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Sample records for bwr fuel rods

  1. Probabilistic analysis of PWR and BWR fuel rod performance using the code CASINO-SLEUTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, A.J.

    1987-05-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the Monte Carlo and response surface techniques used in the code, and a probabilistic analysis of fuel rod performance in PWR and BWR applications. The analysis shows that fission gas release predictions are very sensitive to changes in certain of the code's inputs, identifies the most dominant input parameters and compares their effects in the two cases.

  2. Comparison study of the thermal mechanical performance of fuel rods during BWR fuel preconditioning operations using the computer codes FUELSIM and FEMAXI-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R., E-mail: rafael.pantoja10@yahoo.com.m [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The safety of nuclear power plants requires monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behaviour under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, pre-conditioning simulations are necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod during any power ramp, and mainly during reactor startup, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with array 8 x 8, and the other one from a 10 x 10 fuel assembly design, and a comparison of the thermal-mechanical performance between the two different rod designs is performed. The performance simulations were performed by the code FUELSIM, and compared against results previously obtained from similar simulation with the code FEMAXI-V. (Author)

  3. MCTP, a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of a fuel rod of BWR type reactors (Neutron part); MCTP, un codigo para el analisis termo-mecanico de una barra combustible de reactores tipo BWR (Parte Neutronica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: hhl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of the fuel rods of the BWR type reactors of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde is developed. The code solves the diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates with several energy groups. The code, likewise, calculates the temperature distribution and power distribution in those fuel rods. The code is denominated Multi groups With Temperatures and Power (MCTP). In the code, the energy with which the fission neutrons are emitted it is divided in six groups. They are also considered the produced perturbations by the changes in the temperatures of the materials that constitute the fuel rods, the content of fission products, the uranium consumption and in its case the gadolinium, as well as the plutonium production. In this work there are present preliminary results obtained with the code, using data of operation of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  4. Thermomechanical analysis of a fuel rod in a BWR reactor using the FUELSIM code; Analisis termomecanico de una barra de combustible de un reactor BWR utilizando el codigo FUELSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Ortiz V, J.; Araiza M, E. [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: rapaca78@yahoo.com.mx

    2009-10-15

    The thermomechanical behaviour of a fuel rod exposed to irradiation is a complex process in which are coupled great quantity of interrelated physical-chemical phenomena, for that analysis of rod performance in the core of a nuclear power reactor is realized generally with computation codes that integrate several phenomena expected during the time life of fuel rod in the core. An application of this type of thermomechanical codes is to predict, inside certain reliability margin, the design parameters that would be required to adjust, in order to get a better economy or rod performance, for a systematic approach to the fuel design optimization. FUELSIM is a thermomechanical code based on the models of FRAPCON code, which was developed under auspice of Nuclear Regulatory Commission of USA. FUELSIM allows iterative calculations like part of its programming structure, allowing search of extreme cases of behaviour, probabilistic analysis (or statistical), parametric analysis (or sensibility) and also can include as entrance data to the uncertainties associated with production data, code parameters and associated models. In this work is reported a first analysis of thermomechanical performance of a typical fuel rod used in a BWR 5/6. Results of maximum temperatures are presented in the fuel center and of axial deformation, for the 10 axial nodes in that the active longitude of fuel rod was divided. (Author)

  5. Validation of the Monte Carlo model developed to estimate doses around the irradiated fuel pool produced by activated control rods discharged from a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abarca, Agustin; Gallardo, Sergio; Rodenas, Jose [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear], e-mail: ergalbe@iqn.upv.es

    2009-07-01

    BWR control rods are irradiated into the reactor by the neutron flux and consequently materials composing the rod become activated. When the control rods are withdrawn from the reactor, they must be stored into the spent fuel storage pool of the plant at a certain depth under water. Doses potentially received by plant workers in the area surrounding the pool edges as well as in a platform moving over the water surface should be calculated to assure the adequate protection. Irradiated fuel elements are stored at the bottom of the pool while controls rods are nearer the surface. Therefore, doses out of the pool are mainly produced by activated control rods. The MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method has been applied to model the pool containing hanger devices with irradiated control rods and to estimate dose rates at points of interest. To obtain dose rates on the pool and around it an F4MESH tally has been used. Furthermore, the SSW/SSR technique has been applied in order to strongly reduce the computer time. Results have been compared with measurements in plant in order to validate the model. An interesting application of the validated model is the assessment of doses when some variation is introduced in the distribution of activated material. (author)

  6. A comparison of crud phases appearing on some Swedish BWR fuel rods using Laser Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)]|[Lulea Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    Previous investigations showed that laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) can be used as a phase specific analytical tool for radioactive fuel crud samples and also for details in the underlying layer of zirconium dioxide. It is relatively easy to record Raman spectra that discriminate between chemical phases for all crud oxides of interest. The method has therefore been recommended for crud investigations within the Swedish program. At ideal conditions the resolution is about 1 {mu}m, permitting detailed position determination of crud phases in the sample. Therefore LRS is a very good complement to X-ray diffraction (XRD). The methods for sample preparation and handling of radioactive crud samples for LRS turn out to be relatively simple. A detailed LRS study on fuel crud samples from Barsebaeck 2, Forsmark 2, Forsmark 3 and Ringhals 1 was performed in this work. All of those Swedish BWRs were operated at different conditions at the time of sampling. The chemistry regimes covered NWC, HWC and other variable conditions. Also different types of fuel, exposure times and sampling positions were selected. (authors)

  7. Analysis of the behavior of irradiated BWR fuel rod in storage dry conditions; Analisis del comportamiento de una barra combustible irradiada BWR en condiciones de almacenamiento en seco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A.; Montes, D.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Munoz-Reja, C.

    2014-07-01

    In order to complete previous studies of creep on PWR sheath material, developed a joint experimental program by CSN, ENRESA and ENUSA about BWR (Zircaloy-2) sheath material. This program consisted in creep tests and then on the material under creep, compression testing diametral obtaining the permissible displacement of the sheath to break. (Author)

  8. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  9. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanical performance of fuel rods of a BWR during a power ramp using the FUELSIM code; Evaluacion del desempeno termomecanico de barras de combustible de un reactor BWR durante una rampa de potencia utilizando el codigo FUELSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R.

    2010-07-01

    To avoid the risk to environment due to release of radioactive material, because of occurrence of an accident, it is the priority of the design and performance of the diverse systems of safety of a commercial nuclear power plant. The safety of nuclear power plants requires, therefore, monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behavior under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. The main application of the thermal-mechanical analysis codes is the prediction of occurrence of conditions and/or phenomena that could lead to the deterioration or even mechanical failure of the fuel rod cladding, as, for example, the pellet-cladding interaction. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, fuel preconditioning operations refer to the operational procedures employed to reduce the fuel rod failure probability due to fuel-cladding interaction, specially during reactor startup. Preconditioning simulations are therefore necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR 5/6, as those two nuclear reactors in Laguna Verde, Veracruz, is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with an array 8 x 8

  10. Calculation of the linear heat generation rates which violate the thermomechanical limit of plastic deformation of the fuel cladding in function of the burn up of a BWR fuel rod type; Calculo de las razones de generacion de calor lineal que violen el limite termomecanico de deformacion plastica de la camisa en funcion del quemado de una barra combustible tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Hernandez L, H. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mal@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    The linear heat generation rates (LHGR) for a BWR type generic fuel rod, as function of the burnup that violate the thermomechanical limit of circumferential plastic deformation of the can (canning) in nominal operation in stationary state of the fuel rod are calculated. The evaluation of the LHGR in function of the burnt of the fuel, is carried out under the condition that the deformation values of the circumferential plastic deformation of the can exceeds in 0.1 the thermomechanical value operation limit of 1%. The results of the calculations are compared with the generation rates of linear operation heat in function of the burnt for this fuel rod type. The calculations are carried out with the FEMAXI-V and RODBURN codes. The results show that for exhibitions or burnt between 0 and 16,000 M Wd/tU a minimum margin of 160.8 W/cm exists among LHGR (439.6 W/cm) operation peak for the given fuel and maximum LHGR of the fuel (calculated) to reach 1.1% of circumferential plastic deformation of the can, for the peak factor of power of 1.40. For burnt of 20,000 MWd/tU and 60,000 MWd/tU exist a margin of 150.3 and 298.6 W/cm, respectively. (Author)

  11. SCORE-EVET: a computer code for the multidimensional transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear fuel rod arrays. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, R. L.; Lords, L. V.; Kiser, D. M.

    1978-02-01

    The SCORE-EVET code was developed to study multidimensional transient fluid flow in nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays. The conservation equations used were derived by volume averaging the transient compressible three-dimensional local continuum equations in Cartesian coordinates. No assumptions associated with subchannel flow have been incorporated into the derivation of the conservation equations. In addition to the three-dimensional fluid flow equations, the SCORE-EVET code ocntains: (a) a one-dimensional steady state solution scheme to initialize the flow field, (b) steady state and transient fuel rod conduction models, and (c) comprehensive correlation packages to describe fluid-to-fuel rod interfacial energy and momentum exchange. Velocity and pressure boundary conditions can be specified as a function of time and space to model reactor transient conditions such as a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or flow blockage.

  12. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew D. Hinds

    2001-10-17

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise.

  13. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, S. J.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Hu, J.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Trellue, H.; Vo, D.

    2016-10-01

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative-Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  14. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Tobin, S.J.; Favalli, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hu, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) (Sweden); Trellue, H.; Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-11

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 134}Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  15. High fidelity analysis of BWR fuel assembly with COBRA-TF/PARCS and trace codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abarca, A.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G., E-mail: aabarca@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, (ISIRYM/UPV), (Spain). Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety; Concejal, A.; Melara, J.; Albendea, M., E-mail: acbe@iberdrola.es, E-mail: jls@iberdrola.es, E-mail: manuel.albendea@iberdrola.es [Iberdrola, Madrid (Spain); Soler, A., E-mail: asoler@iberdrola.es [SEA Propulsion SL, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    The growing importance of detailed reactor core and fuel assembly description for light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the sub-channel safety analysis requires high fidelity models and coupled neutronic/thermalhydraulic codes. Hand in hand with advances in the computer technology, the nuclear safety analysis is beginning to use a more detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics. Previously, a PWR core and a 16 by 16 fuel assembly models were developed to test and validate our COBRA-TF/PARCS v2.7 (CTF/PARCS) coupled code. In this work, a comparison of the modeling and simulation advantages and disadvantages of modern 10 by 10 BWR fuel assembly with CTF/PARCS and TRACE codes has been done. The objective of the comparison is making known the main advantages of using the sub-channel codes to perform high resolution nuclear safety analysis. The sub-channel codes, like CTF, permits obtain accurate predictions, in two flow regime, of the thermalhydraulic parameters important to safety with high local resolution. The modeled BWR fuel assembly has 91 fuel rods (81 full length and 10 partial length fuel rods) and a big square central water rod. This assembly has been modeled with high level of detail with CTF code and using the BWR modeling parameters provided by TRACE. The same neutronic PARCS's model has been used for the simulation with both codes. To compare the codes a coupled steady state has be performed. (author)

  16. Estimation of dose rate around the spent control rods of a BWR; Estimacion de la rapidez de dosis alrededor de las barras de control gastadas de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancino P, G.

    2016-10-01

    The energy can come from fossil renewable sources (solar (natural gas, oil), wind, hydro, tidal, geothermal, biomass, bio energy and nuclear. Nuclear power can be obtained by fission reactions and fusion (still under investigation) atomic nuclei. Fission, is a partition of a very heavy nucleus (Uranium 235, for example) into two lighter nuclei. Much of the world's electric power is generated from the energy released by fission processes. In a nuclear power reactor, light water as the BWR, there are many important elements that allow safe driving operation, one of them are the elements or control systems, the burnable poison or neutron absorber inherently allow control power reactor. The control rods, which consist mostly of stainless steel and absorbing elements (such as boron carbide, hafnium, cadmium, among others) of thermal neutrons is able to initiate, regulate or stop the reactor power. These, due to the use of depleted burned or absorbing material and therefore reach their lifespan, which can be 15 years or have other values depending on the manufacturer. Control rods worn should be removed, stored or confined in expressly places. Precisely at this stage arises the importance of knowing their radiological condition to manipulate safely and without incident to the people health responsible for conducting these proceedings state arises. This thesis consists in the estimation of the dose rate in spent control rod made of boron carbide, from a typical BWR reactor. It will be estimated by direct radiation measurements with measurement equipment for radiotherapy ionization chamber, in six spent control rods, which were taken at different reactor operating cycles and are in a spent fuel pool. Using bracket electromechanical and electronic equipment for positioning and lifting equipment for radiation measurement around the control rod in the axial and radial arrangement for proper scanning. Finally will be presented a graphic corresponding to the dose

  17. Effect of nonuniform 3-D void distribution within BWR fuel assemblies on neutronic characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Toshikazu; Hyoudou, Hideaki; Kitada, Takanori [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering]. E-mail: takeda@nucl.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kosaka, Shinya; Ikeda, Hideaki [Tepco Systems Corp., Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: kisaka-shinya@tepsys.co.jp

    2003-07-01

    The effect of nonuniform distribution of void fractions within fuel assemblies of BWR cores on the neutronic characteristics has been evaluated by coupling the thermal hydraulic and neutronic calculations. It is found that the effect is large for assemblies with Gd rods because of the small void fraction for subchannels with Gd rods. The axially averaged K{sub {infinity}} is reduced by about 0.1 {approx} 0.3% {delta}k/k compared with the case with uniform void distribution. The power peaking is decreased by 0.6 {approx} 1.3%. The reason of these changes is discussed. (author)

  18. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Interfacial Bonding Efficiency Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF, also known as “used nuclear fuel” [UNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. Additional CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods; two specimens failed, and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 × 107 cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the SNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, eleven SNF rod segments from the Limerick BWR were tested using the ORNL CIRFT equipment; one test under static conditions and ten tests under dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at a maximum curvature of 4.0 m-1. The specimen did not show any sign of failure during three repeated loading cycles to a similar maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitudes varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of

  19. Behaviour of the reactivity for BWR fuel cells; Comportamiento de la reactividad para celdas de combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Delfin, A.; Vargas, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: galonso@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the behaviour of the reactivity of a fuel assembly type BWR was studied, the objective is to obtain some expressions that consider the average enrichment of U-235 and the gadolinium concentration like a function of the fuel cells burnt. Also, the applicability of the lineal reactivity model was analyzed for fuel cells type BWR. The analysis was carried out with the CASMO-4 code. (Author)

  20. Undermoderated spectrum MOX core study. Advanced fuel recycle by BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuyama, Shinichiro; Sakashita, Yoshiaki [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    The concept of BARS (BWR with Advanced Recycle System) is described. This system is to recycle fuel for breeding type BWR using spent fuel by the dry reprocessing. At present, it is studying about the high spectrum core cooling with light water, the dry reprocessing, Vibration Compaction fuel and so on. In the dry reprocessing method used oxide, RE and DF are one of the technical issues. In the case that DF is about 10, RE doesn`t influence a core behavior. According to improve the present process, the possibility lies in making DF from 5 to equal or more than 10 sufficiently. Here, the outline, the development situation of these studies and the prospect of BARS from ability are explained. (author)

  1. Analysis of Core Physics Experiments on Irradiated BWR MOX Fuel in REBUS Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Toru; Ando, Yoshihira [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Safety Standard Division, Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Yamato [Toshiba Corporation, Power System Company, Yokohama (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    As part of analyses of experimental data of a critical core containing a irradiated BWR MOX test bundle in the REBUS program, depletion calculations was performed for the BWR MOX fuel assemblies from that the MOX test rods were selected by using a general purpose neutronics code system SRAC. The core analyses were carried out using SRAC and a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP. The calculated k{sub eff}s were compared with those of the core containing a fresh MOX fuel bundle in the program. The SRAC-diffusion calculation underestimates k{sub eff}s of the both cores by 1.0 to 1.3 %dk and the k{sub eff}s of MVP are 1.001. The difference in k{sub eff} between the irradiated BWR MOX test bundle core and the fresh MOX one is 0.4 %dk in the SRAC-diffusion calculation and 0.0 %dk in the MVP calculation. The calculated fission rate distributions are in good agreement with the measurement in the SRAC-diffusion and MVP calculations. The calculated neutron flux distributions are also in good agreement with the measurement. The calculated burnup reactivity in the both calculations well reproduce the measurements. (authors)

  2. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  3. Transient and stability analysis of a BWR core with thorium-uranium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779 Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, DF (Mexico)], E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx; Francois, Juan-Luis [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec Mor. (Mexico)

    2008-08-15

    The kinetic response of a boiling water reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium as a nuclear material, in an integrated blanket-seed assembly, is presented in this work. Additionally an in-house code was developed to evaluate this core under steady state and transient conditions including a stability analysis. The code has two modules: (a) the time domain module for transient analysis and (b) the frequency domain module for stability analysis. The thermal-hydraulic process is modeled by a set of five equations, considering no homogeneous flow with drift-flux approximation and non-equilibrium thermodynamic. The neutronic process is calculated with a point kinetics model. Typical BWR reactivity effects are considered: void fraction, fuel temperature, moderator temperature and control rod density. Collapsed parameters were included in the code to represent the core using an average fuel channel. For the stability analysis, in the frequency domain, the transfer function is determined by applying Laplace-transforming to the calculated pressure drop perturbations in each of the considered regions where a constant total pressure drop was considered. The transfer function was used to study the system response in the frequency domain when an inlet flow perturbation is applied. The results show that the neutronic behavior of the core with thorium uranium fuel is similar to a UO{sub 2} core, even during transient conditions. The stability and transient analysis show that the thorium-uranium fuel can be operated safely in current BWRs.

  4. Fuel rod pressure in nuclear power reactors: Statistical evaluation of the fuel rod internal pressure in LWRs with application to lift-off probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelinek, Tomas

    2001-02-01

    In this thesis, a methodology for quantifying the risk of exceeding the Lift-off limit in nuclear light water power reactors is outlined. Due to fission gas release, the pressure in the gap between the fuel pellets and the cladding increases with burnup of the fuel. An increase in the fuel-clad gap due to clad creep would be expected to result in positive feedback, in the form of higher fuel temperatures, leading to more fission gas release, higher rod pressure, etc, until the cladding breaks. An increase in the fuel-clad gap that leads to this positive feedback is a phenomenon called Lift-off and is a limitation that must be considered in the fuel core management. Lift-off is a consequence of very high internal fuel rod pressure. The internal fuel rod pressure is therefore used as a Lift-off indicator. The internal fuel rod pressure is closely connected to the fission gas release into the fuel rod plenum and is thus used to increase the database. It is concluded that the dominating error source in the prediction of the pressure in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR), is the power history. There is a bias in the fuel pressure prediction that is dependent on the fuel rod position in the fuel assembly for BWRs. A methodology to quantify the risk of the fuel rod internal pressure exceeding a certain limit is developed; the risk is dependent of the pressure prediction and the fuel rod position. The methodology is based on statistical treatment of the discrepancies between predicted and measured fuel rod internal pressures. Finally, a methodology to estimate the Lift-off probability of the whole core is outlined.

  5. Safety analysis of thorium-based fuels in the General Electric Standard BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, M.J.; Townsend, D.B.; Kunz, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    A denatured (U-233/Th)O/sub 2/ fuel assembly has been designed which is energy equivalent to and hardware interchangeable with a modern boiling water reactor (BWR) reference reload assembly. Relative to the reference UO/sub 2/ fuel, the thorium fuel design shows better performance during normal and transient reactor operation for the BWR/6 product line and will meet or exceed current safety and licensing criteria. Power distributions are flattened and thermal operating margins are increased by reduced steam void reactivity coefficients caused by U-233. However, a (U-233/Th)O/sub 2/-fueled BWR will likely have reduced operating flexibility. A (U-235/Th)O/sub 2/-fueled BWR should perform similar to a UO/sub 2/-fueled BWR under all operating conditions. A (Pu/Th)O/sub 2/-fueled BWR may have reduced thermal margins and similar accident response and be less stable than a UO/sub 2/-fueled BWR. The assessment is based on comparisions of point model and infinite lattice predictions of various nuclear reactivity parameters, including void reactivity coefficients, Doppler reactivity coefficients, and control blade worths.

  6. Analysis of dose rates received around the storage pool for irradiated control rods in a BWR nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ródenas, J; Abarca, A; Gallardo, S

    2011-08-01

    BWR control rods are activated by neutron reactions in the reactor. The dose produced by this activity can affect workers in the area surrounding the storage pool, where activated rods are stored. Monte Carlo (MC) models for neutron activation and dose assessment around the storage pool have been developed and validated. In this work, the MC models are applied to verify the expected reduction of dose when the irradiated control rod is hanged in an inverted position into the pool. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radial power density distribution of MOX fuel rods in the IFA-651

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun; Joo, Hyung Kook; Cheon, Jin Sik; Oh, Je Yong; Sohn, Dong Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Two MOX fuel rods, which were fabricated in the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland in cooperation with Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, have been irradiated in the HBWR from June, 2000 in the framework of OECD-HRP together with a reference MOX fuel rod supplied by the BNFL. Since fuel temperature, which is influenced by radial power distribution, is basic in analyzing fuel behavior, it is required to consider radial power distribution in the HBWR. A subroutine FACTOR{sub H}BWR that calculates radial power density distribution for three MOX fuel rods has been developed based on neutron physics results and DEPRESS program. The developed subroutine FACTOR{sub H}BWR gives good agreement with the physics calculation except slight under-prediction at the outer part of the pellet above the burnup of 20 MWd/kgHM. The subroutine will be incorporated into a computer code COSMOS and used to analyze the in-reactor behavior of the three MOX fuel rods during the Halden irradiation test. 24 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  8. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W. (comp.)

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  9. Enhancing BWR proliferation resistance fuel with minor actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Gray S.

    2009-03-01

    To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced light water reactor- LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides ( 237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 238Pu/Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In the study, a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO 2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance in the intermediate-term goal for future nuclear energy systems. To account for the water coolant density variation from the bottom (0.76 g/cm 3) to the top (0.35 g/cm 3) of the core, the axial coolant channel and fuel pin were divided to 24 nodes. The MA transmutation characteristics at different elevations were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality discussed. The concept of MARA, which involves the use of transuranic nuclides ( 237Np and/or 241Am), significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in

  10. Study of transient rod extraction failure without RBM in a BWR; Estudio del transitorio error de extraccion de barra sin RBM en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: amhed_jvq@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The study and analysis of the operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-term events and the impact that would cause this transient. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could cause an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis results of the transient rod extraction failure in which not taken into operation the RBM is presented. The study was conducted for a BWR of 2027 MWt, in an intermediate cycle of its useful life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a scenario of anomalies was created in the core reactivity which gave a coherent prediction to the type of presented event. (Author)

  11. Implementation of a methodology to perform the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of the control rod drop in a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes F, M. del C.

    2015-07-01

    A methodology to perform uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the cross sections used in a Trace/PARCS coupled model for a control rod drop transient of a BWR-5 reactor was implemented with the neutronics code PARCS. A model of the nuclear reactor detailing all assemblies located in the core was developed. However, the thermohydraulic model designed in Trace was a simple model, where one channel representing all the types of assemblies located in the core, it was located inside a simple vessel model and boundary conditions were established. The thermohydraulic model was coupled with the neutronics model, first for the steady state and then a Control Rod Drop (CRD) transient was performed, in order to carry out the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. To perform the analysis of the cross sections used in the Trace/PARCS coupled model during the transient, Probability Density Functions (PDFs) were generated for the 22 parameters cross sections selected from the neutronics parameters that PARCS requires, thus obtaining 100 different cases for the Trace/PARCS coupled model, each with a database of different cross sections. All these cases were executed with the coupled model, therefore obtaining 100 different outputs for the CRD transient with special emphasis on 4 responses per output: 1) The reactivity, 2) the percentage of rated power, 3) the average fuel temperature and 4) the average coolant density. For each response during the transient an uncertainty analysis was performed in which the corresponding uncertainty bands were generated. With this analysis it is possible to observe the results ranges of the responses chose by varying the uncertainty parameters selected. This is very useful and important for maintaining the safety in the nuclear power plants, also to verify if the uncertainty band is within of safety margins. The sensitivity analysis complements the uncertainty analysis identifying the parameter or parameters with the most influence on the

  12. Nuclear fuel activity with minor actinides after their useful life in a BWR; Actividad del combustible nuclear con actinidos menores despues de su vida util en un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: eduardo.martinez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Nuclear fuel used in nuclear power reactors has a life cycle, in which it provides energy, at the end of this cycle is withdrawn from the reactor core. This used fuel is known as spent nuclear fuel, a strong problem with this fuel is that when the fuel was irradiated in a nuclear reactor it leaves with an activity of approximately 1.229 x 10{sup 15} Bq. The aim of the transmutation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel is to reduce the activity of high level waste that must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high level waste; these two achievements would reduce the number of necessary repositories, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is aimed at evaluating the activity of a nuclear fuel in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material, first establishing a reference of actinides production in the standard nuclear fuel of uranium at end of its burning in a BWR, and a fuel rod design containing 6% of actinides in an uranium matrix from the enrichment tails is proposed, then 4 standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by 4 actinide bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of the same, finally the reduction of actinide activity in the fuel is evaluated. (Author)

  13. Fuel rod under power oscillations; calculations with the ENIGMA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranta-Puska, Kari

    1999-05-15

    Power oscillations in a BWR may result from a series of events starting from a re-circulation pump trip or can be initiated during start-up at low-flow conditions by other perturbations. Whole core and regional oscillations have been observed. Severe consequences may be anticipated if the instability diverges and the reactor protection system fails (no scram) in all phases of the incident (ATWS). Power peaks higher than ten times of the pre-transient power level have been speculated to appear. Low-magnitude oscillations have been observed at the TVO plant, Olkiluoto 1987, and at the Lasalle-2 plant, 1988, and in other BWRs world-wide. Typically, a boiling water reactor has an unstable operational point at low flow and high power conditions. The physical phenomenon behind the instability is density wave oscillations leading to boiling boundary oscillations and void fraction fluctuations across the heated channel. These in turn, make the fission power vary. The typical frequency of the oscillations seems to be of the order of 0.5 Hz, and thus the power peak for a fuel rod is considerably wider than a RIA-pulse, for instance. Large oscillations can result in elevated fuel temperatures, accelerated fission gas release and additional internal loads on the cladding. These effects may be more severe for a high burnup rod with a large fission gas inventory and a closed gap. Therefore, an experiment has been proposed to be conducted at Halden reactor for simulating the fuel rod response under power oscillations. As there is lack of knowledge also on the relevant boundary conditions, pre-calculations with various input options have been performed and are further suggested. Calculations with FRAPTRAN code have shown the importance of the cladding-coolant heat transfer to the fuel temperature. The applicability of the ENIGMA code to this kind of transients was confirmed. To support the planning of the proposed Halden test, estimates on fuel and cladding temperatures as well as

  14. Thermal performance of nuclear fuel rod with a Jacobian elliptic cross sectional form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Joao B. de; Tu, Carlos C.C.; Abe, Luciano [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Sistemas Mecanicos], e-mail: jbaguiar@usp.br, e-mail: carlcctu@usp.br, e-mail: Luciano.abe@poli.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    Boiling water reactors, BWR, commercially use fuel rods with a circular cross section. Set the operational conditions as well as the distribution of these rods, a specific power is established. Changing this form while conserving the cross sectional area may deliver a better performance. This fact is investigated here for a family of elliptic forms, in a thermal sense, using the finite element method. Two limiting values are considered: the melting temperature of the fuel and the critical flux rate. For 2 d models, gains of the order of twenty percent in performance are estimated. It is also perceived the advantage of this alteration in other form of reactor, and discussed means of addressing other aspects of the problem. (author)

  15. Estimation of the coolant flow through a natural circulation BWR fuel channel applying and equivalent electrical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, DEPFI, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Campus Morelos en IMTA, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: julfi_ig@yahoo.com.m [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    This work presents the design and implementation of an advanced controller for a reduced order model of a BWR reactor core cooled by natural circulating water, which allows real time estimates of coolant flows through fuel assemblies about standard neutron flux strings. Nuclear power plants with boiling water reactors control individual fuel assembly coolant flows by forced circulation using external or internal water pumps and different core support plate orifices. These two elements reduce flow dependency on local channel pressure drops. In BWR reactors using only natural circulation coolant flows, these two elements are not available and therefore individual channel coolant flows are highly dependent in local conditions, such as power distributions and local pressure drops. Therefore it is expected that grater uncertainties in these variables be used during safety, fuel management and other analysis, which in turns may lead to increased operation penalties, such as tighter operating limits. The objective of this work is to asses by computer simulations means to reduce uncertainties in the measurement of fuel assembly coolant flows and eventually the associated penalties. During coolant phase transitions, pressure drops and local power may alter local natural circulation through fuel assemblies and flow estimates can be helped or not by control rod moves. This work presents the construction of an optimal controller for a core flow estimator based on a reduced order model of the coolant going though the reactor vessel components and nuclear core. This model is to be driven by plant signals from standard BWR instrumentation in order to estimate the coolant flows in selected fuel assemblies about a LPRM string. For this purpose an equivalent electrical model has been mathematically developed and numerically tested. The power-flow maps of typical BRW are used as steady state references for this equivalent model. Once these were fully reproduced for steady state

  16. 1D and 3D analyses of the Zy2 SCIP BWR ramp tests with the fuel codes METEOR and ALCYONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sercombe, J.; Agard, M.; Stuzik, C.; Michel, B.; Thouvenin, G.; Poussard, C.; Kallstrom, K. R. [CEA, Saint-Paul-lez Durance (France)

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, three power ramp tests performed on high burn-up Recrystallized Zircaloy2 - UO{sub 2} BWR fuel rods (56 to 63 MWd/kgU) within the SCIP project have been simulated with METEOR and ALCYONE 3D. Two of the ramp tests are of staircase type up to Linear Heat Rates of 420 and 520 W/cm and with long holding periods. Failure of the 420 W/cm fuel rod was observed after 40 minutes. The third ramp test consists in a more standard ramp test with a constant power rate of 80 W/cm/min till 410 W/cm and a short holding time. The tests were first simulated with the METEOR 1D fuel rod code leading accurate results in terms of profilometry and fission gas releases. The behaviour of a fuel pellet fragment and of the cladding piece on top of it was then investigated with ALCYONE 3D. The size and the main characteristics of the ridges after base irradiation and power ramp testing were recovered. Finally, the failure criteria validated for PWR conditions and fuel rods with low to medium burn ups were used to analyze the failure probability of the KKL rodlets during ramp testing.

