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Sample records for bwr nuclear power

  1. Study of the Utilization BWR Type Nuclear Power Reactor for Desalination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The needs of fresh water increased by rapid population growth and industrials expansion, but these demands can not be prepared naturally. Following this case, seawater desalination becomes the primer option which can fulfill the need through the nuclear desalination technology. The coupled nuclear power reactor enables to supply thermal energy for auxiliary equipment and pumps operation. The utilization study of power reactor type BWR coupled with desalination process has been performed. The goal of study is to obtain characteristic data of desalted water specification which desalination system coupling with nuclear power plant produced energy for desalination process. The study is carried out by browsing data and information, and comprehensive review of thermal energy correlation between NPP with desalination process installation. According to reviewing are found that the thermal energy and electric power utilization from the nuclear power reactor are enable to remove the seawater to produce desalted water and also to operate auxiliary equipments. The assessment results is VK-300 reactor prototype, BWR type 250 MW(e) power are cogeneration unit can supplied hot steam temperature 285 °C to the extraction turbine to empower 150 MW electric power, and a part of hot steam 130 °C is use to operate desalination process and remind heat is distribute to the municipal and offices at that region. The coupled of VK-300 reactor power type BWR with desalination installation of MED type enable to produce desalted water with high quality distillate. Based on the economic calculation that the VK-300 reactor power of BWR type produced water distillate capacity is 300.000 m3/hour with cost US$ 0.58/m3. The coupling VK-300 reactor power type BWR with MED desalination plant is competitive economically. (author)

  2. Development of a dynamic model of a BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dynamic model of a nuclear power plant, including a boiling water reactor, high- and low-pressure turbines, moisture separator, reheater, condenser, feedwater heaters and feedwater pump, was developed. The model is one-dimensional except for the nuclear part of the reactor, which is based on the point kinetics equation, and the condenser model and feedwater pump model. It has been used to study different transients occuring during normal operating conditions and for evaluating the control systems of a BWR nuclear power plant. Particular emphasis was laid on the reactor pressure control system and the recirculation flow control system. (author)

  3. The development of emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR Candu type of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR-Candu type of nuclear power plant are reviewed. In PWR and BWR the emergency cooling can be catagorized as active high pressure, active low pressure, and a passive one. The PWR uses components of the shutdown cooling system: whereas the BWR uses components of pressure suppression contaiment. HWR Candu also uses the shutdown cooling system similar to the PWR except some details coming out from moderator coolant separation and expensive cost of heavy water. (author)

  4. CAE advanced reactor demonstrators for CANDU, PWR and BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAE, a private Canadian company specializing in full scope flight, industrial, and nuclear plant simulators, will provide a license to IAEA for a suite of nuclear power plant demonstrators. This suite will consist of CANDU, PWR and BWR demonstrators, and will operate on a 486 or higher level PC. The suite of demonstrators will be provided to IAEA at no cost to IAEA. The IAEA has agreed to make the CAE suite of nuclear power plant demonstrators available to all member states at no charge under a sub-license agreement, and to sponsor training courses that will provide basic training on the reactor types covered, and on the operation of the demonstrator suite, to all those who obtain the demonstrator suite. The suite of demonstrators will be available to the IAEA by March 1997. (author)

  5. Real time simulation of the main steam system of a BWR nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a real time model of the main steam system for a BWR 675 MW power plant unit. The model includes the start up and shut down of the system, where the steam flow is very small or non existent and phenomena like condensation can occur, changing drastically the effects observed from those of normal operation at medium or high loads. Severe transients are also contemplated. Consistency and stability tests were done to the model, and it was validated for steady state using plant design data. During transients the model's results were compared with the predictions of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the prototype unit, and it was found that the model's response follow the expected trends

  6. BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of an emergency core cooling system while suppressing the flow out of coolants upon rapture accidents in a coolant recycling device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: Recirculation pumps are located at a position higher than the reactor core in a pressure vessel, and the lower plenum is bisected vertically by a partition plate. Further, a gas-liquid separator is surrounded with a wall and the water level at the outer side of the wall is made higher than the water level in the inside of the wall. In this structure, coolants are introduced from the upper chamber in the lower plenum into the reactor core, and the steams generated in the reactor core are separated in the gas-liquid separator, whereby the separated liquid is introduced as coolants by way of the inner chamber into the lower chamber of the lower plenum and further sent by way of the outer chamber into the reactor core. Consequently, idle rotation of the recycling pumps due to the flow-in of saturated water is prevented and loss of coolants in the reactor core can also be prevented upon raptures in the pipeway and the driving section of the pump connected to the pressure vessel and in the bottom of the pressure vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. The Advanced BWR Nuclear Plant: Safe, economic nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redding, J.R. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The safety and economics of Advanced BWR Nuclear Power Plants are outlined. The topics discussed include: ABWR Programs: status in US and Japan; ABWR competitiveness: safety and economics; SBWR status; combining ABWR and SBWR: the passive ABWR; and Korean/GE partnership.

  8. Decontamination techniques for BWR power generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes various techniques used for decontamination in BWR power generation plants. Objectives and requirements for decontamination in BWR power plants are first discussed focusing on reduction in dose, prevention of spread of contamination, cleaning of work environments, exposure of equipment parts for inspection, re-use of decontaminated resources, and standards for decontamination. Then, the report outlines major physical, chemical and electrochemical decontamination techniques generally used in BWR power generation plants. The physical techniques include suction of deposits in tanks, jet cleaning, particle blast cleaning, ultrasonic cleaning, coating with special paints, and flushing cleaning. The chemical decontamination techniques include the use of organic acids etc. for dissolution of oxidized surface layers and treatment of secondary wastes such as liquids released from primary decontamination processes. Other techniques are used for removal of penetrated contaminants, and soft and hard cladding in and on equipment and piping that are in direct contact with radioactive materials used in nuclear power generation plants. (N.K.)

  9. MELCOR/SNAP analysis of Chinshan (BWR/4) Nuclear Power Plant spent fuel pool for the similar Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinshan nuclear power plant (NPP), a BWR/4 plant, is the first NPP in Taiwan. After Fukushima NPP event occurred, there is more concern for the safety of NPPs in Taiwan. Therefore, in order to estimate the safety of Chinshan NPP spent fuel pool, by using MELCOR 2.1 and SNAP 2.2.7 codes, INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, R.O.C.) performed the safety analysis of Chinshan NPP spent fuel pool (SFP). There were two main steps in this research. The first step was the establishment of Chinshan NPP SFP MELCOR/SNAP model. And the transient analysis under the SFP cooling system failure condition was performed. Besides, in order to study the detailed thermal-hydraulic performance of this transient, TRACE was used in this analysis. CFD data from INER report was used to compare with the results of MELCOR and TRACE. The next step was the fuel rod performance analysis by using FRAPTRAN and TRACE's results. Besides, the animation model of Chinshan NPP SFP was presented using the animation function of SNAP with MELCOR analysis results. (author)

  10. Development of a dynamic model of a BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of a one-dimensional steady-state model of a high-pressure steam turbine, a low-pressure steam turbine, a moisture separator, a reheater, a condenser, feedwater heaters and feedwater pump for a nuclear power plant. The model is contained in the program ''TURBPLANT''. The dynamic part of this model is presented in part II of this report. (author)

  11. Development of electrical cable penetration for secondary containment vessel of BWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The penetration holes in the walls and floors of the secondary containment vessel of the nuclear power plants must be air-tight, shielded against the radiation, and fire-resistant. At present, the penetration holes are air-tightened with iron plates and sealing material after the cables are laid. However, installation of a number of cables and its sealing work now pose a serious problem in nuclear power plant construction in relation to the installation of reactor system components. The authors have recently developed a method for electric wall penetration in an attempt to solve this problem. This method is provided with prefabricated cable portions for wall penetration, reducing field work, saving labor in wiring work through use of multicore cables, and increasing the reliability of the sealing and caulking work. This wall penetration consists of an iron sleeves to be embedded into the wall, a header-plate, and an assembly of modules in which a specified number of insulated conductors are set up, and furthermore termination boxes are installed on both ends of the penetration holes. This paper deals with the design standard and construction of the wall penetration and the results of tests which were performed under various environmental conditions, which has shown excellent properties, such as sealing quality and electric characteristics, of the wall penetration. (author)

  12. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: Metal components of BWR containment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g. caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must therefore be effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wear-out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers, and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues. The guidance reports are directed toward technical experts from NPPs and from regulatory, plant design, manufacturing and technical support organizations dealing with specific

  13. Institutional implications of establishing safety goals for nuclear power plants. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, F.A.; Hooper, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to anticipate and address institutional problems that may arise from the adoption of NRC's proposed Policy Statement on Safety Goals for Nuclear Power Plants. The report emphasizes one particular category of institutional problems: the possible use of safety goals as a basis for legal challenges to NRC actions, and the resolution of such challenges by the courts. Three types of legal issues are identified and analyzed. These are, first, general legal issues such as access to the legal system, burden of proof, and standard of proof. Second is the particular formulation of goals. Involved here are such questions as sustainable rationale, definitions, avoided issues, vagueness of time and space details, and degree of conservatism. Implementation brings up the third set of issues which include interpretation and application, linkage to probabilistic risk assessment, consequences as compared to events, and the use of results.

  14. Study of environmental noise in a BWR plant like the Nuclear Power Plant Laguna Verde; Estudio de ruido ambiental en una planta BWR como la Central Nuclear Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Cruz G, M.; Amador C, C., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In all industry type the health costs generated by the noise are high, because the noise can cause nuisance and to harm the capacity to work when causing tension and to perturb the concentration, and in more severe cases to reach to lose the sense of the hearing in the long term. The noise levels in the industry have been designated for the different types of use like residential, commercial, and industrial and silence areas. The noise can cause accidents when obstructing the communications and alarm signs. For this reason the noise should be controlled and mitigated, at a low level as reasonably is possible, taking into account that the noise is an acoustic contamination. The present study determines a bases line of the environmental noise levels in a nuclear power plant BWR-5 as Laguna Verde, (like reference) to be able to determine and to give pursuit to the possible solutions to eliminate or to limit the noise level in the different job areas. The noise levels were registered with a meter of integrative noise level (sonometer) and areas of noise exposure levels mapping the general areas in the buildings were established, being the registered maximum level of 96.94 dba in the building of the Reactor-elevation 0.65 m under the operation conditions of Extended Power Up rate (EPU) of 120% PTN. Knowing that the exposition to noises and the noise dose in the job place can influence in the health and in the safety of the workers, are extensive topics that they should be analyzed for separate as they are: to) the effects in the health of the exposure to the noise, b) how measuring the noise, c) the methods and technologies to combat and to control the noise in the industry by part of engineering area and d) the function of the industrial safety bodies as delegates of the health and safety in the task against the noise in the job. (author)

  15. BWR type nuclear power plant and operation method therefor and method of forming oxide membrane on the surface of the constitutional member in contact with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type nuclear power plant, an oxide membrane is formed on the surface of the constitutional members of a reactor primary system to be in contact with water while keeping the reactor water at a pH of 7.5 or less based on a room temperature and keeping a temperature of reactor water at 250degC or higher for 250 hours or more and then adding alkaline water to control the pH within a range of from 7.5 to 9.0 based on the room temperature and keeping the reactor water temperature to 250degC or higher for 100 hours or more. This process is conducted during the reactor shut down state and during the operation period from the time of the reactor shut down state to the time of the rated power operation state of the electric power generator. Then, a corrosion resistant oxide membrane with less involvement of radioactive ions can be formed, thereby enabling to improve corrosion resistance of nuclear fuel elements and suppressing the dose rate on the surface of pipelines of a primary coolant system, accordingly, operator's radiation dose rate can be reduced upon periodical inspection. (N.H.)

  16. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

  17. Validation of LANCR01/AETNA01 BWR code package against FUBILA MOX experiments and Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 MOX core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LANCR01 assembly code and AETNA01 core simulator are the advanced BWR package developed by Global Nuclear Fuel (GNF). In order to establish the applicability of the package to the plutonium containing mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, validation tests have been conducted against BASALA, FUBILA MOX critical experiments and the operational data from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 (1F3) with MOX assemblies loaded at cycle 25. For BASALA and FUBILA, critical eigenvalue and the pin-by-pin fission rate distribution by LANCR01 were compared with the experimental data. For 1F3, AETNA01 predictions with LANCR01 assembly cross sections were compared with the measured control blade worth and the moderator temperature coefficient in the reactor physics tests, as well as the cold/hot eigenvalues and the in-core instrument readings during the operation. It is concluded that LANCR01/AETNA01 system has a comparable accuracy for the MOX cores with that for the uranium cores. (author)

  18. Study and characterization of noble metal deposits on similar rusty surfaces to those of the reactor U-1 type BWR of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present investigation work, were determined the parameters to simulate the conditions of internal oxidation reactor circulation pipes of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz. We used 304l stainless steel cylinders with two faces prepared with abrasive paper of No. 600, with the finality to obtain similar surface to the internal circulation piping nuclear reactor. Oxides was formed within an autoclave (Autoclave MEX-02 unit B), which is a device that simulates the working conditions of the nuclear reactor, but without radiation generated by the fission reaction within the reactor. The oxidation conditions were a temperature of 280 C and pressure of 8 MPa, similar conditions to the reactor operating in nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz, Mexico (BWR conditions), with an average conductivity of 4.58 ms / cm and 2352 ppb oxygen to simulate normal water chemistry NWC. Were obtained deposits of noble metal oxides formed on 304l stainless steel samples, in a 250 ml autoclave at a temperature range of 180 to 200 C. The elements that were used to deposit platinum-rhodium (Pt-Rh) with aqueous Na2Pt (OH)6 and Na3Rh (NO2)6, Silver (Ag) with an aqueous solution of AgNO3, zirconium (Zr) with aqueous Zr O (NO3) and ZrO2, and zinc (Zn) in aqueous solution of Zn (NO3)2 under conditions of normal water chemistry. Also there was the oxidation of 304l stainless steel specimens in normal water chemistry with a solution of Zinc (Zn) (NWC + Zn). Oxidation of the specimens in water chemistry with a solution of zinc (Zn + NWC) was prepared in two ways: within the MEX-02 autoclave unit A in a solution of zinc and a flask at constant temperature in zinc solution. The oxides formed and deposits were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, elemental field analysis and X-ray diffraction. By other hand was evaluated the electrochemical behavior of the oxides formed on the surface of 304l stainless steel in normal water

  19. Nuclear Power in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents how Swedish technology has combined competence in planning, building, commissioning, maintenance, and operation of nuclear power and waste facilities. The items are elaborated in the following chapters: Nuclear power today and for the future, Sweden and its power supply, The history of nuclear power in Sweden, Nuclear Sweden today, Operating experience in 10 nuclear power units, Maintenance experience, Third-generation BWR-plants commissioned in five years, Personnel and training, Reactor safety, Quality assurance and quality control, Characteristic features of the ASEA-ATOM BWR, Experience of PWR steam generators, Nuclear fuel supply and management, Policy and techniques of radioactive waste management, Nuclear energy authorities and Inherently safe LWR. The publication is concluded by facts in brief and a statement by the Director General of IAEA. (G.B.)

  20. Analysis of the microstructural evolution of the damage by neutron irradiation in the pressure vessel of a nuclear power reactor BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactor pressure vessel type BWR, installed in Mexico and in many other countries, are made of an alloy of low carbon steel. The American Society for Testing and Materials (Astm) classifies this alloy as A533-B, class 1. Both the vessel and other internal structures are continuously exposed to the neutron flux from the reactions of fission in nuclear fuel. A large number of neutrons reach the vessel and penetrate certain depth depending on their energy. Its penetration in the neutron collides with the nuclei of the atoms out of their positions in the crystal lattice of steel, producing vacancies, interstitial, segregations, among other defects, capable of affecting its mechanical properties. Analyze the micro-structural damage to the vessel due to neutron irradiation, is essential for reasons of integrity of this enclosure and safety of any nuclear power plant. The objective of this thesis work is theoretical and experimentally determine the microstructural damage of a type nuclear reactor vessel steel BWR, due to neutron radiation from the reactor core, using microscopic and spectroscopic techniques as well as Monte Carlo simulation. Microscopy Optical, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersion of X-rays Spectrometry and X-rays Diffractometry were the techniques used in this research. These techniques helped in the characterization of both the basis of design of pressure vessel steel and steel irradiated, after eight years of neutron irradiation on the vessel, allowing know the surface morphology and crystal structures of the previous steel and post-irradiation, analyze the change in the microstructure of the steel vessel, morphological damage to surface level in an irradiated sample, among which are cavities in the order of microns produced by Atomic displacements due to the impact of neutronic, above all in the first layers of thickness of the vessel, the effect of swelling, regions of greater damage and Atomic

  1. Procedures for using expert judgment to estimate human-error probabilities in nuclear power plant operations. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaver, D.A.; Stillwell, W.G.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes and evaluates several procedures for using expert judgment to estimate human-error probabilities (HEPs) in nuclear power plant operations. These HEPs are currently needed for several purposes, particularly for probabilistic risk assessments. Data do not exist for estimating these HEPs, so expert judgment can provide these estimates in a timely manner. Five judgmental procedures are described here: paired comparisons, ranking and rating, direct numerical estimation, indirect numerical estimation and multiattribute utility measurement. These procedures are evaluated in terms of several criteria: quality of judgments, difficulty of data collection, empirical support, acceptability, theoretical justification, and data processing. Situational constraints such as the number of experts available, the number of HEPs to be estimated, the time available, the location of the experts, and the resources available are discussed in regard to their implications for selecting a procedure for use.

  2. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: BWR pressure vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (caused for instance by unanticipated phenomena and by operating maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling, within acceptable limits, the ageing degradation and ware out of components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of guidance reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers, and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life cycle management of plant components, which involves economic considerations. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of heavy water moderated reactors (HWRs), boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues

  3. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: BWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (caused for instance by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling, within acceptable limits, the ageing degradation and wear out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life cycle management of plant components, which involves economic considerations. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues

  4. Reliability improvement method for BWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of the nuclear power generating facilities in Japan was commenced by the import of technological know-how from the United States, but in ten years since then, they reached the stage of improvement and standardization by the effort for the domestic production and the accumulated technological ability. But the unscheduled stop of operation was not able to avoid centering around the initially imported plants, and it cannot be said that the sufficient rate of operation was attained. In Japan, plant manufacturers deliver the whole installations including nuclear reactors in the lump, and carry out the planning, design, manufacture, construction, periodic inspection and maintenance, accordingly the feedback of the operational results can be made quickly, differing from the U.S. system. As the result, No. 1 plant of the Shimane Nuclear Power Station, Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc., which was constructed by the domestic technology, has attained about 72% of the average rate of operation in six years, and showed the high reliability of the domestically produced plants. The measures for improving system reliability in system planning and the reliability of machinery and equipments, the method of evaluating the reliability of systems, machines and equipments, the quality of nuclear power generating facilities and the quality assurance, and the management of maintenance in Hitachi Ltd. are explained. (Kako, I.)

  5. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary: main report. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the objectives and organization of the reactor safety study; the basic concepts of risk; the nature of nuclear power plant accidents; risk assessment methodology; reactor accident risk; and comparison of nuclear risks to other societal risks.

  6. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy.

  7. A BWR power plant simulator for Barsebaeck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer simulator of a Barsebaeck power plant unit has been developed in cooperation between Sydkraft AB, Lund Institute of Technology, and Risoe National Laboratory. The simulator is of the kind often referred to as a compact simulator, because it involves only a computer with display screens and other input/output devices plus the software needed for calculation and presentation of the plant state as a function of time, and no sort of model of the control room as in large reactor simulators for operator training. The purpose of training courses with the compact simulator is to give students a better understanding of the behaviour of the power plant under transient conditions by displaying variables, e.g. pressures, temperatures, reactivity, nuclear power, as functions of time, thereby showing the interactions between different parts of the plant during the transient and the influence of a number of possible operator actions. The present paper describes the Barsebaeck compact simulator with the emphasis on the software developed at Risoe National Laboratory. The Risoe work comprises the programming of the dynamic plant model, in the form of a number of Fortran subroutines containing the physical description of the power plant. (author)

  8. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew D. Hinds

    2001-10-17

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise.

  9. Estimate of radiation-induced steel embrittlement in the BWR core shroud and vessel wall from reactor-grade MOX/UOX fuel for the nuclear power plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Lisa Rene

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18--30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. This dissertation provides computational results of the neutron fluence, flux, energy spectrum, and radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s-1) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 BWR. The results were computed using the nuclear data processing code NJOY99 and the continuous energy Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP4B. The MCNP4B model of the reactor core was for maximum core loading fractions of ⅓ MOX and ⅔ UOX reactor-grade fuel in an equilibrium core. The primary conclusion of this dissertation was that the addition of the maximum fraction of ⅓ MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  10. Analysis of the microstructural evolution of the damage by neutron irradiation in the pressure vessel of a nuclear power reactor BWR; Analisis de la evolucion microestructural del dano por irradiacion neutronica en la vasija de presion de un reactor nuclear de potencia BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel y R, M.

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear reactor pressure vessel type BWR, installed in Mexico and in many other countries, are made of an alloy of low carbon steel. The American Society for Testing and Materials (Astm) classifies this alloy as A533-B, class 1. Both the vessel and other internal structures are continuously exposed to the neutron flux from the reactions of fission in nuclear fuel. A large number of neutrons reach the vessel and penetrate certain depth depending on their energy. Its penetration in the neutron collides with the nuclei of the atoms out of their positions in the crystal lattice of steel, producing vacancies, interstitial, segregations, among other defects, capable of affecting its mechanical properties. Analyze the micro-structural damage to the vessel due to neutron irradiation, is essential for reasons of integrity of this enclosure and safety of any nuclear power plant. The objective of this thesis work is theoretical and experimentally determine the microstructural damage of a type nuclear reactor vessel steel BWR, due to neutron radiation from the reactor core, using microscopic and spectroscopic techniques as well as Monte Carlo simulation. Microscopy Optical, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersion of X-rays Spectrometry and X-rays Diffractometry were the techniques used in this research. These techniques helped in the characterization of both the basis of design of pressure vessel steel and steel irradiated, after eight years of neutron irradiation on the vessel, allowing know the surface morphology and crystal structures of the previous steel and post-irradiation, analyze the change in the microstructure of the steel vessel, morphological damage to surface level in an irradiated sample, among which are cavities in the order of microns produced by Atomic displacements due to the impact of neutronic, above all in the first layers of thickness of the vessel, the effect of swelling, regions of greater damage and Atomic

  11. Study and characterization of noble metal deposits on similar rusty surfaces to those of the reactor U-1 type BWR of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde; Estudio y caracterizacion de depositos de metales nobles sobre superficies oxidadas similares a las del reactor de la Central de Laguna Verde (CNLV) U1 del tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores S, V. H.

    2011-07-01

    In the present investigation work, were determined the parameters to simulate the conditions of internal oxidation reactor circulation pipes of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz. We used 304l stainless steel cylinders with two faces prepared with abrasive paper of No. 600, with the finality to obtain similar surface to the internal circulation piping nuclear reactor. Oxides was formed within an autoclave (Autoclave MEX-02 unit B), which is a device that simulates the working conditions of the nuclear reactor, but without radiation generated by the fission reaction within the reactor. The oxidation conditions were a temperature of 280 C and pressure of 8 MPa, similar conditions to the reactor operating in nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz, Mexico (BWR conditions), with an average conductivity of 4.58 ms / cm and 2352 ppb oxygen to simulate normal water chemistry NWC. Were obtained deposits of noble metal oxides formed on 304l stainless steel samples, in a 250 ml autoclave at a temperature range of 180 to 200 C. The elements that were used to deposit platinum-rhodium (Pt-Rh) with aqueous Na{sub 2}Pt (OH){sub 6} and Na{sub 3}Rh (NO{sub 2}){sub 6}, Silver (Ag) with an aqueous solution of AgNO{sub 3}, zirconium (Zr) with aqueous Zr O (NO{sub 3}) and ZrO{sub 2}, and zinc (Zn) in aqueous solution of Zn (NO{sub 3}){sub 2} under conditions of normal water chemistry. Also there was the oxidation of 304l stainless steel specimens in normal water chemistry with a solution of Zinc (Zn) (NWC + Zn). Oxidation of the specimens in water chemistry with a solution of zinc (Zn + NWC) was prepared in two ways: within the MEX-02 autoclave unit A in a solution of zinc and a flask at constant temperature in zinc solution. The oxides formed and deposits were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, elemental field analysis and X-ray diffraction. By other hand was evaluated the electrochemical behavior of the oxides

  12. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: nuclear power certainties and doubts; nuclear power in the Western World to 2000; the frequency of core meltdown accidents; hidden costs of the accident at Three Mile Island; costs of nuclear accidents - implications for reactor choice; defining the risks of nuclear power; the uncertain economics of a nuclear power program; the economics of enabling decisions (Sizewell B as an enabling decision); trade in nuclear electricity; some pointers to the future. (U.K.)

  13. BUTREN-RC an hybrid system for the recharges optimization of nuclear fuels in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The obtained results with the hybrid system BUTREN-RC are presented that obtains recharges of nuclear fuel for a BWR type reactor. The system has implemented the methods of optimization heuristic taboo search and neural networks. The optimization it carried out with the technique of taboo search, and the neural networks, previously trained, were used to predict the behavior of the recharges of fuel, in substitution of commercial codes of reactor simulation. The obtained recharges of nuclear fuel correspond to 5 different operation cycles of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant, Veracruz in Mexico. The obtained results were compared with the designs of this cycles. The energy gain with the recharges of fuel proposals is of approximately 4.5% with respect to those of design. The time of compute consumed it was considerably smaller that when a commercial code for reactor simulation is used. (Author)

  14. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices III and IV. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    The items listed below summarize the detail sections which follow: a listing of definitions and a discussion of the general treatment of data within the random variable approach as utilized by the study; a tabulation of the assessed data base containing failure classifications, final assessed ranges utilized in quantification and reference source values considered in determining the ranges; a discussion of nuclear power plant experience that was used to validate the data assessment by testing its applicability as well as to check on the adequacy of the model to incorporate typical real incidents; an expanded presentation of the data assessment giving information on applicability considerations; a discussion of test and maintenance data including comparisons of models with experience data; and special topics, including assessments required for the initiating event probabilities and human error data and modeling.

  15. Nuclear power

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, David; McDonald, Alan; Greenwald, Judith; Mobbs, Paul

    2005-01-01

    David Waller and Alan McDonald ask whether a nuclear renaissance can be predicted; Judith M. Greenwald discusses keeping the nuclear power option open; Paul Mobbs considers the availability of uranium and the future of nuclear energy.

  16. Investigation of control rod worth and nuclear end of life of BWR control rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Per

    2008-01-15

    This work has investigated the Control Rod Worth (CRW) and Nuclear End of Life (NEOL) values for BWR control rods. A study of how different parameters affect NEOL was performed with the transport code PHOENIX4. It was found that NEOL, expressed in terms of {sup 10}B depletion, can be generalized beyond the conditions for which the rod is depleted, such as different power densities and void fractions, the corresponding variation in the NEOL will be about 0.2-0.4% {sup 10}B. It was also found that NEOL results for different fuel types and different fuel enrichments have a variation of about 2-3% in {sup 10}B depletion. A comparative study on NHOL and CRW was made between PHOENIX4 and the stochastic Monte Carlo code MCNP. It was found that there is a significant difference, both due to differences in the codes and to limitations in the geometrical modeling in PHOENIX4. Since MCNP is considered more physically correct, a methodology was developed to calculate the nuclear end of life of BWR control rods with MCNP. The advantages of the methodology are that it does not require other codes to perform the depletion of the absorber material, it can describe control rods of any design and it can deplete the control rod absorber material without burning the fuel. The disadvantage of the method is that is it time-consuming.

  17. Fuel gases generation in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in a nuclear power plant with reactor type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During an accident design base of coolant loos, the hydrogen gas can accumulate inside the primary contention as a result of several generation mechanisms among those that are: 1) the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant, 2) the metals corrosion for the solutions used in the emergency cooling and dew of the contention, and 3) the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency. In this work the contribution of each generation mechanism to the hydrogen total in the primary contention is analyzed, considering typical inventories of zirconium, zinc, aluminum and fission products in balance cycle of a reactor type BWR. In the analysis the distribution model of fission products and hydrogen production proposed in the regulator guide 1.7, Rev. 2 of the US NRC was used. The results indicate that the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation at the end of a period of 24 hours of initiate the accident is the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency continued by the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding with the reactor coolant, and lastly the aluminum and zinc oxidation present in the primary contention. However, the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant is the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation in the first moments after the accident. This study constitutes the first part of the general analysis of the generation, transport and control of fuel gases in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in BWRs. (Author)

  18. Design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel for BWR reactors; Diseno y optimizacion axial de combustible nuclear para reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia V, M.A

    2006-07-01

    In the present thesis, the modifications made to the axial optimization system based on Tabu Search (BT) for the axial design of BWR fuel type are presented, developed previously in the Nuclear Engineering Group of the UNAM Engineering Faculty. With the modifications what is mainly looked is to consider the particular characteristics of the mechanical design of the GE12 fuel type, used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central (CNLV) and that it considers the fuel bars of partial longitude. The information obtained in this thesis will allow to plan nuclear fuel reloads with the best conditions to operate in a certain cycle guaranteeing a better yield and use in the fuel burnt, additionally people in charge in the reload planning will be favored with the changes carried out to the system for the design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel, which facilitate their handling and it reduces their execution time. This thesis this developed in five chapters that are understood in the following way in general: Chapter 1: It approaches the basic concepts of the nuclear energy, it describes the physical and chemical composition of the atoms as well as that of the uranium isotopes, the handling of the uranium isotope by means of the nuclear fission until arriving to the operation of the nuclear reactors. Chapter 2: The nuclear fuel cycle is described, the methods for its extraction, its conversion and its enrichment to arrive to the stages of the nuclear fuel management used in the reactors are described. Beginning by the radial design, the axial design and the core design of the nuclear reactor related with the fuel assemblies design. Chapter 3: the optimization methods of nuclear fuel previously used are exposed among those that are: the genetic algorithms method, the search methods based on heuristic rules and the application of the tabu search method, which was used for the development of this thesis. Chapter 4: In this part the used methodology to the

  19. A Mechanistic Approach for the Prediction of Critical Power in BWR Fuel Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandraker, Dinesh Kumar; Vijayan, Pallipattu Krishnan; Sinha, Ratan Kumar; Aritomi, Masanori

    The critical power corresponding to the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) or dryout condition is an important design parameter for the evaluation of safety margins in a nuclear fuel bundle. The empirical approaches for the prediction of CHF in a rod bundle are highly geometric specific and proprietary in nature. The critical power experiments are very expensive and technically challenging owing to the stringent simulation requirements for the rod bundle tests involving radial and axial power profiles. In view of this, the mechanistic approach has gained momentum in the thermal hydraulic community. The Liquid Film Dryout (LFD) in an annular flow is the mechanism of CHF under BWR conditions and the dryout modeling has been found to predict the CHF quite accurately for a tubular geometry. The successful extension of the mechanistic model of dryout to the rod bundle application is vital for the evaluation of critical power in the rod bundle. The present work proposes the uniform film flow approach around the rod by analyzing individual film of the subchannel bounded by rods with different heat fluxes resulting in different film flow rates around a rod and subsequently distributing the varying film flow rates of a rod to arrive at the uniform film flow rate as it has been found that the liquid film has a strong tendency to be uniform around the rod. The FIDOM-Rod code developed for the dryout prediction in BWR assemblies provides detailed solution of the multiple liquid films in a subchannel. The approach of uniform film flow rate around the rod simplifies the liquid film cross flow modeling and was found to provide dryout prediction with a good accuracy when compared with the experimental data of 16, 19 and 37 rod bundles under BWR conditions. The critical power has been predicted for a newly designed 54 rod bundle of the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). The selected constitutive models for the droplet entrainment and deposition rates validated for the dryout in tube were

  20. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  1. Manufacturing industry and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manufacturing industry and nuclear power is discussed at two levels. There is the supplier level where the problems tend to be orthodox but take on a special peculiarity when applied to the nuclear market, and there is the level that may be termed nuclear politics and which has a number of aspects including energy policy, choice of reactor system, efficient uses of industrial resources and public acceptability. The role of the supplier is seen as searching for new orders, having secured an order performing the contract, and finally looking at the long term requirements of the industry. The choice of thermal reactor system, PWR, AGR, or BWR is discussed. (author)

  2. Pool swell in a nuclear containment wetwell. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, T.

    1976-04-01

    A brief description is presented of scale model tests conducted to study LOCA induced wetwell pool swelling in the BWR Mk 1 containment pressure suppression system. The Mk 1 containment configuration is described together with the scale model design, the conduct of the tests, and the experimental results. (DG)

  3. Development of neural network simulating power distribution of a BWR fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neural network model is developed to simulate the precise nuclear physics analysis program code for quick scoping survey calculations. The relation between enrichment and local power distribution of BWR fuel bundles was learned using two layers neural network (ENET). A new model is to introduce burnable neutron absorber (Gadolinia), added to several fuel rods to decrease initial reactivity of fresh bundle. The 2nd stages three layers neural network (GNET) is added on the 1st stage network ENET. GNET studies the local distribution difference caused by Gadolinia. Using this method, it becomes possible to survey of the gradients of sigmoid functions and back propagation constants with reasonable time. Using 99 learning patterns of zero burnup, good error convergence curve is obtained after many trials. This neural network model is able to simulate no learned cases fairly as well as the learned cases. Computer time of this neural network model is about 100 times faster than a precise analysis model. (author)

  4. Development of neural network for analysis of local power distributions in BWR fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neural network model has been developed to learn the local power distributions in a BWR fuel bundle. A two layers neural network with total 128 elements is used for this model. The neural network learns 33 cases of local power peaking factors of fuel rods with given enrichment distribution as the teacher signals, which were calculated by a fuel bundle nuclear analysis code based on precise physical models. This neural network model studied well the teacher signals within 1 % error. It is also able to calculate the local power distributions within several % error for the different enrichment distributions from the teacher signals when the average enrichment is close to 2 %. This neural network is simple and the computing speed of this model is 300 times faster than that of the precise nuclear analysis code. This model was applied to survey the enrichment distribution to meet a target local power distribution in a fuel bundle, and the enrichment distribution with flat power shape are obtained within short computing time. (author)

  5. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Interfacial Bonding Efficiency Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF, also known as “used nuclear fuel” [UNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. Additional CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods; two specimens failed, and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 × 107 cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the SNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, eleven SNF rod segments from the Limerick BWR were tested using the ORNL CIRFT equipment; one test under static conditions and ten tests under dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at a maximum curvature of 4.0 m-1. The specimen did not show any sign of failure during three repeated loading cycles to a similar maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitudes varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of

  6. Alpha-nuclides in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of alpha-nuclides in nuclear power plants is subject of the investigations presented. The source of alpha-nuclides is a contamination with fissile material (so called tramp uranium or tramp fuel) which deposits on fuel rod surfaces and leads to the build-up of transuranium nuclides. The determination of a defect situation with fuel release as well as the quantification of the fissile material contamination background is given for BWR and PWR plants. The quantification of the fuel release and the tramp uranium background can be calculated with different, measurable nuclides in BWR and PWR plants. (orig.)

  7. The synergies of PLiM, PLEX, and power uprates: Lessons learned from recent BWR experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Increasing electricity demand due to population growth and redistribution, high oil and gas prices, concerns for greenhouse gas emissions, and a positive trend in public opinion and government support for nuclear power provide tremendous opportunity for growth in the nuclear industry throughout the world. This can be accomplished in two ways, (1) new plants can be built and (2) the performance of existing plants can be improved through increased reliability and increased in generation capacity known as power uprates. In addition, the operating and design life of existing units can be extended for twenty or even forty years through plant life extension (PLEX). However. these uprates and life extensions are only viable if the plant reliability and capacity factor gains made in recent years continue through the extended operating domainlperiod. A growing number of US and international BWR's have successfully improved economic viability while increasing generation within existing facilities through implementation of uprates and PLEX efforts. The evolution of these efforts is the transition to a synergistic approach of plant modernization (including digital I and C upgrades), Life Cycle Management (LCM), margin recapture, and reliability improvement included in the overall plan with power uprates and PLEX. As the experience base with these programs grows suppliers, like GE, and utilities continue to build on the experience of prior projects, improve project execution, and maximize the investment returns. This paper will present the results of several recent GE BWR projects in the US that have implemented combined efforts of reliability management programs with strategic projects such as power uprates. The paper will focus on the lessons learned froin these efforts to help plants prepare for planning and implementing their own integrated reliability programs. Specific areas to be discussed include project initiation and scoping, project planning, project team

  8. BUTREN-RC an hybrid system for the recharges optimization of nuclear fuels in a BWR; BUTREN-RC un sistema hibrido para la optimizacion de recargas de combustible nuclear en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J.; Castillo M, J.A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The obtained results with the hybrid system BUTREN-RC are presented that obtains recharges of nuclear fuel for a BWR type reactor. The system has implemented the methods of optimization heuristic taboo search and neural networks. The optimization it carried out with the technique of taboo search, and the neural networks, previously trained, were used to predict the behavior of the recharges of fuel, in substitution of commercial codes of reactor simulation. The obtained recharges of nuclear fuel correspond to 5 different operation cycles of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant, Veracruz in Mexico. The obtained results were compared with the designs of this cycles. The energy gain with the recharges of fuel proposals is of approximately 4.5% with respect to those of design. The time of compute consumed it was considerably smaller that when a commercial code for reactor simulation is used. (Author)

  9. Aging and service wear of control rod drive mechanisms for BWR nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Phase I Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) study examines the aging phenomena associated with BWR control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and assesses the merits of various methods of ''managing'' this aging. Information for this study was acquired from (1) the results of a special CRDM aging questionnaire distributed to each US BWR utility, (2) a first-of-its-kind workshop held to discuss CRDM aging and maintenance concerns, (3) an analysis of the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure cases attributed to the control rod drive (CRD) system, and (4) personal information exchange with nuclear industry CRDM maintenance experts. Nearly 23% of the NPRDS CRD system component failure reports were attributed to the CRDM. The CRDM components most often requiring replacement due to normal wear and aging are the Graphiter seals. The predominant causes of aging for these seals are mechanical wear and thermally induced embrittlement More than 59% of the NPRDS CRD system failure reports were attributed to components that comprise the hydraulic control unit (HCU). The predominant HCU components experiencing the effects of service wear and aging are valve seals, discs, seats, stems, packing, and diaphragms. Since CRDM changeout and rebuilding is one of the highest dose, most physically challenging, and complicated maintenance activities routinely accomplished by BWR utilities, this report also highlights recent innovations in CRDM handling equipment and rebuilding tools that have resulted in significant dose reductions to the maintenance crews using them

  10. Nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, P.

    1985-01-01

    The question 'Do we really need nuclear power' is tackled within the context of Christian beliefs. First, an estimate is made of the energy requirements in the future and whether it can be got in conventional ways. The dangers of all the ways of supplying energy (eg coal mining, oil and gas production) are considered scientifically. Also the cost of each source and its environmental effects are debated. The consequences of developing a new energy source, as well as the consequences of not developing it, are considered. Decisions must also take into account a belief about the ultimate purpose of life, the relation of men to each other and to nature. Each issue is raised and questions for discussion are posed. On the whole the book comes down in favour of nuclear power.

  11. Results of the benchmarking in radiological protection practices during fuel reloads in the nuclear power plants of Limerick (BWR) and Ginna (PWR) in the United States of North America; Resultados del benchmarking en practicas de proteccion radiologica durante recargas de combustible en las centrales nucleoelectricas de Limerick (BWR) y Ginna (PWR) en los Estados Unidos de Norteamerica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara H, M. A., E-mail: marco.lara@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, unique in our country, has been imposed several goals related with the continuous improvement of their acting; increase in the quantity of continuous days for operation cycle, improvement in the chemical indexes of the reactor coolant, improvement in the indexes of nuclear security, improvement in the indicators of industrial security, improvement in the standards of radiological protection, etc.; in this last item is precisely where is necessary to search creative solutions to be able to maintain the collective doses of the personnel so low as reasonably it is possible (ALARA) especially due to the last projects of extension of useful life of the nuclear power plant (zinc injection, noble metals and hydrogen) and of power increment of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, same that represent in the short period an increment of collective dose and of exposition levels (until 200%) in very specific points of the primary systems of the reactor. (Author)

  12. Nuclear power data 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brochure on nuclear power data 2016 covers the following topics: (I) nuclear power in Germany: nuclear power plants in Germany; shut-down and decommissioned nuclear power plants, gross electricity generation, primary energy consumption; (II) nuclear power worldwide: nuclear electricity production, nuclear power plants.

  13. Data list of nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the database called PPD (Nuclear Power Plant Database) has started in 1983 at JAERI as a six-year program to provide useful information for reactor safety regulation and reactor safety research. In 1988 the program has been accomplished, and since then the data in the database has been updating and adding. Information source of the PPD is based on SAR's (Safety Analysis Report) of 47 nuclear power plants which are operating, under construction or under licensing review in Japan. The report, BWR edition, consists of lists of major data stored in the PPD, relating to safety design of 25 BWR plants in Japan. (author)

  14. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  15. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  16. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described

  17. Nuclear Theory - Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenne, J. P.; Canton, L.; Kozier, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    The results from modern nuclear theory are accurate and reliable enough to be used for practical applications, in particular for scattering that involves few-nucleon systems of importance to nuclear power. Using well-established nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions that fit well the NN scattering data, and the AGS form of the three-body theory, we have performed precise calculations of low-energy neutron-deuteron (n+d) scattering. We show that three-nucleon force effects that have impact on the low-energy vector analyzing powers have no practical effects on the angular distribution of the n+d cross-section. There appear to be problems for this scattering in the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF) libraries, at the incident neutron energies less than 3.2 MeV. Supporting experimental data in this energy region are rather old (>25 years), sparse and often inconsistent. Our three-body results at low energies, 50 keV to 10.0 MeV, are compared to the ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) -3.3 evaluated angular distributions. The impact of these results on the calculated reactivity for various critical systems involving heavy water is shown.

