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Sample records for bwr pilot plant

  1. BWR type nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Yoshio; Okano, Kimifumi; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Okura, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR plant capable of reducing the size of the reactor building while maintaining reliability of a pool water cooling and cleaning facility even when two fuel storage pools are disposed in the reactor building. Namely, in the reactor building, two fuel storage pools, a temporality storing pool for temporary storing incore structures and a suppression pool are disposed. A primary cleaning facility for cooling and cleaning pool water for each of fuel storage pools comprises a serge tank, a pump, a heat exchanger and a filtration desalting device. A secondary cleaning facility for cleaning pool water in the suppression pool comprises a pump and a filtration desalting device. The first cleaning facility can be switched to be used for the secondary cleaning facility. Specifically, upstream and downstream of the pump of the primary cleaning facility and those of the pump of the secondary cleaning facility are connected by communication pipelines. (I.S.)

  2. Development of next BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke

    1995-01-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.)

  3. Development of next BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works

    1995-04-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.).

  4. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Wulff, W.; Mallen, A.N.; Lekach, S.V.; Stritar, A.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced technology for high-speed interactive nuclear power plant simulations is of great value for timely resolution of safety issues, for plant monitoring, and for computer-aided emergency responses to an accident. Presented is the methodology employed at BNL to develop a BWR plant analyzer capable of simulating severe plant transients at much faster than real-time process speeds. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is given for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computers to achieve the very high simulation speeds. Typical results are shown to demonstrate the modeling fidelity of the BWR plant analyzer

  5. Decontamination techniques for BWR power generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Susumu

    1990-01-01

    The present report describes various techniques used for decontamination in BWR power generation plants. Objectives and requirements for decontamination in BWR power plants are first discussed focusing on reduction in dose, prevention of spread of contamination, cleaning of work environments, exposure of equipment parts for inspection, re-use of decontaminated resources, and standards for decontamination. Then, the report outlines major physical, chemical and electrochemical decontamination techniques generally used in BWR power generation plants. The physical techniques include suction of deposits in tanks, jet cleaning, particle blast cleaning, ultrasonic cleaning, coating with special paints, and flushing cleaning. The chemical decontamination techniques include the use of organic acids etc. for dissolution of oxidized surface layers and treatment of secondary wastes such as liquids released from primary decontamination processes. Other techniques are used for removal of penetrated contaminants, and soft and hard cladding in and on equipment and piping that are in direct contact with radioactive materials used in nuclear power generation plants. (N.K.)

  6. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  7. Managing BWR plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ianni, P.W.; Kiss, E.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed that extending the useful life of a large nuclear plant can be justified with very high cost benefit ratio. In turn, experience with large power plant systems and equipment has shown that a well-integrated and -managed plan is essential in order to achieve potential economic benefits. Consequently, General Electric's efforts have been directed at establishing a life extension plan that considers alternative options and cost-effective steps that can be taken in early life, those appropriate during middle life, and those required in late life. This paper briefly describes an approach designed to provide the plant owner a maximum of flexibility in developing a life extension plan

  8. Method of operating BWR type power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the operation efficiency of BWR type reactors by reducing the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start-up of the turbine and electrical generator, as well as decrease the pressure difference in each of the sections of the pressure vessel to thereby extend its life span. Method: The operation comprises switching the nuclear reactor from the shutdown mode to the start-up mode, increasing the reactor power to a predetermined level lower than a rated power while maintaining the reactor pressure to a predetermined level lower than a rated pressure, starting up a turbine and an electrical generator in the state of the predetermined reactor pressure and the reactor power to connect the electrical generator to the power transmission system and, thereafter, increasing the reactor pressure and the reactor power to the predetermined rated pressure and rated power respectively. This can shorten the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start of the power transmission system, whereby the operation efficiency of the power plant can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. Operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadasu

    1988-01-01

    For the operation management of nuclear power stations with high reliability and safety, the role played by operators is very important. The effort of improving the man-machine interface in the central control rooms of nuclear power stations is energetically advanced, but the importance of the role of operators does not change. For the training of the operators of nuclear power stations, simulators have been used from the early stage. As the simulator facilities for operator training, there are the full scope simulator simulating faithfully the central control room of an actual plant and the small simulator mainly aiming at learning the plant functions. For BWR nuclear power stations, two full scope simulators are installed in the BWR Operator Training Center, and the training has been carried out since 1974. The plant function learning simulators have been installed in respective electric power companies as the education and training facilities in the companies. The role of simulators in operator training, the BTC No.1 simulator of a BWR-4 of 780 MWe and the BTC No.2 simulator of a BWR-5 of 1,100 MWe, plant function learning simulators, and the design of the BTC No.2 simulator and plant function learning simulators are reported. (K.I.)

  10. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake [ISOGO Nuclear Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data.

  11. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data

  12. A BWR power plant simulator for Barsebaeck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    la Cour Christensen, P.; Hvidtfeldt Larsen, A.M.

    1985-07-01

    A computer simulator of a Barsebaeck power plant unit has been developed in cooperation between Sydkraft AB, Lund Institute of Technology, and Risoe National Laboratory. The simulator is of the kind often referred to as a compact simulator, because it involves only a computer with display screens and other input/output devices plus the software needed for calculation and presentation of the plant state as a function of time, and no sort of model of the control room as in large reactor simulators for operator training. The purpose of training courses with the compact simulator is to give students a better understanding of the behaviour of the power plant under transient conditions by displaying variables, e.g. pressures, temperatures, reactivity, nuclear power, as functions of time, thereby showing the interactions between different parts of the plant during the transient and the influence of a number of possible operator actions. The present paper describes the Barsebaeck compact simulator with the emphasis on the software developed at Risoe National Laboratory. The Risoe work comprises the programming of the dynamic plant model, in the form of a number of Fortran subroutines containing the physical description of the power plant. (author)

  13. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric plants, BWR/4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/6, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the BWR Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. This document Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  14. BWR stability analysis with the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1992-10-01

    March 9, 1989 instability at the LaSalle-2 Power Plant and more than ninety related BWR transients have been simulated on the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA). Power peaks were found to be potentially seventeen times greater than the rated power, flow reversal occurs momentarily during large power oscillations, the fuel centerline temperature oscillates between 1,030 and 2,090 K, while the cladding temperature oscillates between 560 and 570 K. The Suppression Pool reaches its specified temperature limit either never or in as little as 4.3 minutes, depending on operator actions and transient scenario. Thermohydraulic oscillations occur at low core coolant flow (both Recirculation Pumps tripped), with sharp axial or redial fission power peaking and with partial loss of feedwater preheating while the feedwater is flow kept high to maintain coolant inventory in the vessel. Effects from BOP system were shown to influence reactor stability strongly through dosed-loop resonance feedback. High feedwater flow and low temperature destabilize the reactor. Low feedwater flow restabilizes the reactor, because of steam condensation and feedwater preheating in the downcomer, which reduces effectively the destabilizing core inlet subcooling. The EPA has been found to be capable of analyzing BWR stability '' shown to be effective for scoping calculations and for supporting accident management

  15. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    An engineering plant analyzer has been developed at BNL for realistically and accurately simulating transients and severe abnormal events in BWR power plants. Simulations are being carried out routinely with high fidelity, high simulation speed, at low cost and with unsurpassed user convenience. The BNL Plant Analyzer is the only operating facility which (a) simulates more than two orders-of-magnitude faster than the CDC-7600 mainframe computer, (b) is accessible and fully operational in on-line interactive mode, remotely from anywhere in the US, from Europe or the Far East (Korea), via widely available IBM-PC compatible personal computers, standard modems and telephone lines, (c) simulates both slow and rapid transients seven times faster than real-time in direct access, and four times faster in remote access modes, (d) achieves high simulation speed without compromising fidelity, and (e) is available to remote access users at the low cost of $160 per hour.

  16. Summary report of seismic PSA of BWR model plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    This report presents a seismic PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) methodology developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) for evaluating risks of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the results from an application of the methodology to a BWR plant in Japan, which is termed Model Plant'. The seismic PSA procedures developed at JAERI are to evaluate core damage frequency (CDF) and have the following four steps: (1) evaluation of seismic hazard, (2) evaluation of realistic response, (3) evaluation of component capacities and failure probabilities, and (4) evaluation of conditional probability of system failure and CDF. Although these procedures are based on the methodologies established and used in the United States, they include several unique features: (1) seismic hazard analysis is performed with use of available knowledge and database on seismological conditions in Japan; (2) response evaluation is performed with a response factor method which is cost effective and associated uncertainties can be reduced with use of modern methods of design calculations; (3) capacity evaluation is performed with use of test results available in Japan in combination with design information and generic capacity data in the U.S.A.; (4) systems reliability analysis, performed with use of the computer code SECOM-2 developed at JAERI, includes identification of dominant accident sequences, importance analysis of components and systems as well as the CDF evaluation with consideration of the effect of correlation of failures by a newly developed method based on the Monte Carlo method. The effect of correlation has been recognized as an important issue in seismic PSAs. The procedures was used to perform a seismic PSA of a 1100 MWe BWR plant. Results are shown as well as the insights derived and future research needs identified in this seismic PSA. (J.P.N.)

  17. Dose rate reduction method for NMCA applied BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Aizawa, Motohiro; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Varela, Juan; Caine, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    BRAC (BWR Radiation Assessment and Control) dose rate is used as an indicator of the incorporation of activated corrosion by products into BWR recirculation piping, which is known to be a significant contributor to dose rate received by workers during refueling outages. In order to reduce radiation exposure of the workers during the outage, it is desirable to keep BRAC dose rates as low as possible. After HWC was adopted to reduce IGSCC, a BRAC dose rate increase was observed in many plants. As a countermeasure to these rapid dose rate increases under HWC conditions, Zn injection was widely adopted in United States and Europe resulting in a reduction of BRAC dose rates. However, BRAC dose rates in several plants remain high, prompting the industry to continue to investigate methods to achieve further reductions. In recent years a large portion of the BWR fleet has adopted NMCA (NobleChem TM ) to enhance the hydrogen injection effect to suppress SCC. After NMCA, especially OLNC (On-Line NobleChem TM ), BRAC dose rates were observed to decrease. In some OLNC applied BWR plants this reduction was observed year after year to reach a new reduced equilibrium level. This dose rate reduction trends suggest the potential dose reduction might be obtained by the combination of Pt and Zn injection. So, laboratory experiments and in-plant tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of Pt and Zn on Co-60 deposition behaviour. Firstly, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of noble metal deposition on Co deposition on stainless steel surfaces. Polished type 316 stainless steel coupons were prepared and some of them were OLNC treated in the test loop before the Co deposition test. Water chemistry conditions to simulate HWC were as follows: Dissolved oxygen, hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide were below 5 ppb, 100 ppb and 0 ppb (no addition), respectively. Zn was injected to target a concentration of 5 ppb. The test was conducted up to 1500 hours at 553 K. Test

  18. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric plants, BWR/4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/6, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the B ampersand W Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. This document Volume 3, contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  19. Reactor power control device in BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Tsuneo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for controlling reactor power based on a start-up/shut down program in a BWR type reactor, as well as for detecting deviation, if occurs, of the power from the start-up/shut down program, to control a recycling flow rate control system or control rod drive mechanisms. Namely, a power instruction section successively executes the start-up/shut down program and controls the coolant recycling system and the control rod driving mechanisms to control the power. A current state monitoring and calculation section receives a process amount, calculates parameters showing the plant state, compares/monitors them with predetermined values, detecting the deviation, if occurs, of the plant state from the start-up/shut down program, and prevents output of a power increase control signal which leads to power increase. A forecasting and monitoring/calculation section forecasts and calculates the plant state when not yet executed steps of the start-up/shut down program are performed, stops the execution of the start-up/shut down program in the next step in a case of forecasting that the results of the calculation will deviate from the start-up/shut down program. (I.S.)

  20. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric Plants, BWR/6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/6, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the B ampersand W Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. This document Volume 1, contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  1. Controlling device for BWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to operate BWR type nuclear power plants while entirely drawing control rods upon stationary operation near the rated power. Method: Upon stationary operation of nuclear power plants near the rated power, an excess reactivity of nuclear fuels is controlled by entirely withdrawing control rods, and varying the feedwater enthalpy thereby changing the void amount. For this purpose, a feedwater heater is additionally disposed between a high pressure feedwater heater of a feedwater pipeway and a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, in which steams used for rising the temperature of the feedwater are introduced to the high temperature side of the high pressure feedwater heater and used again for the heating of the feedwater. In this case, the feedwater enthalpy can be increased approximately to the saturation enthalpy by adjusting such that about 30 % of the main steams are introduced to the high temperature side of the feedwater heater by a steam flow rate control valve, which enables to control the stationary operation without using control rods. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. Explosive Formulation Pilot Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pilot Plant for Explosive Formulation supports the development of new explosives that are comprised of several components. This system is particularly beneficial...

  3. Description of the power plant model BWR-plasim outlined for the Barsebaeck 2 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, P. la Cour.

    1979-08-01

    A description is given of a BWR power plant model outlined for the Barsebaeck 2 plant with data placed at our disposal by the Swedish Power Company Sydkraft A/B. The basic operations are derived and simplifications discussed. The model is implemented with a simulation system DYSYS which assures reliable solutions and easy programming. Emphasis has been placed on the models versatility and flexibility so new features are easy to incorporate. The model may be used for transient calculations for both normal plant conditions and for abnormal occurences as well as for control system studies. (author)

  4. Kinetic analyses on startup and shutdown chemistry of BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domae, Masafumi; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Inagaki, Hiromitsu

    2012-09-01

    During startup and shutdown of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants, temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of reactor water change in a wide range. The changes result in variation of conductivity and pH of the reactor water. It has been speculated that the water chemistry change is due to dissolution of the oxides on fuel claddings and structural materials. However, detailed mechanism is not known. In the present paper, trend of recent water chemistry in several BWR plants during startup and shutdown is presented. Conductivity and pH are convenient indication of coolant purity. We tried to clarify the mechanism of the change in the conductivity and the pH value during startup and shutdown, based on the water chemistry data measured. In the water chemistry data, change in chromate concentration and Ni 2+ concentration is rather large. It is assumed that change in the chromate concentration and the Ni 2+ concentration results in the time variation of the conductivity and the pH value. It is reasonable to consider that the increase in the chromate concentration and the Ni 2+ concentration is ascribed to dissolution of Cr oxides and Ni oxides, respectively. A model of dissolution of the Cr oxides and the Ni oxides is proposed. A concept of finite inventory of the Cr oxides and the Ni oxides in the coolant system is introduced. The model is as follows. Chromate is generated by oxidation of the Cr oxides and the Cr dissolution rate depends on the DO concentration. The dissolution rate of chromate is in proportion to DO concentration, the inventory of Cr and difference between solubility limit and the chromate concentration. On the other hand, Ni 2+ is formed by dissolution of the Ni oxides, and DO is not necessary in this process. The dissolution rate of Ni 2+ is in proportion to the inventory of Ni and difference between solubility limit and the Ni 2+ concentration. Coolant is continuously purified, and the chromate concentration and the Ni 2+ concentration

  5. Analysis of a BWR direct cycle forced circulation power plants operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, G.G. de.

    1973-01-01

    First, it is established a general view over the operational problems of the BWR direct cycle forced circulation power plants, and then it is analysed the possibility of the utilization of the energy purged from the turbine as an additional energy for the electrical generation. To simulate the BWR power plant and to obtain the solution of the mathematical model it was developed a computer code named ATOR which shows the feasibility of the proposed method. In this way it is shown the possibility to get a better maneuvering allowance for the BWR power plant whenever it is permitted a convenient use of the vapor extracted from the turbine for the feedwater pre-heaters of the reactor. (author)

  6. Power plant design: ESBWR - the latest passive BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, H.; Yadigaroglu, G.; Stoop, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    When General Electric said it would end development of its 670 MWe SBWR (Simplified Boiling Water Reactor), it was not quite the end of the story. Also on the drawing board at the time was the larger ESBWR (standing for either European or Economic Simplified BWR) whose goal was to provide the improved economic performance that the SBWR could not. (UK)

  7. Automatic refueling platform and CRD remote handling device for BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Takagi, Kaoru

    1978-01-01

    In BWR plants, machines for replacing fuel assemblies and control rod drives are usually operated directly by personnel. An automatic refueling platform and a CRD remote handling device aiming at radiation exposure reduction and handling perfectness are described, which are already used in BWR plants. Automation of the former is achieved in transporting fuel assemblies between a reactor pressure vessel and a fuel storage pool, shuffling fuel assemblies in a reactor core and moving fuel assemblies in a fuel storage pool. In the latter, replacement of CRDs is nearly all performed remotely. (Mori, K.)

  8. Key Parameters for Operator Diagnosis of BWR Plant Condition during a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the key information needed from nuclear power plant instrumentation to guide severe accident management and mitigation for boiling water reactor (BWR) designs (specifically, a BWR/4-Mark I), estimate environmental conditions that the instrumentation will experience during a severe accident, and identify potential gaps in existing instrumentation that may require further research and development. This report notes the key parameters that instrumentation needs to measure to help operators respond to severe accidents. A follow-up report will assess severe accident environmental conditions as estimated by severe accident simulation model analysis for a specific US BWR/4-Mark I plant for those instrumentation systems considered most important for accident management purposes.

  9. Development and recent trend of disign of BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kani, Jiro

    1977-01-01

    Many improvements have been carried out in BWR nuclear power plants from BWR-1, represented by Dresden No. 1 plant, to the present BWR-6 as the capacity has increased. In Japan, the plants up to BWR-5 have been constructed. In addition, further fine design improvements are being performed in the complete domestic manufacturing of BRWs based on the operational experiences to date. A variety of investigations on the standardization of nuclear power facilities have been progressing under the leadership of Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry since 1975. In this standardization, it is intended to forward the plant design taking eight concrete items into consideration, mainly aiming at carrying cut unerringly the maintenance and inspection, reduction of exposure of employees to radiation, and improvements of the rate of operation of plants and equipment reliability. The containment vessel has been developed in three forms, from Mark 1 through 3, adopting the pressure control system consistently since BWR-2. Mark 1 and 2 were constructed in Japan. However, these designs sacrificed the workability and increased radiation exposure during maintenance as a result of placing emphasis on the safety facilities, therefore Toshiba Electric has investigated the advanced Mark 1 type. Its features are the design for improving the work efficiency in a containment vessel, reducing the radiation exposure of workers, shortening plant construction period, and considering the aseismatic capability. In addition, the following themes are being planned as future standardization: (1) electrically driven control rod driving system, (2) improved design of reactor core, and (3) internal pump system as compared with external re-circulation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Application of process computers and colour CRT displays in the plant control room of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, M.; Hayakawa, H.; Kawahara, H.; Neda, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The recent application of a CRT display system in an 1100-MW(e) BWR plant control room and the design features of a new control room whose installation is planned for the next generation are discussed. As reactor unit capacity and the need for plant safety and reliability continue to increase, instrumentation and control equipment is growing in number and complexity. In consequence, control and supervision of plant operations require improvement. Thus, because of recent progress in the field of process computers and display equipment (colour CRTs), efficient improvements of the control room are under way in the Japanese BWR plant. In the recently constructed BWR plant (1100 MW(e)), five CRTs on the bench board and two process computers were additionally installed in the control room during the construction stage to improve plant control and supervisory functions by implementing the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident. The major functions of the new computers and display systems are to show integrated graphic displays of the plant status, to monitor the standby condition of the safety system, to show the condition of the integrated alarm system, etc. In practice, in the actual plant, this newly installed system performs well. On the basis of the experience gained in these activities, a new computerized control and monitoring system is now being designed for subsequent domestic BWR plants. This advanced system will incorporate not only the functions already mentioned, but also a surveillance guide system and plant automation. For future plants, a diagnostic system and an instructional system that can analyse a disturbance and give operational guidance to the plant operator are being developed in a government-sponsored programme. (author)

  11. Development of a computerized operator support system for BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, K.; Sekimizu, K.; Sato, N.; Araki, T.; Mori, N.

    1985-01-01

    A computerized operator support system for BWR power plant has been developed since 1980 supported by the Japanese government. The main functions of the systems are post trip operational guidance, disturbance analysis, standby system management, operational margin monitoring and control rod operational guidance. The former two functions aim at protection against incidents during operation of nuclear power plants and the latter three functions aim at their prevention. As the final stage of the development, these functions are combined with the plant supervision function and are organized as an advanced man-machine interface for BWR power plant. During the above process, operator task analyses are performed to enable synthesis of these support functions for right fit to operator tasks and to realize a hierarchical structure for CRT displays for right fit to operators cognitive needs. (author)

  12. Sophistication of operator training using BWR plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshiro, Nobuo; Endou, Hideaki; Fujita, Eimitsu; Miyakita, Kouji

    1986-01-01

    In Japanese nuclear power stations, owing to the improvement of fuel management, thorough maintenance and inspection, and the improvement of facilities, high capacity ratio has been attained. The thorough training of operators in nuclear power stations also contributes to it sufficiently. The BWR operator training center was established in 1971, and started the training of operators in April, 1974. As of the end of March, 1986, more than 1800 trainees completed training. At present, in the BWR operator training center, No.1 simulator of 800 MW class and No.2 simulator of 1100 MW class are operated for training. In this report, the method, by newly adopting it, good result was obtained, is described, that is, the method of introducing the feeling of being present on the spot into the place of training, and the new testing method introduced in retraining course. In the simulator training which is apt to place emphasis on a central control room, the method of stimulating trainees by playing the part of correspondence on the spot and heightening the training effect of multiple monitoring was tried, and the result was confirmed. The test of confirmation on the control board was added. (Kako, I.)

  13. Radiation field control at the latest BWR plants -- design principle, operational experience and future subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Energy Research Lab., Ibaraki (Japan); Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie [Hitachi Works, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Improvements of operational procedures to control water chemistry, e.g., nickel/iron control, as well as application of hardware improvements for reducing radioactive corrosion products resulted in an extremely low occupational exposure of less than 0.5 man.Sv/yr without any serious impact on the radwaste system, for BWR plants involved in the Japanese Improvement and Standardization Program. Recently, {sup 60}C radioactively in the reactor water has been increasing due to less crud fixation on the two smooth surfaces of new type high performance fuels and to the pH drop caused by chromium oxide anions released from stainless steel structures and pipings. This increase must be limited by changes in water chemistry, e.g., applications of modified nickel/iron ratio control and weak alkali control. Controlled water chemistry to optimize three points, the plant radiation level and integrities of fuel and structural materials, is the primary future subject for BWR water chemistry.

  14. Feasibility study on development of plate-type heat exchanger for BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Nobuhiro; Suda, Kenichi; Ogata, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Shinichi; Nagasaka, Kazuhiro; Fujii, Toshi; Nozawa, Toshiya; Ishihama, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Tomokazu

    2004-01-01

    In order to apply plate-type heat exchanger to RCW, TCW and FPC system in BWR plants, heat test and seismic test of RCW system heat exchanger sample were carried out. The results of these tests showed new design plate-type heat exchanger satisfied the fixed pressure resistance and seismic resistance and keep the function. The evaluation method of seismic design was constructed and confirmed by the results of tests. As anti-adhesion measure of marine organism, an ozone-water circulation method, chemical-feed method and combination of circulation of hot water and air bubbling are useful in place of the chlorine feeding method. Application of the plate-type heat exchanger to BWR plant is confirmed by these investigations. The basic principles, structure, characteristics, application limit and reliability are stated. (S.Y.)

  15. Development of a coordinated control system for BWR nuclear power plant and HVDC transmission system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.; Hara, T.; Hirayama, K.; Sekiya, K.

    1986-01-01

    The combined use of dc and ac transmissions or so-called hybrid transmission was under study, employing both dc and ac systems to enable stable transmission of 10,000 MW of electric power generated by the BWR nuclear plant, scheduled to be built about 800 km away from the center of the load. It was thus necessary to develop a hybrid power transmission control system, the hybrid power transmission system consisting of a high voltage dc transmission system (HVDC) and an ultrahigh ac transmission system (UHVAC). It was also necessary to develop a control system for HVDC transmission which protects the BWR nuclear power plant from being influenced by any change in transmission mode that occurs as a result of faults on the UHVAC side when the entire power of the BWR plant is being sent by the HVDC transmission. This paper clarifies the requirements for the HVDC system control during hybrid transmission and also during dc transmission. The control method that satisfies these requirements was studied to develop a control algorithm

  16. Natural heat transfer augmentation in passive advanced BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, R.E.; Peterson, P.F.; Greif, R.

    2001-01-01

    In the European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR), the long-term post-accident containment pressure is determined by the combination of non condensable gas pressure and steam pressure in the wet well gas space. Since there are no active systems for heat removal in the wet well, energy transmitted to the wet well gas space, by a variety of means, must be removed by passive heat transfer to the walls and suppression pool (SP). The cold suppression pool located below the hotter gas space provides a stable configuration in which convection currents are suppressed thus limiting heat and mass transfer between the gas space and pool. However, heat transfer to the walls results in natural circulation currents that can augment the heat and mass transfer to the pool surface. Using a simplified model, parametric studies are carried out to show that augmentation of the order of magnitude expected can significantly impact the heat and mass transfer to the pool. Additionally a review of available literature in the area of augmentation and mixed convection of this type is presented and indicates the need for additional experimental work in order to develop adequate models for heat and mass transfer augmentation in the configuration of a BWR suppression pool. (author)

  17. BWR 90: The ABB advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced fight water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and the total power generation costs have been low. In the development of BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to the reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher dim that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Thus, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The work is scheduled for completion in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with the 'evolutionary' design BWR 90+. The primary design goal is to develop the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is

  18. Quantitative evaluation for training results of nuclear plant operator on BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Sato, Tatsuaki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Miyakita, Kohji; Mizuno, Toshiyuki

    1985-01-01

    Recently, the reliability of neclear power plants has largely risen, and the abnormal phenomena in the actual plants are rarely encountered. Therefore, the training using simulators becomes more and more important. In BWR Operator Training Center Corp., the training of the operators of BWR power plants has been continued for about ten years using a simulator having the nearly same function as the actual plants. The recent high capacity ratio of nuclear power plants has been mostly supported by excellent operators trained in this way. Taking the opportunity of the start of operation of No.2 simulator, effort has been exerted to quantitatively grasp the effect of training and to heighten the quality of training. The outline of seven training courses is shown. The technical ability required for operators, the items of quantifying the effect of training, that is, operational errors and the time required for operation, the method of quantifying, the method of collecting the data and the results of the application to the actual training are described. It was found that this method is suitable to quantify the effect of training. (Kako, I.)

  19. New technology for BWR power plant control and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Makoto; Murata, Fumio.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are facing strong demands for higher reliability and cost-performance in their control and instrumentation systems. To meet these needs, Hitachi is developing advanced control and instrumentation technology by rationalizing the conventional technology in that field. The rationalization is done through the utilization of reliable digital technology and optical transmission technology, and others, which are now commonly used in computer applications. The goal of the development work is to ensure safe, stable operation of the plant facilities and to secure harmony between man and machine. To alleviate the burdens of the operators, the latest electronic devices are being employed to create an advanced man-machine interface, and to promote automatic operation of the plant based upon the automatic operation of individual systems. In addition, the control and instrumentation system, including the safety system, incorporates more and more digital components in order to further enhance the reliability and maintainability of the plant. (author)

  20. Recent control and instrumentation systems for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hiroaki; Higashikawa, Yuichi; Sato, Hideyuki

    1990-01-01

    For the needs of the more stable operation of nuclear power stations, the upgrading of the measurement and control system for BWRs has been promoted by positively introducing remarkably advancing electronic technology. Further, it is aimed at to construct the synthetic digitized measurement and control system for nuclear power stations to heighten the operation reliability in ABWRs. As the first step of the development in the synthetic digitization, the monitoring and control system for radioactive waste treatment was put in practical use for No.5 plant of Kashiwazaki, Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. Hitachi Ltd. has promoted the development and the application to actual plants of the measurement and control system for BWRs, in which digital control technology, optical information transmission technology and the operation-supporting technology using a computer were utilized. Hereafter, it is intended to expand the application of digital measurement and control aiming at improving the reliability, operation performance and maintainability. The nuclear power plant control complex with advanced man-machine interface-90 (NUCAMM-90) was developed, and its application to actual plants is planned. (K.I.)

  1. Operational experience of human-friendly control and instrumentation systems for BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, M.; Watanabe, T.; Suto, O.; Asahi, R.

    1987-01-01

    In recent BWR nuclear power plants in Japan, an advanced centralized monitoring and control system PODIA (Plant Operation by Displayed Information and Automation), which incorporates many operator aid functions, has been in operation since 1985. Main functions of the PODIA system as a computerized operator aid system are as follows. CRT displays for plant monitoring. Automatic controls and operation guides for plant operation. Stand-by status monitoring for engineered safety features during normal operation. Surveillance test procedure guides for engineered safety features. Integrated alarm display. The effectiveness of these functions have been proved through test and commercial operation. It has been obtained that operators have preferred PODIA much more than conventional monitoring and control systems

  2. The BWR owners' group planning guide for life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.K.; Lehnert, D.F.; Locke, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Extending the operating life of a commercial nuclear power plant has been shown to be economically beneficial to both the utility and the electric customer. As such, many utilities are planning and implementing plant life extension (PLEX) programs. A document has been developed which provides guidance to utilities in formulating a PLEX program plant for one or more boiling water reactor (BWR) plants. The guide has been developed by the BWR Owners' Group Plant Life Extension Committee. The principal bases for this guide were the BWR Pilot and Lead Plant Programs. These programs were used as models to develop the 'base plan' described in this guide. By formulating their program plant utilizing the base plan, utilities will be able to maximize the use of existing evaluations and results. The utility planner will build upon the base plan by adding any tasks or features that are unique to their programs. (author)

  3. Core damage frequency prespectives for BWR 3/4 and Westinghouse 4-loop plants based on IPE results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Camp, S.; LaChance, J.; Mary Drouin

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the core damage frequency (CDF) insights gained by analyzing the results of the Individual Plant Examinations (IPES) for two groups of plants: boiling water reactor (BWR) 3/4 plants with Reactor Core Isolation Cooling systems, and Westinghouse 4-loop plants. Wide variability was observed for the plant CDFs and for the CDFs of the contributing accident classes. On average, transients-with loss of injection, station blackout sequences, and transients with loss of decay heat removal are important contributors for the BWR 3/4 plants, while transients, station blackout sequences, and loss-of-coolant accidents are important for the Westinghouse 4-loop plants. The key factors that contribute to the variability in the results are discussed. The results are often driven by plant-specific design and operational characteristics, but differences in modeling approaches are also important for some accident classes

  4. Distributed control and data processing system with a centralized database for a BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, K.; Neda, T.; Kawamura, A.; Monta, K.; Satoh, K.

    1980-01-01

    Recent digital techniques based on changes in electronics and computer technologies have realized a very wide scale of computer application to BWR Power Plant control and instrumentation. Multifarious computers, from micro to mega, are introduced separately. And to get better control and instrumentation system performance, hierarchical computer complex system architecture has been developed. This paper addresses the hierarchical computer complex system architecture which enables more efficient introduction of computer systems to a Nuclear Power Plant. Distributed control and processing systems, which are the components of the hierarchical computer complex, are described in some detail, and the database for the hierarchical computer complex is also discussed. The hierarchical computer complex system has been developed and is now in the detailed design stage for actual power plant application. (auth)

  5. Study of environmental noise in a BWR plant like the Nuclear Power Plant Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijerina S, F.; Cruz G, M.; Amador C, C.

    2013-10-01

    In all industry type the health costs generated by the noise are high, because the noise can cause nuisance and to harm the capacity to work when causing tension and to perturb the concentration, and in more severe cases to reach to lose the sense of the hearing in the long term. The noise levels in the industry have been designated for the different types of use like residential, commercial, and industrial and silence areas. The noise can cause accidents when obstructing the communications and alarm signs. For this reason the noise should be controlled and mitigated, at a low level as reasonably is possible, taking into account that the noise is an acoustic contamination. The present study determines a bases line of the environmental noise levels in a nuclear power plant BWR-5 as Laguna Verde, (like reference) to be able to determine and to give pursuit to the possible solutions to eliminate or to limit the noise level in the different job areas. The noise levels were registered with a meter of integrative noise level (sonometer) and areas of noise exposure levels mapping the general areas in the buildings were established, being the registered maximum level of 96.94 dba in the building of the Reactor-elevation 0.65 m under the operation conditions of Extended Power Up rate (EPU) of 120% PTN. Knowing that the exposition to noises and the noise dose in the job place can influence in the health and in the safety of the workers, are extensive topics that they should be analyzed for separate as they are: to) the effects in the health of the exposure to the noise, b) how measuring the noise, c) the methods and technologies to combat and to control the noise in the industry by part of engineering area and d) the function of the industrial safety bodies as delegates of the health and safety in the task against the noise in the job. (author)

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Douglas James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-27

    The mission of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to demonstrate the safe, environmentally sound, cost effective, permanent disposal of Transuranic (TRU) waste left from production of nuclear weapons.

  7. Computerized operator support system with new man-machine interface for BWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, K.; Naito, N.; Sugawara, M.; Sato, N.; Mori, N.; Tai, I.; Fukumoto, A.; Tsuchida, M.

    1984-01-01

    Improvement of the man-machine interface of nuclear power plants is an important contribution to the further enhancement of operational safety. In addition, recent advances in computer technology seem to offer the greatest opportunity to date for achieving improvement in the man-machine interface. The development of a computerized operator support system for BWRs has been undertaken since 1980 with the support of the Japanese Government. The conceptual design of this system is based on the role of the operators. The main functions are standby system management, disturbance analysis and post-trip operational guidance. The objective of the standby system management is to monitor the standby status of the engineered safety feature during normal operation to assure its proper functioning at the onset of emergency situations. The disturbance analysis system detects disturbances in the plant in their early stages and informs the plant operators about, for example, the cause of the disturbances, the plant status and possible propagations. Consequently, operators can take corrective actions to prevent unnecessary plant shutdown. The objective of the post trip operational guide is to support operators in diagnosis and corrective action after a plant trip. Its functions are to monitor the performance of the engineered safety feature, to identify the plant status and to guide the appropriate corrective action to achieve safe plant shutdown. The information from the computerized operator support system is supplied to operators through a colour CRT operator console. The authors have evaluated the performance of various new man-machine interfacing tools and proposed a new operator console design. A prototype system has been developed and verification/validation is proceeding with a BWR plant simulator. (author)

  8. Standard technical specifications General Electric plants, BWR/6. Volume 1, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/6 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS.

  9. Standard technical specifications: General Electric plants, BWR/4. Volume 1, Revision 1: Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/4 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS.

  10. Comparison of the General Electric BWR/6 standard plant design to the IAEA NUSS codes and guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ardenne, W.H.; Sherwood, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    The General Electric BWR/6 Mark III standard plant design meets or exceeds current requirements of published International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Safety Standards (NUSS) codes and guides. This conclusion is based on a review of the NUSS codes and guides by General Electric and by the co-ordinated US review of the NUSS codes and guides during their development. General Electric compared the published IAEA NUSS codes and guides with the General Electric design. The applicability of each code and guide to the BWR/6 Mark III standard plant design was determined. Each code or guide was reviewed by a General Electric engineer knowledgeable about the structures, systems and components addressed and the technical area covered by that code or guide. The results of this review show that the BWR/6 Mark III standard plant design meets or exceeds the applicable requirements of the published IAEA NUSS codes and guides. The co-ordinated US review of the IAEA NUSS codes and guides corroborates the General Electric review. In the co-ordinated US review, the USNRC and US industry organizations (including General Electric) review the NUSS codes and guides during their development. This review ensures that the NUSS codes and guides are consistent with the current US government regulations, guidance and regulatory practices, US voluntary industry codes and standards, and accepted US industry design, construction and operational practices. If any inconsistencies are identified, comments are submitted to the IAEA by the USNRC. All US concerns submitted to the IAEA have been resolved. General Electric design reviews and the Final Design Approval (FDA) issued by the USNRC have verified that the General Electric BWR/6 Mark III standard plant design meets or exceeds the current US requirements, guidance and practices. Since these requirements, guidance and practices meet or exceed those of the NUSS codes and guides, so does the General Electric design. (author)

  11. Containment venting sliding pressure venting process for PWR and BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt, B.

    1991-01-01

    In order to reduce the residual risk associated with hypothetical severe nuclear accidents, nuclear power plants in Germany as well as in certain other European countries have been or will be backfitted with a system for filtered containment venting. During venting system process design, particular importance is attached to the requirements regarding, for example, high aerosol loading capability, provision for decay heat removal from the scrubber unit, the aerosol spectrum to be retained and entirely passive functioning of the scrubber unit. The aerosol spectrum relevant for process design and testing varies depending on aerosol concentrations, the time at which venting is commenced and whether there is an upstream wetwell, etc. Because of this the Reactor Safety Commission in Germany has specified that SnO 2 with a mass mean diameter of approximately 0.5 μm should be used as an enveloping test aerosol. To meet the above-mentioned requirements, a combined venturi scrubber system was developed which comprises a venturi section and a filter demister section and is operated in the sliding pressure mode. This scrubber system was tested using a full-scale model and has now been installed in 14 PWR and BWR plants in Germany and Finland

  12. The integrity of NSSS and containment during extended station blackout for Kuosheng BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Keng-Hsien; Yuann, Yng-Ruey; Lin, Ansheng [Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research

    2017-11-15

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident occurring on March 11, 2011, reveals that Station Blackout (SBO) may last longer than 8 h. However, the original design may not have sufficient capacity to cope with a SBO for more than 8 h. In view of this, Taiwan Power Company has initiated several enhancements to mitigate the severity of the extended SBO. Based on the improved plant configuration, a SBO coping analysis is performed in this study to assess whether the Kuosheng BWR plant has sufficient capability to cope with SBO for 24 h with respect to maintaining the integrity of the reactor core and containment. The analyses in the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) and the containment are based on the RETRAN-3D and GOTHIC models, respectively. The flow conditions calculated by RETRAN-3D during the event are retrieved and input to the GOTHIC containment model to determine the containment pressure and temperature response. These boundary conditions include SRV flow rate, SRV flow enthalpy, and total reactor coolant system leakage flow rate.

  13. The integrity of NSSS and containment during extended station blackout for Kuosheng BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Keng-Hsien; Yuann, Yng-Ruey; Lin, Ansheng

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident occurring on March 11, 2011, reveals that Station Blackout (SBO) may last longer than 8 h. However, the original design may not have sufficient capacity to cope with a SBO for more than 8 h. In view of this, Taiwan Power Company has initiated several enhancements to mitigate the severity of the extended SBO. Based on the improved plant configuration, a SBO coping analysis is performed in this study to assess whether the Kuosheng BWR plant has sufficient capability to cope with SBO for 24 h with respect to maintaining the integrity of the reactor core and containment. The analyses in the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) and the containment are based on the RETRAN-3D and GOTHIC models, respectively. The flow conditions calculated by RETRAN-3D during the event are retrieved and input to the GOTHIC containment model to determine the containment pressure and temperature response. These boundary conditions include SRV flow rate, SRV flow enthalpy, and total reactor coolant system leakage flow rate.

  14. ORCOST-2, PWR, BWR, HTGR, Fossil Fuel Power Plant Cost and Economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, L.C.; Myers, M.L.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ORCOST2 estimates the cost of electrical energy production from single-unit steam-electric power plants. Capital costs and operating and maintenance costs are calculated using base cost models which are included in the program for each of the following types of plants: PWR, BWR, HTGR, coal, oil, and gas. The user may select one of several input/output options for calculation of capital cost, operating and maintenance cost, levelized energy costs, fixed charge rate, annual cash flows, cumulative cash flows, and cumulative discounted cash flows. Options include the input of capital cost and/or fixed charge rate to override the normal calculations. Transmission and distribution costs are not included. Fuel costs must be input by the user. 2 - Method of solution: The code follows the guidelines of AEC Report NUS-531. A base capital-cost model and a base operating- and maintenance-cost model are selected and adjusted for desired size, location, date, etc. Costs are discounted to the year of first commercial operation and levelized to provide annual cost of electric power generation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The capital cost models are of doubtful validity outside the 500 to 1500 MW(e) range

  15. Global vibrations in the wetwell condensation process caused by LOCA in BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerndahl, O.; Andersson, Magnus

    1998-12-01

    During the last years a substantial part of third part review work related to dynamical loadings has been review of loading specifications dealing with vibrations in containment building related to so called LOCA-events in Swedish BWR plants. Compared to other loading categories characterised as global vibrations these secondary effects of LOCA-events are complex to analyse. One experience from the review work at SAQ up to now is that it is not fully clear what prediction methods and what model idealisations are the most adequate for structural integrity verification on mechanical systems as pressure vessels and piping under such loading conditions. At SAQ Teknik a project work has been carried out to investigate the general status of the methodology used today in Sweden and a work to in the long term develop simplified prediction models and methods for the loading categories condensation oscillations (CO) and chugging (CH). The work was initially concentrated on a study of the background of the methodology which was developed for these type of loading in American BWR-containments of the Mark-II design. The methodology was developed by General Electric, GE, in cooperation with the Mark-II plant owners. The methodology used in Sweden to predict vibrations in BWR containments of this design is with some minor modifications very close to technique developed by GE. The methodology developed by GE is the only accepted by USNRC for the Mark-II design and could be found as reference in Standard Review Plan 6.2.1.1.C, Rev 6 - August 1984. Based on identical physical assumptions about the dynamic behaviour of the building structure and the water in the suppression pool, mathematical models are derived in this report for predictions of secondary structure response spectra for loading conditions as global vibrations during CO and CH. Based on parameters identified by so called one pipe experiments responses my be predicted. By use of these derived mathematical models as a

  16. Experiences with monitoring and control of microbiological growth in the standby service water system of a BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisson, P.S.; Whitaker, J.M.; Neilson, H.L.; Mayne, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    In 1989, the Unites States Nuclear Regulatory Commission formally recognized the potential for nuclear accidents resulting from microbiological causes. Such causes range from loss of heat transfer due to microbiological fouling, to loss of system integrity caused by microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). As a result of these potential problems, monitoring, mitigation, and control procedures must be developed by all regulated plants. In developing a control and mitigation strategy for the standby service water system of a boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant, numerous monitoring techniques were employed to evaluate effectiveness. This paper describes the monitoring techniques that were evaluated, and those that ultimately proved to be effective

  17. Analysis of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in an A BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escorcia O, D.; Salazar S, E.

    2016-09-01

    The present work aims to recreate the accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan on March 11, 2011, making use of an academic simulator of forced circulation of the A BWR reactor provided by the IAEA to know the scope of this simulator. The simulator was developed and distributed by the IAEA for academic purposes and contains the characteristics and general elements of this reactor to be able to simulate transients and failures of different types, allowing also to observe the general behavior of the reactor, as well as several phenomena and present systems in the same. Is an educational tool of great value, but it does not have a scope that allows the training of plant operators. To recreate the conditions of the Fukushima accident in the simulator, we first have to know what events led to this accident, as well as the actions taken by operators and managers to reduce the consequences of this accident; and the sequence of events that occurred during the course of the accident. Differences in the nuclear power plant behavior are observed and interpreted throughout the simulation, since the Fukushima plant technology and the simulator technology are not the same, although they have several elements in common. The Fukushima plant had an event that by far exceeded the design basis, which triggered in an accident that occurred in the first place by a total loss of power supply, followed by the loss of cooling systems, causing a level too high in temperature, melting the core and damaging the containment accordingly, allowing the escape of hydrogen and radioactive material. As a result of the simulation, was determined that the scope of the IAEA academic simulator reaches the entrance of the emergency equipment, so is able to simulate almost all the events occurred at the time of the earthquake and the arrival of the tsunami in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi. However, due to its characteristics, is not able to simulate later

  18. Uncertainty analysis of suppression pool heating during an ATWS in a BWR-5 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Johnsen, G.W.; Lellouche, G.S.

