Guidelines), an operator decides the operational procedure by predicting the change of parameters from the plant status, because EPGs are described in a symptom style for emergency conditions. Technical knowledge of the plant behavior and its operation are necessary for operator to understand the EPGs. An interactive simulation-based education system, EPG-ICAI (Intelligent Computer Assisted Instruction), has been developed for BWR plant operators to acquire the knowledge of EPGs. EPG-ICAI is designed to realize an effective education by the step-by-step study by using an interactive real time simulator and an individual education by applying an intelligent tutoring function. (orig.) (2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.)

  7. Application of gadolinia credit to cask transportation of BWR-STEP3 SFAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Tsukasa; Mitsuhashi, Ishi; Ito, Dai-ichiro; Nakamura, Yu

    2003-01-01

    Instead of the fresh-fuel assumption, the application of gadolinia credit to cask transportation of BWR SFAs is studied. Its efficacy for BWR-STEP2 SFAs had already been estimated. This paper reports on the application of gadolinia credit to cask transportation of BWR-STEP3 SFAs. (author)

  8. Development of a methodology of analysis of instabilities in BWR reactors; Desarrollo de una metodologia de analisis de inestabilidades en reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Fenoll, M.; Abarca, A.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology of analysis of the reactors instabilities of BWR type. This methodology covers of modal analysis of the point operation techniques of signal analysis and simulation of transients, through 3D Coupled RELAP5/PARCSv2.7 code.

  9. BWR type nuclear power plants and its operation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Akira; Toshimitsu, Satoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the soundness of facilities by decreasing the dissolved oxygen density in primary coolants which causes stress corrosion crackings in pipelines or the likes upon reactor start-up. Method: After starting-up a condensate recycling pump and initiating the sealing for the gland seal portion in a turbine, the inside pressure of the main condenser is rendered negative by a condenser evacuating device. Then, recycling and agitation for the primary coolants in a pressure vessel of the nuclear reactor are started by the recycling pump, recycling and agitation for the coolants in the main condenser are further effected to promote the removal of dissolved oxygen in the primary coolants in the main condenser and the feedwater pipelines. Then, the upper space in the reactor pressure vessel is communicated with the main condenser. Then the substantial power-up is performed by the withdrawal of control rods while monitoring the dissolved oxygen density in the primary coolants within the pressure vessel, so that it may be kept as far as possible from the dangerous region for stress corrosions. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Laguna Verde nuclear power plant: an experience to consider in advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes Marquez, L.

    2001-01-01

    Laguna Verde is a BWR 5 containment Mark II. Designed by GE, two external re-circulation loops, each of them having two speed re-circulation pump and a flow control valve to define the drive flow and consequently the total core flow an power control by total core flow. Laguna Verde Design and operational experience has shown some insights to be considering in design for advanced BRW reactors in order to improve the potential of nuclear power plants. NSSS and Balance of plant design, codes used to perform nuclear core design, margins derived from engineering judgment, at the time Laguna Verde designed and constructed had conducted to have a plant with an operational license, generating with a very good performance and availability. Nevertheless, some design characteristics and operational experience have shown that potential improvements or areas of opportunity shall be focused in the advanced BWR design. Computer codes used to design the nuclear core have been evolved relatively fast. The computers are faster and powerful than those used during the design process, also instrumentation and control are becoming part of this amazing technical evolution in the industry. The Laguna Verde experience is the subject to share in this paper. (author)

  11. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Wells, J.E.; Johnson, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    The seismic risk methodology developed in the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant, a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models was developed and analyzed. The SSMRP methodology can equally be applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR). To demonstrate its applicability, to identify fundamental differences in seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR, and to provide a basis of comparison of seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR when analyzed with comparable methodology and assumptions, a seismic risk analysis is being performed on the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant

  12. Simulation of decreasing reactor power level with BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwoto; Zuhair; Rivai, Abu Khalid

    2002-01-01

    Study on characteristic of BWR using Desktop PC Based Simulator Program was analysed. This simulator is more efficient and cheaper for analyzing of characteristic and dynamic respond than full scope simulator for decreasing power level of BW. Dynamic responses of BWR reactor was investigated during the power level reduction from 100% FP (Full Power) which is 3926 MWth to 0% FP with 25% steps and 1 % FP/sec rate. The overall results for core flow rate, reactor steam flow, feed-water flow and turbine-generator power show tendency proportional to reduction of reactor power. This results show that reactor power control in BWR could be done by control of re-circulation flow that alter the density of water used as coolant and moderator. Decreasing the re-circulation flow rate will decrease void density which has negative reactivity and also affect the position of control rods

  13. An overview of the BWR ECCS strainer blockage issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, A.W.; Marshall, M.L. Jr.; Elliott, R.

    1996-01-01

    This Paper provides a brief overview of actions taken in the mid 1980s to resolve Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-43, open-quotes Containment Emergency Sump Performance,close quotes and their relationship to the BWR strainer blockage issue; the importance of insights gained from the Barseback-2 (a Swedish BWR) incident in 1992 and from ECCS strainer testing and inspections at the Perry nuclear power plant in 1992 and 1993; an analysis of an US BWR/4 with a Mark I containment; an international community sharing of knowledge relevant to ECCS strainer blockage, additional experimental programs; and identification of actions needed to resolve the strainer blockage issue and the status of such efforts

  14. The JAERI code system for evaluation of BWR ECCS performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohsaka, Atsuo; Akimoto, Masayuki; Asahi, Yoshiro; Abe, Kiyoharu; Muramatsu, Ken; Araya, Fumimasa; Sato, Kazuo