  18. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to identify issues and support documentation and identify and detail existing research on spent fuel dry storage; provide information to support potential R&D for the UKABWR (United Kingdom Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) Spent Fuel Interim Storage (SFIS) Pre-Construction Safety Report; and support development of answers to questions developed by the regulator. Where there are gaps or insufficient data, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has summarized the research planned to provide the necessary data along with the schedule for the research, if known. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants has historically been stored on site (wet) in spent fuel pools pending ultimate disposition. Nuclear power users (countries, utilities, vendors) are developing a suite of options and set of supporting analyses that will enable future informed choices about how best to manage these materials. As part of that effort, they are beginning to lay the groundwork for implementing longer-term interim storage of the SNF and the Greater Than Class C (CTCC) waste (dry). Deploying dry storage will require a number of technical issues to be addressed. For the past 4-5 years, ORNL has been supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in identifying these key technical issues, managing the collection of data to be used in issue resolution, and identifying gaps in the needed data. During this effort, ORNL subject matter experts (SMEs) have become expert in understanding what information is publicly available and what gaps in data remain. To ensure the safety of the spent fuel under normal and frequent conditions of wet and subsequent dry storage, intact fuel must be shown to: 1.Maintain fuel cladding integrity; 2.Maintain its geometry for cooling, shielding, and subcriticality; 3.Maintain retrievability, and damaged fuel with pinhole or hairline cracks must be shown not to degrade further. Where PWR (pressurized water reactor) information is

  19. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mertyurek, Ugur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this report is to identify issues and support documentation and identify and detail existing research on spent fuel dry storage; provide information to support potential R&D for the UKABWR (United Kingdom Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) Spent Fuel Interim Storage (SFIS) Pre-Construction Safety Report; and support development of answers to questions developed by the regulator. Where there are gaps or insufficient data, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has summarized the research planned to provide the necessary data along with the schedule for the research, if known. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants has historically been stored on site (wet) in spent fuel pools pending ultimate disposition. Nuclear power users (countries, utilities, vendors) are developing a suite of options and set of supporting analyses that will enable future informed choices about how best to manage these materials. As part of that effort, they are beginning to lay the groundwork for implementing longer-term interim storage of the SNF and the Greater Than Class C (CTCC) waste (dry). Deploying dry storage will require a number of technical issues to be addressed. For the past 4-5 years, ORNL has been supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in identifying these key technical issues, managing the collection of data to be used in issue resolution, and identifying gaps in the needed data. During this effort, ORNL subject matter experts (SMEs) have become expert in understanding what information is publicly available and what gaps in data remain. To ensure the safety of the spent fuel under normal and frequent conditions of wet and subsequent dry storage, intact fuel must be shown to: 1.Maintain fuel cladding integrity; 2.Maintain its geometry for cooling, shielding, and subcriticality; 3.Maintain retrievability, and damaged fuel with pinhole or hairline cracks must be shown not to degrade further. Where PWR (pressurized water reactor) information is

  20. Construction and operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How does a nuclear power plant work. Which reactor types are in use. What safety measures are being taken. These questions and the like are frequently asked by those interested in nuclear power generation. The respective answers are to be found in the report ''Construction and Operation of Nuclear Power Plants''. Nuclear-physical fundamentals and the basic safety measures are explained, and four reactor types that are most common in the Federal Republic of Germany are described: PWR-, BWR-, HTR-type and faster breeder reactors. For each reactor type, the principle of operation, steam generator system, auxiliary and service buildings as well as the respective safety devices are indicated, and visualized by means of numerous illustrations. The report is meant to be instrumental to the purpose of getting objectiveness into the public discussion on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. (orig.)

  1. Basic evaluation on nuclear characteristics of BWR high burnup MOX fuel and core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOX fuel will be used in existing commercial BWR cores as a part of reload fuels with equivalent operability, safety and economy to UO2 fuel in Japan. The design concept should be compatible with UO2 fuel design. High burnup UO2 fuels are being developed and commercialized step by step. The MOX fuel planned to be introduced in around year 2000 will use the same hardware as UO2 8 x 8 array fuel developed for a second step of UO2 high burnup fuel. The target discharge exposure of this MOX fuel is about 33 GWd/t. And the loading fraction of MOX fuel is approximately one-third in an equilibrium core. On the other hand, it becomes necessary to minimize a number of MOX fuels and plants utilizing MOX fuel, mainly due to the fuel economy, handling cost and inspection cost in site. For the above reasons, it needed to developed a high burnup MOX fuel containing much Pu and a core with a large amount of MOX fuels. The purpose of this study is to evaluate basic nuclear fuel and core characteristics of BWR high burnup MOX fuel with batch average exposure of about 39.5 GWd/t using 9 x 9 array fuel. The loading fraction of MOX fuel in the core is within a range of about 50% to 100%. Also the influence of Pu isotopic composition fluctuations and Pu-241 decay upon nuclear characteristics are studied. (author). 3 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Nuclear coupled flow instability study for natural circulation BWR startup transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural circulation Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) startup transient was investigated in Purdue University Multidimensional Test Assembly (PUMA) facility based on a natural circulation BWR design. Strategy and results of the experiments, which consider the effects of void-reactivity and fuel heat conduction time constant, are discussed. Total reactivity is treated to be composed of two components: external reactivity due to control rod motion and void-reactivity. A detailed analysis for heat conduction problem is performed to derive dimensionless groups. Based on area-averaged heat conduction equations for pellet and clad regions, Fourier and Biot numbers are derived to simulate wall heat flux response. Power transient, which has been used for startup transient investigation without void-reactivity feedback is used to derive the control rod reactivity. Twelve conductivity probes are used to measure local void fraction inside core at three axial locations. The local void-fraction data is used to calculate volume average void fraction, which is used to calculate the voil-reactivity. A real-time Point Kinetic Model solver is implemented to PUMA heater power control program to determine power transient during startup. The results demonstrate that the inclusion of void-reactivity feedback worsen the scenario for startup instabilities and may cause large amplitude neutron flux oscillations. (author)

  3. Nuclear power economic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power economic database (NPEDB), based on ORACLE V6.0, consists of three parts, i.e., economic data base of nuclear power station, economic data base of nuclear fuel cycle and economic database of nuclear power planning and nuclear environment. Economic database of nuclear power station includes data of general economics, technique, capital cost and benefit, etc. Economic database of nuclear fuel cycle includes data of technique and nuclear fuel price. Economic database of nuclear power planning and nuclear environment includes data of energy history, forecast, energy balance, electric power and energy facilities

  4. U.S. Department Of Energy's nuclear engineering education research: highlights of recent and current research-II. 7. Hybrid Reactor Simulation and 3-D Information Display of BWR Out-of-Phase Oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The real-time hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability of the Penn State TRIGA reactor has been recently expanded for BWR out-of-phase behavior. Out-of-phase oscillation is a phenomenon that occurs at BWRs. During this kind of event, half of the core can significantly oscillate out of phase with the other half, while the average power reported by the neutronic instrumentation may show a much lower amplitude for the oscillations. The HRS will be used for development and validation of stability monitoring and control techniques as part of an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Engineering Education and Research grant. The Penn State TRIGA reactor is used to simulate BWR fundamental mode power dynamics. The first harmonic mode power, together with detailed thermal hydraulics of boiling channels of both fundamental mode and first harmonic mode, is simulated digitally in real time with a computer. Simulations of boiling channels provide reactivity feedback to the TRIGA reactor, and the TRIGA reactor's power response is in turn fed into the channel simulations and the first harmonic mode power simulation. The combination of reactor power response and the simulated first harmonic power response with spatial distribution functions thus mimics the stability phenomena actually encountered in BWRs. The digital simulations of the boiling channels are performed by solving conservation equations for different regions in the channel with C-MEX S-functions. A fast three-dimensional (3-D) reactor power display of modal BWR power distribution was implemented using MATLAB graphics capability. Fundamental mode, first harmonic, together with the total power distribution over the reactor cross section, are displayed. Because of the large amount of computation for BWR boiling channel simulation and real-time data processing and graph generation, one computer is not sufficient to handle these jobs in the hybrid reactor simulation environment. A new three-computer setup has been

  5. Prediction of the local power factor in BWR fuel cells by means of a multilayer neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To the beginning of a new operation cycle in a BWR reactor the reactivity of this it increases by means of the introduction of fresh fuel, the one denominated reload fuel. The problem of the definition of the characteristics of this reload fuel represents a combinatory optimization problem that requires significantly a great quantity of CPU time for their determination. This situation has motivated to study the possibility to substitute the Helios code, the one which is used to generate the new cells of the reload fuel parameters, by an artificial neuronal network, with the purpose of predicting the parameters of the fuel reload cell of a BWR reactor. In this work the results of the one training of a multilayer neuronal net that can predict the local power factor (LPPF) in such fuel cells are presented. The prediction of the LPPF is carried out in those condition of beginning of the life of the cell (0.0 MWD/T, to 40% of holes in the one moderator, temperature of 793 K in the fuel and a moderator temperature of 560 K. The cells considered in the present study consist of an arrangement of 10x10 bars, of those which 92 contains U235, some of these bars also contain a concentration of Gd2O3 and 8 of them contain only water. The axial location inside the one assembles of recharge of these cells it is exactly up of the cells that contain natural uranium in the base of the reactor core. The training of the neuronal net is carried out by means of a retro-propagation algorithm that uses a space of training formed starting from previous evaluations of cells by means of the Helios code. They are also presented the results of the application of the neuronal net found for the prediction of the LPPF of some cells used in the real operation of the Unit One of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power station. (Author)

  6. Development of neural network for predicting local power distributions in BWR fuel bundles considering burnable neutron absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neural network model is under development to predict the local power distribution in a BWR fuel bundle as a high speed simulator of precise nuclear physical analysis model. The relation between 235U enrichment of fuel rods and local peaking factor (LPF) has been learned using a two-layered neural network model ENET. The training signals used were 33 patterns having considered a line symmetry of a 8x8 assembly lattice including 4 water rods. The ENET model is used in the first stage and a new model GNET which learns the change of LPFs caused by burnable neutron absorber Gadolinia, is added to the ENET in the second stage. Using this two-staged model EGNET, total number of training signals can be decreased to 99. These training signals are for zero-burnup cases. The effect of Gadolinia on LPF has a large nonlinearity and the GNET should have three layers. This combined model of EGNET can predict the training signals within 0.02 of LPF error, and the LPF of a high power rod is predictable within 0.03 error for Gadolinia rod distributions different from the training signals when the number of Gadolinia rods is less than 10. The computing speed of EGNET is more than 100 times faster than that of a precise nuclear analysis model, and EGNET is suitable for scoping survey analysis. (author)

  7. Neutron noise analysis techniques in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main techniques used in neutron noise analysis of BWR and PWR nuclear reactors are reviewed. Several applications such as control of vibrations in both reactor types, determination of two phase flow parameters in BWR and stability control in BWR are discussed with some detail. The paper contains many experimental results obtained by the main author of this paper. (author)

  8. Development of a computer program of fast calculation for the pre design of advanced nuclear fuel 10 x 10 for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) a methodology is developed to optimize the design of cells 10x10 of assemble fuels for reactors of water in boil or BWR. It was proposed a lineal calculation formula based on a coefficients matrix (of the change reason of the relative power due to changes in the enrichment of U-235) for estimate the relative powers by pin of a cell. With this it was developed the computer program of fast calculation named PreDiCeldas. The one which by means of a simple search algorithm allows to minimize the relative power peak maximum of cell or LPPF. This is achieved varying the distribution of U-235 inside the cell, maintaining in turn fixed its average enrichment. The accuracy in the estimation of the relative powers for pin is of the order from 1.9% when comparing it with results of the 'best estimate' HELIOS code. With the PreDiCeldas it was possible, at one minimum time of calculation, to re-design a reference cell diminishing the LPPF, to the beginning of the life, of 1.44 to a value of 1.31. With the cell design with low LPPF is sought to even design cycles but extensive that those reached at the moment in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central. (Author)

  9. Nuclear power in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Association believes that the CANDU nuclear power generation system can play a major role in achieving energy self-sufficiency in Canada. The benefits of nuclear power, factors affecting projections of electric power demand, risks and benefits relative to other conventional and non-conventional energy sources, power economics, and uranium supply are discussed from a Canadian perspective. (LL)

  10. Nuclear power training programmes in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of nuclear power in Spain is developing very rapidly. At present 1.1GW(e) are installed in Spain and this is expected to increase to 8GW(e) in 1980 and to 28GW(e) in 1990. Spanish industry and technology are also rapidly increasing their participation in building nuclear stations, in manufacturing the necessary components and in the activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle. All of this requires properly trained personnel, which is estimated to become approximately 1200 high-level technicians, 1100 medium-level technicians and 1500 technical assistants by 1980. This personnel is trained: (a) in engineering schools; (b) in the Nuclear Studies Institute; (c) in the electric companies with nuclear programmes. The majority of the high-level engineering schools in the country include physics and basic nuclear technology courses in their programmes. Some of them have an experimental low-power nuclear reactor. The Nuclear Studies Institute is an official organism dependent on the Nuclear Energy Commission and responsible, among other subjects, for training personnel for the peaceful use and development of nuclear energy in the country. The electric companies also participate in training personnel for future nuclear stations and they plan to have advanced simulators of PWR and BWR type stations for operator training. The report deals with the personnel requirement forecasts and describes the training programmes. (author)

  11. Calculation of the neutron flux and fluence in the covering of the nucleus and the vessel of a BWR; Calculo del flujo neutronico y fluencia en la envolvente del nucleo y la vasija de un reactor nuclear BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: evalle@esfm.ipn.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    One of the main objectives related with the safety in any nuclear power plant, including the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is to guarantee the structural integrity of the pressure vessel of the reactor. To identify and quantifying the damage caused be neutron irradiation in the vessel of any nuclear reactor, is necessary to know as much the neutron flux as the fluence that it has been receiving during their time of operation life, since the observables damages by means of tests mechanics are products of micro-structural effects, induced by neutron irradiation, therefore, is important the study and prediction of the neutron flux to have a better knowledge of the damage that are receiving these materials. In our calculation the code DORT was used, which solves the transport equation in discreet coordinates and in two dimensions (x-y, r-{theta} and r-z), in accord to the regulator guide, it requires to make and approach of the neutron flux in three dimensions by means of the Synthesis Method. Whit this method is possible to achieve a representation of the flux in 3D combining or synthesizing the calculated fluxes by DORT code in r-{theta}, r-z and r. In this work the application of the Synthesis Method is presented, according to the Regulator Guide 1.190, to determine the fluxes 3D in the interns of a BWR using three different space meshes. (Author)

  12. Prospects for Nuclear Power

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas W. Davis

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has long been controversial because of concerns about nuclear accidents, storage of spent fuel, and how the spread of nuclear power might raise risks of the proliferation of nuclear weapons. These concerns are real and important. However, emphasizing these concerns implicitly suggests that unless these issues are taken into account, nuclear power would otherwise be cost effective compared to other forms of electricity generation. This implication is unwarranted. Throughout the h...

  13. Nuclear Power in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China’s vigorous efforts to propel development of nuclear power are paying off as the country’s nuclear power sector advances at an amazing pace. At present, China has set up three enormous nuclear power bases, one each in Qinshan of Zhejiang Province, Dayawan of Guangdong

  14. Hydrogen uptake of BWR fuel rods. Power history effects at long irradiation times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA LTP (Low Temperature Process) Zircaloy-2 cladding for Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) in both RXA (Recrystallized Annealed) and CWSR (Cold Worked Stress Relieved) metallurgical states, has an optimized microstructure with an optimum size of SPP (Secondary Phase Particles) that has reduced the nodular corrosion to a minimum while maintaining a good uniform corrosion performance with acceptable hydrogen pickup. Classically hydrogen uptake is described by the Hydrogen Pick-Up Fraction (HPUF), which is the ratio of the hydrogen generated by uniform oxidation that is eventually picked up by the metal to the total hydrogen generated by oxidation. In the past, the hydrogen uptake database showed a low HPUF with hydrogen concentration close to the saturation value of the metal at operating temperature and correspondingly little hydride formation. The hydrogen concentration was correlated with irradiation time via the HPUF (at an almost constant corrosion and hydrogen production rate). Recently, some significantly higher hydrogen concentration values (300 wppm and more) have been measured for medium and high burnup rods. This effect was also observed on four AREVA fuel rods from BWR (Boiling Water Reactors). This prompted a thorough analysis of the hydrogen pickup database as well as material and environmental factors influencing corrosion and hydrogen uptake. The most important outcome of the investigation was that a low power – low steam condition is associated with increased hydrogen pickup. The linear power is a proxy variable for low heat flux and low steam quality in the coolant, which were identified as important parameters for physical processes that could explain the enhanced hydrogen uptake in some cases. The paper will present the database of the enhanced hydrogen uptake measured in European power reactors and demonstrate the effect of power history on the uptake process. Power histories with high hydrogen uptake included extended low power periods later in

  15. Safety Evalution Report related to the final design approval of the GESSAR II BWR/6 nuclear island design (Docket No. 50-447)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report supplements the GESSAR II SER (NUREG-0979), issued in April 1983, summarizing the results of the staff's safety review of the GESSAR II BWR/6 nuclear island design. The review is carried out in accordance with the procedures for demonstrating the acceptability of the design for the severe-accident concerns described in draft NUREG-1070, NRC Policy on Future Reactor Designs: Decisions on Severe Accident Issues in Nuclear Power Plant Regulation. Supplement 2 also provides more recent information regarding resolution or update of the confirmatory items and FDA-1 conditions identified in SSER 1. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this supplement, the staff concludes that the GESSAR II design satisfactorily addresses the severe-accident concerns described in draft NUREG-1070

  16. Nuclear power prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of the nuclear power needs of the less-developed countries and a study of the technology and economics of small and medium scale power reactors are envisioned by the General Conference. Agency makes its services available to Member States to assist them for their future nuclear power plans, and in particular in studying the technical and economic aspects of their power programs. The Agency also undertakes general studies on the economics of nuclear power, including the collection and analysis of cost data, in order to assist Member States in comparing and forecasting nuclear power costs in relation to their specific situations

  17. Experience of MOX-fuel operation in the Gundremmingen BWR plant: Nuclear characteristics and in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After 4 years of good experience with MOX-fuel operation in the BWR plants Gundremmingen units B and C the number of inserted MOX-FAs will be increased in the future continuously. Until now all MOX-FAs are in good condition. Furthermore calculations and measurements concerning zero power tests and tip measurements are in good agreement as expected: all results lead to the conclusion that MOX-FAs can be calculated with the same precision as uranium-FAs. (author)

  18. RETHINKING NUCLEAR POWER SAFETY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident sounds alarm bells in China’s nuclear power industry In the wake of the Fukushima nucleara ccident caused by the earthquake andt sunami in Japan,the safety of nuclearp ower plants and the development of nuclear power have raised concerns,

  19. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanical performance of fuel rods of a BWR during a power ramp using the FUELSIM code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To avoid the risk to environment due to release of radioactive material, because of occurrence of an accident, it is the priority of the design and performance of the diverse systems of safety of a commercial nuclear power plant. The safety of nuclear power plants requires, therefore, monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behavior under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. The main application of the thermal-mechanical analysis codes is the prediction of occurrence of conditions and/or phenomena that could lead to the deterioration or even mechanical failure of the fuel rod cladding, as, for example, the pellet-cladding interaction. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, fuel preconditioning operations refer to the operational procedures employed to reduce the fuel rod failure probability due to fuel-cladding interaction, specially during reactor startup. Preconditioning simulations are therefore necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR 5/6, as those two nuclear reactors in Laguna Verde, Veracruz, is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with an array 8 x 8

  20. Actinides record, power calculations and activity for present isotopes in the spent fuel of a BWR; Historial de actinidos y calculos de potencia y actividad para isotopos presentes en el combustible gastado de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez C, P.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Lucatero, M. A., E-mail: pastor.enriquez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The administration of spent fuel is one of the more important stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, and this has become a problem of supreme importance in countries that possess nuclear reactors. Due to this in this work, the study on the actinides record and present fission products to the discharge of the irradiated fuel in a light water reactor type BWR is shown, to quantify the power and activity that emit to the discharge and during the cooling time. The analysis was realized on a fuel assembly type 10 x 10 with an enrichment average of 3.69 wt % in U-235 and the assembly simulation assumes four cycles of operation of 18 months each one and presents an exposition of 47 G Wd/Tm to the discharge. The module OrigenArp of the Scale 6 code is the computation tool used for the assembly simulation and to obtain the results on the actinides record presents to the fuel discharge. The study covers the following points: a) Obtaining of the plutonium vector used in the fuel production of mixed oxides, and b) Power calculation and activity for present actinides to the discharge. The results presented in this work, correspond at the same time immediate of discharge (0 years) and to a cooling stage in the irradiated fuel pool (5 years). (Author)

  1. Fuel design with low peak of local power for BWR reactors with increased nominal power; Diseno de un combustible con bajo pico de potencia local para reactores BWR con potencia nominal aumentada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia C, R.; Montes, J.L.; Hernandez, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Castillo, A. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mrpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The Federal Commission of Electricity recently announcement the beginning of the works related with the increase of the power to 120% of the original nominal one in the Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of the Laguna Verde Central (CLV): In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) are carried out studies of the impact on the design of the recharge of derived fuel of this increase. One of the main effects of the power increase type that it is promoting, is the increment of the flow of generated vapor, what takes, to a bigger fraction of vacuum in the core presenting increased values of the maximum fraction to the limit, so much of the ratio of lineal heat generation (XFLPD) as of the ratio of critic power (MFLCPR). In the made studies, it is found that these fractions rise lineally with the increase of the nominal power. Considering that the reactors of the CLV at the moment operate to 105% of the original nominal power, it would imply an increment of the order of 13.35% in the XFLPD and in the MFLCPR operating to a nominal power of 120% of the original one. This would propitiate bigger problems to design appropriately the fuel cycle and the necessity, almost unavoidable, of to resort to a fuel assembly type more advanced for the recharges of the cores. As option, in the ININ the feasibility of continuing using the same type of it fuel assembles that one has come using recently in the CLV, the type GE12 is analyzed. To achieve it was outlined to diminish the peak factor of local power (LPPF) of the power cells that compose the fuel recharge in 13.35%. It was started of a fuel design previously used in the recharge of the unit 1 cycle 12 and it was re-design to use it in the recharge design of the cycle 13 of the unit 1, considering an increase to 120% of the original power and the same requirements of cycle extension. For the re-design of the fuel assembly cell it was used the PreDiCeldas computer program developed in the ININ. It was able to diminish the LPPF

  2. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the problem of necessity to develop nuclear power, conceivable consequences of this development, its disadvantages and advantages. It is shown that the nuclear power is capable of supplying the world's economy with practically unlimited and the most low-cost energy resources providing the transition from the epoch of organic fuel to the epoch with another energy sources. The analysis of various factors of nuclear power effects on population and environment is presented. Special attention is focused on emergency situations at NPPs. The problem of raising the nuclear power safety is considered. 11 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Digital implementation, simulation and tests in MATLAB of the models of Steam line, the turbines, the pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this phase of the project they were carried out exhaustive tests to the models of the steam lines, turbines and pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric central for to verify that their tendencies and behaviors are it more real possible. For it, it was necessary to also analyze the transfer functions of the different components along the steam line until the power generator. Such models define alone the dominant poles of the system, what is not limitation to reproduce a wide range of anticipated transitoriness of a power station operation. In the same manner, it was integrated and proved the integrated model form with the models of feeding water of the SUN-RAH, simulating the nuclear reactor starting from predetermined entrances of the prospective values of the vessel. Also it was coupled with the graphic interface developed with the libraries DirectX implementing a specific monitoring panel for this system. (Author)

  4. Nuclear power debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent resurgence of interest in Australia in the nuclear power option has been largely attributed to growing concerns over climate change. But what are the real pros and cons of nuclear power? Have advances in technology solved the sector's key challenges? Do the economics stack up for Australia where there is so much coal, gas and renewable resources? Is the greenhouse footprint' of nuclear power low enough to justify its use? During May and June, the AIE hosted a series of Branch events on nuclear power across Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. In the interest of balance, and at risk of being a little bit repetitive, here we draw together four items that resulted from these events and that reflect the opposing views on nuclear power in Australia. Nuclear Power for Australia: Irrelevant or Inevitable? - a summary of the presentations to the symposium held by Sydney Branch on 8 June 2005. Nuclear Reactors Waste the Planet - text from the flyer distributed by The Greens at their protest gathering outside the symposium venue on 8 June 2005. The Case For Nuclear Power - an edited transcript of Ian Hore-Lacy's presentation to Adelaide Branch on 19 May 2005 and to Perth Branch on 28 June 2005. The Case Against Nuclear Power - an article submitted to Energy News by Robin Chappie subsequent to Mr Hore-Lacy's presentation to Perth Branch

  5. Nuclear power in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the energy sector Belgium is 90% dependent on imports. This was clearly felt by the electricity generating economy when the share of hydrocarbons in the energy resources used for electricity generation increased to more than 85% in 1973 as a consequence of rising electricity consumption. Although Belgium had been early to start employing nuclear power for peaceful purposes, only little use had initially been made of this possibility. After the first oil price crisis the Belgian electricity utilities turned more attention to nuclear power. To this day, seven nuclear power plants have been started up, and Belgian utilities hold a fifty percent share in a French nuclear power plant, while the French EdF holds fifty percent in one Belgian nuclear generating unit. The Belgian nuclear power plants, which were built mostly by Belgian industries, have an excellent operating record. Their availabilities are considerably above the worldwide average and they contributed some 60% to the electricity production in Belgium in 1985. Thanks to nuclear power, the cumulative percentage shares of heating oil and gas in electricity production were reduced to well over 15%, compared to 1973, thus meeting the objectives of using nuclear power, i.e., to save foreign exchange and become self-sufficient in supplying the country's needs. The use of nuclear power allowed the Belgian utilities to reduce the price per kilowatthour of electricity and, in this way, remain competitive with other countries. The introduction of nuclear power continues to have a stabilizing influence on electricity generating costs. In the light of the forecast future development of consumption it is regarded as probable that another nuclear power plant of 1390 MWe will have to be built and commissioned before the year 2000. (orig.)

  6. Sydkraft and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article summarizes the report made by G. Ekberg for the Swedish Sydkraft Power Co. at the company's annual meeting in June 1976. The report comprises the year 1975 and the first five months of 1976 and largely discusses nuclear power. Experience with the running of Oskarshamn and Barsebaeck nuclear power stations is reported. Nuclear power has enabled production in the oil-fired power stations at Karlshamn and Malmoe to be reduced. 750 000 tons of oil have been saved. In the first five months of 1976, nuclear power accounted for 48% of Sydkraft's electricity production, water power 36% and oil only 16%. In 1975, Sydkraft produced 13% of Sweden's electricity. (H.E.G.)

  7. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  8. Economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the economics of nuclear and coal-fired power plants operated by Commonwealth Edison was developed. In this comparison, fuel costs, total busbar costs and plant performance were of particular interest. Also included were comparisons of construction costs of nuclear and coal-fired power plants over the past two decades

  9. Talk About Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremlett, Lewis

    1976-01-01

    Presents an overview of the relation of nuclear power to human health and the environment, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power as an energy source urging technical educators to inculcate an awareness of the problems associated with the production of energy. Describes the fission reaction process, the hazards of…

  10. Nuclear Power Day '86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings in two volumes of the event ''Nuclear Power Day '86'' held in the Institute of Nuclear Research, contain full texts of 13 papers which all fall under the INIS Scope. The objective of the event was to acquaint broad technical public with the scope of the State Research and Development Project called ''Development of Nuclear Power till the Year 2000''. The papers were mainly focused on increased safety and reliability of nuclear power plants with WWER reactors, on the development of equipment and systems for disposal and burial of radioactive wastes, the introduction of production of nuclear power facilities of an output of 1,000 MW, and on the construction of nuclear heat sources. (Z.M.)

  11. Serpent: an alternative for the nuclear fuel cells analysis of a BWR; SERPENT: una alternativa para el analisis de celdas de combustible nuclear de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva A, L.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: lidi.s.albarran@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In the last ten years the diverse research groups in nuclear engineering of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (UNAM, IPN), as of research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ) as well as the personnel of the Nuclear Plant Management of the Comision Federal de Electricidad have been using the codes Helios and /or CASMO-4 in the generation of cross sections (X S) of nuclear fuel cells of the cores corresponding to the Units 1 and 2 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Both codes belong to the Studsvik-Scandpower Company who receives the payment for the use and their respective maintenance. In recent years, the code Serpent appears among the nuclear community distributed by the OECD/Nea which does not has cost neither in its use neither in its maintenance. The code is based on the Monte Carlo method and makes use of the processing in parallel. In the Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of the IPN, the personnel has accumulated certain experience in the use of Serpent under the direction of personal of the ININ; of this experience have been obtained for diverse fuel burned, the infinite multiplication factor for three cells of nuclear fuel, without control bar and with control bar for a known thermodynamic state fixed by: a) the fuel temperature (T{sub f}), b) the moderator temperature (T{sub m}) and c) the vacuums fraction (α). Although was not realized any comparison with the X S that the codes Helios and CASMO-4 generate, the results obtained for the infinite multiplication factor show the prospective tendencies with regard to the fuel burned so much in the case in that is not present the control bar like when it is. The results are encouraging and motivate to the study group to continue with the X S generation of a core in order to build the respective library of nuclear data as a following step and this can be used for the codes PARCS, of USA NRC, DYN3D of HZDR, or others developed locally

  12. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  13. Nuclear Power in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    In the early years of the United States space program, lightweight batteries, fuel cells, and solar modules provided electric power for space missions. As missions became more ambitious and complex, power needs increased and scientists investigated various options to meet these challenging power requirements. One of the options was nuclear energy. By the mid-1950s, research had begun in earnest on ways to use nuclear power in space. These efforts resulted in the first radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which are nuclear power generators build specifically for space and special terrestrial uses. These RTGs convert the heat generated from the natural decay of their radioactive fuel into electricity. RTGs have powered many spacecraft used for exploring the outer planets of the solar system and orbiting the sun and Earth. They have also landed on Mars and the moon. They provide the power that enables us to see and learn about even the farthermost objects in our solar system.

  14. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs

  15. Impact analysis of modifying the composition of the nuclear fuel of a BWR with beryllium oxide; Analisis del impacto de modificar la composicion del combustible nuclear de un BWR con oxido de berilio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo V, J. M.; Morales S, J. B., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The beryllium oxide (Be O) presents excellent physical properties, especially its high thermal conductivity that contrasts clearly with that of the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) used at the present as fuel in a great number of nuclear plants. The present work models a nuclear reactor cooled by light water in boiling with two external recirculation loops (BWR/5) using the code for the transitory analysis and postulated accidents Trac-B F1, implementing a UO{sub 2} mixture and different fractions of Be O, with the objective of improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel. The numeric results and the realized analyses indicate that when adding a fraction in volume of 10% the central temperature decreases in 30.4% in stationary state, while during the large break loss of coolant accident the peak cladding temperature diminishes in 7%. Although the real interaction of the mixture has not been determined experimentally, the obtained results are promising. (Author)

  16. Nuclear power experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Conference on Nuclear Power Experience, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was held at the Hofburg Conference Center, Vienna, Austria, from 13 to 17 September 1982. Almost 1200 participants and observers from 63 countries and 20 organizations attended the conference. The 239 papers presented were grouped under the following seven main topics: planning and development of nuclear power programmes; technical and economic experience of nuclear power production; the nuclear fuel cycle; nuclear safety experience; advanced systems; international safeguards; international co-operation. The proceedings are published in six volumes. The sixth volume contains a complete Contents of Volume 1 to 5, a List of Participants, Authors and Transliteration Indexes, a Subject Index and an Index of Papers by Number

  17. 600 MW nuclear power database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    600 MW Nuclear power database, based on ORACLE 6.0, consists of three parts, i.e. nuclear power plant database, nuclear power position database and nuclear power equipment database. In the database, there are a great deal of technique data and picture of nuclear power, provided by engineering designing units and individual. The database can give help to the designers of nuclear power

  18. Nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The legal aspects of nuclear power plant construction in Brazil, derived from governamental political guidelines, are presented. Their evolution, as a consequence of tecnology development is related. (A.L.S.L.)

  19. Safeguarding nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic features of nuclear fuel accounting and control in present-day power reactors are considered. Emphasis is placed on reactor operations and spent-fuel characteristics for Light-Water Reactors (LWRs) and Heavy-Water Reactors (HWRs)

  20. Commercial nuclear power 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents historical data on commercial nuclear power in the United States, with projections of domestic nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2020. The report also gives country-specific projections of nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2010 for other countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information is also presented regarding operable reactors and those under construction in countries with centrally planned economies. 39 tabs

  1. Prediction of the local power factor in BWR fuel cells by means of a multilayer neural network; Prediccion del factor local de potencia en celdas de combustible BWR mediante una red neuronal multicapas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Perusquia C, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Francois, J.L.; Martin del Campo M, C. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jlmt@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    To the beginning of a new operation cycle in a BWR reactor the reactivity of this it increases by means of the introduction of fresh fuel, the one denominated reload fuel. The problem of the definition of the characteristics of this reload fuel represents a combinatory optimization problem that requires significantly a great quantity of CPU time for their determination. This situation has motivated to study the possibility to substitute the Helios code, the one which is used to generate the new cells of the reload fuel parameters, by an artificial neuronal network, with the purpose of predicting the parameters of the fuel reload cell of a BWR reactor. In this work the results of the one training of a multilayer neuronal net that can predict the local power factor (LPPF) in such fuel cells are presented. The prediction of the LPPF is carried out in those condition of beginning of the life of the cell (0.0 MWD/T, to 40% of holes in the one moderator, temperature of 793 K in the fuel and a moderator temperature of 560 K. The cells considered in the present study consist of an arrangement of 10x10 bars, of those which 92 contains U{sup 235}, some of these bars also contain a concentration of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 8 of them contain only water. The axial location inside the one assembles of recharge of these cells it is exactly up of the cells that contain natural uranium in the base of the reactor core. The training of the neuronal net is carried out by means of a retro-propagation algorithm that uses a space of training formed starting from previous evaluations of cells by means of the Helios code. They are also presented the results of the application of the neuronal net found for the prediction of the LPPF of some cells used in the real operation of the Unit One of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power station. (Author)

  2. Turkey's nuclear power effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the expected role of nuclear energy in the production of electric power to serve the growing needs of Turkey, examining past activities and recent developments. The paper also reviews Turkey's plans with respect to nuclear energy and the challenges that the country faces along the way

  3. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  4. No to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Beazley has again stated a Labor Government would not pursue nuclear power because the economics 'simply don't stack up'. 'We have significant gas, coal and renewable energy reserves and do not have a solution for the disposal of low-level nuclear waste, let alone waste from nuclear power stations.' The Opposition Leader said developing nuclear power now would have ramifications for Australia's security. 'Such a move could result in our regional neighbours fearing we will use it militarily.' Instead, Labor would focus on the practical measures that 'deliver economic and environmental stability while protecting our national security'. Mr Beazley's comments on nuclear power came in the same week as Prime Minister John Howard declined the request of Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh for uranium exports, although seemingly not ruling out a policy change at some stage. The Prime Ministers held talks in New Delhi over whether Australia would sell uranium to India without it signing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. An agreement reached during a visit by US President George W. Bush gives India access to long-denied nuclear technology and guaranteed fuel in exchange for allowing international inspection of some civilian nuclear facilities. Copyright (2006) Crown Content Pty Ltd

  5. Nuclear power and leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet describes the nature of leukaemia, disease incidence in the UK and the possible causes. Epidemiological studies observing rates of leukaemia near nuclear power stations in the UK and other parts of the world are discussed. Possible causes of leukaemia excesses near nuclear establishments include radioactive discharges into the environment, paternal radiation exposure and viral causes. (UK)

  6. Globalization and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different aspects of the experience of nuclear power as recounted by well-known commentators and new contributors are included in two special issues. In general, the discussions are historical and theoretical and most are retrospective. The current position of nuclear power world wide is considered. Its future seems less than secure especially as it will have to compete alongside other energy sources with many problems of control of its materials still unresolved. (UK)

  7. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of space nuclear power and propulsion in the United States started in 1955 with the initiation of the ROVER project. The first step in the ROVER program was the KIWI project that included the development and testing of 8 non-flyable ultrahigh temperature nuclear test reactors during 1955-1964. The KIWI project was precursor to the PHOEBUS carbon-based fuel reactor project that resulted in ground testing of three high power reactors during 1965-1968 with the last reactor operated at 4,100 MW. During the same time period a parallel program was pursued to develop a nuclear thermal rocket based on cermet fuel technology. The third component of the ROVER program was the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) that was initiated in 1961 with the primary goal of designing the first generation of nuclear rocket engine based on the KIWI project experience. The fourth component of the ROVER program was the Reactor In-Flight Test (RIFT) project that was intended to design, fabricate, and flight test a NERVA powered upper stage engine for the Saturn-class lunch vehicle. During the ROVER program era, the Unites States ventured in a comprehensive space nuclear program that included design and testing of several compact reactors and space suitable power conversion systems, and the development of a few light weight heat rejection systems. Contrary to its sister ROVER program, the space nuclear power program resulted in the first ever deployment and in-space operation of the nuclear powered SNAP-10A in 1965. The USSR space nuclear program started in early 70's and resulted in deployment of two 6 kWe TOPAZ reactors into space and ground testing of the prototype of a relatively small nuclear rocket engine in 1984. The US ambition for the development and deployment of space nuclear powered systems was resurrected in mid 1980's and intermittently continued to date with the initiation of several research programs that included the SP-100, Space Exploration

  8. Nuclear power for tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of nuclear power has established this energy source as a viable mature technology, producing at comparative costs more than 16% of the electricity generated world-wide. After outlining the current status of nuclear power, extreme future scenarios are presented, corresponding respectively to maximum penetration limited by technical-economic characteristics, and nuclear phase-out at medium term. The situation is complex and country specific. The relative perception of the importance of different factors and the compensation of advantages vs. disadvantages, or risk vs. benefits, has predominant influence. In order to proceed with an objective and realistic estimate of the future role of nuclear power worldwide, the fundamental factors indicated below pro nuclear power and against are assessed, including expected trends regarding their evolution: Nuclear safety risk; reduction to levels of high improbability but not zero risk. Reliable source of energy; improvements towards uniform standards of excellence. Economic competitiveness vs. alternatives; stabilization and possible reduction of costs. Financing needs and constraints; availability according to requirements. Environmental effects; comparative analysis with alternatives. Public and political acceptance; emphasis on reason and facts over emotions. Conservation of fossil energy resources; gradual deterioration but no dramatic crisis. Energy supply assurance; continuing concerns. Infrastructure requirements and availability; improvements in many countries due to overall development. Non-proliferation in military uses; separation of issues from nuclear power. IAEA forecasts to the year 2005 are based on current projects, national plans and policies and on prevailing trends. Nuclear electricity generation is expected to reach about 18% of total worldwide electricity generation, with 500 to 580 GW(e) installed capacity. On a longer term, to 2030, a stabilized role and place among available viable

  9. Modeling and validation of a mechanistic tool (MEFISTO) for the prediction of critical power in BWR fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamsson, Carl, E-mail: carl.adamsson@psi.ch [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, SE-721 63, Vaesteras (Sweden); Le Corre, Jean-Marie, E-mail: lecorrjm@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, SE-721 63, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > The MEFISTO code efficiently and accurately predicts the dryout event in a BWR fuel bundle, using a mechanistic model. > A hybrid approach between a fast and robust sub-channel analysis and a three-field two-phase analysis is adopted. > MEFISTO modeling approach, calibration, CPU usage, sensitivity, trend analysis and performance evaluation are presented. > The calibration parameters and process were carefully selected to preserve the mechanistic nature of the code. > The code dryout prediction performance is near the level of fuel-specific empirical dryout correlations. - Abstract: Westinghouse is currently developing the MEFISTO code with the main goal to achieve fast, robust, practical and reliable prediction of steady-state dryout Critical Power in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle based on a mechanistic approach. A computationally efficient simulation scheme was used to achieve this goal, where the code resolves all relevant field (drop, steam and multi-film) mass balance equations, within the annular flow region, at the sub-channel level while relying on a fast and robust two-phase (liquid/steam) sub-channel solution to provide the cross-flow information. The MEFISTO code can hence provide highly detailed solution of the multi-film flow in BWR fuel bundle while enhancing flexibility and reducing the computer time by an order of magnitude as compared to a standard three-field sub-channel analysis approach. Models for the numerical computation of the one-dimensional field flowrate distributions in an open channel (e.g. a sub-channel), including the numerical treatment of field cross-flows, part-length rods, spacers grids and post-dryout conditions are presented in this paper. The MEFISTO code is then applied to dryout prediction in BWR fuel bundle using VIPRE-W as a fast and robust two-phase sub-channel driver code. The dryout power is numerically predicted by iterating on the bundle power so that the minimum film flowrate in the bundle

  10. Country nuclear power profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme for nuclear power plant performance assessment and feedback. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the energy and economic situation and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The task was included in the IAEA's programmes for 1993/1994 and 1995/1996. In March 1993, the IAEA organized a Technical Committee meeting to discuss the establishment of country data ''profiles'', to define the information to be included in the profiles and to review the information already available in the IAEA. Two expert meetings were convened in November 1994 to provide guidance to the IAEA on the establishment of the country nuclear profiles, on the structure and content of the profiles, and on the preparation of the publication and the electronic database. In June 1995, an Advisory Group meeting provided the IAEA with comprehensive guidance on the establishment and dissemination of an information package on industrial and organizational aspects of nuclear power to be included in the profiles. The group of experts recommended that the profiles focus on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. In its first release, the compilation would cover all countries with operating power plants by the end of 1995. It was also recommended to further promote information exchange on the lessons learned from the countries engaged in nuclear programmes. For the preparation of this publication, the IAEA received contributions from the 29 countries operating nuclear power plants and Italy. A database has been implemented and the profiles are supporting programmatic needs within the IAEA; it is expected that the database will be publicly accessible in the future

  11. The nuclear power alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Director General of the IAEA stressed the need for energy policies and other measures which would help to slow and eventually halt the present build-up of carbon dioxide, methane and other so-called greenhouse gases, which are held to cause global warming. He urged that nuclear power and various other sources of energy, none of which contribute to global warming, should not be seen as alternatives, but should all be used to counteract the greenhouse effect. He pointed out that the commercially used renewable energies, apart from hydropower, currently represent only 0.3% of the world's energy consumption and, by contrast, the 5% of the world's energy consumption coming from nuclear power is not insignificant. Dr. Blix noted that opposition for nuclear power stems from fear of accidents and concern about the nuclear wastes. But no generation of electricity, whether by coal, hydro, gas or nuclear power, is without some risk. He emphasized that safety can never be a static concept, and that many new measures are being taken by governments and by the IAEA to further strengthen the safety of nuclear power

  12. Nuclear power in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power debate hinges upon three major issues: radioactive waste disposal, reactor safety and proliferation. An alternative strategy for waste disposal is advocated which involves disposing of the radwaste (immobilized in SYNROC, a titanate ceramic waste form) in deep (4 km) drill-holes widely dispersed throughout the entire country. It is demonstrated that this strategy possesses major technical (safety) advantages over centralized, mined repositories. The comparative risks associated with coal-fired power generation and with the nuclear fuel cycle have been evaluated by many scientists, who conclude that nuclear power is far less hazardous. Considerable improvements in reactor design and safety are readily attainable. The nuclear industry should be obliged to meet these higher standards. The most hopeful means of limiting proliferation lies in international agreements, possibly combined with international monitoring and control of key segments of the fuel cycle, such as reprocessing

  13. Physics and nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttery, N. E.

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear power owes its origin to physicists. Fission was demonstrated by physicists and chemists and the first nuclear reactor project was led by physicists. However as nuclear power was harnessed to produce electricity the role of the engineer became stronger. Modern nuclear power reactors bring together the skills of physicists, chemists, chemical engineers, electrical engineers, mechanical engineers and civil engineers. The paper illustrates this by considering the Sizewell B project and the role played by physicists in this. This covers not only the roles in design and analysis but in problem solving during the commissioning of first of a kind plant. Looking forward to the challenges to provide sustainable and environmentally acceptable energy sources for the future illustrates the need for a continuing synergy between physics and engineering. This will be discussed in the context of the challenges posed by Generation IV reactors.