  17. Design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel for BWR reactors; Diseno y optimizacion axial de combustible nuclear para reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia V, M.A

    2006-07-01

    In the present thesis, the modifications made to the axial optimization system based on Tabu Search (BT) for the axial design of BWR fuel type are presented, developed previously in the Nuclear Engineering Group of the UNAM Engineering Faculty. With the modifications what is mainly looked is to consider the particular characteristics of the mechanical design of the GE12 fuel type, used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central (CNLV) and that it considers the fuel bars of partial longitude. The information obtained in this thesis will allow to plan nuclear fuel reloads with the best conditions to operate in a certain cycle guaranteeing a better yield and use in the fuel burnt, additionally people in charge in the reload planning will be favored with the changes carried out to the system for the design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel, which facilitate their handling and it reduces their execution time. This thesis this developed in five chapters that are understood in the following way in general: Chapter 1: It approaches the basic concepts of the nuclear energy, it describes the physical and chemical composition of the atoms as well as that of the uranium isotopes, the handling of the uranium isotope by means of the nuclear fission until arriving to the operation of the nuclear reactors. Chapter 2: The nuclear fuel cycle is described, the methods for its extraction, its conversion and its enrichment to arrive to the stages of the nuclear fuel management used in the reactors are described. Beginning by the radial design, the axial design and the core design of the nuclear reactor related with the fuel assemblies design. Chapter 3: the optimization methods of nuclear fuel previously used are exposed among those that are: the genetic algorithms method, the search methods based on heuristic rules and the application of the tabu search method, which was used for the development of this thesis. Chapter 4: In this part the used methodology to the

  18. Extended Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowman, Stephen M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauld, Ian C [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Martinez, J. S. [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-01-01

    [Full Text] Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase investigates the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used for spent fuel pools to spent fuel storage and transportation casks and the validation of reactivity (keff) calculations and depleted fuel compositions. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents work performed to date, investigating some aspects of extended BUC, and it also describes the plan to complete the evaluations. The technical basis for application of peak reactivity methods to BWR fuel in storage and transportation systems is presented in a companion paper. Two reactor operating parameters are being evaluated to establish an adequate basis for extended BWR BUC, including investigation of the axial void profile effect and the effect of control blade utilization during operation. A detailed analysis of core simulator data for one cycle of an operating BWR plant was performed to determine the range of void profiles and the variability of the profile experienced during irradiation. While a single cycle does not provide complete data, the data obtained are sufficient to use to determine the primary effects and identify conservative modeling approaches. Using data resulting from a single cycle, the axial void profile is studied by first determining the temporal fidelity necessary in depletion modeling, and then using multiple void profiles to examine the effect of the void profile on cask reactivity. The results of these studies are being used to develop recommendations for conservatively modeling the void profile effects for BWR depletion calculations. The second operational parameter studied is control blade exposure. Control blades

  19. Fuel performance annual report for 1981. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.; Tokar, M.

    1982-12-01

    This annual report, the fourth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1981 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel problems, fuel design changes and fuel surveillance programs, and high-burnup fuel experience are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included.

  20. Estimation of the activity generated by neutron activation in control rods of a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenas, Jose [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jrodenas@iqn.upv.es; Gallardo, Sergio; Abarca, Agustin; Juan, Violeta [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Control rods are activated by neutron reactions into the reactor. The activation is produced mainly in stainless steel and its impurities. The dose produced by this activity is not important inside the reactor, but it has to be taken into account when the rod is withdrawn from the reactor. Activation reactions produced have been modelled by the MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method. The code gives the number of reactions that can be converted into activity.

  1. Evaluation of the radial design of fuel cells in an operation cycle of a BWR reactor; Evaluacion del diseno radial de celdas de combustible en un ciclo de operacion de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez C, J.; Martin del Campo M, C. [Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jgco@ver.megared.net.mx

    2003-07-01

    This work is continuation of one previous in the one that the application of the optimization technique called Tabu search to the radial design of fuel cells of boiling water reactors (BWR, Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The objective function used in the optimization process only include neutron parameters (k-infinite and peak of radial power) considering the cell at infinite media. It was obtained to reduce the cell average enrichment completing the characteristics of reactivity of an original cell. The objective of the present work is to validate the objective function that was used for the radial design of the fuel cell (test cell), analyzing the operation of a one cycle of the reactor in which fuels have been fresh recharged that contain an axial area with the nuclear database of the cell designed instead of the original cell. For it is simulated it with Cm-Presto the cycle 10 of the reactor operation of the Unit 1 of the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (U1-CNLV). For the cycle evaluation its were applied so much the simulation with the Haling strategy, as the simulation of the one cycle with control rod patterns and they were evaluated the energy generation and several power limits and reactivity that are used as design parameters in fuel reloads of BWR reactors. The results at level of an operation cycle of the reactor, show that the objective function used in the optimization and radial design of the cell is adequate and that it can induce to one good use of the fuel. (Author)

  2. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: The DF-4 BWR Damaged Fuel experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tautges, T.J.

    1993-10-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC, that models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRs. As a part of an ongoing assessment, program, MELCOR has been used to model the ACRR in-pile DF-4 Damaged Fuel experiment. DF-4 provided data for early phase melt progression in BWR fuel assemblies, particularly for phenomena associated with eutectic interactions in the BWR control blade and zircaloy oxidation in the canister and cladding. MELCOR provided good agreement with experimental data in the key areas of eutectic material behavior and canister and cladding oxidation. Several shortcomings associated with the MELCOR modeling of BWR geometries were found and corrected. Twenty-five sensitivity studies were performed on COR, HS and CVH parameters. These studies showed that the new MELCOR eutectics model played an important role in predicting control blade behavior. These studies revealed slight time step dependence and no machine dependencies. Comparisons made with the results from four best-estimate codes showed that MELCOR did as well as these codes in matching DF-4 experimental data.

  3. Development of a scatter search optimization algorithm for BWR fuel lattice design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, J.L.; Martin-del-Campo, C. [Mexico Univ. Nacional Autonoma, Facultad de Ingenieria (Mexico); Morales, L.B.; Palomera, M.A. [Mexico Univ. Nacional Autonoma, Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    A basic Scatter Search (SS) method, applied to the optimization of radial enrichment and gadolinia distributions for BWR fuel lattices, is presented in this paper. Scatter search is considered as an evolutionary algorithm that constructs solutions by combining others. The goal of this methodology is to enable the implementation of solution procedures that can derive new solutions from combined elements. The main mechanism for combining solutions is such that a new solution is created from the strategic combination of two other solutions to explore the solutions' space. Results show that the Scatter Search method is an efficient optimization algorithm applied to the BWR design and optimization problem. Its main features are based on the use of heuristic rules since the beginning of the process, which allows directing the optimization process to the solution, and to use the diversity mechanism in the combination operator, which allows covering the search space in an efficient way. (authors)

  4. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mertyurek, Ugur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    utilized or referenced, justification has been provided as to why the data can be utilized for BWR fuel.

  5. Dependence of control rod worth on fuel burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savva, P., E-mail: savvapan@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Varvayanni, M., E-mail: melina@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Catsaros, N., E-mail: nicos@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: Diffusion and MC calculations for rod worth dependence on burnup and Xe in reactors. One-step rod withdrawal/insertion are used for rod worth estimation. The study showed that when Xe is present the rods worth is significantly reduced. Rod worth variation with burnup depends on rod position in core. Rod worth obtained with MC code is higher than that obtained from deterministic. - Abstract: One important parameter in the design and the analysis of a nuclear reactor core is the reactivity worth of the control rods, i.e. their efficiency to absorb excess reactivity. The control rod worth is affected by parameters such as the fuel burnup in the rod vicinity, the Xe concentration in the core, the operational time of the rod and its position in the core. In the present work, two different computational approaches, a deterministic and a stochastic one, were used for the determination of the rods worth dependence on the fuel burnup level and the Xe concentration level in a conceptual, symmetric reactor core, based on the MTR fuel assemblies used in the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1). For the deterministic approach the neutronics code system composed by the SCALE modules NITAWL and XSDRN and the diffusion code CITATION was used, while for the stochastic one the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI was applied. The study showed that when Xe is present in the core, the rods worth is significantly reduced, while the rod worth variation with increasing burnup depends on the rods position in the core grid. The rod worth obtained with the use of the Monte Carlo code is higher than the one obtained from the deterministic code.

  6. Axial profiles of burned and fraction of holes for calculations of criticality with credit for BWR fuel burning; Perfiles axiales de quemado y fraccion de huecos para calculos de criticidad con credito al quemado para combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casado Sanchez, C.; Rubio Oviedo, P.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a method to define surround profiles of burning and fraction of holes suited for use in applications of credit to burning of BWR fuel from results obtained with the module STARBUCS of SCALE. (Author)

  7. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  8. Design study of Thorium-232 and Protactinium-231 based fuel for long life BWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trianti, N.; Su'ud, Z.; Riyana, E. S.

    2012-06-01

    A preliminary design study for the utilization of thorium added with 231Pa based fuel on BWR type reactor has been performed. In the previous research utilization of fuel based Thorium-232 and Uranium-233 show 10 years operation time with maximum excess-reactivity about 4.075% dk/k. To increase reactor operation time and reduce excess-reactivity below 1% dk/k, Protactinium (Pa-231) is used as Burnable Poison. Protactinium-231 has very interesting neutronic properties, which enable the core to reduce initial excess-reactivity and simultaneously increase production of 233U to 231Pa in burn-up process. Optimizations of the content of 231Pa in the core enables the BWR core to sustain long period of operation time with reasonable burn-up reactivity swing. Based on the optimization of fuel element composition (Th and Pa) in various moderation ratio we can get reactor core with longer operation time, 20 ˜ 30 years operation without fuel shuffling or refuelling, with average power densities maximum of about 35 watt/cc, and maximum excess-reactivity 0.56% dk/k.

  9. Single- and Two-Phase Turbulent Mixing Rate between Subchannels in Triangle Tight Lattice Rod Bundle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KAWAHARA, Akimaro; SADATOMI, Michio; KUDO, Hiroyuki; KANO, Keiko

    2006-01-01

    In order to obtain the data on turbulent mixing rate between triangle tight lattice subchannels, which will be adopted as the next generation BWR fuel rod bundle, adiabatic experiments were conducted...

  10. Design and optimization of a fuel reload of BWR with plutonium and minor actinides; Diseno y optimizacion de una recarga de combustible de BWR con plutonio y actinidos menores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman A, J. R.; Francois L, J. L.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Palomera P, M. A. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos 62550 (Mexico)]. e-mail: maestro_juan_rafael@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In this work is designed and optimized a pattern of fuel reload of a boiling water reactor (BWR), whose fuel is compound of uranium coming from the enrichment lines, plutonium and minor actinides (neptunium, americium, curium); obtained of the spent fuel recycling of reactors type BWR. This work is divided in two stages: in the first stage a reload pattern designs with and equilibrium cycle is reached, where the reload lot is invariant cycle to cycle. This reload pattern is gotten adjusting the plutonium content of the assembly for to reach the length of the wished cycle. Furthermore, it is necessary to increase the concentration of boron-10 in the control rods and to introduce gadolinium in some fuel rods of the assembly, in order to satisfy the margin approach of out. Some reactor parameters are presented: the axial profile of power average of the reactor core, and the axial and radial distribution of the fraction of holes, for the one reload pattern in balance. For the design of reload pattern codes HELIOS and CM-PRESTO are used. In the second stage an optimization technique based on genetic algorithms is used, along with certain obtained heuristic rules of the engineer experience, with the intention of optimizing the reload pattern obtained in the first stage. The objective function looks for to maximize the length of the reactor cycle, at the same time as that they are satisfied their limits related to the power and the reactor reactivity. Certain heuristic rules are applied in order to satisfy the recommendations of the fuel management: the strategy of the control cells core, the strategy of reload pattern of low leakage, and the symmetry of a quarter of nucleus. For the evaluation of the parameters that take part in the objective function it simulates the reactor using code CM-PRESTO. Using the technique of optimization of the genetic algorithms an energy of the cycle of 10834.5 MW d/tHM is obtained, which represents 5.5% of extra energy with respect to the

  11. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, October 1977--September 1978. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1978-10-01

    This quarterly/annual report reviews and summarizes the activities performed in support of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP) during Fiscal Year 1978 with emphasis on those activities that transpired during the quarter ending September 30, 1978. Significant progress has been made in achieving the primary objectives of the program, i.e., to demonstrate commercially viable fuel concepts with improved fuel - cladding interaction (FCI) behavior. This includes out-of-reactor experiments to support the fuel concepts being evaluated, initiation of instrumented test rod experiments in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), and fabrication of the first series of demonstration rods for irradiation in the Big Rock Point Reactor (BRPR).

  12. Development of a new bench for puncturing of irradiated fuel rods in STAR hot laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitprez, B.; Silvestre, P.; Valenza, P.; Boulore, A.; David, T.

    2018-01-01

    A new device for puncturing of irradiated fuel rods in commercial power plants has been designed by Fuel Research Department of CEA Cadarache in order to provide experimental data of high precision on fuel pins with various designs. It will replace the current set-up that has been used since 1998 in hot cell 2 of STAR facility with more than 200 rod puncturing experiments. Based on this consistent experimental feedback, the heavy-duty technique of rod perforation by clad punching has been preserved for the new bench. The method of double expansion of rod gases is also retained since it allows upgrading the confidence interval of volumetric results obtained from rod puncturing. Furthermore, many evolutions have been introduced in the new design in order to improve its reliability, to make the maintenance easier by remote handling and to reduce experimental uncertainties. Tightness components have been studied with Sealing Laboratory Maestral at Pierrelatte so as to make them able to work under mixed pressure conditions (from vacuum at 10-5 mbar up to pressure at 50 bars) and to lengthen their lifetime under permanent gamma irradiation in hot cell. Bench ergonomics has been optimized to make its operating by remote handling easier and to secure the critical phases of a puncturing experiment. A high pressure gas line equipped with high precision pressure sensors out of cell can be connected to the bench in cell for calibration purposes. Uncertainty analyses using Monte Carlo calculations have been performed in order to optimize capacity of the different volumes of the apparatus according to volumetric characteristics of the rod to be punctured. At last this device is composed of independent modules which allow puncturing fuel pins out of different geometries (PWR, BWR, VVER). After leak tests of the device and remote handling simulation in a mock-up cell, several punctures of calibrated specimens have been performed in 2016. The bench will be implemented soon in hot

  13. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, April--September 1977. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1977-11-01

    The Fuel Performance Improvement Program has as its objective the identification and demonstration of fuel concepts with improved power ramp performance. The program contains a combination of out-of-reactor studies, in-reactor experiments and in-reactor demonstrations. Fuel concepts initially being considered include annular pellets, cladding internally coated with graphite and packed-particle fuels. The performance capability of each concept will be compared to a reference fuel of contemporary pellet design by irradiations in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor. Fuel design and process development is being completed and fuel rod fabrication will begin for the Halden test rods and for the first series of in-reactor demonstrations. The in-reactor demonstrations are being performed in the Big Rock Point reactor to show that the concepts pose no undue risk to commercial operation.

  14. Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Bobby R.; Tracy, Donald B.; Griffiths, Vernon

    1991-01-01

    Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is consumable with the fuel rod, and in another embodiment, part of the mold can be re-used. Several molds can be arranged together in a cascaded manner, if desired, or several long cavities can be integrated in a monolithic multiple cavity re-usable mold.

  15. On Cherenkov light production by irradiated nuclear fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branger, E.; Grape, S.; Jacobsson Svärd, S.; Jansson, P.; Andersson Sundén, E.

    2017-06-01

    Safeguards verification of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage is frequently done by measuring the Cherenkov light in the surrounding water produced due to radioactive decays of fission products in the fuel. This paper accounts for the physical processes behind the Cherenkov light production caused by a single fuel rod in wet storage, and simulations are presented that investigate to what extent various properties of the rod affect the Cherenkov light production. The results show that the fuel properties have a noticeable effect on the Cherenkov light production, and thus that the prediction models for Cherenkov light production which are used in the safeguards verifications could potentially be improved by considering these properties. It is concluded that the dominating source of the Cherenkov light is gamma-ray interactions with electrons in the surrounding water. Electrons created from beta decay may also exit the fuel and produce Cherenkov light, and e.g. Y-90 was identified as a possible contributor to significant levels of the measurable Cherenkov light in long-cooled fuel. The results also show that the cylindrical, elongated fuel rod geometry results in a non-isotropic Cherenkov light production, and the light component parallel to the rod's axis exhibits a dependence on gamma-ray energy that differs from the total intensity, which is of importance since the typical safeguards measurement situation observes the vertical light component. It is also concluded that the radial distributions of the radiation sources in a fuel rod will affect the Cherenkov light production.

  16. Evaluation of the reduction of boron-10 in the control rods in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central, through steady state calculations; Evaluacion de la reduccion del Boro-10 en las barras de control en los BWR de la CLV, mediante calculos en estado estacionario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes T, J.L.; Perusquia, R.; Hernandez, J.L.; Ramirez S, J.R. [Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    One of the more important aspects related with the safety and economy in the operation of a nuclear power reactor, it is without a doubt the control of the reactivity. During the normal operation of a reactor of boiling water (BWR-Boiling Water Reactor), the control of the reactivity in the nucleus it is strongly determined by the efficiency of the control rods. In the case of the Laguna Verde Nuclear power station (CNLV) the nucleus of the reactors has 109 control rods grouped in 4 sets. The CNLV at the moment uses the CCC method (Control Cell Core) in the design of the cycle. With this method only the A2 group is used for the control of the reactivity at full power. With the purpose of quantifying the effect of the decrease of the burnable poison (B{sub 4}C) of the control rods and in particular to the effect due to the postulated lost of 10% of Boron 10, it was carried out a series of calculations of the nucleus in stationary state by means of the system of HELIOS/CM-PRESTO codes. In this work the main derived results of these 3D simulations(three dimensions) of the reactors of the CNLV are presented. It was analyzed the one behavior of the infinite neutron multiplication factor (K{sub infinite}), at fuel assemble cell level used in an equilibrium cycle for the CNLV. It was also analyzed the effect in the shutdown margin (ShutDown Margin- SDM) in cold condition CZP (Cold Zero Power). Its are also included those results of the ARI cases (All Rods In) and SRO (Strong Rod Out). From the cases in condition HFP (Hot Full Power) the behavior of the effective multiplication factor (K{sub eff}) is presented. (Author)

  17. Optimization of fuel reloads for a BWR using the ant colony system; Optimizacion de recargas de combustible para un BWR usando el sistema de colonia de hormigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel E, J. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Ingenieria, Cerro de Coatepec s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 50110 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ortiz S, J. J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: jaime.es.jaime@gmail.com

    2009-10-15

    In this work some results obtained during the development of optimization systems are presented, which are employees for the fuel reload design in a BWR. The systems use the ant colony optimization technique. As first instance, a system is developed that was adapted at travel salesman problem applied for the 32 state capitals of Mexican Republic. The purpose of this implementation is that a similarity exists with the design of fuel reload, since the two problems are of combinatorial optimization with decision variables that have similarity between both. The system was coupled to simulator SIMULATE-3, obtaining good results when being applied to an operation cycle in equilibrium for reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  18. Impact of modeling Choices on Inventory and In-Cask Criticality Calculations for Forsmark 3 BWR Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S. [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Ade, Brian J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowman, Stephen M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauld, Ian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Marshall, William BJ J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Simulation of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel depletion poses a challenge for nuclide inventory validation and nuclear criticality safety analyses. This challenge is due to the complex operating conditions and assembly design heterogeneities that characterize these nuclear systems. Fuel depletion simulations and in-cask criticality calculations are affected by (1) completeness of design information, (2) variability of operating conditions needed for modeling purposes, and (3) possible modeling choices. These effects must be identified, quantified, and ranked according to their significance. This paper presents an investigation of BWR fuel depletion using a complete set of actual design specifications and detailed operational data available for five operating cycles of the Swedish BWR Forsmark 3 reactor. The data includes detailed axial profiles of power, burnup, and void fraction in a very fine temporal mesh for a GE14 (10×10) fuel assembly. The specifications of this case can be used to assess the impacts of different modeling choices on inventory prediction and in-cask criticality, specifically regarding the key parameters that drive inventory and reactivity throughout fuel burnup. This study focused on the effects of the fidelity with which power history and void fraction distributions are modeled. The corresponding sensitivity of the reactivity in storage configurations is assessed, and the impacts of modeling choices on decay heat and inventory are addressed.

  19. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  20. Development of a fuzzy logic method to build objective functions in optimization problems: application to BWR fuel lattice design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-del-Campo, C.; Francois, J.L.; Barragan, A.M. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Facultad de Ingenieria (Mexico); Palomera, M.A. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistema, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we develop a methodology based on the use of the Fuzzy Logic technique to build multi-objective functions to be used in optimization processes applied to in-core nuclear fuel management. As an example, we selected the problem of determining optimal radial fuel enrichment and gadolinia distributions in a typical 'Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)' fuel lattice. The methodology is based on the use of the mathematical capability of Fuzzy Logic to model nonlinear functions of arbitrary complexity. The utility of Fuzzy Logic is to map an input space into an output space, and the primary mechanism for doing this is a list of if-then statements called rules. The rules refer to variables and adjectives that describe those variables and, the Fuzzy Logic technique interprets the values in the input vectors and, based on the set of rules assigns values to the output vector. The methodology was developed for the radial optimization of a BWR lattice where the optimization algorithm employed is Tabu Search. The global objective is to find the optimal distribution of enrichments and burnable poison concentrations in a 10*10 BWR lattice. In order to do that, a fuzzy control inference system was developed using the Fuzzy Logic Toolbox of Matlab and it has been linked to the Tabu Search optimization process. Results show that Tabu Search combined with Fuzzy Logic performs very well, obtaining lattices with optimal fuel utilization. (authors)

  1. Estimation and control in HTGR fuel rod fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, D J; Bailey, M J

    1980-01-01

    A control algorithm has been derived for a HTGR Fuel Rod Fabrication Process utilizing the method of Box and Jenkins. The estimator is a Kalman filter and is compared with a Least Square estimator and a standard control chart. The effects of system delays are presented.