    1994-03-01

    The uncertainty has been estimated of predicting the peak temperature in the suppression pool of a BWR power plant, which undergoes an NRC-postulated Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS). The ATWS is initiated by recirculation-pump trips, and then leads to power and flow oscillations as they had occurred at the LaSalle-2 Power Station in March of 1988. After limit-cycle oscillations have been established, the turbines are tripped, but without MSIV closure, allowing steam discharge through the turbine bypass into the condenser. Postulated operator actions, namely to lower the reactor vessel pressure and the level elevation in the downcomer, are simulated by a robot model which accounts for operator uncertainty. All balance of plant and control systems modeling uncertainties were part of the statistical uncertainty analysis that was patterned after the Code Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU) evaluation methodology. The analysis showed that the predicted suppression-pool peak temperature of 329.3 K (133 degrees F) has a 95-percentile uncertainty of 14.4 K (26 degrees F), and that the size of this uncertainty bracket is dominated by the experimental uncertainty of measuring Safety and Relief Valve mass flow rates under critical-flow conditions. The analysis showed also that the probability of exceeding the suppression-pool temperature limit of 352.6 K (175 degrees F) is most likely zero (it is estimated as < 5-104). The square root of the sum of the squares of all the computed peak pool temperatures is 350.7 K (171.6 degrees F)

  19. Pilot plant environmental conditions (OPDD Appendix C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, C.M.; Whitson, M.E.; Coggi, J.V.

    1978-08-15

    This is Appendix C to the Pilot Plant Overall Plant design description document for the 10-MW pilot central receiver plant to be located at Barstow, California. The environmental design criteria to be used for plant design day performance, operational limits, and survival environmental limits are specified. Data are presented on insolation, wind, temperature, and other meteorological conditions. (WHK)

  20. BWR 90 and BWR 90+: Two advanced BWR design generations from ABB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced light water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and total power generation costs have been low. When developing the BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to a reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher than that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Hence, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The review work was completed in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with an 'evolutionary' design called BWR 90+, which aims at developing the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is performed by ABB Atom

  1. Direct torus venting analysis for Chinshan BWR-4 plant with MARK-I containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuann, Yng-Ruey, E-mail: ryyuann@iner.gov.tw

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Study the effectiveness of Direct Torus Venting System (DTVS) during extended SBO of 24 h for Chinshan MARK-I plant. • Containment response is analyzed by GOTHIC based on boundary conditions from RETRAN calculation. • Analyses are performed with and without DTVS, respectively. • Suppression pool is sub-divided and thermal stratification is observed. - Abstract: The Chinshan plant, owned by Taiwan Power Company, has twin units of BWR-4 reactor and MARK-I containment. Both units have been operating at rated core thermal power of 1840 MWt. The existing Direct Torus Venting System (DTVS) is the main system used for venting the containment during the extended station blackout event. The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of the DTVS venting on the response of the containment pressure and temperature. The reactor is depressurized by manually opening the safety relief valves (SRVs) during the SBO, which causes the mass and energy to be discharged into and heat up the suppression pool. The RETRAN model is used to calculate the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) response and generate the SRV blowdown conditions, including SRV pressure, enthalpy, and mass flow rate. These conditions are then used as the time-dependent boundary conditions for the GOTHIC code to calculate the containment pressure and temperature response. The DTVS model is established in the GOTHIC model based on the venting size, venting piping loss, venting initiation time, and venting source. The lumped volume model, 1-D coarse-mesh model, and 3-D coarse-mesh model are considered in the torus volume. The calculation is first done without DTVS venting to establish a reference basis. Then a case with DTVS available is performed. Comparison of the two cases shows that the existing DTVS design is effective in mitigating the severity of the containment pressure and temperature transients. The results also show that the 1-D coarse-mesh model may not be appropriate since a

  2. Pilot plants for polymers: Safety considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, C.F.; Zvanut, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Air Products and Chemicals is a major manufacturer of polyvinyl alcohol, vinyl acetate-ethylene emulsions and suspension PVC. Polyvinyl alcohol is a water soluble polymer and its primary end-uses are as a textile sizing agent and in adhesives. The emulsion products are used primarily in adhesives, paper, paints, and non-wovens. In order to support these business areas and to expand into new product lines, Air Products operates several polymer pilot plants. The safe operation of these pilot plants mandates careful attention to both design and operating procedures. Often, more care is needed in operating a polymer pilot plant than in other pilot plants or manufacturing facilities.

  3. Plant analyzer for high-speed interactive simulation of BWR plant transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.; Wulff, W.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A combination of advanced modeling techniques and modern, special-purpose peripheral minicomputer technology was utilized to develop a plant analyzer which affords realistic predictions of plant transients and severe off-normal events in LWR power plants through on-line simulations at speeds up to 10 times faster than actual process speeds. The mathematical models account for nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous two-phase flow effects in the coolant, for acoustical effects in the steam line and for the dynamics of the entire balance of the plant. Reactor core models include point kinetics with reactivity feedback due to void fraction, fuel temperature, coolant temperature, and boron concentration as well as a conduction model for predicting fuel and clad temperatures. Control systems and trip logic for plant protection systems are also simulated. The AD10 of Applied Dynamics International, a special-purpose peripheral processor, is used as the principal hardware of the plant analyzer

  4. Plant analyzer development for high-speed interactive simulation of BWR plant transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced modeling techniques have been combined with modern, special-purpose peripheral minicomputer technology to develop a plant analyzer which provides realistic and accurate predictions of plant transients and severe off-normal events in nuclear power plants through on-line simulations at speeds of approximately 10 times faster than actual process speeds. The new simulation technology serves not only for carrying out routinely and efficiently safety analyses, optimizations of emergency procedures and design changes, parametric studies for obtaining safety margins and for generic training but also for assisting plant operations. Five modeling principles are presented which serve to achieve high-speed simulation of neutron kinetics, thermal conduction, nonhomogeneous and nonequilibrium two-phase flow coolant dynamics, steam line acoustical effects, and the dynamics of the balance of plant and containment systems, control systems and plant protection systems. Principles for selecting numerical integration techniques are presented, as well as efficient techniques for reducing mathematical operations during the simulation. Available computer architectures are compared with regard to their suitability for simulating complex systems. The AD10 peripheral processor's architecture is presented. The BNL Plant Analyzer is described and simulation results are presented. It is shown that the plant analyzer surpasses supercomputers in simulation speed and produces the same results as large systems codes for a wide variety of transients, but at considerably lower cost than mainframe computers. (author)

  5. Development of advanced BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Masatoshi

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese technology and domestic production of BWR type nuclear power plants have been established through the experiences in the construction and operation of BWRs in addition to the technical agreement with the General Electric Co. In early days, the plants experienced some trouble such as stress corrosion cracking and some inconvenience in the operation and maintenance. The government, electric power companies and BWR manufacturers have endeavored to standardize and improve the design of LWRs for the purpose of improving the safety, reliability and the rate of operation and reducing the radiation exposure dose of plant workers. The first and second stages of the standardization and improvement of LWRs have been completed. Five manufacturers of BWRs in the world have continued the conceptual design of a new version of BWR power plants. It was concluded that this is the most desirable version of BWR nuclear power stations, but the technical and economic evaluation must be made before the commercial application. Six electric power companies and three manufacturers of BWRs in Japan set up the organization to develop the technology in cooperation. The internal pump system, the new control rod drive mechanism and others are the main features. (Kako, I.)

  6. Transient thermohydraulic computations in steam piping systems and comparison with start-up measurements in BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, L.; Mohammadian, S.; Slegers, L.

    1986-01-01

    The safe design of piping systems in a nuclear power plant requires structural analysis for all specified static and dynamic loads, including fluid dynamic forces due to operational and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) transients. For the reliable prediction of fluid forces, boundary conditions such as the characterisation of a closing isolation valve with the proper friction coefficient need to be carefully chosen. A valve model is described which implicitly determines the downstroke of the valve piston. Pre- and postcalculations were performed for the valve closure tests carried out during start-up at the BWR nuclear power plant at Kruemmel, West Germany. The dynamic friction coefficient in a valve is introduced and its influence on the fluid dynamic forcing function in piping systems is examined. (author)

  7. Risk-informed decision-making analysis for the electrical raceway fire barrier systems on a BWR-4 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ching-Hui; Lin, Tsu-Jen; Kao, Tsu-Mu; Chen, Chyn-Rong

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a risk-informed decision-making approach used to resolve the fire barrier issue in a BWR-4 nuclear plant where Appendix R separation requirements cannot be met without installing additional fire protection features such as electrical raceway fire barrier system. The related risk measures in CDF (core damage frequency) and LERF (large early release frequency) of the fire barrier issue can be determined by calculating the difference in plant risks between various alternative cases and that met the requirement of the Appendix R. In some alternative cases, additional early-detection and fast-response fire suppression systems are suggested. In some other cases, cable re-routing of some improper layout of non-safety related cables are required. Sets of fire scenarios are re-evaluated more detailed by reviewing the cable damage impact for the BWR-4 plant. The fire hazard model, COMPBRM III-e, is used in this study and the dominant results in risk measures are benchmarked with the CFD code, FDS 2.0, to ensure that the risk impact of fire barrier is estimated accurately in the risk-informed decision making. The traditional deterministic qualitative methods, such as defense-in-depth, safety margin and post-fire safety shutdown capability are also proceeded. The value-impact analysis for proposed alternatives of fire wrapping required by Appendix R has been completed for technical basis of the exemption on Appendix R application. The outcome of the above analysis should be in compliance with the regulatory guidelines (RG) 1.174 and 1.189 for the applications in the risk-informed decision-making of the fire wrapping issues. (author)

  8. A computerized operator support system for BWR power plant during normal and abnormal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, K.; Sato, N.; Tsunoyama, S.; Sekimizu, K.; Mori, N.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized operator support system for BWR was developed based on the operators tasks which are divided into problem solving and controlling. Problem solving comprises fault managing and planning tasks. One of the operator supports for the problem solving is the automatic diagnostic support. However, the operator supports for controlling tasks are still important, e.g. to support its rule memory and rule execution. In the system presented here, operator supports are considered for both of these two categories. In the paper two subsystems for the latter are mainly described. (author)

  9. Electrical equipment performance under severe accident conditions (BWR/Mark 1 plant analysis): Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, P.R.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Medford, G.T.

    1986-09-01

    The purpose of the Performance Evaluation of Electrical Equipment during Severe Accident States Program is to determine the performance of electrical equipment, important to safety, under severe accident conditions. In FY85, a method was devised to identify important electrical equipment and the severe accident environments in which the equipment was likely to fail. This method was used to evaluate the equipment and severe accident environments for Browns Ferry Unit 1, a BWR/Mark I. Following this work, a test plan was written in FY86 to experimentally determine the performance of one selected component to two severe accident environments.

  10. Characterization of solidified radioactive wastes produced at Montalto di Castro BWR plant with reference to the site storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donato, A.; Ricci, G.; Pace, A.

    1985-01-01

    The cement solidification of the Montalto di Castro BWR plant radwastes has been studied both from the point of view of the mixtures of formulation and of the product characterization. Five radwaste types and mixtures of them have been taken into consideration, determining the best chemical formulations starting from the compressive strenght as leading parameter. The solidified products have been characterized from the point of view of the freeze and thawing resistance, the water immersion resistance, the leachability, the dimensional changes and the free standing water. All the tests have been performed taking into account the real site conditions, so the leaching tests and the water immersion tests have been carried out using sea water and table water as leachant

  11. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: Metal components of BWR containment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    plant components addressed in the reports. This report addresses the metal components of BWR containment systems. The primary ageing mechanisms that may potentially impact the structural capacity, leaktight integrity, or service life of BWR containments are corrosion of metal components and stress corrosion cracking of bellows. Other potential degradation mechanisms include fatigue and mechanical wear. Areas of concern are where surfaces are inaccessible for inspection (e.g areas adjacent to floors, where the containment vessel is embedded in concrete, and locations adjacent to equipment or other structures)

  12. Containment venting as a mitigation technique for BWR MARK I plant ATWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Containment venting is studied as a mitigation strategy for preventing or delaying severe fuel damage following hypothetical BWR Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) accidents initiated by MSIV-closure, and compounded by failure of the Standby Liquid Control (SLC) system injection of sodium pentaborate solution and by the failure of manually initiated control rod insertion. The venting of primary containment after reaching 75 psia (0.52 MPa) is found to result in the release of the vented steam inside the reactor building, and to result in inadequate Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) for any system pumping from the pressure suppression pool. CONTAIN code calculations show that personnel access to large portions of the reactor building would be lost soon after the initiation of venting and that the temperatures reached would be likely to result in independent equipment failures. It is concluded that containment venting would be more likely to cause or to hasten the onset of severe fuel damage than to prevent or to delay it. Two alternative strategies that do not require containment venting, but that could delay or prevent severe fuel damage, are analyzed. BWR-LTAS code results are presented for a successful mitigation strategy in which the reactor vessel is depressurized, and for one in which the reactor vessel remains at pressure

  13. Design of a uranium recovery pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The engineering design of a pilot plant of uranium recover, is presented. The diagrams and specifications of the equipments such as pipelines, pumps, values tanks, filters, engines, etc... as well as metallic structure and architetonic design is also presented. (author)

  14. Standard Technical Specifications General Electric plants, BWR/4:Bases (Sections 3.4-3.10). Volume 3, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/4 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains he Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1-3.3 of the improved STS. This document, Volume 3, contains the Bases for Sections 3.4-3.10 of the improved STS

  15. Experience for plant monitoring design in Italian BWR NPP and future trends in man-machine interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maestri, F.; Sepielli, M.

    1987-01-01

    TMI accidental sequence and daily-gained operating experience on italian and abroad NPPs have affected in depth the approach to the design of information presentation to the Control Room staff. It has been cleared that most problems in plant operation arise from a poor and inadequate information system. The main lacks have been identified in the Control Room lay-out and information organization. This has pushed designers both to improve the Control Room environment and to better exploit the computer data processing and data presentation capabilities. The paper deals with the basic criteria for the design and the design review of a computerized system to be inserted in a hybrid Control Room in Italian 981 Mwe BWR-6 NPP, where the concepts outlined above were taken-up from the very beginning. The Control Room keeps conventional instrumentation arranged in a human-factor lay-out, according to post-TMI requirements, and adds a powerful computer-based information system for advanced alarm presentation and plant supervision during both normal and emergency conditions with high data reliability. Colour videounits and operating panels are functionally integrated to create powerful operator work-stations. Emphasis is mostly given on the revision work for video-unit displays and Man-System Communication carried out in cooperation with Halden Reactor Project human factor and plant operation experts. The work peculiarity has been a strong care on the integration between conventional and computerized information presentation, with particular regard to common information and code consistency. (author)

  16. BWR Steam Dryer Alternating Stress Assessment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hambric, S. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ziada, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an overview of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) steam dryer design; the fatigue cracking failures that occurred at the Quad Cities (QC) plants and their root causes; a history of BWR Extended Power Uprates (EPUs) in the USA; and a discussion of steam dryer modifications/replacements, alternating stress mechanisms on steam dryers, and structural integrity evaluations (static and alternating stress).

  17. BWR operation for life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancavage, P.

    1987-01-01

    Most nuclear power plant life extension studies conducted to date focus on the technology, licensing, and economics of extended service life. The most significant factor in plant longevity, however, is proper operation and maintenance. This paper highlights the benefits of boiling water reactor (BWR) operation for life extension and discusses specific recommendations that will enhance the prospects for safe, reliable, and economic power production in the long term. The benefits of BWR operation for life extension include a lower cost of electric energy production, increased capacity and availability factors, a lower forced outage rate, and reduced occupational exposure to radiation. Operating experience and advanced in technology have provided a wealth of knowledge that can be used to develop specific recommendations for adding years to the expected life of BWR plants. This paper discusses key factors in operation for life extension

  18. GARLIC-B. A digital code for real-time calculation of the transient behaviour of nodal and global core and plant parameters of BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercan, Y.; Hoeld, A.; Lupas, O.

    1982-04-01

    A program description of the code GARLIC-B is given. The code is based on a nonlinear transient model for BWR nuclear power plants which consist of a 3D-core, a top plenum, steam removal and feed water systems and a downcomer with main coolant recirculation pumps. The core is subdivided into a number of superboxes and flow channels with different coolant mass flow rates. Subcooled boiling within these channels has an important reactivity feed back effect and has to be taken also into account. The code computes the local and global core and plant transient situation as dependent on both the inherent core dynamics and external control actions, i.e., disturbances such as motions of control rod banks, changes of mass flow rates of coolant, feed water and steam outlet. The case of a pressure-controlled reactor operation is also considered. (orig./GL) [de

  19. BIMOMASS GASIFICATION PILOT PLANT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a gasification pilot program using two biomass feedstocks: bagasse pellets and wood chips. he object of the program was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its suitability as a fuel for gas-turbine-based power generation cycles. he f...

  20. Panorama of the BWR reactors - Evolution of the concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, C.; Uhrig, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Safety Engineering Department - PEPS-G (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Nowadays, a fleet of more than 50 boiling water reactors (BWR) are in operation in the world. This article gives a short overview on the developments of nuclear power plants of the BWR type, with a focus on the European builds. It describes the technical bases from the early designs in the fifties, sketches the innovations of the sixties and seventies in the types BWR 69 and 72 (Baulinie 69 and 72) and gives an outlook of a possible next generation BWR. A promising approach in recent BWR developments is the the combination of passive safety systems with established design basis

  1. Study of environmental noise in a BWR plant like the Nuclear Power Plant Laguna Verde; Estudio de ruido ambiental en una planta BWR como la Central Nuclear Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Cruz G, M.; Amador C, C., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In all industry type the health costs generated by the noise are high, because the noise can cause nuisance and to harm the capacity to work when causing tension and to perturb the concentration, and in more severe cases to reach to lose the sense of the hearing in the long term. The noise levels in the industry have been designated for the different types of use like residential, commercial, and industrial and silence areas. The noise can cause accidents when obstructing the communications and alarm signs. For this reason the noise should be controlled and mitigated, at a low level as reasonably is possible, taking into account that the noise is an acoustic contamination. The present study determines a bases line of the environmental noise levels in a nuclear power plant BWR-5 as Laguna Verde, (like reference) to be able to determine and to give pursuit to the possible solutions to eliminate or to limit the noise level in the different job areas. The noise levels were registered with a meter of integrative noise level (sonometer) and areas of noise exposure levels mapping the general areas in the buildings were established, being the registered maximum level of 96.94 dba in the building of the Reactor-elevation 0.65 m under the operation conditions of Extended Power Up rate (EPU) of 120% PTN. Knowing that the exposition to noises and the noise dose in the job place can influence in the health and in the safety of the workers, are extensive topics that they should be analyzed for separate as they are: to) the effects in the health of the exposure to the noise, b) how measuring the noise, c) the methods and technologies to combat and to control the noise in the industry by part of engineering area and d) the function of the industrial safety bodies as delegates of the health and safety in the task against the noise in the job. (author)

  2. High-speed BWR power plant simulations on the special-purpose peripheral processor AD10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    A newly developed technique is described for fast, on-line simulations of normal and accidental transients in nuclear power plants. The technique is based on the utilization of the special-purpose peripheral processor AD10, which is specifically designed for high-speed systems simulations through integration of large systems of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The Peach Bottom-II Boiling Water Reactor power plant has been simulated and results are presented. It is shown that the new technique not only advances safety analyses but also supports plant monitoring, failure diagnosis and accident mitigation, as well as the training of nuclear power plant operators. (author)

  3. Fusion pilot plant scoping study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierszewski, P.J.; Blevins, P.J.; Brunnader, H.; Natalizio, A.; Cumyn, P.; Dean, B.; Smith, S.; Galambos, J.; Holloway, C.; Stremlaw, J.; Williams, G.

    1994-05-01

    CFFTP Pilot is representative of a class of machines that, like NPD in the CANDU development program, could test the key reactor core technologies on an integrated power reactor relevant system (materials, conditions, configuration). But in order to reduce costs, the machine would operate at reduced neutron flux relative to a power reactor, would not produce electricity, and would not test superconducting magnets. This design shows research directions towards a machine that could provide integrated nuclear testing (but not ignition physics) at a cost of about 1/3 ITER CDA. The test volume - the outboard blanket volume - would be comparable to the test port volume on ITER CDA, while the fluence and power density would be about 1/4 ITER CDA. 91 refs., 43 tabs., 45 figs

  4. Digital controller for feedwater and recirculation flow control of BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Ito, Tetsuo; Omori, Takashi; Iida, Hiroshi; Yanai, Katsuya.

    1980-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, it is required to operate the plants on load-following basis as the proportion of nuclear power plants in whole power supply network has been increasing. For this purpose, the requirements of more reliable, more automated plants and of the flexibility of operation are becoming serious. To respond to such demands, digital controllers are inevitable because analog controllers are limited in their controllability. It is also required to devise more intelligent systems such as those enabling strengthened diagnostic functions or sophisticated predictive control. On such background, duplicated redundant digital control system has been developed, using two control microcomputers and uniting the conventional feed-water control system and recirculation flow control system. The report discribes on the design concept for this digital controller, the hardware and software of the control system and the confirmation of the performance by simulation. The verifying test for the control performance, the simulation test for recirculation pump abnormality, the test for predictive control and the test on the response characteristics of recirculation system were carried out. The digital controller attained the MTBF 10 times as much, and the down time ratio 1/5 as small as those of the analog control systems. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  5. Development of a dynamic model of a BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonboel, E.

    1975-12-01

    A description is given of a one-dimensional steady-state model of a high-pressure steam turbine, a low-pressure steam turbine, a moisture separator, a reheater, a condenser, feedwater heaters and feedwater pump for a nuclear power plant. The model is contained in the program ''TURBPLANT''. The dynamic part of this model is presented in part II of this report. (author)

  6. Pilot plant for biohidrometallurgical production of copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conić Vesna T.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, technical and technological characteristics of pilot plant for biohydrometallurgical production of copper financed by Ministry of Science and Environment Protection of Serbia, in the frame of capital providing for scientific research for the period 2006-2008 is presented. Presented within this project is the contribution and capability of the Institute for Mining and Metallurgy Bor to carry out the Fp6 IP project: 'Biotechnology for Metal Bearing Materials in Europe (BioMinE'. In the pilot plant, processes such as: microbiological leaching, pressures oxidation, chemical purification of solutions, solvent extraction and electrowining of copper were carried out. Bioleaching can treat complex copper concentrates which are either unacceptable to smelting or attract high penalties. Some of the elements penalized in smelting (for example zinc are dissolved in the bioleach process and can be recovered for sale. This may often allow an increased recovery of a few percent in the production of the copper concentrate. Bioleaching can be used in either small or large cathodic copper production from copper concentrate. Bioleaching uses conventional upstream and downstream process technology and the unit operation itself has been proven in the gold industry. For these reasons, this work describes the pilot plant for biotechnological production of copper from RTB Bor resources.

  7. Management of radioactive waste from a major core damage in a BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkert, J.; Christensen, H.; Torstenfelt, B.

    1990-01-01

    Large amounts of fission products would be released in case of a major core damage in a nuclear power reactor. In this theoretical study the core damage is caused by a loss of coolant accident followed by a complete loss of all electric power for about 30 minutes resulting in the release of 10% of the core inventory of noble gases. A second case has also been briefly studied, in which the corresponding core damage is supposed to be created merely by the complete loss of electric power during a limited time period. It appears from the study that the radioactive waste generated as a consequence of an accident of the extent can be managed in the reference reactor with only minor modifications required in the waste plant. The detailed results of the study are reactor specific, but many of the findings and recommendations are generally applicable. (author) 28 refs

  8. Institutional implications of establishing safety goals for nuclear power plants. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, F.A.; Hooper, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to anticipate and address institutional problems that may arise from the adoption of NRC's proposed Policy Statement on Safety Goals for Nuclear Power Plants. The report emphasizes one particular category of institutional problems: the possible use of safety goals as a basis for legal challenges to NRC actions, and the resolution of such challenges by the courts. Three types of legal issues are identified and analyzed. These are, first, general legal issues such as access to the legal system, burden of proof, and standard of proof. Second is the particular formulation of goals. Involved here are such questions as sustainable rationale, definitions, avoided issues, vagueness of time and space details, and degree of conservatism. Implementation brings up the third set of issues which include interpretation and application, linkage to probabilistic risk assessment, consequences as compared to events, and the use of results.

  9. BWR zinc addition Sourcebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Alfred J.

    2014-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have been injecting zinc into the primary coolant via the reactor feedwater system for over 25 years for the purpose of controlling primary system radiation fields. The BWR zinc injection process has evolved since the initial application at the Hope Creek Nuclear Station in 1986. Key transitions were from the original natural zinc oxide (NZO) to depleted zinc oxide (DZO), and from active zinc injection of a powdered zinc oxide slurry (pumped systems) to passive injection systems (zinc pellet beds). Zinc addition has continued through various chemistry regimes changes, from normal water chemistry (NWC) to hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC with noble metals (NobleChem™) for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of reactor internals and primary system piping. While past reports published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) document specific industry experience related to these topics, the Zinc Sourcebook was prepared to consolidate all of the experience gained over the past 25 years. The Zinc Sourcebook will benefit experienced BWR Chemistry, Operations, Radiation Protection and Engineering personnel as well as new people entering the nuclear power industry. While all North American BWRs implement feedwater zinc injection, a number of other BWRs do not inject zinc. This Sourcebook will also be a valuable resource to plants considering the benefits of zinc addition process implementation, and to gain insights on industry experience related to zinc process control and best practices. This paper presents some of the highlights from the Sourcebook. (author)

  10. Plan for the civil reprocessing pilot plant of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.Y.; Chen, M.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the R and D work, experience on plant operation and site situation, the necessity and feasibility of building a pilot plant for civil reprocessing in China are discussed. The capacity of 100 kg HM/day (LWR) and 3 kg HM/day (MTR) has been proposed. The plant consists of cold testing facility and hot pilot facility. It is expected to complete the pilot plant in 1990's. This paper also describes the purpose, scale, process and equipment of the pilot plant

  11. Vitrification pilot plant experiences at Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akgunduz, N.; Gimpel, R.F.; Paine, D.; Pierce, V.H.

    1997-01-01

    A one metric ton/day Vitrification Pilot Plant (VITPP) at Fernald, Ohio, simulated the vitrification of radium and radon bearing silo residues using representative non-radioactive surrogates containing high concentrations of lead, sulfates, and phosphates. The vitrification process was carried out at temperatures of 1,150 to 1,350 C. The VITPP processed glass for seven months, until a breach of the melter containment vessel suspended operations. More than 70,000 pounds of surrogate glass were produced by the VITPP. Experiences, lessons learned, and path forward will be presented

  12. Secondary systems of PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, N.

    1981-01-01

    The secondary systems of a nuclear power plant comprises the steam, condensate and feedwater cycle, the steam plant auxiliary or ancillary systems and the cooling water systems. The presentation gives a general review about the main systems which show a high similarity of PWR and BWR plants. (orig./RW)

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

  14. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives

  15. Analysis of dose rates received around the storage pool for irradiated control rods in a BWR nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ródenas, J; Abarca, A; Gallardo, S

    2011-08-01

    BWR control rods are activated by neutron reactions in the reactor. The dose produced by this activity can affect workers in the area surrounding the storage pool, where activated rods are stored. Monte Carlo (MC) models for neutron activation and dose assessment around the storage pool have been developed and validated. In this work, the MC models are applied to verify the expected reduction of dose when the irradiated control rod is hanged in an inverted position into the pool. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. TASK 3: PILOT PLANT GASIFIER TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fusselman, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. Design, fabrication and initial testing of the pilot plant compact gasifier was completed in 2011 by a development team led by AR. Findings from this initial test program, as well as subsequent gasifier design and pilot plant testing by AR, identified a number of technical aspects to address prior to advancing into a demonstration-scale gasifier design. Key among these were an evaluation of gasifier ability to handle thermal environments with highly reactive coals; ability to handle high ash content, high ash fusion temperature coals with reliable slag discharge; and to develop an understanding of residual properties pertaining to gasification kinetics as carbon conversion approaches 99%. The gasifier did demonstrate the ability to withstand the thermal environments of highly reactive Powder River Basin coal, while achieving high carbon conversion in < 0.15 seconds residence time. Continuous operation with the high ash fusion temperature Xinyuan coal was demonstrated in long duration testing, validating suitability of outlet design as well as downstream slag discharge systems. Surface area and porosity data were obtained for the Xinyuan and Xinjing coals for carbon conversion ranging from 85% to 97%, and showed a pronounced downward trend in surface area per unit mass carbon as conversion increased. Injector faceplate measurements showed no incremental loss of material over the course of these experiments, validating the commercially traceable design approach and supportive of long injector life goals. Hybrid testing of PRB and natural gas was successfully completed over a wide range of natural gas feed content, providing test data to anchor predictions

  17. Risk evaluation of the alternate-3A modification to the ATWS prevention/mitigation system in a BWR-4, MARK-II power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, I.A.; Bari, R.A.; Karol, R.; Shiu, K.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present a risk evaluation of the ATWS Alternate 3A modification proposed by NRC staff in NUREG-0460 to the ATWS prevention/mitigation system in a BWR nuclear power plant. The evaluation is done relative to three risk indices: the frequency of core damage, the expected early fatalities, and the expected latent fatalities. The ATWS prevention tree includes: the mechanical subsystem of the reactor protection system, the electrical subsystem of the reactor protection system, the recirculation pump trip and the Alternate Rod Insertion System. The mitigation tree includes: standby liquid control system, opening of the relief valves, reclosing the relief valves, failure of coolant injection, inadvertent actuation of the automatic depressurization system, inadvertent operation of high-pressure injection system and containment heat removal

  18. Development of 1000kW-class MCFC pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooue, M.; Yasue, H. [MCFC Research Association, Mie (Japan); Takasu, K.; Tsuchitori, T.

    1996-12-31

    This pilot plant is a part of the New Sunshine Program which has proceeded by the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. MCFC Research Association is entrusted with the development of the pilot plant, and constructing it at Kawagoe site. Following items will be verified by this pilot plant operation. (a) Development of 250kW class stack and confirmation of stack performance and decay rate. (b) System verification such as basic process, control system and operation characteristics, toward commercialization. (c) To get design data for demonstration plant.

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed in this FY-95 Annual Update as they relate to the CH TRU safety bases: Executive Summary; Site Characteristics; Principal Design and Safety Criteria; Facility Design and Operation; Hazards and Accident Analysis; Derivation of Technical Safety Requirements; Radiological and Hazardous Material Protection; Institutional Programs; Quality Assurance; and Decontamination and Decommissioning. The System Design Descriptions`` (SDDS) for the WIPP were reviewed and incorporated into Chapter 3, Principal Design and Safety Criteria and Chapter 4, Facility Design and Operation. This provides the most currently available final engineering design information on waste emplacement operations throughout the disposal phase up to the point of permanent closure. Also, the criteria which define the TRU waste to be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility were summarized in Chapter 3 based on the WAC for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.`` This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents the safety analyses that develop and evaluate the adequacy of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact-Handled Transuranic Wastes (WIPP CH TRU) safety bases necessary to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment from the hazards posed by WIPP waste handling and emplacement operations during the disposal phase and hazards associated with the decommissioning and decontamination phase. The analyses of the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) disposal of TRU and TRU mixed waste, and demonstration of compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 191, Subpart B and 40 CFR 268.6 will be addressed in detail in the WIPP Final Certification Application scheduled for submittal in October 1996 (40 CFR 191) and the No-Migration Variance Petition (40 CFR 268.6) scheduled for submittal in June 1996. Section 5.4, Long-Term Waste Isolation Assessment summarizes the current status of the assessment.

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed in this FY-95 Annual Update as they relate to the CH TRU safety bases: Executive Summary; Site Characteristics; Principal Design and Safety Criteria; Facility Design and Operation; Hazards and Accident Analysis; Derivation of Technical Safety Requirements; Radiological and Hazardous Material Protection; Institutional Programs; Quality Assurance; and Decontamination and Decommissioning. The System Design Descriptions'' (SDDS) for the WIPP were reviewed and incorporated into Chapter 3, Principal Design and Safety Criteria and Chapter 4, Facility Design and Operation. This provides the most currently available final engineering design information on waste emplacement operations throughout the disposal phase up to the point of permanent closure. Also, the criteria which define the TRU waste to be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility were summarized in Chapter 3 based on the WAC for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.'' This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents the safety analyses that develop and evaluate the adequacy of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact-Handled Transuranic Wastes (WIPP CH TRU) safety bases necessary to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment from the hazards posed by WIPP waste handling and emplacement operations during the disposal phase and hazards associated with the decommissioning and decontamination phase. The analyses of the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) disposal of TRU and TRU mixed waste, and demonstration of compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 191, Subpart B and 40 CFR 268.6 will be addressed in detail in the WIPP Final Certification Application scheduled for submittal in October 1996 (40 CFR 191) and the No-Migration Variance Petition (40 CFR 268.6) scheduled for submittal in June 1996. Section 5.4, Long-Term Waste Isolation Assessment summarizes the current status of the assessment

  1. Common cause failure analysis of hydraulic scram and control rod systems in the Swedish and Finnish BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankamo, T. [Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    The main task of the project included the analysis of the operating experiences at the BWRs of ABB Atom design, comprising 9 units in Sweden and 2 in Finland. International experience and reference information were also surveyed. A reference application was done for the Barsebaeck plant. This pilot study covered all systems which contribute to the reactor shutdown, including also the actuation relays at the interface to the reactor protection system. The Common Load Model was used as the quantification method, which proved to be a practicable approach. This method provides a consistent handling of failure combinatorics and workable extension to evaluate localized dependence between adjacent control rod and drive assemblies (CRDAs). As part of this project, instructions of handbook style were prepared for the CCF analysis of high redundancy systems. The primary focus in the analysis of operating experience was placed on the scram valves and CRDAs. Due to the limited component population, the experiences for the scram valve constitute only a few single failures and some potential but none actual CCF event. These insights are compatible with the generic data for these valves. The experiences for the CRDAs include several single failures, and some actual and many potential CCF events of varying degree of functional impact. Special emphasis was placed to identify any multiple failure or degradation indicating that adjacent rods would be more vulnerable to failure, because such phenomena are far more critical for the scram function as compared to failure of randomly placed rods. 17 refs.

  2. Pilot plant study for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.S. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-02-01

    Most of domestic alcohol fermentation factory adopt batch process of which productivity is lower than continuous fermentation process. They have made great effort to increase productivity by means of partial unit process automatization and process improvement with their accumulated experience but there is technical limitation in productivity of batch fermentation process. To produce and supply fuel alcohol, economic aspects must be considered first of all. Therefore, development of continuous fermentation process, of which productivity is high, is prerequisite to produce and use fuel alcohol but only a few foreign company possess continuous fermentation technic and use it in practical industrial scale fermentation. We constructed pilot plant (5 Stage CSTR 1 kl 99.5 v/v% ethanol/Day scale) to study some aspects stated below and our ultimate aims are production of industrial scale fuel alcohol and construction of the plant by ourselves. Some study concerned with energy saving separation and contamination control technic were entrusted to KAIST, A-ju university and KIST respectively. (author) 67 refs., 100 figs., 58 tabs.

  3. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  4. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No-migration variance petition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report describes various aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) including design data, waste characterization, dissolution features, ground water hydrology, natural resources, monitoring, general geology, and the gas generation/test program

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Decontamination Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, Ricky Lynn [Idaho National Laboratory; Reese, Stephen Joseph [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-03-01

    On February 14, 2014, americium and plutonium contamination was released in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) salt caverns. Several practical, easily deployable methods of decontaminating WIPP salt, using a surrogate contaminant and americium (241Am), were developed and tested. The effectiveness of the methods is evaluated qualitatively, and to the extent practical, quantitatively. Of the methods tested (dry brushing, vacuum cleaning, water washing, mechanical grinding, strippable coatings, and fixative barriers), the most practical seems to be water washing. Effectiveness is very high, and water washing is easy and rapid to deploy. The amount of wastewater produced (~2 L/m2) would be substantial and may not be easy to manage, but the method is the clear winner from a usability perspective. Removable surface contamination levels (smear results) from water washed coupons found no residual removable contamination. Thus, whatever contamination is left is likely adhered to (or trapped within) the salt. The other option that shows promise is the use of a fixative barrier. Bartlett Nuclear, Inc.’s Polymeric Barrier System proved the most durable of the coatings tested. The coatings were not tested for contaminant entrapment, only for coating integrity and durability.

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) was authorized by Public Law 96-164 to provide a research and development facility for demonstrating the safe permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes from national defense activities and programs of the United States exempted from regulations by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico near Carlsbad, was constructed to determine the efficacy of an underground repository for disposal of TRU wastes. In accordance with the 1981 and 1990 Records of Decision (ROD), the development of the WIPP was to proceed with a phased approach. Development of the WIPP began with a siting phase, during which several sites were evaluated and the present site selected based on extensive geotechnical research, supplemented by testing. The site and preliminary design validation phase (SPDV) followed the siting phase, during which two shafts were constructed, an underground testing area was excavated, and various geologic, hydrologic, and other geotechnical features were investigated. The construction phase followed the SPDV phase during which surface structures for receiving waste were built and underground excavations were completed for waste emplacement

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-03-12

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Strategic Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Strategic Plan is to provide decision makers, project participants, and the public with a high-level overview of the objectives, issues, and strategiesthat impact a decision on the suitability of WIPP as a permanent, safe disposal facility for transuranic (TRU) waste that has resulted from defense activities. This document is a component of an integrated planning process and is a key management tool that is coordinated and consistent with the Secretary's Disposal Decision Plan and the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Five-Year Plan. This documentsupports other US Department of Energy (DOE) planning efforts, including the TRU Waste Program. The WIPP Strategic Plan addresses the WIPP Program Test Phase, Disposal Decision, Disposal Phase, and Decommissioning Phase (decontamination and decommissioning). It describes the actions and activities that the DOE will conduct to ensure that WIPP will comply with applicable, relevant, and appropriate requirements of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), State of New Mexico, and other applicable federal and state regulations. It also includes the key assumptions under which the strategy was developed. A comprehensive discussion of the multitude of activities involved in the WIPP Program cannot be adequately presented in this document. The specific details of these activities are presented in other, more detailed WIPP planningdocuments

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Decontamination Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer; Stephen Reese

    2014-09-01

    On February 14, 2014, americium and plutonium contamination was released in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) salt caverns. At the request of WIPP’s operations contractor, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel developed several methods of decontaminating WIPP salt, using surrogate contaminants and also americium (241Am). The effectiveness of the methods is evaluated qualitatively, and to the extent possible, quantitatively. One of the requirements of this effort was delivering initial results and recommendations within a few weeks. That requirement, in combination with the limited scope of the project, made in-depth analysis impractical in some instances. Of the methods tested (dry brushing, vacuum cleaning, water washing, strippable coatings, and mechanical grinding), the most practical seems to be water washing. Effectiveness is very high, and it is very easy and rapid to deploy. The amount of wastewater produced (2 L/m2) would be substantial and may not be easy to manage, but the method is the clear winner from a usability perspective. Removable surface contamination levels (smear results) from the strippable coating and water washing coupons found no residual removable contamination. Thus, whatever is left is likely adhered to (or trapped within) the salt. The other option that shows promise is the use of a fixative barrier. Bartlett Nuclear, Inc.’s Polymeric Barrier System (PBS) proved the most durable of the coatings tested. The coatings were not tested for contaminant entrapment, only for coating integrity and durability.

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  12. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable.

  14. Improvement for BWR operator training, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noji, Kunio; Toeda, Susumu; Saito, Genhachi; Suzuki, Koichi

    1990-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) is conducting training for BWR plant operators using Full-scope Simulators. There are several courses for individual operators and one training course for shift crew (Family Training Course) in BTC. Family Training is carried out by all members of the operating shift-crew. BTC has made efforts to improve the Family Training in order to acquire more effective training results and contribute to up-grade team performance of all crews. This paper describes some items of our efforts towards Family Training improvement. (author)

  15. BWR consolidation system final design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, G.L.; Kelly, M.J.; Larsen, W.R.

    1993-05-01

    Because of delays in the opening of a permanent geologic repository to accept spent fuel from nuclear reactor plants, several utilities are seeking additional off-site storage to avert premature shutdown. Fuel rod consolidation is a proven, viable option for pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants, but until now, no consolidation system addressed boiling water reactor (BWR) spent-fuel assemblies.The purpose of this project, jointly funded by the Empire State Electric Energy Research Company (ESEERCO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is to develop a system for consolidating BWR spent fuel assemblies. This design will provide more efficient storage in reactor spent-fuel pools. The design goal is a 2:1 consolidation of the fuel rods and a minimum 10:1 compaction of the non-fuel bearing components. in addition, the consolidation system must be operationally compatible with BWR reactor plants and be economically viable with other forms of supplementary on-site storage. The work began in Lynchburg, Virginia on May 6, 1991 and concluded on September 30, 1992 with the delivery of the final report. The design achieves all of the project goals. Furthermore, consolidation of BWR spent-fuel assemblies is feasible, compatible with reactor plant operations and potentially the lowest cost option for a utility seeking to add oil-site storage capacity

  16. Development of a reliable estimation procedure of radioactivity inventory in a BWR plant due to neutron irradiation for decommissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Ken-ichi; Ueno, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Reliable information of radioactivity inventory resulted from the radiological characterization is important in order to plan decommissioning planning and is also crucial in order to promote decommissioning in effectiveness and in safe. The information is referred to by planning of decommissioning strategy and by an application to regulator. Reliable information of radioactivity inventory can be used to optimize the decommissioning processes. In order to perform the radiological characterization reliably, we improved a procedure of an evaluation of neutron-activated materials for a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Neutron-activated materials are calculated with calculation codes and their validity should be verified with measurements. The evaluation of neutron-activated materials can be divided into two processes. One is a distribution calculation of neutron-flux. Another is an activation calculation of materials. The distribution calculation of neutron-flux is performed with neutron transport calculation codes with appropriate cross section library to simulate neutron transport phenomena well. Using the distribution of neutron-flux, we perform distribution calculations of radioactivity concentration. We also estimate a time dependent distribution of radioactivity classification and a radioactive-waste classification. The information obtained from the evaluation is utilized by other tasks in the preparatory tasks to make the decommissioning plan and the activity safe and rational.