  14. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  15. Cause-Effect relationship of the Laguna Verde BWR power instability by empirical mode decomposition; Relacion efecto-causa de la inestabilidad de potencia del BWR de Laguna Verde por descomposicion modal empirica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazquez, J.; Ruiz, J.; Castillo, R. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The signals coming from natural phenomena are in essence non lineal and not stationary. A recent development, well-known as Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) it presents a novel focus that allows to represent in adaptative form non stationary signals as a sum of components of half zero. These components denominated Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) they help to the analysis of the frequency composition of unidimensional signals. The use of the EMD followed by the Hilbert transform of the IMFs it allows to carry out an analysis in time-frequency of the non lineal and not stationary data. This technique is known as the Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT). In this work a power instability event occurred in January 24, 1995 in the unit I of the nuclear power station of Laguna Verde (Mexico), corresponding to a BWR/5 is analyzed. When a Nuclear Plant suffers a power instability event, it is required obligatorily to explain to the Regulator Organism the effects and the causes of the event. The effects are described simply; not in vain there is a registration of signals in the Process Computer of where the required information is extracted. But the causes are not always immediate and easy for to identify. The power instability can happen during the start, when the refrigeration flow is relatively low in front to the power. By reason of that the reactivity coefficient by holes is negative, the power oscillates with a very defined frequency, generally of the order of 0.5 Hz. If the oscillations increase progressively of amplitude, we are in an instability event. It is interesting to include in the report the instant in that the began instability and the actions of the operator before and after the same one. As the actions are registered, the investigation is focused toward the instant of the beginning to be able to identify them. In this work the power signal in five empiric ways of Hilbert-Huang and a residual breaks down. The instability is only reflected in the way of smaller

  16. France without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As coal production declined and France found herself in a condition of energy dependency, the country decided to turn to nuclear power and a major construction program was undertaken in 1970. The consequences of this step are examined in this article, by imagining where France would be without its nuclear power. At the end of the sixties, fuel-oil incontestably offered the cheapest way of producing electricity; but the first petroleum crisis was to upset the order of economic performance, and coal then became the more attractive fuel. The first part of this article therefore presents coal as an alternative to nuclear power, describing the coal scenario first and then comparing the relative costs of nuclear and coal investment strategies and operating costs (the item that differs most is the price of the fuel). The second part of the article analyzes the consequences this would have on the electrical power market, from the supply and demand point of view, and in terms of prices. The third part of the article discusses the macro-economic consequences of such a step: the drop in the level of energy dependency, increased costs and the disappearance of electricity exports. The article ends with an analysis of the environmental consequences, which are of greater and greater concern today. The advantage here falls very much in favor of nuclear power, if we judge by the lesser emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and especially carbon dioxide. 22 refs.; 13 figs.; 10 tabs

  17. Connected analysis nuclear-thermo-hydraulic of parallel channels of a BWR reactor using distributed computation; Analisis acoplado nuclear-termohidraulico de canales paralelos de un reactor BWR empleando computacion distribuida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Gonzalez, Rina Margarita

    2007-07-15

    This work consists of the integration of three models previously developed which are described widely in Literature: model of the thermo-hydraulic channel, model of the modal neutronic and the model of the recirculation bows. The tool used for this connection of models is the PVM system, Parallel Virtual Machine that allowed paralleling the model by means of the concept of distributed computation. The purpose of making this connection of models is the one of obtaining a more complete tool than better represents the real configuration and the phenomenology of the nucleus of a BWR reactor, thus obtaining better results. In addition to maintaining the flexibility to improve the resulting model at any time, since the very complex or sophisticated models are difficult to improve being impossible to modify the equations they use and can include variables that are not of primary importance in the tackled problem or that mask relations among variables due to the excess of results. Also maintaining the flexibility for adding component of models or systems of the BWR reactor, all of this following the modeling needs. The Swedish Ringhals power plant was chosen to characterize the resulting connected model for counting on a Stability Benchmark that offers the opportunity to count on real plant data. Besides that in case 9 of cycle 14 of this Benchamark oscillations outside phase appeared, which are from great interest because the detection systems that register the average of the power of the nucleus do not detect them. Additionally in this work the model of the recirculation bows as an independent module is obtained in an individual way, since this model belongs to another work and works connected to the reactor vessel. The model of the recirculation bows is able to model several transients of interest, as it is shown in the Appendix A of this work, among which are found the tripping of recirculation pumps or the transference at low or high velocity of them. The scope of the

  18. Nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I want to give some ideas on the situation of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany and perhaps a little bit on Europe. Let me start with public perception. I think in Germany we have a general trend in the public perception of technology during the last decade that has been investigated in a systematic manner in a recent study. It is clear that the general acceptance of technology decreased substantially during the last twenty years. We can also observe during this time that aspects of the benefits of technology are much less reported in the media, that most reporting by the media now is related to the consequences of technologies, such as negative environmental consequences. hat development has led to a general opposition against new technological projects, in particular unusual and large. That trend is related not only to nuclear power, we see it also for new airports, trains, coal-fired plants. here is almost no new technological project in Germany where there is not very strong opposition against it, at least locally. What is the current public opinion concerning nuclear power? Nuclear power certainly received a big shock after Chernobyl, but actually, about two thirds of the German population wants to keep the operating plants running. Some people want to phase the plants out as they reach the end-of-life, some want to substitute newer nuclear technology, and a smaller part want to increase the use of nuclear power. But only a minority of the German public would really like to abandon nuclear energy

  19. How nuclear power began

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the features of the story of nuclear power, both in nuclear weapons and nuclear power stations, derive from their timing. Usually, in the history of science the precise timing of discovery does not make much difference, but in the case of nuclear fission there was the coincidence that crucial discoveries were made and openly published in the same year, 1939, as the outbreak of the Second World War. It is these events of the 1930s and the early post-war era that are mainly discussed. However, the story began a lot earlier and even in the early 1900s the potential power within the atom had been foreseen by Soddy and Rutherford. In the 1930s Enrico Fermi and his team saw the technological importance of their discoveries and took out a patent on their process to produce artificial radioactivity from slow neutron beams. The need for secrecy because of the war, and the personal trusts and mistrusts run through the story of nuclear power. (UK)

  20. Infinite fuel element simulation of pin power distributions and control blade history in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet-Cladding Interaction (PCI) is a well known effect in fuel pins. One possible reason for PCI-effects could be local power excursions in the fuel pins, which can led to a rupture of the fuel cladding tube. From a reactor safety point of view this has to be considered as a violence of the barrier principal in order to retain fission products in the fuel pins. This paper focuses on the pin power distributions in a 2D infinite lattice of a BWR fuel element. Lots of studies related PCI effect can be found in the literature. In this compact, coupled neutronic depletion calculations taking the control history effect into account are described. Depletion calculations of an infinite fuel element of a BWR were carried out with controlled, uncontrolled and temporarily controlled scenarios. Later ones are needed to describe the control blade history (CBH) effect. A Monte-Carlo approach is mandatory to simulate the neutron physics. The VESTA code was applied to couple the Monte-Carlo-Code MCNP(X) with the burnup code ORIGEN. Additionally, CASMO-4 is also employed to verify the method of simulation results from VESTA. The cross sections for Monte Carlo and burn-up calculations are derived from ENDF/B-VII.0. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the fifth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2007 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  2. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the fourth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2006 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  3. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the third report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2005 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  4. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the fifth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2008 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  5. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the second report in a new series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2004 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  6. The abuse of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different aspects of possible abuse of nuclear power by countries or individuals are discussed. Special attention is paid to the advantage of nuclear power, despite the risk of weapon proliferation or terrorism. The concepts of some nuclear power critics, concerning health risks in the nuclear sector are rejected as untrue and abusive

  7. Nuclear Power in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Energy consumption in Japan has grown at a faster rate than in any other major industrial country. To maintain continued prosperity, the government has embarked on a crash program for nuclear power. Current progress and issues/reactions to the plan are discussed. (JN)

  8. Cavitation preventing device in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent the generation of cavitation upon loss of feedwater flow rate in BWR nuclear power plant by reliably and rapidly tripping a recycling pump. Constitution: Two phase streams from a nuclear reactor are divided into main steams and saturated water in a steam drum. The deviation between the corresponding flow rate of the main steams and the feedwater flow rate of the feedwater pump sending condensates to the steam drum, as well as the continuing period of the deviation are monitored. Then, if it is detected that both of the deviation and the continuing period thereof exceed specified levels, the recycling pump feeding the saturated water to the reactor is tripped. In this way, the recycling pump can be tripped rapidly and reliably upon loss of feedwater flow rate, whereby the generation of the cavitation can be prevented and the normal operation of the nuclear power plant can be insured. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. Economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economics of electricity supply and production in the FRG is to see on the background of the unique European interconnected grid system which makes very significant contributions to the availability of standby energy and peak load power. On this basis and the existing high voltage grid system, we can build large nuclear generating units and realise the favorable cost aspects per installed KW and reduced standby power. An example of calculating the overall electricity generating costs based on the present worth method is explained. From the figures shown, the sensitivity of the generating costs with respect to the different cost components can be derived. It is apparent from the example used, that the major advantage of nuclear power stations compared with fossil fired stations lies in the relatively small percentage fraction contributed by the fuel costs to the electricity generating costs. (orig.)

  10. Serpent: an alternative for the nuclear fuel cells analysis of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last ten years the diverse research groups in nuclear engineering of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (UNAM, IPN), as of research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ) as well as the personnel of the Nuclear Plant Management of the Comision Federal de Electricidad have been using the codes Helios and /or CASMO-4 in the generation of cross sections (X S) of nuclear fuel cells of the cores corresponding to the Units 1 and 2 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Both codes belong to the Studsvik-Scandpower Company who receives the payment for the use and their respective maintenance. In recent years, the code Serpent appears among the nuclear community distributed by the OECD/Nea which does not has cost neither in its use neither in its maintenance. The code is based on the Monte Carlo method and makes use of the processing in parallel. In the Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of the IPN, the personnel has accumulated certain experience in the use of Serpent under the direction of personal of the ININ; of this experience have been obtained for diverse fuel burned, the infinite multiplication factor for three cells of nuclear fuel, without control bar and with control bar for a known thermodynamic state fixed by: a) the fuel temperature (Tf), b) the moderator temperature (Tm) and c) the vacuums fraction (α). Although was not realized any comparison with the X S that the codes Helios and CASMO-4 generate, the results obtained for the infinite multiplication factor show the prospective tendencies with regard to the fuel burned so much in the case in that is not present the control bar like when it is. The results are encouraging and motivate to the study group to continue with the X S generation of a core in order to build the respective library of nuclear data as a following step and this can be used for the codes PARCS, of USA NRC, DYN3D of HZDR, or others developed locally in the IPN

  11. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides data and assessments of the status and prospects of nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle. The report discusses the economic competitiveness of nuclear electricity generation, the extent of world uranium resources, production and requirements, uranium conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel treatment and radioactive waste management. A review is given of the status of nuclear fusion research

  12. Framatome advanced nuclear power-benefits for our clients from the new company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Framatome ANP (Advanced Nuclear Power) merges the complementary strengths of two global nuclear industry leaders Framatome and Siemens - offering clients the best technological solutions for safe, reliable and economical plant performance. With a combined workforce of 13,300 skilled individuals, Framatome ANP is now the nuclear industry's leading supplier. Serving as Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) for more than 90 reactors that provide about 30% of the world's total installed nuclear power capacity, our experienced resources remain focused on the local needs of individual clients, wherever in the world they may be. The Company main business used to be turnkey construction of complete Nuclear Power plants, BWR and PWR capabilities, heavy equipment manufacturing, comprehensive I and C capabilities, and also expertise and knowledge of VVER. Framatome ANP will benefit in all of its fields of activity of the experience gained through Framatome and Siemens' collaboration on the next generation reactor, the EPR, as well as on steam generators replacements and or modernization of VVER. Framatome ANP nuclear fuel designs for both PWR and BWR plants provide innovative features and world-leading performance. Framatome ANP is organized according a matrix organization with: - 4 Business Groups (Project and Engineering, Service, Nuclear Fuel, Mechanical Equipment) - 3 Regional Divisions (Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power S.A.S., France; Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power GmbH, Germany; Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power Inc., USA). By 30th January 2001 Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH, founded in 2000 as successor of the Nuclear Division of Siemens Power Generation Group (KWU), was renamed to Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power GmbH forming the German part of the world wide acting company. Over the past 40 years 23 nuclear power plants all around the world - not only pressurized and boiling water reactors, but also two heavy-watermoderated reactors have been designed, constructed and

  13. Space Nuclear Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Fission power and propulsion systems can enable exciting space exploration missions. These include bases on the moon and Mars; and the exploration, development, and utilization of the solar system. In the near-term, fission surface power systems could provide abundant, constant, cost-effective power anywhere on the surface of the Moon or Mars, independent of available sunlight. Affordable access to Mars, the asteroid belt, or other destinations could be provided by nuclear thermal rockets. In the further term, high performance fission power supplies could enable both extremely high power levels on planetary surfaces and fission electric propulsion vehicles for rapid, efficient cargo and crew transfer. Advanced fission propulsion systems could eventually allow routine access to the entire solar system. Fission systems could also enable the utilization of resources within the solar system.

  14. Nuclear Power Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present trend is to construct larger plants: the average power of the plants under construction at present, including prototypes, is 300 MW(e), i.e. three times higher than in the case of plants already in operation. Examples of new large-scale plants ares (a) Wylfa, Anglesey, United Kingdom - scheduled power of 1180 MW(e) (800 MW to be installed by 1967), to be completed in 1968; (b) ''Dungeness B'', United Kingdom - scheduled power of 1200 MW(e); (c) second unit for United States Dresden power plant - scheduled power of 715 MW(e) minimum to almost 800 MW(e). Nuclear plants on the whole serve the same purpose as conventional thermal plants

  15. Physical protection of nuclear facilities. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1978. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, L.D. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    Major activities during the fourth quarter of FY78 included (1) the vital area analysis of operational reactors and characterization of the Standardized Nuclear Unit Power Plant System (SNUPPS), (2) the algorithm development of a new pathfinding computer code, (3) the completion of contractor-supported work for the component generic data base, (4) the refinement of tests related to human parameters modeling, and (5) the addition of improvements to and demonstration of the Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE), Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure (SNAP), and Fixed-Site Neutralization Model (FSNM) methodologies.

  16. Nuclear power for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water is one of the most important assets to mankind and without which the human race would cease to exist. Water is required by us right from domestic to industrial levels. As notified by the 'American Nuclear Society' and 'World Nuclear Association' about 1/5th of the world population does not access to portable water especially in the Asian and African subcontinent. The situation is becoming adverse day by day due to rise in population and industrialization. The need of alternative water resource is thus becoming vital. About 97.5% of Earth is covered by oceans. Desalination of saline water to generate potable water is thus an important topic of research. Currently about 12,500 desalination plants are operating worldwide with a capacity of about 35 million m3/day using mainly fossil fuels for generation of large amount of energy required for processing water. These thermal power station release large amount of carbon dioxide and other green house gases. Nuclear reactors are capable of delivering energy to the high energy-intensive processes without any environmental concerns for climate change etc., giving a vision to sustainable growth of desalination process. These projects are currently employed in Kazakhstan, India, Japan, and Pakistan and are coupled to the nuclear reactor for generating electricity and potable water as well. The current climatic scenario favors the need for expanding dual purpose nuclear power plants producing energy and water at the same location. (author)

  17. Safety Evaluation Report related to the final design approval of the GESSAR II BWR/6 Nuclear Island design, Docket No. 50-447

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by General Electric Company for the Final Design Approval for the General Electric Standard Safety Analysis Report (GESSAR II FSAR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the results of the staff's safety review of the GESSAR II BWR/6 Nuclear Island Design. Subject to favorable resolution of items discussed in the Safety Evaluation Report, the staff concludes that the facilities referencing GESSAR II, subject to approval of the balance-of-plant design, can conform with the provisions of the Act and the regulations of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  18. Recent developments in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water chemistry is of critical importance to the operation and economic viability of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). A successful water chemistry program will satisfy the following goals: - Minimize the incidence and growth of SCC/IASCC, - Minimize plant radiation fields controllable by chemistry, -Maintain fuel integrity by minimizing cladding corrosion, - Minimize flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) in balance-of-plant components. The impact of water chemistry on each of these goals is discussed in more detail in this paper. It should be noted that water chemistry programs also include surveillance and operating limits for other plant water systems (e.g., service water, closed cooling water systems, etc.) but these are out of the scope of this paper. This paper reviews developments in water chemistry guidelines for U.S. BWR nuclear power plants. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  19. An overview of the BWR ECCS strainer blockage issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkiz, A.W.; Marshall, M.L. Jr.; Elliott, R. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This Paper provides a brief overview of actions taken in the mid 1980s to resolve Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-43, {open_quotes}Containment Emergency Sump Performance,{close_quotes} and their relationship to the BWR strainer blockage issue; the importance of insights gained from the Barseback-2 (a Swedish BWR) incident in 1992 and from ECCS strainer testing and inspections at the Perry nuclear power plant in 1992 and 1993; an analysis of an US BWR/4 with a Mark I containment; an international community sharing of knowledge relevant to ECCS strainer blockage, additional experimental programs; and identification of actions needed to resolve the strainer blockage issue and the status of such efforts.

  20. The BWR owners' group planning guide for life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extending the operating life of a commercial nuclear power plant has been shown to be economically beneficial to both the utility and the electric customer. As such, many utilities are planning and implementing plant life extension (PLEX) programs. A document has been developed which provides guidance to utilities in formulating a PLEX program plant for one or more boiling water reactor (BWR) plants. The guide has been developed by the BWR Owners' Group Plant Life Extension Committee. The principal bases for this guide were the BWR Pilot and Lead Plant Programs. These programs were used as models to develop the 'base plan' described in this guide. By formulating their program plant utilizing the base plan, utilities will be able to maximize the use of existing evaluations and results. The utility planner will build upon the base plan by adding any tasks or features that are unique to their programs. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanical performance of fuel rods of a BWR during a power ramp using the FUELSIM code; Evaluacion del desempeno termomecanico de barras de combustible de un reactor BWR durante una rampa de potencia utilizando el codigo FUELSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R.

    2010-07-01

    To avoid the risk to environment due to release of radioactive material, because of occurrence of an accident, it is the priority of the design and performance of the diverse systems of safety of a commercial nuclear power plant. The safety of nuclear power plants requires, therefore, monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behavior under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. The main application of the thermal-mechanical analysis codes is the prediction of occurrence of conditions and/or phenomena that could lead to the deterioration or even mechanical failure of the fuel rod cladding, as, for example, the pellet-cladding interaction. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, fuel preconditioning operations refer to the operational procedures employed to reduce the fuel rod failure probability due to fuel-cladding interaction, specially during reactor startup. Preconditioning simulations are therefore necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR 5/6, as those two nuclear reactors in Laguna Verde, Veracruz, is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with an array 8 x 8

  2. Pragmatics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In context of depletion of fossil fuels and continuous increase of global warming, nuclear power is highly solicited by world energy congress for solving energy crisis for ever. No doubt, a small amount of nuclear fuel can provide immense amount of energy but in exchange of what? Safety, security, large compensation and huge risk of lives, gift of radio-activity to environment and so many adverse effects. Yet are we in a position to reject or neglect it exclusively? Can we show such luxury? Again are we capable to control such a demon for the benefit of human being. Either is it magic lamp of Aladdin or a Frankenstein? Who will give the answer? Likely after nuclear war, is there anybody left in this planet to hide or is there any place available to hide. Answers are not yet known. (author)

  3. Ethical aspects of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear controversy comprises many ethical aspects, e.g. the waste disposal problem. Nuclear opponents should not neglect the environmental protection aspect; for example, the use of nuclear power alone brought about an 8% reduction of the CO2 burden in 1987. Our responsibility towards nature and humans in the Third World leaves us no alternative to nuclear power. On the other hand, the nuclear power debate should not become a matter of religious beliefs. (DG)

  4. Safety analysis of thorium-based fuels in the General Electric Standard BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A denatured (U-233/Th)O2 fuel assembly has been designed which is energy equivalent to and hardware interchangeable with a modern boiling water reactor (BWR) reference reload assembly. Relative to the reference UO2 fuel, the thorium fuel design shows better performance during normal and transient reactor operation for the BWR/6 product line and will meet or exceed current safety and licensing criteria. Power distributions are flattened and thermal operating margins are increased by reduced steam void reactivity coefficients caused by U-233. However, a (U-233/Th)O2-fueled BWR will likely have reduced operating flexibility. A (U-235/Th)O2-fueled BWR should perform similar to a UO2-fueled BWR under all operating conditions. A (Pu/Th)O2-fueled BWR may have reduced thermal margins and similar accident response and be less stable than a UO2-fueled BWR. The assessment is based on comparisions of point model and infinite lattice predictions of various nuclear reactivity parameters, including void reactivity coefficients, Doppler reactivity coefficients, and control blade worths

  5. Nuclear turbine power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose : To improve the heat cycle balance in a nuclear turbine power plant or the like equipped with a moisture separating and reheating device, by eliminating undesired overcooling of the drains in the pipes of a heat transmission pipe bundle. Constitution : A high pressure turbine is driven by main steams from a steam generator. The steams after driving the high pressure turbine are removed with moistures by way of a moisture separator and then re-heated. Extracted steams from the steam generator or the high pressure turbine are used as a heating source for the reheating. In the nuclear turbine power plant having such a constitution, a vessel for separating the drains and the steams resulted from the heat exchange is provided at the outlet of the reheating device and the steams in the vessel are introduced to the inlet of the moisture separator. (Aizawa, K.)

  6. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To suppress corrosion at the inner surfaces of equipments and pipeways in nuclear power plants. Constitution: An injection device comprising a chemical injection tank and a plunger type chemical injection pump for injecting hydrazine as an oxygen remover and ammonia as a pH controller is disposed to the downstream of a condensate desalter column for primary coolant circuits. Since dessolved oxygen in circuit water injected with these chemicals is substantially reduced to zero and pH is adjuted to about 10 - 11, occurrence of stress corrosion cracks in carbon steels and stainless steels as main constituent materials for the nuclear power plant and corrosion products are inhibited in high temperature water, and of corrosion products are inhibited from being introduced as they are through leakage to the reactor core, by which the operators' exposure does can be decreased significantly. (Sekiya, K.)

  7. Initiative against nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication of the Initiative of Austrian Nuclear Power Plant Opponents contains articles on radiactive waste dispoasal in Austria and and discusses safety issues of the nuclear power plant 'Zwentendorf'. (kancsar)

  8. Nuclear power in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As is known to most of this audience in November of 1987 a referendum determined a rejection of nuclear power in Italy. The referendum may be taken into consideration here as a large scale experiment which offers points of interest to this conference and problems to be aware of, in approaching a severe confrontation with the public. To give a synopsis of the Italian perspective I will examine: first the public acceptance in the situation before Chernobyl, then the most disturbing and sensitive factors of Chernobyl's consequences; how the opposition to nuclear energy worked with the support of most media and the strong pressures of an anti-nuclear political party, the syllogism of the opponents and the arguments used, the causes of major weakness of the defenders and how a new perception of nuclear risk was generated in the public. I will come to the topic of utility acceptance by mentioning that ENEL, as the National Utility, in its role is bound to a policy of compliance with Government decisions. It is oriented today to performance of feasibility studies and development of requirements for the next generation of reactors in order to maintain an updated proposal for a future recovery of the nuclear option. I will then try to identify in general terms the factors determining the future acceptance of nuclear power. They will be determined in the interdisciplinary area of politics, media and public interactions with the utilities the uses of the technology are forced to follow, by political constraints, two main directives: working only in new projects to achieve, if possible, new safety goals

  9. Nuclear power in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lecture describes the energy-political situation in Sweden after the change of Government in October 1976. The present announced nuclear power plant-hostile energy politic, has to face the viewpoints of a technical and economical dependent reality. Disagreements and transgressions of political competences must be reduced, due to the fact that a constructive cooperation between politicians and energy producing corporations is a necessity, to guarantee a safe energy supply in Sweden. (orig.)

  10. Submarine nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a ballast tank, and nuclear power facilities within the containment shell of a pressure resistance structure and a maintenance operator's entrance and a transmission cable cut-off device at the outer part of the containment shell, whereby after the construction, the shell is towed, and installed by self-submerging, and it can be refloated for repairs by its own strength. Constitution: Within a containment shell having a ballast tank and a pressure resisting structure, there are provided nuclear power facilities including a nuclear power generating chamber, a maintenance operator's living room and the like. Furthermore, a maintenance operator's entrance and exit device and a transmission cable cut-off device are provided within the shell, whereby when it is towed to a predetermined a area after the construction, it submerges by its own strength and when any repair inspection is necessary, it can float up by its own strength, and can be towed to a repair dock or the like. (Yoshihara, H.)

  11. Overview paper on nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiewak, I.; Cope, D.F.

    1980-09-01

    This paper was prepared as an input to ORNL's Strategic Planning Activity, ORNL National Energy Perspective (ONEP). It is intended to provide historical background on nuclear power, an analysis of the mission of nuclear power, a discussion of the issues, the technology choices, and the suggestion of a strategy for encouraging further growth of nuclear power.

  12. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is an extremely sensitive issue and its future has been hotly debated. Conflicting arguments have been put forward regarding the viability of nuclear power. The question of whether the world should look to nuclear power for its electricity generating needs is addressed. 2 ills

  13. Overview paper on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper was prepared as an input to ORNL's Strategic Planning Activity, ORNL National Energy Perspective (ONEP). It is intended to provide historical background on nuclear power, an analysis of the mission of nuclear power, a discussion of the issues, the technology choices, and the suggestion of a strategy for encouraging further growth of nuclear power

  14. Digital implementation, simulation and tests in MATLAB of the models of Steam line, the turbines, the pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric power plant; Implementacion digital, simulacion y pruebas en MATLAB de los modelos de la linea de vapor, las turbinas y el regulador de presion de una central Nucleoelectrica tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez R, A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: andyskamx@yahoo.com.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this phase of the project they were carried out exhaustive tests to the models of the steam lines, turbines and pressure regulator of a BWR type nucleo electric central for to verify that their tendencies and behaviors are it more real possible. For it, it was necessary to also analyze the transfer functions of the different components along the steam line until the power generator. Such models define alone the dominant poles of the system, what is not limitation to reproduce a wide range of anticipated transitoriness of a power station operation. In the same manner, it was integrated and proved the integrated model form with the models of feeding water of the SUN-RAH, simulating the nuclear reactor starting from predetermined entrances of the prospective values of the vessel. Also it was coupled with the graphic interface developed with the libraries DirectX implementing a specific monitoring panel for this system. (Author)

  15. Nuclear power renaissance or demise?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossani, Umair

    2010-09-15

    Nuclear power is going through a renaissance or demise is widely debated around the world keeping in mind the facts that there are risks related to nuclear technology and at the same time that is it environmentally friendly. My part of the argument is that there is no better alternative than Nuclear power. Firstly Nuclear Power in comparison to all other alternative fuels is environmentally sustainable. Second Nuclear power at present is at the dawn of a new era with new designs and technologies. Third part of the debate is renovation in the nuclear fuel production, reprocessing and disposal.

  16. The need for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This leaflet examines our energy future and concludes that nuclear power is an essential part of it. The leaflet also discusses relative costs, but it does not deal with social and environmental implications of nuclear power in any detail, since these are covered by other British Nuclear Forum publications. Headings are: present consumption; how will this change in future; primary energy resources (fossil fuels; renewable resources; nuclear); energy savings; availability of fossil fuels; availability of renewable energy resources; the contribution of thermal nuclear power; electricity; costs for nuclear power. (U.K.)

  17. Examination of turbine discs from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations were performed on a cracked turbine disc from the Cooper Nuclear Power Station, and on two failed turbine discs (governor and generator ends) from the Yankee-Rowe Nuclear Power Station. Cooper is a boiling water reactor (BWR) which went into commercial operation in July 1974, and Yankee-Rowe is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) which went into commercial operation in June 1961. Cracks were identified in the bore of the Cooper disc after 41,913 hours of operation, and the disc removed for repair. At Yankee-Rowe two discs failed after 100,000 hours of operation. Samples of the Cooper disc and both Yankee-Rowe disc (one from the governor and one from the generator end of the LP turbine) were sent to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for failure analysis

  18. Data list of nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has collected and compiled the data by December in 1981 concerning performances, equipments and installations of the nuclear power plants in Japan. The data have been modified according to the changes produced after previous publication of 1979 edition including BWR and PWR (JAERI-M 8947) and 1980 edition including PWR (JAERI-M 9629), and extended to cover the new plants developed thereafter. All data have been processed and tabulated with a data processing computer program FREP. Besides this report, user also can refer to 'Data List of Nuclear Power Plant in Japan' through terminals equipped at various places in JAERI using TSS (Time Shearing System) network of FACOM M-200, and the explanation of the usage is given in the Appendix. (author)

  19. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization maintains an ongoing assessment of the world's nuclear technology developments, as a core activity of its Strategic Plan. This publication reviews the current status of the nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle in Australia and around the world. Main issues discussed include: performances and economics of various types of nuclear reactors, uranium resources and requirements, fuel fabrication and technology, radioactive waste management. A brief account of the large international effort to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power is also given. 11 tabs., ills

  20. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the ninth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2011 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations and conflicts, and the Fukushima accident. (LN)

  1. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the eighth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2010 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations, and conflicts and the Fukushima accident. (LN)

  2. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the seventh report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2009 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations, conflicts and the European safety directive. (LN)

  3. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the tenth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is prepared in collaboration between DTU Nutech and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2012 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations and conflicts, and the results of the EU stress test. (LN)

  4. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiba, James M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scherer, Carolynn P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  5. Is nuclear power acceptable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy shortage forecast for the early 21st century is considered. Possible energy sources other than fossil fuel are stated as geothermal, fusion, solar and fission, of which only fission has been demonstrated technically and economically. The environmental impacts of fission are examined. The hazards are discussed under the following headings: nuclear accident, fatality risk, safe reactor, property damage, acts of God, low-level release of radioactivity, diversion of fissile material and sabotage, radioactive waste disposal, toxicity of plutonium. The public reaction to nuclear power is analyzed, and proposals are made for a programme of safety and security which the author hopes will make it acceptable as the ultimate energy source. (U.K.)

  6. International nuclear power status 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the ninth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2002, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory: 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2001); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2002; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  7. International nuclear power status 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the eighth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2001, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Nuclear terrorism; 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2000); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2001; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  8. International nuclear power status 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the sixth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 1999, the report contains: General trends in the development of nuclear power; The past and possible future of Barsebaeck Nuclear Power Plant; Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 1998); An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 1999; The development in Sweden; The development in Eastern Europe; The development in the rest of the world; Trends in the development of reactor types; Trends in the development of the nuclear fuel cycle. (au)

  9. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWR) (NUREG-1123) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog and Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations (NUREG-1121) will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55. The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at boiling water reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring personnel and public health and safety. The BWR K/A Catalog is organized into five major sections: Plant-wide Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. The BWR Catalog represents a modification of the form and content of the K/A Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Pressurized Water Reactors (NUREG-1122). First, categories of knowledge and ability statements have been redefined. Second, the scope of the definition of emergency and abnormal plant evolutions has been revised in line with a symptom-based approach. Third, K/As related to the operational applications of theory have been incorporated into the delineations for both plant systems and emergency and abnormal plant evolutions, while K/As pertaining to theory fundamental to plant operation have been delineated in a separate theory section. Finally, the components section has been revised

  10. The Brazilian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The booklet contains survey articles on the nuclear power problems of Brazil, the German-Brazilian nuclear power agreement, the application of international safety measures, and 'Brazil and the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons'. The agreement is given in full wording. (HP)

  11. Nuclear power generation modern power station practice

    CERN Document Server

    1971-01-01

    Nuclear Power Generation focuses on the use of nuclear reactors as heat sources for electricity generation. This volume explains how nuclear energy can be harnessed to produce power by discussing the fundamental physical facts and the properties of matter underlying the operation of a reactor. This book is comprised of five chapters and opens with an overview of nuclear physics, first by considering the structure of matter and basic physical concepts such as atomic structure and nuclear reactions. The second chapter deals with the requirements of a reactor as a heat source, along with the diff

  12. Evaluation of the cracking by stress corrosion in nuclear reactor environments type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was studied in sensitized, solution annealed 304 steel, and in 304-L welded with a heat treatment that simulated the radiation induced segregation, by the slow strain rate test technique, in a similar environment of a boiling water reactor (BWR), 288 C, 8 MPa, low conductivity and a electrochemical corrosion potential near 200 mV. vs. standard hydrogen electrode (She). The electrochemical noise technique was used for the detection of the initiation and propagation of the cracking. The steels were characterized by metallographic studies with optical and scanning electronic microscopy and by the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation of single loop and double loop. In all the cases, the steels present delta ferrite. The slow strain rate tests showed that the 304 steel in the solution annealed condition is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), such as in a normalized condition showed granulated. In the sensitized condition the steel showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking, followed by a transition to TGSCC. The electrochemical noise time series showed that is possible associated different time sequences to different modes of cracking and that is possible detect sequentially cracking events, it is means, one after other, supported by the fractographic studies by scanning electron microscopy. The parameter that can distinguish between the different modes of cracking is the re passivation rate, obtained by the current decay rate -n- in the current transients. This is due that the re passivation rate is a function of the microstructure and the sensitization. Other statistic parameters like the localized index, Kurtosis, Skew, produce results that are related with mixed corrosion. (Author)

  13. Obrigheim nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gross output of the 345MWe pressurized water nuclear power station at Obrigheim, operation on base load, amounted to about 2.57TWh in 1974, the net power fed to the grid being about 2.44TWh. The core was used to its full capacity until 10 May 1974. Thereafter, the reactor was on stretch-out operation with steadily decreasing load until refuelled in August 1974. Plant availability in 1974 amounted to 92.1%. Of the 7.9% non-availability, 7.87% was attributable to the refuelling operation carried out from 16 August to 14 September and to the inspection, overhaul and repair work and the routine tests performed during this period. The plant was in good condition. Only two brief shutdowns occurred in 1974, the total outage time being 21/2 hours. From the beginning of trial operation in March 1969 to the end of 1974, the plant achieved an availability factor of 85.2%. The mean core burnup at the end of the fifth cycle was 19600 MWd/tonne U, with one fuel element that had been used for four cycles achieving a mean burnup of 39000 MWd/tonne U. The sipping test on the fuel elements revealed defective fuel-rods in a prototype plutonium fuel element, a high-efficiency uranium fuel element and a uranium fuel element. The quantities of radioactive substances released to the environment in 1974 were far below the officially permitted values. In july 1974, a reference preparation made up in the nuclear power station in October 1973 was discovered by outsiders on the Obrigheim municipality rubbish tip. The investigations revealed that this reference preparation had very probably been abstracted from the plant in October 1973 and arrived at the rubbish tip in a most irregular manner shortly before its discovery

  14. Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia Bonelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A description of the results for a Station Black-Out analysis for Atucha 2 Nuclear Power Plant is presented here. Calculations were performed with MELCOR 1.8.6 YV3165 Code. Atucha 2 is a pressurized heavy water reactor, cooled and moderated with heavy water, by two separate systems, presently under final construction in Argentina. The initiating event is loss of power, accompanied by the failure of four out of four diesel generators. All remaining plant safety systems are supposed to be available. It is assumed that during the Station Black-Out sequence the first pressurizer safety valve fails stuck open after 3 cycles of water release, respectively, 17 cycles in total. During the transient, the water in the fuel channels evaporates first while the moderator tank is still partially full. The moderator tank inventory acts as a temporary heat sink for the decay heat, which is evacuated through conduction and radiation heat transfer, delaying core degradation. This feature, together with the large volume of the steel filler pieces in the lower plenum and a high primary system volume to thermal power ratio, derives in a very slow transient in which RPV failure time is four to five times larger than that of other German PWRs.

  15. Completion of Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No. 4 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. is a BWR plant in which the results of the LWR improvement and standardization project by Japanese independent technology were adopted. Hitachi Ltd. has applied the experiences of construction and operation obtained so far, the improved technology based on research and development and the latest technologies to it, in addition to the technology which was verified in the preceding No. 5 plant. In the aspect of the systems and facilities, the various improvements based on the experience in past plants were reflected from the initial stage of design. Also in the design techniques, the three-dimensional CAD system using the newest computer technology was applied to the layout and piping design, and the quality and efficiency of design were improved. In the aspect of construction, a crawler crane with the largest lifting capacity in the world was used, and the large section module method, by which large prefabricated machinery, equipment and piping are directly lifted in, was applied. By these means, the safety of workings was secured, the construction period was shortened, and the plant showed good, stable results in the trial, and started the commercial operation in August, 1994. No. 4 plant is a BWR plant of 1100 MW output. The applied new technologies and the contents of the improvement of the design and facilities are shown. The outline and the features of the construction works and the trial operation are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Discharges from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HM Inspectorate of Pollution commissioned, with authorising responsibilities in England and Wales, a study into the discharges of radioactive effluents from Nuclear Power Stations. The study considered arisings from nuclear power stations in Europe and the USA and the technologies to treat and control the radioactive discharges. This report contains details of the technologies used at many nuclear power stations to treat and control radioactive discharges and gives, where information was available, details of discharges and authorised discharge limits. (author)

  17. Manpower development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guidebook provides policy-makers and managers of nuclear power programmes with information and guidance on the role, requirements, planning and implementation of manpower development programmes. It presents and discusses the manpower requirements associated with the activities of a nuclear power programme, the technical qualifications of this manpower and the manpower development corresponding to these requirements and qualifications. The Guidebook also discusses the purpose and conditions of national participation in the activities of a nuclear power programme

  18. Problems concerning the installation of pipings for nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power stations in the world in operation at the end of 1975 were 173 plants, and those in planning or construction stage were 505 plants. The total power output amounted to 530 x 103 MW. Light water reactors occupy nearly 90% of commercial nuclear power stations. The pipings in a 1100 MW BWR nuclear power station exceeds 5000 tons, and the man-hours for the construction of the pipings are enormous. High degree of safety and reliability are required for these pipings, and it is the difference and the feature that the manufacture and installation of these pipings are carried out under the strict quality assurance system, as compared with other plants. The pipings in a nuclear power plant are diverse and complex, and laid in very restricted spaces. Therefore they interfere with each other, and construction schedule is disturbed. The problems in the planning of the pipings, the reliability of the pipings, the enormous amount of the pipings, the management of working procedures, the storage, piping works and the state of installation, the consideration about the design and layout, the pipings in a containment vessel and the models of machinery and equipments, and the tendency of design method for the future are explained. (Kako, I.)

  19. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude

  20. Analysis of the documents about the core envelopment of nuclear reactor at the Laguna Verde U-1 power plant; Analisis de documentos de los materiales de la envolvente del nucleo del reactor nuclear de la CLV U-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora R, L.; Medina F, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The degradation of internal components at BWR type reactors is an important subject to consider in the performance availability of the power plant. The Wuergassen nuclear reactor license was confiscated due to the presence of cracking in the core envelopment. In consequence it is necessary carrying out a detailed study with the purpose to avoid these problems in the future. This report presents a review and analysis of documents and technical information referring to the core envelopment of a BWR/5/6 and the Laguna Verde Unit 1 nuclear reactor in Mexico. In this document are presented design data, documents about fabrication processes, and manufacturing of core envelopment. (Author)

  1. Latest experiences in inspecting the inside of BWR vessel shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, R.; Gonzalez, E.

    2001-07-01

    In the last few years, the owners of BWR nuclear power plants have been forced to address new fuel shield inspection requirements, TECNATOM has responded to this situation by launching the TEIDE projects, which include development of an inspection machine and the corresponding Non-Destructive Tests to examine the inside of this shield. With these projects, TECNATOM has performed more than 12 fuel shield inspections in different countries. This article describes the experience gained in the last three years. (Author)

  2. Nuclear power in human medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The public widely associate nuclear power with the megawatt dimensions of nuclear power plants in which nuclear power is released and used for electricity production. While this use of nuclear power for electricity generation is rejected by part of the population adopting the polemic attitude of ''opting out of nuclear,'' the application of nuclear power in medicine is generally accepted. The appreciative, positive term used in this case is nuclear medicine. Both areas, nuclear medicine and environmentally friendly nuclear electricity production, can be traced back to one common origin, i.e. the ''Atoms for Peace'' speech by U.S. President Eisenhower to the U.N. Plenary Assembly on December 8, 1953. The methods of examination and treatment in nuclear medicine are illustrated in a few examples from the perspective of a nuclear engineer. Nuclear medicine is a medical discipline dealing with the use of radionuclides in humans for medical purposes. This is based on 2 principles, namely that the human organism is unable to distinguish among different isotopes in metabolic processes, and the radioactive substances are employed in amounts so small that metabolic processes will not be influenced. As in classical medicine, the application of these principles serves two complementary purposes: diagnosis and therapy. (orig.)