  2. FY15 Status Report: CIRFT Testing of Spent Nuclear Fuel Rods from Boiler Water Reactor Limerick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of used nuclear fuel (UNF, also known as spent nuclear fuel [SNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. The additional CIRFT was conducted on three HBR rods (R3, R4, and R5) in which two specimens failed and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 10⁷ cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR UNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the UNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum of tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, ten SNF rod segments from BWR Limerick were tested using ORNL CIRFT, with one under static and nine dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at maximum curvature 4.0 m⁻¹. The specimen did not show any sign of failure in three repeated loading cycles to almost same maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitude varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of the tested rod specimens. The cycles to failure were

  3. Carbon 14 distribution in irradiated BWR fuel cladding and released carbon 14 after aqueous immersion of 6.5 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuragi, T. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tsukishima 1-15-7, Chuo City, Tokyo, 104-0052 (Japan); Yamashita, Y.; Akagi, M.; Takahashi, R. [TOSHIBA Corporation, Ukishima Cho 4-1, Kawasaki Ward, Kawasaki, 210-0862 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Spent fuel cladding which is highly activated and strongly contaminated is expected to be disposed of in an underground repository. A typical activation product in the activated metal waste is carbon 14 ({sup 14}C), which is mainly generated by the {sup 14}N(n,p){sup 14}C reaction and produces a significant exposure dose due to the large inventory, long half-life (5730 years), rapid release rate, and the speciation and consequent migration parameters. In the preliminary Japanese safety case, the release of radionuclides from the metal matrix is regarded as the corrosion-related congruent release, and the cladding oxide layer is regarded as a source of instant release fraction (IRF). In the present work, specific activity of {sup 14}C was measured using an irradiated BWR fuel cladding (Zircaloy-2, average rod burnup of 41.6 GWd/tU) which has an external oxide film having a thickness of 25.3 μm. The {sup 14}C specific activity of the base metal was 1.49*10{sup 4} Bq/g, which in the corresponding burnup is comparable to values in the existing literature, which were obtained from various irradiated claddings. Although the specific activity in oxide was 2.8 times the base metal activity due to the additive generation by the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction, the {sup 14}C abundance in oxide was less than 10% of total inventory. A static leaching test using the cladding tube was carried out in an air-tight vessel filled with a deoxygenated dilute NaOH solution (pH of 12.5) at room temperature. After 6.5 years, {sup 14}C was found in each leachate fraction of gas phase and dissolved organics and inorganics, the total of which was less than 0.01% of the {sup 14}C inventory of the immersed cladding tube. A simple calculation based on the congruent release with Zircaloy corrosion has suggested that the 96.7% of released {sup 14}C was from the external oxide layer and 3.3% was from the base Zircaloy metal. However, both the {sup 14}C abundance and the low leaching rate

  4. Artificial intelligence applied to fuel management in BWR type reactors; Inteligencia artificial aplicada a la administracion de combustible en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J

    1998-10-01

    In this work two techniques of artificial intelligence, neural networks and genetic algorithms were applied to a practical problem of nuclear fuel management; the determination of the optimal fuel reload for a BWR type reactor. This is an important problem in the design of the operation cycle of the reactor. As a result of the application of these techniques, comparable or even better reloads proposals than those given by expert companies in the subject were obtained. Additionally, two other simpler problems in reactor physics were solved: the determination of the axial power profile and the prediction of the value of some variables of interest at the end of the operation cycle of the reactor. Neural networks and genetic algorithms have been applied to solve many problems of engineering because of their versatility but they have been rarely used in the area of fuel management. The results obtained in this thesis indicates the convenience of undertaking further work on this area and suggest the application of these techniques of artificial intelligence to the solution of other problems in nuclear reactor physics. (Author)

  5. Development of examination technique for oxide layer thickness measurement of irradiated fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, D. S.; Park, S. W.; Kim, J. H.; Seo, H. S.; Min, D. K.; Kim, E. K.; Chun, Y. B.; Bang, K. S

    1999-06-01

    Technique for oxide layer thickness measurement of irradiated fuel rods was developed to measure oxide layer thickness and study characteristic of fuel rods. Oxide layer thickness of irradiated fuels were measured, analyzed. Outer oxide layer thickness of 3 cycle-irradiated fuel rods were 20 - 30 {mu}m, inner oxide layer thickness 0 - 10 {mu}m and inner oxide layer thickness on cracked cladding about 30 {mu}m. Oxide layer thickness of 4 cycle-irradiated fuel rods were about 2 times as thick as those of 1 cycle-irradiated fuel rods. Oxide layer on lower region of irradiated fuel rods was thin and oxide layer from lower region to upper region indicated gradual increase in thickness. Oxide layer thickness from 2500 to 3000 mm showed maximum and oxide layer thickness from 3000 to top region of irradiated fuel rods showed decreasing trend. Inner oxide layer thicknesses of 4 cycle-irradiated fuel rod were about 8 {mu}m at 750 - 3500 mm from the bottom end of fuel rod. Outer oxide layer thickness were about 8 {mu}m at 750 - 1000 mm from the bottom end of fuel rod. These indicated gradual increase up to upper region from the bottom end of fuel rod. These indicated gradual increase up to upper region from the bottom end of fuel. Oxide layer thickness technique will apply safety evaluation and study of reactor fuels. (author). 6 refs., 14 figs.

  6. Strategy for Fuel Rod Receipt, Characterization, Sample Allocation for the Demonstration Sister Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschman, Steven C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Warmann, Stephan A. [Portage, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rusch, Chris [NAC International, Inc., Norcross, GA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    , inert gas backfilling, and transfer to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for multi-year storage. To document the initial condition of the used fuel prior to emplacement in a storage system, “sister ” fuel rods will be harvested and sent to a national laboratory for characterization and archival purposes. This report supports the demonstration by describing how sister rods will be shipped and received at a national laboratory, and recommending basic nondestructive and destructive analyses to assure the fuel rods are adequately characterized for UFDC work. For this report, a hub-and-spoke model is proposed, with one location serving as the hub for fuel rod receipt and characterization. In this model, fuel and/or clad would be sent to other locations when capabilities at the hub were inadequate or nonexistent. This model has been proposed to reduce DOE-NE’s obligation for waste cleanup and decontamination of equipment.

  7. AREVA NP burnup credit investigation on irradiated MOX fuel within the REBUS BWR programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alander, Alexandra; Misu, Stefan; Timm, Wolf [AREVA, AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany); Thareau, Sebastien [AREVA, AREVA NP, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The present paper summarizes a criticality and burnup credit investigation carried out using the 2D spectral codes CASMO-4 and APOLLO2-A. Fission rate distributions and multiplication factors, for UOX and MOX configurations, are calculated as well as the reactivity effect caused by burnup on a selection of irradiated MOX fuel assemblies. 3D core criticality calculations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code MOCA and the deterministic transport code VARIANT (a nodal code developed by ANL) using CASMO-4 generated cross section libraries. Calculations were compared to experimental data from the critical facility VENUS in the context of the REBUS BWR Programme. The results confirm that the spectral codes CASMO-4 and APOLLO2-A are well suited to calculate fission rates, multiplication factors and reactivity effects. It is also found that the calculated burnup reactivity effect, using CASMO-4 generated cross sections and the best 3D method (MOCA), is underestimated by merely 7% compared to the experimental value, which can mainly be attributed to the simplifications done in order to model the critical configurations with reasonable efforts. (authors)

  8. Optimization of fuel cells for BWR based in Tabu modified search; Optimizacion de celdas de combustible para BWR basada en busqueda Tabu modificada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J.L. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Palomera P, M.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Posgrado en Ingenieria en Computacion, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: cmcm@fi-b.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The advances in the development of a computational system for the design and optimization of cells for assemble of fuel of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are presented. The method of optimization is based on the technique of Tabu Search (Tabu Search, TS) implemented in progressive stages designed to accelerate the search and to reduce the time used in the process of optimization. It was programed an algorithm to create the first solution. Also for to diversify the generation of random numbers, required by the technical TS, it was used the Makoto Matsumoto function obtaining excellent results. The objective function has been coded in such a way that can adapt to optimize different parameters like they can be the enrichment average or the peak factor of radial power. The neutronic evaluation of the cells is carried out in a fine way by means of the HELIOS simulator. In the work the main characteristics of the system are described and an application example is presented to the design of a cell of 10x10 bars of fuel with 10 different enrichment compositions and gadolinium content. (Author)

  9. Fuel rod crud deposition: effects of heat load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Facundo

    1999-05-15

    Anomalous diameter changes have been observed on the fuel rods of the in-pile test assembly IFA-585. These diameter changes are described in the HWR-407 [1], where it is suggested that crud deposition is their cause. The present report continues the study of the causes of crud deposition on the fuel rods, by analysing its dependence with the heat load. It is observed that crud deposition is less favoured on the cladding at axial positions of pellet-pellet interfaces, and that this is directly correlated with the fact that heat flux is lower at pellet-pellet interfaces. A finite element model is built to analyse the heat flux on the cladding at the surroundings of pellet-pellet interfaces. Also, an empirical formula is derived for the dependence of crud deposition rate with heat loading, taking into account the differences in heat flux on the surroundings of pellet-pellet interfaces (author) (ml)

  10. Control rod system useable for fuel handling in a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1976-11-30

    A control rod and its associated drive are used to elevate a complete stack of fuel blocks to a position above the core of a gas-cooled nuclear reactor. A fuel-handling machine grasps the control rod and the drive is unlatched from the rod. The stack and rod are transferred out of the reactor, or to a new location in the reactor, by the fuel-handling machine.

  11. Radial optimization of a BWR fuel cell using genetic algorithms; Optimizacion radial de una celda de combustible BWR usando algoritmos geneticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo M, C.; Carmona H, R.; Oropeza C, I.P. [UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: cmcm@fi-b.unam.mx

    2006-07-01

    The development of the application of the Genetic Algorithms (GA) to the optimization of the radial distribution of enrichment in a cell of fuel of a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The optimization process it was ties to the HELIOS simulator, which is a transport code of neutron simulation of fuel cells that has been validated for the calculation of nuclear banks for BWRs. With heterogeneous radial designs can improve the radial distribution of the power, for what the radial design of fuel has a strong influence in the global design of fuel recharges. The optimum radial distribution of fuel bars is looked for with different enrichments of U{sup 235} and contents of consumable poison. For it is necessary to define the representation of the solution, the objective function and the implementation of the specific optimization process to the solution of the problem. The optimization process it was coded in 'C' language, it was automated the creation of the entrances to the simulator, the execution of the simulator and the extraction, in the exit of the simulator, of the parameters that intervene in the objective function. The objective function includes four parameters: average enrichment of the cell, average gadolinia concentration of the cell, peak factor of radial power and k-infinite multiplication factor. To be able to calculate the parameters that intervene in the objective function, the one evaluation process of GA was ties to the HELIOS code executed in a Compaq Alpha workstation. It was applied to the design of a fuel cell of 10 x 10 that it can be employee in the fuel assemble designs that are used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. Its were considered 10 different fuel compositions which four contain gadolinia. Three heuristic rules that consist in prohibiting the placement of bars with gadolinia in the ends of the cell, to place the compositions with the smallest enrichment in the corners of the cell and to fix

  12. Validation of the Monte Carlo model developed to assess the activity generated in control rods of a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenas, Jose, E-mail: jrodenas@iqn.upv.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Abarca, Agustin; Gallardo, Sergio [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Sollet, Eduardo [Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Central Nuclear de Cofrentes, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-07-21

    Control rods are activated by neutron reactions into the reactor. The activation is produced mainly in stainless steel and its impurities. The dose produced by this activity is not important inside the reactor, but it has to be taken into account when the rod is withdrawn from it. The neutron activation has been modeled with the MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method. The number of reactions obtained with the code can be converted into activity. In this work, a detailed model of the control rod has been developed considering all its components: handle, tubes, gain, and central core. On the other hand, the rod has been divided into 5 zones in order to consider the different axial exposition to neutron flux into the reactor. Results of the Monte Carlo simulation for the neutron activation constitute a gamma source in the control rod. With this source, applying again the Monte Carlo method, doses at certain distance of the rod have been calculated. Comparison of calculated doses with experimental measurements leads to the validation of the model developed.

  13. Optimization of axial enrichment distribution for BWR fuels using scoping libraries and block coordinate descent method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Wu-Hsiung, E-mail: wstong@iner.gov.tw; Lee, Tien-Tso; Kuo, Weng-Sheng; Yaur, Shung-Jung

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • An optimization method for axial enrichment distribution in a BWR fuel was developed. • Block coordinate descent method is employed to search for optimal solution. • Scoping libraries are used to reduce computational effort. • Optimization search space consists of enrichment difference parameters. • Capability of the method to find optimal solution is demonstrated. - Abstract: An optimization method has been developed to search for the optimal axial enrichment distribution in a fuel assembly for a boiling water reactor core. The optimization method features: (1) employing the block coordinate descent method to find the optimal solution in the space of enrichment difference parameters, (2) using scoping libraries to reduce the amount of CASMO-4 calculation, and (3) integrating a core critical constraint into the objective function that is used to quantify the quality of an axial enrichment design. The objective function consists of the weighted sum of core parameters such as shutdown margin and critical power ratio. The core parameters are evaluated by using SIMULATE-3, and the cross section data required for the SIMULATE-3 calculation are generated by using CASMO-4 and scoping libraries. The application of the method to a 4-segment fuel design (with the highest allowable segment enrichment relaxed to 5%) demonstrated that the method can obtain an axial enrichment design with improved thermal limit ratios and objective function value while satisfying the core design constraints and core critical requirement through the use of an objective function. The use of scoping libraries effectively reduced the number of CASMO-4 calculation, from 85 to 24, in the 4-segment optimization case. An exhausted search was performed to examine the capability of the method in finding the optimal solution for a 4-segment fuel design. The results show that the method found a solution very close to the optimum obtained by the exhausted search. The number of

  14. Models for fuel rod behaviour at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernkvist, Lars O.; Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    This report deals with release of fission product gases and irradiation-induced restructuring in uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloy clad tubes to light water reactor fuel rods is also discussed. Computational models, suitable for implementation in the FRAPCON-3.2 computer code, are proposed for these potentially life-limiting phenomena. Hence, an integrated model for the calculation or thermal fission gas release by intragranular diffusion, gas trapping in grain boundaries, irradiation-induced re-solution, grain boundary saturation, and grain boundary sweeping in UO{sub 2} fuel, under time varying temperature loads, is formulated. After a brief review of the status of thermal fission gas release modelling, we delineate the governing equations for the aforementioned processes. Grain growth kinetic modelling is briefly reviewed and pertinent data on grain growth of high burnup fuel obtained during power ramps in the Third Risoe Fission Gas Release Project are evaluated. Sample computations are performed, which clearly show the connection between fission gas release and gram growth as a function of time at different isotherms. Models are also proposed for the restructuring of uranium dioxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called rim formation, and its effect on fuel porosity build-up, fuel thermal conductivity and fission gas release. These models are assessed by use of recent experimental data from the High Burnup Rim Project, as well as from post irradiation examinations of high-burnup fuel, irradiated in power reactors. Moreover, models for clad oxide growth and hydrogen pickup in PWRs, applicable to Zircaloy-4, ZIRLO or M5 cladding, are formulated, based on recent in-reactor corrosion data for high-burnup fuel rods. Our evaluation of these data indicates that the oxidation rate of ZIRLO-type materials is about 20% lower than for standard Zircaloy-4 cladding under typical PWR conditions. Likewise, the oxidation rate of M5 seems to be

  15. Improving the neutronic characteristics of a boiling water reactor by using uranium zirconium hydride fuel instead of uranium dioxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, Ahmed Abdelghafar [Higher Technological Institute, Ramadan (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The present work discusses two different models of boiling water reactor (BWR) bundle to compare the neutronic characteristics of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) and uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH{sub 1.6}) fuel. Each bundle consists of four assemblies. The BWR assembly fueled with UO{sub 2} contains 8 × 8 fuel rods while that fueled with UZrH{sub 1.6} contains 9 × 9 fuel rods. The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport code, based on the Mont Carlo method, is used to design three dimensional models for BWR fuel bundles at typical operating temperatures and pressure conditions. These models are used to determine the multiplication factor, pin-by-pin power distribution, axial power distribution, thermal neutron flux distribution, and axial thermal neutron flux. The moderator and coolant (water) are permitted to boil within the BWR core forming steam bubbles, so it is important to calculate the reactivity effect of voiding at different values. It is found that the hydride fuel bundle design can be simplified by eliminating water rods and replacing the control blade with control rods. UZrH{sub 1.6} fuel improves the performance of the BWR in different ways such as increasing the energy extracted per fuel assembly, reducing the uranium ore, and reducing the plutonium accumulated in the BWR through burnup.

  16. Structural analysis of fuel rod applied to pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Danilo P.; Pinheiro, Andre Ricardo M.; Lotto, André A., E-mail: danilo.pinheiro@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The design of fuel assemblies applied to Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has several requirements and acceptance criteria that must be attended for licensing. In the case of PWR fuel rods, an important mechanical structural requirement is to keep the radial stability when submitted to the coolant external pressure. In the framework of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program new materials have been studied to replace zirconium based alloys as cladding, including iron-based alloys. In this sense, efforts have been made to evaluate the behavior of these materials under PWR conditions. The present work aims to evaluate the collapse cold pressure of a stainless steel thin-walled tube similar to that used as cladding material of fuel rods by means of the comparison of numeric data, and experimental results. As a result of the simulations, it was observed that the collapse pressure has a value intermediate value between those found by regulatory requirements and analytical calculations. The experiment was carried out for the validation of the computational model using test specimens of thin-walled tubes considering empty tube. The test specimens were sealed at both ends by means of welding. They were subjected to a high pressure device until the collapse of the tubes. Preliminary results obtained from experiments with the empty test specimens indicate that the computational model can be validated for stainless steel cladding, considering the difference between collapse pressure indicated in the regulatory document and the actual limit pressure concerning to radial instability of tubes with the studied characteristics. (author)

  17. Thermomechanical evaluation of BWR fuel elements for procedures of preconditioned with FEMAXI-V; Evaluacion termomecanica de elementos combustible BWR para procedimientos de preacondicionado con FEMAXI-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H.; Lucatero, M.A.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: hhl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The limitations in the burnt of the nuclear fuel usually are fixed by the one limit in the efforts to that undergo them the components of a nuclear fuel assembly. The limits defined its provide the direction to the fuel designer to reduce to the minimum the fuel failure during the operation, and they also prevent against some thermomechanical phenomena that could happen during the evolution of transitory events. Particularly, a limit value of LHGR is fixed to consider those physical phenomena that could lead to the interaction of the pellet-shirt (Pellet Cladding Interaction, PCI). This limit value it is related directly with an PCI limit that can be fixed based on experimental tests of power ramps. This way, to avoid to violate the PCI limit, the conditioning procedures of the fuel are still required for fuel elements with and without barrier. Those simulation procedures of the power ramp are carried out for the reactor operator during the starting maneuvers or of power increase like preventive measure of possible consequences in the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel. In this work, the thermomechanical behavior of two different types of fuel rods of the boiling water reactor is analyzed during the pursuit of the procedures of fuel preconditioning. Five diverse preconditioning calculations were carried out, each one with three diverse linear ramps of power increments. The starting point of the ramps was taken of the data of the cycle 8 of the unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. The superior limit superior of the ramps it was the threshold of the lineal power in which a fuel failure could be presented by PCI, in function of the fuel burnt. The analysis was carried out with the FEMAXI-V code. (Author)

  18. Analysis of the performance of fuel cells BWR with a single enrichment and radial distribution of enrichments; Analisis del desempeno de celdas combustibles BWR con un solo enriquecimiento y con distribucion radial de enriquecimientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Vargas, S.; Alonso, G.; Del Valle, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. Lindavista, Mexico D. F. 07738 (Mexico); Xolocostli M, J. V. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: govaj666@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    The efficient use of the fuel is one of the objectives in the assemblies design of type BWR. The present tendency in the assemblies design of type BWR is through a radial distribution of enrichments. The present work has like object showing the because of this decision, for what a comparison of the neutronic performance of two fuel cells with the same enrichment average but one of them with radial distribution of enrichment and the other with a single enrichment equal to the average. The cells were analyzed with the CASMO-4 code and the obtained results of the behavior of the neutron flow and the power sustain the because of the radial distribution of enrichments. (Author)

  19. SCADOP: Phenomenological modeling of dryout in nuclear fuel rod bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Arnab, E-mail: arnie@barc.gov.in; Chandraker, D.K., E-mail: dineshkc@barc.gov.in; Vijayan, P.K., E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Phenomenological model for annular flow dryout is presented. • The model evaluates initial entrained fraction using a new methodology. • The history effect in annular flow is predicted and validated. • Rod bundle dryout is predicted using subchannel methodology. • Model is validated against experimental dryout data in tubes and rod bundles. - Abstract: Analysis and prediction of dryout is of important consequence to safety of nuclear fuel clusters of boiling water type of reactors. Traditionally, experimental correlations are used for dryout predictions. Since these correlations are based on operating parameters and do not aim to model the underlying phenomena, there has been a proliferation of the correlations, each catering to some specific bundle geometry under a specific set of operating conditions. Moreover, such experiments are extremely costly. In general, changes in tested bundle geometry for improvement in thermal-hydraulic performance would require re-experimentation. Understanding and modeling the basic processes leading to dryout in flow boiling thus has great incentive. Such a model has the ability to predict dryout in any rod bundle geometry, unlike the operating parameter based correlation approach. Thus more informed experiments can be carried out. A good model can, reduce the number of experiments required during the iterations in bundle design. In this paper, a phenomenological model as indicated above is presented. The model incorporates a new methodology to estimate the Initial Entrained Fraction (IEF), i.e., entrained fraction at the onset of annular flow. The incorporation of this new methodology is important since IEF is often assumed ad-hoc and sometimes also used as a parameter to tune the model predictions to experimental data. It is highlighted that IEF may be low under certain conditions against the general perception of a high IEF due to influence of churn flow. It is shown that the same phenomenological model is

  20. Fuel-rod temperature transients during LWR degraded-core accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briscoe, F; Rivard, J B; Young, M F

    1982-01-01

    Heat transfer models of fuel rods and coolant have been developed in support of LWR damaged fuel studies underway at Sandia National Laboratories for the NRC. A one-dimensional, full-length model simulates a PWR fuel rod; a two-dimensional, 0.5 m model simulates 9-rod bundle experiments to be performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor. The models include zircaloy oxidation, heat transfer by convecting steam/hydrogen flow, and radiation between surfaces through an absorbing/emitting gas. Characteristics of the one-dimensional reactor fuel rod model for two types of accident sequence are reported, as well as comparisons with MARCH code results.

  1. Fabrication of fuel rods containing /sup 233/U pelletized oxide fuels (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankhouser, W.L.; Crain, H.H.; Fischer, R.L.; Suldan, J.H.; Eyler, J.H.; Speer, E.L.

    1967-02-01

    Approximately 13 kg of U-233 were fabricated into 1 wt % UO/sub 2/-ThO/sub 2/ and 26 wt % UO/sub 2/-ZrO/sub 2/ pellets and enclosed in Zircaloy-2 cladding tubes as 1299 blanket and 377 seed rods. The U-233 contained 38 ppM of U-232, and was purified as two batches of liquid UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ immediately prior to processing into powder form. All fuel rods were completed within 95 days of this initial solvent extraction of the nitrate. Overall U yield of nitrate to usable materials was over 90%, and only 14 rods were rejected in welding and all without loss of contained fuel. (NSA 21: 14872)

  2. Time-domain analysis of BWR core stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokomizo, Osamu

    1983-01-01

    A time-domain stability analysis program for boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRs) has been developed and applied to analysis of a commercial size BWR. The program takes into account parallel channel effects. The model incorporates (a) one point neutron kinetics with weighted average reactivity feedback, (b) radial heat conduction and transfer in fuel rods, (c) fuel channel thermal hydraulics with quasi-equilibrium subcooled boiling approximation, and (d) recirculation hydrodynamics. Nonlinearity and parallel channel effects are examined through analyses of a commercial size BWR. Core behavior has been found virtually linear for small but finite amplitude oscillations, which proved the validity of frequency-domain stability analyses for finite disturbances. It has also been found that single channel analyses with core averaged thermal hydraulic properties give more stable results than parallel channel analyses.

  3. The effect of axial fuel rod power profile on fuel temperature and cladding strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyu-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The most limiting design criteria for nuclear reactor normal operating conditions (ANS Condition I are known to be rod internal pressure and cladding oxidation, while those for nuclear reactor transient operating conditions (ANS Conditon II to be fuel centerline temperature and transient cladding total tensile strain. However, the design margins against fuel temperature and transient cladding tensile strain become smaller since power uprating is being or will be utilized for the most of nuclear power reactors to enhance the economics of nuclear power. In order to secure sufficient design margins against fuel temperature and cladding total tensile strain even for power uprating, the current axial rod power profiles used in the reactor transient analysis were optimized to reduce over-conservatism, considering that 118% overpower of a steady-state peak rod average power was not exceeded during the reactor transients. The comparison of the current axial rod power profiles and the optimized ones indicates that the latter reduces the fuel centerline temperature and cladding total tensile strain by 26°C and 0.02%, respectively.

  4. Measurement of nuclear fuel rod deformation using an image processing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jung Cheol [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, a deformation measurement technology for nuclear fuel rods is proposed. The deformation measurement system includes a high-definition CMOS image sensor, a lens, a semiconductor laser line beam marker, and optical and mechanical accessories. The basic idea of the proposed deformation measurement system is to illuminate the outer surface of a fuel rod with a collimated laser line beam at an angle of 45 degrees or higher. For this method, it is assumed that a nuclear fuel rod and the optical axis of the image sensor for observing the rod are vertically composed. The relative motion of the fuel rod in the horizontal direction causes the illuminated laser line beam to move vertically along the surface of the fuel rod. The resulting change of the laser line beam position on the surface of the fuel rod is imaged as a parabolic beam in the high definition CMOS image sensor. An ellipse model is then extracted from the parabolic beam pattern. The center coordinates of the ellipse model are taken as the feature of the deformed fuel rod. The vertical offset of the feature point of the nuclear fuel rod is derived based on the displacement of the offset in the horizontal direction. Based on the experimental results for a nuclear fuel rod sample with a formation of surface crud, an inspection resolution of 50 is achieved using the proposed method. In terms of the degree of precision, this inspection resolution is an improvement of more than 300% from a 150 {mu}m resolution, which is the conventional measurement criteria required for the deformation of neutron irradiated fuel rods

  5. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN

  6. A Multi-Stage Wear Model for Grid-to-Rod Fretting of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The wear of fuel rod cladding against the supporting structures in the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors (PWRs) is an important and potentially costly tribological issue. Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF), as it is known, involves not only time-varying contact conditions, but also elevated temperatures, flowing hot water, aqueous tribo-corrosion, and the embrittling effects of neutron fluences. The multi-stage, closed-form analytical model described in this paper relies on published out-of-reactor wear and corrosion data and a set of simplifying assumptions to portray the conversion of frictional work into wear depth. The cladding material of interest is a zirconium-based alloy called Zircaloy-4, and the grid support is made of a harder and more wear-resistant material. Focus is on the wear of the cladding. The model involves an incubation stage, a surface oxide wear stage, and a base alloy wear stage. The wear coefficient, which is a measure of the efficiency of conversion of frictional work into wear damage, can change to reflect the evolving metallurgical condition of the alloy. Wear coefficients for Zircaloy-4 and for a polyphase zirconia layer were back-calculated for a range of times required to wear to a critical depth. Inputs for the model, like the friction coefficient, are taken from the tribology literature in lieu of in-reactor tribological data. Concepts of classical fretting were used as a basis, but are modified to enable the model to accommodate the complexities of the PWR environment. Factors like grid spring relaxation, pre-oxidation of the cladding, multiple oxide phases, gap formation, impact, and hydrogen embrittlement are part of the problem definition but uncertainties in their relative roles limits the ability to validate the model. Sample calculations of wear depth versus time in the cladding illustrate how GTRF wear might occur in a discontinuous fashion during months-long reactor operating cycles. A means to account for grid/rod gaps

  7. Cerenkov Characteristics of BWR Assemblies using a Prototype DCVD with a Back-Illuminated CCD. Prepared for the Canadian Safeguards Support Program and the Swedish Support Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.D.; Gerwing, A.F. [Channel Systems Inc., Pinawa MA (Canada); Maxwell, R. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Larsson, M.; Axell, K.; Hildingsson, L. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Lindberg, B. [LENS-TECH AB, Skellefteaa (Sweden); Sundkvist, E. [Teleca Design and Development, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-11-01

    The Canadian and Swedish Safeguards Support Programs have developed a prototype Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) to verify spent fuel. Field measurements in Swedish nuclear power reactor fuel bays on BWR fuel and non-fuel assemblies resulted in new Cerenkov information that offers the possibility of computer-assisted verification of spent-fuel assemblies. A number of fuel assemblies with missing fuel rods were examined. The missing fuel rods are easily detected when not hidden under the lifting handle of the fuel assembly. Initial studies of off-angle viewing of these assemblies show promise for the detection of the missing fuel rods under the lifting handle. The quantitative nature of the charge-coupled device was examined. A number of procedures were developed to quantify parameters such as image intensity and alignment (collimation) of fuel and no fuel assemblies. The quantitative studies on fuel assembly intensity as a function of cooling time showed excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  8. Simulations of ex-vessel fuel coolant interactions in a Nordic BWR using MC3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) employ a drywell cavity flooding technique as a nuclear severe accident management strategy. In case of core melt accident where the reactor pressure vessel will fail and the melt will eject from the lower head and fall into a water pool, may be in the form of a continuous jet. It is assumed that the melt jet will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed into the water pool. The melt interaction with a water pool may cause an energetic steam explosion which creates a potential risk towards the integrity of containment, leading to fission products release into the atmosphere. The results of the APRI-7 project suggest that the significant damage to containment structures by steam explosion cannot be ruled according to the state-of-the-art knowledge about corresponding accident scenario. In the follow-up project APRI-8 (2012-2016) one of the goals of the KTH research is to resolve the steam explosion energetics (SEE) issue, developing a risk-oriented framework for quantifying conditional threats to containment integrity for a Nordic type BWR. The present study deals with the premixing and explosion phase calculations of a Nordic BWR dry cavity, using MC3D, a multiphase CFD code for fuel coolant interactions. The main goal of the study is the assessment of pressure buildup in the cavity and the impact loading on the side walls. The conditions for the calculations are used from the SERENA-II BWR case exercise. The other objective was to do the sensitivity analysis of the parameters in modeling of fuel coolant interactions, which can help to reduce uncertainty in assessment of steam explosion energetics. The results show that the amount of liquid melt droplets in the water (region of void<0.6) is maximum even before reaching the jet at the bottom. In the explosion phase, maximum pressure is attained at the bottom and the maximum impulse on the wall is at the bottom of the wall. The analysis is carried out using two different

  9. FRAPCON-1: a computer code for the steady state analysis of oxide fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A.; Bohn, M. P.; Coleman, D. R.; Lanning, D. D.