  17. Waste water pilot plant research, development, and demonstration permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This permit application has been prepared to obtain a research, development, and demonstration permit to perform pilot-scale treatability testing on the 242-A Evaporator process condensate waste water effluent stream. It provides the management framework, and controls all the testing conducted in the waste water pilot plant using dangerous waste. It also provides a waste acceptance envelope (upper limits for selected constituents) and details the safety and environmental protection requirements for waste water pilot plant testing. This permit application describes the overall approach to testing and the various components or requirements that are common to all tests. This permit application has been prepared at a sufficient level of detail to establish permit conditions for all waste water pilot plant tests to be conducted

  18. Encapsulation pilot plant of radioactive wastes in thermosetting resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The thermosetting resins (polyesters, epoxides) are used to encapsulate the low and intermediate - level radioactive wastes. The testing program concerning the drums produced by the pilot plant of the Chooz nuclear power plant is described. The installation operating is examined while thinking of the industrial application. The production costs are then evaluated

  19. Recent developments in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water chemistry is of critical importance to the operation and economic viability of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). A successful water chemistry program will satisfy the following goals: - Minimize the incidence and growth of SCC/IASCC, - Minimize plant radiation fields controllable by chemistry, -Maintain fuel integrity by minimizing cladding corrosion, - Minimize flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) in balance-of-plant components. The impact of water chemistry on each of these goals is discussed in more detail in this paper. It should be noted that water chemistry programs also include surveillance and operating limits for other plant water systems (e.g., service water, closed cooling water systems, etc.) but these are out of the scope of this paper. This paper reviews developments in water chemistry guidelines for U.S. BWR nuclear power plants. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  20. Alternative cooling water flow path for RHR heat exchanger and its effect on containment response during extended station blackout for Chinshan BWR-4 plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuann, Yng-Ruey, E-mail: ryyuann@iner.gov.tw

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Motivating alternative RHR heat exchanger tube-side flow path and determining required capacity. • Calculate NSSS and containment response during 24-h SBO for Chinshan BWR-4 plant. • RETRAN and GOTHIC models are developed for NSSS and containment, respectively. • Safety relief valve blowdown flow and energy to drywell are generated by RETRAN. • Analyses are performed with and without reactor depressurization, respectively. - Abstract: The extended Station Blackout (SBO) of 24 h has been analyzed with respect to the containment response, in particular the suppression pool temperature response, for the Chinshan BWR-4 plant of MARK-I containment. The Chinshan plant, owned by Taiwan Power Company, has twin units with rated core thermal power of 1840 MW each. The analysis is aimed at determining the required alternative cooling water flow capacity for the residual heat removal (RHR) heat exchanger when its tube-side sea water cooling flow path is blocked, due to some reason such as earthquake or tsunami, and is switched to the alternative raw water source. Energy will be dissipated to the suppression pool through safety relief valves (SRVs) of the main steam lines during SBO. The RETRAN model is used to calculate the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) response and generate the SRV blowdown conditions, including SRV pressure, enthalpy, and mass flow rate. These conditions are then used as the time-dependent boundary conditions for the GOTHIC code to calculate the containment pressure and temperature response. The shaft seals of the two recirculation pumps are conservatively assumed to fail due to loss of seal cooling and a total leakage flow rate of 36 gpm to the drywell is included in the GOTHIC model. Based on the given SRV blowdown conditions, the GOTHIC containment calculation is performed several times, through the adjustment of the heat transfer rate of the RHR heat exchanger, until the criterion that the maximum suppression pool temperature

  1. BWR vessel and internals project (BWRVIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilanin, W.J.; Dyle, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) inspections indicate that Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) is a significant technical issue for some BWR internals. IN response, the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) was formed by an associated of domestic and international utilities which own and operate BWRs. The project is identifying or developing generic, cost-effective strategies for managing degradation of reactor internals from which each utility can select the alternative most appropriate for their plant. The Electric Power Research Institute manages the technical program, implementing the utility defined programs. The BWRVIP is organized into four technical tasks: Assessment, Inspection, Repair and Mitigation. An Integration task coordinates the work. The goal of the Assessment task is to develop methodologies for evaluation of vessel and internal components in support of decisions for operation, inspection, mitigation or repair. The goal of the Inspection task is to develop and assess effective and predictable inspection techniques which can be used to determine the condition of BWR vessel and internals that are potentially susceptible to service-related SCC degradation. The goal of the Repair task is to assure the availability of cost-effective repair/replacement alternatives. The goal of the Mitigation task is to develop and demonstrate countermeasures for SCC degradation. This paper summarizes the BWRVIP approach for addressing BWR internals SCC degradation and illustrates how utilities are utilizing BWRVIP products to successfully manage the effect of SCC on core shrouds

  2. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: an organizational overview. Volume 1. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.

    1983-08-01

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. A model is introduced for the purposes of organizing the literature review and showing key relationships among identified organizational factors and nuclear power plant safety. Volume I of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety.

  3. Radiological effects of a nuclear power plant on a river system, as demonstrated by the Gundremmingen BWR on the Danube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, H.; Ruf, M.; Huebel, K.; Luensmann, W.

    1975-01-01

    The Gundremmingen Nuclear Power Plant (boiling water reactor, 237 MW(e)), on the Upper Danube, has been in operation since 1967. Radiological data have been collected throughout its period of operation. The behaviour of the radioactive waste products in the ecological system of the Upper Danube (water, sediments, suspended solids, water-plants, fish) has been analysed in connection with environmental contamination, the uptake capacity of the Danube, and the possible pathways to man. As a result of the investigations, it seems possible to build further nuclear power plants on the Danube, if their rates of release of radioactivity are similar to those at Gundremmingen. (author)

  4. Benchmark calculation for radioactivity inventory using MAXS library based on JENDL-4.0 and JEFF-3.0/A for decommissioning BWR plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed benchmark calculation for radioactivity activated in a Primary Containment Vessel (PCV of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR by using MAXS library, which was developed by collapsing with neutron energy spectra in the PCV of the BWR. Radioactivities due to neutron irradiation were measured by using activation foil detector of Gold (Au and Nickel (Ni at thirty locations in the PCV. We performed activation calculations of the foils with SCALE5.1/ORIGEN-S code with irradiation conditions of each foil location as the benchmark calculation. We compared calculations and measurements to estimate an effectiveness of MAXS library.

  5. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: BWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (caused for instance by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling, within acceptable limits, the ageing degradation and wear out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life cycle management of plant components, which involves economic considerations. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues

  6. The HAMBO BWR simulator of HAMMLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Tommy; Jokstad, Haakon; Meyer, Brita D.; Nihlwing, Christer; Norrman, Sixten; Puska, Eija Karita; Raussi, Pekka; Tiihonen, Olli

    2001-02-15

    Modernisation of control rooms of the nuclear power plants has been a major issue in Sweden and Finland the last few years, and this will continue in the years to come. As an aid in the process of introducing new technology into the control rooms, the benefit of having an experimental simulator where proto typing of solutions can be performed, has been emphasised by many plants. With this as a basis, the BWR plants in Sweden and Finland decided to fund, in co-operation with the Halden Project, an experimental BWR simulator based on the Forsmark 3 plant in Sweden. The BWR simulator development project was initiated in January 1998. VTT Energy in Finland developed the simulator models with the aid of their APROS tool, while the operator interface was developed by the Halden Project. The simulator was thoroughly tested by experienced HRP personnel and professional Forsmark 3 operators, and accepted by the BWR utilities in June 2000. The acceptance tests consisted of 19 well-defined transients, as well as the running of the simulator from full power down to cold shutdown and back up again with the use of plant procedures. This report describes the HAMBO simulator, with its simulator models, the operator interface, and the underlying hardware and software infrastructure. The tools used for developing the simulator, APROS, Picasso-3 and the Integration Platform, are also briefly described. The acceptance tests are described, and examples of the results are presented, to illustrate the level of validation of the simulator. The report concludes with an indication of the short-term usage of the simulator. (Author)

  7. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: BWR pressure vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (caused for instance by unanticipated phenomena and by operating maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling, within acceptable limits, the ageing degradation and ware out of components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of guidance reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers, and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life cycle management of plant components, which involves economic considerations. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of heavy water moderated reactors (HWRs), boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues

  8. BWR recirculation pump diagnostic expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, S.C.; Morimoto, C.N.; Torres, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    At General Electric (GE), an on-line expert system to support maintenance decisions for BWR recirculation pumps for nuclear power plants has been developed. This diagnostic expert system is an interactive on-line system that furnishes diagnostic information concerning BWR recirculation pump operational problems. It effectively provides the recirculation pump diagnostic expertise in the plant control room continuously 24 hours a day. The expert system is interfaced to an on-line monitoring system, which uses existing plant sensors to acquire non-safety related data in real time. The expert system correlates and evaluates process data and vibration data by applying expert rules to determine the condition of a BWR recirculation pump system by applying knowledge based rules. Any diagnosis will be automatically displayed, indicating which pump may have a problem, the category of the problem, and the degree of concern expressed by the validity index and color hierarchy. The rules incorporate the expert knowledge from various technical sources such as plant experience, engineering principles, and published reports. These rules are installed in IF-THEN formats and the resulting truth values are also expressed in fuzzy terms and a certainty factor called a validity index. This GE Recirculation Pump Expert System uses industry-standard software, hardware, and network access to provide flexible interfaces with other possible data acquisition systems. Gensym G2 Real-Time Expert System is used for the expert shell and provides the graphical user interface, knowledge base, and inference engine capabilities. (author)

  9. Rock mechanics activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francke, C.; Saeb, S.

    1996-01-01

    The application of rock mechanics at nuclear waste repositories is a true multidisciplinary effort. A description and historical summary of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is presented. Rock mechanics programs at the WIPP are outlined, and the current rock mechanics modeling philosophy of the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division is discussed

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Technical Assessment Team Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-03-17

    This report provides the results of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) technical assessment led by the Savannah River National Laboratory and conducted by a team of experts in pertinent disciplines from SRNL and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL).

  11. Pilot plant for the radioactive decontamination of spent oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores E, R.M.; Ortiz O, H.V.; Cisneros L, L.; Lopez G, R.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the operation parameters obtained in the laboratory of oil storage are presented, as well as the operations which shape the pilot plant, the design criteria and the basic design of the core equipment of the developed process. Finally, the comparative results obtained the decontamination process of oil are given as well as laboratory scale. (Author)

  12. Dissolution studies with pilot plant and actual INTEC calcines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Garn, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive Al(NO 3 ) 3 solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated >95 wt.% of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt.% dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt.% dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines

  13. Emission studies from a CO2 capture pilot plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, E.F. da; Kolderup, H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Hjarbo, K.W.; Huizinga, A.; Khakharia, P.M.; Tuinman, I.L.; Mejdell, T.; Zahlsen, K.; Vernstad, K.; Hyldbakk, A.; Holten, T.; Kvamsdal, H.M.; Os, P.J. van; Einbu, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of emissions from a pilot-plant for CO2 capture at Maasvlakte (in the Netherlands). Three contributions to emissions were identified and analyzed: Gas phase emission, aerosols (also referred to as mist or fog) and droplets of entrained solvents. For the emission

  14. Analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Samples: Integrated Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, Phillip F [ORNL

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Samples: Integrated Summary Report. Summaries of conclusions, analytical processes, and analytical results. Analysis of samples taken from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico in support of the WIPP Technical Assessment Team (TAT) activities to determine to the extent feasible the mechanisms and chemical reactions that may have resulted in the breach of at least one waste drum and release of waste material in WIPP Panel 7 Room 7 on February 14, 2014. This report integrates and summarizes the results contained in three separate reports, described below, and draws conclusions based on those results. Chemical and Radiochemical Analyses of WIPP Samples R-15 C5 SWB and R16 C-4 Lip; PNNL-24003, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, December 2014 Analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Underground and MgO Samples by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); SRNL-STI-2014-00617; Savannah River National Laboratory, December 2014 Report for WIPP UG Sample #3, R15C5 (9/3/14); LLNL-TR-667015; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, January 2015 This report is also contained in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Technical Assessment Team Report; SRNL-RP-2015-01198; Savannah River National Laboratory, March 17, 2015, as Appendix C: Analysis Integrated Summary Report.

  15. Methodology to classify accident sequences of an Individual Plant Examination according to the severe releases for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval V, S.

    2001-01-01

    The Light Water Reactor (LWR) operation regulations require to every operating plant to perform of an Individual Plant Examination study (Ipe). One of the main purposes of an Ipe is t o gain a more quantitative understanding of the overall probabilities of core damage and fission product releases . Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) methodologies and Severe Accident Analysis are used to perform Ipe studies. PSA methodologies are used to identify and analyse the set of event sequences that might originate the fission product release from a nuclear power plant; these methodologies are combinatorial in nature and generate thousands of sequences. Among other uses within an Ipe, severe accident simulations are used to determine the characteristics of the fission product release for the identified sequences and in this way, the releases can be understood and characterized. A vast amount of resources is required to simulate and analyse every Ipe sequence. This effort is unnecessary if similar sequences are grouped. The grouping scheme must achieve an efficient trade off between problem reduction and accuracy. The methodology presented in this work enables an accurate characterization and analysis of the Ipe fission product releases by using a reduced problem. The methodology encourages the use of specific plant simulations. (Author)

  16. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

  17. BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valtonen, K.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to examine TVO-I oscillation incident, which occured in February 22.1987 and to find out safety implications of oscillations in ATWS incidents. Calculations have been performed with RAMONA-3B and TRAB codes. RAMONA-3B is a BWR transient analysis code with three-dimencional neutron kinetics and nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous thermal hydraulics. TRAB code is a one-dimencional BWR transient code which uses methods similar to RAMONA-3B. The results have shown that both codes are capable of analyzing of the oscillation incidents. Both out-of-phase and in-phase oscillations are possible. If the reactor scram fails (ATWS) during oscillations the severe fuel failures are always possible and the reactor core may exceed the prompt criticality

  18. Water chemistry control practices and data of the European BWR fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nineteen BWR plants are in operation in Europe, nine built by ASEA Atom, six by Siemens KWU and four by General Electric. This paper gives an overview of water chemistry operation practices and parameters of the European BWR plants. General design characteristics of the plants are described. Chemistry control strategies and underlying water chemistry guidelines are summarized. Chemistry data are presented and discussed with regard to plant design characteristics. The paper is based on a contract of the European BWR Forum with AREVA on a chemistry sourcebook for member plants. The survey of chemistry data was conducted for the years 2002 to 2008. (author)

  19. Water chemistry control practices and data of the European BWR fleet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellwag, Bernhard; Laendner, Alexander; Weiss, Steffen [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Huettner, Frank [Vattenfall Europe Nuclear Energy GmbH (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Nineteen boiling water reactor (BWR) plants are in operation in Europe, nine built by ASEA Atom, six by Siemens KWU and four by General Electric. This paper gives an overview of the water chemistry operation practices and parameters of the European BWR plants. General design characteristics of the plants are described. Chemistry control strategies and underlying water chemistry guidelines are summarized. Chemistry data are presented and discussed with regard to plant design characteristics. The paper is based on a contract of the European BWR Forum with AREVA on a chemistry sourcebook for member plants. The survey of chemistry data was conducted for the years 2002 to 2008. (orig.)

  20. Water chemistry control practices and data of the European BWR fleet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellwag, B.; Laendner, A.; Weiss, S. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Huettner, F. [Vattenfall Europe Nuclear Energy GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Nineteen BWR plants are in operation in Europe, nine built by ASEA Atom, six by Siemens KWU and four by General Electric. This paper gives an overview of water chemistry operation practices and parameters of the European BWR plants. General design characteristics of the plants are described. Chemistry control strategies and underlying water chemistry guidelines are summarized. Chemistry data are presented and discussed with regard to plant design characteristics. The paper is based on a contract of the European BWR Forum with AREVA on a chemistry sourcebook for member plants. The survey of chemistry data was conducted for the years 2002 to 2008. (author)

  1. Identification of Radioactive Pilot-Plant test requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, W.J.; Riebling, E.F.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive Pilot-Plant testing needs and alternatives are evaluated for enhanced Sludge Washing and High and Low-Level Vitrification efforts. Also investigated was instrument and equipment testing needs associated with the vitrification and retrieval process. The scope of this document is to record the existing March 1994 letter report for future use. A structured Kepner-Trego trademark decision analysis process was used to assist analysis of the testing needs. This analysis provided various combinations of laboratory and radioactive (hot) and cold pilot testing options associated with the above need areas. Recommendations for testing requirements were made

  2. Identification of Radioactive Pilot-Plant test requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, W.J.; Riebling, E.F.

    1995-05-09

    Radioactive Pilot-Plant testing needs and alternatives are evaluated for enhanced Sludge Washing and High and Low-Level Vitrification efforts. Also investigated was instrument and equipment testing needs associated with the vitrification and retrieval process. The scope of this document is to record the existing March 1994 letter report for future use. A structured Kepner-Trego{trademark} decision analysis process was used to assist analysis of the testing needs. This analysis provided various combinations of laboratory and radioactive (hot) and cold pilot testing options associated with the above need areas. Recommendations for testing requirements were made.

  3. TRAC-BWR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.L.; Rouhani, S.Z.

    1983-01-01

    The TRAC-BD1/MOD1 code containing many new or improved models has been assembled and is undergoing developmental assessment and testing and should be available shortly. The preparation of the manual for this code version is underway and should be available to the USNRC and their designated contractors by April of 1984. Finally work is currently underway on a fast running version of TRAC-BWR which will contain a one-dimensional neutron kinetics model

  4. BWR water chemistry guidelines in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Hideo; Usui, Naoshi; Kitajima, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Through Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operations for more than 40 years in Japan, sustainable developments of water chemistry technologies, including state-of-the-art and unique R and D results, have been developed to achieve the highest performance of maintaining NPP reactor and coolant system component integrity and fuel reliability and excellent dose rate reduction in the world. Based on this long-term operational experience, Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) utilities have established effective and reasonable water chemistry parameters with reference to safety regulations and municipal laws. However, only a few parameters are regulated by control target to ensure the long-term reliability of the reactor and coolant system. After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, it is even more necessary to improve the safety levels of plant operation and increase the transparency of plant management in order to recover the public's confidence forward nuclear energy. Based on these situations, the BWR water chemistry guidelines task group has been working to establish the guidelines under the Standards Committee of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). The draft will be deliberated on and approved by the Standards Committee after it receives public comments. The Japanese BWR water chemistry guidelines should provide the world-class strategies for maintaining the long-term integrity of materials and fuel. Concretely, the guidelines should provide reasonable 'control values', 'diagnostic values' and 'action levels' for multiple parameters and suggest the necessary actions to exceed the action levels. This paper provides a framework for the preliminary guidelines for BWR primary water chemistry. (author)

  5. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  6. Procedures for using expert judgment to estimate human-error probabilities in nuclear power plant operations. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaver, D.A.; Stillwell, W.G.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes and evaluates several procedures for using expert judgment to estimate human-error probabilities (HEPs) in nuclear power plant operations. These HEPs are currently needed for several purposes, particularly for probabilistic risk assessments. Data do not exist for estimating these HEPs, so expert judgment can provide these estimates in a timely manner. Five judgmental procedures are described here: paired comparisons, ranking and rating, direct numerical estimation, indirect numerical estimation and multiattribute utility measurement. These procedures are evaluated in terms of several criteria: quality of judgments, difficulty of data collection, empirical support, acceptability, theoretical justification, and data processing. Situational constraints such as the number of experts available, the number of HEPs to be estimated, the time available, the location of the experts, and the resources available are discussed in regard to their implications for selecting a procedure for use.

  7. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I: preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost, commercial plant cost and performance. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-01

    Cost estimates are presented for the Solar Pilot Plant by cost breakdown structure element, with a commitment schedule and an expenditure schedule. Cost estimates are given for a Commercial Plant, including several point costs for plants with various solar multiples and storage times. Specific questions (ERDA) pertaining to commercial plant design and performance data are addressed. The cost estimates are supplemented by two books of vendor and subcontractor cost data.

  8. Pilot plant trial of the reflux classifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvin, K.P.; Doroodchi, E.; Callen, A.M.; Lambert, N.; Pratten, S.J. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineers

    2002-01-01

    The Ludowici LMPE Reflux Classifier is a new device designed for classifying and separating particles on the basis of size or density. This work presents a series of experimental results obtained from the first pilot scale study of the reflux classifier (RC). The main focus of the investigation was to assess the particle gravity separation and throughput performance of the device. In this study, the classifier was used to separate coal and mineral matter less than 2 mm in size. The experimental results were then compared with the performance data on a teetered bed separator (TBS). It was concluded that the classifier could offer an excellent gravity separation at a remarkably high solids throughput of 47 t/m{sup 2}h more than 3 times higher than for a TBS. The separation performance of the RC was also better, with significantly less variation in the D-50 with particle size. A simple theoretical model providing an explanation of the separation performance is also presented.

  9. BWR Stability Issues in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Ikeda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reviews activates relevant to the boiling water reactor (BWR stability phenomenon, which has a coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic nature, from the viewpoint of model and code developments and their applications to the BWR stability solution methodology in Japan.

  10. Process control of an HTGR fuel reprocessing cold pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, J.S.

    1976-10-01

    Development of engineering-scale systems for a large-scale HTGR fuel reprocessing demonstration facility is currently underway in a cold pilot plant. These systems include two fluidized-bed burners, which remove the graphite (carbon) matrix from the crushed HTGR fuel by high temperature (900 0 C) oxidation. The burners are controlled by a digital process controller with an all analog input/output interface which has been in use since March, 1976. The advantages of such a control system to a pilot plant operation can be summarized as follows: (1) Control loop functions and configurations can be changed easily; (2) control constants, alarm limits, output limits, and scaling constants can be changed easily; (3) calculation of data and/or interface with a computerized information retrieval system during operation are available; (4) diagnosis of process control problems is facilitated; and (5) control panel/room space is saved

  11. MBR pilot plant for textile wastewater treatment and reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubello, C; Caffaz, S; Mangini, L; Santianni, D; Caretti, C

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out in order to evaluate the possibility of upgrading the conventional activated sludge WWTP of Seano (Prato, Italy) which treats municipal and textile wastewaters, by using membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology. The MBR pilot plant, set up within Seano WWTP, was fed with mixed municipal-industrial wastewaters during the first experimental period and with pure industrial wastewaters during the second. Performances and operation of the MBR were evaluated in terms of permeate characteristics and variability (COD, colour, surfactants, total N and P) and other operational parameters (sludge growth and observed yield). According to the experimental results the MBR permeate quality was always superior to the Seano WWTP one and it was suitable for industrial reuse in the textile district of the Prato area. Respirometric tests provided a modified IWA ASM1 model which fits very well the experimental data and can be used for the design and the monitoring of a full-scale MBR pilot plant.

  12. Continuous precipitation of uranium peroxide in process pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinelato, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study on uranium peroxide precipitation has been carried out with the objective to evaluate the influence of the main process parameters with a technological approach. The uraniferous solution used was obtained from the hydrometallurgical processing of an ore from Itataia - CE. Studies were developed in two distinct experimental stages. In the first stage, the precipitation was investigated by means of laboratory batch tests and, in the second stage, by means of continuous operation in a process pilot plant. (author)

  13. A shaft seal system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, F.D.; Ahrens, E.H.; Dennis, A.W.; Hurtado, L.D.; Knowles, M.K.; Tillerson, J.R.; Thompson, T.W.; Galbraith, D.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the demonstration of compliance with federal regulations, a shaft seal system has been designed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The system completely fills the 650 m shafts with components consisting of the common engineering materials, each of which possesses low permeability, longevity, and can be constructed using available technology. Design investigations couple rock mechanics and fluid flow analysis and tests of these materials within the natural geological setting, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the design

  14. Technical Integration of SMART Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H.; Park, P. H.; Noh, P. C. (and others)

    2006-12-15

    Preliminary experimental tests were carried out using the thermal-hydraulic integral test facility, VISTA (Experimental Verification by Integral Simulation of Transients and Accidents), which has been constructed to simulate the SMART-P. The VISTA facility is an integral test facility including the primary and secondary systems as well as safety-related Passive Residual heat removal (PRHR) systems. The integrated SMART desalination plant consists of Multi Effect Distillation Process combined with Thermal-Vapor Compressor(MED-TVC) and coupled with the extracted steam from turbine through the steam transformer. Steam transformer produces the main pressure steam and supplies to the MED-TVC unit. MED-TVC was selected as a desalination process coupled with SMART, since the thermal vapor compression is very effective where the steam is available at high temperature and pressure conditions than required in the evaporator. The standard design of the SMART desalination plant is under development as a part of the SMART project. This report describes design concept of these systems and their requirements.

  15. Common Cause Failure Analysis of Control Rods and Drives in the Swedish and Finnish BWR Plants. Operating Experiences in 1983 - 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankamo, Tuomas

    2006-11-01

    substantial time difference and/or spatial distance within the core. The exploration of CCF cases showed that the most prevalent factor in the CCF mechanisms was the time coupling by sequencing maintenance into refueling outages. Essential contributing factors were design changes, deviations or errors in maintenance or new types of replacement parts, accompanied by unexpected influences. An evident positive trend could be observed both for single failures and CCFs . Impact Vectors were used to expresses the conditional failure probability for the various multiplicity in CCF events, linking event analysis to the estimation of CCF model parameters. A reference application was made for the Forsmark 1 and 2 plant. The Common Load Model was used as parametric CCF model, which proved to be a practicable approach. This method provides a consistent handling of failure combinations and workable extension to evaluate localized dependence between adjacent control rod and drives. Also international experience and reference information were surveyed. The developed methods and collected data are utilized in the ongoing PSA updates for the Swedish BWRs and Olkiluoto 1 and 2. Review - within the project a detailed and project extern review has been performed, covering also the older CCF events. This do now guarantee that the CCF data for the control rods and drives in Swedish and Finnish BWR:s during the observation period 1983 - 2003, now can be judged as quality assured. The scope of this project was limited to collection, analysis and classification of CCF data, and reference application using the industry average of pooled data. It has not been the scope of this project to perform more comprehensive probabilistic studies on e.g., positive learning trends, impact of plant specific design details or different amount of failing control rods at different operational conditions in the reactor vessel and with different safety and support systems in operation. It has either been the scope to

  16. Common Cause Failure Analysis of Control Rods and Drives in the Swedish and Finnish BWR Plants. Operating Experiences in 1983 - 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankamo, Tuomas [Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-11-15

    substantial time difference and/or spatial distance within the core. The exploration of CCF cases showed that the most prevalent factor in the CCF mechanisms was the time coupling by sequencing maintenance into refueling outages. Essential contributing factors were design changes, deviations or errors in maintenance or new types of replacement parts, accompanied by unexpected influences. An evident positive trend could be observed both for single failures and CCFs . Impact Vectors were used to expresses the conditional failure probability for the various multiplicity in CCF events, linking event analysis to the estimation of CCF model parameters. A reference application was made for the Forsmark 1 and 2 plant. The Common Load Model was used as parametric CCF model, which proved to be a practicable approach. This method provides a consistent handling of failure combinations and workable extension to evaluate localized dependence between adjacent control rod and drives. Also international experience and reference information were surveyed. The developed methods and collected data are utilized in the ongoing PSA updates for the Swedish BWRs and Olkiluoto 1 and 2. Review - within the project a detailed and project extern review has been performed, covering also the older CCF events. This do now guarantee that the CCF data for the control rods and drives in Swedish and Finnish BWR:s during the observation period 1983 - 2003, now can be judged as quality assured. The scope of this project was limited to collection, analysis and classification of CCF data, and reference application using the industry average of pooled data. It has not been the scope of this project to perform more comprehensive probabilistic studies on e.g., positive learning trends, impact of plant specific design details or different amount of failing control rods at different operational conditions in the reactor vessel and with different safety and support systems in operation. It has either been the scope to

  17. First geothermal pilot power plant in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth Anikó

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hungarian petroleum industry has always participated in the utilization of favourable geothermal conditions in the country. Most of the Hungarian geothermal wells were drilled by the MOL Ltd. as CH prospect holes. Accordingly, the field of geothermics belonged to the petroleum engineering, although marginally. It was therefore a surprise to hear of the decision of MOL Ltd. to build a geothermal power plant of about 2-5 MW. The tender was published in 2004.The site selected for the geothermal project is near the western border of an Hungarian oilfield, close to the Slovenian border. The location of the planned geothermal power plant was chosen after an analysis of suitable wells owned by the MOL Rt. The decision was made on the bases of different reservoir data. The existence of a reservoir of the necessary size, temperature, permeability, productivity and the water chemistry data was proved. The wells provide an enough information to understand the character of the reservoir and will be the production wells used by the planned power plant.The depth of the wells is about 2930 - 3200 m. The Triassic formation is reached at around 2851 m. The production and the reinjection wells are planned. The primary objective of the evaluation is to further learn the nature of the geothermal system. First a one-day discharge test is carried out. If this short-term test is successful, a six-months long-term discharge test will follow. The first period of the test is a transient phenomenon. Within the well test, the wellhead pressure, the flow rate, the outflowing water temperature, the dynamic fluid level, and the chemical components will be measured. The heat transfer around the bore-hole is influenced by the flow rate and the time. For the right appreciation of the measured data, it is very important to analyse the heat transfer processes around the bore-hole. The obtained data from the experiments must be also fitted into the framework of a mathematical

  18. Proposed OTEC Punta Tuna Pilot Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, J.; Perez, F.

    1981-12-01

    Siting features and the design of a 40 MWe prototype OTEC for installation at Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico are presented. An annual average temperature gradient of 40 F from surface to 3,000 ft depth, a sharp coastal drop-off, projected benign environmental effects, and expensive indigenous power supplies are seen as favorable for fixed, floating, or grazing OTEC plants. The Punta Tuna design is for a platform fitted with generators in 300 ft of water, submarine cable power transmission, fiberglass seawater pipes, NH3 as a working fluid, and heat exchangers at the 300 ft depth, below hurricane wind and wave action. Methods of installing the 3,000 ft cold water pipes are discussed, and the use of OTEC derived electricity for aluminum smelting in the Caribbean is indicated.

  19. BWR shutdown analyzer using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype alarm system for detecting abnormal reactor shutdowns based on artificial intelligence technology is described. The system incorporates knowledge about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant design and component behavior, as well as knowledge required to distinguish normal, abnormal, and ATWS accident conditions. The system was developed using a software tool environment for creating knowledge-based applications on a LISP machine. To facilitate prototype implementation and evaluation, a casual simulation of BWR shutdown sequences was developed and interfaced with the alarm system. An intelligent graphics interface for execution and control is described. System performance considerations and general observations relating to artificial intelligence application to nuclear power plant problems are provided

  20. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Wells, J.E.; Johnson, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    The seismic risk methodology developed in the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant, a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models was developed and analyzed. The SSMRP methodology can equally be applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR). To demonstrate its applicability, to identify fundamental differences in seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR, and to provide a basis of comparison of seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR when analyzed with comparable methodology and assumptions, a seismic risk analysis is being performed on the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant

  1. Estimate of radiation-induced steel embrittlement in the BWR core shroud and vessel wall from reactor-grade MOX/UOX fuel for the nuclear power plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Lisa Rene

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18--30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. This dissertation provides computational results of the neutron fluence, flux, energy spectrum, and radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s-1) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 BWR. The results were computed using the nuclear data processing code NJOY99 and the continuous energy Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP4B. The MCNP4B model of the reactor core was for maximum core loading fractions of ⅓ MOX and ⅔ UOX reactor-grade fuel in an equilibrium core. The primary conclusion of this dissertation was that the addition of the maximum fraction of ⅓ MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  2. Experimental results: Pilot plant calcine dissolution and liquid feed stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Fryer, D.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Johnson, C.K.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-02-01

    The dissolution of simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant pilot plant calcines, containing none of the radioactive actinides, lanthanides or fission products, was examined to evaluate the solubility of calcine matrix materials in acidic media. This study was a necessary precursor to dissolution and optimization experiments with actual radionuclide-containing calcines. The importance of temperature, nitric acid concentration, ratio of acid volume to calcine mass, and time on the amount, as a weight percentage of calcine dissolved, was evaluated. These parameters were studied for several representative pilot plant calcine types: (1) Run No. 74 Zirconia calcine; (2) Run No. 17 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 64 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 1027 Alumina calcine; and (4) Run No. 20 Alumina/Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Statistically designed experiments with the different pilot plant calcines indicated the effect of the studied process variables on the amount of calcine dissolved decreases in the order: Acid/Calcine Ratio > Temperature > HNO 3 Concentration > Dissolution Time. The following conditions are suitable to achieve greater than 90 wt. % dissolution of most Zr, Al, or Na blend calcines: (1) Maximum nitric acid concentration of 5M; (2) Minimum acid/calcine ratio of 10 mL acid/1 gram calcine; (3) Minimum dissolution temperature of 90 degrees C; and (4) Minimum dissolution time of 30 minutes. The formation of calcium sulphate (CaSO 4 ) precipitates was observed in certain dissolved calcine solutions during the dissolution experiments. Consequently, a study was initiated to evaluate if and under what conditions the resulting dissolved calcine solutions would be unstable with regards to precipitate formation. The results indicate that precipitate formation in the calcine solutions prepared under the above proposed dissolution conditions are not anticipated

  3. Failure cause and failure rate evaluation on pumps of BWR plants in PSA. Hypothesis testing for typical or plant specific failure rate of pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Takahiro; Nakamura, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    In support of domestic nuclear industry effort to gather and analyze failure data of components concerning nuclear power plants, Nuclear Information Archives (NUCIA) are published for useful information to help PSA. This report focuses on NUCIA pertaining to pumps in domestic nuclear power plants, and provides the reliable estimation on failure rate of pumps resulting from failure cause analysis and hypothesis testing of classified and plant specific failure rate of pumps for improving quality in PSA. The classified and plant specific failure rate of pumps are estimated by analyzing individual domestic nuclear power plant's data of 26 Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) concerning functionally structurally classified pump failures reported from beginning of commercial operation to March 31, 2007. (author)

  4. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P. [ABB Atom, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions.

  5. Technical Proposal Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1975-03-28

    The proposed Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program comprises two phases. The objective of Phase 1 is to develop the technology for power generation from high-temperature, high-salinity geothermal brines existing in the Salton Sea known geothermal resources area. Phase 1 work will result in the following: (a) Completion of a preliminary design and cost estimate for a pilot geothermal brine utilization facility. (b) Design and construction of an Area Resource Test Facility (ARTF) in which developmental geothermal utilization concepts can be tested and evaluated. Program efforts will be divided into four sub-programs; Power Generation, Mineral Extraction, Reservoir Production, and the Area Resources Test Facility. The Power Generation Subprogram will include testing of scale and corrosion control methods, and critical power cycle components; power cycle selection based on an optimization of technical, environmental and economic analyses of candidate cycles; preliminary design of a pilot geothermal-electric generating station to be constructed in Phase 2 of this program. The Mineral Extraction Subprogram will involve the following: selection of an optimum mineral recovery process; recommendation of a brine clean-up process for well injection enhancement; engineering, construction and operation of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities; analysis of facility operating results from environmental, economical and technical point-of-view; preliminary design of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities of sufficient size to match the planned pilot power plant. The Reservoir Production Subprogram will include monitoring the operation and maintenance of brine production, handling and injection systems which were built with private funding in phase 0, and monitoring of the brine characteristics and potential subsidence effects during well production and injection. Based on the above, recommendations and specifications will be prepared for production and

  6. Pilot plant straw biomass power plant; Demonstrationsanlage Strohkraftwerk Gronau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodegel, Stefan [Claustahler Umwelttechnik-Institut GmbH (CUTEC), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Lach, Friedrich-Wilhelm [Ueberlandwerk Leinetal GmbH, Gronau (Leine) (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Drastically increasing prices for oil and gas promote the change to renewable energies. Biomass has the advantage of the storability. However, it has the disadvantage of a small stocking density. This suggests decentralized power plants. Also the proven technology of water vapour cycles with use of turbine is questioned. In the rural district Hildesheim there are efforts of thermal utilisation straw from wheat cropping. For this, a feasibility study of the Claustahler Umwelttechnik-Technik GmbH (Clausthal Zellerfeld, Federal Republic of Germany) presents technical and economic possibilities exemplary for the industrial area West in Gronau (Federal Republic of Germany). Technical and economic chances and risks are pointed out.

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 1999 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Roy B.; Adams, Amy; Martin, Don; Morris, Randall C.; Reynolds, Timothy D.; Warren, Ronald W.

    2000-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)Carlsbad Area Office and the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 1999 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 1999 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during calendar year 1999. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 1999, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment. Radionuclide concentrations in the environment surrounding WIPP were not statistically higher in 1999 than in 1998.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions, Inc.

    2002-09-20

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2001 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above Orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2001. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2001, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment.

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CY 2000 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC; Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc.

    2001-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office and Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2000 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2000 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protect ion Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2000. The format of this report follows guidance offered in a June 1, 2001 memo from DOE's Office of Policy and Guidance with the subject ''Guidance for the preparation of Department of Energy (DOE) Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2000.'' WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2000, no

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions, Inc.

    2002-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2001 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2001 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above Orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2001. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2001, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CY 2000 Site Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC; Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office and Westinghouse TRU Solutions, LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2000 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year (CY) 2000 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protect ion Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during CY 2000. The format of this report follows guidance offered in a June 1, 2001 memo from DOE's Office of Policy and Guidance with the subject ''Guidance for the preparation of Department of Energy (DOE) Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2000.'' WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 2000, no evidence was found of any adverse

  12. The waste isolation pilot plant regulatory compliance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mewhinney, J.A.; Kehrman, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    The passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA) marked a turning point for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program. It established a Congressional mandate to open the WIPP in as short a time as possible, thereby initiating the process of addressing this nation's transuranic (TRU) waste problem. The DOE responded to the LWA by shifting the priority at the WIPP from scientific investigations to regulatory compliance and the completion of prerequisites for the initiation of operations. Regulatory compliance activities have taken four main focuses: (1) preparing regulatory submittals; (2) aggressive schedules; (3) regulator interface; and (4) public interactions

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

  14. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant status and related socioeconomic impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.C.; Adcock, L.D.; Hohmann, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been ''authorized as a defense activity of the Department of Energy...for the express purpose of providing a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from the defense activities and programs of the United States...'' (PL 96-164). As reported in previous conferences, WIPP continues ahead of schedule and below budget with full facility construction well underway. To date, based on recent review, the socioeconomic impacts have been negligible and steps have been taken to ensure that they remain that way throughout operations

  15. The reprocessing pilot plant at Marcoule: the TOR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauteron, Jean; Calame-Longjean, Andre

    1987-01-01

    The irradiated fuel reprocessing pilot plant has recently been renovated and enlarged by the structures of the TOR project (traitement d'oxydes rapides). A new building to house the head end of the process and packaging the corresponding wastes has been built. The general principles underlying this new TOR head end and the guidelines for the telemanipulation functions are given. The processing is shown in a schematic layout. At TOR there has been considerable research and development of mechanics and telemanipulation equipment and of the chemical processing required. This development is described. (UK)

  16. High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O& #39; Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

    2004-02-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing

  17. Geotechnical Perspectives on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francke, Chris T.; Hansen, Frank D.; Knowles, M. Kathyn; Patchet, Stanley J.; Rempe, Norbert T.

    1999-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the first nuclear waste repository certified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Success in regulatory compliance resulted from an excellent natural setting for such a repository, a facility with multiple, redundant safety systems, and from a rigorous, transparent scientific and technical evaluation. The WIPP story, which has evolved over the past 25 years, has generated a library of publications and analyses. Details of the multifaceted program are contained in the cited references. Selected geotechnical highlights prove the eminent suitability of the WIPP to serve its congressionally mandated purpose

  18. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2004. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico.

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services (WRES)

    2004-10-25

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2004. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico.

  20. Operations Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This document, Revision 4 of the Operations Program Plan, has been developed as the seven-year master plan for operating of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Subjects covered include public and technical communications; regulatory and environmental programs; startup engineering; radiation handling, surface operations, and underground operations; waste certification and waste handling; transportation development; geotechnical engineering; experimental operations; engineering program; general maintenance; security program; safety, radiation, and regulatory assurance; quality assurance program; training program; administration activities; management systems program; and decommissioning. 243 refs., 19 figs., 25 tabs. (SM)

  1. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurisu, Takanori; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Harada, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Iwao.

    1988-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center was founded in April, 1971, and in April, 1974, training was begun, since then, 13 years elapsed. During this period, the curriculum and training facilities were strengthened to meet the training needs, and the new training techniques from different viewpoint were developed, thus the improvement of training has been done. In this report, a number of the training techniques which have been developed and adopted recently, and are effective for the improvement of the knowledge and skill of operators are described. Recently Japanese nuclear power stations have been operated at stable high capacity factor, accordingly the chance of experiencing the occurrence of abnormality and the usual start and stop of plants decreased, and the training of operators using simulators becomes more important. The basic concept on training is explained. In the standard training course and the short period fundamental course, the development of the guide for reviewing lessons, the utilization of VTRs and the development of the techniques for diagnosing individual degree of learning were carried out. The problems, the points of improvement and the results of these are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Decentralized photovoltaic pilot plants; Dezentrale photovoltaische Stromerzeugung - Versuchsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruschek, R. [Lehrstuhl ``Technik der Energieversorgung und Energiewirtschschaft`` (TEE), Univ. GH Essen (Germany); Dress, A. [Lehrstuhl ``Technik der Energieversorgung und Energiewirtschschaft`` (TEE), Univ. GH Essen (Germany); Rauh, H.U. [Lehrstuhl ``Technik der Energieversorgung und Energiewirtschschaft`` (TEE), Univ. GH Essen (Germany); Steuer, U. [Lehrstuhl ``Technik der Energieversorgung und Energiewirtschschaft`` (TEE), Univ. GH Essen (Germany); Weidele, T. [Lehrstuhl ``Technik der Energieversorgung und Energiewirtschschaft`` (TEE), Univ. GH Essen (Germany)

    1994-09-01

    Within the framework of a research project several photovoltaic power plants were installed and put into operation. Some of the pilot plants are designed for isolated battery storage operation, others are mains-coupled. In addition, the energy efficiencies of four smaller, tracked systems with different types of drive and control equipment were determined. The measured-value system and the first test results are introduced. (HW) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen eines Forschungsprogrammes werden verschiedene photovoltaische Stromerzeugungsanlagen aufgebaut und in Betrieb genommen. Die Versuchsanlagen sind zum Teil als Inselsysteme mit Batteriespeicher und z.T. als netzgekoppelte Systeme konzipiert. Ausserdem werden vier kleinere, nachgefuehrte Systeme mit unterschiedlichen Antriebs-, Regelungs- und Steuerungseinrichtungen hinsichtlich ihrer energetischen Ausbeute untersucht. Der vorliegende Beitrag stellt das Messwerterfassungssystem und die ersten Versuchsergebnisse vor. (HW)

  3. Radioactive wastes bituminization by the pilot-plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golinsky, M.; Ferenc, M.; Ksendzak, Z.; Tikal, A.

    1978-01-01

    Operation experience of pilot-plant for bituminization of radioactive wastes by the method of hot mixing is described. The results obtained have conffirmed parameters of the process gained in laboratory conditions for asphalts D-35 and P-60. The results are stated for experiments of bituminization of still residuums obtained as a result of distillation of low and intermediate-level of activity sewage waters. Chemical composition of the still residuums and characteristics of the P-60 asphalt are given. Bituminization of crystal sodium nitrate and supersaturated solutions at 200 centigrades up to 30% contents of salt in the compound was performed. It is shown that bituminization results depend on salts composition of radioactive wastes subject to solidification. The results are described of investigations of bituminization by the method of hot mixing of still residuums of radioactive wastes containing sodium nitrates on the pilot-plant. Parameters are given of bituminization process and characteristics of compounds obtained in bituminization of still residuums in a form of concentrates. Leachind process for wastes solidificated by the method of bituminization has been investigated. Leaching rate for radionuclides incorporated into bituminization products depending on time of storage is given. Results of the spectrometric analysis of solidificated concentrates, bituminization product and gaseous products of radioactive wastes processing by the method of hot mixing are given. (I.T.) [ru

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2003-09-17

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2002 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 2002 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, and Guidance for the Preparation of DOE Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2002 (DOE Memorandum EH-41: Natoli:6-1336, April 4, 2003). These Orders and the guidance document require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  5. Arizona Public Service - Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. Francfort

    2003-12-01

    Hydrogen has promise to be the fuel of the future. Its use as a chemical reagent and as a rocket propellant has grown to over eight million metric tons per year in the United States. Although use of hydrogen is abundant, it has not been used extensively as a transportation fuel. To assess the viability of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the viability of producing hydrogen using off-peak electric energy, Pinnacle West Capital Corporation (PNW) and its electric utility subsidiary, Arizona Public Service (APS) designed, constructed, and operates a hydrogen and compressed natural gas fueling station—the APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant. This report summarizes the design of the APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and presents lessons learned from its design and construction. Electric Transportation Applications prepared this report under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  6. Modeling temperature variations in a pilot plant thermophilic anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Guadarrama, Salvador; Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; López-Cruz, Irineo L; Domaschko, Max

    2011-05-01

    A model that predicts temperature changes in a pilot plant thermophilic anaerobic digester was developed based on fundamental thermodynamic laws. The methodology utilized two simulation strategies. In the first, model equations were solved through a searching routine based on a minimal square optimization criterion, from which the overall heat transfer coefficient values, for both biodigester and heat exchanger, were determined. In the second, the simulation was performed with variable values of these overall coefficients. The prediction with both strategies allowed reproducing experimental data within 5% of the temperature span permitted in the equipment by the system control, which validated the model. The temperature variation was affected by the heterogeneity of the feeding and extraction processes, by the heterogeneity of the digestate recirculation through the heating system and by the lack of a perfect mixing inside the biodigester tank. The use of variable overall heat transfer coefficients improved the temperature change prediction and reduced the effect of a non-ideal performance of the pilot plant modeled.