  3. Analysis of Heat Balance on Innovative-Simplified Nuclear Power Plant Using Multi-Stage Steam Injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shoji; Ohmori, Shuichi; Mori, Michitsugu

    The total space and weight of the feedwater heaters in a nuclear power plant (NPP) can be reduced by replacing low-pressure feedwater heaters with high-efficiency steam injectors (SIs). The SI works as a direct heat exchanger between feedwater from condensers and steam extracted from turbines. It can attain pressures higher than the supplied steam pressure. The maintenance cost is lower than that of the current feedwater heater because of its simplified system without movable parts. In this paper, we explain the observed mechanisms of the SI experimentally and the analysis of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD). We then describe mainly the analysis of the heat balance and plant efficiency of the innovative-simplified NPP, which adapted to the boiling water reactor (BWR) with the high-efficiency SI. The plant efficiencies of this innovative-simplified BWR with SI are compared with those of a 1100MWe-class BWR. The SI model is adopted in the heat balance simulator as a simplified model. The results show that the plant efficiencies of the innovate-simplified BWR with SI are almost equal to those of the original BWR. They show that the plant efficiency would be slightly higher if the low-pressure steam, which is extracted from the low-pressure turbine, is used because the first-stage of the SI uses very low pressure.

  4. Investigation of BWR [boiling water reactor] instability phenomena using RETRAN-03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988, LaSalle, a boiling water reactor (BWR)/5, experienced severe flux oscillations following a trip of both recirculation pumps. The flux oscillations were terminated by an automatic scram at 118% of rated neutron flux. As a result of this event, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has asked the BWR utilities to develop procedural or hardware changes that will assure protection of all safety limits. The rapid growth of the oscillations at LaSalle, and the fact that previous stability analyses had predicted the plant to be very stable, emphasizes that a better understanding of this phenomenon is needed before the success of the long-term fixes can be assured. The intent of the Electric Power Research Institute's work was to use BWR transient methods to model reactor instabilities and investigate the factors that dominate this phenomenon. The one-dimensional transient code RETRAN-03 (Ref. 1) was used. The following conclusions are drawn: (1) RETRAN has demonstrated the ability to model BWR instability (nonlinear oscillations). (2) The general system behavior predicted by RETRAN in BWR stability analyses matches theoretical prediction and plant data. (3) These one-dimensional, time-domain results have increased the understanding of BWR stability phenomena and have helped optimize the long-term solutions being developed by the utilities

  5. Identification of dose-reduction techniques for BWR and PWR repetitive high-dose jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of concern about the apparent increase in collective radiation dose to workers at nuclear power plants, this project will provide information to industry in preplanning for radiation protection during maintenance operations. This study identifies Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) repetitive jobs, and respective collective dose trends and dose reduction techniques. 3 references, 2 tables

  6. International nuclear power status 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the seventh in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2000, the report contains: 1. General trends in the development of nuclear power. 2. Deposition of low-level radioactive waste. 3. Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 1999). 4. An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2000. 5. The development in Sweden. 6. The development in Eastern Europe. 7. The development in the rest of the world. 8. Trends in the development of reactor types. 9. Trends in the development of the nuclear fuel cycle. (au)

  7. Nuclear Power Development in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Chengge; Li Shulan

    2009-01-01

    @@ China's nuclear power industry experienced such three stages as initiation, moderate development and active development. So far, there have been 11 nuclear power units in service in the Chinese mainland with a total installed capacity of 9 100 MW. In addition, there are 24 units being constructed or to be constructed as listed in the 11th Five-Year Plan.

  8. Solid-State Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    A strategy for "Solid-State" Nuclear Power is proposed to guide development of technologies and systems into the second 50 years of nuclear spaceflight. The strategy emphasizes a simple and highly integrated system architecture with few moving parts or fluid loops; the leverage of modern advances in materials, manufacturing, semiconductors, microelectromechanical and nanotechnology devices; and the targeted advancement of high temperature nuclear fuels, materials and static power conversion to enable high performance from simple system topologies.

  9. Strategy for utilizing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the national goals is to achieve independence in the area of energy supplies in the next few years. It is believed that attaining this goal will require extensive utilization of nuclear power in conventional fission reactors. It is proposed that the best way to develop the nuclear resource is through government ownership of the reactors. It is argued that this will minimize the risks associated with the nuclear-power option and clear the way for its exploitation

  10. Nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early 1988, 417 nuclear power plants were in opration worldwide, which is twenty more than in early 1987. The total installed power of 300 GWe corresponds to 11% of the total generating capacity and contributes more than 16% of the worldwide electricity production. Fifty of these nuclear power plants, with an aggregate 28 GWe, have been built in developing countries, where they contribute 7% to the electricity requirement. With respect to installed power, the growth of nuclear power lags behind the plans made ten years ago, because some developing countries have stretched out their nuclear power programs for the next decade. This is due to various reasons. In some cases, the availability of alternative energies has reduced the use of nuclear power. In other cases, the delay has been due to funding and to the long planning and construction periods. The main problem facing the developing countries, however, is financing nuclear power plant projects in the light of the high capital costs of nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  11. Developing countries curtail nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power programmes in developing countries, following the accident at the Chernobyl power plant are summarized. Many of these have abandoned plans for nuclear power (eg Gabon), mothballed existing reactors (eg Philippines) or deferred decisions on a reactor programme (eg Egypt, Taiwan, Libya). Economic and political pressures are usually the underlying reasons, but the Chernobyl incident has proved a useful excuse. Other countries (Nigeria, Korea, India, Pakistan) have not let the accident change their nuclear policy. In China, Israel and Turkey the debate about nuclear power has been sharpened by the accident. Although Chernobyl has hastened decisions on nuclear power in some countries it has not affected the long-term policies of developing countries. (UK)

  12. Climate change and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry has increased its efforts to have nuclear power plants integrated into the post- Kyoto negotiating process of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) states: ''For many reasons, current and future nuclear energy projects are a superior method of generating emission credits that must be considered as the US expands the use of market- based mechanisms designed around emission credit creation and trading to achieve environmental goals ''. The NEI considers that nuclear energy should be allowed to enter all stages of the Kyoto ''flexibility Mechanisms'': emissions trading, joint implementation and the Clean Development Mechanism. The industry sees the operation of nuclear reactors as emission ''avoidance actions'' and believes that increasing the generation of nuclear power above the 1990 baseline year either through extension and renewal of operating licenses or new nuclear plant should be accepted under the flexibility mechanisms in the same way as wind, solar and hydro power. For the time being, there is no clear definition of the framework conditions for operating the flexibility mechanisms. However, eligible mechanisms must contribute to the ultimate objective of the Climate Convention of preventing ''dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system''. The information presented in the following sections of this report underlines that nuclear power is not a sustainable source of energy, for many reasons. In conclusion, an efficient greenhouse gas abatement strategy will be based on energy efficiency and not on the use of nuclear power. (author)

  13. Obrigheim nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1973 the 345 MW pressurized water nuclear power plant at Obrigheim operated on base load, generating approximately 2.63 TWh, approximately 2.5 TWh of which was supplied to the KWO members. The plant availability for the year was 89.9%. Of the 10.1% non-availability, 6.4% (23 d) was caused by refuelling, including inspection, overhaul and repair operations and routine tests carried out in September 1973. 3.3% was due to stoppages for repairs to a steam generator and the two main cooling pumps, while 0.4% resulted from failures in the electrical section of the plant. The plant was shut down seven times in all, including three scrams. The average core burnup at the end of the fourth cycle (1 September 1973) was 18900 MWd/tU, representing an average burnup of approximately 37500 MWd/tU for a fuel element used in all four cycles. The operating performance of the steam generators and the result of the steam generator inspection carried out during refuelling in 1973 suggest no progressive damage. The quantities of radioactive materials released to the environment in 1973 were well below the officially permitted levels. The availability of the plant from the beginning of pilot operation in 1969 to the end of 1973 was 83.7 %

  14. Garigliano nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period under review, the Garigliano power station produced 1,028,77 million kWh with a utilization factor of 73,41% and an availability factor of 85,64%. The disparity between the utilization and availability factors was mainly due to a shutdown of about one and half months owing to lack of staff at the plant. The reasons for nonavailability (14.36%) break down as follows: nuclear reasons 11,49%; conventional reasons 2,81%; other reasons 0,06%. During the period under review, no fuel replacements took place. The plant functioned throughout with a single reactor reticulation pump and resulting maximum available capacity of 150 MWe gross. After the month of August, the plant was operated at levels slightly below the maximum available capacity in order to lengthen the fuel cycle. The total number of outages during the period under review was 11. Since the plant was brought into commercial operation, it has produced 9.226 million kWh

  15. Effects of Void Uncertainties on Pin Power Distributions and the Void Reactivity Coefficient for a 10X10 BWR Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jatuff, F.; Krouthen, J.; Helmersson, S.; Chawla, R

    2004-03-01

    A significant source of uncertainty in Boiling Water Reactor physics is associated with the precise characterisation of the axially-dependent neutron moderation properties of the coolant inside the fuel assembly channel, and the corresponding effects on reactor physics parameters such as the lattice neutron multiplication, the neutron migration length, and the pin-by-pin power distribution. In this paper, the effects of particularly relevant void fraction uncertainties on reactor physics parameters have been studied for a BWR assembly of type Westinghouse SVEA-96 using the CASMO-4, HELIOS/PRESTO-2 and MCNP4C codes. The SVEA-96 geometry is characterised by the sub-division of the assembly into four different sub-bundles by means of an inner bypass with a cruciform shape. The study has covered the following issues: (a) the effects of different cross-section data libraries on the void coefficient of reactivity, for a wide range of void fractions; (b) the effects due to a heterogeneous vs. homogeneous void distribution inside the sub-bundles; and (c) the consequences of partly inserted absorber blades producing different void fractions in different sub-bundles. (author)

  16. Nuclear power for environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power does not produce CO2 or other greenhouse gases, and also does not produce any SO2, NOx or other gases which contribute to acid rain. These characteristics of nuclear power are especially important in comparison to coal-fired generation of electricity. As an example, in comparison with a coal-fired power plant of the same size, with abatement systems, a 1300 MW(e) nuclear power plant eliminates annually emissions to the air of about: 2000 t of particulates; 8.5 million t of CO2: 12,000 t of SO2; and 6,000 t of NOx, the precise quantities being dependent on coal quality, power plant design and thermal efficiency, and on the effectiveness of the abatement systems. Opponents of nuclear power concede these facts, but argue that nuclear power is such a small part of the world energy balance that it is insignificant to the big issue of CO2. This is hardly correct. Today, 16% of the world's electricity (and 5% of the world's total primary energy) is generated using nuclear power. If this electricity were to have been generated using coal, it would have resulted in about 1600 million tons of CO2 annually. This is 8% of the 20,000 million tons of CO2 now emitted annually from the burning of fossil fuels, an amount which the Toronto Conference proposed should be cut by 20% up to the year 2005. A further major difference in the two energy systems is that the relatively smaller amount of nuclear wastes is fully isolated from the environment. In addition to discussing the global contributions of nuclear power to environmental improvement, the paper presents actual results achieved in a number of countries, demonstrating the positive contribution which nuclear power has made to reducing the environmental impacts of electricity production. 7 figs, 12 tabs

  17. Towards sustainable nuclear power development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, Andrei A.; Murogov, Victor M.; Kuptsov, Ilya S. [Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering of NNRU MEPhl, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-15

    The review of the current situation in the nuclear energy sector carried out in this article brings to light key problems and contradictions, development trends and prospects, which finally determine the role and significance of nuclear power as a factor ensuring a sustainable energy development. Authors perspectives on the most appropriate developments of nuclear power, which should be based on a balanced use of proven innovative nuclear technologies and comprehensive multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle are expressed. The problems of wording appropriate and essential requirements for new countries with respect to their preparedness to develop nuclear programs, taking into account their development level of industry and infrastructure as well as national heritages and peculiarities, are explained. It is also indicated that one of the major components of sustainability in the development of nuclear power, which legitimates its public image as a power technology, is the necessity of developing and promoting the concepts of nuclear culture, nuclear education, and professional nuclear ethics. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear power in the Midwest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Twelfth Annual Illinois Energy Conference, held in Chicago, Illinois, October 1984 was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources, the Illinois Energy Resources Commission, and the Illinois Commerce Commission. The theme for the conference was ''Nuclear Power in the Midwest.'' The topic of Nuclear Power is particularly appropriate in view of the fact that the State of Illinois, as well as the Midwest region, has made a major commitment to the use of this option for electric power generation. This is evidenced by the fact that some twenty-three of the eighty-six currently licensed nuclear reactors in the United States are located in the Midwest region. Illinois alone contains ten licensed nuclear reactors with four other nuclear plants either under construction or waiting for an operating license. In rated capacity of electric power generated by nuclear reactors, the region is capable of producing 21.5% of the national total of 70,000 MWe. The problems surrounding nuclear power involve complex technologies, environmental and public health concerns, economic and legal factors as well as numerous other policy questions. The goal of the 12th Annual Illinois Energy Conference was to review these issues in order to educate the public and to assist government policy makers in making rational judgements regarding the use and development of the nuclear power option

  19. Nuclear power - a reliable future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ministry of Education and Research - Department of Research has implemented a national Research and Development program taking into consideration the following: - the requirements of the European Union on research as a factor of development of the knowledge-based society; - the commitments to the assimilation and enforcement of the recommendations of the European Union on nuclear power prompted by the negotiations of the sections 'Science and Research' and ' Energy' of the aquis communautaire; - the major lines of interest in Romania in the nuclear power field established by National Framework Program of Cooperation with IAEA, signed on April 2001; - the short and medium term nuclear options of the Romanian Government; - the objectives of the National Nuclear Plan. The major elements of the nuclear research and development program MENER (Environment, Energy, Resources) supported by the Department of Research of the Ministry of Education and Research are the following: - reactor physics and nuclear fuel management; - operation safety of the Power Unit 1 of Cernavoda Nuclear Electric Power Station; - improved nuclear technological solutions at the Cernavoda NPP; - development of technologies for nuclear fuel cycle; - operation safety of the other nuclear plants in Romania; - assessment of nuclear risks and estimation of the radiological impact on the environment; - behavior of materials under the reactor service conditions and environmental conditions; - design of nuclear systems and equipment for the nuclear power stations and nuclear facilities; - radiological safety; - application of nuclear techniques and technologies in industry, agriculture, medicine and other fields of social life. Research to develop high performance methods and equipment for monitoring nuclear impact on environment are conducted to endorse the measures for radiation protection. Also mentioned are the research on implementing a new type of nuclear fuel cycle in CANDU reactors as well as

  20. On PA of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present state of things relating to the nuclear power generation are described first, focusing on the Chernobyl accident, power control test, old-wave and new-wave antinuclear movements, move toward elimination of nuclear power plants, and trend in government-level argument concerning nuclear power generation. Then the importance of public relations activities for nuclear power generation is emphasized. It is stressed that information should be supplied positively to the public to obtain public understanding and confidence. Various activities currently made to promote public relations for nuclear power generation are also outlined, focusing on the improvement in the nuclear power public relations system and practical plans for these activities. Activities for improvement in the public relations system include the organization of public relations groups, establishment and effective implementation of an overall public relations plan, training of core workers for public relations, and management of the public relations system. Other practical activities include the encouragement of the public to come and see the power generation facilities and distribution of pamphlets, and use of the media. (N.K.)

  1. Greenfield nuclear power for Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarenpaa, Tapio

    2010-09-15

    In Finland, licensing for new nuclear power is ongoing. The political approval is to be completed in 2010. Fennovoima's project is unique in various ways: (i) the company was established only in 2007, (ii) its ownership includes a mixture of local energy companies, electricity-intensive industries and international nuclear competence through E.ON, and (iii) it has two alternative greenfield sites. There are five prerequisites for a successful nuclear power project in a transparent democracy of today: (1) need for additional power capacity, (2) actor prepared to invest, (3) established competence, (4) available site, (5) open communications, and (6) favorable public opinion.

  2. Development of a computer program of fast calculation for the pre design of advanced nuclear fuel 10 x 10 for BWR type reactors; Desarrollo de un program de computo de calculo rapido para el prediseno de celdas de combustible nuclear avanzado 10 x 10 para reactores de agua en ebullicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mrpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) a methodology is developed to optimize the design of cells 10x10 of assemble fuels for reactors of water in boil or BWR. It was proposed a lineal calculation formula based on a coefficients matrix (of the change reason of the relative power due to changes in the enrichment of U-235) for estimate the relative powers by pin of a cell. With this it was developed the computer program of fast calculation named PreDiCeldas. The one which by means of a simple search algorithm allows to minimize the relative power peak maximum of cell or LPPF. This is achieved varying the distribution of U-235 inside the cell, maintaining in turn fixed its average enrichment. The accuracy in the estimation of the relative powers for pin is of the order from 1.9% when comparing it with results of the 'best estimate' HELIOS code. With the PreDiCeldas it was possible, at one minimum time of calculation, to re-design a reference cell diminishing the LPPF, to the beginning of the life, of 1.44 to a value of 1.31. With the cell design with low LPPF is sought to even design cycles but extensive that those reached at the moment in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central. (Author)

  3. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  4. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Electrical switchgear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant electrical switchgear important to license renewal. The latent of this AMG to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner which allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance, to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  5. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, S.; Katz, D.; Daavettila, N.; Lehnert, D. [MDC-Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  6. Nuclear power stations licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The judicial aspects of nuclear stations licensing are presented. The licensing systems of the United States, Spain, France and Federal Republic of Germany are focused. The decree n0 60.824 from July 7 sup(th), 1967 and the following legislation which define the systematic and area of competence in nuclear stations licensing are analysed

  7. Nuclear power: An evolving scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past two years have found the IAEA often in the spotlight - primarily because of our role as the world's 'nuclear watchdog', as we are sometimes referred to on the evening news. The most visible, and often controversial, peaceful nuclear application is the generation of electricity, the focus of this article largely from a European perspective. At the end of last year there were 440 nuclear power units operating worldwide. Together, they supply about 16% of the world's electricity. That percentage has remained relatively steady for almost 20 years. Expansion and growth prospects for nuclear power are centred in Asia. Of the 31 units under construction worldwide, 18 are located in India, Japan, South Korea and China, including Taiwan. Twenty of the last 29 reactors to be connected to the grid are also in the Far East and South Asia. That is probably more active construction than most Europeans would guess, given how little recent growth has occurred in the West. For Western Europe and North America, nuclear construction has been a frozen playing field - the last plant to be completed being Civaux-2 in France in 1999. That should raise a question: with little to no new construction, how has nuclear power been able to keep up with other energy sources, to maintain its share of electricity generation? Interestingly enough, the answer is tied directly to efforts to improve safety performance. The accident at Chernobyl in 1986 prompted the creation of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), and revolutionized the IAEA approach to nuclear power plant safety. Some analysts believe the case for new nuclear construction in Europe is gaining new ground, for a number of reasons: efforts to limit greenhouse gas emissions and reduce the risk of climate change; security of energy supply; Comparative Public Health Risk; different set of variables when choosing Each country's and region energy strategy. Looking to the future, certain key challenges are, of direct

  8. Nuclear power and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power is a new, innovative technology for energy production, seen in the longer historic perspective. Nuclear technology has a large potential for further development and use in new applications. To achieve this potential the industry needs to develop the arguments to convince policy makers and the general public that nuclear power is a real alternative as part of a sustainable energy system. This paper examines the basic concept of sustainable development and gives a quality review of the most important factors and requirements, which have to be met to quality nuclear power as sustainable. This paper intends to demonstrate that it is not only in minimising greenhouse gas emissions that nuclear power is a sustainable technology, also with respect to land use, fuel availability waste disposal, recycling and use of limited economic resources arguments can be developed in favour of nuclear power as a long term sustainable technology. It is demonstrated that nuclear power is in all aspects a sustainable technology, which could serve in the long term with minimal environmental effects and at minimum costs to the society. And the challenge can be met. But to achieve need political leadership is needed, to support and develop the institutional and legal framework that is the basis for a stable and long-term energy policy. Industry leaders are needed as well to stand up for nuclear power, to create a new industry culture of openness and communication with the public that is necessary to get the public acceptance that we have failed to do so far. The basic facts are all in favour of nuclear power and they should be used

  9. The economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is seen by some as a partial solution to climate change. The obvious supporters include nuclear establishments, but the 'surprising' supporters comprise some environmentalists like James Lovelock. One of the 15 strategies proposed by Stephen Pacala and Robert Socolow as part of their wedge model is to substitute nuclear power for coal power. The addition of 700 GW of nuclear power, i.e. roughly twice the current global capacity, would constitute one wedge and could reduce one billion tonnes of carbon by mid-century. (The other 14 strategies include: efficient vehicles; reduced use of vehicles; efficient buildings; efficient baseload coal plants; gas baseload power for coal baseload power capture CO2 at baseload power plant capture CO2 at H2 plant; capture CO2 at coal-to-synfuels plant and geological storage; wind power for coal power; PV power for coal power; wind H2 in fuel-cell car for gasoline in hybrid car; biomass fuel for fossil fuel; reduced deforestation, plus reforestation, afforestation, and new plantations, and conservation tillage

  10. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Battery chargers, inverters and uninterruptible power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant battery chargers, inverters and uninterruptible power supplies important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already, experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  11. Nuclear power and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental impacts and the impacts on man are compared for nuclear power plants and solid-fossil-fuel power plants. Practical experience points to significant advantages of nuclear power facilities. While coal-fired power plants in normal operation pollute the environment up to 30% of the permissible limits, the actual exposures caused by nuclear power plants are less than one per mille of the limits given by legal regulations. Some problems are also discussed of radiation protection. It is stated that thanks to the systematic research in this field which has been carried out for nearly sixty years, the knowledge of ionizing radiation hazards is now much more profound and complex than, e.g., that of toxic chemical pollutants released from fossil-fuel power plants and from chemical plants or contained in vehicle exhaust gases. (Z.M.). 5 tabs

  12. The debate on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for nuclear power is pointed out. The Study Group on Nuclear Fuel Cycles of the American Physical Society has studied the problem of waste disposal in detail and has found that geological emplacement leads to safe waste disposal. The relation between nuclear power and weapons proliferation is discussed. The problem of preventing proliferation is primarily a political problem, and the availability of nuclear power will contribute little to the potential for proliferation. However, to further reduce this contribution, it may be desirable to keep fast-breeder reactors under international control and to use only converters for national reactors. The desirable converter is one which has a high conversion ratio, probably one using the thorium cycle, 233U, and heavy water as the moderator. The nuclear debate in the United States of America is discussed. Work on physical and technical safeguards in the USA against diversion of fissile materials is mentioned. (author)

  13. Nuclear power - razing and creating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the book a studies fulfilled by the author is summarized, and issues of modern status for nuclear reactors safety; worldwide statement of nuclear power; nuclear waste disposal; radiation ecology; military polygons infrastructure conversion are considered. Works - fulfilled under scientific supervision of the author - on getting a new information about nuclear tests consequences on the Kazakhstan territory, its effect on the environment and human health, problems of determination of radiation contamination levels of the Republic's regions, suffered population rehabilitation from these tests, reimbursement of former agricultural areas after nuclear tests activity into national economy are discussed, and implementation of up-to-date technologies is given. The book is intended for a wide circle of readers, specialists, teachers, postgraduates and students and all who are interesting of nuclear power use issues for a prosperity and well-being of mankind

  14. History on foundation of Korea nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This reports the history on foundation of Korea nuclear power from 1955 to 1980, which is divided ten chapters. The contents of this book are domestic and foreign affairs before foundation of nuclear power center, establishment of nuclear power and research center, early activity and internal conflict about nuclear power center, study for nuclear power business and commercialization of the studying ordeal over nuclear power administration and new phase, dispute for jurisdiction on nuclear power business and the process, permission for nuclear reactor, regulation and local administration, the process of deliberation and decision of reactor 3. 4 in Yonggwang, introduction of nuclear reprocessing facilities and activities for social organization.

  15. An engineer-constructor's view of nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At SWEC we have been involved in the development of safety features of nuclear power plants ever since we served as the engineer-constructur for the first commerical nuclear power station at Shippingport, Pennsylvania, in the 1950s. Our personnel have pioneered a number of safety innovations and improvements. Among these innovations is the subatmospheric containment for pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants. This type of containment is designed so that leakage will terminate within 1 to 2 hours of the worst postulated loss of coolant accident. Other notable contributions include first use of reinforced-concrete atmospheric containments for PWR power plants and of reinforced-concrete, vapor-suppression containments for boiling water reactor (BWR) power plants. Both concepts meet rigorous U.S. safety requirements. SWEC has performed a substantial amount of work on developing standardized plant designs and has developed standardized engineering and construction techniques and procedures. Standardization concepts are being developed in Canada, France, USSR, and Germany, as well as in the United States. The West German convoy concept, which involves developing a number of standardized plants in a common effort, has been quite successful. We believe standardization contributes to safety in a number of ways. Use of standardized designs, procedures, techniques, equipment, and methods increases efficiency and results in higher quality. Standardization also reduces the design variations with which plant operators, emergency teams, and regulatory personnel must be familiar, thus increasing operator capability, and permits specialized talents to be focused on important safety considerations. (orig./RW)

  16. Investor perceptions of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence is provided that investor concerns about nuclear power have recently been reflected in the common stock returns of all utilities with such facilities and have resulted in a risk premium. In particular, over the 1978-1982 period, three nuclear-related events occurred at the same time as, and therefore appear to have caused, significant drops in the market values of nuclear utilities relative to their non-nuclear counterparts. The three events were as follows: the accident at TMI, which occurred in March 1979; the realization in the summer of 1980 that an accident of the magnitude of TMI could result in cleanup costs of over $1 billion, which are not completely insurable and could therefore result in substantial losses; and the summer 1982 decision by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) to cancel some if its nuclear power plant construction projects, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) decision to stop work on the construction of the Zimmer reactor, followed by a warning that it might close the Indian Point 2 and 3 reactors. If an individual had invested $100 in an average nuclear utility on the day before the TMI accident and reinvested all dividends, the value of this investment would have fallen by 10% relative to an identical investment in the average non-nuclear utility. The risk of investments in nuclear power versus conventional generating technologies shows nuclear power to be a relatively risky investment. However, relative to all investments, nuclear power was less risky in terms of the type of risk that would cause investors to require a premium before purchasing their securities. 6 figures, 6 tables

  17. Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fran

    1979-01-01

    Presents a nuclear power plant simulation game which is designed to involve a class of 30 junior or senior high school students. Scientific, ecological, and social issues covered in the game are also presented. (HM)

  18. Space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials of the 19-th Symposium on Space Nuclear Energetic and Engine Units taking place in 2002, in Albuquerque, USA are reviewed. Reports on transformation of heat energy produced by nuclear reactors in electrical one are presented in the reports. Result of works on improvement as traditional (Brayton and Rankine cycles, thermoelectricity and thermionic emission), so innovation converter systems (Stirling engine, alkali metal thermal to electric converter - AMTEC, thermoacoustic engine) are represented

  19. Is nuclear power safe enough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vice-chairman of the Nuclear Power Safety Commission presents here the background for the Commission's work. He summarises informally the conclusions reached and quotes the minority dissensions. He also criticises many of the arguments made by anti-nuclear organisations. (JIW)

  20. Sustainable development and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sustainability of specific technology became the important issue in future developement perspective as the environmental issue occupies the most priority in adopting the relevant technology. This study summarizes the concepts of sustainable development and analyses the nuclear future under the pressure of sustainable development. Also, it shows the fields that need the concentrated research in nuclear power

  1. Nuclear power and childhood leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimston, M. (AEA Technology, London (UK))

    1991-06-19

    The possibility of illness caused by exposure to emissions from nuclear power plants continues to raise enormous public concern. Nowhere is this more evident than in the debate over the aetiology of childhood leukaemias. This review explores the evidence in relation to this and other diseases which are linked in the public's mind to nuclear power. The scientific evidence presented suggests that these links are more tenuous than is commonly believed. (author).

  2. Nuclear Power Development in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China's nuclear power industry experienced such three stages as initiation,moderate development and active development.So far,there have been 11 nuclear power units in service in the Chinese mainland with a total installed capacity of 9 100 MW.In addition,there are 24 units being constructed or to be constructed as listed in the 11th Five-Year Plan.

  3. Nuclear power: Issues and misunderstandings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sizeable sector of the public remains hesitant or opposed to the use of nuclear power. With other groups claiming nuclear power has a legitimate role in energy programs, there is a need to openly and objectively discuss the concerns limiting its acceptance: the perceived health effects, the consequences of severe accidents, and the disposal of high level waste. This paper discusses these concerns using comparisons with other energy sources. (author)

  4. Start up and commercial operation of Laguna Verde nuclear power plant. Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to start up of Laguna Verde nuclear power plant preoperational tests and start tests were performed and they are described in its more eminent aspects. In relation to commercial operation of nuclear station a series of indicator were set to which allow the measurement of performance in unit 1, in areas of plant efficiency and personal safety. Antecedents. Laguna Verde station is located in Alto Lucero municipality in Veracruz state, 70 kilometers north-northeast from port of Veracruz and a 290 kilometers east-northeast from Mexico city. The station consist of two units manufactured by General Electric, with a nuclear system of vapor supply also called boiling water (BWR/5), and with a system turbine-generator manufactured by Mitsubishi. Each unit has a nominal power of 1931 MWt and a level design power of 675 Mwe and a net power of 654 Electric Megawatts

  5. Nuclear power - the glittering prizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, C.C.

    The paper on the benefits of nuclear power is based on a lecture given for the Institution of Nuclear Engineers, London, 1986. Suggestions for short term benefits include a clean environment and a cheap energy source, whereas suggestions for long term benefits include freedom from want in the world and avoidance of 'energy wars'. These benefits are discussed along with alternative energy sources, the financial savings to be saved from nuclear power, world energy wealth, depletion of world energy reserves, and risks due to radiation exposure.

  6. Nuclear power - the glittering prizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on the benefits of nuclear power is based on a lecture given for the Institution of Nuclear Engineers, London, 1986. Suggestions for short term benefits include a clean environment and a cheap energy source, whereas suggestions for long term benefits include freedom from want in the world and avoidance of 'energy wars'. These benefits are discussed along with alternative energy sources, the financial savings to be saved from nuclear power, world energy wealth, depletion of world energy reserves, and risks due to radiation exposure. (UK)

  7. Design optimization of the Laguna Verde nuclear power station fuel recharge; Optimacion del diseno de recargas de combustible para la Central Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes Campos, Carlos Cristobal [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Montes Tadeo, Jose Luis [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Salazar (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    It is described, in general terms, the procedure that is followed to accomplish the optimization of the recharge design, and an example is shown where this procedure was applied for the analysis of the type BWR reactor of Unit No. 1 of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Station. [Espanol] Se describe en terminos generales el procedimiento que se sigue para realizar la optimacion del diseno de recargas, y se muestra un ejemplo en el que se utilizo dicho procedimiento para el analisis del reactor tipo BWR de la unidad 1, de la Central Laguna Verde (CLV).

  8. Training Nuclear Power Specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Situation of preparation of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. In view with decision to shut down Unit 1, the Ignalina NPP is limiting the number of new personnel to fill in vacancies. The main attention is given to the training courses for improvement skills of existing Ignalina NPP, VATESI personnel. Main topics of the training courses are listed. Information on number of the personnel who extended their knowledge and improved skills by the type of training is presented

  9. Characteristics of fluctuating pressure generated in BWR main steam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BWR-3 steam dryer in the Quad Cities Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant was damaged by high cycle fatigue due to acoustic-induced vibration. The dryer failure was as attributed to flow-induced acoustic resonance at the stub pipes of safety relief valves (SRVs) in the main steam lines (MSLs). The acoustic resonance was considered to be generated by interaction between the sound field and an unstable shear layer across the closed side branches with SRV stub pipes. We have started a research program on BWR dryers to develop their loading evaluation methods. Moreover, it has been necessary to evaluate the dryer integrity of BWR-5 plants which are the main type of BWR in Japan. In the present study, we used 1/10-scale BWR tests and analyses to investigate the flow-induced acoustic resonance and acoustic characteristics in MSLs. The test apparatus consisted of a steam dryer, a steam dome and 4 MSLs with 20 SRV stub pipes. A finite element method (FEM) was applied for the calculation of three-dimensional wave equations in acoustic analysis. We demonstrated that remarkable fluctuating pressures occurred in high and low frequency regions. High frequency fluctuating pressures was generated by the flow-induced acoustic resonance in the SRV stub pipes. Low frequency fluctuating pressure was generated in an MSL with the dead leg. The frequency of the latter almost coincided with the natural frequency of the MSL with the dead leg. The amplitude of the fluctuating pressures in the multiple stub pipes became more intense because of interaction between them compared with that in the single stub pipe. Acoustic analysis results showed that the multiple stub pipes caused several natural frequencies in the vicinity of the natural frequency of the single stub pipe and several modes of the standing wave in the MSLs. (author)

  10. Infrastructure needs for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is a significant component of electricity systems world-wide and in OECD countries as a whole it accounts for about 25% of the electricity supply. The current stagnation in nuclear power orders and the expectation of diminishing nuclear programmes in several countries might jeopardize industrial infrastructures based on nuclear activities. Questions arise as to whether special measures are needed to ensure that the nuclear option will be available when wanted and if so, who would take these measures. This paper provides at first an attempt to define what can be considered as ''structure'' and ''infrastructure'' and then a review of relevant issues related to industrial and governmental supporting infrastructure. In particular, the manpower availability and educational implications are examined

  11. Public attitudes to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The public is influenced against nuclear power by fear of a large accident, fear of radiation, worry about nuclear waste, and by the fact that it is a symbol of the bureaucratic, impersonal aspects of industrialized society. The nuclear industry must do several things to overcome this public concern. It must be more articulate in speaking to the public in a language the public understands and not in nuclear jargon; it must be strictly accurate and truthful in all statements, and if it believes the case it is putting forward is sound, it should defend the proposal and not promise to do even more to buy off criticism. Acceptance of nuclear power will either have to wait until the energy situation is desperate, or until the industry puts enough effort into presenting and defending its case to convince all objective people

  12. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Any discussion of 21st century energy trends must take into account the global energy imbalance. Roughly 1.6 billion people still lack access to modern energy services, and few aspects of development - whether related to living standards, health care or industrial productivity - can take place without the requisite supply of energy. As we look to the century before us, the growth in energy demand will be substantial, and 'connecting the unconnected' will be a key to progress. Another challenge will be sustainability. How can we meet these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects that could compromise the living environment of future generations? Nuclear power is not a 'fix-all' option. It is a choice that has a place among the mix of solutions, and expectations for the expanding use of nuclear power are rising. In addition to the growth in demand, these expectations are driven by energy security concerns, nuclear power's low greenhouse gas emissions, and the sustained strong performance of nuclear plants. Each country must make its own energy choices; one size does not fit all. But for those countries interested in making nuclear power part of their sustainable development strategies, it is important that the nuclear power option be kept open and accessible

  13. Nuclear power infrastructure and planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several stages in the process of introducing nuclear power in a country. These include feasibility studies; technology evaluation; request for proposals and proposal evaluation; project and contracts development and financing; supply, construction, and commissioning; and finally operation. The IAEA is developing guidance directed to provide criteria for assessing the minimum infrastructure necessary for: a) a host country to consider when engaging in the implementation of nuclear power, or b) a supplier country to consider when assessing that the recipient country would be in an acceptable condition to begin the implementation of nuclear power. There are Member States that may be denied the benefits of nuclear energy if the infrastructure requirements are too large or onerous for the national economy. However if co-operation could be achieved, the infrastructure burden could be shared and economic benefits gained by several countries acting jointly. The IAEA is developing guidance on the potential for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure among countries adopting or extending nuclear power programme

  14. Sustainable development and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although there is an awareness on both the technical and political levels of the advantages of nuclear power, it is not a globally favoured option in a sustainable energy future. A sizeable sector of public opinion remains hesitant or opposed to its increased use, some even to a continuation at present levels. With various groups calling for a role for nuclear power, there is a need openly and objectively to discuss the concerns that limit its acceptance: the perceived health effects, the consequences of severe accidents, the disposal of high level waste and nuclear proliferation. This brochure discusses these concerns, and also the distinct advantages of nuclear power. Extensive comparisons with other energy sources are made

  15. Topics in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 101 nuclear plants operating in the US today are far safer than they were 20-30 years ago. For example, there's been about a 100-fold reduction in the occurrence of 'significant events' since the late 1970s. Although the youngest of currently operating US plants was designed in the 1970s, all have been significantly modified over the years. Key contributors to the safety gains are a vigilant culture, much improved equipment reliability, greatly improved training of operators and maintenance workers, worldwide sharing of experience, and the effective use of probabilistic risk assessment. Several manufacturers have submitted high quality new designs for large reactors to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for design approval, and several companies are vigorously working on designs for smaller, modular reactors. Although the Fukushima reactor accident in March 2011 in Japan has been an almost unmitigated disaster for the local population due to their being displaced from their homes and workplaces and also due to the land contamination, its 'lessons learned' have been important for the broader nuclear industry, and will surely result in safer nuclear plants worldwide - indeed, have already done so, with more safety improvements to come

  16. Nuclear power: in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Agnew, former director of Los Alamos Scientific Lab., observes that modern communications have made the over-populated and less-developed countries impatient to have the energy-intensive living standards enjoyed by Europe and the US. More cartels can be expected, he feels, to give these people economic leverage unless they are supplied with cheap, available energy. He notes that all energy sources, including nuclear, have a role and must be developed. The economic and environmental impacts of nuclear energy compare favorably with other major energy sources, but the public neds to be given factual rather than sensational information about nuclear energy so that realistic comparisons can be made. Dr. Agnew points to new types of reactors for land-based facilities that can be designed and that will be safer than the water-cooled design and eliminate some risks. He also finds fuel reprocessing removing some risks, in contrast to the failing nonproliferation policy. He admonishes opponents of nuclear energy to recognize that their position has serious social and economic implications for developing countries and possibly grave political and security repercussions for the US

  17. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear part with the negative pressure control system is installed in an underground chamber of a mountain. The containment consists of a sealing concrete layer directly sprayed to the rock and containing reinforcement inserts as well as of a consolidating concrete shell. The sealing concrete layer is combined with the rock by means of prestressed concrete tie rods. (DG)

  18. Topics in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budnitz, Robert J. [Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    The 101 nuclear plants operating in the US today are far safer than they were 20-30 years ago. For example, there's been about a 100-fold reduction in the occurrence of 'significant events' since the late 1970s. Although the youngest of currently operating US plants was designed in the 1970s, all have been significantly modified over the years. Key contributors to the safety gains are a vigilant culture, much improved equipment reliability, greatly improved training of operators and maintenance workers, worldwide sharing of experience, and the effective use of probabilistic risk assessment. Several manufacturers have submitted high quality new designs for large reactors to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for design approval, and several companies are vigorously working on designs for smaller, modular reactors. Although the Fukushima reactor accident in March 2011 in Japan has been an almost unmitigated disaster for the local population due to their being displaced from their homes and workplaces and also due to the land contamination, its 'lessons learned' have been important for the broader nuclear industry, and will surely result in safer nuclear plants worldwide - indeed, have already done so, with more safety improvements to come.

  19. Providing emergency supply of nuclear power plants

    OpenAIRE

    ROZMILER, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Work "Providing emergency power nuclear power plant" describes how solving their own consumption nuclear power plant, as emergency power supply is designed and how it should be a solution of known states of emergency, having an immediate impact on the power consumption of their own nuclear power plants. The aim of this thesis is to propose options to strengthen its own emergency power consumption of nuclear power plants, one might say-more resistant to harsh extremes, which could lead to loss...

  20. Judith Perera: 'Nuclear Power in Europe'-A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book published by Financial Time Energy, London 1999, presents the history of nuclear power and its current status in both Eastern and Western Europe. The book extends on 370 pages and is structured in 8 chapters, annexes, a glossary of terms and references. Romanian nuclear power is represented by the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 commissioned in December 1996. Till September 1999 the production of Cernavoda NPP amounted up to 15,271 TWh with a internal consumption lower than 8%, which covered 10-14% of the total electric energy demand of Romania, at a 12 to 14 USD/MWh production cost. The statistical data show that: - with the highest nuclear energy quota appears US, namely with 28.1% of world nuclear power production; - in a classification on countries, Lithuania and France appear on the first place, namely with 77.2% and 75.8%, respectively, as share of nuclear energy in the total national energy production. A review of the reactor types mostly used world wide show that the PWR is the most used technology in France, Japan, USA and several other countries. The chapter two presents the performances of different reactor types among which AGR, BWR and PWR, the load factor of which appears to be the highest. The problems of fuel cycles, fuel conversion, enrichment and production are treated in Chapter 3. The following chapter presents the economic aspects of nuclear power, the energy costs being a pro in the public debates on the future of nuclear energy. A detailed analysis on the environmental impact of nuclear power production is given in Chapter 6. The situation of nuclear sector throughout Europe is shown in the following chapter while the last one is devoted to the main European power companies implied in the nuclear industry. In conclusion, the prospects of nuclear energy in Europe are reviewed by taking into account factors like: public acceptance, costs, competition, waste management, fuel market, safety environmental issues, in-service life, personnel

  1. Environmental aspects of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power provides the world with an important option for generating electricity. To successfully and safely utilize this power, engineering and environmental factors should be carefully considered throughout a nuclear power plant project, especially during the planning stages. This paper discusses the major environmental aspects of a nuclear power plant project from site selection to retirement. During the site selection process, both engineering and environmental resources must be identified and evaluated. Environmental resources include areas that support agricultural or aquatic commercial activities, habitats for commercial or endangered species, population centers, transportation systems, and recreational areas. Also, during the site selection process, the potential impacts of both construction and operating activities must be considered. In addition to the area actually disturbed by construction, construction activities also affect local services, such as transportation systems, housing, school systems, and other social services. Since nuclear power plants use a 'clean fuel,' generally the most significant operating activity having a potential environmental impact is the discharge of cooling water. The potential effect of this discharge on commercial activities and sensitive habitats should be thoroughly evaluated. Lastly, the method of decommissioning can affect long-range land use planning and should therefore be considered during the planning process. With appropriate planning, nuclear power plants can be constructed and operated with minimum environmental impact. (author)

  2. Starting of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure is briefly characterized of jobs in nuclear power plant start-up and the differences are pointed out from those used in conventional power generation. Pressure tests are described oriented to tightness, tests of the secondary circuit and of the individual nodes and facilities. The possibility is shown of increased efficiency of such jobs on an example of the hydraulic tests of the second unit of the Dukovany nuclear power plant where the second and the third stages were combined in the so-colled integrated hydraulic test. (Z.M.). 5 figs

  3. BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1993 Revision, Normal and hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of water chemistry control is to extend the operating life of the reactor and rector coolant system, balance-of-plant components, and turbines while simultaneously controlling costs to safeguard the continued economic viability of the nuclear power generation investment. To further this goal an industry committee of chemistry personnel prepared guidelines to identify the benefits, risks, and costs associated with water chemistry in BWRs and to provide a template for an optimized water chemistry program. This document replaces the BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines - 1986 Revision and the BWR Hydrogen Water Chemistry Guidelines -- 1987 Revision. It expands on the previous guidelines documents by covering the economic implications of BWR water chemistry control

  4. Key Parameters for Operator Diagnosis of BWR Plant Condition during a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the key information needed from nuclear power plant instrumentation to guide severe accident management and mitigation for boiling water reactor (BWR) designs (specifically, a BWR/4-Mark I), estimate environmental conditions that the instrumentation will experience during a severe accident, and identify potential gaps in existing instrumentation that may require further research and development. This report notes the key parameters that instrumentation needs to measure to help operators respond to severe accidents. A follow-up report will assess severe accident environmental conditions as estimated by severe accident simulation model analysis for a specific US BWR/4-Mark I plant for those instrumentation systems considered most important for accident management purposes.