    1978-08-01

    FRAPCON is a FORTRAN IV computer code which predicts the steady state long-term burnup response of a light water reactor fuel rod. The coupled effects of fuel and cladding deformation, temperature, and internal gas pressure on the behavior of the fuel rod are considered in determining fuel rod response. The cladding deformation model includes multi-axial, elasto-plastic analysis and considers both primary and secondary creep. The fuel temperature model considers the effects of fuel cracking and relocation in determining the fuel temperature distribution. Burnup dependent fission gas generation and release is included in calculating fuel rod internal pressure. An integral fuel rod failure subcode determines failure and failure modes based on the operating conditions at each timestep. The material property subcode, MATPRO, provides gas, fuel and cladding properties to the computational subcodes in FRAPCON. No material properties need to be supplied by the code user. FRAPCON is a completely modular code with each major computational subcode isolated within the code and coupled to the main code by subroutine calls and data transfer through argument lists. FRAPCON is soft-coupled to the transient fuel rod code, FRAP-T, to provide initial conditions to initiate analysis of such off-normal transients as a loss-of-coolant accident. The code is presently programmed and running on a CDC 7600 computer.

  10. BUTREN-RC an hybrid system for the recharges optimization of nuclear fuels in a BWR; BUTREN-RC un sistema hibrido para la optimizacion de recargas de combustible nuclear en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J.; Castillo M, J.A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The obtained results with the hybrid system BUTREN-RC are presented that obtains recharges of nuclear fuel for a BWR type reactor. The system has implemented the methods of optimization heuristic taboo search and neural networks. The optimization it carried out with the technique of taboo search, and the neural networks, previously trained, were used to predict the behavior of the recharges of fuel, in substitution of commercial codes of reactor simulation. The obtained recharges of nuclear fuel correspond to 5 different operation cycles of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant, Veracruz in Mexico. The obtained results were compared with the designs of this cycles. The energy gain with the recharges of fuel proposals is of approximately 4.5% with respect to those of design. The time of compute consumed it was considerably smaller that when a commercial code for reactor simulation is used. (Author)

  11. Effects of fuel relocation on reflood in a partially-blocked rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Jae [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongrok; Kim, Kihwan; Bae, Sung Won [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Division, 111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sang-Ki, E-mail: skmoon@kaeri.re.kr [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Division, 111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Ballooning of the fuel rods has been an important issue, since it can influence the coolability of the rod bundle in a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA). Numerous past studies have investigated the effect of blockage geometry on the heat transfer in a partially blocked rod bundle. However, they did not consider the occurrence of fuel relocation and the corresponding effect on two-phase heat transfer. Some fragmented fuel particles located above the ballooned region may drop into the enlarged volume of the balloon. Accordingly, the fuel relocation brings in a local power increase in the ballooned region. The present study’s objective is to investigate the effect of the fuel relocation on the reflood under a LBLOCA condition. Toward this end, experiments were performed in a 5 × 5 partially-blocked rod bundle. Two power profiles were tested: one is a typical cosine shape and the other is the modified shape considering the effect of the fuel relocation. For a typical power shape, the peak temperature in the ballooned rods was lower than that in the intact rods. On the other hand, for the modified power shape, the peak temperature in the ballooned rods was higher than that in the intact rods. Numerical simulations were also performed using the MARS code. The tendencies of the peak clad temperatures were well predicted.

  12. Assessment of precision gamma scanning for inspecting LWR fuel rods. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.R.; Barnes, B.K.; Barnes, M.L.; Hamlin, D.K.; Medina-Ortega, E.G.

    1981-07-01

    Reconstruction of the radial two-dimensional distributions of fission products using projections obtained by nondestructive gamma scanning was evaluated. The filtered backprojection algorithm provided the best reconstruction for simulated gamma-ray sources, as well as for actual irradiated fuel material. Both a low-burnup (11.5 GWd/tU) light-water reactor fuel rod and a high-burnup (179.1 GWd/tU) fast breeder reactor fuel rod were examined using this technique.

  13. MOX fuel assembly and reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Motoo; Shimada, Hidemitsu; Kaneto, Kunikazu; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Uchikawa, Sadao [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Izutsu, Sadayuki; Fujita, Satoshi

    1998-03-10

    MOX fuel assemblies containing fuel rods of mixed oxide (MOX) of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a reactor core of a BWR type reactor. The fuel assembly comprises lattice like arranged fuel rods, one large diameter water rod disposed at the central portion and a channel box surrounding them. An average enrichment degree A of fission plutonium of fuel rods arranged at the outermost layer region and an average enrichment degree B of fission plutonium of fuel rods arranged at the inner layer region satisfy the relation of B/A {>=} 2.2. It is preferable that the average enrichment degree C of fission plutonium of fuel rods arranged at the outermost corner portions and the enrichment degree A satisfy the relation: C/A {<=} 0.5. With such a constitution, even in a case where the MOX fuel assemblies and uranium fuel assemblies are disposed together, thermal margin can be improved. (I.N.)

  14. Analysis of core stability measurement data of advanced 9 x 9 fuel assembly in a BWR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Katsuhiro; Itami, Akira; Kubo, Yuichiro; Shakudo, Taketomi [Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kreuter, D.; Anegawa, Takafumi; Kitamura, Hideya; Ishikawa, Masumi

    1997-05-01

    The core stability measurements were taken during the cycle-9 startup of the 1,300 MWe BWR, Kernkraftwerk Kruemmel (KKK). The core contained advanced 9 x 9 type high burn-up design reload fuel with a higher enrichment than current 8 x 8 fuel. A design feature of the advanced 9 x 9 fuel assembly (FA) is a large square water channel for enhanced neutron moderation. The measurement data as a function of core flow and power showed almost the same stability characteristics as those of the past measurement during the cycle-3 startup of the KKK core with the 8 x 8 FA. The local power range monitors (LPRM) detected neutron flux oscillations in both core-wide in-phase and half-core out-of-phase modes. The frequency-domain stability analysis using the STAIF-PK code well reproduced the measurement result that the onset of unstable operation in KKK first occurs when about half of the reactor internal pumps are operating and the other half are stopped. The stability performance of the advanced 9 x 9 FA in the core was compared with the 8 x 8 FA by a design parameter analysis with respect to thermal-hydraulic and neutronic design. It has been demonstrated by the analysis that the stability performance of the advanced 9 x 9 FA is comparable with current 8 x 8 FA. (author)

  15. Characterization of control rod worths and fuel rod power peaking factors in the university of Utah TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alroumi Fawaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Control rod reactivity (worths for the three control rods and fuel rod power peaking factors in the University of Utah research reactor (100 kW TRIGA Mark I are characterized using the AGENT code system and the results described in this paper. These values are compared to the MCNP6 and existing experimental measurements. In addition, the eigenvalue, neutron spatial flux distributions and reaction rates are analyzed and discussed. The AGENT code system is widely benchmarked for various reactor types and complexities in their geometric arrangements of the assemblies and reactor core material distributions. Thus, it is used as a base methodology to evaluate neutronics variables of the research reactor at the University of Utah. With its much shorter computation time than MCNP6, AGENT provides agreement with the MCNP6 within a 0.5 % difference for the eigenvalue and a maximum difference of 10% in the power peaking factor values. Differential and integral control rod worths obtained by AGENT show well agreement with MCNP6 and the theoretical model. However, regulating the control rod worth is somewhat overestimated by both MCNP6 and AGENT models when compared to the experimental/theoretical values. In comparison to MCNP6, the total control rod worths and shutdown margin obtained with AGENT show better agreement to the experimental values.

  16. Review of CTF s Fuel Rod Modeling Using FRAPCON-4.0 s Centerline Temperature Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toptan, Aysenur [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Salko, Robert K [ORNL; Avramova, Maria [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh

    2017-01-01

    Coolant Boiling in Rod Arrays Two Fluid (COBRA-TF), or CTF1 [1], is a nuclear thermal hydraulic subchannel code used throughout academia and industry. CTF s fuel rod modeling is originally developed for VIPRE code [2]. Its methodology is based on GAPCON [3] and FRAP [4] fuel performance codes, and material properties are included from MATPRO handbook [5]. This work focuses on review of CTF s fuel rod modeling to address shortcomings in CTF s temperature predictions. CTF is compared to FRAPCON which is U.S. NRC s steady-state fuel performance code for light-water reactor fuel rods. FRAPCON calculates the changes in fuel rod variables and temperatures including the eects of cladding hoop strain, cladding oxidation, hydriding, fuel irradiation swelling, densification, fission gas release and rod internal gas pressure. It uses fuel, clad and gap material properties from MATPRO. Additionally, it has its own models for fission gas release, cladding corrosion and cladding hydrogen pickup. It allows finite dierence or finite element approaches for its mechanical model. In this study, FRAPCON-4.0 [6] is used as a reference fuel performance code. In comparison, Halden Reactor Data for IFA432 Rod 1 and Rod 3. CTF simulations are performed in two ways; informing CTF with gap conductance value from FRAPCON, and using CTF s dynamic gap conductance model. First case is chosen to show temperature is predicted correctly with CTF s models for thermal and cladding conductivities once gap conductance is provided. Latter is to review CTF s dynamic gap conductance model. These Halden test cases are selected to be representative of cases with and without any physical contact between fuel-pellet and clad while reviewing functionality of CTF s dynamic gap conductance model. Improving the CTF s dynamic gap conductance model will allow prediction of fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior under irradiation, and better temperature feedbacks from CTF in transient calculations.

  17. Study on nuclear physics of high burn-up full MOX-BWR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa; Okubo, Tsutomu; Ochiai, Masa-aki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-08-01

    In this report, neutronics study of full Mixed-oxide (MOX) high burn-up BWR core is presented. Our design goals are about 3-year cycle length, four-batch refueling scheme and more than 100GWd/t fuel discharge burn-up. Base core configuration is 1,350MWe US version of ABWR with 9 x 9 type fuel assembly. Investigation of the reactor core has been carried out by arranging Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents in fuel rods and changing water to fuel volume ratio (V{sub m}/V{sub f}) through the number of water rods or adjustment of fuel clad diameter. JAERI`s general purpose neutronics code system SRAC95 was used for two dimensional XY fuel assembly cell neutronics calculations. Calculated cases are for a comparatively high moderated fuel assembly with 9 water rods, a fuel assembly without water rods and a comparatively low moderated fuel assembly without water rods and with larger fuel clad diameter. All these 3 cases seem to achieve our design goals mentioned above. For the last case, three dimensional core burn-up calculation was performed by this code system. This case seems to attain a low linear power density and the operation with all control rod out. (author)

  18. Final Report: Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowsell, David Leon [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report documents the Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation. The review followed the approved Plan of Action (POA) and Implementation Plan (IP) using the identified core requirements. The activity was limited scope focusing on the control rod drives functional isolation and fuel element movement. The purpose of this review is to ensure the facility's readiness to move fuel elements thus supporting inspection and functionally isolate the control rod drives to maintain the required shutdown margin.

  19. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  20. Computer simulation of the behaviour and performance of a CANDU fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, A.C. [Comison Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)

    1997-07-01

    At the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA) the BACO code (for 'BArra COmbustible', fuel rod) was developed. It allows the simulation of the thermo-mechanical performance of a cylindrical fuel rod in a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The standard present version of the code (2.30), is a powerful tool for a relatively easy and complete evaluation of fuel behaviour predictions. Input parameters and, therefore, output ones may include statistical dispersion. As a demonstration of BACO capabilities we include a review of CANDU fuel applications, and the calculation and a parametric analysis of a characteristic CANDU fuel. (author)

  1. BWR simulation in a stationary state for the evaluation of fuel cell design; Simulacion de un reactor BWR en estado estacionario para la evaluacion del diseno de celdas de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del C, R.; Castillo M, A., E-mail: joseluis.montes@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper the simulation of a BWR in order to evaluate the performance of a set of fuel assemblies under stationary state in three dimensions (3-D) is presented. 15 cases selected from a database containing a total of 18225 cases are evaluated. The main selection criteria were based on the results of the design phase of the power cells in two dimensions (2-D) and 3-D initial study. In 2-D studies the parameters that were used to qualify and select the designs were basically the local power peaking factor and neutron multiplication factor of each fuel cell. In the initial 3-D study variables that defined the quality of results, and from which the selection was realized, are the margins to thermal limits of reactor operation and the value of the effective multiplication factor at the end of cycle operation. From the 2-D and 3-D results of the studies described a second 3-D study was realized, where the optimizations of the fuel reload pattern was carried out. The results presented in this paper correspond to this second 3-D study. It was found that the designs of the fuel cell they had a similar behavior to those provided by the fuel supplier of reference BWR. Particularly it noted the impact of reload pattern on the cold shut down margin. An estimate of the operation costs of reference cycle analyzed with each one designed reload batch was also performed. As a result a positive difference (gain) up to 10,347 M/US D was found. (Author)

  2. Literature search on Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel and absorber rod fabrication, 1960--1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, C R [comp.

    1977-02-01

    A literature search was conducted to provide information supporting the design of a conceptual Light Water Reactor (LWR) Fuel Fabrication plant. Emphasis was placed on fuel processing and pin bundle fabrication, effects of fuel impurities and microstructure on performance and densification, quality assurance, absorber and poison rod fabrication, and fuel pin welding. All data have been taken from publicly available documents, journals, and books. This work was sponsored by the Finishing Processes-Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Studies program at HEDL.

  3. Effect of anisotropic scattering in neutronics analysis of BWR assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Toshikazu [Division of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0571 (Japan)]. E-mail: takeda@nucl.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Okamoto, Toshiki [Division of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0571 (Japan); Inoue, Akira [Division of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0571 (Japan); Kosaka, Shinya [TEPCO Systems Corporation, 2-37-28 Eitai, Koutou-ku, Tokyo 135-0034 (Japan); Ikeda, Hideaki [TEPCO Systems Corporation, 2-37-28 Eitai, Koutou-ku, Tokyo 135-0034 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    The anisotropic scattering effect to keff is studied for UO{sub 2} and MOX fueled BWR assemblies. The anisotropic scattering effect increases the assembly k {sub {infinity}} by 0.44% {delta}k for the UO{sub 2} assembly with 0% void fraction, and by 0.21% {delta}k for the MOX assembly with 0% void fraction. This is because the anisotropic scattering effect flattens the intra-assembly thermal flux, and the absorption rate in the surrounding water gap is decreased, but the absorption rates in the MOX fuel rods are increased compared to the UO{sub 2} rods. Therefore, the total decrease in absorption rates in the UO{sub 2} assembly is relatively large, and the k {sub {infinity}} is increased in the UO{sub 2} assembly. The dependence of the anisotropic scattering effect on the void fraction is investigated, and the significant difference of 0.62% {delta}k/k is found for the 0% and the 80% void fractions. The BWR assemblies with Gd rods are also considered. Furthermore, the usefulness of the transport cross section is investigated, and it is found that the transport cross section gives reasonable anisotropic scattering effect, though not satisfactory.

  4. CFD analysis of blockage length on a partially blocked fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scuro, Nikolas Lymberis; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear; Angelo, Gabriel [Centro Universitário FEI (UNIFEI), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecânica; Angelo, Edvaldo, E-mail: nikolas.scuro@gmail.com, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br, E-mail: gangelo@fei.edu.br, E-mail: eangelo@mackenzie.br [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola da Engenharia. Grupo de Simulação Numérica

    2017-07-01

    In LOCA accidents, fuel rods may balloon by the increasing of pressure difference between fuel rod and core vessel. With the balloon effect, the swelling can partially block the flow channel, affecting the coolability during reflood phase. In order to analyze the influence of blockage length after LOCA events, many numerical simulations using Ansys-CFX code have been done in steady state condition, characterizing the final phase of reflood. Peaks of temperature are observed in the middle of the fuel rod, followed by a temperature drop. This effect is justified by the increasing of heat transfer coefficient, originated from the high turbulence effects. Therefore, this paper considers a radial blockage of 90%, varying just the blockage length. This study observed that, for the same boundary conditions, the longer the blockage length originated after LOCA events, the higher are the central temperatures in the fuel rod. (author)

  5. Impact analysis of modifying the composition of the nuclear fuel of a BWR with beryllium oxide; Analisis del impacto de modificar la composicion del combustible nuclear de un BWR con oxido de berilio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo V, J. M.; Morales S, J. B., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The beryllium oxide (Be O) presents excellent physical properties, especially its high thermal conductivity that contrasts clearly with that of the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) used at the present as fuel in a great number of nuclear plants. The present work models a nuclear reactor cooled by light water in boiling with two external recirculation loops (BWR/5) using the code for the transitory analysis and postulated accidents Trac-B F1, implementing a UO{sub 2} mixture and different fractions of Be O, with the objective of improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel. The numeric results and the realized analyses indicate that when adding a fraction in volume of 10% the central temperature decreases in 30.4% in stationary state, while during the large break loss of coolant accident the peak cladding temperature diminishes in 7%. Although the real interaction of the mixture has not been determined experimentally, the obtained results are promising. (Author)

  6. Actinides record, power calculations and activity for present isotopes in the spent fuel of a BWR; Historial de actinidos y calculos de potencia y actividad para isotopos presentes en el combustible gastado de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez C, P.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Lucatero, M. A., E-mail: pastor.enriquez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The administration of spent fuel is one of the more important stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, and this has become a problem of supreme importance in countries that possess nuclear reactors. Due to this in this work, the study on the actinides record and present fission products to the discharge of the irradiated fuel in a light water reactor type BWR is shown, to quantify the power and activity that emit to the discharge and during the cooling time. The analysis was realized on a fuel assembly type 10 x 10 with an enrichment average of 3.69 wt % in U-235 and the assembly simulation assumes four cycles of operation of 18 months each one and presents an exposition of 47 G Wd/Tm to the discharge. The module OrigenArp of the Scale 6 code is the computation tool used for the assembly simulation and to obtain the results on the actinides record presents to the fuel discharge. The study covers the following points: a) Obtaining of the plutonium vector used in the fuel production of mixed oxides, and b) Power calculation and activity for present actinides to the discharge. The results presented in this work, correspond at the same time immediate of discharge (0 years) and to a cooling stage in the irradiated fuel pool (5 years). (Author)

  7. Xe-133 Activity Evaluation of a Defective Fuel Rod Depending on Loading Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Young; Yang, Sung Tae; Jung, Ji Eun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Reliable performance of LWR fuels not only allows power plants to operate economically but also minimizes personnel radiation exposure, which may in turn contribute to convince the public of the viability of clean nuclear energy. Although KHNP's fuel failure rate has been remarkably decreased and it is excellent worldwide, one or two fuel rods have been damaged annually. Whenever fuel failure is occurred, KHNP engineers have to evaluate which FA(fuel assembly) is damaged by analyzing reactor coolant activity. It is important because they decide whether the FA with a damaged rod is the reload FA in the next cycle or not. Recently, based on our operational experience and technical expertise, we analyzed the reactor coolant activity in order to identify FA's loading cycle with a damaged fuel rod. This paper suggests the knowledge about Xe{sup 133} activity level analysis

  8. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of IFA-796 Rod 3 & 4 and Investigation of the Impact of Fuel Creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sweet, Ryan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace the currently used zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromiumaluminum (FeCrAl) alloys because they exhibit slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and slow cladding consumption in the presence of high temperature steam. These alloys should also exhibit increased “coping time” in the event of an accident scenario by improving the mechanical performance at high temperatures, allowing greater flexibility to achieve core cooling. As a continuation of the development of these alloys, in-reactor irradiation testing of FeCrAl cladded fuel rods has started. In order to provide insight on the possible behavior of these fuel rods as they undergo irradiation in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor, engineering analysis has been performed using FeCrAl material models implemented into the BISON fuel performance code. This milestone report provides an update on the ongoing development of modeling capability to predict FeCrAl cladding fuel performance and to provide an early look at the possible behavior of planned in-reactor FeCrAl cladding experiments. In particular, this report consists of two separate analyses. The first analysis consists of fuel performance simulations of IFA-796 rod 4 and two segments of rod 3. These simulations utilize previously implemented material models for the C35M FeCrAl alloy and UO2 to provide a bounding behavior analysis corresponding to variation of the initial fuel cladding gap thickness within the fuel rod. The second analysis is an assessment of the fuel and cladding stress states after modification of the fuel creep model that is currently implemented in the BISON fuel performance code. Effects from modifying the fuel creep model were identified for the BISON simulations

  9. The post irradiation examinations of twenty-years stored spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasahara, A.; Matsumura, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The post irradiation examinations (PIE) on the twenty years stored spent fuels were carried out to evaluate fuel integrity during storage. The spent BWR-MOX fuel rods and PWR-UO{sub 2} fuel rod irradiated in commercial LWR were used. The burnup of the BWR-MOX fuels (five fuel rods) are about 20 GWd/t and that of the PWR-UO{sub 2} fuel is 58 GWd/t. PIE items in this study are, a) visual inspection of the cladding surface, b) puncture test or gas analysis in capsule, c) ceramographic examination to observe oxide layer thickness on outside/inside cladding and pellet microstructure such as grain size, d) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) on pellet, e) hydrogen content in cladding. The preliminary result shows that twenty years stored fuel rods were not different from that before storage. (authors)

  10. FUEL PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Power-Ramp Testing and Postirradiation Examination of PCI- Resistant LWR Fuel Rod Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barner, J. O.; Guenther, R. J.

    1982-09-01

    This report describes the power-ramp testing results from 10 fuel rods irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), Halden, Norway. Tne work is part of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP), which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DUE) and is conducted through the joint efforts of Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, lnc., and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the FPlP is to identify and demonstrate fuel concepts with improved pellet-cladding interaction (PCl) behavior that will be capable of extended burnup. The postirradiation examination results obtained from one nonramped rod are also presented. The power-ramping behavior of three basic fuel rod types--rods with annular-pellet fuel, sphere-pac fuel, and dished-pellet (reference) fuel--are compared in terms of mechanisms known to promote PCl failures. The effects of graphite coating on the inside cladding surface and helium pressurization in rods witn annular fuel are also evaluated .

  11. Fuel Performance Improvement Program. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1977. [BWR, PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, D.S. (comp.)

    1977-07-01

    The Fuel Performance Improvement Program has as its objective the identification and demonstration of fuel concepts with improved power ramp performance. Improved fuels are being sought to allow reduction or elimination of fuel related operating guidelines on nuclear power plants such that the fuel may be power maneuvered within the rates allowed by the system technical specifications. The program contains a combination of out-of-reactor studies, in-reactor experiments and in-reactor demonstrations. Fuel concepts initially being considered include annular-pellets, cladding internally coated with graphite and packed-particle fuels. The performance capability of each concept is being compared to a reference fuel of contemporary pellet design through test reactor experiments.

  12. Radial distribution of UO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} in fuel cells of a BWR Reactor; Distribucion radial de UO{sub 2} y Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} en celdas de combustible de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Perusquia del C, R. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Francois, J.L.; Martin del Campo M, C. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos 62500 (Mexico)]. e-mail: jlmt@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-07-01

    The fuel system that is used at the moment in a power plant based on power reactors BWR, includes as much like the one of its substantial parts to the distribution of the fissile materials like a distribution of burnt poisons within each one of the cells which they constitute the fuel assemblies, used for the energy generation. Reason why at the beginning of a new operation cycle in a reactor of this type, the reactivity of the nucleus should be compensated by the exhaustion of the assemblies that it moves away of the nucleus for their final disposition. This compensation is given by means of the introduction of the recharge fuel, starting from the UO{sub 2} enriched in U{sup 2}35, and of the Gadolinium (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The distribution of these materials not only defines the requirements of energy generation, but in certain measures also the form in that the margins will behave to the limit them thermal during the operation of the reactor. These margins must be taken into account for the safe and efficient extraction of the energy of the fuel. In this work typical fuel cells appear that are obtained by means of the use of a emulation model of an ants colony. This model allows generating from a possible inventory of values of enrichment of U{sup 2}35, as well as of concentration of Gadolinium a typical fuel cell, which consists of an arrangement of lOxlO rods, of which 92 contain U{sup 2}35, some of these rods contain a concentration of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 8 of the total contain only water. The search of each cell finishes when the value of the Local Peak Power Factor (LPPF) in the cell reaches a minimal value, or when a pre established value of iterations is reached. The cell parameters are obtained from the results of the execution of the code HELIOS, which incorporates like a part integral of the search algorithm. (Author)

  13. Experimental Study on Surrogate Nuclear Fuel Rods under Reversed Cyclic Bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) rods under reversed cyclic bending or bending fatigue must be understood to evaluate their vibration integrity in a transportation environment. This is especially important for high-burnup fuels (>45 GWd/MTU), which have the potential for increased structural damage. It has been demonstrated that the bending fatigue of SNF rods can be effectively studied using surrogate rods. In this investigation, surrogate rods made of stainless steel (SS) 304 cladding and aluminum oxide pellets were tested under load or moment control at a variety of amplitude levels at 5 Hz using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The behavior of the rods was further characterized using flexural rigidity and hysteresis data, and fractography was performed on the failed rods. The proposed surrogate rods captured many of the characteristics of deformation and failure mode observed in SNF, including the linear-to-nonlinear deformation transition and large residual curvature in static tests, PPI and PCMI failure mechanisms, and large variation in the initial structural condition. Rod degradation was measured and characterized by measuring the flexural rigidity; the degradation of the rigidity depended on both the moment amplitude applied and the initial structural condition of the rods. It was also shown that a cracking initiation site can be located on the internal surface or the external surface of cladding. Finally, fatigue damage to the bending rods can be described in terms of flexural rigidity, and the fatigue life of rods can be predicted once damage model parameters are properly evaluated. The developed experimental approach, test protocol, and analysis method can be used to study the vibration integrity of SNF rods in the future.