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2003-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2002 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 2002 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, and Guidance for the Preparation of DOE Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2002 (DOE Memorandum EH-41: Natoli:6-1336, April 4, 2003). These Orders and the guidance document require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED)

  8. BWR normal water chemistry guidelines: 1986 revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) have experienced stress corrosion cracking in the reactor cooling system piping resulting in adverse impacts on plant availability and personnel radiation exposure. The BWR Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major research and development program to provide remedies for this stress corrosion cracking problem. This work shows that the likelihood of cracking depends on the plant's water chemistry performance (environment) as well as on material condition and stress level. Plant experience and other research demonstrate that water quality also affects fuel performance and radiation field buildup in BWRs. This report,''BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1986 Revision,'' presents suggested generic water chemistry specifications, justifies the proposed water chemistry limits, suggests responses to out-of-specification water chemistry, discusses available chemical analysis methods as well as data management and surveillance schemes, and details the management philosophy required to successfully implement a water chemistry control program. An appendix contains recommendations for water quality of auxiliary systems. 73 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Guidebook on design, construction and operation of pilot plants for uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The design, construction and operation of a pilot plant are often important stages in the development of a project for the production of uranium concentrates. Since building and operating a pilot plant is very costly and may not always be required, it is important that such a plant be built only after several prerequisites have been met. The main purpose of this guidebook is to discuss the objectives of a pilot plant and its proper role in the overall project. Given the wide range of conditions under which a pilot plant may be designed and operated, it is not possible to provide specific details. Instead, this book discusses the rationale for a pilot plant and provides guidelines with suggested solutions for a variety of problems that may be encountered. This guidebook is part of a series of Technical Reports on uranium ore processing being prepared by the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management. 42 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Digital implementation, simulation and tests in MATLAB of the models of Steam line, the turbines, the pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez R, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this phase of the project they were carried out exhaustive tests to the models of the steam lines, turbines and pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric central for to verify that their tendencies and behaviors are it more real possible. For it, it was necessary to also analyze the transfer functions of the different components along the steam line until the power generator. Such models define alone the dominant poles of the system, what is not limitation to reproduce a wide range of anticipated transitoriness of a power station operation. In the same manner, it was integrated and proved the integrated model form with the models of feeding water of the SUN-RAH, simulating the nuclear reactor starting from predetermined entrances of the prospective values of the vessel. Also it was coupled with the graphic interface developed with the libraries DirectX implementing a specific monitoring panel for this system. (Author)

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to support the construction and operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP facility is designed to receive, inspect, emplace, and store unclassified defense-generated transuranic wastes in a retrievable fashion in an underground salt medium and to conduct studies and perform experiments in salt with high-level wastes. Upon the successful completion of these studies and experiments, WIPP is designed to serve as a permanent facility. The first chapter of this report provides a summary of the location and major design features of WIPP. Chapters 2 through 5 describe the site characteristics, design criteria, and design bases used in the design of the plant and the plant operations. Chapter 6 discusses radiation protection; Chapters 7 and 8 present an accident analysis of the plant and an assessment of the long-term waste isolation at WIPP. The conduct of operations and operating controls and limits are discussed in Chapters 9 and 10. The quality assurance programs are described in Chapter 11

  12. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to support the construction and operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP facility is designed to receive, inspect, emplace, and store unclassified defense-generated transuranic wastes in a retrievable fashion in an underground salt medium and to conduct studies and perform experiments in salt with high-level wastes. Upon the successful completion of these studies and experiments, WIPP is designed to serve as a permanent facility. The first chapter of this report provides a summary of the location and major design features of WIPP. Chapters 2 through 5 describe the site characteristics, design criteria, and design bases used in the design of the plant and the plant operations. Chapter 6 discusses radiation protection; Chapters 7 and 8 present an accident analysis of the plant and an assessment of the long-term waste isolation at WIPP. The conduct of operations and operating controls and limits are discussed in Chapters 9 and 10. The quality assurance programs are described in Chapter 11

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to support the construction and operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP facility is designed to receive, inspect, emplace, and store unclassified defense-generated transuranic wastes in a retrievable fashion in an underground salt medium and to conduct studies and perform experiments in salt with high-level wastes. Upon the successful completion of these studies and experiments, WIPP is designed to serve as a permanent facility. The first chapter of this report provides a summary of the location and major design features of WIPP. Chapters 2 through 5 describe the site characteristics, design criteria, and design bases used in the design of the plant and the plant operations. Chapter 6 discusses radiation protection; Chapters 7 and 8 present an accident analysis of the plant and an assessment of the long-term waste isolation at WIPP. The conduct of operations and operating controls and limits are discussed in Chapters 9 and 10. The quality assurance programs are described in Chapter 11

  14. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to support the construction and operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP facility is designed to receive, inspect, emplace, and store unclassified defense-generated transuranic wastes in a retrievable fashion in an underground salt medium and to conduct studies and perform experiments in salt with high-level wastes. Upon the successful completion of these studies and experiments, WIPP is designed to serve as a permanent facility. The first chapter of this report provides a summary of the location and major design features of WIPP. Chapters 2 through 5 describe the site characteristics, design criteria, and design bases used in the design of the plant and the plant operations. Chapter 6 discusses radiation protection: Chapters 7 and 8 present an accident analysis of the plant and an assessment of the long-term waste isolation at WIPP. The conduct of operations and operating control and limits are discussed in Chapters 9 and 10. The quality assurance programs are described in Chapter 11

  15. Tetrafluoride uranium pilot plant in operation at IEA, using the moving bed process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca Junior, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A UF 4 pilot plant, in operation at IEA, using the moving bed process is reported. UO 3 obtained from the thermal decomposition of ADU is used as a starting material in this pilot plant. The type of equipment and the process are both described. Ammonia gas (NH 3 ) was used in the reduction operation and anhydrous hydrofluoric acid (HF) in the hydrofluorination step

  16. The significance of the pilot conditioning plant (PKA) for spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willax, H.O.

    1996-01-01

    The pilot conditioning plant (PKA) is intended as a multi-purpose facility and thus may serve various purposes involved in the conditioning or disposal of spent fuel elements or radwaste. Its design as a pilot plant permits development and trial of various methods and processes for fuel element conditioning, as well as for radwaste conditioning. (orig./DG) [de

  17. Development of a continuous rotating cone reactor pilot plant for the pyrolysis of polyethene and polypropene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, R.W.J.; Westerhout, R.W.J.; Waanders, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1998-01-01

    A pilot plant for the high-temperature pyrolysis of polymers to recycle plastic waste to valuable products was constructed based on the rotating cone reactor (RCR) technology. The RCR used in this pilot plant, termed the continuous RCR ([C]RCR) was an improved version of the bench-scale RCR ([B]RCR)

  18. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  19. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  20. BWR crack control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immel, R.

    1981-01-01

    Cooperative research by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Boiling Water Reactor Owners Group (BWROG) may be finding a solution to the problem of stress corrosion cracking in reactor piping, which had caused 254 cracks in BWRs around the world by 1981. Welded joints of type-304 stainless steel in BWR recirculation systems are particularly vulnerable to microscopic stress corrosion cracking, which differs from fatigue cracking because it occurs when electrochemical processes break down the protective film in the zones affected by welding heat. The cracking is not hazardous to the public because it takes place within the containment building and causes leaks that are quickly detected. About one percent of welds crack, causing downtime and personnel exposure. The EPRI-BWROG project used a model of stress, water condition, and steel sensitization to find out the causes, develop remedies, and get the remedies into the field. Among the remedies are the adaptive learning network, an automated, microprocessor-controlled ultrasonic testing system that is scheduled for field testing and utility application in 1982. 2 figures

  1. Florida's proposed OTEC pilot plant for Key West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, D. L.; Rotundo, L.; Griffin, A.; Kelly, T.

    1981-12-01

    A description of the organizational structure, resource, and plant design for an OTEC system near Key West, Fla., is presented. A consortium of government offices has contracted with individual industrial developers to form an initial design team and manage subcontracting. Key West was chosen because of high electric rates, a proximity to warm and deep seawater, and a cooperative utility. Ocean water temperatures range from 80 F for the surface to 42 F for deep waters. A 40 MWe pilot plant is planned, with a double hull design for the 600-700 ft by 100-200 ft barge; four 15 MWe power modules will use ammonia as a working fluid. Strong available currents have reduced the needed sizes of the surface water intake ducts; less than two weeks down time are projected for hurricanes. The fiber reinforced composite cooling water pipe will be 2,600 ft long and designed to withstand hurricane stresses. Mooring and power delivery cabling are described, and it is noted that the design for the Key West plant is transferable to anywhere in the world due to the built-in engineering considerations.

  2. Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This volume contains the appendices for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Alternative geologic environs are considered. Salt, crystalline rock, argillaceous rock, and tuff are discussed. Studies on alternate geologic regions for the siting of WIPP are reviewed. President Carter's message to Congress on the management of radioactive wastes and the findings and recommendations of the interagency review group on nuclear waste management are included. Selection criteria for the WIPP site including geologic, hydrologic, tectonic, physicochemical compatability, and socio-economic factors are presented. A description of the waste types and the waste processing procedures are given. Methods used to calculate radiation doses from radionuclide releases during operation are presented. A complete description of the Los Medanos site, including archaeological and historic aspects is included. Environmental monitoring programs and long-term safety analysis program are described. (DMC)

  3. Preliminary seal design evaluation for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stormont, J C

    1988-03-01

    This report presents a preliminary evaluation of design concepts for the eventual sealing of the shafts, drifts, and boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Facility. The purpose of the seal systems is to limit the flow of water into, through, and out of the repository. The principal design strategy involves the consolidation of crushed or granular salt in response to the closure of the excavations in salt. Other candidate seal materials are bentonite, cementitious mixtures, and possibly asphalt. Results from in situ experiments and modeling studies, as well as laboratory materials testing and related industrial experience, are used to develop seal designs for shafts, waste storage panel entryways, non-waste containing drifts, and boreholes. Key elements of the ongoing experimental program are identified. 112 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daemen, J.; Ran, Chongwei

    1996-12-01

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites

  5. Revised concept for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, A.W.; Milloy, J.A.; Scully, L.W.; Shefelbine, H.C.; Stinebaugh, R.E.; Wowak, W.E.

    1978-07-01

    The quantities of remotely handled wastes that must be handled at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant have been reduced from 250 x 10 3 ft 3 /y to 10 x 10 3 ft 3 /y; the capital cost of the facility will be reduced from 534 to 428 million dollars. Changes in the facility design due to the reduction in the amount of remote-handled waste are discussed. If DOE should exercise its option to construct a high-level waste repository concurrently with the construction of the revised design, with both facilities receiving waste in 1985, the combined cost would be about 580 million dollars. However, it is unlikely that significant quantities of high-level waste in a form suitable for geologic disposal would be available until after 1990. (13 figures, 5 tables)

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2002-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to prepare a Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan. This document fulfills the requirement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This document was prepared by the Hydrology Section of the Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) Environmental Compliance Department, and it is the responsibility of this group to review the plan annually and update it every three years. This document is not, nor is it intended to be, an implementing document that sets forth specific details on carrying out field projects or operational policy. Rather, it is intended to give the reader insight to the groundwater protection philosophy at WIPP

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2002-09-24

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to prepare a Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan. This document fulfills the requirement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This document was prepared by the Hydrology Section of the Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) Environmental Compliance Department, and it is the responsibility of this group to review the plan annually and update it every three years. This document is not, nor is it intended to be, an implementing document that sets forth specific details on carrying out field projects or operational policy. Rather, it is intended to give the reader insight to the groundwater protection philosophy at WIPP.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson [Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), NM (United States); Basabilvazo, George T. [Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2016 (ASER) is to provide the information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP facility. DOE Order 231.1B; DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability; and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1B, which requires DOE facilities to submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer.

  9. Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    This volume contains the appendices for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Alternative geologic environs are considered. Salt, crystalline rock, argillaceous rock, and tuff are discussed. Studies on alternate geologic regions for the siting of WIPP are reviewed. President Carter's message to Congress on the management of radioactive wastes and the findings and recommendations of the interagency review group on nuclear waste management are included. Selection criteria for the WIPP site including geologic, hydrologic, tectonic, physicochemical compatability, and socio-economic factors are presented. A description of the waste types and the waste processing procedures are given. Methods used to calculate radiation doses from radionuclide releases during operation are presented. A complete description of the Los Medanos site, including archaeological and historic aspects is included. Environmental monitoring programs and long-term safety analysis program are described

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in situ experimental program for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will be a facility to demonstrate the environmental and operational safety of storing radioactive wastes in a deep geologic bedded salt facility. The WIPP will be located in southeastern New Mexico, approximately 30 miles east of the city of Carlsbad. The major focus of the pilot plant operation involves ERDA defense related low and intermediate-level transuranic wastes. The scope of the project also specifically includes experimentation utilizing commercially generated high-level wastes, or alternatively, spent unreprocessed fuel elements. WIPP HLW experiments are being conducted in an inter-related laboratory, bench-scale, and in situ mode. This presentation focuses on the planned in situ experiments which, depending on the availability of commercially reprocessed waste plus delays in the construction schedule of the WIPP, will begin in approximately 1985. Such experiments are necessary to validate preceding laboratory results and to provide actual, total conditions of geologic storage which cannot be adequately simulated. One set of planned experiments involves emplacing bare HLW fragments into direct contact with the bedded salt environment. A second set utilizes full-size canisters of waste emplaced in the salt in the same manner as planned for a future HLW repository. The bare waste experiments will study in an accelerated manner waste-salt bed-brine interactions including matrix integrity/degradation, brine leaching, system chemistry, and potential radionuclide migration through the salt bed. Utilization of full-size canisters of HLW in situ permits us to demonstrate operational effectiveness and safety. Experiments will evaluate corrosion and compatibility interactions between the waste matrix, canister and overpack materials, getter materials, stored energy, waste buoyancy, etc. Using full size canisters also allows us to demonstrate engineered retrievability of wastes, if necessary, at the end of experimentation

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions

    2000-01-01

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 1998, to March 31, 2000. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, and amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office's (hereinafter the ''CAO'') compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. An issue was identified in the 1998 BECR relating to a potential cross-connection between the fire-water systems and the site domestic water system. While the CAO and its managing and operating contractor (hereinafter the ''MOC'') believe the site was always in compliance with cross-connection control requirements, hardware and procedural upgrades w ere implemented in March 1999 to strengthen its compliance posture. Further discussion of this issue is presented in section 30.2.2 herein. During this reporting period WIPP received two letters and a compliance order alleging violation of certain requirements outlined in section 9(a)(1) of the LWA. With the exception of one item, pending a final decision by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), all alleged violations have been resolved without the assessment of fines or penalties. Non-mixed TRU waste shipments began on March 26, 1999. Shipments continued through November 26, 1999, the effective date of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF). No shipments regulated under the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit were received at WIPP during this BECR reporting period

  12. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions

    2000-12-01

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 1998, to March 31, 2000. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, and amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office's (hereinafter the ''CAO'') compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. An issue was identified in the 1998 BECR relating to a potential cross-connection between the fire-water systems and the site domestic water system. While the CAO and its managing and operating contractor (hereinafter the ''MOC'') believe the site was always in compliance with cross-connection control requirements, hardware and procedural upgrades w ere implemented in March 1999 to strengthen its compliance posture. Further discussion of this issue is presented in section 30.2.2 herein. During this reporting period WIPP received two letters and a compliance order alleging violation of certain requirements outlined in section 9(a)(1) of the LWA. With the exception of one item, pending a final decision by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), all alleged violations have been resolved without the assessment of fines or penalties. Non-mixed TRU waste shipments began on March 26, 1999. Shipments continued through November 26, 1999, the effective date of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF). No shipments regulated under the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit were received at WIPP during this BECR reporting period.

  13. TF Inner Leg Space Allocation for Pilot Plant Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter H. Titus and Ali Zolfaghari

    2012-09-06

    A critical design feature of any tokamak is the space taken up by the inner leg of the toroidal field (TF) coil. The radial build needed for the TF inner leg, along with shield thickness , size of the central solenoid and plasma minor radius set the major radius of the machine. The cost of the tokamak core roughly scales with the cube of the major radius. Small reductions in the TF build can have a big impact on the overall cost of the reactor. The cross section of the TF inner leg must structurally support the centering force and that portion of the vertical separating force that is not supported by the outer structures. In this paper, the TF inner leg equatorial plane cross sections are considered. Out-of- Plane (OOP) forces must also be supported, but these are largest away from the equatorial plane, in the inner upper and lower corners and outboard sections of the TF coil. OOP forces are taken by structures that are not closely coupled with the radial build of the central column at the equatorial plane. The "Vertical Access AT Pilot Plant" currently under consideration at PPPL is used as a starting point for the structural, field and current requirements. Other TF structural concepts are considered. Most are drawn from existing designs such as ITER's circular conduits in radial plates bearing on a heavy nose section, and TPX's square conduits in a case, Each of these concepts can rely on full wedging, or partial wedging. Vaulted TF coils are considered as are those with some component of bucking against a central solenoid or bucking post. With the expectation that the pilot plant will be a steady state machine, a static stress criteria is used for all the concepts. The coils are assumed to be superconducting, with the superconductor not contributing to the structural strength. Limit analysis is employed to assess the degree of conservatism in the static criteria as it is applied to a linear elastic stress analysis. TF concepts, and in particular the PPPL AT

  14. Experimental pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation. Future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, I; Bornea, Anisia; Brad, S; Constantin, N; Cristescu, Ioana; Pearsica, Claudia; Poenariu, V; Sofalca, N; Stefan, L; Zamfirache, M

    1998-01-01

    Experimental Pilot Plant for Tritium and Deuterium Separation at Rm. Valcea has the goal of establishing the technological data required to design and operate an industrial-scale for detritiation of heavy water contaminated by various tritium concentrations. The technology developed at Rm. Valcea is based upon the catalytic isotopic exchange heavy water - deuterium, followed of cryogenic distillation of a mixture between molecular species of hydrogen and its isotopes. In the paper we present the main steps of commissioning and we analyse the plant's performances regarding tritium and deuterium separation. The links between the detritiation plant and a CANDU type reactor are presented. The experimental pilot plant contains five modules that can work independently or coupled between them: a. In the isotopic exchange module the transfer of deuterium and tritium from heavy water into the hydrogen flow is realized by means of a catalytic isotope exchange process at 80 o C. The mixed catalytic packing was made and tested. It contains a catalyst of Pt/C/PTFE type and B7 packing; b. In the preliminary purification module the purification of hydrogen is carried out to remove the oxygen and water, which can affect the good functioning of the cryogenic distillation module; c. In the cryogenic distillation module the mixture of hydrogen isotopes is separated; The deuterium concentration at the bottom of the column is up to 99.9% D/(D+H); The column is filled with ordered package and the condenser's temperature is 22 K; d. In the catalytic burning module, deuterated hydrogen is catalytically combined with oxygen and heavy water results with the concentration of 19.9% D/(D+H). The hydrogen burning takes place on mixed catalytic package with 10% hydrophobe catalyst of Pt/C/PTFE type and 90% package; e. The module of water isotopic distillation under vacuum allows heavy water concentration to raise from 49.9% D/(D+H) to 99.8% D/(D+H) on ordered package.(authors)

  15. A pilot plant for solar-cell manufacture; Ligne pilote de fabrication de cellules solaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.; Ziegler, Y.; Closset, A. [VHF - Technologies SA, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    A pilot plant for the manufacture of amorphous silicon solar cells on plastic film substrate was built allowing the annual production of 40 kW peak power. The production steps comprise: a) the continuous coating of n-i-p solar cells by VHF-PECVD with a capacity of 28.5 meters in 8.5 hours; b) transparent-conducting-oxide (TCO) top contact structuring using a continuous process; c) series connection step (scribing and Ag-paste) with a capacity of 28 meters in 6 hours; d) back and top contact sputtering with 3 parallel magnetrons; e) integration of a large-area vacuum laminator enabling the simultaneous lamination of 4 products of 4 Wp. In parallel with this project, a complete cost model was established enabling a more quantitative approach of the future technological and industrial strategy of the company. An increase of the capacity to 100 kWp has been planned for summer 2005.

  16. Advanced technology for BWR operator training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Akira; Fujita, Eimitsu; Nakao, Toshihiko; Nakabaru, Mitsugu; Asaoka, Kouchi.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plants which went into service recently. The simulator is a full scope replica type simulator which faithfully replicates the control room environment of the reference plant with six main control panels and twelve auxiliary ones. In comparison with earlier simulators, the scope of the simulation is significantly extended in both width and depth. The simulation model is also refined in order to include operator training according to sympton-based emergency procedure guidelines to mitigate the results in accident cases. In particular, the core model and the calculational model of the radiation intensity distribution, if radioactive materials were released, are improved. As for simulator control capabilities by which efficient and effective training can be achieved, various advanced designs are adopted allowing easy use of the simulators. (author)

  17. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    A recently completed Oak Ridge effort proposes two management strategies for mitigation of the events that might occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage in a BWR severe accident. While the probability of such an accident is low, there may be effective yet inexpensive mitigation measures that could be implemented employing the existing plant equipment and requiring only additions to the plant emergency procedures. In this spirit, accident management strategies have been proposed for use of a borated solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and for containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if injection systems cannot be restored. The proposed strategy for poisoning of the water used for vessel reflood should injection systems be restored after control blade damage has occurred has great promise, using only the existing plant equipment but employing a different chemical form for the boron poison. The dominant BWR severe accident sequence is Station Blackout and without means for mechanical stirring or heating of the storage tank, the question of being able to form the poisoned solution under accident conditions becomes of supreme importance. On the other hand, the proposed strategy for drywell flooding to cool the reactor vessel bottom head and prevent the core and structure debris from escaping to the drywell holds less promise. This strategy does, however, have potential for future plant designs in which passive methods might be employed to completely submerge the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions without the need for containment venting

  18. Decay heat measurements and predictions of BWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Heeb, C.M.; Creer, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Pre-calorimetry decay heat predictions obtained with the ORIGEN2 computer code were compared to calorimeter data obtained for eleven boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assemblies using General Electric, Morris Operation's in-pool calorimeter. Ten of the 7 x 7 BWR spent fuel assemblies were obtained from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The remaining BWR assembly was from Commonwealth Edison's Dresden Nuclear Power Plant. The assemblies had burnups ranging from 5.3 to 27.6 GWD/MTU and had been removed from their respective reactors for 2 or more years. The majority of the assemblies had burnups of between 20 and 28 GWD/MTU and had been out of the reactor 2 to 4 years. The assemblies represent spent fuel that has been continuously burned and fuel that has been reinserted. Comparisons of ORIGEN2 pre-calorimetry decay heat predictions with calorimeter data showed that predictions agreed with data within the precision/repeatibility of the experimental data (+-15 Watts or 5% for a 300 Watt BWR assembly). Comparisons of predicted axial gamma profiles based on core-averaged axial burnups with measured profiles showed difference. These differences may be explained by reactor operation with partially inserted control rods

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Enviromental Report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Enviromnetal Services

    2009-09-21

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2008 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to characterize site environmental management performance; summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant facility programs and efforts; and describe how compliance and environmental improvement is accomplished through the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) Number NM4890139088-TSDF (treatment, storage, and disposal facility) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WIPP mission is to safely dispose of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated by the production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. In 2008, 5,265 cubic meters (m3) of TRU waste were disposed of at the WIPP facility, including 5,216 m3 of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and 49 m3 of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. From the first

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Enviromental Report for 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2008 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to characterize site environmental management performance; summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant facility programs and efforts; and describe how compliance and environmental improvement is accomplished through the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) Number NM4890139088-TSDF (treatment, storage, and disposal facility) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WIPP mission is to safely dispose of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated by the production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. In 2008, 5,265 cubic meters (m3) of TRU waste were disposed of at the WIPP facility, including 5,216 m3 of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and 49 m3 of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. From the first

  1. Fuel gases generation in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in a nuclear power plant with reactor type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaices, M.; Salaices, E.; Ovando, R.; Esquivias, J.

    2011-11-01

    During an accident design base of coolant loos, the hydrogen gas can accumulate inside the primary contention as a result of several generation mechanisms among those that are: 1) the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant, 2) the metals corrosion for the solutions used in the emergency cooling and dew of the contention, and 3) the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency. In this work the contribution of each generation mechanism to the hydrogen total in the primary contention is analyzed, considering typical inventories of zirconium, zinc, aluminum and fission products in balance cycle of a reactor type BWR. In the analysis the distribution model of fission products and hydrogen production proposed in the regulator guide 1.7, Rev. 2 of the US NRC was used. The results indicate that the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation at the end of a period of 24 hours of initiate the accident is the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency continued by the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding with the reactor coolant, and lastly the aluminum and zinc oxidation present in the primary contention. However, the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant is the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation in the first moments after the accident. This study constitutes the first part of the general analysis of the generation, transport and control of fuel gases in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in BWRs. (Author)

  2. Seismic reflection data report: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hern, J.L.; Powers, D.W.; Barrows, L.J.

    1978-12-01

    Volume II contains uninterpreted processed lines and shotpoint maps from three seismic reflection surveys conducted from 1976 through 1978 by Sandia Laboratories to support investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Data interpretations will be the subject of subsequent reports

  3. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No-migration variance petition. Addendum: Volume 7, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    This report describes various aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) including design data, waste characterization, dissolution features, ground water hydrology, natural resources, monitoring, general geology, and the gas generation/test program.

  4. NPDES Permit for Crow Municipal Rural & Industrial Pilot Water Treatment Plant in Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit MT-0031827, the Crow Indian Tribe is authorized to discharge from the Crow Municipal Rural & Industrial (MR&I) Pilot Water Treatment Plant in Bighorn County, Montana to the Bighorn River.

  5. Study on designing a complete pilot plant for processing sandstone ores in Palua-Parong area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Quang Thai; Tran Van Son; Tran The Dinh; Trinh Nguyen Quynh; Vu Khac Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Design work is the first step of the construction and operation of pilot plant. Thus, the project Study on designing a complete pilot plant for processing sandstone ores in Palua - Parong area was conducted to design a pilot plant for testing entire technological process to obtain yellowcake. Based on a literature review of uranium ore processing technology in the world, information of ore and previous research results of uranium ore in PaLua - PaRong area at the Institute for Technology of Radioactive and Rare Elements, a suitable technological flowsheet for processing this ore has been selected. The size, location of the pilot plant and planed experiments has been selected during the implementation of this project, in which basic parameters, designed system of equipment, buildings, ect. were also calculated. (author)

  6. Recent developments in ultrasonic inspection of BWR pipes in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behravesh, M.; Dau, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Following the 1982 discovery of widespread intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the recirculation piping system at the Nine Mile Point unit 1 plant, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) made the requirement that the operating BWR plants demonstrate the effectiveness of their ultrasonic testing procedures. Since that time, the detection, identification, and sizing of IGSCC in BWR pipes has received an even greater amount of attention. Initially EPRI through its NDE Center in Charlotte took an active role in providing a mechanism whereby the affected utilities could demonstrate the required capabilities. This effort was soon followed with the development and regular offering of a one week course on IGSCC detection whose final exam was patterned after the requirements of the US NRC Bulletin IE 83-02 on performance capability demonstration

  7. NOx Abatement Pilot Plant 90-day test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCray, J.A.; Boardman, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    High-level radioactive liquid wastes produced during nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant are calcined in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to provide both volume reduction and a more stable waste form. Because a large component of the HLW is nitric acid, high levels of oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) are produced in the process and discharged to the environment via the calciner off-gas. The NO x abatement program is required by the new Fuel Processing Restoration (FPR) project permit to construct to reduce NO x emissions from the NWCF. Extensive research and development has indicated that the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process is the most promising technology for treating the NWCF off-gas. Pilot plant tests were performed to determine the compatibility of the SCR process with actual NWCF off-gas. Test results indicate that the SCR process is a viable method for abating the NO x from the NWCF off-gas. Reduction efficiencies over 95% can be obtained, with minimal amounts of ammonia slip, provided favorable operating conditions exist. Two reactors operated with series flow will provide optimum reduction capabilities. Typical operation should be performed with a first reactor stage gas space velocity of 20,000 hr -1 and an inlet temperature of 320 degrees C. The first stage exhaust NO x concentration will then dictate the parameter settings for the second stage. Operation should always strive for a peak reactor temperature of 520 degrees C in both reactors, with minimal NH 3 slip from the second reactor. Frequent fluctuations in the NWCF off-gas NO x concentration will require a full-scale reduction facility that is versatile and quick-responding. Sudden changes in NWCF off-gas NO x concentrations will require quick detection and immediate response to avoid reactor bed over-heating and/or excessive ammonia slip

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year. (3) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (4) Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Permit) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  9. Key Geomechanics Issues at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HANSEN, FRANCIS D.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical and hydrological properties of rock salt provide excellent bases for geological isolation of hazardous materials. Regulatory compliance determinations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) stand as testament to the widely held conclusion that salt provides excellent isolation properties. The WIPP saga began in the 1950s when the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommended a salt vault as a promising solution to the national problem of nuclear waste disposal. For over 20 years, the Scientific basis for the NAS recommendation has been fortified by Sandia National Laboratories through a series of large scale field tests and laboratory investigations of salt properties. These scientific investigations helped develop a comprehensive understanding of salt's 4 reformational behavior over an applicable range of stresses and temperatures. Sophisticated constitutive modeling, validated through underground testing, provides the computational ability to model long-term behavior of repository configurations. In concert with advancement of the mechanical models, fluid flow measurements showed not only that the evaporite lithology was essentially impermeable but that the WIPP setting was hydrologically inactive. Favorable mechanical properties ensure isolation of materials placed in a salt geological setting. Key areas of the geomechanics investigations leading to the certification of WIPP are in situ experiments, laboratory tests, and shaft seal design

  10. Waset Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-09-26

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data that: (a) Characterize site environmental management performance; (b) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (d) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP site. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. This order requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) (No. NM4890139088-TSDF [treatment, storage, and disposal facility]) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  11. Regulatory basis for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Bryan A.; Crawford, M.B.; Galson, D.A.; Marietta, Melvin G.

    2000-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the first operational repository designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste from the defense programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for certifications and regulation of the WIPP facility for the radioactive components of the waste. The EPA has promulgated general radioactive waste disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 191. and WIPP-specific criteria to implement and interpret the generic disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 194. In October 1996. the DOE submitted its Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the EPA to demonstrate compliance with the disposal standards at Subparts B and C of 40 CFR Part 191. This paper summarizes the development of the overall legal framework for radioactive waste disposal at the WIPP, the parallel development of the WIPP performance assessment (PA), and how the EPA disposal standards and implementing criteria formed the basis for the CCA WIPP PA. The CCA resulted in a certification in May 1998 by the EPA of the WIPP'S compliance with the EPA's disposal standard, thus enabling the WIPP to begin radioactive waste disposal

  12. Summary of scientific investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weart, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    The scientific issues concerning disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations have received 40 years of attention since the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) first addressed this issue in the mid-50s. For the last 21 years, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have directed site specific studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This paper will focus primarily on the WIPP scientific studies now in their concluding stages, the major scientific controversies regarding the site, and some of the surprises encountered during the course of these scientific investigations. The WIPP project's present understanding of the scientific processes involved continues to support the site as a satisfactory, safe location for the disposal of defense-related transuranic waste and one which will be shown to be in compliance with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. Compliance will be evaluated by incorporating data from these experiments into Performance Assessment (PA) models developed to describe the physical and chemical processes that could occur at the WIPP during the next 10,000 years under a variety of scenarios. The resulting compliance document is scheduled to be presented to the EPA in October 1996 and all relevant information from scientific studies will be included in this application and the supporting analyses. Studies supporting this compliance application conclude the major period of scientific investigation for the WIPP. Further studies will be of a ''confirmatory'' and monitoring nature

  13. Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), DOE/WIPP-069, was initially developed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Steering Committee to provide performance requirements to ensure public health and safety as well as the safe handling of transuranic (TRU) waste at the WIPP. This revision updates the criteria and requirements of previous revisions and deletes those which were applicable only to the test phase. The criteria and requirements in this document must be met by participating DOE TRU Waste Generator/Storage Sites (Sites) prior to shipping contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste forms to the WIPP. The WIPP Project will comply with applicable federal and state regulations and requirements, including those in Titles 10, 40, and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The WAC, DOE/WIPP-069, serves as the primary directive for assuring the safe handling, transportation, and disposal of TRU wastes in the WIPP and for the certification of these wastes. The WAC identifies strict requirements that must be met by participating Sites before these TRU wastes may be shipped for disposal in the WIPP facility. These criteria and requirements will be reviewed and revised as appropriate, based on new technical or regulatory requirements. The WAC is a controlled document. Revised/changed pages will be supplied to all holders of controlled copies

  14. Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included

  15. A historical review of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant backfill development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; MOLECKE,MARTIN A.; PAPENGUTH,HANS W.; BRUSH,LAURENCE H.

    2000-06-05

    Backfills have been part of Sandia National Laboratories' [Sandia's] Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] designs for over twenty years. Historically, backfill research at Sandia has depended heavily on the changing mission of the WIPP facility. Early testing considered heat producing, high level, wastes. Bentonite/sand/salt mixtures were evaluated and studies focused on developing materials that would retard brine ingress, sorb radionuclides, and withstand elevated temperatures. The present-day backfill consists of pure MgO [magnesium oxide] in a pelletized form and is directed at treating the relatively low contamination level, non-heat producing, wastes actually being disposed of in the WIPP. Its introduction was motivated by the need to scavenging CO{sub 2} [carbon dioxide] from decaying organic components in the waste. However, other benefits, such as a substantial desiccating capacity, are also being evaluated. The MgO backfill also fulfills a statutory requirement for assurance measures beyond those needed to demonstrate compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regulatory release limits. However, even without a backfill, the WIPP repository design still operates within EPA regulatory release limits.

  16. Mechanical compaction of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, B.M.; Thompson, T.W.; VanBuskirk, R.G.; Patti, N.C.

    1991-06-01

    The investigation described in this report acquired experimental information about how materials simulating transuranic (TRU) waste compact under axial compressive stress, and used these data to define a model for use in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal room analyses. The first step was to determine compaction curves for various simultant materials characteristic of TRU waste. Stress-volume compaction curves for various combinations of these materials were than derived to represent the combustible, metallic, and sludge waste categories. Prediction of compaction response in this manner is considered essential for the WIPP program because of the difficulties inherent in working with real (radioactive) waste. Next, full-sized 55-gallon drums of simulated combustible, metallic, and sludge waste were axially compacted. These results provided data that can be directly applied to room consolidation and data for comparison with the predictions obtained in Part 1 of the investigation. Compaction curves, which represent the combustible, metallic, and sludge waste categories, were determined, and a curve for the averaged waste inventory of the entire repository was derived. 9 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs

  17. The determination of residence times in a pilot plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, F. Pablo; Cortés, M. Eugenia

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that residence time distributions (RTD) are very important in many chemical processes such as separation, reforming, hydrocracking, fluid catalytic cracking, hydrodesulfuration, hydrogenation among others [3 Procédés de transformation, Editions Technip, Institute Francais du Petrole, Paris, France, 1998]. In addition, tracers can be used to measure the velocity, distribution and residence time of any stream through any part of an industrial [Guidebook on Radioisotope Tracers in Industry, IAEA, Vienna, 1990] or experimental system. Perhaps the best quality of radiotracers is that they do not interfere with normal unit operations or production scheduling. In this paper are presented the RTDs obtained in a pilot plant for a hydrogenation process [IMP, Technical Report, Determinación del tiempo de residencia promedio en el reactor de la planta piloto de hidroagotamiento de crudo, 2002]. The RTDs show a random phenomenon, which is not typical of this type of chemical processes. Several RTDs were determined in order to confirm this random behavior. The data were obtained using as a tracer a radioactive form of sodium iodide containing iodine-131 [The Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 10th Ed., Van Nostrand Reinhold, USA, 1981]. The process works with two phases in a countercurrent flow, inside a packed column. The liquid phase goes down by gravity. The gas phase goes up due to pressure difference [3 Procédés de transformation, Editions Technip, Institute Francais du Petrole, Paris, France, 1998]. The tracer was selected such that it would follow the liquid phase.

  18. Compliance status report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated through national defense-related activities. Approximately 53,700 m 2 of these wastes have been generated and are currently stored at government defense installations across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, has been sited and constructed to meet the criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed wastes. This Compliance Status Report (CSR) provides an assessment of the progress of the WIPP Program toward compliance with long-term disposal regulations, set forth in Title 40 CFR 191 (EPA, 1993a), Subparts B and C, and Title 40 CFR section 268.6 (EPA, 1993b), in order to focus on-going and future experimental and engineering activities. The CSR attempts to identify issues associated with the performance of the WIPP as a long-term repository and to focus on the resolution of these issues. This report will serve as a tool to focus project resources on the areas necessary to ensure complete, accurate, and timely submittal of the compliance application. This document is not intended to constitute a statement of compliance or a demonstration of compliance

  19. Compliance status report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated through national defense-related activities. Approximately 53,700 m{sup 2} of these wastes have been generated and are currently stored at government defense installations across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, has been sited and constructed to meet the criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed wastes. This Compliance Status Report (CSR) provides an assessment of the progress of the WIPP Program toward compliance with long-term disposal regulations, set forth in Title 40 CFR 191 (EPA, 1993a), Subparts B and C, and Title 40 CFR {section}268.6 (EPA, 1993b), in order to focus on-going and future experimental and engineering activities. The CSR attempts to identify issues associated with the performance of the WIPP as a long-term repository and to focus on the resolution of these issues. This report will serve as a tool to focus project resources on the areas necessary to ensure complete, accurate, and timely submittal of the compliance application. This document is not intended to constitute a statement of compliance or a demonstration of compliance.

  20. Waset Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data that: (a) Characterize site environmental management performance; (b) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (d) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP site. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. This order requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) (No. NM4890139088-TSDF [treatment, storage, and disposal facility]) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  1. Preoperational environmental programs for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, C.C.; Eastmond, R.J.; Kehrman, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Since its inception, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project has involved a comprehensive series of environmental programs. The first round of field studies began in 1975 to characterize the local environment and to provide data necessary for the projection of potential environmental impacts. These included ecological surveys and experiments, along with measurements of meteorological and radiological parameters in the vicinity of the site. A second round of preoperational field studies is just starting. The current programs monitor construction-related environmental impacts and quantify baseline levels of radiation and radionuclides along possible release pathways. In 1988, when transuranic wastes arrive, these programs will be replaced by operational programs that monitor the same parameters, but with possible adjustments in sampling intensity. Operational monitoring will presist until 2013, with a few components lasting through the two-year decommissioning period and beyond closure of the facility. This paper describes and classifies the preoperational environmental programs for the WIPP project. The paper also provides a chronological context for all programs of environmental data acquisition which have been or will be implemented during the period of active institutional control over the site. A time chart is used to illustrate how past and present activities fit into the overall program for environmental surveillance and protection at the WIPP project

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year. (3) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (4) Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Permit) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  3. Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included.

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents compliance with environmental regulations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. This BECR covers the reporting period from April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2006. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with regulations and permits issued pursuant to the following: (1) Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Subpart A, 'Environmental Standards for Management and Storage'; (2) Clean Air Act (CAA) (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 7401, et seq.); (3) Solid Waste Disposal Act (SWDA) (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992, et seq.); (4) Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (42 U.S.C. 300f, et seq.); (5) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (15 U.S.C. 2601, et seq.); (6) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.); and all other federal and state of New Mexico laws pertaining to public health and safety or the environment.

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2006-10-12

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents compliance with environmental regulations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. This BECR covers the reporting period from April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2006. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with regulations and permits issued pursuant to the following: (1) Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Subpart A, "Environmental Standards for Management and Storage"; (2) Clean Air Act (CAA) (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §7401, et seq.); (3) Solid Waste Disposal Act (SWDA) (42 U.S.C. §§6901-6992, et seq.); (4) Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (42 U.S.C. §§300f, et seq.); (5) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (15 U.S.C. §§2601, et seq.); (6) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. §§9601, et seq.); and all other federal and state of New Mexico laws pertaining to public health and safety or the environment.

  6. Manufacturing technology and process for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    Following recent advanced technologies, processes and requests of the design changes of BWR fuel, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) has upgraded the manufacturing technology and honed its own skills to complete its brand-new automated facility in Tokai in the latter half of 1980's. The plant uses various forms of automation throughout the manufacturing process: the acceptance of uranium dioxide powder, pelletizing, fuel rod assembling, fuel bundle assembling and shipment. All processes are well computerized and linked together to establish the integrated control system with three levels of Production and Quality Control, Process Control and Process Automation. This multi-level system plays an important role in the quality assurance system which generates the highest quality of fuels and other benefits. (author)

  7. Final Report: RPP-WTP Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M. R.; Adamson, D. J.; Calloway, T. B.; Fowley, M. D.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steimke, J. L.; Williams, M. R.; Zamecnik, J. R.

    2005-06-01

    In August 2004 the last of the SIPP task testing ended--a task that formally began with the issuance of the RPP-WTP Test Specification in June 2003. The planning for the task was a major effort in itself and culminated with the input of all stakeholders, DOE, Bechtel National, Inc., Washington Group International, in October 2003 at Hanford, WA (Appendix A). This report documents the activities carried out as a result of that planning. Campaign IV, the fourth and final step towards the Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant (SIPP) task, conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at the Savannah River Site, was to take the several recycle streams produced in Campaign III, the third step of the task, and combine them with other simulated recycle and chosen waste streams. (Campaign III was fed recycles from Campaign II, as Campaign II was fed by Campaign I.) The combined stream was processed in a fashion that mimicked the pretreatment operations of the DOE River Protection Project--Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) with the exception of the Ion Exchange Process. The SIPP task is considered semi-integrated because it only deals with the pretreatment operations of the RPP-WTP. That is, the pilot plant starts by receiving waste from the tank farm and ends when waste is processed to the point of being sent for vitrification. The resulting pretreated LAW and HLW simulants produced by the SIPP were shipped to VSL (Vitreous State Laboratory) and successfully vitrified in pilot WTP melters. Within the SIPP task these steps are referred to as Campaigns and there were four Campaigns in all. Campaign I, which is completely different than other campaigns, subjected a simulant of Hanford Tank 241-AY-102/C-106 (AY102) waste to cross-flow ultrafiltration only and in that process several important recycle streams were produced as a result of washing the simulant and cleaning the cross-flow filter. These streams were fed to subsequent campaigns and that work was

  8. Final Report: RPP-WTP Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duignan, M. R.; Adamson, D. J.; Calloway, T. B.; Fowley, M. D.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steimke, J. L.; Williams, M. R.; Zamecnik, J. R.