  5. Reduced order models, inertial manifolds, and global bifurcations: searching instability boundaries in nuclear power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Antola, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.suarez@miem.gub.u, E-mail: rsuarez@ucu.edu.u [Universidad Catolica del Uruguay, Montevideo (Uruguay). Fac. de Ingenieria y Tecnologias. Dept. de Matematica; Ministerio de Industria, Energia y Mineria, Montevideo (Uruguay). Direccion General de Secretaria

    2011-07-01

    One of the goals of nuclear power systems design and operation is to restrict the possible states of certain critical subsystems to remain inside a certain bounded set of admissible states and state variations. In the framework of an analytic or numerical modeling process of a BWR power plant, this could imply first to find a suitable approximation to the solution manifold of the differential equations describing the stability behavior, and then a classification of the different solution types concerning their relation with the operational safety of the power plant. Inertial manifold theory gives a foundation for the construction and use of reduced order models (ROM's) of reactor dynamics to discover and characterize meaningful bifurcations that may pass unnoticed during digital simulations done with full scale computer codes of the nuclear power plant. The March-Leuba's BWR ROM is generalized and used to exemplify the analytical approach developed here. A nonlinear integral-differential equation in the logarithmic power is derived. Introducing a KBM Ansatz, a coupled set of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations is obtained. Analytical formulae are derived for the frequency of oscillation and the parameters that determine the stability of the steady states, including sub- and supercritical PAH bifurcations. A Bautin's bifurcation scenario seems possible on the power-flow plane: near the boundary of stability, a region where stable steady states are surrounded by unstable limit cycles surrounded at their turn by stable limit cycles. The analytical results are compared with recent digital simulations and applications of semi-analytical bifurcation theory done with reduced order models of BWR. (author)

  6. Benchmarking of transient codes against cycle 19 STABILITY measurements at Leibstadt nuclear power plant (KKL) - 131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupled neutronics-thermal hydraulic codes are used by many utilities, research institutes and regulatory authorities worldwide for performing BWR stability analysis. RAMONA-3 has been established in the industry for quite a long time as a reliable time-domain dynamic code with best performance for predictive calculations. Next generation of codes such as RAMONA-5, SIMULATE-3K and POLCA-T, with advanced two-group neutronics and more detailed plant description and thermal hydraulics models have been introduced. The performance of these codes against the stability measurements performed in cycle 19 at the Swiss nuclear power plant Leibstadt (KKL), a BWR/6 from General Electric, is presented in this paper. Important suppliers of the nuclear industry such as Westinghouse Electric Sweden, AREVA NP Germany, Studsvik Scandpower Inc. USA, and the Swiss research institute PSI have participated in this work. The validation of calculation methods against the KKL stability measurements was considered important by the various organizations for different reasons. Amongst others, Studsvik Scandpower aimed at filling a gap in the SIMULATE-3K stability benchmark database to include a jet pumps driven plant, AREVA NP had to fulfill fuel licensing requirements, and Westinghouse planned to launch POLCA-T parallel to a validation of RAMONA-5 as a production code. PSI cooperated with KKL in stability issues from the very beginning and introduced the stability test project in the framework of NACUSP, a European consortium that aimed for a better understanding of the BWR stability problem. For that purpose, this validation provides an assessment of advanced stability codes for modern BWR core designs. (authors)

  7. Nuclear power and durable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper highlights the role that the nuclear power can play in a durable development of society. From a comparative analysis of different energy sources capable to fulfil the national energy demand it turns out that for Romania the optimal alternative is nuclear power. The nuclear power proved its attributes and characteristics in ensuring durable development by: 1. the technological maturation of the CANDU system as demonstrated by the good functioning of Cernavoda NPP Unit 1; 2. optimal utilization of the uranium national resources as well as the mining industry; 3. uranium processing and nuclear fuel and heavy water manufacturing as entailed by an educational infrastructure, research and industrial development; 4. low environmental impact; 5. high professional skill of the nuclear personnel. In addition, the low cost of the energy produced by the nuclear sector, as well as the social effects, namely, a 100% utilization of industrial infrastructure and national research capacity, urges the decision makers to develop the Cernavoda NPP, to increase the weight of nuclear energy in the energy production of the country

  8. World nuclear power plant capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the background information for statistics and analysis developed by NUKEM in its monthly Market Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The assessments in this Special Report are based on the continuous review of individual nuclear power plant projects. This Special Report begins with tables summarizing a variety of nuclear power generating capacity statistics for 1990. It continues with a brief review of the year's major events regarding each country's nuclear power program. The standard NUKEM Market Report tables on nuclear plant capacity are given on pages 24 and 25. Owing to space limitations, the first year shown is 1988. Please refer to previous Special Reports for data covering earlier years. Detailed tables for each country list all existing plants as well as those expected by NUKEM to be in commercial operation by the end of 2005. An Appendix containing a list of abbreviations can be found starting on page 56. Only nuclear power plants intended for civilian use are included in this Special Report. Reactor lifetimes are assumed to be 35 years for all light water reactors and 30 years for all other reactor types, unless other data or definite decommissioning dates have been published by the operators. (orig./UA)

  9. The abuse of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reproduces an address by Sir John Hill, Chairman of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, at a conference in London organised by the Financial Times in July 1976. Actions that, in the author's view, could be regarded as constituting abuse of nuclear power are first summarised, and the various aspects of the use and abuse of nuclear power are discussed. The author considers that achieving the maximum degree of acceptance of the Non-Proliferation Treaty is the most important political objective in nuclear power, but considers that nuclear terrorism would be abortive and that, so far as the UK is concerned, the present precautions are adequate and will remain so. It is considered that much abuse of nuclear power arises from the prevalence of its critics, particularly with reference to Pu hazards, the health of nuclear employees, and possible damage to the health of the public. The Pu problem is considered to be far more emotive than rational. The possibility of lung cancer and leukaemia is discussed. It is concluded that atomic energy is one of the best of industries in which to work, both from the health and interest points of view. (U.K.)

  10. Technology and costs for decommissioning of Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning study for the Swedish nuclear power plants has been carried out during 1992 to 1994 and the work has been led by a steering group consisting of people from the nuclear utilities and SKB. The study has been focused on two reference plants, Oskarshamn 3 and Ringhals 2. Oskarshamn 3 is a boiling water reactor (BWR) and Ringhals 2 is a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Subsequently, the result from these plants have been translated to the other Swedish plants. The study gives an account of the procedures, costs, waste quantities and occupational doses associated with decommissioning of the Swedish nuclear power plants. Dismantling is assumed to start immediately after removal of the spent fuel. No attempts at optimization, in terms of technology or costs, have been made. The nuclear power plant site is restored after decommissioning so that it can be released for use without restriction for other industrial activities. The study shows that a reactor can be dismantled in about five years, with an average labour force of about 150 persons. The maximum labour force required for Oskarshamn 3 has been estimated to about 300 persons. This peak load occurred the first years but is reduced to about 50 persons during the demolishing of the buildings. The cost of decommissioning Oskarshamn 3 has been estimated to be about MSEK 940 in January 1994 prices. The decommissioning of Ringhals 2 has been estimated to be MSEK 640. The costs for the other Swedish nuclear power plants lie in the range MSEK 590-960. 17 refs, 21 figs, 15 tabs

  11. Nuclear power data; Kernenergie in Zahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-05-15

    The report ''nuclear power data'' includes data on the following issues: nuclear power plants in Germany including their operational characteristics, gross data on electricity generation in Germany, primary energy consumption in Germany, nuclear power plants worldwide, top ten nuclear power plants worldwide with respect to electricity generation in 2012.

  12. Elections: nuclear power confirmed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007 was an election year in France and the presidential campaign was an opportunity to bring in the debate a lot of topics, it appears that this year sustainable development was a concern shared by a lot of politicians. Candidate Sarkozy said that nuclear energy is consistent with the preservation of the environment and must be an essential part of the energy mix. He compelled himself to pursue the construction of the EPR reactor on the Flamanville site and to organize as soon as possible a large debate on all the topics involved in sustainable development. (A.C.)

  13. Severe Accident Simulation of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Espinosa-Paredes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA simulation in the boiling water reactor (BWR of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (LVNPP at 105% of rated power is analyzed in this work. The LVNPP model was developed using RELAP/SCDAPSIM code. The lack of cooling water after the LOCA gets to the LVNPP to melting of the core that exceeds the design basis of the nuclear power plant (NPP sufficiently to cause failure of structures, materials, and systems that are needed to ensure proper cooling of the reactor core by normal means. Faced with a severe accident, the first response is to maintain the reactor core cooling by any means available, but in order to carry out such an attempt is necessary to understand fully the progression of core damage, since such action has effects that may be decisive in accident progression. The simulation considers a LOCA in the recirculation loop of the reactor with and without cooling water injection. During the progression of core damage, we analyze the cooling water injection at different times and the results show that there are significant differences in the level of core damage and hydrogen production, among other variables analyzed such as maximum surface temperature, fission products released, and debris bed height.

  14. Nuclear power world report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2014-07-15

    At the end of 2013, 435 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number decreased by 2 units compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2012. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 398,861 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 378,070 MWe (gross: 392,793 MWe, net: 372,572 MWe, new data base as of 2013: nameplate capacities). Four units were commissioned in 2014; three units in China and one in India. Eight units were shut down permanently in 2013; 2 units in Japan, and four units in the USA. Two units in Canada were declared permanently shut-down after a long-term shutdown. 70 nuclear generating units - 2 more than at the end of 2012 - were under construction in late 2013 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 73,814 MWe and net power of approx. 69,279 MWe. Six new projects have been started in 2013 in four countries (Belarus, China, the Republic of Korea, and the United Arab Emirates). Worldwide, some 125 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2013 achieved a level of approx. 2,364.15 billion (109) kWh (2012: approx. 2,350.80 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 70,310 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear power generation incorporating modern power system practice

    CERN Document Server

    Myerscough, PB

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power generation has undergone major expansion and developments in recent years; this third edition contains much revised material in presenting the state-of-the-art of nuclear power station designs currently in operation throughout the world. The volume covers nuclear physics and basic technology, nuclear station design, nuclear station operation, and nuclear safety. Each chapter is independent but with the necessary technical overlap to provide a complete work on the safe and economic design and operation of nuclear power stations.

  16. The benefits of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of the article is to indicate in fairly general terms the nature and magnitude of the benefits of nuclear power. The paper argues that significant economic gains have been obtained and that investment in civil nuclear development has fully justified itself. The justification for these claims is discussed under the topic headings: scale of the industry and world fuel savings, environment, health, fuel prices, United Kingdom benefits, generation costs, security of fuel supply, and the third world. (U.K.)

  17. Nuclear fuel procurement management at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The market situation of nuclear fuel cycles is highlighted. It also summarises the possible contract models and the elements of effective management for nuclear fuel procurement at nuclear power station based upon the nuclear fuel procurement practice of Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS)

  18. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When it was announced in June that France had beaten Japan in the race to host the world's next big fusion lab, the news made headlines around the world. The media reported in generally positive tones how the 10 bn Euro International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will be the next step on the path to a commercially viable nuclear fusion reactor (Physics World August p5). The coverage was a clear sign of the growing debate surrounding the future of nuclear power. Nuclear Renaissance is a welcome contribution to that debate. The book bills itself as a 'semi-technical overview of modern technologies', which perhaps underplays what the author has achieved. It reviews past, current and prospective nuclear technologies, but links them clearly to the wider topics of energy policy, climate change and energy supply. Apart from being 'semi-technical', the book is also 'semi-British'. Although those sections on technology have a global scope, the lengthy first part - devoted to the 'policy landscape' - is firmly UK in its perspective. It provides a basic description of nuclear power, the economics of nuclear generation, and how nuclear energy could combat climate change. The contribution of nuclear power to a balanced energy supply and its links with weapons proliferation are also discussed. This opening part ends with a chapter on waste management. While the first part of the book could be a stand-alone introduction to nuclear power for layreaders, the second and third parts - on nuclear fission and nuclear fusion - seem to be aimed at a different readership altogether. In particular, they will help students who have some scientific training to understand in more detail how specific types of nuclear technology work. If you want to know how a Westinghouse Advanced Passive Reactor differs from a European Pressurised Water Reactor - or learn the specifics of the Canadian CANDU reactor or the South African pebble-bed modular reactor - then this is for you. Nuttall

  19. Generation 'Next' and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    My generation was labeled by Russian mass media as generation 'Next.' My technical education is above average. My current position is as a mechanical engineer in the leading research and development institute for Russian nuclear engineering for peaceful applications. It is noteworthy to point out that many of our developments were really first-of-a-kind in the history of engineering. However, it is difficult to grasp the importance of these accomplishments, especially since the progress of nuclear technologies is at a standstill. Can generation 'Next' be independent in their attitude towards nuclear power or shall we rely on the opinions of elder colleagues in our industry? (authors)

  20. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent liquid wastes from being discharged out of the system by processing to recover them in the nuclear reactor and reusing them. Constitution: Discharge of liquid wastes to the surrounding atmosphere are completely eliminated by collecting floor drains, a part of processing water for the regeneration of liquid wastes, non-radioactive steam drains and laundry drains conventionally discharged so far out of the system, processing them in a concentrator, a desalter or the like into water of a high purity and extremely low radioactive concentration, storing the water in an exclusive storage tank and supplying it as a steam or supplementing water to each portion in the plant that requires water of such high purity and extremely low radioactivity. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. Nuclear power, society and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This rubric reports on 12 short notes about sociological and environmental aspects of nuclear power in France and other countries: the epidemiological inquiry widened to all French nuclear sites; the sanitary and radioecological effects of nuclear activities in Northern Cotentin (France); the WONUC (World National Council of Nuclear Workers) anger with the French government about the shutdown of Superphenix reactor; the new more informative promotional campaign of Electricite de France (EdF) for nuclear power; the scientific and research prices attributed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) to its searchers; the creation of a committee of inquiry in the French senate for the careful examination of the economical, social and financial consequences of the shutdown of Superphenix; the 31.2% increase of CEA-Industrie benefits for 1997; the decrease of nuclear contestation in Germany; the French-German communication efficiency during the Fessenheim accident simulation in October 7, 1997; the 3.5% increase of CO2 emissions in the USA; the decommissioning of 3 Russian reactors for military plutonium production; Greenpeace condemnation for abusive purposes against British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) and its activities at Sellafield (UK). (J.S.)

  2. The future of nuclear power

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James

    2012-01-01

    Newly conceived, safer reactor designs are being built in the United States (and around the world) to replace the 104 obsolete operating nuclear power reactors in this country alone. The designs--which once seemed exotic and futuristic--are now 40 years old, and one by one these vintage Generation II plants will reach the end of productive service in the next 30 years. The Future of Nuclear Power examines the advanced designs, practical concepts, and fully developed systems that have yet to be used. This book introduces readers to the traditional, American system of units, with some archaic te

  3. Safe and green nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy development plays an important role in the national economic growth. Presently the per capita consumption of energy in our country is about 750 kWh including captive power generation which is low in comparison to that in the developed countries like USA where it is about 12,000 kWh. As of now the total installed capacity of electricity generation is about 152,148 MW(e) which is drawn from Thermal (65%), Hydel (24%), Nuclear (3%) power plants and Renewables (8%). It is expected that by the end of year 2020, the required installed capacity would be more than 3,00,000 MW(e), if we assume per capita consumption of about 800-1000 kWh for Indian population of well over one billion. To meet the projected power requirement in India, suitable options need to be identified and explored for generation of electricity. For choosing better alternatives various factors such as availability of resources, potential to generate commercial power, economic viability, etc. need to be considered. Besides these factors, an important factor which must be taken into consideration is protection of environment around the operating power stations. This paper attempts to demonstrate that the nuclear power generation is an environmentally benign option for meeting the future requirement of electricity in India. It also discusses the need for creating the public awareness about the safe operations of the nuclear power plants and ionising radiation. (author)

  4. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner's Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section

  5. Vibration characteristics of BWR primary containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a part of a seismic proving test of a BWR Primary Containment Vessel (PCV), a vibration analysis that is carried out considering the effect of reinforcement around attached masses such as equipment hatches and a personnel airlock. A deflected shape with the local attached masses and reinforcement is expanded using free vibration modes of an axisymmetric PCV without attached masses and reinforcement. The free vibration modes are calculated considering a coupling effect between the PCV shell and suppression pool water using conical shell finite elements and ring fluid elements. The same expanding functions and free vibration modes are used to express strain energy, kinetic energy and work done by inertia forces due to input acceleration considering locally varying thickness of the PCV and attached masses. The equations of motion are obtained by substituting the strain energy, kinetic energy, and work done by inertia forces into the Lagrange's equation. Calculated natural frequencies, free vibration modes and frequency response functions are compared with numerical results obtained by a general shell finite element analysis and with test results using the large-scale high-performance vibration table of Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory, Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC). The comparison shows a reasonable agreement, leading to better understanding of the dynamic characteristics of the BWR PCV

  6. Nuclear power generation cost methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified calculational procedure for the estimation of nuclear power generation cost is outlined. The report contains a discussion of the various components of power generation cost and basic equations for calculating that cost. An example calculation is given. The basis of the fixed-charge rate, the derivation of the levelized fuel cycle cost equation, and the heavy water charge rate are included as appendixes

  7. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric Plants, BWR/6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/4, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the BWR Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3, contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  8. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric plants, BWR/4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/6, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the BWR Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. This document Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  9. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BWR Operator Training Center was founded in April, 1971, and in April, 1974, training was begun, since then, 13 years elapsed. During this period, the curriculum and training facilities were strengthened to meet the training needs, and the new training techniques from different viewpoint were developed, thus the improvement of training has been done. In this report, a number of the training techniques which have been developed and adopted recently, and are effective for the improvement of the knowledge and skill of operators are described. Recently Japanese nuclear power stations have been operated at stable high capacity factor, accordingly the chance of experiencing the occurrence of abnormality and the usual start and stop of plants decreased, and the training of operators using simulators becomes more important. The basic concept on training is explained. In the standard training course and the short period fundamental course, the development of the guide for reviewing lessons, the utilization of VTRs and the development of the techniques for diagnosing individual degree of learning were carried out. The problems, the points of improvement and the results of these are reported. (Kako, I.)

  10. Nuclear power program in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear program in Indonesia is derived from the long-range national development plan. The main aim of this plan is to realize a just and prosperous society within a united and democratic nation, and to contribute to world peace. A research and development infrastructure is being developed to establish the necessary technological foundations, to train technical personnel, and to develop the capacity for technical adaptation and innovation. BATAN, the National Atomic Energy Agency, is responsible for nuclear R and D, and also has a regulatory function and implements the national nuclear program. The author describes the functions of the eight BATAN laboratories, and surveys the energy resources available to Indonesia. In the ten years preceding 1983 electric energy consumption increased at a rate of 12.4 percent per year. It is projected that an electric capacity of 42,000 MW(e) will be required in the year 2003. The nuclear contribution could be around 10 percent. The decision to adopt nuclear power generation depends, among other factors, on financial considerations, the perception that nuclear power would perpetuate the dependence on developed nations, and safety concerns

  11. QA programs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an overview of quality assurance programs in nuclear power plants, the energy picture as it appears today is reviewed. Nuclear power plants and their operations are described and an attempt is made to place in proper perspective the alleged ''threats'' inherent in nuclear power. Finally, the quality assurance programs being used in the nuclear industry are described

  12. Benefits and hazards of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compilation of a seminar at the KFA Juelich on topical problems of nuclear power. Subjects: Energy demand, its expected development and possibilities of coverage; physical fundamentals and technical realisation of power generation by nuclear fission; fuel cycle problems and solutions; effects of radioactive radiation; safety of nuclear power plants and the nuclear hazard as compared with other hazards. (orig./RW)

  13. A renaissance in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an analysis of the worldwide evolution of the fleet of nuclear power plants until the 1980s; the reasons why in the same era this contingent was rejected in various developed countries due to a complete lack of public acceptance, being condemned to a phaseout planned to eliminate more than half of the operating power plants by 2020; and finally, what are the reasons for this competent base-load power source to silently resist for more than a quarter of a century, having been the focus of studies and improvements in the most renowned research centers in the world and the most traditional universities of the developed countries, resurging as one of the main allies of worldwide sustainable development, even with all the difficulties of deployment, ecological risks, and nuclear proliferation. However, after more than 30 years of intense debates involving a wide variety of interrelated problems, scientists have collected irrefutable proof that the actions of humankind have caused climate changes that represent an imminent threat to the survival of the human species on Earth, requiring coordinated international action that seeks to determine the economic aspects of the stabilization of levels of GHGs (greenhouse gases) in the atmosphere. The transition to a worldwide low-carbon economy presents political challenges, where, the most complex political question, is the supply of energy which would depends on a change in the supply of energy from fossil fuels to renewable, hydro and nuclear. Undoubtedly the nuclear power plants are, by far, the most controversial. (author)

  14. How safe is nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed, with particular reference to nuclear power in the UK, as follows: ionising radiations; components of the radiation dose to which on average each person in the UK is exposed; regulation and control; mining; reactor operations - accidents, safety; transport of spent fuel; radioactive wastes; fast reactors and plutonium; insurance. (U.K.)

  15. Nuclear Power on Energy Agenda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The big debate on whether or not to use nuclear power as an energy option has raged among countries like the U.S., Britain, and Germany for decades, with not even the advent and threat of global warming forcing a conclusion. China, however, has always stressed energy diversity and been determined to develop and use this alternative energy source.

  16. Nuclear power and its alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nuclear power to contribute significantly to the alleviation of demands for increased electricity by the year 2000, a further obstacle must be overcome, namely the present nuclear phobia of the American public. This phobia can be addressed only through public education leading to a balanced perspective of the benefits and hazards of nuclear power compared with those of alternate sources of energy and to the risks associated with an insufficient supply of energy in a few years. Also to be considered in a public education effort should be the precarious and capricious nature of this country's continued reliance on energy sources imported from politically unstable countries, as well as the risk this importation poses for the nation's economic, social and military security

  17. The future for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord Marshall explains how the situation for nuclear power in late 1989 in the United Kingdom had come about. Despite warnings that for a successful nuclear programme a large generator which has the obligation to supply in a defined geographical area should operate, this is not what will happen under the plans to privatise the electricity supply industry in the UK. Under these no body will have the obligation to supply electricity and the distribution Company will not have the obligation to supply after the first few years. Other problems with the privatisation plans are discussed. The implications of the government's decisions on nuclear power, first to maintain the Magnox stations in the government sector, second to abandon the full PWR construction programme and thirdly not to transfer the AGRs to the private sector, are discussed. (UK)

  18. Indicators for management of planned outages in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outages considered within the scope of this publication are planned refuelling outages (PWR and BWR nuclear power plants) and planned outages associated with major maintenance, tests and inspections (PHWR and LWGR nuclear power plants). The IAEA has published some valuable reports providing guidance and assistance to operating organizations on outage management. This TECDOC outlines main issues to be considered in outage performance monitoring and provides guidance to operating organizations for the development and implementation of outage programmes which could enhance plant safety, reliability and economics. It also complements the series of reports published by the IAEA on outage management and on previous work related to performance indicators developed for monitoring different areas of plant operation, such as safety, production, reliability and economics. This publication is based upon the information presented at a technical meeting to develop a standardized set of outage indicators for outage optimization, which was organised in Vienna, 6-9 October 2003. At this meeting, case studies and good practices relating to performance indicator utilization in the process of planned outage management were presented and discussed

  19. Evaluating and improving nuclear power plant operating performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report aims to provide the basis for improvements in the understanding of nuclear power plants operation and ideas for improving future productivity. The purpose of the project was to identify good practices of operating performance at a few of the world's most productive plants. This report was prepared through a series of consultants meetings, a specialists meeting and an Advisory Group meeting with participation of experts from 23 Member States. The report is based on self-assessment of half a dozen plants that have been chosen as representatives of different reactor types in as many different countries, and the views and assessment of the participants on good practices influencing plant performance. Three main areas that influence nuclear power plant availability and reliability were identified in the discussions: (1) management practices, (2) personnel characteristics, and (3) working practices. These areas cover causes influencing plant performance under plant management control. In each area the report describes factors or good practices that positively influence plant availability. The case studies, presented in annexes, contain the plant self-assessment of areas that influence their availability and reliability. Six plants are represented in the case studies: (1) Dukovany (WWER, 1760 MW) in the Czech Republic; (2) Blayais (PWR, 3640 MW) in France; (3) Paks (WWER, 1840 MW) in Hungary; (4) Wolsong 1 (PHWR, 600 MW) in the Republic of Korea; (5) Trillo 1 (PWR, 1066 MW) in Spain; and (6) Limerick (BWR, 2220 MW) in the United States of America

  20. Nuclear power: tomorrow's energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, 76% of electricity is produced by nuclear power. The industry's pricing levels are among the most competitive in Europe. Thanks to its 58 nuclear reactors France enjoys almost 50% energy autonomy thus ensuring a highly stable supply. Equally, as a non-producer of greenhouse gases, the nuclear sector can rightfully claim to have an environmentally friendly impact. Against a background to increasing global demand with predictions that fossil fuels will run out and global warming a central issue, it is important to use production methods which face up to problems of this nature. There is no question that nuclear energy has a vital role to play alongside other energy sources. (authors)

  1. Study of the optimization of maintenance plan for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a quantitative evaluation method for the maintenance plan for nuclear power plants, developed by introducing the scientific approach, and also proposes a method to search for an optimum maintenance plan to be obtained by maximizing nuclear safety and economic efficiency simultaneously, then balancing them. As a result of consideration, the following results were obtained. (1) The quantitative evaluation methodology for optimizing the maintenance plan for nuclear power plants was developed. (2) The computer simulation of maintenance planning for a couple of BWR systems by using this methodology was carried out. It was concluded that this methodology can produce a new maintenance plan which meets the maintenance targets corresponding to optimum maintenance. (author)

  2. Seismic resistance design of nuclear power plant building structures in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitano, Takehito [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Japan is one of the countries where earthquakes occur most frequently in the world and has incurred a lot of disasters in the past. Therefore, the seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant plays a very important role in Japan. This report describes the general method of seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant giving examples of PWR and BWR type reactor buildings in Japan. Nuclear facilities are classified into three seismic classes and is designed according to the corresponding seismic class in Japan. Concerning reactor buildings, the short-term allowable stress design is applied for the S1 seismic load and it is confirmed that the structures have a safety margin against the S2 seismic load. (J.P.N.)

  3. Nuclear power consensus and nuclear transports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transports of spent fuel elements to the reprocessing plants of La Hague, France, and Sellafield, UK, as well as of casks with vitrified high-level waste returned to Germany were resumed in early 2001. These transports had been interrupted in 1998 after elevated levels of surface contamination had been found on the out-sides of the shipping casks. The transport issue was settled immediately in all countries affected except Germany, after the situation had been clarified. Numerous agencies involved as well as independent ones found that the increased contamination had to be removed, but had been neither dangerous nor, at that time, notifiable. The outcome of the German federal parliamentary elections in 1998 had produced a new government majority, thus changing the political environment for nuclear power. Opting out of the peaceful use of nuclear power in a properly arranged way and without having to pay compensation is the declared goal of the federal government. Accordingly, also transports of fuel elements for reprocessing are to be abandoned from 2005 on, and transports of spent fuel elements are to be minimized, for the time being, by building on-site-interim stores. The government's policy and opt-out legislation raise a number of questions which will have to be answered in a satisfactory way in the future. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear power and energy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the rapid depletion of conventional energy sources such as coal and oil and the growing world demand for energy the question of how to provide the extra energy needed in the future is addressed. Relevant facts and figures are presented. Coal and oil have disadvantages as their burning contributes to the greenhouse gases and they will become scarcer and more expensive. Renewable sources such as wind and wave power can supply some but not all future energy requirements. The case made for nuclear power is that it is the only source which offers the long term prospect of meeting the growing world energy demand whilst keeping energy costs close to present levels and which does not add to atmospheric pollution. Reassurance as to the safety of nuclear power plants and the safe disposal of radioactive wastes is given. (UK)

  5. Optimization and improvement of the technical specifications for Santa Maria de Garona and Cofrentes nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical Specifications (TS) form one of the basic documents necessary for licensing nuclear power plants and are required by the Government in accordance with Article 26 of the Regulation for Nuclear and Radioactive Facilities. They contain specific plant characteristics and operating limits to provide adequate protection for the safety and health of operators and the general public. For operator actuation, TS include all the surveillance requirements and limiting operating conditions (operation at full power, startup, hot and cold shutdown, and refueling outage) of safety-related systems. They also include the conventional support systems which are necessary to keep the plant in a safe operating conditioner to bring it to safe shutdown in the event of incidents or hypothetical accidents. Because of the large volume of information contained in the TS, the NRC and American utility owners began to simplify and improve the initial standard TS, which has given way to the development of a TS Optimization Program in the USA under the auspices of the NRC. Empresarios Agrupados has been contracted by the BWR Spanish Owners' Group (GPE-BWR) to develop optimized TS for the Santa Maria de Garona and Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plants. The optimized and improved TS are simplified versions of the current ones and facilitate the work of plant operators. They help to prevent risks, and reduce the number of potential transients caused by the large number of tests required by current TS. Plant operational safety is enhanced and higher effective operation is achieved. The GPE-BWR has submitted the first part of the optimized TS with their corresponding Bases to the Spanish Nuclear Council (CSN), for comment and subsequent approval. Once the TS are approved by the Spanish Nuclear Council, the operators of the Santa Maria de Garona and Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plants will be given a training and adaptation course prior to their implementation. (author)

  6. Global warming and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    Nuclear fission power reactors represent a potential solution to many aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high-grade heat for large-scale electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-energizing around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates; importantly, electricity production costs from the best nuclear plants presently are closely comparable with those of the best fossil-fired plants. However, a substantial number of issues currently stand between nuclear power and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems. These include perceptual ones regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps most seriously- readily quantifiable concerns regarding long-term fuel supply and total unit electrical energy cost. We sketch a road-map for proceeding from the present situation toward a nuclear power-intensive world, addressing along the way each of the concerns which presently impede widespread nuclear substitution for fossil fuels, particularly for coal in the most populous and rapidly developing portions of the world, e.g., China and India. This `design to societal specifications` approach to large-scale nuclear fission power systems may lead to energy sources meeting essentially all stationary demands for high-temperature heat. Such advanced options offer a human population of ten billion the electricity supply levels currently enjoyed by Americans for 10,000 years. Nuclear power systems tailored to local needs-and-interests and having a common advanced technology base could reduce present-day world-wide C0{sub 2} emissions by two-fold, if universally employed. By application to small mobile demands, a second two

  7. Swedish Opinion on Nuclear Power 1986 - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Soeren

    2012-11-01

    This report contains the Swedish opinion on Nuclear Power and European Attitudes on Nuclear Power. It also includes European Attitudes Towards the Future of Three Energy Sources; Nuclear Energy, Wind Power and Solar Power - with a focus on the Swedish opinion. Results from measurements done by the SOM Inst. are presented.

  8. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 2003 version of Elecnuc contents information, data and charts on the nuclear power plants in the world and general information on the national perspectives concerning the electric power industry. The following topics are presented: 2002 highlights; characteristics of main reactor types and on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; the worldwide status of nuclear power plants on 2002/12/3; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the Grid by reactor type groups; nuclear power plants under construction; capacity of the nuclear power plants on the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear plants by country at the end 2002; performance indicator of french PWR units; trends of the generation indicator worldwide from 1960 to 2002; 2002 cumulative Load Factor by owners; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by countries; status of license renewal applications in Usa; nuclear power plants under construction; Shutdown nuclear power plants; exported nuclear power plants by type; exported nuclear power plants by countries; nuclear power plants under construction or order; steam generator replacements; recycling of Plutonium in LWR; projects of MOX fuel use in reactors; electricity needs of Germany, Belgium, Spain, Finland, United Kingdom; electricity indicators of the five countries. (A.L.B.)

  9. Nuclear power in rock. Principal report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In September 1975 the Swedish Government directed the Swedish State Power Board to study the question of rock-siting nuclear power plants. The study accounted for in this report aims at clarifying the advantages and disadvantages of siting a nuclear power plant in rock, compared to siting on ground level, considering reactor safety, war protection and sabotage. The need for nuclear power production during war situations and the closing down of nuclear power plants after terminated operation are also dealt with. (author)

  10. Insurance of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical utility companies have invested large sums in the establishment of nuclear facilities. For this reason it is normal for these companies to attempt to protect their investments as much as possible. One of the methods of protection is recourse to insurance. For a variety of reasons traditional insurance markets are unable to function normally for a number of reasons including, the insufficient number of risks, an absence of meaningful accident statistics, the enormous sums involved and a lack of familiarity with nuclear risks on the part of insurers, resulting in a reluctance or even refusal to accept such risks. Insurers have, in response to requests for coverage from nuclear power station operators, established an alternative system of coverage - insurance through a system of insurance pools. Insurers in every country unite in a pool, providing a net capacity for every risk which is a capacity covered by their own funds, and consequently without reinsurance. All pools exchange capacity. The inconvenience of this system, for the operators in particular, is that it involves a monopolistic system in which there are consequently few possibilities for the negotiation of premiums and conditions of coverage. The system does not permit the establishment of reserves which could, over time, reduce the need for insurance on the part of nuclear power station operators. Thus the cost of nuclear insurance remains high. Alternatives to the poor system of insurance are explored in this article. (author)

  11. 77 FR 76541 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... requested by Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. (the licensee), for operation of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power... Impact Statement for ] License Renewal of Nuclear Plants Regarding Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station,...

  12. Loviisa nuclear power plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The APROS Simulation Environment has been developed since 1986 by Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). It provides tools, solution algorithms and process components for use in different simulation systems for design, analysis and training purposes. One of its main nuclear applications is the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant Analyzer (LPA). The Loviisa Plant Analyzer includes all the important plant components both in the primary and in the secondary circuits. In addition, all the main control systems, the protection system and the high voltage electrical systems are included. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear power a reference handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Harry R

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century, nuclear power has been identified as a viable alternative to traditional energy sources to stem global climate change, and condemned as risky to human health and environmentally irresponsible. Do the advantages of nuclear energy outweigh the risks, especially in light of the meltdown at the Fukushima plant in 2011? This guide provides both a comprehensive overview of this critical and controversial technology, presenting reference tools that include important facts and statistics, biographical profiles, a chronology, and a glossary. It covers major controversies and proposed solutions in detail and contains contributions by experts and important stakeholders that provide invaluable perspective on the topic.

  14. Nuclear power in New Brunswick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New Brunswick Power is a medium-utility with gross production for the past fiscal year for domestic and external sales of about 16.5 billion kilowatt hours. Of this figure 33.5% was supplied through nuclear generation. The financial risks involved with the production of the Point Lepreau nuclear generating station were discussed. Further, questions of assurances given for schedule and cost, licencing, and long-term plant performance of the Point Lepreau no. 2 unit were addressed. These were discussed with particular emphasis on the competition for the New England market

  15. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1997 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1997; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; forecasts; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  16. Economic competitiveness of nuclear power in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of nuclear power in China has made a good progress. Currently, economic competitiveness of nuclear power compared to fossil-fuelled power plants is one of the major problems which hamper its development. This article presents the economic competitiveness of nuclear power in China with two-level analyses. First, levelized lifetime cost method is adopted for electricity generation cost comparisons. Important factors influencing economic competitiveness of nuclear power are described. Furthermore, a broad economic evaluation of the full fuel chain of nuclear power and fossil-fuelled plants is discussed concerning macro social-economic issues, environmental and health impacts. The comprehensive comparative assessment would be carried out for decision making to implement nuclear power programme. In consideration of external costs and carbon value, the economic competitiveness of nuclear power would be further improved. Facing swift economic growth, huge energy demand and heavy environmental burden, nuclear power could play a significant role in sustainable development in China. (authors)

  17. An analysis of human maintenance failures of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the report, a study of faults caused by maintenance activities is presented. The objective of the study was to draw conclusions on the unplanned effects of maintenance on nuclear power plant safety and system availability. More than 4400 maintenance history reports from the years 1992-1994 of Olkiluoto BWR nuclear power plant (NPP) were analysed together with the maintenance personnel. The human action induced faults were classified, e.g., according to their multiplicity and effects. This paper presents and discusses the results of a statistical analysis of the data. Instrumentation and electrical components appeared to be especially prone to human failures. Many human failures were found in safety related systems. Several failures also remained latent from outages to power operation. However, the safety significance of failures was generally small. Modifications were an important source of multiple human failures. Plant maintenance data is a good source of human reliability data and it should be used more in the future. (orig.)

  18. Statistical analysis of human maintenance failures of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a statistical study of faults caused by maintenance activities is presented. The objective of the study was to draw conclusions on the unplanned effects of maintenance on nuclear power plant safety and system availability. More than 4400 maintenance history reports from the years 1992-1994 of Olkiluoto BWR nuclear power plant (NPP) were analysed together with the maintenance personnel. The human action induced faults were classified, e.g., according to their multiplicity and effects. This paper presents and discusses the results of a statistical analysis of the data. Instrumentation and electrical components are especially prone to human failures. Many human failures were found in safety related systems. Similarly, several failures remained latent from outages to power operation. The safety significance was generally small. Modifications are an important source of multiple human failures. Plant maintenance data is a good source of human reliability data and it should be used more, in future. (orig.)

  19. Docommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German utilities operating nuclear power plants have long concerned themselves with aspects of decommissioning and for this purpose an engineering company was given a contract to study the entire spectrum of decommissioning. The results of this study have been available in autumn 1980 and it is possible to discuss all the aspects of decommissioning on a new basis. Following these results no change in the design concept of LWR nuclear power plants in operation or under construction is necessary because the techniques, necessary for decommissioning, are fully available today. The technical feasibility of decommissioning for power plants of Biblis A and KRB type has been shown in detail. The calculations of the quantity of waste produced during removal of a nuclear power plant could be confirmed and it could be determined with high procedure. The radiation dose to the decommissioning personnel is in the range of the radiation protection regulations and is in the same range as the radiation dose to the personnel within a yearly inservice inspection. (AF)

  20. Economic challenges of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The costs of nuclear power is detailed. Concerning the construction costs, the mean value over the French fleet of reactors is 1,2 billions euros/GWe and 1.5 billions euros/GWe when the engineering and pre-exploitation costs are included. The construction costs of future reactors will be far higher than expected: 6 billion euros versus 3.5 billions euros for the EPR. The Audit Office has recently made public the real cost of today's nuclear electricity in France: 54 euros/MWh, this value is given by the CCE method and includes all the aspects of nuclear energy: construction, operation, dismantling, maintenance, upgrading works required for life extension, new safety requirements due to Fukushima feedback and long-term managing of wastes. The cost of nuclear accidents is not taken into account. The costs of dismantling can be estimated from the feedback experience from the dismantling of nuclear reactors in the Usa, the value obtained is consistent with the OECD rule that states that it represents 15% of the construction cost. The economic impact of decommissioning a plant after 40 years of operating life while its operating life could have been extended to reach 50 or even 60 years has a cost of losing 1 billion to 2 billion euros per reactor. Despite the fact that tomorrow's nuclear systems will be more expensive than today's, it will stay in a competitive range. (A.C.)

  1. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the IAEA's PRIS and AREVA-CEA's GAIA databases. The following aspects are reviewed: 2007 highlights; Main characteristics of reactor types; Map of the French nuclear power plants on 2007/01/01; Worldwide status of nuclear power plants (12/31/2007); Units distributed by countries; Nuclear power plants connected to the Grid- by reactor type groups; Nuclear power plants under construction on 2007; Evolution of nuclear power plants capacities connected to the grid; First electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit in each country; Electrical generation from nuclear power plants by country at the end 2007; Performance indicator of French PWR units; Evolution of the generation indicators worldwide by type; Nuclear operator ranking according to their installed capacity; Units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2007; Status of licence renewal applications in USA; Nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2007; Shutdown reactors; Exported nuclear capacity in net MWe; Exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid; Exported nuclear power plants under construction; Exported and national nuclear capacity under construction; Nuclear power plants ordered at 12/31/2007; Long term shutdown units at 12/31/2007; COL (combined licences) applications in the USA; Recycling of Plutonium in reactors and experiences; Mox licence plants projects; Appendix - historical development; Meaning of the used acronyms; Glossary

  2. Alternative institutional arrangements for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates how alternative organizations of nuclear power generation would effect the regulatory environment for nuclear power production, how it would effect financial constraints on new construction, and what governmental barriers to such reorganization exist

  3. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  4. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented

  5. Nuclear power plants and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of nuclear power plants is analysed in details. The fundamental principles of reactors are described as well as the problems of safety involved with the reactor operation and the quantity and type of radioactive released to the environment. It shows that the amount of radioactive is very long. The reactor accidents has occurred, as three mile island, are also analysed. (M.I.A.)