  14. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIA: Criticality calculations of BWR spent fuel assemblies in storage and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ando, Yoshihira [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    The report describes the final results of Phase IIIA Benchmarks conducted by the Burnup Credit Criticality Calculation Working Group under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The benchmarks are intended to confirm the predictive capability of the current computer code and data library combinations for the neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of a layer of irradiated BWR fuel assembly array model. In total 22 benchmark problems are proposed for calculations of k{sub eff}. The effects of following parameters are investigated: cooling time, inclusion/exclusion of FP nuclides and axial burnup profile, and inclusion of axial profile of void fraction or constant void fractions during burnup. Axial profiles of fractional fission rates are further requested for five cases out of the 22 problems. Twenty-one sets of results are presented, contributed by 17 institutes from 9 countries. The relative dispersion of k{sub eff} values calculated by the participants from the mean value is almost within the band of {+-}1%{delta}k/k. The deviations from the averaged calculated fission rate profiles are found to be within {+-}5% for most cases. (author)

  15. A methodology for obtaining the control rod patterns in a BWR using genetic algorithms; Una metodologia para obtener los patrones de barras de control en un BWR usando algoritmos geneticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J.; Montes T, J.L. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Requena R, I. [Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)]. e-mail: jjortiz@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    In this work the GACRP system based on the genetic algorithms technique for the obtaining of the drivers of control bars in a BWR reactor is presented. This methodology was applied to a transition cycle and a one of balance of the Laguna Verde nuclear power station (CNLV). For each one of the studied cycles, it was executed the methodology with a fixed length of the cycle and it was compared the effective multiplication factor of neutrons at the end of the cycle that it is obtained with the proposed drivers of control bars and the multiplication factor of neutrons obtained by means of a Haling calculation. It was found that it is possible to extend several days the length of both cycles with regard to the one Haling calculation. (Author)

  16. Boiling water reactors with uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. Report 5: Analysis of the reactivity coefficients and the stability of a BWR loaded with MOx fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires

    2000-01-01

    This report is a part of the project titled 'Boiling Water Reactors With Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide (MOx) Fuel'. The aim of this study is to model the impact of a core loading pattern containing MOx bundles upon the main characteristics of a BWR (reactivity coefficients, stability, etc.). For this purpose, the Core Management System (CMS) codes of Studsvik Scandpower are used. This package is constituted by CASMO-4/TABLES-3/SIMULATE-3. It has been shown in previous reports that these codes are able to accurately represent and model MOx bundles. This report is thus devoted to the study of BWR cores loaded (partially or totally) with MOx bundles. The plutonium quality used is the Pu type 2016 (mostly Pu-239, 56 %, and Pu-240, 26 %), but a variation of the plutonium isotopic vector was also investigated, in case of a partial MOx loading. One notices that the reactivity coefficients do not present significant changes in comparison with a full UOx loading. Nevertheless, two main problems arise: the shutdown margin at BOC is lower than 1 % and the stability to in-phase oscillations is slightly decreased. (The SIMULATE-3 version used for this study does not contain the latest MOx enhancements described in literature, since these code developments have not been provided to the department. Nevertheless, as the nominal average enrichment of the MOx bundles is 5.41 % (total amount of plutonium), which can still be considered as a relatively low enrichment, the accuracy of the CMS codes is acceptable without the use of the MOx improvements for this level of Pu enrichment.

  17. POST-IRRADIATION ANALYSES OF U-MO DISPERSION FUEL RODS OF KOMO TESTS AT HANARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.J. RYU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2001, a series of five irradiation test campaigns for atomized U-Mo dispersion fuel rods, KOMO-1, -2, -3, -4, and -5, has been conducted at HANARO (Korea in order to develop high performance low enriched uranium dispersion fuel for research reactors. The KOMO irradiation tests provided valuable information on the irradiation behavior of U-Mo fuel that results from the distinct fuel design and irradiation conditions of the rod fuel for HANARO. Full size U-Mo dispersion fuel rods of 4–5 g-U/cm3 were irradiated at a maximum linear power of approximately 105 kW/m up to 85% of the initial U-235 depletion burnup without breakaway swelling or fuel cladding failure. Electron probe microanalyses of the irradiated samples showed localized distribution of the silicon that was added in the matrix during fuel fabrication and confirmed its beneficial effect on interaction layer growth during irradiation. The modifications of U-Mo fuel particles by the addition of a ternary alloying element (Ti or Zr, additional protective coatings (silicide or nitride, and the use of larger fuel particles resulted in significantly reduced interaction layers between fuel particles and Al.

  18. Assessment of stainless steel 348 fuel rod performance against literature available data using TRANSURANUS code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovedi Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early pressurized water reactors were originally designed to operate using stainless steel as cladding material, but during their lifetime this material was replaced by zirconium-based alloys. However, after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the problems related to the zirconium-based alloys due to the hydrogen production and explosion under severe accident brought the importance to assess different materials. In this sense, initiatives as ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel program are considering different material as fuel cladding and, one candidate is iron-based alloy. In order to assess the fuel performance of fuel rods manufactured using iron-based alloy as cladding material, it was necessary to select a specific stainless steel (type 348 and modify properly conventional fuel performance codes developed in the last decades. Then, 348 stainless steel mechanical and physics properties were introduced in the TRANSURANUS code. The aim of this paper is to present the obtained results concerning the verification of the modified TRANSURANUS code version against data collected from the open literature, related to reactors which operated using stainless steel as cladding. Considering that some data were not available, some assumptions had to be made. Important differences related to the conventional fuel rods were taken into account. Obtained results regarding the cladding behavior are in agreement with available information. This constitutes an evidence of the modified TRANSURANUS code capabilities to perform fuel rod investigation of fuel rods manufactured using 348 stainless steel as cladding material.

  19. Complex FEM based system of computer codes to model nuclear fuel rod thermomechanical behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valach, M.; Dostal, M.; Zymak, J. (Nuclear Reseach Institute, Rez-Husinec (Czech Republic)), e-mail: dostal@nri.cz

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents long-term effort to establish closed chain of computer codes, which allow computer modeling of the thermo-mechanical fuel rod behaviour from the 1D representation to the 3D detailed problem description. The whole complex uses the same FEM based mathematical approach. The principle of this modular approach is to handle boundary and initial conditions by the similar transfer independent on the complexity of solved problem. The goal of our modeling work was to develop model (FRA - Fuel Rod Analyser) capable of computing the spatial distribution of temperature and stress-strain in the fuel and cladding especially during power transients

  20. MATPRO: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Thompson, L.B. (eds.)

    1976-02-01

    This handbook describes the materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Documentation and formulations that are generally semiempirical in nature are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, gas mixture, and LWR fuel rod material properties.

  1. Investigation of stainless steel clad fuel rod failures and fuel performance in the Connecticut Yankee Reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R. W.

    1981-11-01

    Significant levels of fuel rod failures were observed in the batch 8 fuel assemblies of the Connecticut Yankee reactor. Failure of 304 stainless steel cladding in a PWR environment was not expected. Therefore a detailed poolside and hot cell examination program was conducted to determine the cause of failure and identify differences between batch 8 fuel and previous batches which had operated without failures. Hot cell work conducted consisted of detailed nondestructive and destructive examination of fuel rods from batches 7 and 8. The results indicate that the batch 8 failure mechanism was stress corrosion cracking initiating on the clad outer surface. The sources of cladding stresses are believed to be (a) fuel pellet chips wedged in the cladding gap, (b) swelling of highly nondensifying batch 8 fuel and (c) potentially harmful effects of a power change event that occurred near the end of the second cycle of irradiation for batch 8.

  2. Isotopic Details of the Spent Catawba-1 MOX Fuel Rods at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy funded Shaw/AREVA MOX Services LLC to fabricate four MOX Lead Test Assemblies (LTA) from weapons-grade plutonium. A total of four MOX LTAs (including MX03) were irradiated in the Catawba Nuclear Station (Unit 1) Catawba-1 PWR which operated at a total thermal power of 3411 MWt and had a core with 193 total fuel assemblies. The MOX LTAs were irradiated along with Duke Energy s irradiation of eight Westinghouse Next Generation Fuel (NGF) LEU LTAs (ref.1) and the remaining 181 LEU fuel assemblies. The MX03 LTA was irradiated in the Catawba-1 PWR core (refs.2,3) during cycles C-16 and C-17. C-16 began on June 5, 2005, and ended on November 11, 2006, after 499 effective full power days (EFPDs). C-17 started on December 29, 2006, (after a shutdown of 48 days) and continued for 485 EFPDs. The MX03 and three other MOX LTAs (and other fuel assemblies) were discharged at the end of C-17 on May 3, 2008. The design of the MOX LTAs was based on the (Framatome ANP, Inc.) Mark-BW/MOX1 17 17 fuel assembly design (refs. 4,5,6) for use in Westinghouse PWRs, but with MOX fuel rods with three Pu loading ranges: the nominal Pu loadings are 4.94 wt%, 3.30 wt%, and 2.40 wt%, respectively, for high, medium, and low Pu content. The Mark-BW/MOX1 (MOX LTA) fuel assembly design is the same as the Advanced Mark-BW fuel assembly design but with the LEU fuel rods replaced by MOX fuel rods (ref. 5). The fabrication of the fuel pellets and fuel rods for the MOX LTAs was performed at the Cadarache facility in France, with the fabrication of the LTAs performed at the MELOX facility, also in France.

  3. A methodology for obtaining the control rods patterns in a BWR using systems based on ants colonies; Una metodologia para obtener los patrones de barras de control en un BWR usando sistemas basados en colonias de hormigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J. [Depto. de Sistemas Nucleares, ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Requena R, I. [Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)]. e-mail: jjortiz@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    In this work the AZCATL-PBC system based on a technique of ants colonies for the search of control rods patterns of those reactors of the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (CNLV) is presented. The technique was applied to a transition cycle and one of balance. For both cycles they were compared the k{sub ef} values obtained with a Haling calculation and the control rods pattern proposed by AZCATL-PBC for a burnt one fixed. It was found that the methodology is able to extend the length of the cycle with respect to the Haling prediction, maintaining sure to the reactor. (Author)

  4. Information to be requested from the NSSS vendor for fuel management capability for BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.; Esteban, A.; Gomez, M.; Leira, G.; Martinez, R.; Serrano, J.

    1975-07-01

    A set of the nuclear, thermal-hydraulic, and mechanical parameters necessary according to the design of BWRs, is listed. This parameters are necessary to perform the fuel elements management and design, and it must be supplied by the Reactor Manufacturer to the Utility. (Author) 18 refs.

  5. The possibility and the effects of a steam explosion in the BWR lower head on recriticality of a BWR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N. [Sehgal Consult (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    The report describes an analysis considering a BWR postulated severe accident scenario during which the late vessel automatic depressurization brings the water below the level of the bottom core plate. The subsequent lack of ECCS leads to core heat up during which the control rods melt and the melt deposits on the core plate. At that point of time in the scenario, the core fuel bundles are still intact and the Zircaloy clad oxidation is about to start. The objective of the study is to provide the conditions of reflood into the hot core due to the level swell or a slug delivered from the lower head as the control rod melt drops into the water. These conditions are employed in the neutronic analysis with the RECRIT code to determine if the core recriticality may be achieved. (au)

  6. Measurement station for interim inspections of Lightbridge metallic fuel rods at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmann C.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightbridge Corporation has developed a new Uranium-Zirconium based metallic fuel. The fuel rods aremanufactured via a co-extrusion process, and are characterized by their multi-lobed (cruciform-shaped cross section. The fuel rods are also helically-twisted in the axial direction. Two experimental fuel assemblies, each containing four Lightbridge fuel rods, are scheduled to be irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR starting in 2018. In addition to on-line monitoring of fuel rod elongation and critical assembly conditions (e.g. power, flow rates, coolant temperatures, etc. during the irradiation, several key parameters of the fuel will be measured out-of-core during interim inspections. An inspection measurement station for use in the irradiated fuel handling compartment at the HBWR has therefore been developed for this purpose. The multi-lobed cladding cross section combined with the spiral shape of the Lightbridge metallic fuel rods requires a high-precision guiding system to ensure good position repeatability combined with low-friction guiding. The measurement station is equipped with a combination of instruments and equipment supplied from third-party vendors and instruments and equipment developed at Institute for Energy Technology (IFE. Two sets of floating linear voltage differential transformer (LVDT pairs are used to measure swelling and diameter changes between the lobes and the valleys over the length of the fuel rods. Eddy current probes are used to measure the thickness of oxide layers in the valleys and on the lobe tips and also to detect possible surface cracks/pores. The measurement station also accommodates gamma scans. Additionally, an eddy-current probe has been developed at IFE specifically to detect potential gaps or discontinuities in the bonding layer between the metallic fuel and the Zirconium alloy cladding. Potential gaps in the bonding layer will be hidden behind a 0.5-1.0 mm thick cladding wall. It has

  7. Measurement station for interim inspections of Lightbridge metallic fuel rods at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, C.; Totemeier, A.; Holcombe, S.; Liverud, J.; Limi, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Navestad, E. AB(; )

    2018-01-01

    Lightbridge Corporation has developed a new Uranium-Zirconium based metallic fuel. The fuel rods aremanufactured via a co-extrusion process, and are characterized by their multi-lobed (cruciform-shaped) cross section. The fuel rods are also helically-twisted in the axial direction. Two experimental fuel assemblies, each containing four Lightbridge fuel rods, are scheduled to be irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) starting in 2018. In addition to on-line monitoring of fuel rod elongation and critical assembly conditions (e.g. power, flow rates, coolant temperatures, etc.) during the irradiation, several key parameters of the fuel will be measured out-of-core during interim inspections. An inspection measurement station for use in the irradiated fuel handling compartment at the HBWR has therefore been developed for this purpose. The multi-lobed cladding cross section combined with the spiral shape of the Lightbridge metallic fuel rods requires a high-precision guiding system to ensure good position repeatability combined with low-friction guiding. The measurement station is equipped with a combination of instruments and equipment supplied from third-party vendors and instruments and equipment developed at Institute for Energy Technology (IFE). Two sets of floating linear voltage differential transformer (LVDT) pairs are used to measure swelling and diameter changes between the lobes and the valleys over the length of the fuel rods. Eddy current probes are used to measure the thickness of oxide layers in the valleys and on the lobe tips and also to detect possible surface cracks/pores. The measurement station also accommodates gamma scans. Additionally, an eddy-current probe has been developed at IFE specifically to detect potential gaps or discontinuities in the bonding layer between the metallic fuel and the Zirconium alloy cladding. Potential gaps in the bonding layer will be hidden behind a 0.5-1.0 mm thick cladding wall. It has therefore been

  8. Gap transport of fission products in defective fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, H.W.; Lewis, B.J.

    1994-12-31

    The diffusive and convective transport of fission products released into the fuel-to-sheath gap of defective fuel has been modeled analytically and numerically for normal reactor operation and for accident conditions. The model is based on the results of in-reactor and out-of-pile annealing tests performed at the Chalk River Laboratories.

  9. Consistent neutron-physical and thermal-physical calculations of fuel rods of VVER type reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikhomirov Georgy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For modeling the isotopic composition of fuel, and maximum temperatures at different moments of time, one can use different algorithms and codes. In connection with the development of new types of fuel assemblies and progress in computer technology, the task makes important to increase accuracy in modeling of the above characteristics of fuel assemblies during the operation. Calculations of neutronphysical characteristics of fuel rods are mainly based on models using averaged temperature, thermal conductivity factors, and heat power density. In this paper, complex approach is presented, based on modern algorithms, methods and codes to solve separate tasks of thermal conductivity, neutron transport, and nuclide transformation kinetics. It allows to perform neutron-physical and thermal-physical calculation of the reactor with detailed temperature distribution, with account of temperature-depending thermal conductivity and other characteristics. It was applied to studies of fuel cell of the VVER-1000 reactor. When developing new algorithms and programs, which should improve the accuracy of modeling the isotopic composition and maximum temperature in the fuel rod, it is necessary to have a set of test tasks for verification. The proposed approach can be used for development of such verification base for testing calculation of fuel rods of VVER type reactors

  10. Experience with incomplete control rod insertion in fuel with burnup exceeding approximately 40 GWD/MTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, E. [Houston Lighting & Power Co., Wadworth, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Analysis and measurement experience with fuel assemblies having incomplete control rod insertion at burnups of approximately 40 GWD/MTU is presented. Control rod motion dynamics and simplified structural analyses are presented and compared to measurement data. Fuel assembly growth measurements taken with the plant Refueling Machine Z-Tape are described and presented. Bow measurements (including plug gauging) are described and potential improvements are suggested. The measurements described and analysis performed show that sufficient guide tube bow (either from creep or yield buckling) is present in some high burnup assemblies to stop the control rods before they reach their full limit of travel. Recommendations are made that, if implemented, could improve cost performance related to testing and analysis activities.

  11. CFD analysis of rewetting vertical nuclear fuel rod by dispersed fluid jet impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajoy Debbarma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical analysis of cooling assessment in hot vertical fuel rod is carryout using ANSYS 14.0 – CFX Solver. Rewetting is the process of re-establishment of coolants with hot surfaces. Numerical validation exercise carried out with number of turbulence and shear stress turbulence model fairly predict the experimental data and used for further investigation. In the present paper, dispersed fluid is simulating with CFX solver to investigate the flow boiling process in emergency cooling of vertical fuel rod. When coolants come in contact on the hot surface this may not initiated the wetting patch. However, this paper introduces the unique jet impingement direction to remove the heat from the hot surface. In this report, the rewetting temperature and wetting delay also described during in progress of wetting front movement in hot vertical rod.

  12. Fretting wear behavior of Cr-coated fuel rod for accident-tolerant fuel in flowing fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Gil; Koo, Yang Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Fretting wear test of the Cr-coated fuel clading candidate have been performed in the flowing fluid condition in order to verify the reliability of Cr-coated layer on zirconium-based fuel cladding. Rod wear volume at each grid spring and dimple is dramaically increased with GTR gap even though each wear scar is not evenly distributed within a 1x1 grid cell.

  13. Development of End Plug Welding Technique for SFR Fuel Rod Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Won Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Korea, R&D on a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR was begun in 1997, as one of the national long-term nuclear R&D programs. As one fuel option for a prototype SFR, a metallic fuel, U-Zr alloy fuel, was selected and is currently being developed. For the fabrication of SFR metallic fuel rods, the end plug welding is a crucial process. The sealing of the end plug to the cladding tube should be hermetically perfect to prevent a leakage of fission gases and to maintain a good reactor performance. In this study, the welding technique, welding equipment, welding conditions, and parameters were developed for the end plug welding of SFR metallic fuel rods. A gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed. In addition, the optimal welding conditions and parameters were established. Based on the establishment of the welding conditions, the GTAW technique was qualified for the end plug welding of SFR metallic fuel rods.

  14. Fuel design with low peak of local power for BWR reactors with increased nominal power; Diseno de un combustible con bajo pico de potencia local para reactores BWR con potencia nominal aumentada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia C, R.; Montes, J.L.; Hernandez, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Castillo, A. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mrpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The Federal Commission of Electricity recently announcement the beginning of the works related with the increase of the power to 120% of the original nominal one in the Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of the Laguna Verde Central (CLV): In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) are carried out studies of the impact on the design of the recharge of derived fuel of this increase. One of the main effects of the power increase type that it is promoting, is the increment of the flow of generated vapor, what takes, to a bigger fraction of vacuum in the core presenting increased values of the maximum fraction to the limit, so much of the ratio of lineal heat generation (XFLPD) as of the ratio of critic power (MFLCPR). In the made studies, it is found that these fractions rise lineally with the increase of the nominal power. Considering that the reactors of the CLV at the moment operate to 105% of the original nominal power, it would imply an increment of the order of 13.35% in the XFLPD and in the MFLCPR operating to a nominal power of 120% of the original one. This would propitiate bigger problems to design appropriately the fuel cycle and the necessity, almost unavoidable, of to resort to a fuel assembly type more advanced for the recharges of the cores. As option, in the ININ the feasibility of continuing using the same type of it fuel assembles that one has come using recently in the CLV, the type GE12 is analyzed. To achieve it was outlined to diminish the peak factor of local power (LPPF) of the power cells that compose the fuel recharge in 13.35%. It was started of a fuel design previously used in the recharge of the unit 1 cycle 12 and it was re-design to use it in the recharge design of the cycle 13 of the unit 1, considering an increase to 120% of the original power and the same requirements of cycle extension. For the re-design of the fuel assembly cell it was used the PreDiCeldas computer program developed in the ININ. It was able to diminish the LPPF

  15. Advanced and flexible genetic algorithms for BWR fuel loading pattern optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-del-Campo, Cecilia [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Mor., 62550 (Mexico)], E-mail: cmcm@fi-b.unam.mx; Palomera-Perez, Miguel-Angel [Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Escolar, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 DF (Mexico)], E-mail: mapp@uxmcc2.iimas.unam.mx; Francois, Juan-Luis [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Mor., 62550 (Mexico)], E-mail: jlfl@fi-b.unam.mx

    2009-10-15

    This work proposes advances in the implementation of a flexible genetic algorithm (GA) for fuel loading pattern optimization for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). In order to avoid specific implementations of genetic operators and to obtain a more flexible treatment, a binary representation of the solution was implemented; this representation had to take into account that a little change in the genotype must correspond to a little change in the phenotype. An identifier number is assigned to each assembly by means of a Gray Code of 7 bits and the solution (the loading pattern) is represented by a binary chain of 777 bits of length. Another important contribution is the use of a Fitness Function which includes a Heuristic Function and an Objective Function. The Heuristic Function which is defined to give flexibility on the application of a set of positioning rules based on knowledge, and the Objective Function that contains all the parameters which qualify the neutronic and thermal hydraulic performances of each loading pattern. Experimental results illustrating the effectiveness and flexibility of this optimization algorithm are presented and discussed.

  16. Casting technology for manufacturing metal rods from simulated metallic spent fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeand, Y. S.; Lee, D. B.; Kim, C. K.; Shin, Y. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2000-09-01

    A uranium metal rod 13.5 mm in diameter and 1,150 mm long was produced from simulated metallic spent fuels with advanced casting equipment using the directional-solidification method. A vacuum casting furnace equipped with a four-zone heater to prevent surface oxidation and the formation of surface shrinkage holes was designed. By controlling the axial temperature gradient of the casting furnace, deformation by the surface shrinkage phenomena was diminished, and a sound rod was manufactured. The cooling behavior of the molten uranium was analyzed using the computer software package MAGMAsoft.

  17. Development of the vibration analysis technique of fuel rod and research on the methodology of fuel fretting wear analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heung Seok; Kim, Kyung Kyu; Yoon, Hyung Hoo; Song, Ki Nam

    1998-12-01

    The FEM program has been developed to predict the natural frequencies, the FEM program has been developed to predict the natural frequencies, and mode shapes of fuel rod subjected to axial force and continuously supported by a rotational and vent spring system, and to calculate the minimum reaction forces of the spacer grid spring when the maximum vibration amplitude of fuel rod is known. This program has been verified by commercial ANSYS program and the vibration test of dummy rods in air. The test equipment were set to get the fifth modes of test rods. Partial slip problem has been studied for the analysis of fuel fretting problem. Firstly, the assumption of semi-infiniteness of the contact bodies were validated by finite element (FE) analysis. From FE results, a classical bodies were validated by finite element (FE) analysis. From FE results, aclassical theory of elasticity was utilized with regarding the problem as a plane problem. Secondly, the Mindlin-Cattaneo problem was re-evaluated, which gave the fundamental idea for developing the numerical tool for the shear traction on the contact. Shear force of sequentially-changing directions was considered and the corresponding shear traction was evaluated by extending the numerical tool for the Mindlin-Cattaneo problem.

  18. 3D simulation of a core operation cycle of a BWR using Serpent; Simulacion 3D de un ciclo de operacion del nucleo de un BWR usando SERPENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera Ch, M. A.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: rionchez@icloud.com [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This work had the main goal to develop a methodology to obtain the length of an operating cycle of the core of a BWR under different operating states using the Serpent code. The reactor core modeled in Serpent is composed of 444 fuel assemblies (120 with fresh fuels and 324 fuels from previous cycles), 109 cruciform control rods and light water as moderator and coolant. Once the core of the reactor was modeled in Serpent (Three-dimensional) without considering the cruciform control rods, a simulation was carried out with different steps of burning in the operational state with the average values of the fuel temperature (900 K), moderator temperature (600 K) and voids fraction equal to 0.4. In addition, the thermal power considered was 2017 MWt. This operational state was chosen because a previous analysis (not shown in this work) was carried out in 4 types of control cells. The first and second control cell has all of its natural uranium fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod respectively. The third and fourth control cell types have various types of enrichment, both natural uranium and gadolinium in their fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod. The conclusion of this previous analysis was that the behavior of the effective multiplication factor along the fuel burnout within the four control cell types was almost unaffected by the fuel temperature but was affected by the voids fraction. Thus, for this operating cycle in the operating state defined above, its length was 14,63052 GW t/Tm. In addition, at the end of this cycle, the decay heat obtained was equal to 116.71 MWt and the inventory of the most important isotopes to be considered was obtained, such as some isotopes of uranium, neptune, plutonium, americium and curio. (Author)

  19. Serpent: an alternative for the nuclear fuel cells analysis of a BWR; SERPENT: una alternativa para el analisis de celdas de combustible nuclear de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva A, L.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: lidi.s.albarran@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In the last ten years the diverse research groups in nuclear engineering of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (UNAM, IPN), as of research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ) as well as the personnel of the Nuclear Plant Management of the Comision Federal de Electricidad have been using the codes Helios and /or CASMO-4 in the generation of cross sections (X S) of nuclear fuel cells of the cores corresponding to the Units 1 and 2 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Both codes belong to the Studsvik-Scandpower Company who receives the payment for the use and their respective maintenance. In recent years, the code Serpent appears among the nuclear community distributed by the OECD/Nea which does not has cost neither in its use neither in its maintenance. The code is based on the Monte Carlo method and makes use of the processing in parallel. In the Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of the IPN, the personnel has accumulated certain experience in the use of Serpent under the direction of personal of the ININ; of this experience have been obtained for diverse fuel burned, the infinite multiplication factor for three cells of nuclear fuel, without control bar and with control bar for a known thermodynamic state fixed by: a) the fuel temperature (T{sub f}), b) the moderator temperature (T{sub m}) and c) the vacuums fraction (α). Although was not realized any comparison with the X S that the codes Helios and CASMO-4 generate, the results obtained for the infinite multiplication factor show the prospective tendencies with regard to the fuel burned so much in the case in that is not present the control bar like when it is. The results are encouraging and motivate to the study group to continue with the X S generation of a core in order to build the respective library of nuclear data as a following step and this can be used for the codes PARCS, of USA NRC, DYN3D of HZDR, or others developed locally

  20. Rod internal pressure of spent nuclear fuel and its effects on cladding degradation during dry storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Seong; Hong, Jong-Dae; Yang, Yong-Sik; Kook, Dong-Hak

    2017-08-01

    Temperature and hoop stress limits have been used to prevent the gross rupture of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage. The stress due to rod internal pressure can induce cladding degradation such as creep, hydride reorientation, and delayed hydride cracking. Creep is a self-limiting phenomenon in a dry storage system; in contrast, hydride reorientation and delayed hydride cracking are potential degradation mechanisms activated at low temperatures when the cladding material is brittle. In this work, a conservative rod internal pressure and corresponding hoop stress were calculated using FRAPCON-4.0 fuel performance code. Based on the hoop stresses during storage, a study on the onset of hydride reorientation and delayed hydride cracking in spent nuclear fuel was conducted under the current storage guidelines. Hydride reorientation is hard to occur in most of the low burn-up fuel while some high burn-up fuel can experience hydride reorientation, but their effect may not be significant. On the other hand, delayed hydride cracking will not occur in spent nuclear fuel from pressurized water reactor; however, there is a lack of confirmatory data on threshold intensity factor for delayed hydride cracking and crack size distribution in the fuel.