    2005-01-01

    In August 2004 the last of the SIPP task testing ended--a task that formally began with the issuance of the RPP-WTP Test Specification in June 2003. The planning for the task was a major effort in itself and culminated with the input of all stakeholders, DOE, Bechtel National, Inc., Washington Group International, in October 2003 at Hanford, WA (Appendix A). This report documents the activities carried out as a result of that planning. Campaign IV, the fourth and final step towards the Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant (SIPP) task, conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at the Savannah River Site, was to take the several recycle streams produced in Campaign III, the third step of the task, and combine them with other simulated recycle and chosen waste streams. (Campaign III was fed recycles from Campaign II, as Campaign II was fed by Campaign I.) The combined stream was processed in a fashion that mimicked the pretreatment operations of the DOE River Protection Project--Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) with the exception of the Ion Exchange Process. The SIPP task is considered semi-integrated because it only deals with the pretreatment operations of the RPP-WTP. That is, the pilot plant starts by receiving waste from the tank farm and ends when waste is processed to the point of being sent for vitrification. The resulting pretreated LAW and HLW simulants produced by the SIPP were shipped to VSL (Vitreous State Laboratory) and successfully vitrified in pilot WTP melters. Within the SIPP task these steps are referred to as Campaigns and there were four Campaigns in all. Campaign I, which is completely different than other campaigns, subjected a simulant of Hanford Tank 241-AY-102/C-106 (AY102) waste to cross-flow ultrafiltration only and in that process several important recycle streams were produced as a result of washing the simulant and cleaning the cross-flow filter. These streams were fed to subsequent campaigns and that work was

  9. Results of the Simulator smart against synthetic signals using a model of reduced order of BWR with additive and multiplicative noise; Resultados del simulador smart frente a senales sinteticas utilizando un modelo de orden reducido de BWR con ruido aditivo y multiplicativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Montesino, M. E.; Pena, J.; Escriva, A.; Melara, J.

    2011-07-01

    Results of SMART-simulator front of synthetic signals with models of reduced order of BWR with additive and multiplicative noise Under the SMART project, which aims to monitor the signals Cofrentes nuclear plant, we have developed a signal generator of synthetics BWR that will allow together real signals of plant the validation of the monitor.

  10. Maximum thermal loading test of BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Yoshimura, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Satoshi; Ishizuka, Takao.

    1987-01-01

    Various proving tests on the reliability of nuclear power plants have been conducted at the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center and at the Japan Power Plant Engineering and Inspection Corporation. The tests were initiated at the request of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). Toshiba undertook one of the proving tests on the reliability of nuclear fuel assembly; the maximum thermal loading test of BWR fuel assembly from the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center. These tests are part of the proving tests mentioned above, and their purpose is to confirm the reliability of the thermal hydraulic engineering techniques. Toshiba has been engaged for the past nine years in the design, fabrication and testing of the equipment. For the project, a test model fuel assembly was used to measure the critical power of the BWR fuel assembly and the void and fluidity of the coolant. From the test results, it has been confirmed that the heat is transferred safely from the fuel assembly to the coolant in the BWR nuclear power plant. In addition, the propriety and reliability of the thermal hydraulic engineering techniques for the fuel assembly have been proved. (author)

  11. BWR steel containment corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  12. Analysis of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in an A BWR reactor; Analisis del accidente de la planta nucleoelectrica de Fukushima Daiichi en un reactor tipo ABWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escorcia O, D. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Salazar S, E., E-mail: daniel.escorcia.ortiz@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, 62250 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The present work aims to recreate the accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan on March 11, 2011, making use of an academic simulator of forced circulation of the A BWR reactor provided by the IAEA to know the scope of this simulator. The simulator was developed and distributed by the IAEA for academic purposes and contains the characteristics and general elements of this reactor to be able to simulate transients and failures of different types, allowing also to observe the general behavior of the reactor, as well as several phenomena and present systems in the same. Is an educational tool of great value, but it does not have a scope that allows the training of plant operators. To recreate the conditions of the Fukushima accident in the simulator, we first have to know what events led to this accident, as well as the actions taken by operators and managers to reduce the consequences of this accident; and the sequence of events that occurred during the course of the accident. Differences in the nuclear power plant behavior are observed and interpreted throughout the simulation, since the Fukushima plant technology and the simulator technology are not the same, although they have several elements in common. The Fukushima plant had an event that by far exceeded the design basis, which triggered in an accident that occurred in the first place by a total loss of power supply, followed by the loss of cooling systems, causing a level too high in temperature, melting the core and damaging the containment accordingly, allowing the escape of hydrogen and radioactive material. As a result of the simulation, was determined that the scope of the IAEA academic simulator reaches the entrance of the emergency equipment, so is able to simulate almost all the events occurred at the time of the earthquake and the arrival of the tsunami in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi. However, due to its characteristics, is not able to simulate later

  13. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennard, M.W.; Harbottle, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B 4 C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  14. Synergistic failure of BWR internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A. G.; Chang, T.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components

  15. Groundwater monitoring at the waste isolation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehrman, R.; Broberg, K.; Tatro, G.; Richardson, R.; Dasczcyszak, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) being conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The Regulatory and Environmental Programs (REP) section of the Environment, Safety and Health department (ES ampersand H) is responsible for conducting environmental monitoring at the WIPP. Groundwater monitoring is one of the ongoing environmental activities currently taking place. The REP section includes water-quality sampling and water-level monitoring. The WIPP Project is a research and development facility designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of defense-generated TRU and mixed waste in a geologic repository. The Salado Formation of Permian age serves as the repository medium. The Salado Formation consists of bedded salt and associated evaporites. The formation is 602 meters thick at the site area; the top surface is located at a subsurface depth of 262 meters (10). The repository lies at a subsurface depth of 655 meters. Water-quality sampling for physical, chemical, and radiological parameters has been an ongoing activity at the WIPP site for the past six years, and will continue through the life of the project. Data collected from this program to date, has been used by Sandia National Laboratories for site characterization and performance assessment work. The data has also been used to establish a baseline of preoperational radiological and nonradiological groundwater quality. Once the facility begins receiving waste, this baseline will be used to determine if the WIPP facility influences or alters groundwater quality over time. The water quality of a well is determined while the well is continuously pumped. Serial samples of the pumped water are collected and tested for pH, Eh, temperature, specific gravity, specific conductivity, alkalinity, chlorides, divalent cations, ferrous iron, and total iron. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) integrated project management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olona, D.; Sala, D.

    1993-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a research and development project of the Department of Energy (DOE), tasked with the mission of demonstrating the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes. This unique project was authorized by Congress in 1979 in response to the national need for long-term, safe methods for disposing of radioactive by-products from our national defense programs. The WIPP was originally established in December of 1979, by Public Law 96-164, DOE National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980. Since the inception of the WIPP Project, work has continued to prepare the facility to receive TRU wastes. Studies continue to be conducted to demonstrate the safety of the WIPP facility in accordance with federal and state laws, state agreements, environmental regulations, and DOE Orders. The objectives of implementing an integrated project management system are to assure compliance with all regulatory and federal regulations, identify areas of concern, provide justification for funding, provide a management tool for control of program workscope, and establish a project baseline from which accountability and performance will be assessed. Program management and project controls are essential for the success of the WIPP Project. The WIPP has developed an integrated project management system to establish the process for the control of the program which has an expected total dollar value of $2B over the ten-year period from 1990-2000. The implementation of this project management system was motivated by the regulatory requirements of the project, the highly public environment in which the project takes place, limited funding and resources, and the dynamic nature of the project. Specific areas to be addressed in this paper include strategic planning, project organization, planning and scheduling, fiscal planning, and project monitoring and reporting

  17. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New Mexico Administrative Code), 'Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,'specifically 40 CFR 264.90 through 264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

  18. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-07-01

    The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

  19. Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this document as environmental input to future decisions regarding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which would include the disposal of transuranic waste, as currently authorized. The alternatives covered in this document are the following: (1) Continue storing transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as it is now or with improved confinement. (2) Proceed with WIPP at the Los Medanos site in southeastern New Mexico, as currently authorized. (3) Dispose of TRU waste in the first available repository for high-level waste. The Los Medanos site would be investigated for its potential suitability as a candidate site. This is administration policy and is the alternative preferred by the DOE. (4) Delay the WIPP to allow other candidate sites to be evaluated for TRU-waste disposal. This environmental impact statement is arranged in the following manner: Chapter 1 is an overall summary of the analysis contained in the document. Chapters 2 and 4 set forth the objectives of the national waste-management program and analyze the full spectrum of reasonable alternatives for meeting these objectives, including the WIPP. Chapter 5 presents the interim waste-acceptance criteria and waste-form alternatives for the WIPP. Chapters 6 through 13 provide a detailed description and environmental analysis of the WIPP repository and its site. Chapter 14 describes the permits and approvals necessary for the WIPP and the interactions that have taken place with Federal, State, and local authorities, and with the general public in connection with the repository. Chapter 15 analyzes the many comments received on the DEIS and tells what has been done in this FEIS in response. The appendices contain data and discussions in support of the material in the text

  20. Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this document as environmental input to future decisions regarding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which would include the disposal of transuranic waste, as currently authorized. The alternatives covered in this document are the following: (1) Continue storing transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as it is now or with improved confinement. (2) Proceed with WIPP at the Los Medanos site in southeastern New Mexico, as currently authorized. (3) Dispose of TRU waste in the first available repository for high-level waste. The Los Medanos site would be investigated for its potential suitability as a candidate site. This is administration policy and is the alternative preferred by the DOE. (4) Delay the WIPP to allow other candidate sites to be evaluated for TRU-waste disposal. This environmental impact statement is arranged in the following manner: Chapter 1 is an overall summary of the analysis contained in the document. Chapters 2 and 4 set forth the objectives of the national waste-management program and analyze the full spectrum of reasonable alternatives for meeting these objectives, including the WIPP. Chapter 5 presents the interim waste-acceptance criteria and waste-form alternatives for the WIPP. Chapters 6 through 13 provide a detailed description and environmental analysis of the WIPP repository and its site. Chapter 14 describes the permits and approvals necessary for the WIPP and the interactions that have taken place with Federal, State, and local authorities, and with the general public in connection with the repository. Chapter 15 analyzes the many comments received on the DEIS and tells what has been done in this FEIS in response. The appendices contain data and discussions in support of the material in the text.

  1. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washinton TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-30

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2000, to March 31, 2002. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office's (CBFO) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. In the prior BECR, the CBFO and the management and operating contractor (MOC)committed to discuss resolution of a Letter of Violation that had been issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in August 1999, which was during the previous BECR reporting period. This Letter of Violation alleged noncompliance with hazardous waste aisle spacing, labeling, a nd tank requirements. At the time of publication of the prior BECR, resolution of the Letter of Violation was pending. On July 7, 2000, the NMED issued a letter noting that the aisle spacing and labeling concerns had been adequately addressed and that they were rescinding the violation alleging that the Exhaust Shaft Catch Basin failed to comply with the requirements for a hazardous waste tank. During the current reporting period, WIPP received a Notice of Violation and a compliance order alleging the violation of the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Regulations and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP).

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washinton TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-01-01

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2000, to March 31, 2002. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office's (CBFO) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. In the prior BECR, the CBFO and the management and operating contractor (MOC)committed to discuss resolution of a Letter of Violation that had been issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in August 1999, which was during the previous BECR reporting period. This Letter of Violation alleged noncompliance with hazardous waste aisle spacing, labeling, a nd tank requirements. At the time of publication of the prior BECR, resolution of the Letter of Violation was pending. On July 7, 2000, the NMED issued a letter noting that the aisle spacing and labeling concerns had been adequately addressed and that they were rescinding the violation alleging that the Exhaust Shaft Catch Basin failed to comply with the requirements for a hazardous waste tank. During the current reporting period, WIPP received a Notice of Violation and a compliance order alleging the violation of the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Regulations and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP)

  3. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy.

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

    1993-04-01

    The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ''near-reference'' with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed

  5. Automation benefits BWR customers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the increasing use of automation at General Electric's Wilmington fuel fabrication plant. Computerised systems and automated equipment perform a large number of inspections, inventory and process operations, and new advanced systems are being continuously introduced to reduce operator errors and expand product reliability margins. (U.K.)

  6. Recent technology for BWR operator training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Kato, Kanji; Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Asaoka, Koichi.

    1990-01-01

    As one of the important factors for maintaining the high capacity ratio in Japanese nuclear power stations, the contribution of excellent operators is pointed out. BWR Operation Training Center has trained many operators using two full scope simulators for operation training modeling BWRs. But in order to meet the demands of the recent increase of training needs and the upgrading of the contents, it was decided to install the third simulator, and Hitachi Ltd. received the order to construct the main part, and delivered it. This simulator obtained the good reputation as its range of simulation is wide, and the characteristics resemble very well those of the actual plants. Besides, various new designs were adopted in the control of the simulator, and its handling became very easy. Japanese nuclear power plants are operated at constant power output, and the unexpected stop is very rare, therefore the chance of operating the plants by operators is very few. Accordingly, the training using the simulators which can simulate the behavior of the plants with computers, and can freely generate abnormal phenomena has become increasingly important. The mode and positioning of the simulators for operation training, the full scope simulator BTC-3 and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Verification of a BWR code package by gamma scan measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Iwamoto, Tatsuya; Kumanomido, Hironori

    1996-01-01

    High-burnup 8 x 8 fuel with a large central water rod (called step 2 fuel) has been recently introduced to the latest Japanese boiling water reactor (BWR) plants. Lanthanum-140 gamma intensity is almost directly related to nodal powers. By gamma scan measurement, the axial distribution of 140 La in the exposed fuel was measured at the end of cycle (EOC) 1 and was compared with the calculation by a BWR code package TGBLA/LOGOS. The multienrichment fuel-type core (MEC) design was adopted for the initial cycle core of the plants. The MEC design contains three different enrichment types of fuels to simulate the equilibrium cycles, achieve much higher discharge exposure, and save fuel cycle cost, and the low-enrichment fuels are loaded in periphery and in control cells. Such MEC design could be a challenge to the BWR design methods because of the large spectrum mismatch among the fuel assemblies of the different enrichments. The aforementioned comparison has shown that the accuracy of the TGBLA/LOGOS code package is satisfactory

  8. Integrated Electronic Microscopy Method to Characterize BWR Crud Deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Mike G.; Lockamon, Brian; Howe, James M.; Oleshko, Vladimir P.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to present the best combination of analytical Electron Microscopy (EM) techniques suited for studying Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel crud deposits in their 'as found' condition, for example un-adulterated portions of the deposits located in crevices at the surface of deposit. The secondary objective of the paper is to suggest a strategy to connect the analytical EM results with the Power Diffraction File (PDF-4) crystal database to ultimately explain crystal growth phenomena in crevices. The samples analyzed as part of this work were collected from steam generators in Nuclear Power Plants. These samples were selected as segregates for BWR deposits due to their similar structures and because they were freely releasable for study in the University labs. The samples were analyzed extensively through various EM techniques at magnifications up to 150,000 X. Subsequent evaluation of the analysis results demonstrated that the selected samples exhibited characteristics that were very close to second-burned fuel crud deposits from operating BWR plants. (authors)

  9. Seismic proving test of BWR primary loop recirculation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, H.; Shigeta, M.; Karasawa, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The seismic proving test of BWR Primary Loop Recirculation system is the second test to use the large-scale, high-performance vibration table of Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory. The purpose of this test is to prove the seismic reliability of the primary loop recirculation system (PLR), one of the most important safety components in the BWR nuclear plants, and also to confirm the adequacy of seismic analysis method used in the current seismic design. To achieve the purpose, the test was conducted under conditions and scale as near as possible to actual systems. The strength proving test was carried out with the test model mounted on the vibration table in consideration of basic design earthquake ground motions and other conditions to confirm the soundness of structure and the strength against earthquakes. Detailed analysis and analytic evaluation of the data obtained from the test was conducted to confirm the adequacy of the seismic analysis method and earthquake response analysis method used in the current seismic design. Then, on the basis of the results obtained, the seismic safety and reliability of BWR primary loop recirculation of the actual plants was fully evaluated

  10. Electroosmotically enhanced sludge dewatering-pilot-plant study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smollen, M

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available role in determining the ease or difficulty of phase separation. It seems that the inefficiency of dewatering applied to gelatinous and fine-particle sludges can be overcome by mechanical dewatering enhanced by electroosmosis. A prototype pilot...

  11. Performance and Model Calibration of R-D-N Processes in Pilot Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Sota, A.; Larrea, L.; Novak, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the first part of an experimental programme in a pilot plant configured for advanced biological nutrient removal processes treating domestic wastewater of Bilbao. The IAWPRC Model No.1 was calibrated in order to optimize the design of the full-scale plant. In this first phas...

  12. Emission counter-measures in post-combustion CO2 capture: demonstration at pilot plant scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miguel Mercader, F. de; Khakharia, P.M.; Ham, L.V. van der; Huizinga, A.; Kester, L.G.C.; Os, P.J. van; Goetheer. E.L.V.

    2013-01-01

    One of the objectives of the OCTAVIUS project is the demonstration of emission countermeasures for post-combustion CO2 capture. To accomplish it, an acid wash was designed and commissioned at TNO’s CO2 capture pilot plant, which is connected to a coal-fired power plant.

  13. Dismantling of an alpha contaminated hot cell at the Marcoule Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachon, M.

    1988-01-01

    For the remodeling of Marcoule Pilot Plant, the cell 82: old unit for plutonium solution purification by extraction, was dismantled. About 42 tons of wastes were evacuated. Some wastes wen decontaminated by mechanical means other wastes with higher residual activity were stored for subsequent processing. The operation shows that dismantling of a hot cell is possible even if incorporated in an operating plant [fr

  14. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary: main report. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the objectives and organization of the reactor safety study; the basic concepts of risk; the nature of nuclear power plant accidents; risk assessment methodology; reactor accident risk; and comparison of nuclear risks to other societal risks.

  15. Technical Description Lillgrund Wind Power Plant. Lillgrund Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppsson, Joakim; Larsen, Poul Erik; Larsson, Aake (Vattenfall Vindkraft AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-09-15

    Lillgrund offshore wind power plant comprises 48 wind turbines, each rated at 2.3 MW, bringing the total wind farm capacity to 110 MW. The Lillgrund offshore wind power plant is located in a shallow area of Oeresund, 7 km off the coast of Sweden and 7 km south from the Oeresund Bridge connecting Sweden and Denmark. An average wind speed of around 8,5 m/s at hub height, combined with a relatively low water depth of 4 to 8 meters makes it economically feasible to build here. Vattenfall Vindkraft AB is the owner and operator of Lillgrund offshore wind power plant. Lillgrund is a Swedish pilot project supported by the Swedish Energy Agency. The bidding process was completed during 2005 and the offshore power plant was constructed in the period 2006 to 2007. The wind farm was constructed on time and has now been successfully operational since December 2007. There is, however, always potential for improvement and the aim of this report has been to determine and highlight these areas. It is worth noting out that only the electrical system and the foundations are tailor made at offshore wind power plants. The wind turbines are more or less standard products with none or very limited possibilities for project specific design changes. Geotechnical investigations are expensive and it can be difficult to balance the risks as well as the benefits of this expense in the early phases of a large infrastructure project. As a whole, the geotechnical surveys at Lillgrund proved to be useful. They identified potential issues, such as the fact that extra excavation was required for two of the foundations. It also revealed the location of a small number of boulders that would have to be removed. Vattenfall requested a complete study of the electrical system for Lillgrund to be delivered with the bids. That request was not met. Instead Siemens Wind Power began a complete electrical system study after being awarded the Contract. The electrical system study was completed during the

  16. Operation result of 40kW class MCFC pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, H.; Hatori, S.; Hosaka, M.; Uematsu, H. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. developed unique Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) system based on our original concept. To demonstrate the possibility of this system, based on MCFC technology of consigned research from New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) in Japan, we designed 40kW class MCFC pilot plant which had all equipments required as a power plant and constructed in our TO-2 Technical Center. This paper presents the test results of the plant.

  17. Raft River binary-cycle geothermal pilot power plant final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliem, C.J.; Walrath, L.F.

    1983-04-01

    The design and performance of a 5-MW(e) binary-cycle pilot power plant that used a moderate-temperature hydrothermal resource, with isobutane as a working fluid, are examined. Operating problems experienced and solutions found are discussed and recommendations are made for improvements to future power plant designs. The plant and individual systems are analyzed for design specification versus actual performance figures.

  18. Arsenic pilot plant operation and results : Anthony, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Holub, William E., Jr.; Wright, Jerome L.; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2007-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative water treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The pilot tests have been conducted in New Mexico where over 90 sites that exceed the new MCL have been identified by the New Mexico Environment Department. The pilot test described in this report was conducted in Anthony, New Mexico between August 2005 and December 2006 at Desert Sands Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association (MDWCA) (Desert Sands) Well No.3. The pilot demonstrations are a part of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The Sandia National Laboratories pilot demonstration at the Desert Sands site obtained arsenic removal performance data for fourteen different adsorptive media under intermittent flow conditions. Well water at Desert Sands has approximately 20 ppb arsenic in the unoxidized (arsenite-As(III)) redox state with moderately high total dissolved solids (TDS), mainly due to high sulfate, chloride, and varying concentrations of iron. The water is slightly alkaline with a pH near 8. The study provides estimates of the capacity (bed volumes until breakthrough at 10 ppb arsenic) of adsorptive media in the same chlorinated water. Adsorptive media were compared side-by-side in ambient pH water with intermittent flow operation. This pilot is broken down into four phases, which occurred sequentially, however the phases overlapped in most cases.

  19. Development status of compact containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Mori, H.; Sekiguchi, K.; Kuroki, M.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2005-01-01

    In Japan, increase of nuclear plant unit capacity has been promoted to take advantage of economies of scale while further enhancing safety and reliability. As a result, more than 50 units of nuclear power plants are playing important role in electric power generation. However, the factors, such as stagnant growth in the recent electricity demand, limitation in electricity grid capacity and limited in initial investment avoiding risk, will not be in favor of large plant outputs. The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response

  20. 10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver panel test requirements document solar thermal test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-25

    Testing plans for a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally, the design planned for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are presented. Testing is to include operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the panel's transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. Test hardware are described, including the pilot plant receiver, the test receiver assembly, receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and structural assembly. Requirements for the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. The safety of the system is briefly discussed, and procedures are described for assembly, installation, checkout, normal and abnormal operations, maintenance, removal and disposition. Also briefly discussed are quality assurance, contract responsibilities, and test documentation. (LEW)

  1. Pilot plant operation of the Uranium Chip Oxidation Facility at the Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Y.C.

    1987-01-01

    Due to changing environmental regulations, the current practice of depleted uranium chip (machine turning) disposal via shallow land burial has become environmentally objectionable. The chips are pyrophoric and oxidize rapidly when exposed to air; therefore, long-term storage of the uranium chips presents a major fire hazard. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Development Division was contacted to devise a disposal method that would eliminate chip burial and minimize storage space requirements. The proposed method of accomplishing this task was oxidizing the uranium chips to uranium oxide (U 3 O 8 ) under controlled conditions. Pilot plant operation of the Uranium Chip Oxidation Facility (UCOF) was initiated on May 20, 1985, by the Y-12 Development Division. The purpose of this initial development testing was to evaluate the equipment, determine operating parameters, and provide on-the-job training for Waste Treatment Operations (WTO) personnel. Startup of the UCOF began with the check-out of the equipment using only the No. 1 oxidizer. Following the verification stage, the oxidizer was loaded with an initial charge of cold uranium oxide (U 3 O 8 ) in preparation for test burning. Results of the test are given

  2. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development.

  3. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development

  4. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  5. Integrated automation system for a pilot plant for energy conversion using PEMFCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culcer, Mihai; Iliescu, Mariana; Raceanu, Mircea; Stanciu, Vasile; Stefanescu, Ioan; Enache, Adrian; Lazaro, Pavel Gabriel; Lazaroiu, Gheorghe; Badea, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Based on Hydrogen and Fuel Cells researches and technological capabilities achieved in the National R and D Programs, ICIT Rm. Valcea built an experimental-demonstrative pilot plant for energy conversion using hydrogen PEMFCs. This pilot plant consists of a fuel processor based on steam methane reforming (SMR) process, a hydrogen purification unit, a PEM fuel cells stack (FCS) and a power electronics unit. The paper deals with the dedicated controlling system that provides automated data acquisition, manual or on-line operational control, gas management, humidification, temperature and flow controls. (authors)

  6. Development of a computer systems for operational data acquisition of uranium isotopic enrichment pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, W.M.C.

    1985-01-01

    A pilot plant for uranium enrichment using the jet nozzle process was transfered from Federal Republic of Germany to Brazil, to train Brazilian technicist in its operation and to improve the process. This pilot plant is monitored by a data acquisition system and the possibility of faulty events would cause serious dificulties, as far as maintenance is concerned (for instance, unvailable special components). It is described the development of a new system, which is proposed in order to minimize difficulties with maintenance that utilizes in the assembling integrated circuits of large scale of integration. It is controlled by a microcomputer. (Author) [pt

  7. Macroscopic mass and energy balance of a pilot plant anaerobic bioreactor operated under thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Bombardiere, John; Chatfield, Mark; Domaschko, Max; Easter, Michael; Stafford, David A; Castillo-Angeles, Saul; Castellanos-Hernandez, Nehemias

    2006-01-01

    Intensive poultry production generates over 100,000 t of litter annually in West Virginia and 9 x 10(6) t nationwide. Current available technological alternatives based on thermophilic anaerobic digestion for residuals treatment are diverse. A modification of the typical continuous stirred tank reactor is a promising process being relatively stable and owing to its capability to manage considerable amounts of residuals at low operational cost. A 40-m3 pilot plant digester was used for performance evaluation considering energy input and methane production. Results suggest some changes to the pilot plant configuration are necessary to reduce power consumption although maximizing biodigester performance.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant transuranic wastes experimental characterization program: executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1978-11-01

    A general overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant transuranic wastes experimental characterization program is presented. Objectives and outstanding concerns of this program are discussed. Characteristics of transuranic wastes are also described. Concerns for the terminal isolation of such wastes in a deep bedded salt facility are divided into two phases, those during the short-term operational phase of the facility, and those potentially occurring in the long-term, after decommissioning of the repository. An inclusive summary covering individual studies, their importance to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, investigators, general milestones, and comments are presented

  9. Reducing BWR O and M costs through on-line performance monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, T.; Gross, R.; Logback, F.; Josyula, R.

    1995-01-01

    Competition in the electric power industry has placed significant emphasis on reducing operating and maintenance (O and M) costs at nuclear facilities. Therefore, on-line performance monitoring to locate power losses for boiling water reactor (BWR) plants is creating tremendous interest. In addition, the ability to automate activities such as data collection, analysis, and reporting increases the efficiency of plant engineers and gives them more time to concentrate on solving plant efficiency problems. This capability is now available with a unique software product called GEBOPS. GE Nuclear Energy, in conjunction with Joint Venture partner Black and Veatch, has undertaken development of the General Electric/Black and Veatch On-line Performance System (GEBOPS), an on-line performance monitoring system for BWR plants. The experience and expertise of GE Nuclear Energy with BWR plants, coupled with the proven on-line monitoring software development experience and capability of Black and Veatch, provide the foundation for a unique product which addresses the needs of today's BWR plants

  10. Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1980-05-01

    Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

  11. Gridley Ethanol Demonstration Project Utilizing Biomass Gasification Technology: Pilot Plant Gasifier and Syngas Conversion Testing; August 2002 -- June 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-02-01

    This report is part of an overall evaluation of using a modified Pearson Pilot Plant for processing rice straw into syngas and ethanol and the application of the Pearson technology for building a Demonstration Plant at Gridley. This report also includes information on the feedstock preparation, feedstock handling, feedstock performance, catalyst performance, ethanol yields and potential problems identified from the pilot scale experiments.

  12. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  13. Arsenic pilot plant operation and results:Weatherford, Oklahoma.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon, Malynda Jo; Arora, H. (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Karori, Saqib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Pathan, Sakib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona)

    2007-05-01

    Narasimhan Consulting Services, Inc. (NCS), under a contract with the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), designed and operated pilot scale evaluations of the adsorption and coagulation/filtration treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The pilot evaluation was conducted at Well 30 of the City of Weatherford, OK, which supplies drinking water to a population of more than 10,400. Well water contained arsenic in the range of 16 to 29 ppb during the study. Four commercially available adsorption media were evaluated side by side for a period of three months. Both adsorption and coagulation/filtration effectively reduced arsenic from Well No.30. A preliminary economic analysis indicated that adsorption using an iron oxide media was more cost effective than the coagulation/ filtration technology.

  14. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices III and IV. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    The items listed below summarize the detail sections which follow: a listing of definitions and a discussion of the general treatment of data within the random variable approach as utilized by the study; a tabulation of the assessed data base containing failure classifications, final assessed ranges utilized in quantification and reference source values considered in determining the ranges; a discussion of nuclear power plant experience that was used to validate the data assessment by testing its applicability as well as to check on the adequacy of the model to incorporate typical real incidents; an expanded presentation of the data assessment giving information on applicability considerations; a discussion of test and maintenance data including comparisons of models with experience data; and special topics, including assessments required for the initiating event probabilities and human error data and modeling.

  15. Radioactive Waste Treatment and Conditioning Using Plasma Technology Pilot Plant: Testing and Commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafizi Salihuddin; Rohyiza Baan; Norasalwa Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Plasma pilot plant was commissioned for research and development program on radioactive waste treatment. The plant is equipped with a 50 kW direct current of non-transferred arc plasma torch which mounted vertically on top of the combustion chamber. The plant also consists of a dual function chamber, a water cooling system, a compress air supply system and a control system. This paper devoted the outcome after testing and commissioning of the plant. The problems arise was discussed in order to find the possible suggestion to overcome the issues. (author)

  16. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  17. Modernization and enlarging of the Marcoule pilot plant for R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calame-Longjean, A.; Revol, G.; Roux, J.P.; Ranger, G.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the pilot plant is the testing of process and equipment in actual conditions with spent fuels on a half-industrial scale and for a significant time. From 1963 to 1983 more than 11t of spent fuels (mainly from fast reactors) were reprocessed. Since 1983 is modernized and enlarged and the new plant of the TOR project (treatment of oxides from fast reactors) are described [fr

  18. The design of a modular pilot plant based on the adsorber loop concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koske, P.H.; Ohlrogge, K.

    1984-01-01

    The main design criteria for a pilot plant producing about 100 t uranium per year from seawater are discussed. The application of the ''adsorber loop concept'' for the contact between seawater and the adsorber granulate enables the employment of high seawater velocities. The seawater flow is accomplished by active pumping and the plant is supposed to be operating far from shores. Besides some informations on the theoretical background the essential engineering considerations are presented. (orig.) [de

  19. Electrodialytic remediation of CCA-treated waste wood in a 2 m3 pilot plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2006-01-01

    Waste wood that has been treated with chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) poses a potential environmental problem due to the content of copper, chromium and arsenic. A pilot plant for electrodialytic remediation of up to 2 m3 wood has been designed and tested and the results are presented here. Several...

  20. Experimental results from a pilot plant for converting acid whey to potentially useful food products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlin, R.W.; Marvin, C.; Julkowski, K.

    1978-01-01

    The pilot plant used a fluidized bed with lactase immobilized on aluminia as well as ultrafiltration and demineralization equipment. Conversion of lactose to its consitiuent monosaccharides was up to 84%, vs. 65% on a bench scale. Advantages of the fluidized bed reactor are its freedom from plugging, its lower pressure loss, and its adaptability to frequent cleaning, compared to a fixed bed.

  1. Pasteurization of strawberry puree using a pilot plant pulsed electric fields (PEF) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The processing of strawberry puree by pulsed electric fields (PEF) in a pilot plant system has never been evaluated. In addition, a method does not exist to validate the exact number and shape of the pulses applied during PEF processing. Both buffered peptone water (BPW) and fresh strawberry puree (...

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 2005 - June 2006, Volume 2, Supporting Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-03-25

    This report is a compilation of geotechnical data presented as plots for each active instrument installed in the underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) through June 30, 2006. A summary of the geotechnical analyses that were performed using the enclosed data is provided in Volume 1 of the Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR).

  3. Influence of Production Process Parameters on Fish Oil Quality in a Pilot Plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aidos, I.M.; Kreb, N.; Boonman, M.; Luten, J.B.; Boom, R.M.; Padt, van der A.

    2003-01-01

    A pilot plant used for upgrading herring byproducts into fish oil was analyzed on its operational efficiency and product quality. The temperature of the heat exchanger and the speeds of the pump and the 3-phase decanter were varied according to a 23 fractional factorial design. The initial amount of

  4. Resource conservation and recovery act draft hazardous waste facility permit: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Volume I contains the following attachments for Module II: waste analysis plan; quality assurance program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experiment Waste Characterization Program(QAPP); WIPP Characterization Sampling and Analysis Guidance Manual (Plan)(SAP); and no migration Determination Requirement Summary (NMD)

  5. 75 FR 70584 - Criteria for the Certification and Recertification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... Salado mass concrete replacing fresh water concrete. Conditions 2 and 3 of the final certification..., a system of controls to measure and track important waste components, and to apply quality assurance... Energy on Preparation for Recertification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant with 40 CFR parts 191 and...

  6. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: a potential solution for the disposal of transuranic waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff; Commission on Geosciences, Environment and Resources; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council; National Academy of Sciences

    ... Isolation Pilot Plant Board on Radioactive Waste Management Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1996 i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting been have may original from the errors not typographic original retained, and from the c...

  7. Not-from-concentrate pilot plant ‘Wonderful’ cultivar pomegranate juice changes: Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilot plant ultrafiltration was used to mimic the dominant U.S. commercial pomegranate juice extraction method (hydraulic pressing whole fruit), to deliver a not-from-concentrate (NFC) juice that was high-temperature short-time pasteurized and stored at 4 and 25 °C. Recovered were 46 compounds, of ...

  8. Continuous operation of a pilot plant for the production of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, T.C.; Amaral, S.; Silveira, C.M.S.; Oliveira, A.P. de

    1975-01-01

    A method of obtaining beryllium oxide with a purity of 99,2% was developed in a pilot plant with a capacity of 7 tons per month destined to operate continuously. The operation market prospects and control of production with the objective of obtaining internacional technical grade beryllium oxide are discussed [pt

  9. Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations.

  10. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: a potential solution for the disposal of transuranic waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff

    1996-01-01

    ... Isolation Pilot Plant Board on Radioactive Waste Management Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1996 i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting been have may original from the errors not typographic original retained, and from the c...

  11. Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.; Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A.

    1993-12-01

    Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations

  12. Retrieval of canistered experimental waste at the waste isolation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinebaugh, R.E.

    1979-07-01

    To assess the suitability of bedded salt for nuclear waste disposal, an extensive experimental program will be implemented at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In order to evaluate experimental results, it will be necessary to recover certain of these experiments for postmortem examination and analysis. This document describes the equipment and procedures used to effect recovery of one category of WIPP experiments

  13. WIPP conceptual design report. Addendum A. Design calculations for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-04-01

    The design calculations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented. The following categories are discussed: general nuclear calculations; radwaste calculations; structural calculations; mechanical calculations; civil calculations; electrical calculations; TRU waste surface facility time and motion analysis; shaft sinking procedures; hoist time and motion studies; mining system analysis; mine ventilation calculations; mine structural analysis; and miscellaneous underground calculations.

  14. Use of phosphorus release batch tests for modelling an EBPR pilot plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tykesson, E.; Aspegren, H.; Henze, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how routinely performed phosphorus release tests could be used when modelling enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) using activated sludge models such as ASM2d. A pilot plant with an extensive analysis programme was used as basis for the simulations...

  15. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  16. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  17. Double stage dry-wet-fermentation - start-up of a pilot biogas plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschmann, Jeannette; Busch, Gunter; Burkhardt, Marko

    2009-01-01

    The Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU) has developed a double stage dry-wet fermentation process for fast and safe anaerobic degradation. Originally designed for treatment of organic wastes, this process allows using a wide variety of solid biodegradable materials. The dividing of hydrolysis and methanation in this process, allows an optimization of the different steps of biogas generation separately. The main advantages of the process are the optimum process control, an extremely stable process operation and a high gas productivity and quality. Compared to conventional processes, the retention times within the percolation stage (hydrolysis) are reduced considerably. In cooperation with the engineering and consulting company GICON, the technology was qualified further to an industrial scale. In 2007 a pilot plant, and, simultaneously, an industrial plant were built by GICON based on this double stage technology. Based on practical experience from the operation of laboratory fermentation plants, the commissioning of the pilot plant was planned, controlled and monitored by our institution. The start-up of a biogas plant of this type focuses mainly on the inoculation the of methane reactor. The growth of microbial populations and generation of a stable biocenosis within the methane reactor is essential and affects the duration of starting period as well as the methanation efficiency a long time afterwards. This paper concerns with start-up of a pilot biogas plant and discusses particular occurrences and effects during this period. (author)

  18. Complete BWR--EM LOCA analysis using the WRAP--EM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmeyer, R.R.; Gregory, M.V.; Buckner, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Water Reactor Analysis Package, Evaluation Model (WRAP--EM), provides a complete analysis of postulated loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA's) in light--water nuclear power reactors. The system is being developed at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to interpret and evaluate reactor vendor, evaluation model (EM) analyses. The initial version of the WRAP--EM system for analysis of boiling water reactors (BWR's) is operational. To demonstrate the complete capability of the WRAP--BWR--EM system, a LOCA analysis has been performed for the Hope Creek Plant

  19. BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1993 Revision, Normal and hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, G.; Goddard, C.; Fitzpatrick, S.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of water chemistry control is to extend the operating life of the reactor and rector coolant system, balance-of-plant components, and turbines while simultaneously controlling costs to safeguard the continued economic viability of the nuclear power generation investment. To further this goal an industry committee of chemistry personnel prepared guidelines to identify the benefits, risks, and costs associated with water chemistry in BWRs and to provide a template for an optimized water chemistry program. This document replaces the BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines - 1986 Revision and the BWR Hydrogen Water Chemistry Guidelines -- 1987 Revision. It expands on the previous guidelines documents by covering the economic implications of BWR water chemistry control

  20. Design guideline to prevent the pipe rupture by radiolysis gases in BWR steam piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, T.; Miyagawa, M.; Ota, T.; Sato, T.; Sakata, K.

    2009-01-01

    In late 2001, pipe rupture accidents due to fast combustion of radiolysis gas occurred in Japan and elsewhere's BWR power plants. TENPES began to set up the guideline as action to such a new problem to prevent accumulation and combustion of radiolysis gas in BWR steam piping. And then, the first edition of guideline was published in October 2005. Afterwards, the experimental study about combustion/detonation of radiolysis gas have been continued. And in March 2007, TENPES published a revised edition of the guideline. This is the report of the revised edition of that guideline. According to this guideline, it became possible to design BWR's steam piping to prevent accumulation of radiolysis gas. (author)

  1. Development of water chemistry diagnosis system for BWR primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Asakura, Yamato; Sakagami, Masaharu; Uchida, Shunsuke; Ohsumi, Katsumi.

    1988-01-01

    The prototype of a water chemistry diagnosis system for BWR primary loop has been developed. Its purposes are improvement of water chemistry control and reduction of the work burden on plant chemistry personnel. It has three main features as follows. (1) Intensifying the observation of water chemistry conditions by variable sampling intervals based on the on-line measured data. (2) Early detection of water chemistry data trends using a second order regression curve which is calculated from the measured data, and then searching the cause of anomaly if anything (3) Diagnosis of Fe concentration in feedwater using model simulations, in order to lower the radiation level in the primary system. (author)

  2. Studies of thermal-hydraulic flow stability characteristics of two design versions of the SVEA BWR fuel assembly, based on signal recordings made in the Forsmark 2 plant over the years 1990-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomstrand, J.; Carlsson, R.; Petersson, M.

    1997-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Stability normally refers to a specific topic denoted ''Core Stability''. This phenomenon embraces the entire core, involving periodic fluctuations of a coherent nature in the flows through the core coolant channels. The subject is well known and has been discussed in a large number of conference papers and articles. Other periodic fluctuations which are incoherent may also be present in the channel flows through BWR cores. The phenomenon, denoted ''Channel Flow Stability'', is also well known. Experimental research work on this topic has mostly been made out-of-pile. This paper presents studies of ''Channel Flow Stability'' that have been conducted differently. They are based on the dynamic behaviour of measured channel inlet flows to the core of an operating BWR: Forsmark 2 in Sweden. The investigations cover the years 1990-1995, a time period during which its core inventory experienced a transition from fuel of one assembly design to another, having an increased number of fuel rods of reduced diameter. (UK)

  3. Perancangan dan Pabrikasi Pembuatan Pupuk Organik Aktif dari Effluent Pengolahan Lanjut Limbah Cair Pabrik Kelapa Sawit (LCPKS) Skala Pilot Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Harahap, Basril Amirza

    2016-01-01

    This study is an assessment of the design of the pilot plant liquid organic fertilizer . This study aims to design a manufacturing process of the active organic liquid fertilizer effluent wastewater treatment plant palm oil (LCPKS) into biogas, calibration and get major equipment performance and accecoris and overcome any confounding factors in the process of making organic fertilizer active on the pilot plant scale. The material used is a further processing Effluent starter LC...

  4. Cross-section adjustment techniques for BWR adaptive simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson

    Computational capability has been developed to adjust multi-group neutron cross-sections to improve the fidelity of boiling water reactor (BWR) modeling and simulation. The method involves propagating multi-group neutron cross-section uncertainties through BWR computational models to evaluate uncertainties in key core attributes such as core k-effective, nodal power distributions, thermal margins, and in-core detector readings. Uncertainty-based inverse theory methods are then employed to adjust multi-group cross-sections to minimize the disagreement between BWR modeling predictions and measured plant data. For this work, measured plant data were virtually simulated in the form of perturbed 3-D nodal power distributions with discrepancies with predictions of the same order of magnitude as expected from plant data. Using the simulated plant data, multi-group cross-section adjustment reduces the error in core k-effective to less than 0.2% and the RMS error in nodal power to 4% (i.e. the noise level of the in-core instrumentation). To ensure that the adapted BWR model predictions are robust, Tikhonov regularization is utilized to control the magnitude of the cross-section adjustment. In contrast to few-group cross-section adjustment, which was the focus of previous research on BWR adaptive simulation, multigroup cross-section adjustment allows for future fuel cycle design optimization to include the determination of optimal fresh fuel assembly designs using the adjusted multi-group cross-sections. The major focus of this work is to efficiently propagate multi-group neutron cross-section uncertainty through BWR lattice physics calculations. Basic neutron cross-section uncertainties are provided in the form of multi-group cross-section covariance matrices. For energy groups in the resolved resonance energy range, the cross-section uncertainties are computed using an infinitely-dilute approximation of the neutron flux. In order to accurately account for spatial and

  5. Experimental investigation of the chemical looping method on a 1 MW pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Attempting to counteract the consequences of climate change, leading industrial nations have agreed on reducing their CO 2 emissions significantly. To reach these reduction goals, it is essential to reduce the CO 2 emissions in the field of energy conversion. This PHD thesis covers the field of chemical looping combustion, a technology that uses fossil fuels for energy conversion with inherent capture of CO 2 . Since the research regarding chemical looping had so far focused mainly on lab scale or small scale experiments, a 1 MW pilot plant has been erected at Technische Universitaet Darmstadt in order to investigate the process in a semi-industrial scale and to check the process efficiency with commercially usable equipment. This pilot consists of two interconnected fluidized bed reactors and has an overall height of more than 11 m. In this thesis, some experiments with ilmenite - used as the oxygen carrier - are explained. Furthermore, the design, erection and commissioning of the pilot plant are presented as well as the results of the first test campaigns. The evaluation of the latter proves that the process can be handled in the design configuration and that CO 2 can be safely captured in a pilot plant of this scale.