  6. Maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide provides detailed guidance on the provisions of the Code on the Safety in Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, IAEA Safety Series No. 50-C-O(Rev.1) on the maintenance of structures, systems and components. Like the Code, the Guide forms part of the IAEA's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants. Effective maintenance is essential for safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It not only ensures that the level of reliability and effectiveness of all plant structures, systems and components having a bearing on safety remains in accordance with design assumptions and intent, but also that the safety status of the plant is not adversely affected after commencement of operation. Nuclear power plant maintenance requires special attention because of: Limitations set by requirements that a minimum number of components remain operable even when the plant is shut down in order to ensure that all necessary safety functions are guaranteed; Difficulty of access to some plant items even when the plant is shut down, due to radiation protection constraints; Potential radiological hazards to site personnel and the public. This Guide covers the organizational and procedural aspects of maintenance but does not give detailed technical advice on the maintenance of particular plant items. It gives guidance on preventive and remedial measures necessary to ensure that all structures, systems and components important to safety are capable of performing as intended. The Guide covers the organizational and administrative requirements for establishing and implementing preventive maintenance schedules, repairing defective plant items, selecting and training maintenance personnel, providing maintenance facilities and equipment, procuring stores and spare parts, reviewing, controlling and carrying out plant modifications, and generating, collecting and retaining maintenance records for establishing and

  7. Nuclear power and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power demands throughout the world are increasing: energy is essential to assure public health and to provide for the quality of life to which man aspires. Interest in the environmental aspects of nuclear power stations led the IAEA, in co-operation with the US Atomic Energy Commission, to convene a symposium in New York on this topic in August 1970. The enthusiastic response both during and after that meeting, and the interest in environmental matters evidenced by the convening of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm in June this year, led to a decision to summarize the information presented in New York in a condensed and readily understandable form for those not engaged directly in this field of work. The resultant booklet, prepared in co-operation with the World Health Organization, has now been published under the title of this note. It is intended for wide distribution, especially among delegates and others attending the Stockholm conference. This initial distribution is free; it is probable that the booklet will be up-dated later for re-issue as a sales publication at a price to be fixed. 'Nuclear Power and the Environment' is presented in five sections, each treating a specific aspect of the general topic: the role of atomic energy in meeting future power needs; radiation protection standards; safe handling of radioactive materials; other impacts of the nuclear power industry; and public health considerations. The booklet concludes with a summary of the material presented, and annexes listing pertinent publications of the IAEA, WHO and other international organizations, for further reading. Contributions to the booklet were supplied by 28 experts from the IAEA and WHO and a number of Member States; these were compiled and edited in house. The interests and technical background of the prospective audience have a broader spectrum than one would normally try to cover with a single publication. For the lay public the IAEA has

  8. Nuclear power in Czech and Slovak Republics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power in Czech and Slovak Republics has been described. Nuclear power plants contribute 28% to the whole energy production (12.1 TWh in Czech republic and 11.7 in Slovak Republic). The Czech and Slovak Republics' nuclear power generation programme assumes to build in these Republics further nuclear power stations with higher efficiency and better safety parameters. 12 figs, 5 tabs

  9. Czechoslovakia: nuclear power in a socialist society

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is an evaluation of the impact nuclear power planning policies have had on Czechoslovakia's socialist society, particularly for the post-Chernobyl era. Poor indigenous energy resources and the leading role that nuclear power has played in the COMECON's energy-intensive manufacturing sector has made nuclear power into an attractive proposition from the 1960s onwards. Discussion in this paper centres around nuclear-power plant siting and operation, and media coverage of the industry ...

  10. Nuclear power revolution is far away

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The real nuclear debate is as much about money and time as it is about radioactivity and security. While the industry's own people want nuclear power plant to be recognized as climate initiative, said UNFCCC currently no. Nuclear power is virtually CO2-free. The world has 436 nuclear reactors and build 44 new right now. Total this will give a capacity of over 400 G Wh of power. But straightforward power is it not. (AG)

  11. Nuclear power development in the Far East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power development of selected Far Eastern countries is presented in this paper. This paper consists of three sections. Section 1 describes the current power/nuclear power status of Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and China. The first three countries already have operating nuclear power units, while mainland China will have a nuclear power commissioned this year according to their schedule. The power development plan for these countries is also presented. All of them have included nuclear power as part of their energy sources for the future. Section 2 briefly describes the nuclear power industry in these countries which basically covers design, manufacturing and R and D activities. Public Acceptance programs (PAPs) will play a significant role in the future of nuclear power. Section 3 discusses the PAPs of these countries. (author)

  12. Current status of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is not a viable energy source for Sri Lanka at present because of a number of reasons, the main reason being the non-availability of small and economically viable nuclear power plants. However several suppliers of nuclear power plants are in the process of developing small and medium power plants (SMPRs) which could be economically competitive with coal. The paper deals with past and future trends of nuclear power plants, their economics and safety. It also deals with environmental effects and public acceptance of nuclear power plants

  13. A future for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two decades after the Chernobyl accident, Tony Goddard believes that nuclear power must continue to be used to generate electricity. Exactly 20 years ago this month, on 21 April 1986, workers at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in the former Soviet Union carried out an experiment at very low power with one of the facility's two 'RBMK' reactors. They were, however, unaware that their actions would make the reactor dangerously unstable. Its power rapidly increased, leading to the destruction of the core and a massive chemical explosion. The World Health Organisation estimates that between 40 and 50 staff and emergency workers died as a result of radiation released during the accident. It also resulted in widespread contamination and radiation exposure. The Chernobyl disaster was a significant moment in the development of nuclear power, particularly in terms of the public's attitude to this form of energy. It also highlighted how the Soviet nuclear industry was badly regulated, suffered from lax operation and training, and tolerated weak reactor designs. Surprisingly, one power station in Lithuania and three in Russia are still using RBMK reactors after design deficiencies related to Chernobyl were corrected, although the former is due to close in 2009 following appeals by the European Union on safety grounds. Now, however, it appears that the tide is turning back in favour of nuclear power as countries contemplate the problems of climate change, rising energy prices and the fact that many nuclear plants are reaching the end of their lives. The review contains a consultation document entitled 'Our energy challenge' that sets out four goals: to cut carbon-dioxide emissions; to ensure reliable supplies of energy; to achieve sustainable economic growth; and to ensure that every home is adequately and affordably heated. While the UK hesitates, several other countries are already taking action. Finland has commissioned a new European pressurised water (EPR) reactor at Olkiluoto

  14. Public enlightment seminar on nuclear power. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seminar considered different aspects of nuclear power development, including the following issues: electricity generation, power supply and demand, energy sources, consumption of electricity, energy outlook in Europe, comparative analysis of energy options, safety of modern nuclear power plants, radiation and human health, radioactive waste management, nuclear techniques to promote world food security, public information issues

  15. Nuclear power newsletter. Vol. 1, no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This first issue of newsletter describes the Nuclear Power Division of the Department of Nuclear Energy responsible for implementation of the IAEA programme on Nuclear Power. The mission of the Division is to increase the capability of interested Member States to implement and maintain competitive and sustainable nuclear power programmes and to develop and apply advanced nuclear technologies. The topics covered in this publication are: Engineering and Management Support for Competitive Nuclear Power; Improving Human Performance, Quality and Technical Infrastructure; Co-ordination of International Collaboration for the Development of Innovative Nuclear Technology; Technology Developments and Applications for Advanced Reactors; The International Conference on 'Fifty Years of Nuclear Power - the Next Fifty Years'. A list of documents published recently by the Nuclear Power Division in enclosed

  16. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the Laguna Verde

  17. Transportation activities for BWR fuels at NFI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Fuel Industries, LTD. (NFI) supplies fuel assemblies for both PWR and BWR in Japan. We can also manage transportation of the fuel assemblies from our fabrication facilities to the nuclear power plants of Japanese utilities. For the transportation of fuel assembly, we designed and fabricated the transportation containers to meet the requirements of the IAEA regulations, and licensed in Japan. This paper introduced the recent activity and R and D of NFI concerning transportation of BWR fuel assembly. NT-XII transportation container was developed for fresh BWR fuel assemblies. NT-XII container consists of inner container and outer container. Two BWR fuel assemblies with up to 5 wt.-% 235-U enriched are enclosed in an inner container. In the concept of NT-XII container design, we made the best priority to transportation efficiency, as well as ensuring fuel integrity during transportation. NT-XII has been used since 2002 in Japan. Thanks to the lightening weight of containers, the number of containers to be loaded to one transportation truck was increased up to 9 containers (equivalent to 18 fuel assemblies) compared with former type container (NT-IV transportation container) which can be loaded up to 6 containers (equivalent to 12 fuel assemblies). In addition to the design of brand-new container, we promote the improvement of the packaging methods. In Japan, in order to reduce the damage to the fuel rod and fuel spacer while transporting, polyethylene sleeves which are called 'packing separators' are inserted in the rod-to-rod gap of fuel assembly. However, packing separators requires time and cost for the installation at fuel fabrication facility. In the same way, huge time and cost are needed for removal of packing separators at nuclear power plant. For the improvement of preparation efficiency before and after transportation, we investigated the influence of vibration to fuel integrity in case of transportation without packing separators. Based on the above

  18. Service hall in Number 1 Fukushima Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are six BWR type nuclear power plants in the Number 1 Fukushima Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. The service hall of the station is located near the entrance of the station. In the center of this service hall, there is the model of a nuclear reactor of full scale. This mock-up shows the core region in the reactor pressure vessel for the number one plant. The diameter and the thickness of the pressure vessel are about 5 m and 16 cm, respectively. The fuel assemblies and control rods are set just like the actual reactor, and the start-up operation of the reactor is shown colorfully and dynamically by pushing a button. When the control rods are pulled out, the boiling of water is demonstrated. The 1/50 scale model of the sixth plant with the power generating capacity of 1100 MWe is set, and this model is linked to the mock-up of reactor written above. The operations of a recirculating loop, a turbine and a condenser are shown by switching on and off lamps. The other exhibitions are shielding concrete wall, ECCS model, and many kinds of panels and models. This service hall is incorporated in the course of study and observation of civics. The good environmental effects to fishes and shells are explained in this service hall. Official buildings and schools are built near the service hall utilizing the tax and grant concerning power generation. This service hall contributes to give much freedom from anxiety to the public by the tour. (Nakai, Y.)

  19. Validation of a methodology for the study of generation cost of electric power for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was developed a model for the calculation of costs of electric generation of nuclear plants. The developed pattern was validated with the one used by the United States Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in studies of comparison of alternatives for electric generation of nuclear plants and fossil plants with base of gas and of coal in the United States described in the guides calls Technical Assessment Guides of EPRI. They are mentioned in qualitative form some changes in the technology of nucleo electric generation that could be included in the annual publication of Costs and Parameters of Reference for the Formulation of Projects of Investment in the Electric Sector of the Federal Commission of Electricity. These changes are in relation to the advances in the technology, in the licensing, in the construction and in the operation of the reactors called advanced as the A BWR built recently in Japan. (Author)

  20. The economics of nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Ronald L.

    We extend economic analysis of the nuclear power industry by developing and employing three tools. They are (1) compilation and unification of operating and accounting data sets for plants and sites, (2) an abstract industry model with major economic agents and features, and (3) a model of nuclear power plant operators. We build a matched data set to combine dissimilar but mutually dependant bodies of information. We match detailed information on the activities and conditions of individual plants to slightly more aggregated financial data. Others have exploited the data separately, but we extend the sets and pool available data sets. The data reveal dramatic changes in the industry over the past thirty years. The 1980s proved unprofitable for the industry. This is evident both in the cost data and in the operator activity data. Productivity then improved dramatically while cost growth stabilized to the point of industry profitability. Relative electricity prices may be rising after nearly two decades of decline. Such demand side trends, together with supply side improvements, suggest a healthy industry. Our microeconomic model of nuclear power plant operators employs a forward-looking component to capture the information set available to decision makers and to model the decision-making process. Our model includes features often overlooked elsewhere, including electricity price equations and liability. Failure to account for changes in electricity price trends perhaps misled earlier scholars, and they attributed to other causes the effects on profits of changing price structures. The model includes potential losses resulting from catastrophic nuclear accidents. Applications include historical simulations and forecasts. Nuclear power involves risk, and accident costs are borne both by plant owners and the public. Authorities regulate the industry and balance conflicting desires for economic gain and safety. We construct an extensible model with regulators, plant

  1. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR; Estabilidad termohidraulica acoplada a la neutronica en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Mpio. Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico); Castlllo D, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gcm9acpp@cfe.gob.mx

    2006-07-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the

  2. Nuclear power data 2016; Kernenergie in Zahlen 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-04-15

    The brochure on nuclear power data 2016 covers the following topics: (I) nuclear power in Germany: nuclear power plants in Germany; shut-down and decommissioned nuclear power plants, gross electricity generation, primary energy consumption; (II) nuclear power worldwide: nuclear electricity production, nuclear power plants.

  3. Modelling of nuclear power plant decommissioning financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemš, J; Knápek, J; Králík, T; Hejhal, M; Kubančák, J; Vašíček, J

    2015-06-01

    Costs related to the decommissioning of nuclear power plants create a significant financial burden for nuclear power plant operators. This article discusses the various methodologies employed by selected European countries for financing of the liabilities related to the nuclear power plant decommissioning. The article also presents methodology of allocation of future decommissioning costs to the running costs of nuclear power plant in the form of fee imposed on each megawatt hour generated. The application of the methodology is presented in the form of a case study on a new nuclear power plant with installed capacity 1000 MW. PMID:25979740

  4. Country Nuclear Power Profiles - 2013 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Country Nuclear Power Profiles compile background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in Member States. The CNPP summarizes organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programs and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory, and international framework in each country. Its descriptive and statistical overview of the overall economic, energy, and electricity situation in each country and its nuclear power framework is intended to serve as an integrated source of key background information about nuclear power programs in the world. This 2013 edition, issued on CD-ROM and Web pages, contains updated country information for 51 countries

  5. Nuclear power development, safety and environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current state is described of power production by conventional power plants and the problems of burning fossil fuels are discussed. A survey is presented of the development of world nuclear power production and of the planned construction of nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia. The questions of the safety of nuclear installations and their environmental impacts in normal operation and in case of accident are outlined. In the analysis of these aspects of nuclear power production the probability data on the potential hazards of operating nuclear reactors as published in the Rasmussen Safety Report are discussed. (O.K.)

  6. Similarities and differences between conventional power and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the implementation of the national guideline of 'proactively promoting nuclear power development', especially after China decided in 2006 to introduce Westinghouse's AP1000 technology, some of the power groups specialized in conventional power generation, have been participating in the preliminary work and construction of nuclear power projects in certain degrees. Meanwhile, such traditional nuclear power corporations as China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) and China Guangdong Nuclear Power Corporation (CGNPC) have also employed some employees with conventional power generation experience. How can these employees who have long been engaged in conventional power generation successfully adapt to the new work pattern, ideology, knowledge, thinking mode and proficiency of nuclear power, so that they can fit in with the work requirements of nuclear power and become qualified as soon as possible? By analyzing the technological, managerial and cultural features of nuclear power, as well as some issues to be kept in mind when engaged in nuclear power, this paper intends to make some contribution to the nuclear power development in the specific period. (author)

  7. Technical and economic proposal for the extension of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant with an additional nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increment of the human activities in the industrial environments and of generation of electric power, through it burns it of fossil fuels, has brought as consequence an increase in the atmospheric concentrations of the calls greenhouse effect gases and, these in turn, serious repercussions about the environment and the quality of the alive beings life. The recent concern for the environment has provoked that industrialized countries and not industrialized carry out international agreements to mitigate the emission from these gases to the atmosphere. Our country, like part of the international community, not is exempt of this problem for what is necessary that programs begin guided toward the preservation of the environment. As for the electric power generation, it is indispensable to diversify the sources of primary energy; first, to knock down the dependence of the hydrocarbons and, second, to reduce the emission of polluting gases to the atmosphere. In this item, the nucleo electric energy not only has proven to be safe and competitive technical and economically, able to generate big quantities of electric power with a high plant factor and a considerable cost, but rather also, it is one of the energy sources that less pollutants it emits to the atmosphere. The main object of this work is to carry out a technical and economic proposal of the extension of the Laguna Verde Nuclear power plant (CNLV) with a new nuclear reactor of type A BWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactor), evolutionary design of the BWR technology to which belong the two reactors installed at the moment in the plant, with the purpose of increasing the installed capacity of generation of the CNLV and of the Federal Commission of Electricity (CFE) with foundation in the sustainable development and guaranteeing the protection of the environment by means of the exploitation of a clean and sure technology that counts at the moment with around 12,000 year-reactor of operational experience in more of

  8. The future of nuclear power in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future of nuclear power in Mexico shows interesting aspects: the nuclear power is the source of energy that can supply large proportions of energy, that the country needs; the Kw/h of nuclear power is the most economic energy; the installation of 20 nucleoelectric plants will grant future jobs, the associated nuclear industry can be nationally integrated in the natural uranium cycle. (author)

  9. Simulation of a scenario of total loss of external and internal power (Sbo) for different vent pressures of the containment of a BWR-5; Simulacion de un escenario de perdida total de potencia externa e interna (SBO) para distintas presiones de venteo de la contencion de un reactor BWR-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Godinez S, V., E-mail: Jaime.cardenas@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The simulation of a Station Black Out (Sbo) was realized with intervention of the vent containment by means of a rigid vent coming from the dry-well and that discharges directly to the atmosphere, with the MELCOR code version 2.1. This scenario was carried out for a BWR-5 and containment type Mark II, with a thermal power of 2317 MWt similar to the reactor of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. For this scenario was considered as only available system for coolant injection to the reactor to the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (Rcic), which remained operating 4 hours with batteries bank. The Security and Relief Valves (SR V) were considered functional (by simplicity) and that they mechanically do not exceed their capacity to liberate pressure due to the performances in their safety way. The operator maneuver to perform the SR V and to de pressurize the vessel until the pressure (13 kg/cm{sup 2}) to operate the low pressure systems was modeled. The results cover approximately 48 hours (172000 seconds), time in which was observed the behavior of the level and pressure in the vessel. Also the scenario evolution was analyzed to different vent pressures of the primary containment (2.0, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, and 10.0 kg/cm{sup 2}), the temperature profiles of the dry-well, the hydrogen accumulation in the containment, the radio-nuclides liberation through rigid vent to the atmosphere and the inventory of these. In this work an analysis of the pressure behavior in the primary containment is presented, with the purpose of minimizing liberated fission products to the environment. (Author)

  10. Design of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criteria of design and safety, applied internationally to systems and components of PWR type reactors, are described. The main criteria of the design analysed are: thermohydraulic optimization; optimized arrangement of buildings and components; low costs of energy generation; high level of standardization; application of specific safety criteria for nuclear power plants. The safety criteria aim to: assure the safe reactor shutdown; remove the residual heat and; avoid the release of radioactive elements for environment. Some exemples of safety criteria are given for Angra-2 and Angra-3 reactors. (M.C.K.)

  11. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Battery chargers, inverters and uninterruptible power supplies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, R.; Stroinski, M.; Giachetti, R. [Multiple Dynamics Corp., Southfield, MI (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant battery chargers, inverters and uninterruptible power supplies important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already, experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  12. Regression analysis of technical parameters affecting nuclear power plant performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the 80's many studies have been conducted in order to explicate good and bad performances of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs), but yet no defined correlation has been found out to be totally representative of plant operational experience. In early works, data availability and the number of operating power stations were both limited; therefore, results showed that specific technical characteristics of NPPs were supposed to be the main causal factors for successful plant operation. Although these aspects keep on assuming a significant role, later studies and observations showed that other factors concerning management and organization of the plant could instead be predominant comparing utilities operational and economic results. Utility quality, in a word, can be used to summarize all the managerial and operational aspects that seem to be effective in determining plant performance. In this paper operational data of a consistent sample of commercial nuclear power stations, out of the total 433 operating NPPs, are analyzed, mainly focusing on the last decade operational experience. The sample consists of PWR and BWR technology, operated by utilities located in different countries, including U.S. (Japan)) (France)) (Germany)) and Finland. Multivariate regression is performed using Unit Capability Factor (UCF) as the dependent variable; this factor reflects indeed the effectiveness of plant programs and practices in maximizing the available electrical generation and consequently provides an overall indication of how well plants are operated and maintained. Aspects that may not be real causal factors but which can have a consistent impact on the UCF, as technology design, supplier, size and age, are included in the analysis as independent variables. (authors)

  13. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2003 (in Danish)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report, 'Kernekraft og nuklear sikkerhed 2003' (Nuclear power and nuclear safe-ty 2003) is the first report in a new series of annual reports on the international devel-opment of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nu-clear emergency preparedness. The report series is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency and re-places the previous series, 'International kernekraftstatus' (International Nuclear Po-wer Status). The report for 2003 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production and regional trends, development of reactors and emergency management systems, safety-related events with nuclear power production, and international rela-tions and conflicts. (au)

  14. Development of Czechoslovak nuclear power complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research project ''Development of the Czechoslovak nuclear power complex'' was undertaken by several Czechoslovak institutions and was coordinated by the Research Institute of the Fuel and Power Complex in Bratislava. Involved in the project was a staff of 170 people. 274 reports were pulished and the cost approached 70 mill. Czechoslovak crowns. The results are characterized of all six partial tasks. Basic information was prepared for the forecast of the solution of fuel and power problems in Czechoslovakia up to the year 2000 and their prospects up to the year 2020. Program MORNAP was written for the development of nuclear power, which models the operation of a power generation and transmission system with a selectable number of nuclear power plants. Another partial task related to the fuel cycle of nuclear power plants with respect to long-term provision and management of nuclear fuel. Nuclear safety was split into three problem groups, viz.: system safety of nuclear power plant operation; radiation problems of nuclear power plant safety; quality assurance of nuclear power plant components. The two remaining tasks were devoted to nuclear power engineering and to civil engineering. (Z.M.). 3 tabs., 1 refs

  15. Investigation of burnup credit implementation for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup Credit allows considering the reactivity decrease due to fuel irradiation in criticality studies for the nuclear fuel cycle. Its implementation requires to carefully analyze the validity of the assumptions made to define the axial profile of the burnup and void fraction (for BWR), to determine the composition of the irradiated fuel and to compute the criticality simulation. In the framework of Burnup Credit implementation for BWR fuel, this paper proposes to investigate part of these items. The studies presented in this paper concern: the influence of the burnup and of the void fraction on BWR spent fuel content and on the effective multiplication factor of an infinite array of BWR assemblies. A code-to-code comparison for BWR fuel depletion calculations relevant to Burnup Credit is also performed. (authors)

  16. IAEA provisional code of practice on management of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Code of Practice defines the minimum requirements for operations and design of structures, systems and components important for management of wastes from thermal nuclear power plants. It emphasizes what safety requirements shall be met rather than specifies how these requirements can be met; the latter aspect is covered in Safety Guides. The Code defines the need for a Government to assume responsibility for regulating waste management practices in conjunction with the regulation of a nuclear power plant. The Code does not prejudge the organization of the regulatory authority, which may differ from one Member State to another, and may involve more than one body. Similarly, the Code does not deal specifically with the functions of a regulatory authority responsible for such matters, although it may be of value to Member States in providing a basis for consideration of such functions. The Code deals with the entire management system for all wastes from nuclear power plants embodying thermal reactors including PWR, BWR, HWR and HTGR technologies. Topics included are: design, normal and abnormal operation, and regulation of management systems for gaseous, liquid and solid wastes, including decommissioning wastes. The Code includes measures to be taken with regard to the wastes arising from spent fuel management at nuclear power plants. However, the options for further management of spent fuel are only outlined since it is the subject of decisions by individual Member States. The Code does not require that an option(s) be decided upon prior to construction or operation of a nuclear power plant

  17. Nuclear power stations: uneasiness about them and democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report following a press conference at which the author, in discussing the state of the Graben 1140 MW BWR station project, also made some general observations about nuclear energy problems in Switzerland. Matters raised in the paper include legal requirements, safety and health, waste disposal problems, transportation of fuel for reprocessing and finance. The paper is intended to allay public anxiety. (S.W.)

  18. Simulators of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals with the simulators of nuclear power stations used for the training of operators and for the analysis of operations. It reviews the development of analogical, hybrid and digital simulators up to the present, indicating the impact resulting from the TMI-2 accident. It indicates, the components of simulators and the present accepted terminology for a classification of the various types of simulators. It reviews the present state of the art of the technology: how a basic mathematical model of a nuclear power system is worked out and what are the technical problems associated with more accurate models. Examples of elaborate models are given: for a PWR pressurizer, for an AGR steam generator. It also discusses certain problems of hardware technology. Characteristics of present replica simulators are given with certain details: simulated transient evolutions and malfunctions, accuracy of simulation. The work concerning the assessment of the validity of certain simulators is reported. A list of simulator manufacturers and a survey of the principal simulators in operation in the countries of the European Community, in the United States, and in certain other countries are presented. Problem associated with the use of simulators as training facilities, and their use as operational devices are discussed. Studies and research in progress for the expected future development of simulators are reviewed

  19. Pathways and estimated consequences of radionuclide releases from a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive corrosion products 60Co, 58Co, 54Mn, 65Zn, 51Cr and 110Agsp(m) which are released from Barsebaeck Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) into the marine environment have been studied. The brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus has been found to be excellent bioindicator for these radionuclides. The distribution of activation products along the west coast of Sweden has been studied and can very well be described with a power function. Uptake and retention of the activation products in Fucus have been studied and results are reported. The activity concentration in Fucus well reflects the disharge rate from the power plant. Other bioindicators have been studied ; mainly the crustaceans Idothea and Gammarus. A simulation of 131I-release following a fictious BWR 1 accident is described as well as a model for estimation of the individual and collective dose equivalents arising from intake of contaminated milk. (Author)

  20. Country Nuclear Power Profiles - 2009 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Country Nuclear Power Profiles compiles background information on the status and development of nuclear power programs in Member States. It consists of organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programs and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory, and international framework in each country. Its descriptive and statistical overview of the overall economic, energy, and electricity situation in each country, and its nuclear power framework is intended to serve as an integrated source of key background information about nuclear power programs in the world. The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles (CNPP) was initiated in 1990s. It responded to a need for a database and a technical publication containing a description of the energy and economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector, and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. This is the 2009 edition issued on CD-ROM and Web pages. It updates the country information for 44 countries. The CNPP is updated based on information voluntarily provided by participating IAEA Member States. Participants include the 30 countries that have operating nuclear power plants, as well as 14 countries having past or planned nuclear power programmes (Bangladesh, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Italy, Kazakhstan, Nigeria, Philippines, Poland, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey and Vietnam). For the 2009 edition, 26 countries provided updated or new profiles. For the other countries, the IAEA updated the profile statistical tables on nuclear power, energy development, and economic indicators based on information from IAEA and World Bank databases

  1. Nuclear proliferation and the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author expresses concerns felt worldwide, both within and outside the nuclear industry, that expansion of nuclear power systems will be impossible without safeguards against nuclear weapons proliferation. Present problems include: countries with nuclear programs who are not full participants in the non-proliferation regime; the ease with which countries can withdraw from the treaty; obtaining accurate nuclear material inventories; and compliance. He discusses conditions and improvements that would address many of the proliferation concerns

  2. Thirty years of Czechoslovak nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power in the CSSR in its 30 years old history has occupied an important position in the current power base of the country. In 1987, the nuclear power plant share of the total installed capacity was roughly 16% and their share of the total electricity production was 24.3%. By the year 2000, the installed capacity of nuclear power plants should reach a minimum of 10,000 MW and it is envisaged that this value might be exceeded by another 1,000 MW. In addition to the completion of the Mochovce and Temelin nuclear power plants currently under construction, this would require putting into operation two more WWER-1000 units in other localities. It has been decided that new nuclear power plants will be sited at Kecerovce in Eastern Slovakia and at Blahutovice in Northern Moravia. The preparation has considerably progressed of sites for other nuclear power plants. With the envisaged rate of nuclear power plant construction, the production of nuclear electric power should inscrease to 15 TWh in 1990, 41 TWh in 1995 and 58 TWh in the year 2000. Thus, nuclear power plant share of the total electricity production would be more than 50% in the year 2000 and the plant would cover about 16 to 17% of needs of primary power resources. (Z.M.). 3 tabs., 4 refs

  3. Statistical analysis about corrosion in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, it has been carried out the investigations related with the structure degradation mechanisms, systems or and components in the nuclear power plants, since a lot of the involved processes are the responsible of the reliability of these ones, of the integrity of their components, of the safety aspects and others. This work presents the statistics of the studies related with materials corrosion in its wide variety and specific mechanisms. These exist at world level in the PWR, BWR, and WWER reactors, analysing the AIRS (Advanced Incident Reporting System) during the period between 1993-1998 in the two first plants in during the period between 1982-1995 for the WWER. The factors identification allows characterize them as those which apply, they are what have happen by the presence of some corrosion mechanism. Those which not apply, these are due to incidental by natural factors, mechanical failures and human errors. Finally, the total number of cases analysed, they correspond to the total cases which apply and not apply. (Author)

  4. Swedish approaches to radiation protection at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares Swedish health physics programs at nuclear power plants to U.S. programs. Analysis of the Swedish programs includes examination of health physics staff training, size and longevity. Health physics practices are discussed, especially practices during refueling outages. The paper is based on site visits to Ringhals and Oskarshamn by U.S. radiation protection managers in October, 1995, under the sponsorship of the North American Regional Technical Center, ISOE, NEA/IAEA. The reactor vessel decontamination at Oskarshamn 1 BWR is discussed including good health physics practices and radiological results. Ringhals unique management organization is discussed with respect to health physics division of responsibilities and differences between in-plant and on-site health physics groups. Analytical results of failed fuel events at Ringhals is also presented including the observed occurrence of cobalt knock-off. Finally, trends in Swedish plants collective doses are summarized. Comprehensive Swedish studies of potential collective doses over the next 20 years are discussed including management options related to dose reduction options

  5. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development

  6. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development.

  7. Nuclear power a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Irvine, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    With the World desperate to find energy sources that do not emit carbon gasses, nuclear power is back on the agenda and in the news, following the increasing cost of fossil fuels and concerns about the security of their future supply. However, the term 'nuclear power' causes anxiety in many people and there is confusion concerning the nature and extent of the associated risks. Here, Maxwell Irvine presents a concise introduction to the development of nuclear physics leading up to the emergence of the nuclear power industry. He discusses the nature of nuclear energy and deals with various aspec

  8. Space nuclear power and man's extraterrestrial civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines leading space nuclear power technology candidates. Particular emphasis is given the heat-pipe reactor technology currently under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This program is aimed at developing a 10-100 kWe, 7-year lifetime space nuclear power plant. As the demand for space-based power reaches megawatt levels, other nuclear reactor designs including: solid core, fluidized bed, and gaseous core, are considered

  9. Review on the role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of 2 parts. The first part reviews opinions against nuclear power on the aspects: waste disposal, safety and environment, financial; technology, etc. and gives results of a preliminary survey for nuclear power in Vietnam among scientists in 1990. The second part presents advanced reactor concepts and advantages of nuclear power to economy and environment in comparison with other energy sources. (N.H.A). 39 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Getting More Out Of Nuclear Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China’s first nuclear power plant generated 31 billion kw/h electricity from 1991 to 2007 Major repair work on the first phase of the Qinshan nuclear power plant,which began operation in 1991 as China’s first nuclear power plant,was completed on January 13,2008.The overhaul has improved the reliability and safety of the reactors and given the oper- ators experience for running,repairing

  11. Nuclear power: the moral question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference is made to an article under this title by P. Searby, the UKAEA Secretary, which appeared in the May 1978 issue of Atom and which considered some of the moral and ethical aspects of the current public discussion of nuclear power and, in particular, the position adopted on these by the British Council of Churches. This article had previously appeared in the Church of England publication 'Crucible'. The July issue of 'Crucible' contained a letter from Dr. D. Gosling of the Theology Department of Hull University (UK) commenting on the article together with a reply from Searby. These letters are here produced, together with a letter from Dr. J. Davoll, Director of the U.K. Conservation Society, commenting on Searby's views. (U.K.)

  12. Nuclear power: consolidation or change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently about 45% of the electricity consumed in Scotland comes from nuclear sources and when the power station at Torness, near Edinburgh, is fully commissioned it will be about 60%. Torness is an AGR type reactor and the Scottish Electricty Board (SSEB) consider that there is no case for changing to a PWR type design for any future reactor built in the UK. The economics of 'a next AGR' and a PWR reactor are compared. The construction times for the Torness programme, the electrical output, station life, load factor, fuel costs and additional support costs are also considered, and compared with costs estimated by the Central Elecricity Generating Board (CEGB) for the proposed Sizewell-B reactor. Exposure of station staff to radiation, safety, public acceptibility and development potential, impact on industry, job creation and export potential are also discussed briefly. (UK)

  13. Steels for nuclear power. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    trend regarding new materials for nuclear power installations is briefly indicated. (J.B.)

  14. Nuclear power: necessity or self-interest?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In part one of this document a survey is presented, via a number of articles, of the power balances in the Netherlands with respect to nuclear power, the role of various institutions and concerns therein and the consequences of the parliamental decision-making in the Netherlands. In part two the development of nuclear power in the third world is explained by means of some examples, the interests of Western industrial countries in the stimulation of nuclear power in the developing countries and the power structures in these countries which play a role with respect to the atom lobby. Part three starts the discussion on the strategy to be followed by the Anti Nuclear Power movement with three strategies for resistance against the building of new nuclear power plants: via the parliamentary route, by means of direct action (base groups), by combining direct action with broadening and actions against supply industries. 59 refs.; 41 figs.; 6 tabs

  15. Environmental impacts of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal effects of radiation on people are acute radiation sickness, cancer, and genetic effects. Acute radiation sickness results from exposures in excess of 100 rem and can be fatal in a matter of days. There have been about ten deaths in the U.S. from this malady. Cancer induction by radiation has been a much broader threat, the largest single source being the Japanese atomic bomb victims--about 24,000 persons exposed to about 130 rem resulting in over a hundred excess deaths. There is no evidence from human data for genetic defects in offspring from radiation to parents, so the estimate--150 x 10-6 eventual defects per man-rem exposure of the entire population--is based on animal tests. Studies of the survivors of the Japanese bombings have yielded no evidence for additional genetic defects among offspring, a result which assures that the above estimate is not too small; a recent assessment indicates it may be an order-of-magnitude too large. Routine emissions of long half-life radionuclides, power plant accidents, transportation accidents, hazards from plutonium dispersal, theft of plutonium for weapons fabrication, and radioactive waste disposal are ways discussed that members of the public can receive radiation exposure from the nuclear industry. The likelihood of death from these situations is shown to be very small compared to other-than-nuclear situations, namely: automobile driving and riding, smoking cigarettes, the generation of electricity from coal, and coal mining. 82 references

  16. Guidebook on the introduction of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This ''Guidebook on the Introduction of Nuclear Power'' has been structured into three parts. The first part contains a survey of nuclear power, with the objective of providing general background information to the reader on the present status and future prospects of nuclear power and on the technical and economic aspects of available power reactor types and nuclear fuel cycles. In the second part of the Guidebook, the special aspects and considerations relevant to the introduction of nuclear power in a country are discussed. The subject is subdivided into three main headings: the technical aspects and national requirements; the safety and environmental considerations; and the international aspects of nuclear power. Emphasis is placed on the tasks to be performed within the country introducing nuclear power, on responsibilities that cannot be delegated and on the need for adequate national infrastructures and long-term commitments. Finally, the third part of the Guidebook contains more detailed information and guidance on the planning and preparatory stages of launching a first nuclear power project, including in particular: nuclear power programme planning, siting, feasibility studies, bidding and contracting. Design, construction and operation are covered in a brief overview for the sake of completeness

  17. Benefits and risks of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discussion, in a popular form, of issues of interest for an unemotional information of the public on problems of nuclear power: 1) Energy consumption, its assumed growth, and possible ways of supply; 2) the physical fundamental and technical realisation of power generation by nuclear fission; 3) problems of the fuel cycle and possible solutions; 4) the effects of radioactive radiation; 5) the safety of nuclear power plants and the risks of nuclear power as compared to other technical and natural risks. (orig./HP)

  18. A study on maintenance optimization by the automatic planning tool for regular plant outage work in nuclear power plant using the logic programming language 'Prolog'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses maintenance optimization by the automatic planning tool for regular plant outage work in nuclear power plant using the logic programming language 'Prolog'. As a result of consideration, the following results were obtained. (1) The automatic planning tool for regular plant outage in nuclear power plant was developed. (2) Using this tool, the work plan for BWR primary recirculation system and residual heat removal system was automatically made on the condition of flattening man loading over the plant outage schedule as much as possible. (3) Several points for improving the developed tool were listed. (author)

  19. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The total generation of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 70.1 TWh during 1999, which is slightly more than the mean value for the last five years. The total electricity consumption decreased by one percent, compared with 1998, to a total of 142.3 TWh, due to an unusually warm summer and autumn. The abundant supply of hydroelectric power resulted in comparatively extensive load-following operation by the nuclear plants during the year. Production losses due to low demand totalled 3.0 TWh. The closure of Barsebaeck 1 will result in a capacity reduction exceeding 4 TWh per year. The hydroelectric power production was 70 TWh, which was 6 TWh more than during a normal year, i.e. a year with average rainfall. The remaining production sources, mainly from solid fuel plants combined with district heating contributed 9 TWh. Electricity generation by means of wind power is still increasing. There are now about 470 wind power stations, which produced 0.3 TWh during the year. The total electricity generation totalled 149.8 TWh, a three percent decrease compared with 1998. The preliminary figures for export were 15.9 TWh and for import 8.4 TWh. The figures above are calculated from the preliminary production result. A comprehensive report on electric power supply and consumption in Sweden is provided in the 1999 Annual Report from the Swedish Power Association. The unit capability factor for the PWRs at Ringhals averaged 91%, while the BWRs averaged 82% mainly due to the extended outages. The BWR reactors at Forsmark averaged as much as 93%. Forsmark 1 experienced the shortest refuelling outage ever in Sweden, only 9 days and 20 hours. In May, Oskarshamn 2 passed a historical milestone - the unit produced 100 TWh since connection to the grid in 1974. The final production day for Barsebaeck 1, which had been in commercial operation since 1975, was on November 30 when a decision by the Swedish Government revoked the operating licence. Three safety-related events

  20. Small nuclear power: challenges and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates show that, for remote localities difficult of access, nuclear power technologies offer a reasonable alternative to conventional power based on fossil fuels. Still, the deployment of nuclear power sources in the country's northern and eastern territories with hard climatic and complicated social conditions calls for novel designs that satisfy to the requirements beyond the scope of those for the conventional nuclear plant designs. A small nuclear power plant with a water-cooled water-moderated reactor facility, called Unitherm, is one of the most advanced autonomous nuclear heat and power supply designs that satisfies the best to the above requirements, based on the experience in design, manufacture and operation of nuclear propulsion systems. (author)

  1. 77 FR 18271 - Terrestrial Environmental Studies for Nuclear Power Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... COMMISSION Terrestrial Environmental Studies for Nuclear Power Stations AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 4.11, ``Terrestrial Environmental Studies for Nuclear Power Stations... environmental studies and analyses supporting licensing decisions for nuclear power reactors. ADDRESSES:...

  2. Advanced nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) is the largest power company among the six subsidiaries that separated from Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) in 2001, accounting for approximately 25% of electricity producing facilities, hydro and nuclear combined. KHNP operates 20 nuclear power plants in Kori, Yonggwang, Ulchin and Wolsong site and several hydroelectric power generation facilities, providing approximately 36% of the national power supply. As a major source of electricity generation in Korea, nuclear energy contributes greatly to the stability of national electricity supply and energy security. KHNP's commercial nuclear power plant operation, which started with Kori Unit 1 in 1978, has achieved an average capacity factor more than 90% since 2000 and a high record of 93.4% in 2008. Following the introduction of nuclear power plants in the 1970's, Korea accumulated its nuclear technology in the 1980's, developed OPR 1000(Optimized Power Reactor) and demonstrated advanced level of its nuclear technology capabilities in the 2000's by developing an advanced type reactor, APR 1400(Advanced Power Reactor) which is being constructed at Shin-Kori Unit 3 and 4 for the first time. By 2022, KHNP will construct additional 12 nuclear power plants in order to ensure a stable power supply according to the Government Plan of Long-Term Electricity supply and Demand. 4 units of OPR 1000 reactor model will be commissioned by 2013 and 8 units of APR 1400 are under construction and planned. At the end of 2022, the nuclear capacity will reach 33% share of total generation capacity in Korea and account for 48% of national power generation. (author)

  3. Nuclear Power in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency helps its Member States to use nuclear technology for a broad range of peaceful purposes, one of the most important of which is generating electricity. The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan in March 2011 caused anxiety about nuclear safety throughout the world and raised questions about the future of nuclear power. Two years on, it is clear that the use of nuclear power will continue to grow in the coming decades, although growth will be slower than was anticipated before the accident. Many countries with existing nuclear power programmes plan to expand them. Many new countries, both developed and developing, plan to introduce nuclear power. The factors contributing to this growing interest include increasing global demand for energy, as well as concerns about climate change, volatile fossil fuel prices, and security of energy supply. It will be difficult for the world to achieve the twin goals of ensuring sustainable energy supplies and curbing greenhouse gases without nuclear power. The IAEA helps countries that opt for nuclear power to use it safely and securely. Countries that have decided to phase out nuclear power will have to deal with issues such as plant decommissioning, remediation, and waste management for decades to come. The IAEA also assists in these areas. I am grateful to the Russian Federation for hosting the 2013 International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Power in the 21st Century in St Petersburg in June. This timely conference provides a valuable opportunity to take stock of nuclear power in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi accident. A high level of public confidence in the safety of nuclear power is essential for the future of the sector. Much valuable work has been done in the past two years to improve safety. But much remains to be done. It is vitally important that the momentum is maintained and that everything is done to ensure that nuclear power is as safe as humanly

  4. Program increasing of nuclear power plant safeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results achieved within the project of national task 'Program increasing of nuclear power plant safeness' are presented in the document. The project was aimed to extend and deepen activities relating to safety increase of nuclear power units WWER-440 which play significant part in electricity production in the Slovak Republic. The application of advanced foreign calculating programs and calculation of radionuclide spreading in environment and techniques will influence the increase of extent, quality and international acceptance of safety analysis of nuclear power plant blocks WWER-440 and the risk valuation from operating nuclear power plants. Methodic resources for coping in emergency situation in nuclear energetics will be used for support in decision making in real time during radiation emergency on nuclear plant, region and state level. A long-term strategy in dealing with burnt fuel and radioactive substance formatting during nuclear power plant liquidation particularly with waste which is un acceptable in regional dump, has developed into a theoretical and practical preparation of solvable group for operating the converting centre Bohunice and in inactivating the nuclear power plant A-1. The diagnostic activities in nuclear power plants in the Slovak Republic have been elaborated into a project of norm documents in accordance with international norms for diagnostic systems. Presentation of new technologies and materials for repairs and reconstructions of components and nuclear power plant knots qualify increase in their reliability, safety and life. New objective methods and criterions for valuation and monitoring of the residual life and safety of fixed nuclear power plants. Results of problem solving linked with connecting the blocks of nuclear power plants to frequency regulation in electric network in the Slovak Republic are also presented in the document

  5. Construction method for Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit 5, which is a BWR plant with 1,100MW electric output, started construction in October, 1983 and began public operation on April 10, 1990. This is the first plant which fully applied the results of The Second Improvement and Standardization Program for Light Water Reactors and also the latest facility of which reliability has been much more improved using the technologies developed everywhere. Especially, by introducing the large-scale crawler crane to the construction site first in Japan, the prefabrication methods were widely applied and new methods were established to overcome the reduction of work efficiency caused by the winter season weather condition, thus reducing the construction schedule and improving safety of site work. (author)

  6. Under control. An archeology of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume includes a variety of photographs from different German research and power reactors, simulators, the infrastructure of power plants, working situations in the power plant, including fuel exchange and inspection procedures, the dismantling of decommissioned power nuclear facilities and radioactive waste storage facilities. The second part includes interviews with scientists concerning radiobiology, nuclear waste storage, fuel reprocessing, reactor physics, reactor operation, training in the simulator and risk research.