  1. Development of oxygen sensing technology in an irradiated fuel rod. Characteristic test of oxygen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Junichi; Hoshiya, Taiji; Sakurai, Fumio; Sakai, Haruyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1996-03-01

    At the Department of JMTR (Japan Materials Test Reactor), the re-instrumentation technologies to a high burnup fuel rod irradiated in an LWR have been developed to study irradiation behavior of the fuel during power transient. It has been progressed developing a chemical sensor as one of the re-instrumentation technologies. This report summarizes the results of characteristic tests of an oxygen sensor made of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) as a solid electrolyte. Several kinds of experiments were carried out to evaluate the electromotive force (emf) performance, stability and lifetime of the oxygen sensor with Ni/NiO, Cr/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe/FeO, respectively as a reference electrode. From the experimental data, it is suggested that the reference electrode of Ni/NiO reveals the most appropriate characteristic of the sensor to measure the partial oxygen pressure in a fuel rod. It is the final goal of this development to clarify the change of oxygen chemical potential in a fuel rod during power transient. (author).

  2. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from above on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown.

  3. Multi-component gas transport in the fuel-to-clad gap of candu fuel rods during severe accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpunar, B.; Lewis, B. J.; Arimescu, V. I.; Dickson, R. S.; Dickson, L. W.

    2001-04-01

    The multi-component transport of steam, hydrogen and stable fission gas in the fuel-to-clad gap of defective CANDU fuel rods, during severe accident conditions, is investigated in the present work based on a general Stefan-Maxwell treatment. In this analysis, incoming steam must diffuse into a breached rod against a counter-current flow of non-condensable fission gases and out-flowing hydrogen that is produced from the internal reaction of steam with the Zircaloy cladding or urania. A solution of the transport equations yields the local molar distribution of hydrogen and steam so that the internal oxygen potential can be estimated along the length of the gap as a function of time. These equations are numerically solved using finite-difference and control-volume methods with a sparse matrix approach. The model has been used to interpret the fission product release and fuel-rod (i.e., Zircaloy and urania) oxidation behavior observed in high-temperature annealing experiments that were conducted at the Chalk River Laboratories with spent fuel samples with Zircaloy cladding.

  4. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 2. Pre- and post-test decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, L.E.; Lombardo, N.J.; Heeb, C.M.; Jenquin, U.P.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.; Creer, J.M.; McCann, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses conducted in support of performance testing of a Ridhihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2033 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The cask testing program was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and by General Electric at the latters' Morris Operation (GE-MO) as reported in Volume I. The analyses effort consisted of performing pretest calculations to (1) select spent fuel for the test; (2) symmetrically load the spent fuel assemblies in the cask to ensure lateral symmetry of decay heat generation rates; (3) optimally locate temperature and dose rate instrumentation in the cask and spent fuel assemblies; and (4) evaluate the ORIGEN2 (decay heat), HYDRA and COBRA-SFS (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) computer codes. The emphasis of this second volume is on the comparison of code predictions to experimental test data in support of the code evaluation process. Code evaluations were accomplished by comparing pretest (actually pre-look, since some predictions were not completed until testing was in progress) predictions with experimental cask testing data reported in Volume I. No attempt was made in this study to compare the two heat transfer codes because results of other evaluations have not been completed, and a comparison based on one data set may lead to erroneous conclusions.

  5. MOX fuel assembly and reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hidemitsu; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo

    1998-06-26

    The MOX fuel assembly of the present invention is of a c-lattice type loaded to a BWR type reactor. 74 MOX fuel rods filled with mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium and two water rods disposed to a space equal to that for 7 MOX fuel rods are arranged in 9 x 9 matrix. MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are disposed to four corners of the 9 x 9 matrix. The enrichment degree means a ratio of the weight of fission products based on the total weight of fuels. Two MOX fuel rods having the same enrichment degree are arranged in each direction so as to be continuous from the MOX fuel rods at four corners in the direction of the same row and different column and same column and the different row. In addition, among the outermost circumferential portion of the 9 x 9 matrix, MOX fuel rods having a lower enrichment degree next to the MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are arranged, each by three to a portion where MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are not disposed. (I.N.)

  6. Licensing of spent fuel dry storage and consolidated rod storage: A Review of Issues and Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1990-02-01

    The results of this study, performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), respond to the nuclear industry's recommendation that a report be prepared that collects and describes the licensing issues (and their resolutions) that confront a new applicant requesting approval from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for dry storage of spent fuel or for large-scale storage of consolidated spent fuel rods in pools. The issues are identified in comments, questions, and requests from the NRC during its review of applicants' submittals. Included in the report are discussions of (1) the 18 topical reports on cask and module designs for dry storage fuel that have been submitted to the NRC, (2) the three license applications for dry storage of spent fuel at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) that have been submitted to the NRC, and (3) the three applications (one of which was later withdrawn) for large-scale storage of consolidated fuel rods in existing spent fuel storage pools at reactors that were submitted tot he NRC. For each of the applications submitted, examples of some of the issues (and suggestions for their resolutions) are described. The issues and their resolutions are also covered in detail in an example in each of the three subject areas: (1) the application for the CASTOR V/21 dry spent fuel storage cask, (2) the application for the ISFSI for dry storage of spent fuel at Surry, and (3) the application for full-scale wet storage of consolidated spent fuel at Millstone-2. The conclusions in the report include examples of major issues that applicants have encountered. Recommendations for future applicants to follow are listed. 401 refs., 26 tabs.

  7. Analysis of transient heat conduction in a PWR fuel rod by an improved lumped parameter approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourado, Eneida Regina G. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cotta, Renato M. [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica; Jian, Su, E-mail: eneidadourado@gmail.com, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: cotta@mecanica.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to analyze transient heat conduction in a nuclear fuel rod by an improved lumped parameter approach. One-dimensional transient heat conduction is considered, with the circumferential symmetry assumed and the axial conduction neglected. The thermal conductivity and specific heat in the fuel pellet are considered temperature dependent, while the thermophysical properties of the cladding are considered constant. Hermite approximation for integration is used to obtain the average temperature and heat flux in the radial direction. Significant improvement over the classical lumped parameter formulation has been achieved. The proposed model can be also used in dynamic analysis of PWR and nuclear power plant simulators. (author)

  8. Finite element analysis of the contact between fuel rod and spacer grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Young Koon; Kang, Heung Seok; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Song, Kee Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    For the research on the fretting failure problem of nuclear fuel, the contact length and normal stress field are evaluated for the contact between fuel rod and spacer grid by using the Finite Element Method (FEM). An assumption of semi-infiniteness is necessary for applying the Contact Mechanics which is based on the classical theory of elasticity to the present problem. For the contact problem of fuel fretting, the contact mechanical solutions could be utilized well with sufficient accuracy if the contact bodies (i.e., the cladding tube and the spacer grid) can be assumed as semi-infinite bodies. To this end, the contact length evaluated by FEM is discussed together with the relevant research which concerned the effect of dimension for the validity of the assumption of semi-infiniteness. Normal stress profile on the contact is also studied through comparing the theoretical and the FE results. For the analysis of contact problem by FEM, ANSYS code (Version 5.3) is utilized and the geometry is chosen to be the Hertzian (cylinder-to-cylinder), the strip-to-cylinder and the fuel rod/spacer grid contact (strip-to-tube). Present research will be utilized for accessing the fuel fretting problem by FEM together with the theoretical (i.e., contact mechanical) analysis which has been published as KAERI/TR-1113/98. (author). 15 refs., 44 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. FRAPCON-2: A Computer Code for the Calculation of Steady State Thermal-Mechanical Behavior of Oxide Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A; Bohn, M. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Williford, R. E.; Lanning, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    FRAPCON-2 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady state response of light Mater reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, deformation, and tai lure histories of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (a) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (b) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (c) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (d) fission gas release, (e} fuel rod internal gas pressure, (f) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (g) cladding oxidation, and (h) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat transfer correlations. FRAPCON-2 is programmed for use on the CDC Cyber 175 and 176 computers. The FRAPCON-2 code Is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by either the FRAP-T6 computer code or the thermal-hydraulic code, RELAP4/MOD7 Version 2.

  10. Transient thermo-mechanical analysis for metal fuel rod under transient operation condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Lee, Byoung Oon; Kim, Young Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    Computational models for analyzing in-reactor behavior of metallic fuel pins in liquid-metal reactors under transient conditions are developed and implemented in the TRAnsient thermo-Mechanical Analysis Code for metal fuel rod under transient operation condition (TRAMAC). Not only the basic models for fuel rod performance under transient condition, but also some sub-models used for transient condition are installed in TRAMAC. Among the models, fission gas release model, which takes multibubble size distribution into account to characterize the lenticular bubble shape and the saturation condition on the grain boundary and cladding deformation model have been mainly developed based on the existing models in MACSIS code. Finally, cladding strains are calculated from the amount of thermal creep, irradiation creep, irradiation swelling. The cladding strain model in TRAMAC well predicts the absolute magnitudes and general trends of their predictions compared with those of experimental data. TRAMAC results for FM-1,2,6 pins are more conservative than experimental data and relatively reasonable than those of FPIN2. From the calculation results of TRAMAC, it is apparent that the code is capable of predicting fission gas release, and cladding deformation for LMR metal fuel. The results show that in general, the predictions of TRAMAC agree well with the available irradiation data. 13 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  11. Oxidation investigation of cladding specimens for regular and accident tolerant fuel rods under LOCA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyuk, S. S.; Deryabin, I. A.; Kiselev, D. S.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu A.; Mokrushin, A. A.; Parshin, N. Ya; Popov, E. B.; Soldatkin, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    The high-temperature oxidation tests were carried out for the regular fuel rod claddings specimens made of sponge-based zirconium alloy (E110G) and for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) ones – pure vacuum melted molybdenum (VCPM) and niobium alloy (Nb-1%Zr). The tests were carried out under the ambient pressure p ∼ 0.1 MPa in pure water steam. The experimental data on the oxidation characteristics were obtained for E110G specimens in the temperature range T = 1100 ‑ 1500 °C, that for VCPM and Nb-1%Zr are investigated under extended temperature-duration range (more than 1 hour). The thermal effects of molybdenum (QSMR) and niobium (QSNR) interactions with steam were defined and the derived oxidation rate constants for refractory metals were compared with the known ones. Based on the computations performed with PARAM-TG code the high-temperature oxidation characteristics of model fuel assemblies of large-scale facilities under LOCA conditions with regular and ATF claddings were compared. It was shown that Zr-steam interaction of fuel rod cladding (QSZR) is more intensive compared with VCPM and Nb-1%Zr ones under investigated conditions.

  12. Impact of UO{sub 2} Enrichment of Fuel Zoning Rods in Long Cycle Operation of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ho Cheol; Lee, Deokjung [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Eun; Choe, Jiwon [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Extending the cycle length can not only increase the energy production, but also bring down outage costs by reducing the number of refueling outages during the lifetime of a nuclear power plant. It is reasonable that more fresh fuels are loaded for long cycle operation. However, minimizing the number of fresh fuels is essential in aspect of fuel economics. This can cause high power peaking near the water holes, due to increased thermalization of neutrons in those regions. To prevent this, special fuel zoning rods are used and surround the water holes. These rods use lower-enriched uranium (they have an enrichment rate lower than the other fuel rods). If we adjust the enrichment rate of fuel zoning rods, we can reduce power peaking and moreover increase cycle length. In this paper, we designed a core suitable for long cycle operation and we conducted sensitivity tests of fuel cycle length on UO2 enrichment rate in fuel zoning region in order to extend the cycle length while using the same number of fresh fuels. The correlations between the fuel zoning enrichment and cycle length, peaking factor, CBC and shutdown margin were analyzed. The more the enrichment rate in fuel zoning region increases, the more the fuel cycle length increases. At the same time, CBC, Fq and shutdown margin do not change significantly. Increasing the fuel zoning enrichment rate presents the right property of increasing the fuel cycle length without causing a large change to CBC, Fq and shutdown margin. In conclusion, by increasing the uranium enrichment rate in fuel zoning region, fuel cycle length can be increased and the safety margins can be maintained for long cycle operation of cores.

  13. Criticality experiments with low enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierman, S.R.; Murphy, E.S.; Clayton, E.D.; Keay, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The results obtained in a criticality experiments program performed for British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL) under contract with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved low enriched UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium, and are in direct support of BNFL plans to use soluble compounds of the neutron poison gadolinium as a primary criticality safeguard in the reprocessing of low enriched nuclear fuels. The experiments were designed primarily to provide data for validating a calculation method being developed for BNFL design and safety assessments, and to obtain data for the use of gadolinium as a neutron poison in nuclear chemical plant operations - particularly fuel dissolution. The experiments program covers a wide range of neutron moderation (near optimum to very under-moderated) and a wide range of gadolinium concentration (zero to about 2.5 g Gd/l). The measurements provide critical and subcritical k/sub eff/ data (1 greater than or equal to k/sub eff/ greater than or equal to 0.87) on fuel-water assemblies of UO/sub 2/ rods at two enrichments (2.35 wt % and 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U) and on mixed fuel-water assemblies of UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ rods containing 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U and 2 wt % PuO/sub 2/ in natural UO/sub 2/ respectively. Critical size of the lattices was determined with water containing no gadolinium and with water containing dissolved gadolinium nitrate. Pulsed neutron source measurements were performed to determine subcritical k/sub eff/ values as additional amounts of gadolinium were successively dissolved in the water of each critical assembly. Fission rate measurements in /sup 235/U using solid state track recorders were made in each of the three unpoisoned critical assemblies, and in the near-optimum moderated and the close-packed poisoned assemblies of this fuel.

  14. Study of intermediate configurations during the fuel reload in BWRs; Estudio de configuraciones intermedias durante la recarga de combustible en BWR's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes M, L.; Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del C, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Jacinto C, S., E-mail: luis.fuentes@inin.gob.mx [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Yucatan, Calle 60 No. 491-A por 57, 97000 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The criticality state of the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR) was evaluated, during the reload process for the intermediate states between the load pattern of cycle end and the beginning of the next, using the information of the load pattern of the operation cycles 13 and 14 of Unit 1 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. For this evaluation the codes CASMO-4 and Simulate-3 for conditions of the core in cold were used. The strategy consisted on moving assemblies with 4 burned cycles of the reactor core. Later on were re situated the remaining assemblies, placing them in the positions to occupy in the next operation cycle. Finally, was carried out the assemblies load of fresh fuel. In each realized change, it was observing the behavior of the k-effective value that is the parameter used to evaluate the criticality state of each state of the core change. In a second stage, was designed a program that builds in automatic way each one of the intermediate cores and also analyzes the criticality state of the reactor core after each withdrawal, re situated and load of fuel assemblies. (Author)

  15. A cone beam computed tomography inspection method for fuel rod cladding tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Tan, Renbo; Wang, Qianli; Deng, Jingshan; Liu, Ming

    2012-10-01

    Fuel rods in nuclear power plants consist of UO2 pellets enclosed in Zirconium alloy (Zircaloy) cladding tube, which is composed of a body and a plug. The body is manufactured separately from the plug and, before its use, the plug is welded with the body. It is vitally important for the welding zone to remain free from defects after the fuel pellets are loaded into the cladding tube to prevent the radioactive fission products from leaking. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is in principle a feasible inspection method for the welding zone, but it faces several challenges due to the high attenuation of Zircaloy. In this paper, a cone beam CT method is proposed to address these issues and perform the welding flaw inspection. A Zircaloy compensator is adopted to narrow the signal range, a structure-based background removal technique to reveal the defects, a linear extension technique to determine the reference X-ray intensity signal and FDK algorithm to reconstruct the slice images. A prototype system, based on X-ray tube source and flat panel detector, has been developed and the experiments in this system have demonstrated that the welding void and the incomplete joint penetrations could be detected by this method. This approach may find applications in the quality control of nuclear fuel rods.

  16. An electrical simulator of a nuclear fuel rod cooled by nucleate boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Antonio Carlos Lopes da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: aclc@cdtn.br; Machado, Luiz; Koury, Ricardo Nicolau Nassar [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], e-mail: luizm@demec.ufmg.br; Bonjour, Jocelyn [CETHIL, UMR5008, CNRS, INSA-Lyon (France)], e-mail: jocelyn.bonjour@insa-lyon.fr; Passos, Julio Cesar [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. LEPTEN/Boiling], e-mail: jpassos@emc.ufsc.br

    2009-07-01

    This study investigates an electrical heated test section designed to simulate a nuclear fuel rod. This simulator comprises a stainless steel vertical tube, with length and outside diameter of 600 mm and 10 mm, respectively, inside which there is a high power electrical resistor. The heat generated is removed by means of enhanced confined subcooled nucleate boiling of water in an annular space containing 153 small metal inclined discs. The tests were performed under electrical power and pressure up to 48 kW and 40 bar, respectively. The results show that the experimental boiling heat transfer coefficients are in good agreement with those calculated using the Jens-Lottes correlation. (author)

  17. Analysis of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagranda, Albert [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-06-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  18. Determination of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagranda, Albert [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  19. MATPRO-Version 11: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Reymann, G.A. (comps.)

    1979-02-01

    This handbook describes the materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO-Version 11) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Formulations of fuel rod material properties, which are generally semiempirical in nature, are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium--plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, and fill gas mixtures.

  20. Matpro--version 10: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reymann, G.A. (comp.)

    1978-02-01

    The materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO--Version 10) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. Formulations of fuel rod material properties, which are generally semiempirical in nature, are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium--plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, and fill gas mixtures.

  1. Synthesis and Analysis of Alpha Silicon Carbide Components for Encapsulation of Fuel Rods and Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin M. McHugh; John E. Garnier; George W. Griffith

    2011-09-01

    The chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of silicon carbide (SiC) along with its low neutron activation and stability in a radiation field make it an attractive material for encapsulating fuel rods and fuel pellets. The alpha phase (6H) is particularly stable. Unfortunately, it requires very high temperature processing and is not readily available in fibers or near-net shapes. This paper describes an investigation to fabricate a-SiC as thin films, fibers and near-net-shape products by direct conversion of carbon using silicon monoxide vapor at temperatures less than 1700 C. In addition, experiments to nucleate the alpha phase during pyrolysis of polysilazane, are also described. Structure and composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Preliminary tensile property analysis of fibers was also performed.

  2. EPRI/DOE High-Burnup Fuel Sister Rod Test Plan Simplification and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanson, B. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shimskey, R. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Klymyshyn, N. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webster, R. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, P. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); MacFarlan, P. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Billone, Mike [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Scaglione, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Rose [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The EPRI/DOE High-Burnup Confirmatory Data Project (herein called the “Demo”) is a multi-year, multi-entity test with the purpose of providing quantitative and qualitative data to show if high-burnup fuel mechanical properties change in dry storage over a ten-year period. The Demo involves obtaining 32 assemblies of high-burnup PWR fuel of common cladding alloys from the North Anna Nuclear Power Plant, loading them in an NRC-licensed TN-32B cask, drying them according to standard plant procedures, and then storing them on the North Anna dry storage pad for ten years. After the ten-year storage time, the cask will be opened and the mechanical properties of the rods will be tested and analyzed.

  3. Process Management Development for Quality Monitoring on Resistance Weldment of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Tae Hyung; Yang, Kyung Hwan; Kim, In Kyu [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The current, welding force, and displacement are displayed on the indicator during welding. However, real-time quality control is not performed. Due to the importance of fuel rod weldment, many studies on welding procedures have been conducted. However, there are not enough studies regarding weldment quality evaluation. On the other hand, there are continuous studies on the monitoring and control of welding phenomena. In resistance welding, which is performed in a very short time, it is important to find the process parameters that well represent the weld zone formation and the welding process. In his study, Gould attempted to analyze melt zone formation using the finite difference method. Using the artificial neural network, Javed and Sanders, Messler Jr et al., Cho and Rhee, Li and Gong et al. estimated the size of the melt zone by mapping a nonlinear functional relation between the weldment and the electrode head movement, which is a typical welding process parameter. Applications of the artificial intelligence method include fuzzy control using electrode displacement, fuzzy control using the optimal power curve, neural network control using the dynamic resistance curve, fuzzy adaptive control using the optimal electrode curve, etc. Therefore, this study induced quality factors for the real-time quality control of nuclear fuel rod end plug weldment using instantaneous dynamic resistance (IDR), which incorporates the instantaneous value of secondary current and voltage of the transformer, and using instantaneous dynamic force (IDF), obtained real-time during welding.

  4. Determination of the rod-wise fission gas release fraction in a complete fuel assembly using non-destructive gamma emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcombe, Scott, E-mail: scott.holcombe@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology – OECD Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); Andersson, Peter; Svärd, Staffan Jacobsson [Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Hallstadius, Lars [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 22, 72163 Västerås (Sweden)

    2016-11-21

    A gamma tomography instrument has been developed at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) in cooperation between the Institute for Energy Technology, Westinghouse (Sweden) and Uppsala University. The instrument is used to record the gamma radiation field surrounding complete fuel assemblies and consists of a shielded enclosure with fixtures to accurately position the fuel and detector relative to each other. A High Purity Germanium detector is used for acquiring high-resolution spectroscopic data, allowing for analysis of multiple gamma-ray peaks. Using the data extracted from the selected peaks, tomographic reconstruction algorithms are used to reproduce the corresponding spatial gamma-ray source distributions within the fuel assembly. With this method, rod-wise data can be can be deduced without the need to dismantle the fuel. In this work, the tomographic device has been experimentally benchmarked for non-destructive rod-wise determination of the Fission Gas Release (FGR) fraction. Measurements were performed on the fuel-stack and gas-plenum regions of a complete fuel assembly, and quantitative tomographic reconstructions of the measurement data were performed in order to determine the rod-wise ratio of {sup 85}Kr in the gas plenum to {sup 137}Cs in the fuel stack. The rod-wise ratio of {sup 85}Kr/{sup 137}Cs was, in turn, used to calculate the rod-wise FGR fraction. In connection to the tomographic measurements, the fuel rods were also measured individually using gamma scanning in order to provide an experimental benchmark for the tomographic method. Fuel rods from two donor driver fuel assemblies were placed into a nine-rod HBWR driver fuel assembly configuration. In order to provide a challenging measurement object and thus an appropriate benchmark for the tomographic method, five rods were taken from an assembly with a burnup of 51 MWd/kgUO{sub 2}, and four rods were from an assembly with a burnup of 26 MWd/kgUO{sub 2}. At the time of the measurements, the

  5. Computerized operating procedures for shearing and dissolution of segments from LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osudar, J.; Deeken, P.G.; Graczyk, D.G.; Fagan, J.E.; Martino, F.J.; Parks, J.E.; Levitz, N.M.; Kessie, R.W.; Leddin, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents two detailed computerized operating procedures developed to assist and control the shearing and dissolution of irradiated fuel rods. The procedures were employed in the destructive analysis of end-of-life fuel rods from the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) that was designed by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. Seventeen entire fuel rods from the end-of-life core of the LWBR were sheared into 169 precisely characterized segments, and more than 150 of these segments were dissolved during execution of the LWBR Proof-of-Breeding (LWBR-POB) Analytical Support Project at Argonne National Laboratory. The procedures illustrate our approaches to process monitoring, data reduction, and quality assurance during the LWBR-POB work.

  6. An Innovative Accident Tolerant LWR Fuel Rod Design Based on Uranium-Molybdenum Metal Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Robert O.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Henager, Charles H.; Lavender, Curt A.; Smith, Mark T.; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2016-09-12

    The US Department of Energy is developing a uranium-molybdenum metal alloy Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel concept for Light Water Reactor applications that provides improved fuel performance during normal operation, anticipated operational occurrences, and postulated accidents. The high initial uranium atom density, the high thermal conductivity, and a low heat capacity permit a U-Mo-based fuel assembly to meet important design and safety requirements. These attributes also result in a fuel design that can satisfy increased fuel utilization demands and allow for improved accident tolerance in LWRs. This paper summarizes the results obtained from the on-going activities to; 1) evaluate the impact of the U-10wt%Mo thermal properties on operational and accident safety margins, 2) produce a triple extrusion of stainless steel cladding/niobium liner/U-10Mo fuel rod specimen and 3) test the high temperature water corrosion of rodlet samples containing a drilled hole in the cladding. Characterization of the cladding and liner thickness uniformity, microstructural features of the U-Mo gamma phase, and the metallurgical bond between the component materials will be presented. The results from corrosion testing will be discussed which yield insights into the resistance to attack by water ingress during high temperature water exposure for the triple extruded samples containing a drilled hole. These preliminary evaluations find that the U-10Mo fuel design concept has many beneficial features that can meet or improve conventional LWR fuel performance requirements under normal operation, AOOs, and postulated accidents. The viability of a deployable U-Mo fuel design hinges on demonstrating that fabrication processes and alloying additions can produce acceptable irradiation stability during normal operation and accident conditions and controlled metal-water reaction rates in the unlikely event of a cladding perforation. In the area of enhanced accident tolerance, a key objective

  7. Thermal-Hydraulic Effect of Pattern of Wire-wrap Spacer in 19-pin Rod Bundle for SFR Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Dae [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) has been considered the most promising reactor type for future and prototype gen-IV SFR has been developed actively in Korea, thermal-hydraulic aspects of the SFR fuel assembly have the important role for the reactor safety analysis. In PGSFR fuel assembly, 271 pins of fuel rods are tightly packed in triangular array inside hexagonal duct, and wire is wound helically per each fuel rod with regular pattern to assure the gap between rods and prevent the collision, which is called wire-wrapped spacer. Due to helical shape of the wire-wrapped spacer, flow inside duct can have stronger turbulent characteristics and thermal mixing effect. However, many studies showed the possible wake from swirl flow inside subchannel, which cause local hot spot. To prevent the wake flow and improve thermal mixing, new pattern of wire wrap spacer was suggested. To evaluate the effect of wire wrap spacer pattern, CFD analysis was performed for 19-pin rod bundle with comparison of conventional and U-pattern wire wrap spacer. To prevent the wake due to same direction of swirl flow, 7-rod unit pattern of wire spacer, which are arranged to have different rotational direction of wire with adjacent rods and center rod without wire wrap was proposed. From simulation results, swirl flow across gap conflicts its rotation direction causing wake flow from the regular pattern of the conventional one, which generates local hot spot near cladding. With U-pattern of wire wrap spacer, heat transfer in subchannel can be enhanced with evenly distributed cross flow without compensating pressure loss. From the results, the pattern of wire wrap spacer can influence the both heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop, with flow structures generated by wire wrap spacer.