  6. Safety study on nuclear heat utilization system - accident delineation and assessment on nuclear steelmaking pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, T.; Mizuno, M.; Tsuruoka, K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents accident delineation and assessment on a nuclear steelmaking pilot plant as an example of nuclear heat utilization systems. The reactor thermal energy from VHTR is transported to externally located chemical process plant employing helium-heated steam reformer by an intermediate heat transport loop. This paper on the nuclear steelmaking pilot plant will describe (1) system transients under accident conditions, (2) impact of explosion and fire on the nuclear reactor and the public and (3) radiation exposure on the public. The results presented in this paper will contribute considerably to understanding safety features of nuclear heat utilization system that employs the intermediate heat transport loop and the helium-heated steam reformer

  7. BWR containments license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.; Gregor, F.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures, and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IR's). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IR's in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (IOCFR54). The scope of the IR provides the technical basis for license renewal for U.S. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) containments. The scope of the report includes containments constructed of reinforced or prestressed concrete with steel liners and freestanding stell containments. Those domestic BWR containments designated as Mark I, Mark II or Mark III are covered, but no containments are addressed before these designs. The report includes those items within the jurisdictional boundaries for metal and concrete containments defined by Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Division 1, Subsection NE (Class MC) and Division 2 (Class CC) and their supports, but excluding snubbers

  8. An automatic pilot to take off coal fired power plants performance; Un pilote automatique pour faire decoller les performances des centrales au charbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falinower, C.M.; Maurin, S.; Ambos, P. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Dept. de Controle-Commande des Centrales; Dewasmes, M. [Electricite de France, 76 - Le Havre (France). Dept. Ressources Humaines et Financieres

    1999-10-01

    Realizing an automatic pilot for the electric power of fossil fuel plants constitutes a basic measure in order to optimise the production: better availability, increased flexibility for the network, less stress for the plant equipment. Such an automatic pilot has been successfully installed at Le Havre. I coal fired power plant with a better dispatch and load following, a better control for the steam pressure and temperatures. Instrumentation and Control renewal with DCS as well as the use of modern and efficient technics from control theory have led to these promising results. (authors)

  9. Digital implementation, simulation and tests in MATLAB of the models of Steam line, the turbines, the pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric power plant; Implementacion digital, simulacion y pruebas en MATLAB de los modelos de la linea de vapor, las turbinas y el regulador de presion de una central Nucleoelectrica tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez R, A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: andyskamx@yahoo.com.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this phase of the project they were carried out exhaustive tests to the models of the steam lines, turbines and pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric central for to verify that their tendencies and behaviors are it more real possible. For it, it was necessary to also analyze the transfer functions of the different components along the steam line until the power generator. Such models define alone the dominant poles of the system, what is not limitation to reproduce a wide range of anticipated transitoriness of a power station operation. In the same manner, it was integrated and proved the integrated model form with the models of feeding water of the SUN-RAH, simulating the nuclear reactor starting from predetermined entrances of the prospective values of the vessel. Also it was coupled with the graphic interface developed with the libraries DirectX implementing a specific monitoring panel for this system. (Author)

  10. Experimental Investigation and Modelling of a Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation Pilot Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    A detailed model for a wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) pilot plant, based on the packed tower concept, has been developed. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO2, oxidation of HSO3-, dissolution of limestone, and crystallisation of gypsum were included. Population balance...... equations, governing the description of particle size distributions of limestone in the plant, were derived. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas phase concentration profiles of SO2, slurry pH-profiles, solids content of the slurry, liquid phase concentrations, and residual...... wet FGD plants....

  11. Pilot project concerning the establishment of a collective biomass conversion plant on the island of Mors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This pilot project comprises a feasibility study in connection with plans to establish a biomass conversion plant, on the Danish island of Mors, which would provide methane to be used as fuel, in combination with natural gas, for a cogeneration plant serving six villages. The subjects of location, organization, the transportation of biomass, the design of the biomass conversion plant, economical aspects and conditions of the use of the methane are discussed as a basis for decisions in this respect. Environmental considerations are also dealt with. (AB)

  12. Nondestructive measurements in support of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant at Rockwell Hanford Operations: problems and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westsik, G.A.

    1986-05-01

    The 234-5Z Analytical Laboratory, located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, has been requested to provide waste package measurement capability for both the Plutonium/Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant and Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The requested WIPP values are sensitive to changes in isotopic distribution. Unfortunately, the determination of the isotopic distribution of an individual waste item or drum is difficult. The problems and uncertainties encountered in providing the values are discussed. Also, examples of calculations for the WIPP-WAC are shown

  13. Sequential Design of Experiments to Maximize Learning from Carbon Capture Pilot Plant Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soepyan, Frits B.; Morgan, Joshua C.; Omell, Benjamin P.; Zamarripa-Perez, Miguel A.; Matuszewski, Michael S.; Miller, David C.

    2018-02-06

    Pilot plant test campaigns can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, it is of interest to maximize the amount of learning and the efficiency of the test campaign given the limited number of experiments that can be conducted. This work investigates the use of sequential design of experiments (SDOE) to overcome these challenges by demonstrating its usefulness for a recent solvent-based CO2 capture plant test campaign. Unlike traditional design of experiments methods, SDOE regularly uses information from ongoing experiments to determine the optimum locations in the design space for subsequent runs within the same experiment. However, there are challenges that need to be addressed, including reducing the high computational burden to efficiently update the model, and the need to incorporate the methodology into a computational tool. We address these challenges by applying SDOE in combination with a software tool, the Framework for Optimization, Quantification of Uncertainty and Surrogates (FOQUS) (Miller et al., 2014a, 2016, 2017). The results of applying SDOE on a pilot plant test campaign for CO2 capture suggests that relative to traditional design of experiments methods, SDOE can more effectively reduce the uncertainty of the model, thus decreasing technical risk. Future work includes integrating SDOE into FOQUS and using SDOE to support additional large-scale pilot plant test campaigns.

  14. Assessment of severe accident prevention and mitigation features: BWR, Mark II containment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.R.; Hsu, C.J.; Eltawila, F.; Perkins, K.R.; Luckas, W.J.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Pratt, W.T.

    1988-07-01

    Plant features and operator actions, which have been found to be important in either preventing or mitigating severe accidents in BWRs with Mark II containments (BWR Mark II's) have been identified. These features and actions were developed from insights derived from reviews of in-depth risk assessments performed specifically for the Limerick and Shoreham plants and from other relevant studies. Accident sequences that dominate the core-damage frequency and those accident sequences that are of potentially high consequence were identified. Vulnerabilities of the BWR Mark II to severe-accident containment loads were also noted. In addition, those features of a BWR Mark II, which are important for preventing core damage and are available for mitigating fission-product release to the environment were also identified. This report is issued to provide focus to an analyst examining an individual plant. This report calls attention to plant features and operator actions and provides a list of deterministic attributes for assessing those features and actions found to be helpful in reducing the overall risk for Mark II plants. Thus, the guidance is offered as a resource in examining the subject plant to determine if the same, or similar, plant features and operator actions will be of value in reducing overall plant risk. This report is intended to serve solely as guidance

  15. Irradiation pilot plants and experimental facilities available for food preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    With the ever-increasing world food crisis mankind has to face today, the prevention of spoilage of perishable food is gaining in momentum. The World Food Conference (Rome, November 1974) of the United Nations clearly recognized the importance of food preservation and urged action in this field. Irradiation is one of the recently discovered methods to preserve food. Its practical introduction largely depends on three main factors: (a) proof of the safety for human consumption of the irradiated product, (b) technological feasibility and (c) economic competitiveness of the process. As data on safety for consumption ('wholesomeness') continue to become available, the number of countries authorizing the irradiation of certain food items is growing (present total: 17 countries), and the same is true for the number of licensed irradiated commodities (total: 23). Under these conditions, testing of the technological and economic feasibility of food irradiation is a matter of increasing importance. Economic feasibility of any industrial operation can only be studied in larger-scale experiments. Thus, they can only be performed with radiation sources larger than those found in laboratories, i.e. in pilot irradiators, capable of handling from a few hundred to a few thousand kilograms of material within a short period of time. The Food Preservation Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture has attempted to collect data on the availability, for food preservation, of suitable irradiators in Member States

  16. EVALUATION OF FGD DRY INJECTION SORBENTS AND ADDITIVES - VOLUME 2 - PILOT PLANT EVALUATION OF HIGH REACTIVITY SORBENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes a mini-pilot test program to investigate potential new sorbents and processes for dry SO2 removal. Initial tests showed that the 85 cu m/h pilot plant could be used successfully to evaluate both spray dryer and dry injection processes using traditional calciu...

  17. BWR online monitoring system based on noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier; Castillo-Duran, Rogelio; Alonso, Gustavo; Calleros-Micheland, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    A monitoring system for during operation early detection of an anomaly and/or faulty behavior of equipment and systems related to the dynamics of a boiling water reactor (BWR) has been developed. The monitoring system is based on the analysis of the 'noise' or fluctuations of a signal from a sensor or measurement device. An efficient prime factor algorithm to compute the fast Fourier transform allows the continuous, real-time comparison of the normalized power spectrum density function of the signal against previously stored reference patterns in a continuously evolving matrix. The monitoring system has been successfully tested offline. Four examples of the application of the monitoring system to the detection and diagnostic of faulty equipment behavior are presented in this work: the detection of two different events of partial blockage at the jet pump inlet nozzle, miss-calibration of a recirculation mass flow sensor, and detection of a faulty data acquisition card. The events occurred at the two BWR Units of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant. The monitoring system and its possible coupling to the data and processing information system of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant are described. The signal processing methodology is presented along with the introduction of the application of the evolutionary matrix concept for determining the base signature of reactor equipment or component and the detection of off normal operation conditions

  18. Protecting AREVA ATRIUM™ BWR fuel from debris fretting failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Steven E.; Garner, Norman L.; Lippert, Hans-Joachim; Graebert, Rüdiger; Mollard, Pierre; Hahn, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, debris fretting has been the leading cause of fuel rod failure in BWR fuel assemblies, costing the industry millions of dollars in lost generation and negatively impacting the working area of plant site personnel. In this paper the focus will be on recent BWR fuel product innovation designed to eliminate debris related failures. Experience feedback from more than three decades of operation history with non-line-of-sight FUELGUARD™ lower tie plate debris filters will be presented. The development and relative effectiveness of successive generations of filtration technology will be discussed. It will be shown that modern, state of the art debris filters are an effective defense against debris fretting failure. Protective measures extend beyond inlet nozzle debris filters. The comprehensive debris resistance features built into AREVA’s newest fuel design, the ATRIUM™ 11, reduce the overall risk of debris entrapment as well as providing a degree of protection from debris that may fall down on the fuel assembly from above, e.g., during refueling operations. The positive recent experience in a debris sensitive plant will be discussed showing that the combination of advanced fuel technology and a robust foreign material exclusion program at the reactor site can eliminate the debris fretting failure mechanism. (author)

  19. Managing the aging of BWR control rod drive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.; Farmer, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    This Phase I Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) study examines the aging phenomena associated with BWR control and rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and assesses the merits of various methods of ''imaging'' this aging. Information for this study was acquired from (1) the results of a special CRDM aging questionnaire distributed to each US BWR utility, (2) a first-of-its-kind workshop held to discuss CRDM aging and maintenance concerns, (3) an analysis of the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure cases attributed to the control rod drive (CRD) system, and (4) personal information exchange with nuclear industry CRDM maintenance experts. The report documenting the findings of this research, NUREG-5699, will be published this year. Nearly 23% of the NPRDS CRD system component failure reports were attributed to the CRDM. The CRDM components most often requiring replacement due to aging are the Graphitar seals. The predominant causes of aging for these seals are mechanical wear and thermal embrittlement. More than 59% of the NPRDS CRD system failure reports were attributed to components that comprise the hydraulic control unit (HCU). The predominant HCU components experiencing the effects of service wear and aging are value seals, discs, seats, stems, packing, and diaphragms

  20. Natural convection type BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobimatsu, Toshimi.

    1990-01-01

    In a natural convection type BWR reactor, a mixed stream of steams and water undergo a great flow resistance. In particular, pressure loss upon passing from an upper plenum to a stand pipe and pressure loss upon passing through rotational blades are great. Then, a steam dryer comprising laminated dome-like perforated plates and a drain pipe for flowing down separated water to a downcomer are disposed above a riser. The coolants heated in the reactor core are boiled, uprise in the riser as a gas-liquid two phase flow containing voids, release steams containing droplets from the surface of the gas-liquid two phase, flow into the steam dryer comprising the perforated plates and are separated into a gas and a liquid. The dried steams flow to a turbine passing through a main steam pipe and the condensated droplets flow down through the drain pipe and the downcomer to the lower portion of the reactor core. In this way, the conventional gas-liquid separator can be saved without lowering the quality of steam drying to reduce the pressure loss and to improve the operation performance. (N.H.)

  1. Socioeconomic study for the proposed waste isolation pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This document presents the historical and existing socioeconomic conditions in the vicinity of the proposed plant, projected changes in those conditions with and without the plant, and an outline of the various techniques used to make these projections. The analysis predicts impacts on the general economy in the area near the plant and on employment, personal income, population, social structure, the private economic sector, housing, land use, community services and facilities, and local government finances. Among the most important results are the following predictions: The economy of the area will derive $165 million directly and indirectly during the first 7.5 years of the project. After that, it will derive about $21 million directly and indirectly during each year of full operation. About 2100 jobs will be created directly and indirectly at the peak of the construction and about 950 jobs during the full operation. A net in-migration will occur: about 2250 people at the peak of the construction and about 1000 people during operation. A housing shortage may begin in Carlsbad in 1981 or 1982 and last for about 2 years.

  2. Socioeconomic study for the proposed waste isolation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    This document presents the historical and existing socioeconomic conditions in the vicinity of the proposed plant, projected changes in those conditions with and without the plant, and an outline of the various techniques used to make these projections. The analysis predicts impacts on the general economy in the area near the plant and on employment, personal income, population, social structure, the private economic sector, housing, land use, community services and facilities, and local government finances. Among the most important results are the following predictions: The economy of the area will derive $165 million directly and indirectly during the first 7.5 years of the project. After that, it will derive about $21 million directly and indirectly during each year of full operation. About 2100 jobs will be created directly and indirectly at the peak of the construction and about 950 jobs during the full operation. A net in-migration will occur: about 2250 people at the peak of the construction and about 1000 people during operation. A housing shortage may begin in Carlsbad in 1981 or 1982 and last for about 2 years

  3. Results of the DIOS pilot plant test and summary of the joint research; DIOS pilot plant no shiken sogyo kekka to kenkyu seika no matome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, T. [Center for Coal Utilization, Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Kawaoka, K. [The Japan Iron and Steel Federation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    A joint research had been carried out with a subsidy from the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy since fiscal 1988 to fiscal 1995 on the direct iron ore smelting reduction process (DIOS process). The process utilizes coal directly as a process to use the strong points and supplement the weak points of the blast furnace process. During the period, a pilot plant had been operated since 1993. Upon having completed the feasibility study, this paper reports the result thereof. The main facilities consist of a smelting and reducing furnace of iron bath type, a spare reducing furnace of fluidized bed type, and a preheating furnace. The former two furnaces constitute a unit structure with the two furnaces connected vertically. The pilot plant achieved a three-day continuous operation producing 500 tons of iron every day. The production rate reached 21 tons an hour at an upward oxygen blowing velocity of about 13,000 Nm {sup 3} per hour. The coal unit requirement showed a result of <1000 kg/t for high VM coal and <900 kg/t for low VM coal. These results verified a possibility that this process can supplement or replace the blast furnace process even for a production scale of 9000 tons a day. 7 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Development of pilot model of virtual nuclear power plant and its application to radiation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K. D.; Sin, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    Using Virtual Reality (VR) technique, a real model for radiation controlled area in nuclear power plant was developed and a feasibility study to develop a computational program to estimate radiation dose was performed. For this purpose a pilot model with an dynamic function and bi-directional communication was developed. This model was enhanced from the existing 3-D single-directional communication. In this pilot model, a plant visitor needs a series of security checking process initially. If he(she) enters the controlled area and approaches radiation hazard area, the alarms with warning lamp will be initiated automatically. Throughout the test to connect this model from both domestic and international sites in various time zones it has proven that it showed a sufficient performance. Therefore this model can be applied to broad fields as radiation protection procedures photographic data, on-line dose program

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This is the 1989 Site Environmental Report (SER) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP is a government owned and contractor-operated facility. The WIPP project is operated by Westinghouse Electric Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of the WIPP is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by the defense activities of the US Government. This report provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at the WIPP during calendar year 1989. The WIPP facility will not receive waste until all concerns affecting opening the WIPP are addressed to the satisfaction of the Secretary of Energy. Therefore, this report describes the status of the preoperational activities of the Radiological Environmental Surveillance (RES) program, which are outlined in the Radiological Baseline Program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WTSD-TME-057). 72 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

  6. Separation of packaging plastics by froth flotation in a continuous pilot plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Teresa; Durão, Fernando; Ferreira, Célia

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the research was to apply froth flotation to separate post-consumer PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate) from other packaging plastics with similar density, in a continuously operated pilot plant. A representative sample composed of 85% PET, 2.5% PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) and 11.9% PS (Polystyrene) was subjected to a combination of alkaline treatment and surfactant adsorption followed by froth flotation. A mineral processing pilot plant, owned by a Portuguese mining company, was adapted for this purpose. The experimentation showed that it is possible to produce an almost pure concentrate of PET, containing 83% of the PET in feed, in a single bank of mechanical flotation cells. The concentrate grade attained was 97.2% PET, 1.1% PVC and 1.1% PS. By simulation it was shown that the Portuguese recycling industry specifications can be attained if one cleaning and one scavenger stages are added to the circuit. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Separation of packaging plastics by froth flotation in a continuous pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Teresa; Durao, Fernando; Ferreira, Celia

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the research was to apply froth flotation to separate post-consumer PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate) from other packaging plastics with similar density, in a continuously operated pilot plant. A representative sample composed of 85% PET, 2.5% PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) and 11.9% PS (Polystyrene) was subjected to a combination of alkaline treatment and surfactant adsorption followed by froth flotation. A mineral processing pilot plant, owned by a Portuguese mining company, was adapted for this purpose. The experimentation showed that it is possible to produce an almost pure concentrate of PET, containing 83% of the PET in feed, in a single bank of mechanical flotation cells. The concentrate grade attained was 97.2% PET, 1.1% PVC and 1.1% PS. By simulation it was shown that the Portuguese recycling industry specifications can be attained if one cleaning and one scavenger stages are added to the circuit.

  8. Final report on the power production phase of the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radosevich, L.G.

    1988-03-01

    This report describes the evaluations of the power production testing of Solar One, the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant near Barstow, California. The Pilot Plant, a cooperative project of the US Department of Energy and utility firms led by the Southern California Edison Company, began a three year period of power production operation in August 1984. During this period, plant performance indicators, such as capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability, were studied to assess the operational capability of the Pilot Plant to reliably supply electrical power. Also studied was the long-term performance of such key plant components as the heliostats and the receiver. During the three years of power production, the Pilot Plant showed an improvement in performance. Considerable increases in capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability were achieved. Heliostat operation was reliable, and only small amounts of mirror corrosion were observed. Receiver tube leaks did occur, however, and were the main cause of the plant's unscheduled outages. The Pilot Plant provided valuable lessons which will aid in the design of future solar central receiver plants. 53 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Fiscal 1997 report of the development of high efficiency waste power generation technology. No.2 volume. Pilot plant verification test; Kokoritsu haikibutsu hatsuden gijutsu kaihatsu (pilot plant jissho shiken). 1997 nendo hokokusho (daini bunsatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    As to a high efficiency waste power generation system using general waste as fuel, the details of the following were described: design/construction management and operational study of pilot plant, design/manufacture/construction of pilot plant, and study of an optimal total system. Concerning the construction management and operational study, the paper described the application for governmental/official inspection procedures and taking inspection, process management of pilot plant, site patrol, safety management, management of trial run of pilot plant, drawing-up of a verification test plan and test run, etc. Relating to the design/manufacture/construction of pilot plant, an outline of the pilot plant was described. The paper also stated points to be considered in design of furnace structure and boiler structure, points to be considered of the verification test, etc. As to the study of an optimal total system, the following were described: survey of waste gasification/slagging power generation technology, basic study on RDF production process, survey of trends of waste power generation technology in the U.S., etc. 52 refs., 149 figs., 121 tabs.

  10. Biofuels 2.0 move to pilot plant; Les biocarburants 2.0 passent au pilote

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupin, L

    2010-02-15

    The second generation of biofuels, which use the non-energy parts of plants, do not compete with the food industry. These biofuels have been tried and tested at the laboratory but challenges are occurring with the transition to industrial plants. Demonstrators and prototypes are developing in Germany, Japan, USA and France and bet on two different processes, the biochemical way (enzymatic reaction and fermentation) and the thermochemical way (gasification and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis). Research is in progress on a possible third generation of biofuels which will use micro-algae. The interest of this third way is triple: no competition with the food industry, no land use (production in bioreactors), and enhanced CO{sub 2} capture. (J.S.)

  11. Data used in preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (1990)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Luzzolino, H. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Sandha, J.S. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-12-01

    This report documents the data available as of August 1990 and used by the Performance Assessment Division of Sandia National Laboratories in its December 1990 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Parameter values are presented in table form for the geologic subsystem, engineered barriers, borehole flow properties, climate variability, and intrusion characteristics. Sources for the data and a brief discussion of each parameter are provided. 101 refs., 72 figs., 21 tabs.

  12. Preoperational checkout of the remote-handled transuranic waste handling at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This plan describes the preoperational checkout for handling Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Wastes from their receipt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to their emplacement underground. This plan identifies the handling operations to be performed, personnel groups responsible for executing these operations, and required equipment items. In addition, this plan describes the quality assurance that will be exercised throughout the checkout, and finally, it establishes criteria by which to measure the success of the checkout. 7 refs., 5 figs

  13. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This volume contains Appendix D2, engineering design basis reports. Contents include: Design considerations for the waste hoist of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); A site-specific study of wind and tornado probabilities at the WIPP Site in southeast New Mexico; Seismic evaluation report of underground facilities; and calculations for analysis of wind loads and tornado loads for WHB, seismic calculations, calculations for VOC-10 monitoring system, and for shaft at station A

  14. A BWR fuel channel tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    A relational database management system with a query language, Reference 1, has been used to develop a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel channel tracking system on a microcomputer. The software system developed implements channel vendor and Nuclear Regulatory Commission recommendations for in-core channel movements between reactor operating cycles. A BWR Fuel channel encloses the fuel bundle and is typically fabricated using Ziracoly-4. The channel serves three functions: (1) it provides a barrier to separate two parallel flow paths, one inside the fuel assembly and the other in the bypass region outside the fuel assembly and between channels; (2) it guides the control rod as it moves between fuel assemblies and provides a bearing surface for the blades; and (3) it provides rigidity for the fuel bundle. All of these functions are necessary in typical BWR core designs. Fuel channels are not part of typical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core designs

  15. ABB advanced BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Helmersson, S.; Andersson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel designed and fabricated by ABB is now operating in 40 PWRs and BWRs in Europe, the United States and Korea. An excellent fuel reliability track record has been established. High burnups are proven for both BWR and PWR. Thermal margin improving features and advanced burnable absorber concepts enable the utilities to adopt demanding duty cycles to meet new economic objectives. In particular we note the excellent reliability record of ABB PWR fuel equipped with Guardian TM debris filter, proven to meet the -6 rod-cycles fuel failure goal, and the out-standing operating record of the SVEA 10x10 BWR fuel, where ABB is the only vendor to date with multi batch experience to high burnup. ABB is dedicated to maintain high fuel reliability as well as continually improve and develop a broad line of BWR and PWR products. ABB's development and fuel follow-up activities are performed in close co-operation with its customers. (orig.)

  16. 1974 conceptual design description of a bedded salt pilot plant in southeast New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The policy of the United States Atomic Energy Commission is to take custody of all commercial high-level radioactive wastes and maintain control of them in perpetuity. This policy (Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50, Appendix F) requires that the high-level wastes from nuclear fuels reprocessing plants be solidified within five years after reprocessing and then shipped to a federal repository within ten years after reprocessing. Ultimate disposal sites and/or methods have not yet been selected and are not expected to be ready when waste deliveries begin about 1983. Therefore, the AEC plans to build an interim storage facility, called Retrievable Surface Storage Facility (RSSF), to store and isolate the waste from man and his environment until the suitability of the permanent repository is demonstrated and public acceptance has been established. Meantime, the AEC is proceeding with the study and development of an ultimate disposal method. Bedded salt is being considered for ultimate waste disposal, and work is in progress to develop a Bedded Salt Pilot Plant to demonstrate its acceptability. The pilot plant will permit in situ verification of laboratory work on the interaction of heat and radioactivity of the waste with the salt and surroundings. One concept of such a pilot facility is described

  17. 1974 conceptual design description of a bedded salt pilot plant in southeast New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-01

    The policy of the United States Atomic Energy Commission is to take custody of all commercial high-level radioactive wastes and maintain control of them in perpetuity. This policy (Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50, Appendix F) requires that the high-level wastes from nuclear fuels reprocessing plants be solidified within five years after reprocessing and then shipped to a federal repository within ten years after reprocessing. Ultimate disposal sites and/or methods have not yet been selected and are not expected to be ready when waste deliveries begin about 1983. Therefore, the AEC plans to build an interim storage facility, called Retrievable Surface Storage Facility (RSSF), to store and isolate the waste from man and his environment until the suitability of the permanent repository is demonstrated and public acceptance has been established. Meantime, the AEC is proceeding with the study and development of an ultimate disposal method. Bedded salt is being considered for ultimate waste disposal, and work is in progress to develop a Bedded Salt Pilot Plant to demonstrate its acceptability. The pilot plant will permit in situ verification of laboratory work on the interaction of heat and radioactivity of the waste with the salt and surroundings. One concept of such a pilot facility is described.

  18. Radiation decontamination of municipal wastewaters in pilot plant, using electron beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, Trajano; Cueva, Ana Rosa; Munoz, Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The design of a pilot plant for the treatment of municipal wastewaters with an electron accelerator is very important to study the effects of electron beam radiation on contaminated water in continuous flow. The pilot plant facility uses the Soviet linear electron accelerator ELU 6U, which operates on 8 MeV energy and a 5 kW power. The study consists of the optimization of decontamination and disinfection process of municipal wastewater with accelerated electrons, in continuous process, through the study of different variable effects of the irradiation process in the pilot plant on the physical-chemical and microbiological parameters of the wastewater flow rate, thickness and velocity of wastewater under the electron beam, inclination of the irradiation channel, aeration of the wastewater before and during the treatment process with the electron accelerator, ozone addition and double irradiation. The absorbed dose radiation by the wastewater was determined using a water calorimeter . The physical-chemical parameters of the wastewater studied were: pH, true color, apparent color, conductivity, solids content, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BODs), surfactants, phenols, oils and greases, nitrates, nitrites, nitrogen ammonia, cyanides, sulfides, sulfates, alkalinity, chromium, lead, cobalt, nicke and zinc. The microbiological parameters studied were: total microbial content, fecal coliforms, fungi and yeasts. Furthermore, all surviving microorganisms in the irradiated water were identified. (author)

  19. Tung FDG Test Facility. Phase 2, Pilot plant demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Tung FGD Process is a regenerative process which extracts SO{sub 2} from a scrubbing liquor into an organic medium using mixer-settlers followed by steam-stripping the SO{sub 2} off from the organic medium. For the process to operate satisfactorily, (1) the organic must be stable, (2) phase separation must be relatively fast, (3) crud (i.e. solids in-between two phases) must not form and (4) SO{sub 2} must be able to be stripped off from the organic medium readily. The demonstration confirmed that the first three conditions can be met satisfactorily. Much lower stripping efficiency was attained in the pilot plant demonstration than what was previously attained in a bench-scale demonstration. Engineering analysis showed that the pilot plant stripping column was scaled up from the bench-scale column incorrectly. A new scale-up criterion for stripping a relatively viscous liquid medium is proposed based upon pilot plant data.

  20. Future-oriented computerized information system for power plant process control in a pilot project at Philippsburg nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehrle, G.; Kraft, M.

    1988-01-01

    The motivation for the pilot project at Philippsburg nuclear power plant resulted from the Three Mile Island accident in 1979. The primary task embraces an efficient computer-aided reduction of information when a fault occurs based on a process engineering analysis of the information accrued. Accompanying this are a consolidation and evaluation of the information available in the control room. In this pilot project the new tasks of status monitoring, information reduction and operationalcontrol have been realized for the first time using a computer-aided process information system. In addition to the existing control computer, an information computer with approximately 1200 analogue and about 10000 binary signals has been installed. The installation of the system was completed in 1984 and in the meantime initial operational experience has become available. (orig.) [de

  1. Anthocyanin Characterization of Pilot Plant Water Extracts of Delonix regia Flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile M. Gaydou

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the development of new applications of pilot plant scale extraction and formulation processes for natural active bioproducts obtained from various underutilized tropical plants and herbs, we have manufactured water-extracts from Delonix regia flowers, grown in Ivory Coast. These extracts, which contain polyphenols, are traditionally home made and used as healthy bioproducts. They are reddish-coloured due to the presence of anthocyanins. The three major anthocyanins in these extracts have been characterized. The molecular structures were confirmed by LC-SM analysis. Amongst them, two are described for the first time in Delonix regia.

  2. Some economic considerations for a pilot plant based on the adsorber loop concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koske, P.H.; Ohlrogge, Klaus; Jager, Wolfgang.

    1984-01-01

    Some first order estimates about the production costs of seawater uranium are presented on the basis of a pilot plant with a capacity of about 100 tU per year. The plant is assumed to be operating at high seas using the adsorber loop concept for the contact between seawater and adsorber granulate. The effects of some process relevant components and parameters are discussed with regard to their contribution to the production costs and in order to analyse their cost-cutting potential. (author)

  3. LEU fuel element produced by the Egyptian fuel manufacturing pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, W.I.

    2000-01-01

    The Egyptian Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant, FMPP, is a Material Testing Reactor type (MTR) fuel element facility, for producing the specified fuel elements required for the Egyptian Second Research Reactor, ETRR-2. The plant uses uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 , 19.75% U 235 by wt) as a raw material which is processed through a series of the manufacturing, inspection and test plan to produce the final specified fuel elements. Radiological safety aspects during design, construction, operation, and all reasonably accepted steps should be taken to prevent or reduce the chance of accidents occurrence. (author)

  4. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume V. Thermal storage subsystem. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    Design, specifications, and diagrams for the thermal storage subsystem for the 10-MW pilot tower focus power plant are presented in detail. The Honeywell thermal storage subsystem design features a sensible heat storage arrangement using proven equipment and materials. The subsystem consists of a main storage containing oil and rock, two buried superheater tanks containing inorganic salts (Hitec), and the necessary piping, instrumentation, controls, and safety devices. The subsystem can provide 7 MW(e) for three hours after twenty hours of hold. It can be charged in approximately four hours. Storage for the commercial-scale plant consists of the same elements appropriately scaled up. Performance analysis and tradeoff studies are included.

  5. Fuel relocation effects in BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raul Orive Moreno; Ines Gallego Cabezon; Pablo Julio Garcia Sedano; Yolanda Tofino Gomez; Pedro Mata Alonso

    2005-01-01

    One of the objectives of the EPRI's Fuel Reliability Program is to establish the bases for the licensing of nuclear fuel to burnup levels beyond the current licensed value of 62 GWd/MT rod average burnup. One of the licensing points of concern is the behavior of the high burnup fuel in LOCA conditions. To respond to this concern a series of LOCA experiments are being performed at Argonne National Laboratory using fuel rods from Limerick NPP at 57 GWd/MT and H.B. Robinson at 67 GWd/MT. ANL LOCA tests indicate potential fuel relocation during LOCA. This could result in an increase of LHGR during a real plant LOCA. This report presents the LOCA analyses performed by IBERDROLA (Spanish utility), using results from the Cofrentes NPP (BWR-6) LOCA evaluations with GE-14 fuel design for the whole exposure range, quantifying fuel relocation impact. This effect has been modeled and implemented in FRAP-T6/APK (vendor independent IBERDROLA licensing thermomechanical code), as well as the wall-to-fluid heat transfer area increase in the ballooned region. Separate and combined impacts on PCT and ECR values can be evaluated with this modified code version. A new hoop strain versus rupture temperature curve is implemented in code, starting from NUREG-0630 model data base, but with a more best-estimate fit, in order to reproduce expected experimental values. The increase of heat transfer in the ballooned region has been validated with Halden LOCA tests. Preliminary results indicate that the effect of fuel relocation is expected to be compensated by the increased heat transfer area. This effect is to be confirmed with the Halden LOCA tests in progress. (author)

  6. General Electric's training program for BWR chemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.N.; Lim, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the General Electric boiling water reactor chemistry training program from 1959 to the present. The original intention of this program was to provide practical hands on type training in radiochemistry to BWR chemistry supervisors with fossil station experience. This emphasis on radiochemistry has not changed through the years, but the training has expanded to include the high purity water chemistry of the BWR and has been modified to include new commission requirements, engineering developments and advanced instrumentation. Student and instructor qualifications are discussed and a description of the spin off courses for chemistry technicians and refresher training is presented

  7. Pilot incineration plant for solid, combustible, and low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francioni, W.M.

    Radioactively contaminated wastes are formed in the handling of radioactive materials at the Federal Institute for Reactor Research (FIRR) and in other facilities, hospitals, sanitoria, industry, and nuclear power plants. A large part of the wastes are combustible and only very slightly radioactive. Incineration of these wastes is obvious. A pilot incineration plant, henceforth called the PIP, for radioactive combustible wastes of the FIRR is surveyed. The plant and its individual components are described. The production costs of the plant and experience gained in operation available at present are reviewed. Solid combustible radioactive waste can be incinerated in the PIP. The maximum possible reduction in volume of these wastes is achieved by incineration. Subsequently the chemically sterile ashes can be consolidated in a stable block suitable for long-term storage mixing with cement

  8. Pilot Plant for treating of spent exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Alberto M.; Raffo Calderon, Maria del C.; Varani, Jose L.

    2004-01-01

    Spent exchange resins that have been accumulating during the last operational 30 years in Atucha I nuclear power plant (NPP) are a 'problematic' waste. These spent resins conform an intermediate level waste due to the total content of alpha, beta and gamma emitters (some samples of spent resins were analyzed in 2003). For this reason its treatment is more expensive since it is necessary to add more safety barriers for its final disposition and also for the radioprotection actions that are involved. Using sulfuric acid solutions it is possible to elute from the spent resins the ions that are retained. In the same operation are eluted Cobalt, Cesium and alpha emitters since that all these elements react as cations in aqueous solution. Decontamination by electrochemical methods was analyzed as an interesting method to apply after elution operation to these spent resins since that with the decontamination process it is possible to obtain a solid without activity and concentrate the activity in cells that are small in volume and its manipulation doesn't present any extra complication. Experiments made with active samples taken from the deposit were successful. Because of these results it was built a small plant to treat a batch of 100 dm 3 of wet spent exchange resins. Some problems with the material that was in the deposit together with spent resins caused that we had to plan a more complex strategy to obtain a complete decontamination of the spent resins (in this stage we used the cobalt retention cell that was described in other paper to retain Cobalt and alpha emitters and a sample of zeolites from Argentina ores to retain Cesium). Due to alpha emitters act electrochemically like cations it was possible to retain altogether with ionic Cobalt on the copper amalgam electrode. Working in the non-active lab with alcoholic solutions it was possible to retain ionic Cesium on a copper electrode (copper is covered by mercury fine film which forms a solid amalgam) with a

  9. Preliminary study on seismic proving test of BWR core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, M.; Shibata, H.; Sato, H.; Kawakami, S.; Ohno, T.; Ichiki, T.; Sasaki, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A series of seismic proving tests for PWR and BWR facilities have been programmed and conducted. The seismic design of nuclear plants is based on criteria far more stringent than applied to non-nuclear installations. Seismic design involves the complex, advanced and sophisticated calculations. The validity of the techniques employed for these calculations is not susceptible to easy comprehension and acceptance by the population at large. It has become important to demonstrate the seismic strength and functional reliability of currently designed and existing nuclear power facilities. This paper deals with an experimental research project to demonstrate the seismic reliability proving tests for nuclear power plant facilities. The seismic proving test described in this report was conducted from 1986 to 1988 for the boiling water reactor core internals

  10. Safety evaluation of BWR off-gas treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, R.J.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    Some of the results of a safety evaluation performed on current generic types of BWR off-gas treatment systems including cooled and ambient temperature adsorber beds and cryogenics are presented. The evaluation covered the four generic types of off-gas systems and the systems of five major vendors. This study was part of original work performed under AEC contract for the Directorate of Regulatory Standards. The analysis techniques employed for the safety evaluation of these systems include: Fault Tree Analysis; FMECA (Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis); general system comparisons, contaminant, system control, and design adequacy evaluations; and resultant Off-Site Dose Calculations. The salient areas presented are some of the potential problem areas, the approach that industry has taken to mitigate or design against potential upset conditions, and areas where possible deficiencies still exist. Potential problem areas discussed include hydrogen detonation, hydrogen release to equipment areas, operator/automatic control interface, and needed engineering evaluation to insure safe system operation. Of the systems reviewed, most were in the category of advanced or improved over that commonly in use today, and a conclusion from the study was that these systems offer excellent potential for noble gas control for BWR power plants where more stringent controls may be specified -- now or in the future. (U.S.)

  11. Aging assessment of BWR control rod drive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the aging phenomena associated with boiling water reactor (BWR) control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and assess the merits of various methods of managing this aging. Information for this study was acquired from (1) the results of a special CRDM aging questionnaire distributed to each US BWR utility, (2) a first-of-its-kind workshop held to discuss CRDM aging and maintenance concerns, (3) an analysis of Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure cases attributed to the CRD system, and (4) personal information exchange with industry experts. As part of this study, nearly 3500 NPRDS failure reports have been analyzed to examine the prevailing failure trends for CRD system components. An investigation was conducted to summarize the occurrence frequency of these component failures, discovery methods, reported failure causes, their respective symptoms, and actions taken by utilities to restore component and system service. The results of this research have identified the predominant CRDM failure modes and causes. In addition, recommendations are presented that identify specific actions utilities can implement to mitigate CRDM aging. An evaluation has also been made of certain maintenance practices and tooling which have enabled some utilities to reduce ALARA exposures received from routine CRDM replacement and rebuilding activities. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Logical model for the control of a BWR turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas O, Y.; Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work a design of a logical model is presented for the turbine control of a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model is sought to implement later on inside the thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The logical model is developed for the control and protection of the turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control will be been able to use for one or several turbines in series. The quality of the present design of the logical model of the turbine control is that it considers the most important parameters in the operation of a turbine, besides that they have incorporated to the logical model the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a detailed model. The development of the logical model of a turbine will be of utility in the short and medium term to carry out analysis on the turbine operation with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction, specific steps of the turbine to feed other equipment s, in addition to analyze the separate and the integrated effect. (Author)

  13. System control model of a turbine for a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas O, Y.; Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R.; Delfin L, A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work is presented a design of a control system of a turbine for a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model seeks to implement later on at thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The model is developed for control and protection of turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control could be employed for one or several turbines in series. The quality of present designs of control pattern of turbine it is that it considers the parameters more important in the operation of a turbine besides that is has incorporated at control the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a model more detailed. The development of control model of a turbine will be good in short and medium term to realize analysis about the operation of turbine with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction specific steps of turbine to feed other equipment s, besides analyzing the separate effect and integrated effect. (Author)

  14. Utility experience with the BWR power shape monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emrich, W.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station has used the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) boiling water reactor (BWR) power shape monitoring system (PSMS) for approximately one cycle of power operation. During this time, the PSMS was used for both on-line core monitoring and off-line core simulation. The ability to obtain core power distributions in near real time and the ability to simulate anticipated core maneuvers has enabled site personnel to avoid difficult operational situations and to more easily detect problems when they occur. The PSMS is an integrated set of computer codes used to monitor and predict the nuclear and thermal-hydraulic behavior of a BWR code. The PSMS uses a three-dimensional, one-energy-group nodal model similar to the General Electric FLARE code to estimate the core power distribution. The PSMS contains four major modules: (1) data acquisition and storage module: collects plant data; (2) duty cycle approximation module; performs three-dimensional nuclear and thermal-hydraulic calculations; (3) model calibration module: performs all statistical evaluations; and (4) data display module: responsible for displaying PSMS data. The PSMS also has the ability to perform useful predictive calculations. These include: power, flow, or control rod searches; control rod pattern optimizations; and fast approximate predictions.

  15. Development of membrane moisture separator for BWR off-gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawamura, S.; Kumasaka, M.; Nishikubo, M.

    2001-01-01

    In BWR plant off-gas treatment systems, dehumidifiers are used to maintain noble gas adsorption efficiency in the first half of the charcoal hold-up units. From the perspective of simplifying and reducing the cost of such a dehumidification system, Japanese BWR utilities and plant fabricators have been developing a dehumidification system employing moisture separation membrane of the type already proven in fields such as medical instrumentation and precision measuring apparatus. The first part of this development involved laboratory testing to simulate the conditions found in an actual off-gas system, the results of which demonstrated satisfactory results in terms of moisture separation capability and membrane durability, and suggested favorable prospects for application in actual off-gas systems. Further, in-plant testing to verify moisture separation capability and membrane durability in the presence of actual gases is currently underway, with results so far suggesting that the system is capable of obtaining good moisture separation capability. (author)

  16. FY 1991 report on the results of the development of an entrained bed coal gasification power plant. Part 4. Operation of pilot plant; 1991 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 4. Pilot plant unten sosa hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-01-01

    A record was summarized of the operation of the 200 t/d entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant that was constructed with the aim of establishing technology of the integrated coal gasification combined cycle power generation. As to the actual results of operation hours, the paper summarized the records of gasifier facilities, gas refining facilities, gas turbine facilities and safety environment facilities which were collected from April 1991 to January 1993. Relating to the actual results of start-up/stop, the paper summarized the records of gasifier facilities, gas refining facilities (desulfurization), gas refining facilities (dedusting), gas turbine facilities and safety environment facilities. Further, operation manuals were made for the schedule of plant start-up/stop, generalization, gasifier facilities, gas refining facilities (desulfurization), gas refining facilities (dedusting), gas turbine facilities, actual pressure/actual size combustor testing facilities and safety environment facilities. (NEDO)

  17. Study of the Utilization BWR Type Nuclear Power Reactor for Desalination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itjeu Karliana; Sumijanto; Dhandhang Purwadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The needs of fresh water increased by rapid population growth and industrials expansion, but these demands can not be prepared naturally. Following this case, seawater desalination becomes the primer option which can fulfill the need through the nuclear desalination technology. The coupled nuclear power reactor enables to supply thermal energy for auxiliary equipment and pumps operation. The utilization study of power reactor type BWR coupled with desalination process has been performed. The goal of study is to obtain characteristic data of desalted water specification which desalination system coupling with nuclear power plant produced energy for desalination process. The study is carried out by browsing data and information, and comprehensive review of thermal energy correlation between NPP with desalination process installation. According to reviewing are found that the thermal energy and electric power utilization from the nuclear power reactor are enable to remove the seawater to produce desalted water and also to operate auxiliary equipments. The assessment results is VK-300 reactor prototype, BWR type 250 MW(e) power are cogeneration unit can supplied hot steam temperature 285 °C to the extraction turbine to empower 150 MW electric power, and a part of hot steam 130 °C is use to operate desalination process and remind heat is distribute to the municipal and offices at that region. The coupled of VK-300 reactor power type BWR with desalination installation of MED type enable to produce desalted water with high quality distillate. Based on the economic calculation that the VK-300 reactor power of BWR type produced water distillate capacity is 300.000 m 3 /hour with cost US$ 0.58/m 3 . The coupling VK-300 reactor power type BWR with MED desalination plant is competitive economically. (author)

  18. PILOT PLANT STUDY ON NATURAL WATER COAGULANTS AS COAGULAN AIDS FOR WATER SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B BINA

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Natural plant coagulants have an important role to play in provision of portable water to rural communities in the developing world. The plant material that their coagulation properties have been confirmed in previous lab scale studies and can be found widely in Iran was selected as coagulant aids. Pilot plant study was done to evaluate the efficiency of natural material such as Starch/Gum Tragacanth, Fenugreek and Yeast as coagulant aids in conjunction with comercial alum. Methods: The pilot was placed in Isfahan Water Treatment Plant (IWTP and efficiency of these materials in removal of turbidity from raw water enters the IWTP was evaluated. The results indicated while these materials were used as coagulant aids in concentration of 1-5 mg/l conjunction with alum are able to reduced the turbidity and final residuals turbidity meets the standards limits. Results: The coagulation efficiency of these material were found to be effected by certain physico-chemical factors, namely, concentration of suspended solids, divalent cation metal and time of agitation. The relative importance of these variable was evaluated. The results of COD test proved that the natural coagulant aids in the optimum doses produce no any significant organic residual. Discussion: Economical considerations showed that using of these material as coagulant aids can cause reduction in alum consumption and in some cases are more econmical than synthetic polyelectrolyte.