  7. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Masashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  8. State of the art of second international exercise on benchmarks in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a second in series of Benchmarks based on data from operating Swedish BWRs. The first one concerned measurements made in cycles 14,15 16 and 17 at Ringhals 1 Nuclear Power Plant and addressed predictive power of analytical tools used in BWR stability analysis. Part of the data was disclosed only after participants had provided their results. This work has been published in the report: NEA/NSC/DOC(96)22, November 1996. In this report it was recognised that there is a need for better qualification of the applied noise analysis methods. A follow up Benchmark was thus proposed dedicated to the analysis of time series data and including the evaluation of both global and regional stability of Forsmarks 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Plant. In this second Benchmark have participated Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB,NEA Nuclear Science Committee, CSN Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear and Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering of Polytechnic University of Valencia. (Author)

  9. Nuclear power newsletter Vol. 2, no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This newsletter presents information on the following topics: 7th meeting of the INPRO Steering Committee; Nuclear Power Plant Operating Performance and Life Cycle Management; Improving Human Performance, Quality and Technical Infrastructure; Co-ordination of International Collaboration for the Development of Innovative Nuclear Technology; Technology Developments and Applications for Advanced Reactors; 1st European Nuclear Assembly

  10. A Basic Guide to Nuclear Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martocci, Barbara; Wilson, Greg

    More than 100 nuclear power plants supply over 17 percent of the electricity in the United States. The basic principles of how nuclear energy works and how it is used to make electricity are explained in this profusely illustrated booklet written for the average sixth grade reader. Discussions include: (1) atomic structure; (2) nuclear fission;…

  11. Methods of estimating nuclear power costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international panel of experts appointed by the Agency's Director General, after examining costing methods in detail, has recently produced a report entitled 'Introduction to Methods of Estimating Nuclear Power Generating Costs'. The report is intended to help the Agency's Member States, particularly those which are less-developed in nuclear technology, in making a preliminary economic assessment before the construction of a nuclear power station. It gives a description of the different cost items involved in a nuclear power project, some suggestions as to the extrapolation of available data, and an evaluation of different methods of allocating the costs to the units of energy produced

  12. A journalist's guide to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guidebook is meant to assist journalists in communicating information about nuclear power. It provides basic information about the CANDU reactor and its use by Ontario Hydro, radiation, and fission, as well as background and statistics on the use of nuclear power in Canada and around the world

  13. Questions and Answers About Nuclear Power Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet is designed to answer many of the questions that have arisen about nuclear power plants and the environment. It is organized into a question and answer format, with the questions taken from those most often asked by the public. Topics include regulation of nuclear power sources, potential dangers to people's health, whether nuclear…

  14. Foundations of nuclear power engineering safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Report is devoted to justification of nuclear power industry safety. The maximum improvement of safety may be ensured by accident prevention in one of reactor functional units. One presents four basic physical principles ensuring the limiting safety and economical expedience of nuclear power industry

  15. Nuclear power plants for protecting the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some figures are presented comparing date on the CO2 emission and oxygen consumption of nuclear, natural gas fired, advanced coal fired and oil fired power plants, for the same amounts of electricity generated. The data were deduced from the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary. (R.P.)

  16. Engineering and science education for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Guidebook contains detailed information on curricula which would provide the professional technical education qualifications which have been established for nuclear power programme personnel. The core of the Guidebook consists of model curricula in engineering and science, including relevant practical work. Curricula are provided for specialization, undergraduate, and postgraduate programmes in nuclear-oriented mechanical, chemical, electrical, and electronics engineering, as well as nuclear engineering and radiation health physics. Basic nuclear science and engineering laboratory work is presented together with a list of basic experiments and the nuclear equipment needed to perform them. Useful measures for implementing and improving engineering and science education and training capabilities for nuclear power personnel are presented. Valuable information on the national experiences of IAEA Member States in engineering and science education for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education from various Member States, have been included

  17. Nuclear energy technology: theory and practice of commercial nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviews Nuclear Energy Technology: Theory and Practice of Commercial Nuclear Power by Ronald Allen Knief, whose contents include an overview of the basic concepts of reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle; the basics of nuclear physics; reactor theory; heat removal; economics; current concerns at the front and back ends of the fuel cycle; design descriptions of domestic and foreign reactor systems; reactor safety and safeguards; Three Mile Island; and a brief overview of the basic concepts of nuclear fusion. Both magnetic and inertial confinement techniques are clearly outlined. Also reviews Nuclear Fuel Management by Harry W. Graves, Jr., consisting of introductory subjects (e.g. front end of fuel cycle); core physics methodology required for fuel depletion calculations; power capability evaluation (analyzes physical parameters that limit potential core power density); and fuel management topics (economics, loading arrangements and core operation strategies)

  18. Study of multi cycles with FCS-II code for Unit 1 of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of 20 operating cycles for the BWR type reactor of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant UNIT 1 is presented. The study was performed by the optimization group of fuel reloading by means of FCS-II code which is part of a computing package of Fuel Management System; with this results, part of the information concerning to a multi cycles analysis is evaluated; the information was provided by General Electric (GE) to Comision Federal de Electricidad. This study is part of the inter-institutional project of Fuel Management inside core for Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant where the involved institutions are Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas and Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares under the direction of Comision Federal de Electricidad. (Author)

  19. Sustaining the nuclear power option in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the approach taken to establish the information base required prior to a decision on a nuclear power programme, and the strategy adopted and the rationale behind the development of the basic core expertise on nuclear reactor technology. The effect of a lack of decision on the question of nuclear power generation on efforts to build this core technical expertise is also described. (author)

  20. Nuclear Power: Africa and the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Africa is a home to around 800 million people. The total population is expected to reach 1.3 billion by 2020. Efficient, clean energy forms are vital to Africa's sustainable development and fight against poverty. Nuclear power is a sustainable, clean, safe and economic way to met the African countries demand for electrical energy and water desalination As of 29 January 2007, there were 435 nuclear power plants in operation around the world. They total about 369 G We of generating capacity and supply about 16% of the world electricity. Of the 435 nuclear power plants in operation, just two are in Africa: Koeberg-1 and Koeberg-2 in South Africa. Both are 900 M We PWRs.There are also 28 new nuclear power plants under construction none in Africa. In this paper, varies factors , which support the attractiveness of nuclear power for African countries are identified and discussed

  1. TOSHIBA CAE system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOSHIBA aims to secure safety, increase reliability and improve efficiency through the engineering for nuclear power plant using Computer Aided Engineering (CAE). TOSHIBA CAE system for nuclear power plant consists of numbers of sub-systems which had been integrated centering around the Nuclear Power Plant Engineering Data Base (PDBMS) and covers all stage of engineering for nuclear power plant from project management, design, manufacturing, construction to operating plant service and preventive maintenance as it were 'Plant Life-Cycle CAE System'. In recent years, TOSHIBA has been devoting to extend the system for integrated intelligent CAE system with state-of-the-art computer technologies such as computer graphics and artificial intelligence. This paper shows the outline of CAE system for nuclear power plant in TOSHIBA. (author)

  2. U.S. Forward Operating Base Applications of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a high level overview of current nuclear power technology and the potential use of nuclear power at military bases. The size, power ranges, and applicability of nuclear power units for military base power are reviewed. Previous and current reactor projects are described to further define the potential for nuclear power for military power.

  3. U.S. Forward Operating Base Applications of Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, George W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a high level overview of current nuclear power technology and the potential use of nuclear power at military bases. The size, power ranges, and applicability of nuclear power units for military base power are reviewed. Previous and current reactor projects are described to further define the potential for nuclear power for military power.

  4. Maintenance of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance action of nuclear power plant (NPP) was described. Maintenance of NPP aimed at assurance of required function of NPP's equipment so as to prevent release of radioactive materials into the environment as well as attainment of stable operation of NPP. Philosophy of NPP safety was based on defense-in-depth or multiple barriers requiring specified function for the equipment. Preventive maintenance was essential to NPP's equipment and the scope of maintenance was decided on priority with adequate method and frequency of inspection. Most inspection was conducted during periodic inspection at outage. Repair or improvement works were performed if needed. Periodic inspection period was very long and then capacity factor of NPP was low in Japan compared with foreign data although frequency of unscheduled shutdown was very low. Introduction of reability- centered maintenance was requested based on past experiences of overhaul inspection. Technical evaluation of aged NPP had been conducted on aging phenomena and promotion of advanced maintenance was more needed. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Citizens contra nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is Wyhl the beginning of a new citizens' movement against official policies concerning atomic energy or is it the end of citizens' initiatives of latter years. Did democracy pass its test in Wyhl, or was the state's authority undermined. The danger of atomic energy was not the only concern of the citizens of the Rhine valley who demonstrated against the planned nuclear power plant, but also the quality of industrial and energy planning in which the democratic foundations have to be safeguarded. In the meantime, the doubts increase that this source of energy is of a not dangerous nature, and the myth of supposedly cheap atomic energy has been scattered. The dangers in connection with waste transport and storage were made public beyond the boundaries of the places in question, in particular as a result of the demonstrations. The publication documents the course of the demonstration and the site occupation from the beginning of Febuary 1975 onwards. The occupation still continued when the booklet was published despite the decision of the Administrative Court in Freiburg at the end of March (prohibition of commencement of building until the verdict on the principal suit against the overall project has been reached, the final decision to be made by the Higher Administrative Court in Mannheim). The author aims at describing the new quality of citizens' commitments in this booklet. (orig./LN)

  6. Country Nuclear Power Profiles - 2010 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Country Nuclear Power Profiles compiles background information on the status and development of nuclear power programs in Member States. It consists of organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programs and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory, and international framework in each country. Its descriptive and statistical overview of the overall economic, energy, and electricity situation in each country, and its nuclear power framework is intended to serve as an integrated source of key background information about nuclear power programs in the world. The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles (CNPP) was initiated in 1990s. It responded to a need for a database and a technical publication containing a description of the energy and economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector, and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. This is the 2010 edition issued on CD-ROM and Web pages. It updates the country information for 48 countries. The CNPP is updated based on information voluntarily provided by participating IAEA Member States. Participants include the 29 countries that have operating nuclear power plants, as well as 19 countries having past or planned nuclear power programmes (Bangladesh, Belarus, Chile, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Italy, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Morocco, Nigeria, Philippines, Poland, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey and Vietnam). For the 2010 edition, 24 countries provided updated or new profiles. For the other countries, the IAEA updated the profile statistical tables on nuclear power, energy development, and economic indicators based on information from IAEA and World Bank databases. The CNPP reports have been prepared by each Member State in accordance with the IAEA format. The IAEA is not responsible for the content of these reports

  7. Country Nuclear Power Profiles - 2011 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Country Nuclear Power Profiles compiles background information on the status and development of nuclear power programs in Member States. It consists of organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programs and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory, and international framework in each country. Its descriptive and statistical overview of the overall economic, energy, and electricity situation in each country, and its nuclear power framework is intended to serve as an integrated source of key background information about nuclear power programs in the world. The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles (CNPP) was initiated in 1990s. It responded to a need for a database and a technical publication containing a description of the energy and economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector, and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. This is the 2011 edition issued on CD-ROM and Web pages. It updates the country information for 50 countries. The CNPP is updated based on information voluntarily provided by participating IAEA Member States. Participants include the 29 countries that have operating nuclear power plants, as well as 21 countries having past or planned nuclear power programmes (Bangladesh, Belarus, Chile, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Italy, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lithuania, Morocco, Nigeria, Philippines, Poland, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey and Vietnam). For the 2011 edition, 23 countries provided updated or new profiles. For the other countries, the IAEA updated the profile statistical tables on nuclear power, energy development, and economic indicators based on information from IAEA and World Bank databases.

  8. Evaluation of transient test results of Shimane Nuclear Power Station, Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The start-up test of the plant No.1 of Shimane Nuclear Power Station, has been successfully completed for a rather short period. This report describes on the abnormal transient changes that may be considered to occur in BWR plants. The report also states appropriateness of the evaluation of transient change by plant dynamics-analyzing code. The possible causes of abnormal transient change include the systems of main steam, feed water, recirculation and control rod actuation. Start-up test items were selected by preliminary evaluation. The following close investigations were carried out prior to the start-up test; examination of the preceding plants, investigation by plant dynamics analysis, various preliminary tests before the start-up test and organization setup for the start-up test. The evaluation items in rated output test were: total closing of main steam isolation valve, turbine trip (sudden closing of main steam stop valve), load shut-off (sudden closing of regulating valve) feed pump trip, and recirculation motor-generator set trip. The plant has been confirmed to be fully safe and to have the expected performance through individual abnormal transient tests. The improvements of the analysis code will be subsequently continued and reflected to the plant design. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Applications of power from Temelin nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 10 papers of which 9 fall under the INIS scope. They all concern the intentions and possibilities of using heat from nuclear power plants, especially from the Temelin power plant. Waste heat will be used for district heating of adjacent conurbations and for agricultural purposes. Various projects are presented using heat from nuclear power plants, such as greenhouse heating, soil heating, cultivation of algae and fish in warmed-up water. The existing experience is described with the use of heat from the Bohunice nuclear power plant. (M.D.). 15 figs., 6 tabs., 17 refs

  10. Liberation of electric power and nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, as the Rule on Electric Business was revised after an interval of 35 years in 1995, and a competitive bid on new electric source was adopted after 1996 fiscal year, investigation on further competition introduction to electric power market was begun by establishment of the Basic Group of the Electric Business Council in 1997. By a report proposed on January, 1999 by the Group, the Rule was revised again on March, 1999 to start a partial liberation or retail of the electric power from March, 2000. From a viewpoint of energy security and for solution of global environmental problem in Japan it has been decided to positively promote nuclear power in future. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate how the competition introduction affects to development of nuclear power generation and what is a market liberation model capable of harmonizing with the development on liberation of electric power market. Here was elucidated on effect of the introduction on previous and future nuclear power generation, after introducing new aspects of nuclear power problems and investigating characteristic points and investment risks specific to the nuclear power generation. And, by investigating some possibilities to development of nuclear power generation under liberation models of each market, an implication was shown on how to be future liberation on electric power market in Japan. (G.K.)

  11. Government support for the export of nuclear power plants after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depending on the surge of a global evaluation for the nuclear power generation, our country strengthened government support for the export of nuclear power plants. However, under the influence of a Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, the internal and external situation surrounding nuclear power has been changing. Should our country continue government support for the nuclear power plant export according to this? This report outlined the world trend around nuclear power before the Fukushima accident, surveyed merits and problems of the nuclear power plant export, and introduced what kind of export aid package the government took. And then, it showed the situation change after the Fukushima accident and the point at issue on thinking about the way of the government support. The Fukushima accident raised concern for the safety of the nuclear power plant and might have a big influence on the construction trend of the world nuclear power plant in the future. The criticism to conventional government support for the nuclear power plant export has risen, too. However, the role of government support for the nuclear power plant export was not the problem that should be discussed only by the side of safety and the economy. The nuclear power plant export carried an international contribution, reinforcement of the thickness of a technique and the talented person of the nuclear power industry, and a role such as the contribution to economic growth in medium-and-long term energy policy and nuclear energy policy until now. It may be said that we were asked how was placed nuclear power plant export again while these policies were reviewed after the Fukushima accident. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Building infrastructure for new nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, more than sixty countries have indicated that they are considering or launching nuclear power programmes. It has been more than a decade since a country commissioned its first nuclear power plant. In meantime, the global nuclear community has faced greater concerns about safety, security and non-proliferation, resulting in increased international obligations and a greater expectation for transparency and openness regarding nuclear power programmes. Many of these 'nuclear newcomers' are turning to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to understand the implications of the nuclear power option and to receive advice about how to proceed with implementing a national programme. In response to growing demand for assistance, the IAEA developed a comprehensive, phased approach to establishing the infrastructure necessary to support a national nuclear power programme. This 'Milestones' approach is described in Nuclear Energy Series Guide NG-G-3.1 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' (2007). From establishing the national position and legal framework to nuclear safety, security and safeguards, the Milestones covers 19 issues that need to be addressed. This approach also places special emphasis on the need for involvement of the Government, utility, industry, academic, and other stakeholders in a national decision-making process. The IAEA is also helping 'newcomers' to better understand its Safety Standards, which were written from the perspective of operating nuclear power programmes. A new safety guide is in development which provides a Road-map to the safety standards and identifies the standards that are relevant for each phase consistent with the Milestones. Several countries in the Europe region are working with the IAEA to understand the issues associated with a nuclear power programme in preparation for making a knowledgeable commitment. The starting points and approaches vary widely: some are European

  13. Nuclear Power Sources for Space Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukharkin, N. E.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Usov, V. A.

    This chapter contains the information about nuclear power sources for space systems. Reactor nuclear sources are considered that use the energy of heavy nuclei fission generated by controlled chain fission reaction, as well as the isotope ones producing heat due to the energy of nuclei radioactive decay. Power of reactor nuclear sources is determined by the rate of heavy nuclei fission that may be controlled within a wide range from the zero up to the nominal one. Thermal power of isotope sources cannot be controlled. It is determined by the type and quantity of isotopes and decreases in time due to their radioactive decay. Both, in the reactor sources and in the isotope ones, nuclear power is converted into the thermal one that may be consumed for the coolant heating to produce thrust (Nuclear Power Propulsion System, NPPS) or may be converted into electricity (Nuclear Power Source, NPS) dynamically (a turbine generator) or statically (thermoelectric or thermionic converters). Electric power is supplied to the airborne equipment or is used to produce thrust in electric (ionic, plasma) low-thrust engines. A brief description is presented of the different nuclear systems with reactor and isotopic power sources implemented in Russia and the USA. The information is also given about isotopic sources for the ground-based application, mainly for navigation systems.

  14. Country Nuclear Power Profiles - 2007 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles (CNPP) was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme on assessment and feedback of nuclear power plant performance. It responded to a need for a database and a technical publication containing a description of the energy and economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector, and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. It covers background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in countries having nuclear plants in operation and/or plants under construction. This is the 2007 edition issued on CD-ROM and Web pages. It updates the country information, in general, to the end of 2006 for 39 countries. The CNPP is updated based on information voluntarily provided by participating IAEA Member States. Participants include the 30 countries that have operating nuclear power plants, as well as nine countries having past or planned nuclear power programmes (Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Italy, Kazakhstan, Poland, Turkey, and Vietnam). For the 2007 edition, 21 countries provided information to the IAEA to update their profiles. For the 18 other countries, the IAEA updated the profile statistical tables on nuclear power, energy development, and economic indicators based on information from IAEA and World Bank databases. These 18 countries are Argentina, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Egypt, Finland, Indonesia, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, and Ukraine. Overall, the CNPP reviews the organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes in participating countries, and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory and international frameworks in each country. It compiles the current issues in the new environment within which the electricity and nuclear sector operates, i.e. energy policy, and privatization and deregulation in

  15. Nuclear power newsletter Vol. 4, no. 1, March 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics presented in this newsletter are: Workshop on Issues for the Introduction of Nuclear Power; Message from the Director of the Division of Nuclear Power: The Nuclear Energy Series documents: Structure and the process; Nuclear power plant operation; Strengthening nuclear power infrastructures; Technology developments and applications for advanced reactors; New staff in Nuclear Power Division; Current vacancy notice for professional posts in Nuclear Power Division; Meetings in 2007

  16. 78 FR 61400 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Issuance of Director's Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Issuance of Director's Decision... and ML102210411, respectively), concerns the operation of Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (Pilgrim... (non- EQ) inaccessible cables at Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (Pilgrim) are capable of...

  17. Mitigation strategies of intergranular corrosion in systems of reactors of water boiling (BWR). Combined action of the chemistry of the hydrogen and the oxygen; Estrategias de mitigacion de la corrosion intergranular en sistemas de reactores de agua en ebullicion (BWR). Accion combinada de la quimica del hidrogeno y del oxigeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdugo, M.

    2015-07-01

    Inter-Granular Stress Corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in austenitic stainless steel and in austenitic nickel-based alloys has been the subject of many studies the aim of which was to resolve one of the main problems faced by BWR nuclear power plants since the 1960s. This corrosion phenomenon is the result of the combined action of three factors: sensitization of the material, high local stresses and an aggressive medium. This paper deals with these factors separately and analyzes the oxidative chemistry of BWR reactors (aggressivity of the medium) as one the main causes if IGSCC. (Author)

  18. 44-BWR WASTE PACKAGE LOADING CURVE EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of initial boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of spent nuclear fuel into the 44 BWR waste package configuration as provided in Attachment IV. This calculation is an application of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). The scope of this calculation covers a range of enrichments from 0 through 5.0 weight percent (wt%) U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 40 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel applications. The intended use of these results will be in establishing BWR waste package configuration loading specifications. Limitations of this evaluation are as follows: (1) The results are based on burnup credit for actinides and selected fission products as proposed in YMP (2003, Table 3-1) and referred to as the ''Principal Isotopes''. Any change to the isotope listing will have a direct impact on the results of this report. (2) The results of 100 percent of the current BWR projected waste stream being able to be disposed of in the 44-BWR waste package with Ni-Gd Alloy absorber plates is contingent upon the referenced waste stream being sufficiently similar to the waste stream received for disposal. (3) The results are based on 1.5 wt% Gd in the Ni-Gd Alloy material and having no tuff inside the waste package. If the Gd loading is reduced or a process to introduce tuff inside the waste package is defined, then this report would need to be reevaluated based on the alternative materials

  19. Nuclear power planning study for Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prospects of application of nuclear energy for production of electricity and desalinated water in the Kingdom are evaluated. General economic development of the country and data on reserves, production and consumption of oil and natural gas are reviewed. Electrical power system is described with data on production and consumption. Estimates of future power demand are made using Aoki method. Costs of production of electricity from 600 MW, 900 MW and 1200 MW nuclear and oil-fired power plants are calculated along with the costs of production of desalinated water from dual purpose nuclear and oil-fired plants. The economic analysis indicates that the cost of production of electricity and desalinated water are in general cheaper from the nuclear power plants. Suggests consideration of the use of nuclear energy for production of both electricity and desalinated water from 1415 H. Further detailed studies and prepartory organizational steps in this direction are outlined. 38 Ref

  20. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible

  1. Nuclear power and the logic of globalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses effects and results of globalization for nuclear power and other options of electricity generation. According to the present state of knowledge, it will not be possible to meet the growing worldwide energy requirement with fossil and renewable energy sources only - also because of the CO2 problem. Consequently, nuclear power will remain an important alternative. On an international scale, this applies in particular to large countries, such as China and India, as large national economies particularly benefit from the economies of scale offered by nuclear power. This could well make Chinese nuclear technology a product for the world market. Thinking along these lines has not really gained ground in Germany, as nuclear power, being a technology requiring considerably capital outlay, is considered unsuitable for southern countries. It is an illusion to believe that Germany's opting out of the use of nuclear power could be a model to others. Instead, we are faced by the ethical question of how we can help to minimize the accident risks of nuclear facilities worldwide. We can do so only by maintaining the use of nuclear power and exporting our level of safety, for the risks will not become any smaller merely as a result of our opting out. (orig.)

  2. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry`s practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  3. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  4. Innovation design of power nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efforts to ensure design and manufacturing innovations in the sphere of power reactors have reached the level of the large-scale inter-state cooperation. Some nuclear power systems are under evaluation in terms of the IAEA International Project dealing with the innovative power reactors and fuel cycles. In Japan the efforts to design fast sodium low-power reactor to serve as a power source in high-cost power regions and in developing power low-consuming countries are in progress. In South Korea the efforts to design a high-power reactor, that is, the APR1400 reactor based on the KSNP Korean available standard plant are in progress

  5. Climate Change and Nuclear Power 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change is one of the most important issues facing the world today. Nuclear power can make an important contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions while delivering energy in the increasingly large quantities needed for global socioeconomic development. Nuclear power plants produce virtually no greenhouse gas emissions or air pollutants during their operation and only very low emissions over their entire life cycle. The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant of March 2011 caused deep public anxiety and raised fundamental questions about the future of nuclear energy throughout the world. It was a wake-up call for everyone involved in nuclear power - a reminder that safety can never be taken for granted. Yet, in the wake of the accident, it is clear that nuclear energy will remain an important option for many countries. Its advantages in terms of climate change mitigation are an important reason why many countries intend to introduce nuclear power in the coming decades, or to expand existing programmes. All countries have the right to use nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, as well as the responsibility to do so safely and securely. The International Atomic Energy Agency provides assistance and information to countries that wish to introduce nuclear power. It also provides information for broader audiences engaged in energy, environmental and economic policy making. This report has been substantially revised, updated and extended since the 2012 edition. It summarizes the potential role of nuclear power in mitigating global climate change and its contribution to other development and environmental challenges. The report also examines broader issues relevant to the climate change-nuclear energy nexus, such as cost, safety, waste management and non-proliferation. New developments in resource supply, innovative reactor technologies and related fuel cycles are also presented

  6. Nuclear power. Protest and violence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following an introductory survey of the anti-nuclear movement, its activities in the following countries are discussed in detail: USA, West Germany, France, United Kingdom. Motives, methods and organization - including international organization - are considered. The interaction of environmental and political motives, and the contrast between peaceful and violent approaches are analyzed. Appendices cover the following: brief description of the nuclear fuel cycle; chronology of 40 anti-nuclear incidents in the above and other countries between February 1975 and September 1978; brief statement on the 'neutron bomb' controversy. In the course of the document reference is made to anti-nuclear activities in 18 countries in all. (U.K.)

  7. The export of China nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article first introduces the meaning of nuclear power export, and then analyses the advantages of China nuclear industry based on the status and development of this industry. At the same time. the collection of nuclear development for the next 30 years of several nations in south-east Asia, south Asia, Middle East, Africa and South America is compiled, which could be a valuable reference for foreseeing nuclear power export market. Finally, as the situation throughout the world is considered, some suggestions are made that what else could be done for future development and export. (author)

  8. Space nuclear power: a strategy for tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Energy: reliable, portable, abundant and low cost will be a most critical factor, perhaps the sine qua non, for the unfolding of man's permanent presence in space. Space-based nuclear power, in turn, is a key technology for developing such space platforms and the transportation systems necessary to service them. A strategy for meeting space power requirements is the development of a 100-kW(e) nuclear reactor system for high earth orbit missions, transportation from Shuttle orbits to geosynchronous orbit, and for outer planet exploration. The component technology for this nuclear power plant is now underway at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As permanent settlements are established on the Moon and in space, multimegawatt power plants will be needed. This would involve different technology similar to terrestrial nuclear power plants.

  9. Nuclear power propulsion system for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroteev, A. S.; Oshev, Yu. A.; Popov, S. A.; Karevsky, A. V.; Solodukhin, A. Ye.; Zakharenkov, L. E.; Semenkin, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The proposed designs of high-power space tugs that utilize solar or nuclear energy to power an electric jet engine are reviewed. The conceptual design of a nuclear power propulsion system (NPPS) is described; its structural diagram, gas circuit, and electric diagram are discussed. The NPPS incorporates a nuclear reactor, a thermal-to-electric energy conversion system, a system for the conversion and distribution of electric energy, and an electric propulsion system. Two criterion parameters were chosen in the considered NPPS design: the temperature of gaseous working medium at the nuclear reactor outlet and the rotor speed of turboalternators. The maintenance of these parameters at a given level guarantees that the needed electric voltage is generated and allows for power mode control. The processes of startup/shutdown and increasing/reducing the power, the principles of distribution of electric energy over loads, and the probable emergencies for the proposed NPPS design are discussed.

  10. Climate Change and Nuclear Power 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change is one of the most important environmental challenges facing the world today. Nuclear power can make a significant contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions while delivering energy in the increasingly large quantities needed for growing populations and socioeconomic development. Nuclear power plants produce virtually no greenhouse gas emissions or air pollutants during their operation and only very low emissions over their entire life cycle. Nuclear power fosters energy supply security and industrial development by providing electricity reliably at stable and foreseeable prices. The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 caused deep public anxiety and raised fundamental questions about the future of nuclear energy throughout the world. Yet, more than four years after the accident, it is clear that nuclear energy will remain an important option for many countries. Its advantages in terms of climate change mitigation are an important reason why many countries intend to introduce nuclear power in the coming decades, or to expand existing programmes. All countries have the right to use nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, as well as the responsibility to do so safely and securely. The IAEA provides assistance and information to countries that wish to introduce nuclear power. It also provides information for broader audiences engaged in energy, environmental and economic policy making. This report provides a comprehensive review of the potential role of nuclear power in mitigating global climate change and its contribution to other economic, energy and environmental challenges. The report also examines broader issues relevant to the climate change–nuclear energy nexus, such as costs, investments, financing, safety, waste management and non-proliferation. Recent developments in electricity generation and distribution technologies and their impacts on nuclear power are also presented. This edition has been

  11. Climate Change and Nuclear Power 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change is the foremost global environmental issue today. Nuclear power is one of the low carbon technologies that can contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions while delivering energy in the increasingly large quantities needed for growing populations and socioeconomic development. Nuclear power plants produce virtually no greenhouse gas emissions or air pollutants during their operation and only very low emissions over their entire life cycle. Nuclear power fosters energy supply security and industrial development by providing electricity reliably at stable and foreseeable prices. The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 caused deep public anxiety and raised fundamental questions about the future of nuclear energy throughout the world. It was a wake-up call for everyone involved in nuclear power — a reminder that safety can never be taken for granted. Yet, more than three years after the accident, it is clear that nuclear energy will remain an important option for many countries. Its advantages in terms of climate change mitigation are an important reason why many countries intend to introduce nuclear power in the coming decades, or to expand existing programmes. All countries have the right to use nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, as well as the responsibility to do so safely and securely. The IAEA provides assistance and information to countries that wish to introduce nuclear power. It also provides information for broader audiences engaged in energy, environmental and economic policy making. This report provides a comprehensive review of the potential role of nuclear power in mitigating global climate change and its contribution to other development and environmental challenges. The report also examines broader issues relevant to the climate change–nuclear energy nexus, such as costs, investments, financing, safety, waste management and non-proliferation. Recent developments in resource supply, changes in

  12. Second nuclear era: a new start for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thrust of this book is that nuclear power should be fixed, not buried. It is based on a study sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This book is a sober, technically based study of how to make the second nuclear era safe and successful

  13. 76 FR 1469 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... COMMISSION Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2... Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC, the licensee, for operation of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant... for light-water nuclear power reactors,'' which requires that the calculated emergency core...

  14. Constitutional aspects of a nuclear power phaseout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current political debate in Germany about the Federal Government's plans to opt out of nuclear power, the time horizon for implementation of the policy and the nuclear power phaseout is a focal point of interest. This aspect is discussed from the angle of German constitutional law. The author analyses in this context the protective scope of Art. 14 GG (German Basic Law), relating to the protection of ownership rights and the principle of legal protection for bona fide acts, which is a vital aspect for the nuclear industry and the power industry. (orig./CB)

  15. Nuclear power programmes in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on ''Nuclear power programmes in developing countries'' is a report to the IAEA by a Senior Expert Group. A description is given of the requirements for a successful nuclear power programme, including the constraints that developing countries might face in the introduction and execution of the programme. The group attempted to identify the main issues affecting the financing of nuclear power projects and suggested specific actions that could be undertaken in order to reduce economic and financial risks. The various issues were discussed under the topic headings:-programme-project-related factors, investment climate, financing plan, export credits and creditworthiness. (U.K.)

  16. Public concerns and alternative nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic task undertaken in this study was to assess the relative public acceptability of three general types of nuclear power systems as alternatives to the existing Light Water Reactor (LWR) system. Concerns registered toward nuclear power constituted the basic data for this assessment. The primary measure adopted for determining the significance of concerns was the degree of difficulty posed by the concern to the nuclear power decisional structure in the establishment and maintenance of norms to control risks or to advance intended energy objectives. Alleviations or exacerbations of concern resulting from particular attributes of alternative systems were measured from an LWR baseline

  17. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-stationary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant stationary batteries important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  18. Operator support architecture for monitoring abnormal symptoms of nuclear power plant based on knowledge engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An architecture to support nuclear power plant operators for monitoring abnormal symptoms has been proposed based on the techniques of knowledge engineering, and the feasibility of a plant monitoring support system was investigated. The purpose of the support system is to present the operators with useful information so that they can make correct judgment at an early and subtle stage of abnormal plant conditions. In the architecture proposed, abductive reasoning is performed to search for causal events and deductive one to predict consequential events using the knowledge representing plant components as frames and those representing causal relations as production rules. A method to deal with uncertainties in each types of reasoning has been adopted, and it is used to rank several hypotheses of causal events and to assess the importance of plant parameters for monitoring. A prototype system was developed, and its usefulness was tested using a case of failure in a recirculation pump of a BWR plant. (author)

  19. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Motor control centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) commercial nuclear power plant motor control centers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  20. Investigation and analysis of hydrogen ignition and explosion events in foreign nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports about hydrogen ignition and explosion events in foreign nuclear power plants from 1980 to 2001 were investigated, and 31 events were identified. Analysis showed that they were categorized in (1) outer leakage ignition events and (2) inner accumulation ignition events. The dominant event for PWR (pressurized water reactor) was outer leakage ignition in the main generator, and in BWR (boiling water reactor) it was inner accumulation ignition in the off-gas system. The outer leakage ignition was a result of work process failure with the ignition source, operator error, or main generator hydrogen leakage. The inner accumulation ignition events were caused by equipment failure or insufficient monitoring. With careful preventive measures, the factors leading to these events could be eliminated. (author)

  1. Physical and chemical properties and compositions of liquid effluents of a nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behaviours of the released radioactive materials from a nuclear power plant to the marine environment depend largely on their physical and chemical properties. It is therefore important to grasp the compositions of the liquid effluents. From this point of view, some kinds of drainwater of a BWR plant were sampled. These samples are the laundry drain water at charcoal bed inlet and outlet, and the floor drain water. Suspended solids were separated from these samples physically with the step filtration method and ions chemically with the ion exchange resin. Radioactivity of Co-60, Mn-54 and Cs-137 was measured with γ spectrometer. Suspended solids of the laundry drain samples were also analysed with the instrumental methods (differential thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction analysis and x-ray fluorescence analysis)

  2. Nuclear power and public opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The speeches by Bethe and Alfven, delivered at the 1977 Conference in Salzburg, and the report of the World Council of Churches are surveyed, as well as the nuclear controversy and the state-of-the-art reports from various countries on public information and public acceptance of nuclear energy provision

  3. Country nuclear power profiles. 2003 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles (CNPP) was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme on assessment and feedback of nuclear power plant performance. It responded to a need for a database and a technical publication containing a description of the energy and economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector, and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The CNPP covers background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in countries having nuclear plants in operation and/or plants under construction. It reviews the organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes in participating countries, and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory and international frameworks in each country. The CNPP compiles the current issues in the new environment within which the electricity and nuclear sector operates, i.e. energy policy, and privatization and deregulation in these sectors, the role of government, nuclear energy and climate change, and safety and waste management, which differ from country to country

  4. Worldwide perspectives of nuclear power use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article covers the topic of nuclear power from the point of view of a representative of the World Nuclear Association (WNA). It is to address not only global trends, but also to provide an opportunity to describe his impressions to a German whose main job is with an international company in Paris, and whose WNA desk is set up in London. In retrospect, there had hardly been a time when nuclear power was held in the same high regard, internationally, as it is now. In the most recent World Climate Report, which is always the result of international consensus, nuclear power is referred to as one of the currently available, economically viable key technologies in the fight against climate change. Worldwide, roughly half the electricity generated practically without any CO2 emissions is produced in nuclear power plants. Moreover, it is not only climate protection which gives a boost to nuclear power. Also the threats facing important sources of fossil fuel supply have greatly contributed to this development. As regards the use of nuclear power in Germany, the facts are known: Longer periods of operation of nuclear power plants could save a lot of money and even more CO2. This is good for the environment, the economy and, ultimately, for the population in Germany. Competence preservation is an important topic in our industry. We are on the right way, worldwide, in this respect. One example to be mentioned is the common initiative of international organizations, co-initiated especially also by WNA, to establish the World Nuclear University. This institution is in the process of becoming a wellspring of talent specializing in nuclear technology worldwide. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear power generation of electricity in Sri Lanka?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief description of how nuclear power is used to generate electricity, advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power, and the main factors that should be taken into consideration in dividing to use nuclear power in Sri Lanka

  6. Thermionic reactors for space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griaznov, Georgii M.; Zhabotinskii, Evgenii E.; Serbin, Victor I.; Zrodnikov, Anatolii V.; Pupko, Victor Ia.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Usov, V. A.; Nikolaev, Iu. V.

    Compact thermionic nuclear reactor systems with satisfactory mass performance are competitive with space nuclear power systems based on the organic Rankine and closed Brayton cycles. The mass characteristics of the thermionic space nuclear power system are better than that of the solar power system for power levels beyond about 10 kWe. Longlife thermionic fuel element requirements, including their optimal dimensions, and common requirements for the in-core thermionic reactor design are formulated. Thermal and fast in-core thermionic reactors are considered and the ranges of their sensible use are discussed. Some design features of the fast in-core thermionic reactors cores (power range to 1 MWe) including a choice of coolants are discussed. Mass and dimensional performance for thermionic nuclear power reactor system are assessed. It is concluded that thermionic space nuclear power systems are promising power supplies for spacecrafts and that a single basic type of thermionic fuel element may be used for power requirements ranging to several hundred kWe.

  7. BWR radiation buildup control with ionic zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1983 a hypothesis was disclosed which suggested that the presence of ionic zinc in the reactor water of the BWR could reduce radiation buildup. This hypothesis was developed from correlations of plant data, and subsequently, from laboratory experiments which demonstrated clearly that ionic zinc inhibits the corrosion of stainless steel. The benefits of zinc addition have been measured at the Vallecitos Nuclear Center under and EPRI/GE project. Experimentation and analyses have been performed to evaluate the impact of intentional zinc addition on the IGSCC characteristics of primary system materials and on the performance of the nuclear fuel. It has been concluded that no negative effects are expected. The author conclude that the intentional addition of ionic zinc to the BWR reactor water at a concentration of approximately 10 ppb will provide major benefits in controlling the Co-60 buildup on primary system stainless steel surfaces. The intentional addition of zinc is now a qualified technique for use in BWRs

  8. Managing the first nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy is essential for national development. Nearly every aspect of development - from reducing poverty and raising living standards to improving health care, industrial and agricultural productivity - requires reliable access to modern energy resources. States may have different reasons for considering starting a nuclear power project to achieve their national energy needs, such as: lack of available indigenous energy resources, the desire to reduce dependence upon imported energy, the need to increase the diversity of energy resources and/or mitigation of carbon emission increases. The start of a nuclear power plant project involves several complex and interrelated activities with long duration. Experience shows that the time between the initial policy decision by a State to consider nuclear power up to the start of operation of its first nuclear power plant is about 10 to 15 years and that before specific project management can proceed, several key infrastructure issues have to be in place. The proper management of the wide scope of activities to be planned and implemented during this period represents a major challenge for the involved governmental, utility, regulatory, supplier and other supportive organizations. The main focus is to ensure that the project is implemented successfully from a commercial point of view while remaining in accordance with the appropriate engineering and quality requirements, safety standards and security guides. This publication is aimed at providing guidance on the practical management of a first nuclear power project in a country. There are many other issues, related to ensuring that the infrastructure in the country has been prepared adequately to ensure that the project will be able to be completed, that are only briefly addressed in this publication. The construction of the first nuclear power plant is a major undertaking for any country developing a nuclear power programme. Worldwide experience gained in the last 50 years

  9. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. On such package would store tightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97 degrees C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350 degrees C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97 degrees C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350 degrees C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep- related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 x 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97 degrees C for the full 10000-yr analysis period. For the 4.74-kW load, the peak cladding temperature rises to just below the 350 degrees C limit about 4 years after emplacement. If the packages are stored using the spacing specified in the Site Characterization Plan (15 ft x 126 ft), a maximum of 4.1 kW per container may be stored. If the 0.05-m-thick void between the container and the borehole wall is filled with loosely packed bentonite, the peak cladding temperature rises more than 40 degrees C above the allowed cladding limit. In all cases the dominant heat transfer mode between container components is thermal radiation

  10. Investigation of valve failure problems in LWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of component failures from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank shows that for both PWR and BWR plants the component category most responsible for approximately 19.3% of light water reactor (LWR) power plant shutdowns. This investigation by Burns and Roe, Inc. shows that the greatest cause of shutdowns in LWRs due to valve failures is leakage from valve stem packing. Both BWR plants and PWR plants have stem leakage problems

  11. Nuclear power and the electronics revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article mentions a number of innovations and electronic tools, which are influencing nuclear plant operations. Examples are: The incorporation of digital computer devices in safety systems; The application of noise analysis techniques to serveillance systems of nuclear power plants; The use of nuclear power plant training simulators; The attention period to the man-machine interface; The developments in the field of robot uses and remote systems in nuclear power plants. A recommendation is made to all countries to make the best use of the IAEA policy to promote international cooperation and exchange of experience in this field. Reference is made to the international conference on ''Man-Machine Interface in the Nuclear Industry; Control and Instrumentation, Robot Uses and Artificial Intelligence'' that IAEA is planning to hold in 1987

  12. Status update of the BWR cask simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Durbin, Samuel G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are typically evaluated through detailed numerical analysis of the system's thermal performance. These modeling efforts are performed by the vendor to demonstrate the performance and regulatory compliance and are independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Numerous studies have been previously conducted. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have moved the storage location from above ground to below ground and significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the canister helium pressure. Previous cask performance validation testing did not capture these parameters. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern dry casks. These modern cask designs utilize elevated helium pressure in the sealed canister or are intended for subsurface storage. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above ground and below ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the canister. The symmetric single assembly geometry with well-controlled boundary conditions simplifies interpretation of results. Various configurations of outer concentric ducting will be used to mimic conditions for above and below ground storage configurations

  13. Nuclear power newsletter Vol. 4, no. 2, June 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics presented in this newsletter are: International Conference on Non-Electric Application of Nuclear Power; Message from the Director of the Division of Nuclear Power; Nuclear power plant operation; Management systems, nuclear power infrastructures and human resources; Technology developments and applications for advanced reactors; New staff in Nuclear Power Division; Current vacancy notice for professional post in Nuclear Power Division; Upcoming meetings; 2nd International Symposium on PLiM; 8th IAEA-FORATOM Joint Workshop

  14. Global cooperation on nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout the world today, expanding economies will dictate an increase in electrical energy. Over the next decade we will see different scenarios in the various regions of the world as countries begin to expand their generating capacities. Nuclear power is a proven, safe, economic, and environmentally friendly source of electric power that will continue to be a necessary part of the world's energy mix. Through cooperation with and among the nuclear generating countries, the benefits and responsibilities of choosing nuclear energy can be shared. Today we continue to find high activity worldwide on nuclear energy. Many countries have extensive programs focusing on nuclear electricity as a major element. For the West, particularly in the United States and Europe, the focus will be on improved operation and economics of existing nuclear plants. Plant safety upgrades and limited plant construction will be the main thrust in Eastern Europe and Russia. Significant new plant activity will occur in Asia, particularly in the Pacific Rim. (author)

  15. 78 FR 50458 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant, Vermont Yankee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant, Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station, Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Request for Action AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... petitioners'') has requested that the NRC take action with regard to James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power......