  8. NSRR experiment with un-irradiated uranium-zirconium hydride fuel. Design, fabrication process and inspection data of test fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasajima, Hideo; Fuketa, Toyoshi; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Kuroha, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Yoshikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Aizawa, Keiichi

    1998-08-01

    An experiment plan is progressing in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to perform pulse-irradiation with uranium-zirconium hydride (U-ZrH{sub x}) fuel. This fuel is widely used in the training research and isotope production reactor of GA (TRIGA). The objectives of the experiment are to determine the fuel rod failure threshold and to investigate fuel behavior under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. This report summarizes design, fabrication process and inspection data of the test fuel rods before pulse-irradiation. The experiment with U-ZrH{sub x} fuel will realize precise safety evaluation, and improve the TRIGA reactor performance. The data to be obtained in this program will also contribute development of next-generation TRIGA reactor and its safety evaluation. (author)

  9. Influence of the temperature in the measurement of the {sup 235}U content in fuel rods in the passive scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Carlos A. da S.; Junqueira, Fabio da S., E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: fabiojunqueira@ing.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendência de Engenharia do Combustível

    2017-07-01

    The fuel rod, composed of a cladding responsible for storing UO{sub 2} pellets, is an indispensable component for the composition of the mentioned fuel assembly, a metallic structure that is installed inside nuclear reactors for the purpose of generating energy. With the change of the technology of fuel elements of the Angra-1 plant, it was necessary to install a new equipment in the Nuclear Fuel Plant of INB in Resende / RJ. This new equipment, called Rod Scanner, is responsible for inspecting, through non-destructive tests, the internal structure of the fuel rod. Such inspection is the measurement of enrichment of the pellets ({sup 235}U content) inside of the rod by detection of gamma radiation by bismuth germanate (BGO) detectors using the scintillation principle. However, throughout the operation of the equipment, it was found that this measurement was not happening on a regular basis. After an intense investigation, it was verified that one of the factors that affects such measurement is the temperature at which the BGO detectors are submitted. In this way, the objective of this paper is to show the experiments and tests performed to reach the conclusion described previously, as well as to show the relation obtained between the signals collected in the detectors versus the internal temperature of the block where they are located. (author)

  10. Estimate of radiation-induced steel embrittlement in the BWR core shroud and vessel wall from reactor-grade MOX/UOX fuel for the nuclear power plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Lisa Rene

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18--30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. This dissertation provides computational results of the neutron fluence, flux, energy spectrum, and radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s-1) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 BWR. The results were computed using the nuclear data processing code NJOY99 and the continuous energy Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP4B. The MCNP4B model of the reactor core was for maximum core loading fractions of ⅓ MOX and ⅔ UOX reactor-grade fuel in an equilibrium core. The primary conclusion of this dissertation was that the addition of the maximum fraction of ⅓ MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  11. Full MOX core in BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Motoo [Power and Industrial Systems R and D Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-12-01

    Studies on the core design, the fuel rod thermal-mechanical design and the safety evaluation have been summarized for the Full MOX-ABWR, loaded with MOX fuels up to 100% of the core. Fuel bundle configuration for MOX fuels is identical to the STEP II fuel design and the discharge burnup is about 33 GWd/t. Core performance evaluations and fuel rod thermal-mechanical design analyses have been performed, and it has been confirmed that the design criteria are satisfied with enough margin like the UO{sub 2} fuel loaded core. Safety analyses on transients and accidents have also been performed by considering the MOX fuel and core characteristics adequately through selecting appropriate input data for each safety analysis. All safety criteria are satisfied like the UO{sub 2} core. (author)

  12. High burnup fuel onset conditions in dry storage. Prediction of EOL rod internal pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L.E.

    2015-07-01

    During dry storage, cladding resistance to failure can be affected by several degrading mechanisms like creep or hydrides radial reorientation. The driving force of these effects is the stress at which the cladding is submitted. The maximum stress in the cladding is determined by the end-of-reactor-life (EOL) rod internal pressure, PEOL, at the maximum temperature attained during dry storage. Thus, PEOL sets the initial conditions of storage for potential time-dependent changes in the cladding. Based on FRAPCON-3.5 calculations, the aim of this work is to analyse the PEOL of a PWR fuel rod irradiated to burnups greater than 60 GWd/tU, where limited information is available. In order to be conservative, demanding irradiation histories have been used with a peak linear power of 44 kW/m. FRAPCON-3.5 results show an increasing exponential trend of PEOL with burnup, from which a simple correlation has been derived. The comparison with experimental data found in the literature confirms the enveloping nature of the predicted curve. Based on that, a conservative prediction of cladding stress in dry storage has been obtained. The comparison with a critical stress threshold related to hydrides embrittlement seems to point out that this issue should not be a concern at burnups below 65 GWd/tU. (Author)

  13. Two-dimensional thermal analysis of a fuel rod by finite volume method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Rhayanne Y.N.; Silva, Mario A.B. da; Lira, Carlos A.B. de O., E-mail: ryncosta@gmail.com, E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamaento de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    In a nuclear reactor, the amount of power generation is limited by thermal and physic limitations rather than by nuclear parameters. The operation of a reactor core, considering the best heat removal system, must take into account the fact that the temperatures of fuel and cladding shall not exceed safety limits anywhere in the core. If such considerations are not considered, damages in the fuel element may release huge quantities of radioactive materials in the coolant or even core meltdown. Thermal analyses for fuel rods are often accomplished by considering one-dimensional heat diffusion equation. The aim of this study is to develop the first paper to verify the temperature distribution for a two-dimensional heat transfer problem in an advanced reactor. The methodology is based on the Finite Volume Method (FVM), which considers a balance for the property of interest. The validation for such methodology is made by comparing numerical and analytical solutions. For the two-dimensional analysis, the results indicate that the temperature profile agree with expected physical considerations, providing quantitative information for the development of advanced reactors. (author)

  14. Eddy current NDT: a suitable tool to measure oxide layer thickness in PWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Donizete A.; Silva Junior, Silverio F. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: daa@cdtn.br, e-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br; Vieira, Andre L.P.S. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB S.A.), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Fabrica de Combustivel Nuclear], e-mail: andre@inb.gov.br; Soares, Adolpho [Technotest Consultoria e Acessoria Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: adolpho@technotest.com.br

    2009-07-01

    Eddy current is a nondestructive test (NDT) widely used in industry to support integrity analysis of components and equipment. In the nuclear area it is frequently applied to inspect tubes installed in tube exchangers, such as steam generators and condensers in PWR plants, as well as turbine blades. Adequately assisted by means of robotic devices, that inspection method has been pointed as a suitable tool to perform accurate oxide layer thickness measurements in PWR fuel rods. This paper shows some theoretical aspects and physical operating principles of the inspection method, as well as test probes construction details, and the calibration reference standards fabrication processes. Furthermore, some data, experimentally obtained at INB laboratories and other technical information obtained from TECNATOM S.A. are presented, showing the accuracy and efficacy of such NDT method. (author)

  15. Structure Optimization Design of the Electronically Controlled Fuel Control Rod System in a Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor ride comfort and shorter clutch life span are the key factors restricting the commercialization of automated manual transmission (AMT. For nonelectrically controlled engines or AMT where cooperative control between the engine and the transmission is not realizable, applying electronically controlled fuel control rod systems (ECFCRS is an effective way to solve these problems. By applying design software such as CATIA, Matlab and Simulink, and MSC Adams, a suite of optimization design methods for ECFCRS drive mechanisms are developed here. Based on these new methods, design requirements can be analyzed comprehensively and the design scheme can be modified easily, thus greatly shortening the design cycle. The bench tests and real vehicle tests indicate that the system developed achieves preferable engine speed following-up performance and engine speed regulating performance. The method developed has significance as a reference for developing other vehicle systems.

  16. A Procedure to Address the Fuel Rod Failures during LB-LOCA Transient in Atucha-2 NPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Adorni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the specific event scenario and on the purpose of the analysis, the availability of calculation methods that are not implemented in the standard system thermal hydraulic codes might be required. This may imply the use of a dedicated fuel rod thermomechanical computer code. This paper provides an outline of the methodology for the analysis of the 2A LB-LOCA accident in Atucha-2 NPP and describes the procedure adopted for the use of the fuel rod thermomechanical code. The methodology implies the application of best estimate thermalhydraulics, neutron physics, and fuel pin performance computer codes, with the objective to verify the compliance with the specific acceptance criteria. The fuel pin performance code is applied with the main objective to evaluate the extent of cladding failures during the transient. The procedure consists of a deterministic calculation by the fuel performance code of each individual fuel rod during its lifetime and in the subsequent LB-LOCA transient calculations. The boundary and initial conditions are provided by core physics and three-dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic system codes calculations. The procedure is completed by the sensitivity calculations and the application of the probabilistic method, which are outside the scope of the current paper.

  17. Starting Point, Keys and Milestones of a Computer Code for the Simulation of the Behaviour of a Nuclear Fuel Rod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando C. Marino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The BaCo code (“Barra Combustible” was developed at the Atomic Energy National Commission of Argentina (CNEA for the simulation of nuclear fuel rod behaviour under irradiation conditions. We present in this paper a brief description of the code and the strategy used for the development, improvement, enhancement, and validation of a BaCo during the last 30 years. “Extreme case analysis”, parametric (or sensitivity, probabilistic (or statistic analysis plus the analysis of the fuel performance (full core analysis are the tools developed in the structure of BaCo in order to improve the understanding of the burnup extension in the Atucha I NPP, and the design of advanced fuel elements as CARA and CAREM. The 3D additional tools of BaCo can enhance the understanding of the fuel rod behaviour, the fuel design, and the safety margins. The modular structure of the BaCo code and its detailed coupling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation-induced phenomena make it a powerful tool for the prediction of the influence of material properties on the fuel rod performance and integrity.

  18. Technical Development of Gamma Scanning for Irradiated Fuel Rod after Upgrade of System in Hot-cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Hee Moon; Baik, Seung Je; Yoo, Byung Ok; Choo, Yong Sun

    2007-06-15

    Non-destructive test system was installed at hot-cell(M1) in IMEF(Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) more than 10 years ago for the diametric measurement and gamma scanning of fuel rod. But this system must be needed to be remodeled for the effective operations. In 2006, the system was upgraded for 3 months. The collimator bench can be movable with horizontal direction(x-direction) by motorized system for sectional gamma scanning and 3-dimensional tomography of fuel rod. So, gamma scanning for fuel rod can be detectable by x, y and rotation directions. It may be possible to obtain the radioactivities with radial and axial directions of pellet. This system is good for the series experiments with several positions. Operation of fuel bench and gamma detection program were linked each other by new program tools. It can control detection and bench moving automatically when gamma inspection of fuel rod is carried out with axial or radial positions. Some of electronic parts were added in PLC panel, and operating panel was re-designed for the remote control. To operate the fuel bench by computer, AD converter and some I/O cards were installed in computer. All of software were developed in Windows-XP system instead of DOS system. Control programs were made by visual-C language. After upgrade of system, DUPIC fuel which was irradiated in HANARO research reactor was detected by gamma scanning. The results were good and operation of gamma scanning showed reduced inspection time and easy control of data on series of detection with axial positions. With consideration of ECT(Eddy Current Test) installation, the computer program and hardware were set up as well. But ECT is not installed yet, so we have to check abnormal situation of program and hardware system. It is planned to install ECT in 2007.

  19. 44-BWR WASTE PACKAGE LOADING CURVE EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2004-08-25

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of initial boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of spent nuclear fuel into the 44 BWR waste package configuration as provided in Attachment IV. This calculation is an application of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). The scope of this calculation covers a range of enrichments from 0 through 5.0 weight percent (wt%) U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 40 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel applications. The intended use of these results will be in establishing BWR waste package configuration loading specifications. Limitations of this evaluation are as follows: (1) The results are based on burnup credit for actinides and selected fission products as proposed in YMP (2003, Table 3-1) and referred to as the ''Principal Isotopes''. Any change to the isotope listing will have a direct impact on the results of this report. (2) The results of 100 percent of the current BWR projected waste stream being able to be disposed of in the 44-BWR waste package with Ni-Gd Alloy absorber plates is contingent upon the referenced waste stream being sufficiently similar to the waste stream received for disposal. (3) The results are based on 1.5 wt% Gd in the Ni-Gd Alloy material and having no tuff inside the waste package. If the Gd loading is reduced or a process to introduce tuff inside the waste package is defined, then this report would need to be reevaluated based on the alternative materials.

  20. Comprehensive assessment of the Ispra BWR and PWR subchannel experiments and code analysis with different two-phase models and solution schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, L.; Fischer, K.; Herkenrath, H.; Hufschmidt, W.

    1987-02-01

    This paper presents subchannel code results for a selection of the subchannel experiments performed at the Joint Research Centre of the CEC at Ispra with 16-rod BWR and PWR bundles at prototypical conditions. Three different well-known subchannel codes (COBRA-IIIC, CANAL, THERMIT) have been applied, each of which is representative of widely used two-phase flow methodologies (homogeneous, drift-flux, 2-fluid modelling) and numerical solution schemes. Their degrees of agreement with the measured subchannel exit mass flow and enthalpy distributions are reported as well as their limitations due to the lack of details in modelling two-phase flow rod bundle transport phenomena and/or numerical solution schemes both in transverse and axial directions. It is conclusively demonstrated that the extra expenditures of using advanced codes such as THERMIT effectively pay off when stringent requirements for optimizing LWR fuel rod bundles should be met.

  1. Preliminary Content Evaluation of the North Anna High Burn-Up Sister Fuel Rod Segments for Transportation in the 10-160B and NAC-LWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) Program has transported high-burnup nuclear sister fuel rods from a commercial nuclear power plant for purposes of evaluation and testing. The evaluation and testing of high-burnup used nuclear fuel is integral to DOE initiatives to collect information useful in determining the integrity of fuel cladding for future safe transportation of the fuel, and for determining the effects of aging, on the integrity of UNF subjected to extended storage and subsequent transportation. The UFDC Program, in collaboration with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the commercial nuclear industry, has obtained individual used nuclear fuel rods for testing. The rods have been received at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for both separate effects testing (SET) and small-scale testing (SST). To meet the research objectives, testing on multiple 6 inch fuel rod pins cut from the rods at ORNL will be performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Up to 10 rod equivalents will be shipped. Options were evaluated for multiple shipments using the 10-160B (based on 4.5 rod equivalents) and a single shipment using the NAC-LWT. Based on the original INL/Virginia Power transfer agreement, the rods are assumed to 152 inches in length with a 0.374-inch diameter. This report provides a preliminary content evaluation for use of the 10-160B and NAC-LWT for transporting those fuel rod pins from ORNL to PNNL. This report documents the acceptability of using these packagings to transport the fuel segments from ORNL to PNNL based on the following evaluations: enrichment, A2 evaluation, Pu-239 FGE evaluation, heat load, shielding (both gamma and neutron), and content weight/structural evaluation.

  2. Spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel bearing components: characterization, disposal cost estimates, and proposed repository acceptance requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksic, A.T.; McKee, R.W.; Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Purcell, W.L.

    1986-10-01

    There are two categories of waste considered in this report. The first is the spent fuel disassembly (SFD) hardware. This consists of the hardware remaining after the fuel pins have been removed from the fuel assembly. This includes end fittings, spacer grids, water rods (BWR) or guide tubes (PWR) as appropriate, and assorted springs, fasteners, etc. The second category is other non-fuel-bearing (NFB) components the DOE has agreed to accept for disposal, such as control rods, fuel channels, etc., under Appendix E of the standard utiltiy contract (10 CFR 961). It is estimated that there will be approximately 150 kg of SFD and NFB waste per average metric ton of uranium (MTU) of spent uranium. PWR fuel accounts for approximately two-thirds of the average spent-fuel mass but only 50 kg of the SFD and NFB waste, with most of that being spent fuel disassembly hardware. BWR fuel accounts for one-third of the average spent-fuel mass and the remaining 100 kg of the waste. The relatively large contribution of waste hardware in BWR fuel, will be non-fuel-bearing components, primarily consisting of the fuel channels. Chapters are devoted to a description of spent fuel disassembly hardware and non-fuel assembly components, characterization of activated components, disposal considerations (regulatory requirements, economic analysis, and projected annual waste quantities), and proposed acceptance requirements for spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel assembly components at a geologic repository. The economic analysis indicates that there is a large incentive for volume reduction.

  3. BWR MOX core monitoring at Kernkraftwerk Gundremmingen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, Alejandro [Studsvik Scandpower (Suisse) GmbH, Nussbaumen AG (Switzerland); Holzer, Robert [NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Anton, Gerd [Studsvik Scandpower GmbH, Norderstedt (Germany); Smith, Kord [Studsvik Scandpower Inc., Idaho Falls (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The replacement of the core monitoring system for twin KWU Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) is presented. The reactors, Kernkraftwerk Gundremmingen B and C (KGG), are located in Germany. Core monitoring for KGG is more challenging than for most BWR reactors due to its core composition with about 30% MOX fuel assemblies. The objectives of this paper are to discuss the specific MOX modelling aspects in CASMO-4/Simulate-3, the impact of the MOX fuel on several core monitoring aspects like the LPRM detector modelling and to present some core monitoring results since the beginning of GARDEL's operation. The available core monitoring results confirm the accuracy of the underlying physical methods. The core monitoring system replacement att KGG was a common project of Studsvik Scandpower and NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft GmbH, where Studsvik Scandpower supplied its standard core monitoring system GARDEL and NIS was responsible for the computer hardware, system integration and plant specific add-ons. (authors)

  4. Power Burst Facility: U(18)O2-CaO-ZrO2 Fuel Rods in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose Ignacio Marquez Damian; Alexis Weir; Valeria L. Putnam; John D. Bess

    2009-09-01

    The Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactor operated from 1972 to 1985 on the SPERT Area I of the Idaho National Laboratory, then known as Nuclear Reactor Test Station. PBF was designed to provide experimental data to aid in defining thresholds for and modes of failure under postulated accident conditions. PBF reactor startup testing began in 1972. This evaluation focuses on two operational loading tests, chronologically numbered 1 and 2, published in a startup-test report in 1974 [1]. Data for these tests was used by one of the authors to validate a MCNP model for criticality safety purposes [2]. Although specific references to original documents are kept in the text, all the reactor parameters and test specific data presented here was adapted from that report. The tests were performed with operational fuel loadings, a stainless steel in-pile tube (IPT) mockup, a neutron source, four pulse chambers, two fission chambers, and one ion chamber. The reactor's four transition rods (TRs) and control rods (CRs) were present but TR boron was completely withdrawn below the core and CR boron was partially withdrawn above the core. Test configurations differ primarily in the number of shim rods, and consequently the number of fuel rods included in the core. The critical condition was approached by incrementally and uniformly withdrawing CR boron from the core. Based on the analysis of the experimental data and numerical calculations, both experiments are considered acceptable as criticality safety benchmarks.

  5. CFD modelling of supercritical water flow and heat transfer in a 2 × 2 fuel rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podila, Krishna, E-mail: krishna.podila@cnl.ca; Rao, Yanfei, E-mail: yanfei.rao@cnl.ca

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Bare and wire wrapped 2 × 2 fuel rod bundles were modelled with CFD. • Sensitivity of predictions to SST k–ω, v{sup 2}–f and turbulent Prandtl number was tested. • CFD predictions were assessed with experimentally reported fuel wall temperatures. - Abstract: In the present assessment of the CFD code, two heat transfer experiments using water at supercritical pressures were selected: a 2 × 2 rod bare bundle; and a 2 × 2 rod wire-wrapped bundle. A systematic 3D CFD study of the fluid flow and heat transfer at supercritical pressures for the rod bundle geometries was performed with the key parameter being the fuel rod wall temperature. The sensitivity of the prediction to the steady RANS turbulence models of SST k–ω, v{sup 2}–f and turbulent Prandtl number (Pr{sub t}) was tested to ensure the reliability of the predicted wall temperature obtained for the current analysis. Using the appropriate turbulence model based on the sensitivity analysis, the mesh refinement, or the grid convergence, was performed for the two geometries. Following the above sensitivity analyses and mesh refinements, the recommended CFD model was then assessed against the measurements from the two experiments. It was found that the CFD model adopted in the current work was able to qualitatively capture the trends reported by the experiments but the degree of temperature rise along the heated length was underpredicted. Moreover, the applicability of turbulence models varied case-by-case and the performance evaluation of the turbulence models was primarily based on its ability to predict the experimentally reported fuel wall temperatures. Of the two turbulence models tested, the SST k–ω was found to be better at capturing the measurements at pseudo-critical and supercritical test conditions, whereas the v{sup 2}–f performed better at sub-critical test conditions. Along with the appropriate turbulence model, CFD results were found to be particularly sensitive to

  6. Subcooled boiling-induced vibration of a heater rod located between two metallic walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Kenji, E-mail: kenji_takano@mhi.co.jp; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kawara, Zensaku

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A heating structure in water vibrates itself due to subcooled boiling (SBIV). • Experiments with a heater rod located between two metallic walls were conducted. • Large bubbles growing in 1 mm-gap distance with each wall influenced on the SBIV. • Frequency of large bubble generation corresponded to acceleration of the heater rod. • Acceleration of the heater rod in the direction towards each wall was encouraged. - Abstract: The phenomenon that a heating structure vibrates itself due to the behavior of vapor bubbles generated under subcooled boiling has been known as “Subcooled Boiling-induced Vibration (SBIV)”. As one of such a heating structure, fuel assemblies for Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are utilized in subcooled boiling of water, and those for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) may face unexpected subcooled boiling conditions in case of sudden drop of the system pressure or loss of water flow, though they are utilized in single phase of water under normal operating conditions. As studies on SBIV, some researchers have conducted demonstrative experiments with a partial array of fuel rods simulating the actual BWR fuel assembly in a flow test loop, which showed no significant influences of the SBIV to degrade the integrity of the fuel rods. In addition, in order to investigate the fundamental phenomenon of the SBIV, pool boiling experiments of the SBIV on a single heater rod were performed in other studies with a simplified apparatus of a water tank in laboratory size under atmospheric pressure. In the experiments, behavior of bubbles generated under various degree of subcooling were observed, and the acceleration of the SBIV of the heater rod was measured. The present study, as a series of the above experiments for the fundamental phenomenon of the SBIV, the two thin walls made of stainless steel were installed in parallel to interleave the heater rod with the gap distance of 1 mm or 3 mm to each of the two walls, which was expected

  7. Design of an overmoderated fuel and a full MOX core for plutonium consumption in boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, J.L. E-mail: franmar@prodigy.net.mx; Campo, C.M. del; Hernandez, J

    2002-11-01

    The use of uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel (MOX) in light water reactors (LWR) is nowadays a current practice in several countries. Generally 1/3 of the reactor core is loaded with MOX fuel assemblies and the other 2/3 with uranium assemblies. Nevertheless the plutonium utilization could be more effective if the full core could be loaded with MOX fuel. In this paper the design of a boiling water reactor (BWR) core fully loaded with an overmoderated MOX fuel design is investigated. The design of overmoderated BWR MOX fuel assemblies based on a 10x10 lattice are developed, these designs improve the neutron spectrum and the plutonium consumption rate, compared with standard MOX assemblies. In order to increase the moderator to fuel ratio two approaches are followed: in the first approach, 8 or 12 fuel rods are replaced by water rods in the 10x10 lattice; in the second approach, an 11x11 lattice with 24 water rods is designed with an active fuel length very close to the standard MOX assembly. The results of the depletion behavior and the main steady state core parameters are presented. The feasibility of a full core loaded with the 11x11 overmoderated MOX fuel assembly is verified. This design take advantage of the softer spectrum comparable to the 10x10 lattice with 12 water rods but with thermal limits comparable to the standard MOX fuel assembly.

  8. Separation of metallic residues from the dissolution of a high-burnup BWR fuel using nitrogen trifluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Frances N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mausolf, Edward J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Scheele, Randall D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-03-23

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) was used to fluorinate the metallic residue from the dissolution of a high burnup, boiling water reactor fuel (~70 MWd/kgU). The metallic residue included the noble metal phase (containing ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, technetium, and molybdenum), and smaller amounts of zirconium, selenium, tellurium, and silver. Exposing the noble metal phase to 10% NF3 in argon between 400 and 550°C, removed molybdenum and technetium near 400°C as their volatile fluorides, and ruthenium near 500C as its volatile fluoride. The events were thermally and temporally distinct and the conditions specified are a recipe to separate these transition metals from each other and from the noble metal phase nonvolatile residue. Depletion of the volatile fluorides resulted in substantial exothermicity. Thermal excursion behavior was recorded under non-adiabatic, isothermal conditions that typically minimize heat release. Physical characterization of the metallic noble phase and its thermal behavior are consistent with high kinetic velocity reactions encouraged by the nanoparticulate phase or perhaps catalytic influences of the mixed platinum metals with nearly pure phase structure. Post-fluorination, only two phases were present in the residual nonvolatile fraction. These were identified as a nano-crystalline, metallic palladium cubic phase and a hexagonal rhodium trifluoride (RhF3) phase. The two phases were distinct as the sub-µm crystallites of metallic palladium were in contrast to the RhF3 phase, which grew from the parent nano-crystalline noble-metal phase during fluorination, to acicular crystals exceeding 20-µm in length.

  9. Fission gas release during power change. Re-irradiation test of LWR fuel rod at JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Jinichi; Furuta, Teruo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Endo, Yasuichi; Ishii, Tadahiko; Shimizu, Michio

    1995-11-01

    A full length rod irradiated at Tsuruga unit 1 was refablicated to short length rods, and rod inner pressure gauges were re-instrumented to the rods. Re-irradiation tests to study the fission gas release during power change were carried out by means of BOCA/OSF-1 facility at JMTR. In the tests, steady state operation at 40kW/m, power cycling and daily load follow operations between 20 and 40kW/m were conducted for the same high power holding time, and the rod inner pressure change during the tests was measured. The rod inner pressure increase was observed during power change, especially during power reduction. The rod inner pressure increase during a power cycling depended on the length of the high power operation just before the power cycling. The width of the rod inner pressure increase during a power cycling decreased gradually as the power cycling was repeated continuously. When steady state operation and power cycling were repeated at the power levels of 30, 35 and 40kW/m, the power cycling accelerated the fission gas release compared with the steady state operation. The fission gas release during power reduction is estimated to be the release from FP gas bubbles on the grain boundary caused by the thermal stress in the pellet during power reduction. (author).

  10. Data summary report for the destructive examination of Rods G7, G9, J8, I9, and H6 from Turkey Point Fuel Assembly B17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R B; Pasupathi, V

    1981-04-01

    Destructive examination results of five spent fuel rods from a Turkey Point Unit 3 pressurized water reactor are reported. Examinations included fission gas analysis, cladding hydrogen content analysis, fuel burnup analysis, metallographic examination, autoradiography and shielded electron microprobe analysis. All rods were found to be of sound integrity with an average burnup of 27 GWd/MTU and a 0.3% fission gas release.