  19. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs

  20. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  1. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  2. OPTIMASI PROSES DEASIDIFIKASI DALAM PEMURNIAN MINYAK SAWIT MERAH SKALA PILOT PLANT [Optimization of Deacidification Process in Red Palm Oil Purification on Pilot Plant Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Rai Widarta1*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deacidification is one of the steps in palm oil refining process which aims to separate free fatty acids formed during post-harvest handling. It is carried out using alkali solution such as NaOH (sodium hydroxide. Carotenoids in palm oil are affected by this step. Therefore, deacidification has to be controlled to minimize the destruction of carotenoids during processing. The objective of this research was to improve deacidification process in pilot plant scale so that the process can produce lower level of free fatty acids (FFA and higher recovery of carotene in high yield neutralized red palm oil (NRPO. Characterization of physical and chemical properties of crude palm oil (CPO such as moisture content, FFA and carotene contents, saponification number, iodine value, peroxide value, and color were determined before processing. Degumming was performed before deacidification process. The 17.5% excess of NaOH was obtained from the pilot plant scale deacidification trial. The optimization of deacidification time and temperature was carried out by using central composite design (CCD. Response surface method (RSM was used to observe the influence of treatments on the FFA level reduction, carotene recovery, and NRPO yield. The result showed that the optimum deacidification condition was at 61 ± 2°C in 26 minutes, and at the 16°Be NaOH strength with 17.5% excess of NaOH. In this optimum condition, the process achieved 96.35% of FFA reduction, 87.30% of carotene recovery, and 90.16% of NRPO yield.

  3. Experimental pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation. Results and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, I.; Bornea, Anisia; Brad, S.; Cristescu, Loana; Sofalca, N.; Stefan, L.; Zamfirache, M.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental Pilot Plant for tritium and deuterium separation at Rm. Valcea has the aim of establishing the technological data required in designing and operating an industrial plant for heavy water detritiation as function of tritium containment in heavy water. The technology developed at Rm. Valcea is based upon catalytic isotopic exchange in heavy water-deuterium, followed by cryogenic distillation of a mixture between molecular species of hydrogen and its isotopes. The experimental pilot plant contains five modules that can work independently or coupled between them: a - in the isotopic exchange module the transfer of deuterium and tritium is made from heavy water in a hydrogen flow by catalytic isotope exchange. The mixed catalytic packing was made and tested by means of the catalyst Pt/C/PTFE and B7 packing; b - in the preliminary purification module the hydrogen purification is realized by removing oxygen and water, which can affect the good functioning of the cryogenic distillation module; c - in the cryogenic distillation module the mixture of hydrogen isotopes is separated. The deuterium concentration at the bottom D/(D+H) of the column is up to 99.9%. The column is filed with ordered package and the condenser temperature is 22 K.; d - in the catalytic burn module, deuterated hydrogen is catalytically combined with oxygen and heavy water results with a concentration D/(D+H) of 19.9%. The hydrogen burning takes place on mixed catalytic package with 10% hydrophobic catalyst of Pt/C/PTFE type and 90% package; e - the module of water isotopic distillation under vacuum allows heavy water concentration rise from 49.9% to 99.8% on ordered package. In the paper we present the main steps of starting the operation of this experimental pilot plant and analyze the performances with respect to tritium and deuterium separation. (authors)

  4. Research and development in pilot plant production of granular NPK fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failaka, Muhamad Fariz; Firdausi, Nadia Zahrotul; Chairunnisa, Altway, Ali

    2017-05-01

    PT Pupuk Kaltim (Pupuk Kaltim) as one of the biggest fertilizer manufacturer in Indonesia, always striving to improve the product quality and achieve the optimal performance while facing the challenges of global competition NPK (Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium) market. In order to continuously improve operations and processes of two units NPK compound plant, Pupuk Kaltim has successfully initiated a new facility which is referred to as a NPK pilot-scale research facility with design capacity of 30 kg/hr. This mini-plant is used to assist in the scale up of new innovations from laboratory research to better understand the effect of using new raw materials and experiment with process changes to improve quality and efficiency. The pilot installation is composed of the following main parts: mixer, screw feeder, granulator, dryer and cooler. The granulator is the equipment where NPK granules is formed by spraying appropriate steam and water onto raw materials in a rotating drum. The rotary dryer and cooler are intended for the drying process where temperature reduction and the final moisture are obtained. As a part of innovations project since 2014, the pilot plant has conducted many of experiments such as trials using Ammonium Sulfate (ZA) as a new raw material, alternative raw materials of Diammonium Phosphate (DAP), Potassium Chloride (KCl) and clay, and using a novel material of fly ash. In addition, the process engineering staff also conduct the trials of raw materials ratio so that an ideal formulation with lower cost can be obtained especially when it is applied in the existing full-scale plant.

  5. System control model of a turbine for a BWR; Modelo del sistema de control de una turbina para un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas O, Y. [Universidad del Valle de Mexico, Campus Toluca, Av. Las Palmas No. 136, Col. San Jorge Pueblo Nuevo, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R.; Delfin L, A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: rodolfo.amador@inin.gob.mx

    2009-10-15

    In this work is presented a design of a control system of a turbine for a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model seeks to implement later on at thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The model is developed for control and protection of turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control could be employed for one or several turbines in series. The quality of present designs of control pattern of turbine it is that it considers the parameters more important in the operation of a turbine besides that is has incorporated at control the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a model more detailed. The development of control model of a turbine will be good in short and medium term to realize analysis about the operation of turbine with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction specific steps of turbine to feed other equipment s, besides analyzing the separate effect and integrated effect. (Author)

  6. The dispersal and impact of salt from surface storage piles the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, C.C.; Louderbough, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive program of ecological studies occurs at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in an effort to detect and quantify impacts of excavated salt which is stored on the surface in two piles: one having originated in 1980, the other in 1984. Both piles are surrounded by berms which channel runoff to holding ponds, so nearly all dispersal is due to the resuspension, transport, and deposition of salt particles by wind. Ecological parameters which have been monitored since 1984 include: visual evidence (via photography), soil properties, microbial activity, leaf-litter decomposition, seedling emergence, plant foliar cover, and plant species diversity. These are periodically assessed at experimental plots near the salt piles, and at control plots several kilometers away

  7. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors; Metodos aplicados para la mitigacion del dano por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencia de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  8. Pilot plant SERSE: Description and results of the experimental tests under treatment of simulated chemical liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calle, C.; Gili, M.; Luce, A.; Marrocchelli, A.; Pietrelli, L.; Troiani, F.

    1989-11-01

    The chemical processes for the selective separation of the actinides and long lived fission products from aged liquid wastes is described. The SERSE pilot plant is a cold facility which has been designed, by ENEA, for the engineering scale demonstration of the chemical separation processes. The experimental tests carried out in the plant are described and the results confirm the laboratory data. (author)

  9. Experimental fact-finding in CFB biomass gasification for ECN's 500 kWth pilot-plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Prins, W.; van der Drift, A.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2003-01-01

    CFB biomass gasification has been studied by experimentation with ECN's pilot facility and a cold-flow model of this plant. Data obtained by normal operation of this plant and the results of some special experiments have provided new insight into the behavior of circulating fluidized bed reactors

  10. Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CRDL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume III, Book 2. Collector subsystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1977-10-01

    The methods and plans for the manufacture of the 10-MW collector heliostats and associated controls for the pilot plant are detailed. An in-depth description of the production, installation, and verification testing of heliostats for the pilot plant is presented. Specifications for the performance, design, and test requirements for the pilot plant collector subsystem are included. Also, a heliostat location summary report is given. (WHK)

  11. Radioactive waste disposal: Waste isolation pilot plants (WIPP). (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geologic repository located in New Mexico for transuranic wastes generated by the U.S. Government. Articles follow the development of the program from initial site selection and characterization through construction and testing, and examine research programs on environmental impacts, structural design, and radionuclide landfill gases. Existing plants and facilities, pilot plants, migration, rock mechanics, economics, regulations, and transport of wastes to the site are also included. The Salt Repository Project and the Crystalline Repository Project are referenced in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Desind an operation of pilot plant production of biodisel fron frying oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Morales Pedraza

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is present the pilot plant used in the research titled: Production of biodiesel from used edible oils to industrial level for the production of methyl or ethyl esters from vegetable oils used in the food industry that be used as a fuel in diesel engines type, in order to generate alternative use for these oils are reused, and additionally, generate new options in biofuels that can replace methyl ester, since these need of methanol, a product that usually is a derived petrochemical and highly toxic. In this small-scale plant for the production of ethyl esters (biodiesel can be evaluated spent oils of different kinds and diverse origin, or study oils from food industries, which are usually a blend of palm oil and soybean oil, and other times palm oils hydrogenated or mixtures of oil spent with palm oil refning RBD (refned, bleached and deodorized. The results are the basis for the design and construction of a pilot plant to produce biodiesel by lot of 6 liter by hour approximately, which is evaluated under simulated conditions of loading and operation. It was designed and implemented a batch reactor with heating and stirring mechanics, drivers with temperature, condensation and total alcohol refux, maintaining a molar relationship of 6:1 (alcohol/oil, which is considered the best relation for a esterification with basic catalysis several scientifc publications. The temperature of the reaction is set at 60 °C and atmospheric pressure. The productivity of the reaction

  13. Direct Air Capture of CO2 - an Overview of Carbon Engineering's Technology and Pilot Plant Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, G.; Corless, A.

    2014-12-01

    At Carbon Engineering, we are developing and commercializing technology to scrub CO2 directly from atmospheric air at industrial scale. By providing atmospheric CO2 for use in fuel production, we can enable production of transportation fuels with ultra-low carbon intensities, which command price premiums in the growing set of constrained fuels markets such as California's LCFS. We are a Calgary based startup founded in 2009 with 10 employees, and we are considered a global leader in the direct air capture (DAC) field. We will review CE's DAC technology, based on a wet-scrubbing "air contactor" which absorbs CO2 into aqueous solution, and a chemical looping "regeneration" component, which liberates pure CO2 from this aqueous solution while re-making the original absorption chemical. CE's DAC tecnology exports purified atmospheric CO2, combined with the combustion CO2 from plant energy usage, as the end product. We will also discuss CE's 2014-2015 end-to-end Pilot Demonstration Unit. This is a $7M technology demonstration plant that CE is building with the help of key industrial partners and equipment vendors. Vendor design and engineering requirements have been used to specify the pilot air contactor, pellet reactor, calciner, and slaker modules, as well as auxiliary systems. These modules will be run for several months to obtain the engineering and performance data needed for subsequent commercial plant design, as well as to test the residual integration risks associated with CE's process. By the time of the AGU conference, the pilot is expected to be in late stages of fabrication or early stages of site installation.

  14. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014. Emended

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year (CY); Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE environmental sustainability goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

  15. WIPP conceptual design report. Addendum F. HVAC systems energy analysis for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    This report presents the results of a technical and economic analysis of alternative methods of meeting the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning requirements of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facilities proposed to be constructed in southeastern New Mexico. This report analyzes a total of ten WIPP structures to determine the most energy and economic efficient means of providing heating, ventilating, and air conditioning services. Additional analyses were performed to determine the merits of centralized versus dispersed refrigeration and heating facilities, and of performing supplemental domestic hot water heating with solar panels

  16. Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, L.R.; Aguilar, R.; Mercer, J.W.; Newman, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included

  17. No-migration variance petition for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duff, M.; Carnes, R.; Hart, J.; Hansen, R.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is petitioning the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to allow the emplacement of hazardous wastes subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The basis of the petition is that there will be no migration of hazardous constituents from the repository for as long as the wastes remain hazardous. The EPA regulations in 40 CFR Section 268.6 identify specific criteria that must be addressed in making a demonstration of no migration. EPA's approval of this petition will allow the WIPP facility to accept wastes otherwise prohibited or restricted from land disposal. 5 refs

  18. Scientific, institutional, regulatory, political, and public acceptance of the waste isolation pilot plant transuranic waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.G.

    2000-01-01

    The recent successful certification and opening of a first-of-a-kind, deep geological repository for safe disposal of long-lived, transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, New Mexico, United States of America (USA), embody both long-standing local and wide-spread, gradually achieved, scientific, institutional, regulatory, political, and public acceptance. The related historical background and development are outlined and the main contributors to the successful siting, certification, and acceptance of the WIPP TRUW repository, which may also serve as a model to success for other radioactive waste disposal programs, are described. (author)

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Alcove Gas Barrier trade-off study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.S.; Van Sambeek, L.L.

    1992-07-01

    A modified Kepner-Tregoe method was used for a trade-off study of Alcove Gas Barrier (AGB) concepts for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The AGB is a gas-constraining seal to be constructed in an alcove entrance drift. In this trade-off study, evaluation criteria were first selected. Then these criteria were classified as to their importance to the task, assigning a weighting value to each aspect. Eleven conceptual design alternatives were developed based on geometrical/geological considerations, construction materials, constructibility, and other relevant factors and evaluated

  20. Synthesis in pilot plant scale and physical properties of sulfonated polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Cristiane R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogenous sulfonation of polystyrene was developed in a pilot plant scale producing polymers with different sulfonation degrees (18 to 22 mole % of sulfonated styrene units. The reaction yield depends chiefly on the concentration ratio of acetyl sulfate and polystyrene. The morphological and thermal properties of the sulfonated polystyrene obtained by homogeneous sulfonation were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry. The glass transition temperature of sulfonated polystyrene increases in relation to pure polystyrene and DCp was evaluated in order to confirm the strong interactions among the ~SO3H groups.

  1. Resource conversation and recovery act draft hazardous waste facility permit: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Volume II contains attachments for Module II and Module III. Attachments for Module II are: part A permit application; examples of acceptable documentation; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant generator/storage site waste screening and acceptance audit program; inspection schedule and monitoring schedule; inspection log forms; personnel training course outlines; hazardous waste job position training requirements; contingency plan; closure plan; and procedures for establishing background for the underground units. One attachment, facility process information, is included for Module III. Remaining attachments for this module are in Volume III

  2. DSM energy saving pilot project report. Furniture Plant Teika, Riga, Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananevski, V.; Kalejs, M.; Hercogs, J.; Blumbergs, U.

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this pilot project was to carry out energy audit into the furniture plant TEIKA and energy saving measures. Another aim was to transfer the Danish know how and experience obtained through the Danish effort in Latvian industries consumers. Therefore great attention is paid to energy mapping in order to show possibilities of the Danish methodisms. This report is a part of the Joint Latvian - Danish Project Demand Side Management and Energy Saving. It is a results of collaborative efforts between a Latvian team, consisting of the specialists from Latvenergo and on the other hand a Danish team, which was represented by the Danish Power Consult company NESA. (EG)

  3. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume documents model parameters chosen as of July 1992 that were used by the Performance Assessment Department of Sandia National Laboratories in its 1992 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Ranges and distributions for about 300 modeling parameters in the current secondary data base are presented in tables for the geologic and engineered barriers, global materials (e.g., fluid properties), and agents that act upon the WIPP disposal system such as climate variability and human-intrusion boreholes. The 49 parameters sampled in the 1992 Preliminary Performance Assessment are given special emphasis with tables and graphics that provide insight and sources of data for each parameter

  4. Recent advances in AFB biomass gasification pilot plant with catalytic reactors in a downstream slip flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznar, M.P.; Gil, J.; Martin, J.A.; Frances, E.; Olivares, A.; Caballero, M.A.; Perez, P. [Saragossa Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemistry and Environment; Corella, J. [Madrid Univ. (Spain)

    1996-12-31

    A new 3rd generation pilot plant is being used for hot catalytic raw gas cleaning. It is based on a 15 cm. i.d. fluidized bed with biomass throughputs of 400-650 kg/h.m{sup 2}. Gasification is performed using mixtures of steam and oxygen. The produced gas is passed in a slip flow by two reactors in series containing a calcined dolomite and a commercial reforming catalyst. Tars are periodically sampled and analysed after the three reactors. Tar conversions of 99.99 % and a 300 % increase of the hydrogen content in the gas are obtained. (author) (2 refs.)

  5. Reconsolidation of salt as applied to permanent seals for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, F.D.; Callahan, G.D.; Van Sembeek, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    Reconsolidated salt is a fundamental component of the permanent seals for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. As regulations are currently understood and seal concepts envisioned, emplaced salt is the sole long-term seal component designed to prevent the shafts from becoming preferred pathways for rating gases or liquids. Studies under way in support of the sealing function of emplaced salt include laboratory testing of crushed salt small-scale in situ tests, constitutive modeling of crushed salt, calculations of the opening responses during operation and closure, and design practicalities including emplacement techniques. This paper briefly summarizes aspects of these efforts and key areas of future work

  6. The effect of stratigraphic dip on multiphase flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.W.; Larson, K.W.

    1995-01-01

    The natural stratigraphic dip at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), although regionally only about 1 degree, has the potential to affect brine inflow and gas migration distances due to buoyancy forces. Brine inflow may increase due to countercurrent flow, and gas may preferentially migrate updip. Analytical and numerical modeling was used to evaluate the impact of the dip on brine inflow and gas migration distances at the WIPP in one, two, and three dimensions. Results show that the effect of dip on brine inflow and gas migration distance may be significant

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014. Emended

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year (CY); Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE environmental sustainability goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

  8. The distribution of the activity in the primary system of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerberg, S.; Hermansson, H.-P.

    1980-12-01

    A model for the distribution of activity is presented. The model is based upon an earlier mathematical model which has been modified and applied to the calculation of activity of the primary water system and to the buildup of activity in ion exchange materials. Calculations have been performed for Co-60. A certain agreement of the calculations and the data from Swedish BWR plants has been obtained. (G.B.)

  9. Decommissioning of the pilot plant for the reprocessing of irradiated fuel type MTR1 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, J. T.; Zurita, A.; Maza, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The irradiated fuel reprocessing plant MTR type was designed to treat fuel elements plate type from reactor JEN-1 (Ciemat). This facility (M-1 Plant) also served to developed fuel reprocessing processes. Dismantling Works, which have been conducted by ENRESA were carried out by MONCASA-LAINSA (MONLAIN), the most experienced Spanish joint venture in dismantling nuclear facilities. This paper presents the performed dismantling works of the three M-1 Plant main systems: - Hot Cell M-1. - Gloves Boxes Assembly L-1 - Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Cell (F-1). (Author) 12 refs.

  10. Achievement report for fiscal 1993 on developing entrained bed coal gasification power plant. Part 4. Pilot plant operation edition; 1993 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 4. Pilot plant unten sosa hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    Tests and researches have been carried out on operation of a 200-t/d entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant built with an objective of establishing the coal gasification composite power generation technology. This paper summarizes the operation achievements in fiscal 1993. The plant operation record in fiscal 1993 was as follows: 430 hours 27 minutes in the gasification furnace (ten gasification operations), 233 hours 51 minutes in the gas refining facility, 140 hours 31 minutes in the gas turbine facility (power generation amount of 746.8 MWh with nine actuations), 1,263 hours 09 minutes in the processing furnace in the safety environment facility, and 427 hours 22 minutes in the NOx removal equipment. Descriptions were given with detailed graphs on the actuation and shutdown record with respect to the run D2, the run D3 (1 and 2), the run D4, the run D5, the run D6, and the run D7 (1 through 4). The operation procedures were prepared for the plant startup and shutdown schedule, the generalization report, the gasification furnace facility, the gas refining facility (dry type desulfurizing facility), the gas refining facility (dry type dust removing facility), the gas turbine facility, the combustor testing facility with actual pressure and size, and the safety environment facilities. (NEDO)

  11. Pilot Experimentation with Complete Mixing Anoxic Reactors to Improve Sewage Denitrification in Treatment Plants in Small Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Massimo Raboni; Vincenzo Torretta; Paolo Viotti; Giordano Urbini

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of two sewage treatment tests in a community of 15,000 inhabitants. The sewage treatment plant is subject to strong fluctuations in load (BOD 5 , COD, TKN), and in particular in the BOD 5 /TKN ratio. These fluctuations adversely affect the biological denitrification, as demonstrated by many pilot and real-scale plants. The plants we tested were subjected to two treatment types: anoxic-aerobic and simultaneous denitrification. Both processes are designed for comp...

  12. Use of Pilot Plants for Developing Used Nuclear Fuel Recycling Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Chris; Arm, Stuart [EnergySolutions LLC (United States); Banfield, Zara; Jeapes, Andrew; Taylor, Richard [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    EnergySolutions and its teaming partners are working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop processes, equipment and facilities for recycling used nuclear fuel (UNF). Recycling significantly reduces the volume of wastes that ultimately will be consigned to the National Geologic Repository, enables the re-use in new fuel of the valuable uranium and plutonium in the UNF, and allows the long-lived minor actinides to be treated separately so they do not become long term heat emitters in the Repository. A major requirement of any new UNF recycling facility is that pure plutonium is not separated anywhere in the process, so as to reduce the nuclear proliferation attractiveness of the facility. EnergySolutions and its team partner the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) have developed the NUEX process to achieve this and to handle appropriately the treatment of other species such as krypton, tritium, neptunium and technetium. NUEX is based on existing successful commercial UNF recycling processes deployed in the UK, France and imminently in Japan, but with a range of modifications to the flowsheet to keep some uranium with the plutonium at all times and to minimize aerial and liquid radioactive discharges. NNL's long-term experience in developing the recycling and associated facilities at the Sellafield site in the UK, and its current duties to support technically the operation of the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at Sellafield provides essential input to the design of the US NUEX-based facility. Development work for THORP and other first-of-kind nuclear plants employed miniature scale fully radioactive through large scale inactive pilot plants. The sequence of development work that we have found most successful is to (i) perform initial process development at small (typically 1/5000) scale in gloveboxes using trace active materials, (ii) demonstrate the processes at the same small scale with actual irradiated fuel in hot cells and (iii

  13. Pilot studies on management of ageing of nuclear power plant components: Results of Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    To facilitate cooperation between the IAEA Member States and thus to enhance the safety and reliability of operating nuclear plants the IAEA has initiated pilot studies on the management of ageing of four representative plant components: the primary nozzle of the reactor pressure vessel, a motor operated valve, the concrete containment building and instrumentation and control cables. Phase 1 of the studies has been completed and its results are presented in this report. The report documents current understanding of ageing and methods for monitoring and mitigation of this ageing for the above components, identifies existing knowledge and technology gaps and defines follow-up work to deal with these gaps. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Operation of a semi-technical pilot plant for nuclear aided steam gasification of coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, R.; Heek, K.H. van; Juentgen, H.; Peters, W.

    1984-01-01

    After intensive investigations on a small scale, the principle of the process has been tested in a semi-technical pilot plant. In its gasifier a fluidized bed of approx. 1 m 2 cross-section and of up to 4 m height is operated at 40 bar. Heat is supplied to the bed from an immersed heat exchanger with helium flowing through it, which is heated electrically. The plant was commissioned in 1976 and has been in hot operation for approx. 23000 h, over 13000 h whereof account for coal gasification. Roughly 1600 t of coal have been put through. During recent years the processing of German caking long-flame gas coal and the marked improvement of the process by the use of catalysts have been demonstrated successfully. (orig.)

  15. BWR mechanics and materials technology update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses technical results obtained from a variety of important programs underway at General Electric's Nuclear Engineering Division. The principal objective of these programs is to qualify and improve BWR product related technologies that fall broadly under the disciplines of Applied Mechanics and Materials Engineering. The paper identifies and deals with current technical issues that are of general importance to the LWR industry albeit the specific focus is directed to the development and qualification of analytical predictive methods and criteria, and improved materials for use in the design of the BWR. In this paper, specific results and accomplishments are summarized to provide a braod perspective of technology advances. Results are presented in sections which discuss: dynamic analysis and modeling; fatigue and fracture evaluation; materials engineering advances; and flow induced vibration. (orig.)

  16. Scale-up analysis and critical issues of an experimental pilot plant for edible film production using agricultural waste processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Sarghini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was developed to test a multifunctional experimental pilot plant with a reduced environmental impact that is able to process agricultural (fennel and food production (liquid whey waste. The pilot plant, using different thermal and filtration process parameters, is able to recover pectin and whey proteins in a single processing unit in order to produce edible films. An innovative feature of the proposed configuration is related to the possibility of coupling different types of waste treatment, obtaining a final product with a higher economical value, combining the two processing lines. Although an edible film production procedure based on pectin extracted from fennel matrix and whey proteins has already been published in literature, the scale-up process highlighted several critical issues, in particular related to the fennel matrix. Nonetheless, the pilot plant configuration allowed an edible film to be produced that is suitable for use as a direct coating to improve the shelf-life of food products.

  17. Select Generic Dry-Storage Pilot Plant Design for Safeguards and Security by Design (SSBD) per Used Fuel Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demuth, Scott Francis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sprinkle, James K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-26

    As preparation to the year-end deliverable (Provide SSBD Best Practices for Generic Dry-Storage Pilot Scale Plant) for the Work Package (FT-15LA040501–Safeguards and Security by Design for Extended Dry Storage), the initial step was to select a generic dry-storage pilot plant design for SSBD. To be consistent with other DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) activities, the Used Fuel Campaign was engaged for the selection of a design for this deliverable. For the work Package FT-15LA040501–“Safeguards and Security by Design for Extended Dry Storage”, SSBD will be initiated for the Generic Dry-Storage Pilot Scale Plant described by the layout of Reference 2. SSBD will consider aspects of the design that are impacted by domestic material control and accounting (MC&A), domestic security, and international safeguards.

  18. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility for the demonstration of the permanent isolation of transuranic radioactive wastes in a geologic formation. The facility was constructed in southeastern New Mexico in a manner intended to meet criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of transuranic wastes. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an application to demonstrate compliance with the requirements outlined in Title 40, Part 191 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. As mandated by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must evaluate this compliance application and provide a determination regarding compliance with the requirements within one year of receiving a complete application. Because the WIPP is a very complex program, the DOE has planned to submit the application as a draft in two parts. This strategy will allow for the DOE and the EPA to begin technical discussions on critical WIPP issues before the one-year compliance determination period begins. This report is the first of these two draft submittals

  19. Effect of heating strategy on power consumption and performance of a pilot plant anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Valle-Guadarrama, Salvador; Bombardiere, John; Domaschko, Max; Easter, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The effect of heating strategy on power consumption and performance of a pilot plant anaerobic digester treating chicken litter, under thermophilic conditions, has been studied. Heating strategy was evaluated using three different spans (0.2 degrees C, 0.6 degrees C, and 1.0 degree C) for triggering the temperature control system from target temperature (56.7 degrees C). The hydraulic retention time in the pilot plant digester was in the range of 32 to 37 days, varying the total solids concentration fed from 5% to 6%. The results showed that under the experimental conditions, heating was the most energy-demanding process with 95.5% of the energy used. Increments up to 7.5% and 3.8%, respectively, on mechanical and heating power consumption, were observed as the span, for triggering the temperature control system from target temperature, was increased. Under the experimental conditions studied here, an increment of 30.6% on the global biodigester performance index was observed when a span of 1.0 degree C was compared to the one of 0.2 degrees C.

  20. Reinvestigation into Closure Predictions of Room D at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedlunn, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Room D was an in-situ, isothermal, underground experiment conducted at theWaste Isolation Pilot Plant between 1984 and 1991. The room was carefully instrumented to measure the horizontal and vertical closure immediately upon excavation and for several years thereafter. Early finite element simulations of salt creep around Room D under predicted the vertical closure by 4.5×, causing investigators to explore a series of changes to the way Room D was modeled. Discrepancies between simulations and measurements were resolved through a series of adjustments to model parameters, which were openly acknowledged in published reports. Interest in Room D has been rekindled recently by the U.S./German Joint Project III and Project WEIMOS, which seek to improve the predictions of rock salt constitutive models. Joint Project participants calibrate their models solely against laboratory tests, and benchmark the models against underground experiments, such as room D. This report describes updating legacy Room D simulations to today’s computational standards by rectifying several numerical issues. Subsequently, the constitutive model used in previous modeling is recalibrated two different ways against a suite of new laboratory creep experiments on salt extracted from the repository horizon of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Simulations with the new, laboratory-based, calibrations under predict Room D vertical closure by 3.1×. A list of potential improvements is discussed.

  1. Reinvestigation into Closure Predictions of Room D at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedlunn, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-27

    Room D was an in-situ, isothermal, underground experiment conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant between 1984 and 1991. The room was carefully instrumented to measure the horizontal and vertical closure immediately upon excavation and for several years thereafter. Early finite element simulations of salt creep around Room D under-predicted the vertical closure by 4.5×, causing investigators to explore a series of changes to the way Room D was modeled. Discrepancies between simulations and measurements were resolved through a series of adjustments to model parameters, which were openly acknowledged in published reports. Interest in Room D has been rekindled recently by the U.S./German Joint Project III and Project WEIMOS, which seek to improve the predictions of rock salt constitutive models. Joint Project participants calibrate their models solely against laboratory tests, and benchmark the models against underground experiments, such as room D. This report describes updating legacy Room D simulations to today’s computational standards by rectifying several numerical issues. Subsequently, the constitutive model used in previous modeling is recalibrated two different ways against a suite of new laboratory creep experiments on salt extracted from the repository horizon of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Simulations with the new, laboratory-based, calibrations under-predict Room D vertical closure by 3.1×. A list of potential improvements is discussed.

  2. Study in pilot plant of the Itataia phosphoro-uraniferous ore (CE,Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Junior, J.B.; Aquino, J.A. de; Oliveira Luz, I.L. de

    1985-01-01

    Pilot plant data have been obtained for the physical treatment studies of the Itataia, phosphoro-uraniferous ore body located in the state of Ceara-Brazil. Due to the presence of the silic-carbonated gangue, which turns the ore complex, the pilot plant operation comprised 1200 hours. From the results obtained, it was possible to establish a basic flowsheet for the concentration process. Such process includes a grinding step (-65) followed by a cyclone disliming (d50 = 10μ). The cyclone underflow feeds the flotation step. The conventional flotation process, which envolves the direct phosphate flotation followed by cleaning steps, was not efficient due to the presence of the carbonated gangue. In fact, the presence of silicates and carbonates in the gangue required that the flotation would be carried out in two steps. The silicated gangue is eliminated in the first flotation and a phosphate concentrate with significant amount of carbonates is obtained. This concentrate is fed to the second flotation step, termed reverse flotation, where the calcite is floated and the apatite is depressed. (Author) [pt

  3. Study in pilot plant of the Itataia phosphoro-uraniferous ore - CE (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Junior, J.B.; Aquino, J.A. de; Oliveira Luz, I.L. de.

    1987-01-01

    Pilot plant data have been obtained for the physical treatment studies of the Itataia, phosphoro-uraniferous ore body located in the state of Ceara-Brazil. Due to the presence of the silic-carbonated gangue, which turns the ore complex, the pilot plant operation comprised 1200 hours. From the results obtained, it was possible to stablish a basic flowsheet for the concentration process. Such process includes a grinding step followed by a cyclone disliming (d 50 =10μm). The cyclone underflow feeds the flotation step. The conventional flotation process, which envolves the direct phosphate flotation followed by cleaning steps, was not efficient due to the presence of the carbonated gangue. In fact, the presence of silicates and carbonates in the gangue required that the flotation would be carried out in two steps. The silicated gangue is eliminated in the first flotation and a phosphate concentrate with significant amount of carbonates is obtained. This concentrate is fed to the second flotation step, termed reverse flotation, where the calcite is floated and the apatite is depressed. (Author) [pt

  4. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility for the demonstration of the permanent isolation of transuranic radioactive wastes in a geologic formation. The facility was constructed in southeastern New Mexico in a manner intended to meet criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of transuranic wastes. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an application to demonstrate compliance with the requirements outlined in Title 40, Part 191 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. As mandated by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must evaluate this compliance application and provide a determination regarding compliance with the requirements within one year of receiving a complete application. Because the WIPP is a very complex program, the DOE has planned to submit the application as a draft in two parts. This strategy will allow for the DOE and the EPA to begin technical discussions on critical WIPP issues before the one-year compliance determination period begins. This report is the first of these two draft submittals.

  5. 1100 MW BWR power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Now, the start-up test of No. 2 plant in Fukushima No. 2 Nuclear Power Station is smoothly in progress, and the start of its commercial operation is scheduled at the beginning of 1984. Here, the main features of No. 2 plant including piping design are explained. For No. 2 plant, many improving measures were adopted as the base plant of the improvement and standardization project of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, such as the adoption of Mark-2 improved PCV, the adoption of an intermediate loop in the auxiliary cooling system, one-body forging of the lower end cover of the reactor pressure vessel, the adoption of many curved pipes, the adoption of large one-body structural components in reactor recirculation system piping and so on, which are related to the reduction of radiation exposure and the improvement of plant reliability in operation and regular inspection. Also, in order to do general adjustment in the arrangement of equipment and piping and in route design, and to establish the rational construction work plan, model engineering was adopted. In No. 2 plant, a remote-controlled automatic and semiautomatic ultrasonic flaw detection system was adopted to reduce radiation exposure in in-service inspection. Automatic welding was adopted to improve the quality. (Kako, I.)

  6. Fiscal 1995 achievement report. Development of entrained bed coal gasification power plant (Part 4 - Pilot plant operation); 1995 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 4. Pilot plant unten sosa hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The 200 tons/day entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant constructed for establishing the technology of integrated coal gasification combined cycle was subjected to operational tests, and the fiscal 1995 results are compiled. In fiscal 1995, 1328 hours and 3 minutes (8 gasification operations) was recorded with gasification furnace facility, 899 hours and 53 minutes with the gas clean-up facility, 831 hours and 27 minutes with the gas turbine facility (11 startups for the generation of 6657 MWh), and 1958 hours and 2 minutes with the treatment furnace and 1331 hours and 10 minutes with the denitration unit of the safety/environment-related facility. The details of starts and stops were described in graphs which covered Runs D13, D14-1, D14-2, E1, D15, and A14. Operating procedures were studied and compiled for the plant start/stop schedule, general guidelines, gasification furnace facility, gas clean-up facility (dry type desulfurization facility), gas clean-up facility (dry type dedusting facility), gas turbine facility, real-pressure natural-size combustor test facility, and the safety/environment-related facility. (NEDO)

  7. FY 1992 report on the results of the development of an entrained bed coal gasification power plant. Part 4. Operation of pilot plant; 1992 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 4. Pilot plant unten sosa hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-01

    A record was summarized of the operation test study in FY 1992 of the 200 t/d entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant that was constructed with the aim of establishing technology of the integrated coal gasification combined cycle power generation. The operating hour of gasifier facilities in FY 1992 was 635 hours 19 minutes, and the number of times of gasification operation was 9. The operating hour of letting gas through to gas refining facilities was 549 hours 14 minutes. The operating hour of gas turbine facilities was 310 hours 18 minutes, and the generated output was 1,366.2 MWh. The operating hour of treatment furnace of safety environment facilities was 1,401 hours 4 minutes, and that of the denitrification system was 621 hours 24 minutes. As to the actual results of the start-up/stop, the paper detailedly recorded those of RUNs 10, 11, 12, 13 and D1. Further, operation manuals were made for the schedule of plant start-up/stop, gasifier facilities, gas refining facilities (dry desulfurization facilities), gas refining facilities (dry dedusting facilities), actual pressure/actual size combustor testing facilities and safety environment facilities. (NEDO)

  8. Fiscal 1994 achievement report. Development of entrained bed coal gasification power plant (Part 4 - Pilot plant operation); 1994 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 4. Pilot plant unten sosa hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The 200 tons/day entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant constructed for the establishment of the technology of integrated coal gasification combined cycle power generation was operated for testing, and the results are put together. Operating hours recorded were 1347 hours and 7 minutes for the gasification furnace facility (7 gasification operations), 752 hours and 22 minutes for the gas clean-up facilities, 425 hours and 20 minutes for the gas turbine facility (6 startups for generating 2616.1 MWh), and 1852 hours for the treatment furnace and 1304 hours and 32 minutes for the denitration system in the safety/environment-related facility. Detailed graphs were drawn for the description of starts and stops in Run D8, Run D9 (1-3), Run D10, Run D11, and in Run D12. Operating procedures were studied and then compiled for the plant start-stop schedule, general guidelines, gasification furnace facility, gas clean-up facility (dry type desulfurization facility), gas clean-up facility (dry type dedusting facility), gas turbine facility, real-pressure natural-size combustor test facility, and for the safety/environment related facility. (NEDO)

  9. Accounting strategy of tritium inventory in the heavy water detritiation pilot plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidica, N.; Stefanescu, I.; Cristescu, I.; Bornea, A.; Zamfirache, M.; Lazar, A.; Vasut, F.; Pearsica, C.; Stefan, I.; Prisecaru, I.; Sindilar, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology for determination of tritium inventory in a tritium removal facility. The method proposed is based on the developing of computing models for accountancy of the mobile tritium inventory in the separation processes, of the stored tritium and of the trapped tritium inventory in the structure of the process system components. The configuration of the detritiation process is a combination of isotope catalytic exchange between water and hydrogen (LPCE) and the cryogenic distillation of hydrogen isotopes (CD). The computing model for tritium inventory in the LPCE process and the CD process will be developed basing on mass transfer coefficients in catalytic isotope exchange reactions and in dual-phase system (liquid-vapour) of hydrogen isotopes distillation process. Accounting of tritium inventory stored in metallic hydride will be based on in-bed calorimetry. Estimation of the trapped tritium inventory can be made by subtraction of the mobile and stored tritium inventories from the global tritium inventory of the plant area. Determinations of the global tritium inventory of the plant area will be made on a regular basis by measuring any tritium quantity entering or leaving the plant area. This methodology is intended to be applied to the Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea (Romania) and to the Cernavoda Tritium Removal Facility (which will be built in the next 5-7 years). (authors)

  10. Passive BWR integral LOCA testing at the Karlstein test facility INKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, Robert [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Wagner, Thomas [AREVA GmbH, Karlstein am Main (Germany); Leyer, Stephan [TH Univ. of Applied Sciences, Deggendorf (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    KERENA is an innovative AREVA GmbH boiling water reactor (BWR) with passive safety systems (Generation III+). In order to verify the functionality of the reactor design an experimental validation programme was executed. Therefore the INKA (Integral Teststand Karlstein) test facility was designed and erected. It is a mockup of the BWR containment with integrated pressure suppression system. In March 2013 the first integral test - Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) - was executed. The main target was to demonstrate the ability of the passive systems to ensure core coverage, decay heat removal and to maintain the containment within defined limits. The results of the test showed that the passive safety systems are capable to bring the plant to stable conditions meeting all required safety targets with sufficient margins. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of radiological consequences in a typical BWR with a mark-II containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funayama, Kyoko; Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro

    2003-01-01

    INS/NUPEC in Japan has been carrying out the Level 3 PSA program. In the program, the MACCS2 code has been extensively applied to analyze radiological consequences for typical BWR and PWR plants in Japan. The present study deals with analysis of effects of the AMs, which were implemented by industries, on radiological consequence for a typical BWR with a Mark-II containment. In the present study, source terms and their frequencies of source terms were used based on results of Level 2 PSA taking into account AM countermeasures. Radiological consequences were presented with dose risks (Sv/ry), which were multiplied doses (Sv) by containment damage frequencies (/ry), and timing of radionuclides release to the environment. The results of the present study indicated that the dose risks became negligible in most cases taking AM countermeasures and evacuations. (author)

  12. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  13. Development of alternative materials for BWR fuel springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruma, Y.; Osato, T.; Yamazaki, K.

    2002-01-01

    Major sources of radioactivity introduced into reactor water of BWR were estimated fuel crud and in-core materials (especially, fuel springs). Fuel springs are used for fixation of fuel cladding tubes with spacer grid. Those are small parts (total length is only within 25 mm) and so many numbers are loaded simultaneously and then total surfaces area are calculated up to about 200 m 2 . Fuel springs are located under high radiation field and high oxidative environment. Conventional fuel spring is made of alloy-X750 which is one of nickel-based alloy and is reported to show relatively higher corrosion release rate. 58 Co and 60 Co will be released directly into reactor water from intensely radio-activated fuel springs surface and increase radioactivity concentrations in primary coolant. Corrosion release control from fuel springs is an important technical item and a development of alternative material instead of alloy-X750 for fuel spring is a key subject to achieve ultra low man-rem exposure BWR plant. In present work, alloy-X718 which started usage for PWR fuel springs and stainless steel type 316L which has many mechanical property data are picked up for alternative materials and compared their corrosion behaviors with conventional material. Corrosion experiment was conducted under vapor-water two phases flow which is simulated fuel cladding surface boiling condition. After exposure, corrosion film formed under corrosion test was analyzed in detail and corrosion film amount and corrosion release amount are estimated among three materials. (authors)

  14. Effect of different plant species in pilot constructed wetlands for wastewater reuse in agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbagallo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the first results of an experiment carried out in Southern Italy (Sicily on the evapotranspiration (ET and removal in constructed wetlands with five plant species are presented. The pilot plant used for this study is made of twelve horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands (each with a surface area of 4.5 m2 functioning in parallel, and it is used for tertiary treatment of part of the effluents from a conventional municipal wastewater treatment plant (trickling filter. Two beds are unplanted (control while ten beds are planted with five different macrophyte species: Cyperus papyrus, Vetiveria zizanoides, Miscanthus x giganteus, Arundo donax and Phragmites australis (i.e., every specie is planted in two beds to have a replication. The influent flow rate is measured in continuous by an electronic flow meter. The effluent is evaluated by an automatic system that measure the discharged volume for each bed. Physical, chemical and microbiological analyses were carried out on wastewater samples collected at the inlet of CW plant and at the outlet of the twelve beds. An automatic weather station is installed close to the experimental plant, measuring air temperature, wind speed and direction, rainfall, global radiation, relative humidity. This allows to calculate the reference Evapotranspiration (ET0 with the Penman-Monteith formula, while the ET of different plant species is measured through the water balance of the beds. The first results show no great differences in the mean removal performances of the different plant species for TSS, COD and E.coli, ranged from, respectively, 82% to 88%, 60% to 64% and 2.7 to 3.1 Ulog. The average removal efficiency of nutrient (64% for TN; 61 for NH4-N, 31% for PO4-P in the P.australis beds was higher than that other beds. From April to November 2012 ET measured for plant species were completely different from ET0 and ETcontrol, underlining the strong effect of vegetation. The cumulative

  15. Strategies of operation cycles in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, D.; Sendino, F.

    1996-01-01

    The article analyzes the operation cycles in BWR type reactors. The cycle size of operation is the consequence on the optimization process of the costs with the technical characteristics of nuclear fuel and the characteristics of demand and production. The authors analyze the cases of Garona NP and Cofrentes NP, both with BWR reactors. (Author)

  16. GPE-BWR and the containment venting and filtering issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, J.; Santiago, J. de

    1988-01-01

    The Spanish Boiling Water Reactor Owner's Group (GPE-BWR) is formed by three utilities, owning four units: Santa Maria de Garona (46 MWe, BWR3, Mark I containment), Cofrentes (975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) and Valdecaballeros (2x975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) - all of the reactors having been supplied by General Electric. One of the GPE-BWR's several committees is the Safety and Licensing Committee, which follows up the evolution of severe accident topics and particularly the containment venting and filtering issue. In September 1987, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), the Spanish Regulatory Body, asked the GPE-BWR to define its position on the installation of a containment venting system. The GPE-BWR created a Working Group which presented a Report on Containment Venting to the CSN in January 1987 gathered from: the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); some US utilities; and several European countries, especially France, Germany and Sweden. CSN's review of the containment venting Report and the Action Plan proposed by the GPE-BWR finished in April 1988. The conclusion of the Report and the proposed Action Plan take into account the US NRC's identified open items on severe accidents and the R and D programs scheduled to close these items

  17. Pilot plant development of a new catalytic process for improved electrostatic separation of fly-ash in coal fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivares del Valle, J.; Salvador Martinez, L.; Muniz Baum, B.; Cortes Galeano, V. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain). Chemical and Environmental Engineering Dept.