  16. Nuclear power plant cable materials :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gillen, Kenneth T; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2013-05-01

    A selective literature review was conducted to assess whether currently available accelerated aging and original qualification data could be used to establish operational margins for the continued use of cable insulation and jacketing materials in nuclear power plant environments. The materials are subject to chemical and physical degradation under extended radiationthermal- oxidative conditions. Of particular interest were the circumstances under which existing aging data could be used to predict whether aged materials should pass loss of coolant accident (LOCA) performance requirements. Original LOCA qualification testing usually involved accelerated aging simulations of the 40-year expected ambient aging conditions followed by a LOCA simulation. The accelerated aging simulations were conducted under rapid accelerated aging conditions that did not account for many of the known limitations in accelerated polymer aging and therefore did not correctly simulate actual aging conditions. These highly accelerated aging conditions resulted in insulation materials with mostly inert aging processes as well as jacket materials where oxidative damage dropped quickly away from the air-exposed outside jacket surface. Therefore, for most LOCA performance predictions, testing appears to have relied upon heterogeneous aging behavior with oxidation often limited to the exterior of the cable cross-section a situation which is not comparable with the nearly homogenous oxidative aging that will occur over decades under low dose rate and low temperature plant conditions. The historical aging conditions are therefore insufficient to determine with reasonable confidence the remaining operational margins for these materials. This does not necessarily imply that the existing 40-year-old materials would fail if LOCA conditions occurred, but rather that unambiguous statements about the current aging state and anticipated LOCA performance cannot be provided based on

  17. Industrial accidents in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 12 nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany with a total of 3678 employees, 25 notifiable company personnel accidents and 46 notifiable outside personnel accidents were reported for an 18-month period. (orig./HP)

  18. Technical support for nuclear power operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report prepared by the group of senior experts from nuclear operating organizations in Member states, addresses the problem of improving the operating performance of nuclear power plants. Safe and reliable operation is essential for strengthening the viability of nuclear power in the increasingly competitive market of electric power. Basic principles and requirements concerning technical procedures and developed practices are discussed. Report reflects the best current international practices and presents those management initiatives that go beyond the mandated regulatory compliance and could lead to enhancement od operational safety and improved plant performance. By correlating experiences and presenting collective effective practices it is meant to assist nuclear power plant managers in achieving improvement in operation through the contribution of effective technical support

  19. Half life: nuclear power and future society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A definitive critique of nuclear power in Canada is delivered. Also analyzed are reprocessing and waste disposal hazards and the conventional wisdom of energy source mix and energy demand growth. (E.C.B.)

  20. Environmental hazards from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses the radiation exposure due to nuclear power stations in normal operation and after reactor incidents. Also mentioned is the radiation exposure to the emissions from fuel reprocessing plants and radioactive waste facilities. (RW/AK)

  1. The Nuclear Review: the Institution of Nuclear Engineers' response to the Review of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United Kingdom Government's Nuclear Review currently underway, addresses whether and in what form nuclear power should continue to be part of the country's power generation capability. This article sets out the response of the Institution of Nuclear Engineers to the Nuclear Review. This pro-nuclear group emphasises the benefits to be gained from diversity of generation in the energy supply industry. The environmentally benign nature of nuclear power is emphasised, in terms of gaseous emissions. The industry's excellent safety record also argues in favour of nuclear power. Finally, as power demand increases globally, a health U.K. nuclear industry could generate British wealth through power exports and via the construction industry. The Institution's view on radioactive waste management is also set out. (UK)

  2. Nuclear power planning and feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture will review the basic steps associated with planning the introduction of nuclear power. Areas covered will include power market surveys, energy resources evaluations, potential alternative strategies, organisational factors and implementational requirements. The lecture will then consider the implications and requirements associated with establishing the feasibility of a nuclear project. Among others, aspects of power systems integration, site selection reactor type evaluation, cost and economic analysis, influence of contracting strategies, comparison with alternative power generation solutions, financial impact, etc. will be discussed and reviewed. (HK)

  3. Nuclear power plant safety in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Code of Practice for the Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants states that: 'In discharging its responsibility for public health and safety, the government should ensure that the operational safety of a nuclear reactor is subject to surveillance by a regulatory body independent of the operating organization'. In Brazil this task is being carried out by the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear in accordance with the best international practice. (orig./RW)

  4. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  5. European climate targets achievable without nuclear power

    OpenAIRE

    Kemfert, Claudia; Gerbaulet, Clemens; von Hirschhausen, Christian; Lorenz, Casimir; Reitz, Felix

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming Climate Change Conference in Paris will once again highlight the need for action to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions in order to mitigate climate change. The relevant global energy scenarios are often still based on the assumption that the expansion of nuclear power can contribute to climate change mitigation. The spiraling investment and operating costs of nuclear plants, the unresolved issues concerning the dismantling of these plants and permanent storage of nuclear wast...

  6. Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1986, are presented. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors

  7. Nuclear power infrastructure - issues, strategy and possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Today humanity faces daunting challenges: the pressing need for development in many parts of the world and the desire for a more effective system of international security. At the outset of the 21st century, the Millennium Development Goals and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation have both set global objectives for sustainable development (SD) that give high priority to the eradication of poverty and hunger, environmental sustainability, universal access to plentiful fresh water and energy. In this context there are many expectations about Nuclear Renascence supported by many national and international studies, by discussions in the mass media and international forums, etc. The Agency has taken an integrated approach outlining all considerations that have to be taken into account for the introduction of a nuclear power programme, providing guiding documents, forums for sharing information, consultancies and technical meetings and sending multidisciplinary teams to countries requesting assistance with nuclear power infrastructure. The process also includes specific assistance and review services in the areas of infrastructure readiness, feasibility studies, draft nuclear law, regulatory frameworks and organization, siting issues, human resource development and planning, bid evaluation and technology assessment, owner/operator competence, and safety and security. It is important to support the decision making processes of States introducing nuclear power to ensure they can make informed choices on the role of nuclear power in their energy mixes. The IAEA helps countries prepare for the introduction or expansion of nuclear power by 1) helping them ensure that nuclear energy is used safely, securely and with minimal proliferation risk, and 2) meeting the need of developing countries to build capacity in terms of human resources, energy analysis, regulatory capabilities and other infrastructure necessary for nuclear power. The process also includes

  8. Global Protest Against Nuclear Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Astrid Mignon; Meyer, Jan-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    . This focus issue approaches the phenomenon from a transnational perspective for the first time. Against the backdrop of the debate on transnational history, this article develops a framework of analysis, and contextualizes anti-nuclear protest in a broader postwar perspective. The contributions show...... that anti-nuclear movements across the globe were transnationally connected. First, scientific expertise and protest practices were transferred between movements, and subsequently adapted to local requirements. Secondly, transnational cooperation and networks did indeed emerge, playing an important role...

  9. Nuclear power: Yes or no

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author deals with the problems of nuclear energy by drawing many comparisons to other fields of engineering and causes of dangers and he does it in a way that the laity can understand him and is informed. Advocates and opponents would act bona fide: the ones were not in fear and would believe in the realization of nuclear energy; the others were in fear for themselves and their environment. So the layman too could either believe or not believe. (HSCH)

  10. Country nuclear power profiles. 2001 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme on assessment and feedback of nuclear power plant performance. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. In 1998, the first edition of the Country Nuclear Power Profiles was published focusing on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. The compilation was made based on contributions of 29 Member States with operating nuclear power plants by the end of 1995 and Italy. It also incorporated the 'Fact Sheets' on international, multilateral and bilateral agreements as collected by EXPO. The second edition, issued on CD-ROM only, covered the changes in the new environment of the electricity and the nuclear sector, i.e. the impact of privatization and deregulation on these sectors, be it that the situation differs from country to country. The third edition, issued as hard copy and CD-ROM, updates the country information, in general, to the end of 2000. This publication compiles background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in countries having operating nuclear plants and/or plants under construction as of 1 January 2001 and in countries actively engaged in planning such a programme. It presents historical information on energy supply and demand; reviews the organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes in participating countries for the same period; and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory, and international framework in each country. Topics such as reactor safety, the nuclear fuel cycle, radioactive waste management and research programmes are for the most part not discussed in detail

  11. The Role of Nuclear Power in Eurpoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-01-15

    The World Energy Council has published the results of an in-depth review of the current state of nuclear power in Europe, and the possible role of this energy source in Europe's energy future. This regional study combines policy insights, technical details and an analysis of the potential for nuclear as a part of the energy-mix.

  12. Effort on Nuclear Power Plants safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prospects of nuclear power plant on designing, building and operation covering natural safety, technical safety, and emergency safety are discussed. Several problems and their solutions and nuclear energy operation in developing countries especially control and permission are also discussed. (author tr.)

  13. Radiation protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of workers' protection in a nuclear power plant is stated. Considering the nature and magnitude of potential risks and protection procedures, an inventory of occupational safety is made, taking account of accident statistics. It shows the credit to nuclear energy can be granted as to occupational safety

  14. BWR stability analysis with three-dimensional transient code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, neutron flux oscillations of two different modes were observed in several foreign BWR plants. One is core wide oscillation mode which is characterized by a phenomenon that neutron flux oscillates in-phase over a whole core. At La Salle 2 plant (U.S.A.), the amplitude of core wide neutron flux oscillation grew considerably large to result in a reactor scram, which aroused great concern about BWR stability. The other is regional oscillation mode which is characterized by the phenomenon, as typically observed at Caorso plant (Italy), that neutron flux of a half core oscillates out-of-phase to that of the other half core. These neutron flux oscillation phenomena were caused by nuclear-thermal hydraulic coupled instability and requires an evaluation study on oscillation detectability and effect on fuel integrity. Particularly, the regional oscillation mode requires three-dimensional analysis since it may bring about locally large amplitude power oscillation. For this reason, analysis was done with the three-dimensional transient code TOSDYN-2 to study reactor condition which causes the regional oscillation and also to evaluate fuel thermal margin under the neutron flux oscillations of these two instability modes. (author)

  15. Logical model for the control of a BWR turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a design of a logical model is presented for the turbine control of a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model is sought to implement later on inside the thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The logical model is developed for the control and protection of the turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control will be been able to use for one or several turbines in series. The quality of the present design of the logical model of the turbine control is that it considers the most important parameters in the operation of a turbine, besides that they have incorporated to the logical model the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a detailed model. The development of the logical model of a turbine will be of utility in the short and medium term to carry out analysis on the turbine operation with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction, specific steps of the turbine to feed other equipment s, in addition to analyze the separate and the integrated effect. (Author)

  16. Human factors in nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the human factors problems in nuclear power plants and the technology that can be employed to reduce those problems. Many of the changes to improve the human factors in existing plants are inexpensive, and the expected gain in human reliability is substantial. The human factors technology is well-established and there are practitioners in most countries that have nuclear power plants

  17. Human factors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the human factors problems in nuclear power plants and the technology that can be employed to reduce those problems. Many of the changes to improve the human factors in existing plants are inexpensive, and the expected gain in human reliability is substantial. The human factors technology is well-established and there are practitioners in most countries that have nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  18. Report concerning Zarnowiec nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Report of the Team of the President of the National Atomic Energy Agency regarding Zarnowiec nuclear power plant contains the analysis of situation in Poland in June 1990, the assessment of public opinion, as well as the description of ecological, technical and economical problems. The team's conclusions are given together with the general conclusion to stop the construction of Zarnowiec nuclear power plant. 5 appendixes, 6 enclosures, 1 documents list, 1 tab. (A.S.)

  19. Concepts for a modular nuclear powered containership

    OpenAIRE

    Gravina, Jonathan; James I.R. Blake; Shenoi, R. Ajit; Turnock, Stephen R.; Hirdaris, Spyros

    2013-01-01

    With the amendments to the MARPOL Annex VI regulations to control NOx and SOx emissions, fuel prices will increase considerably by 2020. Coupled with depleting fossil fuel reserves and owners’ perceptions on their environmental impact, fossil fuel alternatives are being actively sought. The IMarEST reports that nuclear power is the only emissions free energy which can replace fossil fuels entirely (Jenkins, 2011). Two critical drawbacks for a nuclear powered ship are route restrictions and...

  20. Quality assurance organization for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide provides requirements, recommendations and illustrative examples for structuring, staffing and documenting the organizations that perform activities affecting quality of a nuclear power plant. It also provides guidance on control of organization interfaces, and establishment of lines for direction, communication and co-ordination. The provisions of this Guide are applicable to all organizations participating in any of the constituent areas of activities affecting quality of a nuclear power plant, such as design, manufacture, construction, commissioning and operation

  1. Argentina: Nuclear power development and Atucha 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogarin, Mauro

    2015-08-15

    In 2014, nuclear energy generated about 5,257 GWh of electricity or a total share of 4.05 % of the total electrical energy of about 129,747.63 GWh kWh produced in Argentina and there has been a trend for this production to increase. Argentina currently has a nuclear production capacity of 1,010 megawatts of electrical energy. However, when the Atucha 2 nuclear power plant is completed and starts commercial operation, it will add 745 megawatts to this electrical production capacity. There are two sites with nuclear power plants in Argentina: Atucha and Embalse. The Embalse nuclear power plant went into operation in 1984. At the Atucha site, the Atucha-1 nuclear power plant started operation in 1974. It was the first nuclear power plant in Latin America. Construction of Atucha-2 started in 1981 but advanced slowly due to funding and was suspended in 1994 when the plant was 81 % built. In 2003, new plans were approved to complete the Atucha 2. I summer 2014 the plant went critical for the first time. The construction was completed under a contract with AECL.

  2. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  3. Developing a Nuclear Workforce. IAEA, Nuclear Power Institute Collaborate in Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safe and sustainable nuclear power plant operation is one of the many areas that depend upon sustained nuclear knowledge management. The IAEA's Nuclear Knowledge Management programs help Member States strengthen their nuclear education and training programmes. As a part of that on-going effort, the IAEA signed a 'practical arrangement' with the Nuclear Power Institute (NPI), based at Texas A and M University, USA, on 24 September

  4. Iran's nuclear program - for power generation or nuclear weapons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses the development of a nuclear infrastructure in Iran, and assessments are made on the near-term potential this infrastructure might yield of either nuclear power or nuclear arms production. The most significant facilities are treated in a more elaborate fashion, as these are assumed to have key roles in either a true civilian programme, or in the prospect of weapons-grade fissile material production. The future potential capacity for the latter is calculated under certain presumptions, both in the case that Iran focuses its efforts on uranium-based nuclear weapons, and in the case that it should choose the plutonium path to nuclear weapons. All the conclusions and findings in this report are based on technological considerations. This means that social or political assessments have not prevailed, rather the picture of Iran's nuclear programme is drawn through descriptions and assessments of facilities and systems, and their role in the bigger context. Definite conclusions have not been made as to whether Iran's nuclear programme currently is aimed towards nuclear arms or nuclear power. The secrecy surrounding some of the most prominent nuclear sites together with more or less credible allegations of purely weapons-related activities in the past, make it hard not to conclude that Iran until the disclosures in 2002 made as great an effort as it could on its way on developing nuclear weapons covertly. The scope of today's nuclear programme seems, on the other hand, most likely to be in part to help relieve the ever-increasing need for energy, although considerable deficits to this strategy are identified, at the same time as the Iranian people are united in a giant, high-prestige project in defiance of massive international pressure. Adding to this is a much-feared ability to rapidly being able to redirect their nuclear efforts, and develop nuclear arms in perhaps as little as one year. This so-called break-out scenario, where Iran presumably

  5. Phenomenology of severe accidents in BWR type reactors. First part; Fenomenologia de accidentes severos en reactores nucleares de agua en ebullicion. Primera parte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval V, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Energia Nuclear, Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    A Severe Accident in a nuclear power plant is a deviation from its normal operating conditions, resulting in substantial damage to the core and, potentially, the release of fission products. Although the occurrence of a Severe Accident on a nuclear power plant is a low probability event, due to the multiple safety systems and strict safety regulations applied since plant design and during operation, Severe Accident Analysis is performed as a safety proactive activity. Nuclear Power Plant Severe Accident Analysis is of great benefit for safety studies, training and accident management, among other applications. This work describes and summarizes some of the most important phenomena in Severe Accident field and briefly illustrates its potential use based on the results of two generic simulations. Equally important and abundant as those here presented, fission product transport and retention phenomena are deferred to a complementary work. (Author)

  6. Nuclear power in Asia: Experience and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asian countries have developed ambitious energy supply programs to expand their energy supply systems to meet the growing needs of their rapidly expanding economies. Most of their new electrical generation needs will be met by coal, oil and gas. However, the consideration of growing energy demand, energy security, environmental conservation, and technology enhancement is inducing more Asian countries toward the pursuit of nuclear power development. At present, nuclear power provides about 30% of electricity in Japan, and about 40% of electricity in Korea. These and other Asian countries are presumed to significantly increase their nuclear power generation capacities in coming years. Korea's nuclear power generation facilities are projected to grow from 12 gigawatt in 1998 to 16.7 gigawatt by 2004. On the other hand, China and India have now installed nuclear capacities of about 2 gigawatt, respectively, which will increase by a factor of two or more by 2004. The installed nuclear capacity in the Asian region totalled 67 gigawatt as of the end of 1997, representing about sixteen percent of the world capacity of 369 gigawatt. Looking to the year 2010, it is anticipated that most of the world's increase in nuclear capacity will come from Asia. It is further forecasted that Asian nations will continue to expand their nuclear capacity as they move into the 21st century. For example, China plans to develop additional 18 gigawatt of nuclear power plants by the year 2010. Nuclear power is also of particular interest to a number of emerging Asian countries in view of environmental conservation and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions in particular. Nuclear power appeals to some countries because of its high technology content. The strength in an advanced technology, such as the technological capability related to nuclear power, contributes to the overall development of the corresponding country's engineering base, enhancement of industrial infrastructure and expansion of

  7. A radiation monitoring system model for the Laguna Verde nuclear power training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the Radiation Monitoring System of the Laguna Verde Boiling Water Reactor training simulator is presented. This model comprises enough definitions to assure interactions with the processes related, directly or indirectly, with the transport of radioisotopes. It is capable of following a dynamic behavior of the plant so an operator could be trained to become aware of nuclear radiation hazards. The model is composed of three parts: the electronics for the Process and Area Radiation Monitoring System; a lumped parameter transport model for the most representative radioisotopes; and the interactions with the modeled processes as well as with process not being simulated. The first part represents the radiation monitor controls in the vertical board panels of the nuclear station. The second part allows the carrying of nuclear isotopes between processes. The third part defines the way that the process interacts with the electronics at the point of release to environment or the point of detection. Each part of the model has been tested individually, and the transport model has been incorporated as a part of each process required to simulate nuclear radiation. The model parameters has been calculated using typical BWR nuclear radiation data, and Laguna Verde heat balance data at 100% design power. However, tunning will be necessary once the Simulator is integrated and tested. The tunning allows each detecting channel to behave as expected

  8. Studying dynamics of indicators of nuclear power stations exploitation (the case of US nuclear power stations)

    OpenAIRE

    Varshavsky, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of external and internal factors influencing significant improvement of economic indicators of US nuclear power stations in the 1990s is carried out. Approaches to modeling dynamics of capacity factors of nuclear power stations are proposed. Comparative analysis of dynamics of capacity factors and occupational radiation exposure for various generations of US nuclear power plants is carried out. Dynamical characteristics of «learning by doing» effects for analyzed indicators are measu...

  9. Canadian Experience in Nuclear Power Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology transfer has and will continue to play a major role in the development of nuclear power programs. From the early beginnings of the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear power by just a few nations in the mid-1940s there has been a considerable transfer of technology and today 34 countries have nuclear programs in various stages of development. Indeed, some of the major nuclear vendors achieves their present position through a process of technology transfer and subsequent development. Canada, one of the early leaders in the development of nuclear power, has experience with a wide range of programs bout within its own borders and with other countries. This paper briefly describes this experience and the lessons learned from Canada's involvement in the transfer of nuclear power technology. Nuclear technology is complex and diverse and yet it can be assimilated by a nation given a fire commitment of both suppliers and recipients of technology to achieve success. Canada has reaped large benefits from its nuclear program and we believe this has been instrumentally linked to the sharing of goals and opportunity for participation over extended periods of time by many interests within the Canadian infrastructure. While Canada has accumulated considerable expertise in nuclear technology transfer, we believe there is still much for US to learn. Achieving proficiency in any of the many kinds of nuclear related technologies will place a heavy burden on the financial and human resources of a nation. Care must be taken to plan carefully the total criteria which will assure national benefits in industrial and economic development. Above all, effective transfer of nuclear technology requires a long term commitment by both parties

  10. 77 FR 47121 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... COMMISSION Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC (the licensee) is the holder of Renewed..., ``Fatigue Management for Nuclear Power Plant Personnel,'' endorses the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI)...

  11. System control model of a turbine for a BWR; Modelo del sistema de control de una turbina para un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas O, Y. [Universidad del Valle de Mexico, Campus Toluca, Av. Las Palmas No. 136, Col. San Jorge Pueblo Nuevo, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R.; Delfin L, A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: rodolfo.amador@inin.gob.mx

    2009-10-15

    In this work is presented a design of a control system of a turbine for a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model seeks to implement later on at thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The model is developed for control and protection of turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control could be employed for one or several turbines in series. The quality of present designs of control pattern of turbine it is that it considers the parameters more important in the operation of a turbine besides that is has incorporated at control the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a model more detailed. The development of control model of a turbine will be good in short and medium term to realize analysis about the operation of turbine with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction specific steps of turbine to feed other equipment s, besides analyzing the separate effect and integrated effect. (Author)

  12. Actinides inventory of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time 435 nuclear power reactors exist for the electricity generation operating in the world and 63 in construction. Mexico has two reactors type BWR in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. The nuclear fuel that is used in the nuclear reactors is retired of the reactor core when the energy that this contained has been extracted. This used fuel is known as spent nuclear fuel, the problem with this fuel is that was irradiated inside the reactor and continuous emitting a high radiation, as well as a significant heat quantity when being extracted, for what is necessary to maintain it in cooling and with some shielding to be protected of the radiation that emits. This objective is achieved confining the fuel in the spent nuclear fuel pool, where it is cooled and the same pool provides the necessary shielding to maintain the surroundings in safety radiation levels for the personnel that work in the power plant. An inconvenience of the pools is its limited storage capacity and that after certain time is necessary to remove the fuel, according to the established regulation to continue operating. To correct this inconvenience, two alternatives of spent fuel disposition exist, 1) the final disposition in deep geologic repositories and 2) the reprocessing and recycled of spent fuel. Each alternative presents its particularities and specific problems; however taking many years to be able to implement anyone of them. To carry out the second option, is indispensable to estimate the total mass of actinides generated in the spent nuclear fuel, that which represents to develop a methodology for it, this action is the main purpose of the present work. Inside our calculation method was necessary to appeal to diverse computation tools as the codes Origin-S and Keno V.a. Later on the obtained were compared with a problem type Benchmark, being obtained a smaller absolute error to 1.0%. (Author)

  13. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric plants, BWR/4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/6, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the B ampersand W Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. This document Volume 3, contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  14. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric Plants, BWR/6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/6, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the B ampersand W Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. This document Volume 1, contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  15. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric plants, BWR/6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/6, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the B ampersand W Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. This document Volume 2, contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  16. Nuclear power economics and technology: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intended for the non-specialist reader interested in energy and environmental policy matters, this report presents an overview of the current expert consensus on the status of nuclear power technology and its economic position. It covers the potential demand for nuclear energy, its economic competitivity, and the relevant aspects of reactor performance and future technological developments. The report provides an objective contribution to the ongoing scientific and political debate about what nuclear power can offer, now and in the future, in meeting the world's growing demand for energy and in achieving sustainable economic development. 24 refs., 18 figs;, 12 tabs., 5 photos

  17. Changes in attitude structure toward nuclear power in the nuclear power plant locations of Tohoku district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This survey was examined the changes in structure of attitude toward nuclear power and the influence of environmental value on the attitude structure before and after the accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant. With residents of Aomori, Miyagi, and Fukushima prefectures as participants, we conducted online surveys in November 2009 and October 2011. Comparing the results before and after the accident, we found that trust in the management of nuclear power plants had a stronger influence on the perceived risk and benefit regarding nuclear power after the accident than before the accident. The value of concern about environmental destruction resulted in reduced trust in the management. (author)

  18. 75 FR 2164 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station; Environmental Assessment and...), for operation of Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (Pilgrim), located in Plymouth County, MA....

  19. Nuclear power in an age of uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present nuclear era is drawing to a close. Unit 1 of the Washington Public Power Supply System was indefinitely, perhaps permanently, deferred even though it was 60% complete and $2.1 billion had been invested. This plant and others such as Zimmer and Marble Hill epitomize the difficulties facing the nuclear industry. It is important to remember, however, that other nuclear plants have been very successful and produce reliable, low cost electricity. The future of nuclear power poses a complex dilemma of policymakers. It has advantages that may prove crucial to this nation's energy system in the coming decades, but at present it is an option that no electric utility would seriously consider. OTA examined questions of demand growth, costs, regulation, and public acceptance to evaluate how these factors affect nuclear power's future. We reviewed research directions which could improve conventional light water reactor technology and opportunities to develop other types of reactor concepts that might enhance safe and reliable operation. In addition, the crucial role of utility management in constructing and operating nuclear powerplants is examined at length. The controversy about nuclear safety regulation is also analyzed, and is presented with a review of current proposals for regulatory reform. Finally, the study discusses policy approaches that could assist a revival of the nuclear option should that be a choice of Congress

  20. The market value of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What are the factors and circumstances that have made some plants more valuable to others than to their original owners? What is currently keeping nuclear plants, with their relatively low operating cost and environmental impacts, at the bottom of the heap? Why will some nuclear plants have significantly higher market values in the future while others will fail? What circumstances are likely to change in the near future that could significantly alter this market? In this article, the authors address these questions and attempt to provide insights into the unique market for nuclear power. The authors will proceed by first introducing the components of generation asset valuation, then discussing recent experiences with the sales of non-nuclear and nuclear power plants. Next, the authors will provide some explanation for why non-nuclear assets are enjoying a robust market while the market for nuclear plants remains immature. Finally, the authors present an analysis of the future value of nuclear power and a view of one road to take to get there

  1. Nuclear power technologies. Abstracts of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 14-17, 2000, and on the initiative of the Ministry of Science and High Education of the Republic of Kazakstan with cooperation of Department of Energy US, International Seminar on Nuclear Power Technologies was held in Astana, Kazakhstan. More than 70 reports of scientists from different countries (USA, Russia, Japan and Kazakhstan) were presented during the Seminar. Representatives from different international organizations (European Commission Delegation, IAEA), from organizations of Kazakstan, Russia, USA, Japan took part in the Seminar. In all at the Seminar there were more then 100 participants. The Seminar included Plenary Session, two sections: 1) Nuclear Safety and Nuclear Technologies; 2) Material Investigations for Nuclear and Thermonuclear Power; Workshop: Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning and Decontamination; and Posters

  2. Economic consideration for Indonesia's nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indonesia experienced relatively high economic growth during the 1970s and the energy supply system was strained to keep up with demand. Several energy studies were thus carried out around 1980, including a nuclear power planning study and a nuclear plant feasibility study. During the 1980s, economic growth rates were subtantially lower, but surprisingly electricity demand remained fairly high. In 1984 it was therefore decided to update previous nuclear power studies. This effort was completed in 1986. Using energy projections and cost estimates developed during the updating of previous nuclear power studies, the paper discusses the economic justification for a nuclear power program in Indonesia. Results of the update, including computer runs of MAED and WASP models supplied by the IAEA, will be presented along with appropriate sensitivity analysis. These results are then analyzed in the light of 1986 developments in international oil price. Preparations for the forthcoming nuclear power program are described, including the construction of a multi-purpose reactor and associated laboratories in Serpong, near Jakarta. (author)

  3. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Any discussion of 21st century energy trends must take into account the global energy imbalance. Roughly 1.6 billion people still lack access to modern energy services, and few aspects of development - whether related to living standards, health care or industrial productivity - can take place without the requisite supply of energy. As we look to the century before us, the growth in energy demand will be substantial, and 'connecting the unconnected' will be a key to progress. Another challenge will be sustainability. How can we meet these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects that could compromise the living environment of future generations? Nuclear power is not a 'fix-all' option. It is a choice that has a place among the mix of solutions, and expectations for the expanding use of nuclear power are rising. In addition to the growth in demand, these expectations are driven by energy security concerns, nuclear power's low greenhouse gas emissions, and the sustained strong performance of nuclear plants. Each country must make its own energy choices; one size does not fit all. But for those countries interested in making nuclear power part of their sustainable development strategies, it is important that the nuclear power option be kept open and accessible

  4. Engineering and science education for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience has shown that one of the critical conditions for the successful introduction of a nuclear power programme is the availability of sufficient numbers of personnel having the required education and experience qualifications. For this reason, the introduction of nuclear power should be preceded by a thorough assessment of the relevant capabilities of the industrial and education/training infrastructures of the country involved. The IAEA assists its Member States in a variety of ways in the development of infrastructures and capabilities for engineering and science education for nuclear power. Types of assistance provided by the IAEA to Member States include: Providing information in connection with the establishment or upgrading of academic and non-academic engineering and science education programmes for nuclear power (on the basis of curricula recommended in the Agency's Guidebook on engineering and science education for nuclear power); Expert assistance in setting up or upgrading laboratories and other teaching facilities; Assessing the capabilities and interest of Member States and their institutions/organizations for technical co-operation among countries, especially developing ones, in engineering and science education, as well as its feasibility and usefulness; Preparing and conducting nuclear specialization courses (e.g. on radiation protection) in various Member States

  5. Nuclear power - why do we need it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is maintained that a fundamental aspect of energy policy must be to reduce the consumption of oil. The four main alternative energy sources, coal, nuclear, gas and water power are then compared point for point. Regarding technical feasiblity, economy, environmental aspects and raw material resources. All are found to be technically feasible, and, with reservations for coal and water power, environmentally acceptable. Likewise all exhibit reasonable economy but only nuclear and coal have satisfactory raw material resources. Comparing these two regarding waste, it is stated that nuclear wastes are highly concentrated and contained out of contact with the biosphere, while the wastes from coal combustion cannot be separated from the biosphere. Nuclear power is marginally more economical. Finally nuclear power is much less dependent on fuel costs than coal-fired power, and, when breeder reactors are considered, the fuel resources are practically infinite. Referring to Sweden, it is pointed out that, while Sweden is the world's largest per capita user of oil, she has no oil resources herself, but the world's largest known reserves of uranium, and a nuclear industrial capacity sufficient for her own needs. (JIW)

  6. Nuclear power in the Soviet Bloc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of Soviet Bloc nuclear power generation to the end of the century is evaluated on the basis of policy statements of objectives, past and current nuclear power plant construction, and trends in the potential for future construction. Central to this study is a detailed examination of individual reactor construction and site development that provides specific performance data not given elsewhere. A major commitment to nuclear power is abundantly clear and an expansion of ten times in nuclear electric generation is estimated between 1980 and 2000. This rate of growth is likely to have significant impact upon the total energy economy of the Soviet Bloc including lessening demands for use of coal, oil, and gas for electricity generation

  7. Studies of Fourteen Nuclear-Powered Airplanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, J. N.; McCulloch, J. C.; Schmill, W. C.; Ward, W. H.

    1952-09-01

    A representative series of aircraft which could be powered by a relatively low-temperature liquid-coolant-cycle nuclear power plant are described. Present aircraft such as the B-36, B-52, and B-47 bombers as well as new designs were investigated. Design and performance characteristics of all the aircraft are presented.

  8. Thoughts on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article published before the Chernobyl accident (and the greenhouse effect issue), the author comments the evolution of the perception people have on nuclear energy: it was supposed to be the beginning of a golden age, and is finally perceived as a source of thermal and radioactive pollution and a major industrial risk. He outlines and criticizes the various and more or less violent reactions and debates about the fact that choosing nuclear energy means choosing a certain type of society. He considers that this point of view refuses reality. He states that the emerging new and renewable energies cannot be the solution. He comments the emergence of an energy crisis after the first oil crisis, and the associated questions about a possible reduction of consumption, the replacement of oil, the potential of renewable energies. He criticizes the excessive fear about nuclear materials and energy, discusses the actual risks associated with electronuclear production, and discusses the energy issue in the international context to outline the importance of nuclear energy. He finally addresses issues related to the definition and implementation of an energy policy, with EDF as a major actor

  9. Chernobyl lesson and the nuclear power prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At sixteen years from the disaster which made the commercial power reactor nr. 4 of the Chernobyl NPP known worldwide, the radiation effects and the consequences are still vivid. A basic statement is to be underlined, namely, the Chernobyl event was not an accident in a nuclear power plant being in an industrial, commercial state of operation but an accident following an experiment done on the reactor. Lack of professionalism, of nuclear safety culture, the outrageous violation of basic rules and regulations, established for the unit operation, represent some of the causes originating the Chernobyl disaster. One of the most unfair consequences enhanced by an incorrect mass media information and political manipulation was the ensuing antinuclear media campaign. The paper quotes recent monographs and United Nations Documents showing how the facts were distorted to render arguments and support for various political, economical or humanistic goals. Thus, over more than 15 years due to the hard controversies and irrational campaigns on a global scale the nuclear power was discredited. Practically, all the nuclear power plant constructions were either delayed or cancelled. Moreover, some governments have sustained even closing the existing nuclear stations. The author asks himself rhetorically whether somebody has considered and quantified the immense losses produced by such unmotivated policy or else the additional damage and abuse caused to our home planet by the additional burning of fossil fuels to replace the nuclear fuel burning in nuclear power plants. The paper ends by mentioning the environmental advantages and economic efficiency of that clean energy source which is the nuclear power

  10. Nuclear power plant security assessment technical manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, Sharon L.; Whitehead, Donnie Wayne; Potter, Claude S., III

    2007-09-01

    This report (Nuclear Power Plant Security Assessment Technical Manual) is a revision to NUREG/CR-1345 (Nuclear Power Plant Design Concepts for Sabotage Protection) that was published in January 1981. It provides conceptual and specific technical guidance for U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear power plant design certification and combined operating license applicants as they: (1) develop the layout of a facility (i.e., how buildings are arranged on the site property and how they are arranged internally) to enhance protection against sabotage and facilitate the use of physical security features; (2) design the physical protection system to be used at the facility; and (3) analyze the effectiveness of the PPS against the design basis threat. It should be used as a technical manual in conjunction with the 'Nuclear Power Plant Security Assessment Format and Content Guide'. The opportunity to optimize physical protection in the design of a nuclear power plant is obtained when an applicant utilizes both documents when performing a security assessment. This document provides a set of best practices that incorporates knowledge gained from more than 30 years of physical protection system design and evaluation activities at Sandia National Laboratories and insights derived from U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission technical staff into a manual that describes a development and analysis process of physical protection systems suitable for future nuclear power plants. In addition, selected security system technologies that may be used in a physical protection system are discussed. The scope of this document is limited to the identification of a set of best practices associated with the design and evaluation of physical security at future nuclear power plants in general. As such, it does not provide specific recommendations for the design and evaluation of physical security for any specific reactor design. These best practices should be applicable to the design and

  11. Annex I. Nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout its 52 year history nuclear power has been mainly used in industrialized countries. Of the world's 441 currently operating nuclear power reactors, 403 (or 91%) are in either OECD countries or countries with economies in transition. In terms of electrical generating capacity, 349 GW(e) out of 368 GW(e), or 95% of nuclear generating capacity is installed in these countries. In terms of new construction, however, the pattern is largely reversed. Sixteen of the 27 new reactors under construction (59%), and 11.1 GW(e) out of 21.8 GW(e) (51%), are in developing countries. The most ambitious plans for nuclear expansion are in China and India. China, with three nuclear power plants under construction at the end of 2005, plans to expand nuclear capacity from 6.6 GW(e) today to 40 GW(e) by 2020. India, with eight plants under construction, plans to expand from 3 GW(e) to 29 GW(e) by 2022. Pakistan, with 425 MW(e) and one plant under construction at the end of 2005, plans to add approximately 8 GW(e) by 2030. For nuclear power in general, 2005 was a year of rising expectations, partly because of the potential expansion in developing countries due to their continuing need for substantially increased energy supplies, and partly because of concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil fired electricity generation, particularly coal. In March, high level representatives of 74 governments, including representatives from 31 developing countries, gathered in Paris at a conference organized by the Agency to consider the future role of nuclear power. The vast majority of participants, among them several countries currently without nuclear power programmes, affirmed that nuclear power can make a major contribution to meeting energy needs and sustaining the world's development in the 21st century. This annex reviews the prospects and challenges for the expansion of nuclear power in developing countries. Each country is unique, and its national plans and approach

  12. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to 12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ∼30% by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. The risks of nuclear power should be compared with the risks of the estimated 0.64 C long-term global surface-average temperature rise predicted if nuclear power were replaced with coal-fired power plants without carbon sequestration. Fusion energy, if developed, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

  13. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2010-03-03

    Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to 12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ~30% by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. The risks of nuclear power should be compared with the risks of the estimated 0.64oC long-term global surface-average temperature rise predicted if nuclear power were replaced with coal-fired power plants without carbon sequestration. Fusion energy, if developed, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

  14. Ukrainian Nuclear Society International Conference 'Strategy of the nuclear power development: The choice of Ukraine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of the papers presented at the International Conference of the Ukrainian Nuclear Society 'Strategy of the nuclear power development'. The following problems are considered: present situation with the nuclear power and its safety; nuclear fuel cycle development; waste and spent nuclear fuel management; reactors' decommissioning issues; modernization of the NPP with WWER reactors; future reactors; economics of nuclear power; safety culture; legal and regulatory framework, state nuclear regulatory control; PR in nuclear power industry; staff training

  15. Nuclear power station and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental pollution has become a major problem of the present times. In addition to the pollution of air, water, noise and food, there is pollution by industries and factories. Nuclear power plant is the best option to meet the increasing demand for power and to make use of available uranium and thorium in the country. It is generally believed that nuclear power plants increase pollution and are hazardous and not safe. An attempt has been made to analyse these beliefs on a scientific basis. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs

  16. Nuclear energy products except the electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technically the fission reactors, on service or under construction, can produce other products than the electric power. Meanwhile, these applications are known since the beginning of the reactors exploitation, they never have been developed industrially. This report examines the necessary technical characteristics for using the nuclear systems on non electric power applications with an economical efficiency. What are the markets for these products? What are the strategical challenges to favor the development of non electric power applications of the nuclear energy? (A.L.B.)

  17. Trends in BWR transient analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While boiling water reactor (BWR) analysis methods for transient and loss of coolant accident analysis are well established, refinements and improvements continue to be made. This evolution of BWR analysis methods is driven by the new applications. This paper discusses some examples of these trends, specifically, time domain stability analysis and analysis of the simplified BWR (SBWR), General Electric's design approach involving a shift from active to passive safety systems and the elimination/simplification of systems for improved operation and maintenance

  18. Nuclear power development and nuclear data activities in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, research activities on nuclear power requirement carried out jointly by MINT and other organizations are described. Also discussed are activities on neutronics such as TRIGA reactor fuel management, storage pool criticality, and reactor fuel transfer cask calculations. In addition, recent work on radiation transport activities in MINT such as skyshine and photon phantom dose calculations using the MCNP and MRIPP computer codes are presented. Finally, nuclear data measurement works by researchers in Malaysian universities are described. (author)

  19. Nuclear power development and nuclear data activities in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gui Ah Auu [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research, Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, research activities on nuclear power requirement carried out jointly by MINT and other organizations are described. Also discussed are activities on neutronics such as TRIGA reactor fuel management, storage pool criticality, and reactor fuel transfer cask calculations. In addition, recent work on radiation transport activities in MINT such as skyshine and photon phantom dose calculations using the MCNP and MRIPP computer codes are presented. Finally, nuclear data measurement works by researchers in Malaysian universities are described. (author)

  20. Nuclear power reactors and hydrogen storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among conclusions and results come by, a nuclear-electric-hydrogen integrated power system was suggested as a way to prevent the energy crisis. It was shown that the hydrogen power system using nuclear power as a leading energy resource would hold an advantage in the current international situation as well as for the long-term future. Results reported provide designers of integrated nuclear-electric-hydrogen systems with computation models and routines which will allow them to explore the optimal solution in coupling power reactors to hydrogen producing systems, taking into account the specific characters of hydrogen storage systems. The models were meant for average computers of a type easily available in developing countries. (author)