    1982-12-01

    Development of respective computer code system of BWR and PWR for evaluation of ECCS has been conducted since 1973 considering the differences of the reactor cooling system, core structure and ECCS. The first version of the BWR code system, of which developmental work started earlier than that of the PWR, has been completed. The BWR code system is designed to provide computational tools to analyze all phases of LOCAs and to evaluate the performance of the ECCS including an ''Evaluation Model (EM)'' feature in compliance with the requirements of the current Japanese Evaluation Guideline of ECCS. The BWR code system could be used for licensing purpose, i.e. for ECCS performance evaluation or audit calculations to cross-examine the methods and results of applicants or vendors. The BWR code system presented in this report comprises several computer codes, each of which analyzes a particular phase of a LOCA or a system blowdown depending on a range of LOCAs, i.e. large and small breaks in a variety of locations in the reactor system. The system includes ALARM-B1, HYDY-B1 and THYDE-B1 for analysis of the system blowdown for various break sizes, THYDE-B-REFLOOD for analysis of the reflood phase and SCORCH-B2 for the calculation of the fuel assembl hot plane temperature. When the multiple codes are used to analyze a broad range of LOCA as stated above, it is very important to evaluate the adequacy and consistency between the codes used to cover an entire break spectrum. The system consistency together with the system performance are discussed for a large commercial BWR. (author)

  15. First interim examination of defected BWR and PWR rods tested in unlimited air at 2290C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Cook, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A five-year whole rod test was initiated to investigate the long-term stability of spent fuel rods under a variety of possible dry storage conditions. Both PWR and BWR rods were included in the test. The first interim examination was conducted after three months of testing to determine if there was any degradation in those defected rods stored in an unlimited air atmosphere. Visual observations, diametral measurements and radiographic smears were used to assess the degree of cladding deformation and particulate dispersal. The PWR rod showed no measurable change from the pre-test condition. The two original artificial defects had not changed in appearance and there was no diametral growth of the cladding. One of the defects in BWR rod showed significant deformation. There was approximately 10% cladding strain at the defect site and a small axial crack had formed. The fuel in the defect did not appear to be friable. The second defect showed no visible change and no cladding strain. Following examination, the test was continued at 230 0 C. Another interim examination is planned during the summer of 1983. This paper discusses the details and meaning of the data from the first interim examination

  16. Explaining Operational Instability of Amine Transaminases : Substrate-Induced Inactivation Mechanism and Influence of Quaternary Structure on Enzyme-Cofactor Intermediate Stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borner, Tim; Ramisch, Sebastian; Reddem, Eswar R.; Bartsch, Sebastian; Vogel, Andreas; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Grey, Carl

    The insufficient operational stability of amine transaminases (ATA) constitutes a limiting factor for high productivity in chiral amine synthesis. In this work, we investigated the operational stability of a tetrameric ATA with 92% sequence identity to a Pseudomonas sp. transaminase and compared it

  17. Peach Bottom transient analysis with BWR TRACB02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M.; Sutherland, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    TRAC calculations have been performed for a Turbine Trip transient (TT1) in the Peach Bottom BWR power plant. This study is a part of the qualification of the BWR-TRAC code. The simulation is aimed at reproducing the observed thermal hydraulic behavior in a pressurization transient. Measured core power is an input to the calculation. Comparison with data show the code reasonably well predicts the generation and propagation of the pressure waves in the main steam line and associated pressurization of the reactor vessel following the closure of the turbine stop valve

  18. Limerick BWR turbine control and protection system upgrade success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C.K.; Pietryka, T.S.; Federico, P.A.; Williams, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Westinghouse and Exelon have successfully implemented a digital electro-hydraulic control (DEHC) at Limerick BWR Unit 1 Station to perform the turbine control, protection and reactor pressure functions. The DEHC replaces analog controls and addressed system performance, obsolescence and reliability. This was a first-of-a-kind application for control and protection of the main turbine and BWR pressure control for the distributed control system utilized. The demolition of analog equipment, main control room and front standard modifications, and acceptance testing were completed on schedule during the normal 2014 outage. Key aspects of the project that facilitated this success will be discussed and presented. (author)

  19. Limerick BWR turbine control and protection system upgrade success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, C.K.; Pietryka, T.S.; Federico, P.A., E-mail: tangck@westinghouse.com, E-mail: pietryt@westinghouse, E-mail: federipa@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Williams, J.C., E-mail: Jonathan.Williams@exeloncorp.com [Exelon Nuclear, Warrenville, IL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Westinghouse and Exelon have successfully implemented a digital electro-hydraulic control (DEHC) at Limerick BWR Unit 1 Station to perform the turbine control, protection and reactor pressure functions. The DEHC replaces analog controls and addressed system performance, obsolescence and reliability. This was a first-of-a-kind application for control and protection of the main turbine and BWR pressure control for the distributed control system utilized. The demolition of analog equipment, main control room and front standard modifications, and acceptance testing were completed on schedule during the normal 2014 outage. Key aspects of the project that facilitated this success will be discussed and presented. (author)

  20. BWR shutdown analyzer using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype alarm system for detecting abnormal reactor shutdowns based on artificial intelligence technology is described. The system incorporates knowledge about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant design and component behavior, as well as knowledge required to distinguish normal, abnormal, and ATWS accident conditions. The system was developed using a software tool environment for creating knowledge-based applications on a LISP machine. To facilitate prototype implementation and evaluation, a casual simulation of BWR shutdown sequences was developed and interfaced with the alarm system. An intelligent graphics interface for execution and control is described. System performance considerations and general observations relating to artificial intelligence application to nuclear power plant problems are provided