    1996-12-31

    A new catalytic process for flue gas conditioning in pulverized coal fired power plants is outlined. Vanadium and platinum catalysts specifically prepared on ceramic honeycomb monoliths to oxidize SO{sub 2} into SO{sub 3} have been tested and evaluated at pilot scale. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Coolant Density and Control Blade History Effects in Extended BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase investigates the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used for spent fuel pools to spent fuel storage and transportation casks and the validation of reactivity (keff) calculations and predicted spent fuel compositions. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents work performed to date investigating some aspects of extended BUC. (The technical basis for application of peak reactivity methods to BWR fuel in storage and transportation systems is presented in a companion paper.) Two reactor operating parameters are being evaluated to establish an adequate basis for extended BWR BUC: (1) the effect of axial void profile and (2) the effect of control blade utilization during operation. A detailed analysis of core simulator data for one cycle of a modern operating BWR plant was performed to determine the range of void profiles and the variability of the profile experienced during irradiation. Although a single cycle does not provide complete data, the data obtained are sufficient to determine the primary effects and to identify conservative modeling approaches. These data were used in a study of the effect of axial void profile. The first stage of the study was determination of the necessary moderator density temporal fidelity in depletion modeling. After the required temporal fidelity was established, multiple void profiles were used to examine the effect on cask reactivity. The results of these studies are being used to develop recommendations for conservatively modeling the void profile effects for BWR depletion calculations. The second operational parameter studied was control blade history. Control blades are inserted in

  19. Hanford site as it relates to an alternative site for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: an environmental description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fecht, K.R.

    1978-12-01

    The use of basalt at Hanford as an alternative for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) would require that the present Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) at Hanford be expanded to incorporate the planned WIPP functions, namely the permanent storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes. This report discusses: program costs, demography, ecology, climatology, physiography, hydrology, geology, seismology, and historical and archeological sites

  20. Hanford site as it relates to an alternative site for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: an environmental description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecht, K.R. (ed.)

    1978-12-01

    The use of basalt at Hanford as an alternative for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) would require that the present Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) at Hanford be expanded to incorporate the planned WIPP functions, namely the permanent storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes. This report discusses: program costs, demography, ecology, climatology, physiography, hydrology, geology, seismology, and historical and archeological sites. (DLC)

  1. Production of mineral concentrates from animal manure using reverse osmosis : monitoring of pilot plants in 2012-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, P.; Buisonjé, de F.E.

    2015-01-01

    From 2009 to 2011 the agricultural, economic and environmental effects of the production and use of mineral concentrates, produced from animal slurry, were studied. Part of the study was the monitoring of the 8 participating full-scale (pilot) plants to assess the chemical composition of the half

  2. Pilot plant for the radioactive decontamination of spent oils; Planta piloto para la descontaminacion radiactiva de aceites gastados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores E, R.M.; Ortiz O, H.V.; Cisneros L, L.; Lopez G, R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    In this work the operation parameters obtained in the laboratory of oil storage are presented, as well as the operations which shape the pilot plant, the design criteria and the basic design of the core equipment of the developed process. Finally, the comparative results obtained the decontamination process of oil are given as well as laboratory scale. (Author)

  3. Existing conditions socioeconomic portion. Waste isolation pilot plant environmental impact report, chapter 2, sections 2.2, 2.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The population characteristics and the economic setting of Eddy and Lea Counties, New Mexico, are reviewed as related to site selection for a radioactive waste isolation pilot plant. Sections are included on population distribution, basic industries, trade and services, financial resources, personal income, tourism, labor force, employment, land use, water systems, utilities, transportation, and local government

  4. The Purlex process - a description of the pilot plant leading to the use of the process in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunley, T.H.; Faure, A.

    1969-01-01

    This report briefly describes the pilot plant and highlights the important findings of the testwork. Particular attention is paid to the problems which arose during the two-year period of operation and the steps taken to solve these problems. Average values are given for the important parameters for the various test periods

  5. Research cooperation project on environmentally friendly technology for highly efficient mineral resources extraction and treatment. Detail design for pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Photographs and drawings were edited into a book in relation with a joint project for environment preservation technologies in high-efficiency extraction and treatment of mineral resources, and detail design for a pilot plant. The book classified the related devices into fabricated devices, purchased devices and electrical devices, and contains detailed drawings and photographs thereof. (NEDO)

  6. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

  7. 10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant: collector subsystem foundation construction. Revision No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-18

    Bid documents are provided for the construction of the collector subsystem foundation of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant, including invitation to bid, bid form, representations and certifications, construction contract, and labor standards provisions of the Davis-Bacon Act. Instructions to bidders, general provisions and general conditions are included. Technical specifications are provided for the construction. (LEW)

  8. Determination of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and institutional requirements documents for contact-handled (CH) critical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This document lists the critical requirements documents applicable to the receipt of contact-handled waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. It also describes the processes used to determine the applicability of each document. This analysis is based on the applicable documents that were in effect in the February 1988 time frame. 2 refs

  9. New conceptual method in maintenance with application in cryogenics pilot plant (CPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghel, Vasile

    2006-01-01

    Full text: This study concluded with a series of suggestions concerning the methodology of maintaining a Cryogenics Nuclear Plant where the maintenance is either fundamental or only of importance. The implementation of this methodology can be achieved in two main steps. The first step concerns the conception of the scientific basis for maintenance, while the second step regards the implementation. The first step describes the management of maintenance in conditions of quality, risk and cost constraints. The conditions are established on the basis of a project of research in maintenance. The second step notifies the aspects of design and technology in maintenance of nuclear industrial units. The nuclear complex technical systems of the Cryogenics Pilot Plant at ICSI - Rm Valcea implies the development of some dedicated software, to ensure the designing, realization and operation of the plant, and prototypes of integrated software modules, to ensure the systems operation during of the life cycle. The implementation method is based on vibration analyses and mechanical studies while a flexible data acquisition system for monitoring, and control must be developed as a platform to ensure a more precise diagnosis and prediction of machinery malfunction. With a flexible data acquisition and analysis system in operation it is possible to easily increase the number of input channels. (author)

  10. Radiation effects-prevalence of contributory risk factors a pilot study in Visakhapthnam steel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshman rao, K. V.

    2004-01-01

    Integrated Steel Plants contribute significant air pollution, water pollution and solid waste generation. Diverse occupational health hazards present is steel industry pose ill effects to the industrial workers. Occupational health services and research center (OHS and RC) of this plant established in the year 1992 to protect the health and well-being of all the employees working in different occupations. the primary role OHS and RC is to conduct periodical medical examinations, monitoring of the working environments, suggest the suitable personal protective equipment to the workers, evaluate risk factors, work practices, risk management and industrial toxicological studies. Dissemination of information related to occupational health and safety to the working population through regular educational sessions at the workplaces as at training and development center (T and DC) is also part of our services. The proneness for effects of exposure to ionizing radiation is enhanced by various factors related to the family history of chronic diseases, nutritional status of the individuals, the lifestyle factors apart from psycho-social factors like illiteracy, ignorance, negligence and inadequate utilization of personal protective equipment (PPE) at workplace. To evaluate the prevalence of such contributory risk factors, a pilot study has been conducted in Visakhapatnam Steel Plant. The data is obtained through routine periodical medical examination of workers at the Occupational Health Services Center through standard format. The study revealed statistically high prevalence of the risk factors and indicated the necessity of intensifying primary prevention methods in addition to environmental control and usage of PPE. (Author)

  11. Radiation effects-prevalence of contributory risk factors a pilot study in Visakhapthnam steel plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshman rao, K. V.

    2004-07-01

    Integrated Steel Plants contribute significant air pollution, water pollution and solid waste generation. Diverse occupational health hazards present is steel industry pose ill effects to the industrial workers. Occupational health services and research center (OHS and RC) of this plant established in the year 1992 to protect the health and well-being of all the employees working in different occupations. the primary role OHS and RC is to conduct periodical medical examinations, monitoring of the working environments, suggest the suitable personal protective equipment to the workers, evaluate risk factors, work practices, risk management and industrial toxicological studies. Dissemination of information related to occupational health and safety to the working population through regular educational sessions at the workplaces as at training and development center (T and DC) is also part of our services. The proneness for effects of exposure to ionizing radiation is enhanced by various factors related to the family history of chronic diseases, nutritional status of the individuals, the lifestyle factors apart from psycho-social factors like illiteracy, ignorance, negligence and inadequate utilization of personal protective equipment (PPE) at workplace. To evaluate the prevalence of such contributory risk factors, a pilot study has been conducted in Visakhapatnam Steel Plant. The data is obtained through routine periodical medical examination of workers at the Occupational Health Services Center through standard format. The study revealed statistically high prevalence of the risk factors and indicated the necessity of intensifying primary prevention methods in addition to environmental control and usage of PPE. (Author)

  12. Operation of a pilot plant for the maize desinfestation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedad Beneitez, A. de la.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes the components and the operation of a pilot plant for radiation disinfestation of maize that has been set up at the Van de Graaff Accelerator Laboratory of the Physics Institute (Mexican National Autonomous University). The Laboratory is operated jointly by the Physics Institute and Technology Programme (National Nuclear Energy Institute). A section is included on the fundamentals and terminology relating to the applications of radiation. The present status of radiation disinfestation of maize in other countries is described, together with what has been achieved at this Laboratory. Another section deals in detail with the main components of the plant and its operation. Finally, the authors describe the experiments carried out with the plant to establish optimum conditions of operation prior to the irradiation of maize on a major scale. One such experiment involved determining the uniformity of the beam over the irradiation zone, for which purpose polyvinyl chloride films were used as dosimeters. The dose received by the maize in a single run past the irradiation head was likewise determined from the thermoluminescent response of powdered lithium fluoride irradiated in capsules along with the maize kernels. (author)

  13. Historical Background on the Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RECHARD, ROBERT P.

    1999-01-01

    In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the U.S. Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a Research and development facility for the safe management storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and after site selection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance. assessment conducted in 1996, which is summarized in this special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This paper provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project

  14. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental-Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) identifies the quality of data necessary to meet the specific objectives associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental-Waste Characterization Program (the Program). DOE plans to conduct experiments in the WIPP during a Test Phase of approximately 5 years. These experiments will be conducted to reduce the uncertainties associated with the prediction of several processes (e.g., gas generation) that may influence repository performance. The results of the experiments will be used to assess the ability of the WIPP to meet regulatory requirements for the long-term protection of human health and the environment from the disposal of TRU wastes. 37 refs., 25 figs., 18 tabs

  15. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental-Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) identifies the quality of data necessary to meet the specific objectives associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental-Waste Characterization Program (the Program). This experimental-waste characterization program is only one part of the WIPP Test Phase, both in the short- and long-term, to quantify and evaluate the characteristics and behavior of transuranic (TRU) wastes in the repository environment. Other parts include the bin-scale and alcove tests, drum-scale tests, and laboratory experiments. In simplified terms, the purpose of the Program is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data describing the characteristics of the wastes that will be emplaced in the WIPP, while the remaining WIPP Test Phase is directed at examining the behavior of these wastes in the repository environment. 50 refs., 35 figs., 33 tabs

  16. Transporting transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Risk and cost perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biwer, B. M.; Gilette, J. L.; Poch, L. A.; Suermann, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an authorized US Department of Energy (DOE) research and development facility constructed near the city of Carlsbad in southeastern New Mexico. The facility is intended to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste resulting from US defense activities. Under the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA), federal lands surrounding the WIPP facility were withdrawn from all public use and the title of those lands was transferred to the Secretary of Energy. The DOE's TRU waste is stored, and in some cases is still being generated, at 10 large-quantity and 13 small-quantity sites across the US. After applicable certification requirements have been met, the TRU waste at these sites will be sent to the WIPP to initiate the disposal phase of the facility, which according to current planning is projected to last for approximately 35 years

  17. Geomechanical monitoring system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francke, J.L.; Carrasco, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the geomechanical instrumentation system and the database that has been established from the geomechanical monitoring program. In addition, it describes the quality assurance and control measures that are in place to ensure that the data from the underground is accurate, traceable, and defensible. The system is installed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico. This facility is being developed for the disposal of transuranic nuclear wastes in underground excavations in salt 655 meters below the surface. The purpose of the instrumentation system, is to monitor the deformations and stress changes that are occurring in the rock with time. This information is needed to routinely assess conditions in the facility and to ensure that safe operating conditions are maintained. The geomechanical monitoring system has provided data collection, quality control, and database maintenance, all of which are of vital importance to monitoring the geomechanical performance of underground excavations

  18. Geomechanical monitoring system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francke, J.L.; Cook, R.F.; Carrasco, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the geomechanical instrumentation system and the data base that has been established from the geomechanical monitoring program. In addition, it describes the quality assurance and control measures that are in place to ensure that the data from the underground is accurate, traceable, and defensible. The system is installed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico. This facility is being developed for the disposal of transuranic nuclear wastes in underground excavations in salt 2150 feet below the surface. The purpose of the instrumentation system is to monitor the deformations and stress changes that are occurring in the rock with time. This information is needed to routinely assess conditions in the facility and to ensure that safe operating conditions are maintained

  19. A formal expert judgment procedure for performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauth, K.M.; Guzowski, R.V.; Hora, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an experimental facility located in southeastern New Mexico. It has been designed to determine the feasibility of the geologic disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in a deep bedded-salt formation. The WIPP was also designed for disposal and will operate in that capacity if approved. The WIPP Performance Assessment Department at Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting analyses to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. These analyses sometimes require the use of expert judgment. This Department has convened several expert-judgment panels and from that experience has developed an internal quality-assurance procedure to guide the formal elicitation of expert judgment. This protocol is based on the principles found in the decision-analysis literature

  20. Hydraulic Testing of Salado Formation Evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, Richard L.; Domski, Paul S.; Roberts, Randall M.

    1999-07-01

    This report presents interpretations of hydraulic tests conducted in bedded evaporates of the Salado Formation from May 1992 through May 1995 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP is a US Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic wastes from the nation's defense programs. The WIPP disposal horizon is located in the lower portion of the Permian Salado Formation. The hydraulic tests discussed in this report were performed in the WIPP underground facility by INTERA inc. (now Duke Engineering and Services, Inc.), Austin, Texas, following the Field Operations Plan and Addendum prepared by Saulnier (1988, 1991 ) under the technical direction of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  1. Testing a predictive model for repository cost-- the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, L.H.; Lazur, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a series of cost estimating models (called FAST), originally under the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy and currently under the direction of Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs. One model, an equipment estimating methodology, was used extensively to test the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) equipment estimate validity. A mining and total repository estimating model has also been developed. Along with the other information sources, WIPP design and historical experience were used extensively in the development of this model. The primary focus of this paper will be on the progress of the WIPP Project and the state-of-the-art cost modeling of geologic waste storage facilities

  2. The evolution of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project's public affairs program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    As a first-of-a-kind facility, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) presents a unique perspective on the value of designing a public affairs program that grown with and complements a project's evolution from construction to operations. Like the project itself, the public affairs programs progressed through several stages to its present scope. During the construction phase, foundations were laid in the community. Then, in this past year as the project entered a preoperational status, emphasis shifted to broaden the positive image that had been created locally. In this stage, public affairs presented the project's positive elements to the various state agencies, government officials, and federal organizations involved in our country's radioactive waste management program. Most recently, and continuing until receipt of the first shipment of waste in October 1988, an even broader, more aggressive public affairs program is planned

  3. Progress in long-lived radioactive waste management and disposal at the waste isolation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Matthews, M.L.; Eriksson, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    The Salado Formation is buried more than 350 m beneath the sands and cacti of the Chihuahuan Desert and hosts the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) deep geological repository at a depth of approximately 650 m. Since the WIPP repository is at least 10 years ahead of any other repository development for long-lived radioactive waste, other radioactive waste management organizations and institutions could benefit both scientifically and politically from sharing the lessons learned at WIPP. Benefits would include using existing expertise and facilities to cost-effectively address and solve program-specific issues and to train staff. The characteristics of the WIPP repository and infrastructure are described in this paper. (author)

  4. Design analysis of engineered alternatives for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, J.; Djordjevic, S.; Adams, M.; Spangler, L.; Valdez, J.; Vetter, D.; Drez, P.

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of several engineered alternatives, designed to enhance the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), were evaluated relative to the performance of the baseline design. This evaluation was performed using a computer program referred to as the Design Analysis Model which couples salt creep closure, brine inflow, gas generation and dissipation to realistically simulate these interrelated processes over a 10,000 year period following the decommissioning of the repository. Analyses of the baseline design and nine alternative designs were performed for the undisturbed repository conditions, as well as three human intrusion events. Improvements in repository performance of up to four orders of magnitude were predicted for various engineered alternative waste forms. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  5. A formal expert judgment procedure for performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauth, K.M.; Guzowski, R.V.; Hora, S.C.

    1994-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an experimental facility located in southeastern New Mexico. It has been designed to determine the feasibility of the geologic disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in a deep bedded-salt formation. The WIPP was also designed for disposal and will operate in that capacity if approved. The WIPP Performance Assessment Department at Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting analyses to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. These analyses sometimes require the use of expert judgment. This Department has convened several expert-judgment panels and from that experience has developed an internal quality-assurance procedure to guide the formal elicitation of expert judgment. This protocol is based on the principles found in the decision-analysis literature

  6. Distillation Parameters for Pilot Plant Production of Laurus nobilis Essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temel Özek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils have increasing importance in flavour and fragrance industries. They are obtained by distillation techniques. In order to produce an oil with market potential its optimum production parameters have to be well known prior to its commercial production. Determination of the steam distillation parameters of commercially available Laurel leaves oil in pilot plant scale is described. The effect of steam rate and processing time play a major role in distillation of essential oils. Distillation speed was high in the beginning of the process, then gradually reduced as the distillation proceeded. The main component of the oil of Laurel leaf oil was 1,8-cineole accumulating significantly in the early fractions.

  7. Historical Background on the Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RECHARD, ROBERT P

    1999-10-21

    In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the U.S. Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a Research and development facility for the safe management storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and after site selection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance. assessment conducted in 1996, which is summarized in this special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This paper provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project.

  8. Technical basis for external dosimetry at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, E.W.; Wu, C.F.; Goff, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    The WIPP External Dosimetry Program, administered by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division, for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides external dosimetry support services for operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site. These operations include the receipt, experimentation with, storage, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes. This document describes the technical basis for the WIPP External Radiation Dosimetry Program. The purposes of this document are to: (1) provide assurance that the WIPP External Radiation Dosimetry Program is in compliance with all regulatory requirements, (2) provide assurance that the WIPP External Radiation Dosimetry Program is derived from a sound technical base, (3) serve as a technical reference for radiation protection personnel, and (4) aid in identifying and planning for future needs. The external radiation exposure fields are those that are documented in the WIPP Final Safety Analysis Report

  9. Properties and Performance of SOFCs Produced on a Pre-Pilot Plant Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke; Menon, Mohan; Barfod, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, anode supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), produced on a pre-pilot plant scale in ten batches of ∼100 cells, are characterised with respect to performance. The main purpose was to evaluate the reproducibility of the scaled-up process. Based on 20 tests, the average area...... specific cell resistance at 850 °C was found to be 0.24 Ω cm2 with a standard deviation of 0.05 Ω cm2. The variation in performance between the cells can be largely attributed to variations in the cathode performance. Experimental evidence will be presented on full 4 × 4 cm2 cells, symmetric cells with two...... cathodes on a YSZ strip, and a special cell with a divided cathode....

  10. Operational readiness/risk assessment at the waste isolation pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, T.K.

    1988-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is currently preparing to enter its operational phase. In preparation, a risk-based management (RBM) program is being developed to ensure maximum safety and reliability of all aspects of facility operation. Training of workers, preparation of procedures, and development of emergency action plans are examples of activities currently being performed. The RBM program will verify the safety and operability of the facility prior to startup. Planned as part of the RBM is the selective application of the following risk assessment technologies: 1. operational readiness reviews, 2. vulnerability analyses, 3. safety analyses, 4. probabilistic risk assessments, 5. risk/benefit analyses. These tools provide a meaningful risk and operability analysis for startup and a useful end product for managing safety during facility operation.

  11. Recovery of protactinium-231 and thorium-230 from cotter concentrate: pilot plant operatins and process development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, M.R.; Figgins, P.E.; Deal, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The equipment and methods used to recover and purify 339 g of thorium-230 and 890 mg of protactinium-231 from 22 of the 1251 drums of Cotter Concentrate are described. The process developed was (1) dissolution at 100 0 C in concentrated nitric acid and dilution to 2 to 3 molar acid, (2) filtration to remove undissolved solids (mostly silica filter aid), (3) extraction of uranium with di-sec-butyl-phenyl phophonate (DSBPP) in carbon tetrachloride, (4) extraction of both thorium and protactinium with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in carbon tetrachloride followed by selective stripping of the thorium with dilute of sulfuric acid, (5) thorium purification using oxalic acid, (6) stripping protactinium from the TOPO with oxalic acid, and (7) protactinium purification through a sequence of steps. The development of the separation procedures, the design of the pilot plant, and the operating procedures are described in detail. Analytical procedures are given in an appendix. 8 figures, 4 tables

  12. Characterization of subjective uncertainty in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HELTON,JON CRAIG; MARTELL,MARY-ALENA; TIERNEY,MARTIN S.

    2000-05-18

    The 1996 performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) maintains a separation between stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty, with stochastic uncertainty arising from the possible disruptions that could occur at the WIPP over the 10,000 yr regulatory period specified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 191,40 CFR 194) and subjective uncertainty arising from an inability to uniquely characterize many of the inputs required in the 1996 WIPP PA. The characterization of subjective uncertainty is discussed, including assignment of distributions, uncertain variables selected for inclusion in analysis, correlation control, sample size, statistical confidence on mean complementary cumulative distribution functions, generation of Latin hypercube samples, sensitivity analysis techniques, and scenarios involving stochastic and subjective uncertainty.

  13. Limestone/adipic acid FGD and stack opacity reduction pilot plant tests at Big Rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laslo, D.; Bakke, E.; Chisholm, E.

    1984-01-01

    Big Rivers Electric Corporation (BREC) contracted Peabody Process Systems, Inc. (PPSI) to install a flue gas cleaning (FGC) pilot plant at the BREC R.D. Green Station Unit No. 2 located at Sebree, KY. A six month test program was completed demonstrating technology for: alternatives to using lime as an alkali; methods for improving cake dewatering; identification of the causes of high stack opacity; and methods for the reduction of high stack opacity. This paper presents highlights extracted from the reports submitted by PPSI to BREC on this test program. BREC was primarily interested in reduction of operating costs, if possible, by using an alkali less expensive than lime, and by improving the poor dewatering characteristic inherent in a dolomitic lime system. BREC was also within compliance for particulate emissions and opacity in the duct after the dry electrostatic precipitator, but not in compliance with the stack opacity regulation, and therefore wanted to investigate methods for stack opacity reduction.

  14. Modification of the ventilation system at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    The WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) Project near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a research and development project sponsored by the US Department of Energy, designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive waste. A mine (repository) is being developed 2,150 feet below the surface in a thick salt bed, which will serve as the disposal medium. The underground ventilation system for the WIPP project was originally designed based on a fixed project scope. The design criteria and ventilation requirements were developed for the performance of various activities as then envisioned towards the achievement of this goal. However, in light of new information and actual site-specific experience at WIPP leading to a clearer definition of the scope-related programs and activities, it was realized that the existing ventilation system may need to be modified

  15. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase supplemental environmental impact statement. Implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The Implementation Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) has two primary purposes: (1) To report on the results of the scoping process (2) To provide guidance for preparing SEIS-II SEIS-II will be the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review for WIPP's disposal phase. Chapter 1 of this plan provides background on WIPP and this NEPA review. Chapter 2 describes the purpose and need for action by the Department of Energy (hereafter DOE or the Department), as well as a description of the Proposed Action and alternatives being considered. Chapter 3 describes the work plan, including the schedule, responsibilities, and planned consultations with other agencies and organizations. Chapter 4 describes the scoping process, presents major issues identified during the scoping process, and briefly indicates how issues will be addressed in SEIS-II

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) monitors a comprehensive set of parameters in order to detect any potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future quantitative environmental impact evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, soil, and biotics are measured for background radiation. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include meteorological, air quality, soil properties, and the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the site with emphasis on the salt storage pile, whereas baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in a preoperational state, no waste has been received; therefore, certain elements required by Order DOE 5400.1 are not presented in this report. 15 figs. 19 tabs.

  17. Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

    1994-07-01

    Scenario development is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence in this aspect of the PA will be through the use of the systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable

  18. Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

    2011-07-01

    Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

  19. Tests of model Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site exhaust airflow systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, W.D.; McFarland, A.R.; Glass, M.G.; Ortiz, C.A.; O'Neal, D.L.; Somasundaram, S.; Anand, N.K.; DeOtte, R.E. Jr.

    1988-09-01

    Scale-models of the proposed above-ground, exhaust ventilation system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site were developed and evaluated. The basic scale ratios were 1:5 for physical size and 1:25 for flow rate. Thus, the basic laboratory model testing had the same nominal velocities as the prototype, but had Reynolds numbers 1/5 that of the prototype. However, some special tests were conducted with models that provided a relatively close matching of the prototype Reynolds numbers. The purposes of the testing were to recommend locations for the aerosol samplers and to determine the expected velocity and concentration profiles at those locations. Flow straighteners were also to be investigated to determine their effectiveness for this application. 7 refs., 157 figs

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) monitors a comprehensive set of parameters in order to detect any potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future quantitative environmental impact evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, soil, and biotics are measured for background radiation. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include meteorological, air quality, soil properties, and the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the site with emphasis on the salt storage pile, whereas baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in a preoperational state, no waste has been received; therefore, certain elements required by Order DOE 5400.1 are not presented in this report. 15 figs. 19 tabs

  1. Development of quality assurance and performance testing for the Process Experimental Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.; McDaniel, E.W.; Robinson, S.M.

    1984-08-01

    The Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) is planned for operation by EG and G Idaho, Inc., to demonstrate a full-scale, cement-based, disposal process for transuranic (TRU) wastes. Procedures need to be developed to determine the quality of the waste product during processing and the durability of the final waste form produced in this facility. This report summarizes basic guidelines for the selection of the waste form composition and process conditions that affect product performance. Physical property tests that may be applicable for quality assurance during processing are also described. Approaches to accelerated performance tests needed to predict the performance of the cement-based waste form are identified, and suggestions are made for the development of processing tests to ensure the quality of the final waste-host product. 29 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  2. Development of quality assurance and performance testing for the Process Experimental Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.; McDaniel, E.W.; Robinson, S.M.

    1984-06-01

    The Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) is planned for operation by EG and G Idaho, Inc., to demonstrate a full-scale, cement-based, disposal process for transuranic (TRU) wastes. Procedures need to be developed to determine the quality of the waste product during processing and the durability of the final waste form produced in this facility. This report summarizes basic guidelines for the selection of the waste form composition and process conditions that affect product performance. Physical property tests that may be applicable for quality assurance during processing are also described. Approaches to accelerated performance tests needed to predict the performance of the cement-based waste form are identified, and suggestions are made for the development of processing tests to assure the quality of the final waste-host product. 29 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  3. Environmental management assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Carlsbad, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This document contains the results of the Environmental Management Assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Assessment was conducted by EH-24 from July 19 through July 30, 1993 to advise the Secretary of Energy of the adequacy of management systems established at WIPP to ensure the protection of the environment and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE environmental requirements. The mission of WIPP is to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from the management and operating contractors. This assessment revealed that WIPP`s environmental safety and health programs are satisfactory, and that all levels of the Waste Isolation Division (WID) management and staff consistently exhibit a high level of commitment to achieve environmental excellence.

  4. General description and production lines of the Egyptian fuel manufacturing pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, W.I.; Elseaidy, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Egyptian Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant, FMPP, is a new facility, producing an MTR-type fuel elements required for the Egyptian Second Research Reactor, ETRR-2, as well as other plates or elements for an external clients with the same type and enrichment percent or lower, (LEU). General description is presented. The production lines in FMPP, which begin from uranium hexaflouride (UF 6 , 19.7±0.2 % U 235 by wt), aluminum powder, and nuclear grade 6061 aluminium alloy in sheets, bars, and rods with the different heat treatments and dimensions as a raw materials, are processed through a series of the manufacturing, inspection, and quality control plan to produce the final specified MTR-type fuel elements. All these processes and the product control in each step are presented. The specifications of the final product are presented. (author)

  5. Ecological Monitoring Program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Second semiannual report, January 1985--June 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, N.T.

    1985-12-01

    This is the second semiannual report of the Ecological Monitoring Program (EMP) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project in southeastern New Mexico. The purpose of the EMP is to quantify and assess the impacts of WIPP construction activities on the surrounding ecosystem. The predicted impacts include: (1) alteration of natural habitat, (2) deposition of salt and dust, and (3) increased human activity and noise. This report describes the data collection activities and presents results, analyses, and discussions for the period of January through June, 1985. Also included are data collected prior to this period which were not available for inclusion in the first EMP semiannual report and data collected after this period which provide a more complete basis for the analyses and discussion. The eight subprograms currently active in the EMP are: environmental photography, soil chemistry, soil microbiology, vegetation, wildlife, meteorology, air quality, and water quality. 16 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RH TRU waste preoperational checkout: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH TRU) Waste Preoperational Checkout. The primary objective of this checkout was to demonstrate the process of handling RH TRU waste packages, from receipt through emplacement underground, using equipment, personnel, procedures, and methods to be used with actual waste packages. A further objective was to measure operational time lines to provide bases for confirming the WIPP design through put capability and for projecting operator radiation doses. Successful completion of this checkout is a prerequisite to the receipt of actual RH TRU waste. This checkout was witnessed in part by members of the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) of the state of New Mexico. Further, this report satisfies a key milestone contained in the Agreement for Consultation and Cooperation with the state of New Mexico. 4 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Environmental management assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Carlsbad, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This document contains the results of the Environmental Management Assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Assessment was conducted by EH-24 from July 19 through July 30, 1993 to advise the Secretary of Energy of the adequacy of management systems established at WIPP to ensure the protection of the environment and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE environmental requirements. The mission of WIPP is to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from the management and operating contractors. This assessment revealed that WIPP's environmental safety and health programs are satisfactory, and that all levels of the Waste Isolation Division (WID) management and staff consistently exhibit a high level of commitment to achieve environmental excellence

  8. Characterization of subjective uncertainty in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HELTON, JON CRAIG; MARTELL, MARY-ALENA; TIERNEY, MARTIN S.

    2000-01-01

    The 1996 performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) maintains a separation between stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty, with stochastic uncertainty arising from the possible disruptions that could occur at the WIPP over the 10,000 yr regulatory period specified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 191,40 CFR 194) and subjective uncertainty arising from an inability to uniquely characterize many of the inputs required in the 1996 WIPP PA. The characterization of subjective uncertainty is discussed, including assignment of distributions, uncertain variables selected for inclusion in analysis, correlation control, sample size, statistical confidence on mean complementary cumulative distribution functions, generation of Latin hypercube samples, sensitivity analysis techniques, and scenarios involving stochastic and subjective uncertainty

  9. Results of exploitation of a pilot-plant installation for bituminization of radioactive sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golinski, M.; Ksiazak, Z.; Surala, J.; Dziubecki, R.

    1974-01-01

    Results are discussed of exploitation of a pilot-plant installation for bituminization of radioactive sludges of an efficiency of 25 l/h. In a time period of 20 month 120 cycles were carried out in which 60 m 3 of 2-4% sludges from treatment of low-level waste by the phosphate-ferrocyanide method were solidified. The P-60 asphalt was used for bituminization. The bituminization products contained 5-13.5% of mineral substances. Their activity was in the range 5 x 10 -4 - 5 x 10 -3 μCi/g for alpha emitters and 1.2 - 3.8 x 10 -2 μCi/g for beta emitters. (author)

  10. Software/firmware design specification for 10-MWe solar-thermal central-receiver pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladewig, T.D.

    1981-03-01

    The software and firmware employed for the operation of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are completely described. The systems allow operator control of up to 2048 heliostats, and include the capability of operator-commanded control, graphic displays, status displays, alarm generation, system redundancy, and interfaces to the Operational Control System, the Data Acquisition System, and the Beam Characterization System. The requirements are decomposed into eleven software modules for execution in the Heliostat Array Controller computer, one firmware module for execution in the Heliostat Field Controller microprocessor, and one firmware module for execution in the Heliostat Controller microprocessor. The design of the modules to satisfy requirements, the interfaces between the computers, the software system structure, and the computers in which the software and firmware will execute are detailed. The testing sequence for validation of the software/firmware is described. (LEW)

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase supplemental environmental impact statement. Implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Implementation Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) has two primary purposes: (1) To report on the results of the scoping process (2) To provide guidance for preparing SEIS-II SEIS-II will be the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review for WIPP`s disposal phase. Chapter 1 of this plan provides background on WIPP and this NEPA review. Chapter 2 describes the purpose and need for action by the Department of Energy (hereafter DOE or the Department), as well as a description of the Proposed Action and alternatives being considered. Chapter 3 describes the work plan, including the schedule, responsibilities, and planned consultations with other agencies and organizations. Chapter 4 describes the scoping process, presents major issues identified during the scoping process, and briefly indicates how issues will be addressed in SEIS-II.

  12. Results of the benchmarking in radiological protection practices during fuel reloads in the nuclear power plants of Limerick (BWR) and Ginna (PWR) in the United States of North America; Resultados del benchmarking en practicas de proteccion radiologica durante recargas de combustible en las centrales nucleoelectricas de Limerick (BWR) y Ginna (PWR) en los Estados Unidos de Norteamerica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara H, M. A., E-mail: marco.lara@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, unique in our country, has been imposed several goals related with the continuous improvement of their acting; increase in the quantity of continuous days for operation cycle, improvement in the chemical indexes of the reactor coolant, improvement in the indexes of nuclear security, improvement in the indicators of industrial security, improvement in the standards of radiological protection, etc.; in this last item is precisely where is necessary to search creative solutions to be able to maintain the collective doses of the personnel so low as reasonably it is possible (ALARA) especially due to the last projects of extension of useful life of the nuclear power plant (zinc injection, noble metals and hydrogen) and of power increment of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, same that represent in the short period an increment of collective dose and of exposition levels (until 200%) in very specific points of the primary systems of the reactor. (Author)

  13. Development of methodology for early detection of BWR instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandro Petruzzi; Shin Chin; Kostadin Ivanov; Asok Ray; Fan-Bill Cheung

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The objective of the work presented in this paper research, which is supported by the US Department of Energy under the NEER program, is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology in order to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, based on the US NRC coupled code TRACE/PARCS, is being utilized as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The concept of the methodology is based on the fact that nonlinear systems show bifurcation, which is a change in the qualitative behavior as the system parameters vary. Some of these parameters may change on their own accord and account for the anomaly, while certain parameters can be altered in a controlled fashion. The non-linear, non-autonomous BWR system model considered in this research exhibits phenomena at two time scales. Anomalies occur at the slow time scale while the observation of the dynamical behavior, based on which inferences are made, takes place at the fast time scale. It is assumed that: (i) the system behavior is stationary at the fast time scale; and (ii) any observable non-stationary behavior is associated with parametric changes evolving at the slow time scale. The goal is to make inferences about evolving anomalies based on the asymptotic behavior derived from the computer simulation. However, only sufficient changes in the slowly varying parameter may lead to detectable difference in the asymptotic behavior. The need to detect such small changes in parameters and hence early detection of an anomaly motivate the utilized stimulus-response approach. In this approach, the model

  14. Geologic mapping of the air intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.M.; Powers, D.W.

    1990-12-01

    The air intake shaft (AS) was geologically mapped from the surface to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility horizon. The entire shaft section including the Mescalero Caliche, Gatuna Formation, Santa Rosa Formation, Dewey Lake Redbeds, Rustler Formation, and Salado Formation was geologically described. The air intake shaft (AS) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was constructed to provide a pathway for fresh air into the underground repository and maintain the desired pressure balances for proper underground ventilation. It was up-reamed to minimize construction-related damage to the wall rock. The upper portion of the shaft was lined with slip-formed concrete, while the lower part of the shaft, from approximately 903 ft below top of concrete at the surface, was unlined. As part of WIPP site characterization activities, the AS was geologically mapped. The shaft construction method, up-reaming, created a nearly ideal surface for geologic description. Small-scale textures usually best seen on slabbed core were easily distinguished on the shaft wall, while larger scale textures not generally revealed in core were well displayed. During the mapping, newly recognized textures were interpreted in order to refine depositional and post-depositional models of the units mapped. The objectives of the geologic mapping were to: (1) provide confirmation and documentation of strata overlying the WIPP facility horizon; (2) provide detailed information of the geologic conditions in strata critical to repository sealing and operations; (3) provide technical basis for field adjustments and modification of key and aquifer seal design, based upon the observed geology; (4) provide geological data for the selection of instrument borehole locations; (5) and characterize the geology at geomechanical instrument locations to assist in data interpretation. 40 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab

  15. Geologic mapping of the air intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.M.; Powers, D.W. (IT Corporation (USA))

    1990-12-01

    The air intake shaft (AS) was geologically mapped from the surface to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility horizon. The entire shaft section including the Mescalero Caliche, Gatuna Formation, Santa Rosa Formation, Dewey Lake Redbeds, Rustler Formation, and Salado Formation was geologically described. The air intake shaft (AS) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was constructed to provide a pathway for fresh air into the underground repository and maintain the desired pressure balances for proper underground ventilation. It was up-reamed to minimize construction-related damage to the wall rock. The upper portion of the shaft was lined with slip-formed concrete, while the lower part of the shaft, from approximately 903 ft below top of concrete at the surface, was unlined. As part of WIPP site characterization activities, the AS was geologically mapped. The shaft construction method, up-reaming, created a nearly ideal surface for geologic description. Small-scale textures usually best seen on slabbed core were easily distinguished on the shaft wall, while larger scale textures not generally revealed in core were well displayed. During the mapping, newly recognized textures were interpreted in order to refine depositional and post-depositional models of the units mapped. The objectives of the geologic mapping were to: (1) provide confirmation and documentation of strata overlying the WIPP facility horizon; (2) provide detailed information of the geologic conditions in strata critical to repository sealing and operations; (3) provide technical basis for field adjustments and modification of key and aquifer seal design, based upon the observed geology; (4) provide geological data for the selection of instrument borehole locations; (5) and characterize the geology at geomechanical instrument locations to assist in data interpretation. 40 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Synthane Pilot Plant, Bruceton, Pa. Run report No. 1. Operating period: July--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Test Directive No. 1 provided the operating conditions and process requirements for the first coal to be gasified in the Synthane Pilot Plant. Rosebud coal, which is a western sub-bituminous coal, was chosen by DOE because of its non-caking properties and reactivity. This report summarizes and presents the data obtained. The pilot plant produced gas for a total of 228 hours and gasified 709 tons of Rosebud coal from July 7 to December 20, 1976. Most of this period was spent in achieving process reliability and learning how to operate and control the gasifier. A significant number of equipment and process changes were required to achieve successful operation of the coal grinding and handling facilities, the Petrocarb feed system, and the char handling facilities. A complete revision of all gasifier instrumentation was necessary to achieve good control. Twenty-one test runs were accomplished, the longest of which was 37 hours. During this run, carbon conversions of 57 to 60% were achieved at bed temperatures of 1450 to 1475/sup 0/F. Earlier attempts to operate the gasifier with bed temperatures of 1550 and 1650/sup 0/F resulted in clinker formation in the gasifier and the inability to remove char. Test Directive No. 1 was discontinued in January 1977, without meeting the directive's goals because the process conditions of free fall of coal feed into the Synthane gasifier resulted in excessive quantities of tar and fines carryover into the gas scrubbing area. Each time the gasifier was opened after a run, the internal cyclone dip leg was found to be plugged solidly with hard tar and fines. The gas scrubbing equipment was always badly fouled with char and tar requiring an extensive and difficult cleanout. Packing in the gas scrubber had to be completely changed twice due to extensive fouling.

  17. Biodiesel production from vegetable oil and waste animal fats in a pilot plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Ertan; Canakci, Mustafa; Sanli, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, corn oil as vegetable oil, chicken fat and fleshing oil as animal fats were used to produce methyl ester in a biodiesel pilot plant. The FFA level of the corn oil was below 1% while those of animal fats were too high to produce biodiesel via base catalyst. Therefore, it was needed to perform pretreatment reaction for the animal fats. For this aim, sulfuric acid was used as catalyst and methanol was used as alcohol in the pretreatment reactions. After reducing the FFA level of the animal fats to less than 1%, the transesterification reaction was completed with alkaline catalyst. Due to low FFA content of corn oil, it was directly subjected to transesterification. Potassium hydroxide was used as catalyst and methanol was used as alcohol for transesterification reactions. The fuel properties of methyl esters produced in the biodiesel pilot plant were characterized and compared to EN 14214 and ASTM D6751 biodiesel standards. According to the results, ester yield values of animal fat methyl esters were slightly lower than that of the corn oil methyl ester (COME). The production cost of COME was higher than those of animal fat methyl esters due to being high cost biodiesel feedstock. The fuel properties of produced methyl esters were close to each other. Especially, the sulfur content and cold flow properties of the COME were lower than those of animal fat methyl esters. The measured fuel properties of all produced methyl esters met ASTM D6751 (S500) biodiesel fuel standards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karjunen, T.; Laitinen, T.; Piippo, J.; Sirkiae, P.

    1996-01-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR's as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs

  19. PROJECT MANAGEMENT MATURITY: AN ASSESSMENT OF MATURITY FOR DEVELOPING PILOT PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.K. Mittermaier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Despite the current economic climate, the South African mining and engineering industry is experiencing a very promising future, with a large number of capital projects in the offing. It is inevitable that pilot plant development will form part of this future as a risk mitigation technique. This study found that, even though the terms ‘pilot plant’ and ‘project management maturity’ are familiar within the industry, no link between these two could be found in the literature. A number of maturity models exist; and one developed by PMSolutions was selected to perform an assessment of the current level of project management maturity within the South African mining and engineering industry pertaining to the development of pilot plants. The Delphi technique was used to determine the views of experts in the South African mining, mineral processing, petrochemical, nuclear, and mechanical sectors regarding this maturity. A significant difference was observed between the current level of maturity and the required level of maturity in all but one of the nine knowledge areas defined by the Project Management Institute. The two knowledge areas of project time and risk management showed significant differences between current and required maturity levels, and were identified as key areas for improvement.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Ten spyte van die huidige ekonomiese klimaat ondervind die Suid-Afrikaanse mynbou- en ingenieursbedryf ’n baie bemoedigende toekoms, met ’n groot aantal kapitaalprojekte in die vooruitsig. Ten einde risiko’s te verlaag, sal die ontwikkeling van loodsaanlegte noodwendig deel van hierdie toekoms uitmaak. Daar is gevind dat, alhoewel die terme ‘loodsaanleg’ en ‘projekbestuur volwassenheid’ in die nywerheid bekend is, geen skakeling van hierdie twee terme in die literatuur opgespoor kon word nie. ’n Aantal volwassenheid modelle bestaan; en een wat deur PMSolutions ontwikkel is, is gekies om

  20. Maintenance of BWR control rod drive mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) replacement and rebuilding is one of the highest dose, most physically demanding, and complicated maintenance activities routinely accomplished by BWR utilities. A recent industry workshop sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which dealt with the effects of CRDM aging, revealed enhancements in maintenance techniques and tooling which have reduced ALARA, improved worker comfort and productivity, and have provided revised guidelines for CRDM changeout selection. Highlights of this workshop and ongoing research on CRDM aging are presented in this paper