  11. A procedure for addressing the fuel rod failures during LB-LOCA transient in Atucha-2 NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorni, Martina; Del Nevo, Alessandro; Parisi, Carlo; D' Auria, Francesco [University of Pisa, San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), Via Diotisalvi 2, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Mazzantini, Oscar [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., UGCNAII, 2806 Lima (Argentina)

    2009-06-15

    Overview of CNA-2 NPP: Atucha-2 is a pressurized heavy water cooled and moderated reactor (PHWR) designed by Siemens under construction in the Republic of Argentina. The nominal electric power is 745 MWe. The reactor is equipped with a PWR-type Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). The operating pressure for the moderator and the coolant is equal (11.5 MPa) since the same fluid is simultaneously passing through the core and the moderator tank. The moderator and coolant circuits are connected through the bypass in the lower plenum and the upper plenum of the RPV. The former is constituted by two loops with a U-Tubes SGs. The latter is a four loops moderator system connecting upstream and downstream the moderator tank. Four horizontal U-Tubes exchangers remove the heat from the moderator system and preheat the feed water. The reactor power is generated in the core, composed by 451 fuel bundles placed in vertical fuel channels, each one containing a fuel assembly (FA) composed by 37 fuel rods. The reactor power is removed via the above mentioned 2 hydraulic loops equipped with U-Tubes Steam Generators (SG). The fuel rod consists of a stack of natural UO{sub 2} pellets, of compensation pellets in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the supporting tube, and the compression spring. Everything is placed into a Zircaloy-4 cladding tube. Although most fission products are retained within the UO{sub 2}, a fraction of the gaseous fission products is released from the pellets and accumulated in the plenum of the rod. The fuel rod cladding thickness is adequate to be 'free-standing', i.e., capable of withstanding external reactor pressure without collapsing onto the pellets. All fuel rods are internally pre-pressurized in order to reduce compressive clad stresses and creep down due to the high coolant pressure. Helium is used as pressurizing gas to get good heat transfer from fuel to cladding. The plant is operated with a on-power re-fueling that is performed by a refueling machine. After

  12. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN U-MO DISPERSED FUEL OF FULL-SIZE FUEL ELEMENTS AND MINI-RODS IRRADIATED IN THE MIR REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSEY. L. IZHUTOV

    2013-12-01

    The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60%235U; the mini-rods were irradiated to an average burnup of ∼ 85%235U. The presented data show a significant increase of the void fraction in the U-Mo alloy as the U-235 burnup rises from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%. The effect of irradiation test conditions and U-235 burnup were analyzed with regard to the formation of an interaction layer between the matrix and fuel particles as well as generation of porosity in the U-Mo alloy. Shown here are changes in distribution of U fission products as the U-235 burnup increases from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%.

  13. A comparison between genetic algorithms and neural networks for optimizing fuel recharges in BWR; Una comparacion entre algoritmos geneticos y redes neuronales para optimizar recargas de combustible en BWR's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz J, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Depto. Sistemas Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Requena, I. [Universidad de Granada (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    In this work the results of a genetic algorithm (AG) and a neural recurrent multi state network (RNRME) for optimizing the fuel reload of 5 cycles of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant (CNLV) are presented. The fuel reload obtained by both methods are compared and it was observed that the RNRME creates better fuel distributions that the AG. Moreover a comparison of the utility for using one or another one techniques is make. (Author)

  14. Key instrumentation in BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laendner, Alexander; Stellwag, Bernhard; Fandrich, Joerg [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes water chemistry surveillance practices at boiling water reactor (BWR) power plants. The key instrumentation in BWR plants consists of on-line as well as off-line instrumentation. The chemistry monitoring and control parameters are predominantly based on two guidelines, namely the VGB Water Chemistry Guidelines and the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines. Control parameters and action levels specified in the VGB guideline are described. Typical sampling locations in BWR plants, chemistry analysis methods and water chemistry data of European BWR plants are summarized. Measurement data confirm the high quality of reactor water of the BWRs in Europe. (orig.)

  15. Updating of the costs of the nuclear fuels of the equilibrium reloading of the A BWR and EPR reactors; Actualizacion de los costos de combustible nuclear de la recarga de equilibrio de los reactores ABWR y EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega C, R.F. [FI-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: rortega@fi-b.unam.mx

    2008-07-01

    In the last two and a half years, the price of the uranium in the market spot has ascended of US$20.00 dollars by lb U{sub 3O}8 in January, 2005 to a maximum of US$137.00 dollars by Ib U{sub 3}O{sub 8} by the middle of 2007. At the moment this price has been stabilized in US$90.00 dollars by Ib U{sub 3}O{sub 8} such for the market spot, like for the long term contracts. In this work the reasons of this increment are analyzed, as well as their impact in the fuel prices of the balance recharge of the advanced reactors of boiling water (A BWR) and of the advanced water at pressure reactors (EPR). (Author)

  16. Transient heat transfer analysis up to dryout in 3D fuel rods under unideal conditions through the development of a computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Rodolfo I.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes; Sampaio, Paulo A. B. de, E-mail: rodolfoienny@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we analyze a conjugated transient heat transfer problem consisting of a nuclear reactor's fuel rod and its intrinsic coolant channel. Our analysis is made possible through a computer code being developed at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN). This code is meant to study the temperature behavior in fuel rods which exhibit deviation from their ideal conditions, that is, rods in which the cladding is deformed or the fuel is dislocated. It is also designed to avoid the use of the computationally expensive Navier-Stokes equations. For these reasons, its physical model has as basis a three-dimensional fuel rod coupled to a one-dimensional coolant channel, which are discretized using the finite element method. Intending to study accidental conditions in which the coolant (light water) transcends its saturation temperature, turning into vapor, a homogeneous mixture is used to represent the two-phase flow, and so the coolant channel's energy equation is described using enthalpy. Owing to the fact that temperature and enthalpy are used in the physical model, it became impractical to generate a fully coupled method for solving the pertinent equations. Thus, the conjugated heat transfer problem is solved in a segregated manner through the implementation of an iterative method. Finally, as study cases for this paper we present analyses concerning the behavior of the hottest fuel rod in a Pressurized Water Reactor during a shutdown wherein the residual heat removal system is lost (loss of the reactor's coolant pumps). These studies contemplate cases in which the fuel rod's geometry is ideal or curved. Analyses are also performed for two circumstances of positioning of the fuel inside the rod: concentric and eccentric. (author)

  17. Recriticality calculation with GENFLO code for the BWR core after steam explosion in the lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miettinen, J. [VTT Processes (Finland)

    2002-12-01

    Recriticality of the partially degraded BWR core has been studied by assuming a severe accident phase during which the fuel rods are still intact but the control rods have experienced extensive damage. Previous NKS and EU projects have studied the same case assuming reflooding by the ECCS system In the present study it was assumed that coolant enters the core due to melt-coolant interaction in the lower plenum. In the first case specified the relocation and fragmentation of the molten control rod metal causes the level swell in the core but no steam explosion. In the second case a steam explosion in the lower head was assumed. I n the first case a prompt recriticality peak can occur, but after the peak no semistable power generation remains. In the second case the consequence of the slug entrance into the core is so violent that the fuel disintegration and melting during the first power peak may occur. After the large power peak water is rapidly pushed back from the core and no semistable power generation maintains. The fuel disintegration studies have been based on a coarse assumption that the acceptable local energy addition into the fresh fuel may be 170 cal/g, but with increasing burn-up it can be as low as 60-70 cal/g. In the level swell variations the maximum energy addition was between these limits, but in most of the steam explosion variations much above these limits. Additional variation of the assumptions related to the neutronics demonstrated that for the converged analysis result some interactions would be useful with respect to the boundary conditions and neutronic options.

  18. Design of an equilibrium nucleus of a BWR type reactor based in a Thorium-Uranium fuel; Diseno de un nucleo de equilibrio de un reactor tipo BWR basado en un combustible de Torio-Uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, J.L.; Nunez C, A. [Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Facultad de Ingenieria-UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In this work the design of the reactor nucleus of boiling water using fuel of thorium-uranium is presented. Starting from an integral concept based in a type cover-seed assemble is carried out the design of an equilibrium reload for the nucleus of a reactor like that of the Laguna Verde Central and its are analyzed some of the main design variables like the cycle length, the reload fraction, the burnt fuel, the vacuum distribution, the generation of lineal heat, the margin of shutdown, as well as a first estimation of the fuel cost. The results show that it is feasible to obtain an equilibrium reload, comparable to those that are carried out in the Laguna Verde reactors, with a good behavior of those analyzed variables. The cost of the equilibrium reload designed with the thorium-uranium fuel is approximately 2% high that the uranium reload producing the same energy. It is concluded that it is convenient to include burnable poisons, type gadolinium, in the fuel with the end of improving the reload design, the fuel costs and the margin of shutdown. (Author)

  19. Water chemistry practice at German BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellwag, B. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Staudt, U. [VGB PowerTech e.V., Essen (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    As visual examinations carried out in 1994 detected cracks in a German boiling water reactor (BWR) plant due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in core shroud components manufactured from Nb-stabilized CrNi steel 1.4550, safety-related assessments and in-service inspections were subsequently performed for the other six German BWRs. No cracks were found in the core shrouds of these plants. The second major event in the early 1990s was the detection of cracks at various German BWRs in piping systems made of Ti-stabilized CrNi steel 1.4541 caused by thermal sensitization in the heat-affected zone of welds. Comprehensive investigations resulted in a number of remedial measures (repair, replacement) implemented at piping in contact with reactor coolant of temperatures above 200 C. Thanks to the remedial measures and according to the analyses performed, cracking in the components in question due to the considered damage mechanisms need not be expected. German operators have therefore continued operating their BWR plants on normal water chemistry with an oxidizing environment. As a precaution, more stringent reactor coolant quality requirements have been specified and the limiting values of VGB Guideline R 401 J revised. This paper gives an overview of the trends in chemistry parameters at German BWR plants in the past 10 years. In addition, other relevant experience gained from the German BWR plants operating under normal water chemistry conditions is outlined: dose rates and collective doses, fuel performance, and results of periodic in-service inspections of major components of the reactor system. In the nearly 10 years of plant operation since implementation of the remedial measures, no cracks or other indications have been detected in any of the systems and components concerned. (orig.)

  20. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Louise G., E-mail: evanslg@ornl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De [European Commission, Euratom Safeguards Office (Luxembourg); Browne, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-11-21

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available {sup 241}AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×10{sup 4} s{sup −1}. Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify {sup 235}U content in variable PWR fuel

  1. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Louise G.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De; Browne, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd2O3) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available 241AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×104 s-1. Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify 235U content in variable PWR fuel designs in the presence of up to 32

  2. Statistical analysis in the design of nuclear fuel cells and training of a neural network to predict safety parameters for reactors BWR; Analisis estadistico en el diseno de celdas de combustible nuclear y entrenamiento de una red neuronal para predecir parametros de seguridad para reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauregui Ch, V.

    2013-07-01

    In this work the obtained results for a statistical analysis are shown, with the purpose of studying the performance of the fuel lattice, taking into account the frequency of the pins that were used. For this objective, different statistical distributions were used; one approximately to normal, another type X{sup 2} but in an inverse form and a random distribution. Also, the prediction of some parameters of the nuclear reactor in a fuel reload was made through a neuronal network, which was trained. The statistical analysis was made using the parameters of the fuel lattice, which was generated through three heuristic techniques: Ant Colony Optimization System, Neuronal Networks and a hybrid among Scatter Search and Path Re linking. The behavior of the local power peak factor was revised in the fuel lattice with the use of different frequencies of enrichment uranium pines, using the three techniques mentioned before, in the same way the infinite multiplication factor of neutrons was analyzed (k..), to determine within what range this factor in the reactor is. Taking into account all the information, which was obtained through the statistical analysis, a neuronal network was trained; that will help to predict the behavior of some parameters of the nuclear reactor, considering a fixed fuel reload with their respective control rods pattern. In the same way, the quality of the training was evaluated using different fuel lattices. The neuronal network learned to predict the next parameters: Shutdown Margin (SDM), the pin burn peaks for two different fuel batches, Thermal Limits and the Effective Neutron Multiplication Factor (k{sup eff}). The results show that the fuel lattices in which the frequency, which the inverted form of the X{sup 2} distribution, was used revealed the best values of local power peak factor. Additionally it is shown that the performance of a fuel lattice could be enhanced controlling the frequency of the uranium enrichment rods and the variety of

  3. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel rods in HFIR experiments HRB-11 and -12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, F.J.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kania, M.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Thoms, K.R.; Robbins, J.M.; Wagner, P.

    1980-06-01

    Capsules HRB-11 and -12 were irradiated in support of development of weak-acid-resin-derived recycle fuel for the high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel cycle for the HTGR. Fissil fuel particles with initial oxygen-to-metal ratios between 1.0 and 1.7 performed acceptably to full burnup for HEU fuel. Particles with ratios below 1.0 showed excessive chemical interaction between rare earth fission products and the SiC layer.

  4. BWR ASSEMBLY SOURCE TERMS FOR WASTE PACKAGE DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.L. Lotz

    1997-02-15

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to provide boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly radiation source term data for use during Waste Package (WP) design. The BWR assembly radiation source terms are to be used for evaluation of radiolysis effects at the WP surface, and for personnel shielding requirements during assembly or WP handling operations. The objectives of this evaluation are to generate BWR assembly radiation source terms that bound selected groupings of BWR assemblies, with regard to assembly average burnup and cooling time, which comprise the anticipated MGDS BWR commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste stream. The source term data is to be provided in a form which can easily be utilized in subsequent shielding/radiation dose calculations. Since these calculations may also be used for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), with appropriate justification provided by TSPA, or radionuclide release rate analysis, the grams of each element and additional cooling times out to 25 years will also be calculated and the data included in the output files.

  5. Processing of the GALILEOTM fuel rod code model uncertainties within the AREVA LWR realistic thermal-mechanical analysis methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailhe, P.; Barbier, B.; Garnier, Ch.; Landskron, H.; Sedlacek, R.; Arimescu, I.; Smith, M.; Bellanger, Ph.

    2014-06-01

    The availability of reliable tools and associated methodology able to accurately predict the LWR fuel behavior in all conditions is of great importance for safe and economic fuel usage. For that purpose, AREVA has developed its new global fuel rod performance code GALILEOTM along with its associated realistic thermal-mechanical analysis methodology. This realistic methodology is based on a Monte Carlo type random sampling of all relevant input variables. After having outlined the AREVA realistic methodology, this paper will be focused on the GALILEOTM code benchmarking process on its extended experimental database and the GALILEOTM model uncertainties assessment. The propagation of these model uncertainties through the AREVA realistic methodology is also presented. This GALILEOTM model uncertainties processing is of the utmost importance for accurate fuel design margin evaluation as illustrated on some application examples. With the submittal of Topical Report for GALILEOTM to the U.S. NRC in 2013, GALILEOTM and its methodology are on the way to be industrially used in a wide range of irradiation conditions.

  6. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.; Wehle, F.; Opel, S.; Velten, R. [AREVA, AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  7. Thermoacoustic enhancements for nuclear fuel rods and other high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Steven L.; Smith, James A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    2017-05-09

    A nuclear thermoacoustic device includes a housing defining an interior chamber and a portion of nuclear fuel disposed in the interior chamber. A stack is disposed in the interior chamber and has a hot end and a cold end. The stack is spaced from the portion of nuclear fuel with the hot end directed toward the portion of nuclear fuel. The stack and portion of nuclear fuel are positioned such that an acoustic standing wave is produced in the interior chamber. A frequency of the acoustic standing wave depends on a temperature in the interior chamber.

  8. The R&D PERFROI Project on Thermal Mechanical and Thermal Hydraulics Behaviors of a Fuel Rod Assembly during a Loss of Coolant Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repetto, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Dominguez, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Durville, B. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Carnemolla, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Campello, D. [Institut National des Sciences Appliques, Lyon (France); Tardiff, N. [Institut National des Sciences Appliques, Lyon (France); Gradeck, M. [Univ. de Lorraine, Nancy, France. LEMTA

    2015-09-04

    The safety principle in case of a LOCA is to preserve the short and long term coolability of the core. The associated safety requirements are to ensure the resistance of the fuel rods upon quench and post-quench loads and to maintain a coolable geometry in the core. An R&D program has been launched by IRSN with the support of EDF, to perform both experimental and modeling activities in the frame of the LOCA transient, on technical issues such as: - flow blockage within a fuel rods bundle and its potential impact on coolability, - fuel fragment relocation in the ballooned areas: its potential impact on cladding PCT (Peak Cladding Temperature) and on the maximum oxidation rate, - potential loss of cladding integrity upon quench and post-quench loads. The PERFROI project (2014-2019) focusing on the first above issue, is structured in two axes: 1. axis 1: thermal mechanical behavior of deformation and rupture of cladding taking into account the contact between fuel rods; specific research at LaMCoS laboratory focus on the hydrogen behavior in cladding alloys and its impact on the mechanical behavior of the rod; and, 2. axis 2: thermal hydraulics study of a partially blocked region of the core (ballooned area taking into account the fuel relocation with local over power), during cooling phase by water injection; More detailed activities foreseen in collaboration with LEMTA laboratory will focus on the characterization of two phase flows with heat transfer in deformed structures.

  9. Modelling of the intergranular damage of fuel rod cladding under condition of fuel-cladding interactions; Modelisation de l'endommagement intergranulaire des gaines de combustibles en condition d'interaction pastille-gaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diard, O.; Leclercq, S.; Rousselier, G.; Cailletaud, G. [Centre des Materiaux, ENSMP, Evry (France)

    2001-04-01

    The following topics were dealt with: intergranular damage modelling for Zircaloy-4 fuel rod cladding under fuel-cladding interaction conditions, stress corrosion due to fission products (esp. iodine), inhomogeneous mechanical and chemical damaging effects, microstructural simulations with respect to constraint analysis, intergranular microcavitation and brittle phase formation.

  10. Simulation with DIONISIO 1.0 of thermal and mechanical pellet-cladding interaction in nuclear fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soba, Alejandro; Denis, Alicia

    2008-02-01

    The code DIONISIO 1.0 describes most of the main phenomena occurring in a fuel rod throughout its life under normal operation conditions of a nuclear thermal reactor. Starting from the power history, DIONISIO predicts the temperature distribution in the domain, elastic and plastic stress and strain, creep, swelling and densification, release of fission gases, caesium and iodine to the rod free volume, gas mixing, pressure increase, restructuring and grain growth in the UO 2 pellet, irradiation growth of the Zircaloy cladding, oxide layer growth on its surface, hydrogen uptake and the effects of a corrosive atmosphere either internal or external. In particular, the models of thermal conductance of the gap and of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction incorporated to the code constitute two realistic tools. The possibility of gap closure (including partial contact between rough surfaces) and reopening during burnup is allowed. The non-linear differential equations are integrated by the finite element method in two-dimensions assuming cylindrical symmetry. Good results are obtained for the simulation of several irradiation tests.

  11. Automatic system of welding for nuclear fuel rods; Sistema automatico de soldadura para barras de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero G, M; Romero C, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The welding process of nuclear fuel must be realized in an inert gas environment (He) and constant flow of this. In order to reach these conditions it is necessary to do vacuum at the chamber and after it is pressurized with the noble gas (purge) twice in the welding chamber. The purge eliminates impurities that can provoke oxidation in the weld. Once the conditions for initiating the welding are gotten, it is necessary to draw a graph of the flow parameters, pressure, voltage and arc current and to analyse those conditions in which have been carried out the weld. The rod weld must be free of possible pores or cracks which could provoke rod leaks, so reducing the probability of these failures should intervene mechanical and metallurgical factors. Automatizing the process it allows to do reliable welding assuring that conditions have been performed, reaching a high quality welding. Visually it can be observed the welding process by means of a mimic which represents the welding system. There are the parameters acquired such as voltage, current, pressure and flow during the welding arc to be analysed later. (Author)

  12. Breakdown voltage at the electric terminals of GCFR-core flow test loop fuel rod simulators in helium and air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, W.R.; Conley, T.B.

    1979-12-01

    Tests were performed to determine the ac and dc breakdown voltage at the terminal ends of a fuel rod simulator (FRS) in helium and air atmospheres. The tests were performed at low pressures (1 to 2 atm) and at temperatures from 20 to 350/sup 0/C (68 to 660/sup 0/F). The area of concern was the 0.64-mm (0.025-in.) gap between the coaxial conductor of the FRS and the sheaths of the four internal thermocouples as they exit the FRS. The tests were prformed to ensure a sufficient safety margin during Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) operations that require potentials up to 350 V ac at the FRS terminals. The primary conclusion from the test results is that the CFTL cannot be operated safely if the terminal ends of the FRSs are surrounded by a helium atmosphere but can be operated safely in air.

  13. Model for the analysis of transitories and stability of a BWR reactor with fuel of thorium; Modelo para el analisis de transitorios y de estabilidad de un reactor BWR con combustible de torio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez C, A. [CNSNS, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: anunezc@cnsns.gob.mx; Espinosa P, G. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois L, J.L. [Fac. de Ingenieria, UNAM 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In this work it is described the thermo hydraulic and neutronic pattern used to simulate the behavior of a nucleus of thorium-uranium under different conditions of operation. The analysed nucleus was designed with base to assemblies that operate under the cover-seed concept. The pattern was proven to conditions of stationary state and transitory state. Here it is only presented the simulation of the one SCRAM manual and it is compared in the behavior of a nucleus with UO{sub 2}. Additionally one carries out an analysis of stability taking into account the four corners that define the area of stability of the map flow-power and to conditions of 100% of flow and 100% of power. The module of stability is based on the pattern of Lahey and Podowsky to estimate the drops of pressure during a perturbation. It is concludes that the behavior of this nucleus is not very different to the one shown by the nuclei loaded with the fuel of UO{sub 2}. (Author)

  14. LAPUR5. BWR Core Stability Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    March-Leuba, J.; Otaduy, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1990-01-01

    LAPUR5 is a mathematical description of the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR). The program uses a point kinetics description of the neutron dynamics together with a distributed-parameter model of the core thermal hydrodynamics to produce a space-dependent representation of the dynamics of a BWR in the frequency domain for small perturbations about a steady-state condition. LAPUR5 consists of two autonomous modules, LAPUR5X, the steady-state module, and LAPUR5W the dynamics module, which are linked by use of an intermediate storage device. LAPUR5X solves the coolant and the fuel steady-state governing equations while LAPUR5W solves the dynamic equations for the coolant, fuel, and neutron field in the frequency domain. Considerable detail exists in the modeling of the thermohydrodynamics and the reactivity feedbacks. LAPUR5 can be run interactively (LAPUR) or in batch mode (BLAPUR); these are equivalent except that LAPUR allows the user to edit input parameters at run time. Both spawn the two autonomous modules consecutively and delete the intermediate storage files.

  15. Post-irradiation examination of prototype Al-64 wt% U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel rods from NRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, D.F.; Primeau, M.F.; Buchanan, C.; Rose, D. [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01

    Three prototype fuel rods containing Al-64 wt% U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} (3.15 gU/cm{sup 3}) have been irradiated to their design burnup in the NRU reactor without incident. The fuel was fabricated using production-scale equipment and processes previously developed for Al-U{sub 3}Si fuel fabrication at Chalk River Laboratories, and special equipment developed for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} powder production and handling. The rods were irradiated in NRU up to 87 at% U-235 burnup under typical driver fuel conditions; i.e., nominal coolant inlet temperature 37{degrees}C, inlet pressure 654 kPa, mass flow 12.4 L/s, and element linear power ratings up to 73 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations showed that the fuel elements survived the irradiation without defects. Fuel core diametral increases and volumetric swelling were significantly lower than that of Al-61 wt% U{sub 3}Si fuel irradiated under similar conditions. This irradiation demonstrated that the fabrication techniques are adequate for full-scale fuel manufacture, and qualified the fuel for use in AECL`s research reactors.

  16. Post-processor for simulations of the ORIGEN program and calculation of the composition of the activity of a burnt fuel core by a BWR type reactor; Post-procesador para simulaciones del programa ORIGEN y calculo de la composicion de la actividad de un nucleo de combustible quemado por un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval V, S. [IIE, Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: sandoval@iie.org.mx

    2006-07-01

    The composition calculation and the activity of nuclear materials subject to processes of burnt, irradiation and decay periods are of utility for diverse activities inside the nuclear industry, as they are it: the processes design and operations that manage radioactive material, the calculation of the inventory and activity of a core of burnt nuclear fuel, for studies of type Probabilistic Safety Analysis (APS), as well as for regulation processes and licensing of nuclear facilities. ORIGEN is a program for computer that calculates the composition and the activity of nuclear materials subject to periods of burnt, irradiation and decay. ORIGEN generates a great quantity of information whose processing and analysis are laborious, and it requires thoroughness to avoid errors. The automation of the extraction, conditioning and classification of that information is of great utility for the analyst. By means of the use of the post-processor presented in this work it is facilitated, it speeds up and wide the capacity of analysis of results, since diverse consultations with several classification options and filtrate of results can be made. As illustration of the utility of the post-processor, and as an analysis of interest for itself, it is also presented in this work the composition of the activity of a burned core in a BWR type reactor according to the following classification criteria: by type of radioisotope (fission products, activation products and actinides), by specie type (gassy, volatile, semi-volatile and not volatile), by element and by chemical group. The results show that the total activity of the studied core is dominated by the fission products and for the actinides, in proportion four to one, and that the gassy and volatile species conform a fifth part of the total activity of the core. (Author)

  17. Effect of fission fragment on thermal conductivity via electrons with an energy about 0.5 MeV in fuel rod gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Golian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer process from pellet to coolant is one of the important issues in nuclear reactor. In this regard, the fuel to clad gap and its physical and chemical properties are effective factors on heat transfer in nuclear fuel rod discussion. So, the energy distribution function of electrons with an energy about 0.5 MeV in fuel rod gap in Busherhr’s VVER-1000 nuclear reactor was investigated in this paper. Also, the effect of fission fragments such as Krypton, Bromine, Xenon, Rubidium and Cesium on the electron energy distribution function as well as the heat conduction via electrons in the fuel rod gap have been studied. For this purpose, the Fokker- Planck equation governing the stochastic behavior of electrons in absorbing gap element has been applied in order to obtain the energy distribution function of electrons. This equation was solved via Runge-Kutta numerical method. On the other hand, the electron energy distribution function was determined by using Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. It was concluded that these fission fragments have virtually insignificant effect on energy distribution of electrons and therefore, on thermal conductivity via electrons in the fuel to clad gap. It is worth noting that this result is consistent with the results of other experiments. Also, it is shown that electron relaxation in gap leads to decrease in thermal conductivity via electrons

  18. Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly design with graphite-moderating rods to reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin, E-mail: nzcho@kaist.ac.kr; Park, Hae Min; Jeong, Yong Hoon, E-mail: jeongyh@kaist.ac.kr

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The graphite rod-inserted SFR fuel assembly is proposed to achieve low sodium void reactivity. • The neutronics/thermal-hydraulics analyses are performed for the proposed SFR cores. • The sodium void reactivity is improved about 960–1030 pcm compared to reference design. - Abstract: The concept of a graphite-moderating rod-inserted sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly is proposed in this study to achieve a low sodium void reactivity coefficient. Using this concept, two types of SFR cores are analyzed; the proposed SFR type 1 core has new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions while the proposed SFR type 2 core has a B{sub 4}C absorber sandwich in the middle of the active core region as well as new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions. For the proposed SFR core designs, neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analyses are performed using the DIF3D, REBUS3, and the MATRA-LMR codes. In the neutronics analysis, the sodium void reactivity coefficient is obtained in various void situations. The two types of proposed core designs reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient by about 960–1030 pcm compared to the reference design. However, the TRU enrichment for the proposed SFR core designs is increased. In the thermal hydraulic analysis, the temperature distributions are calculated for the two types of proposed core designs and the mass flow rate is optimized to satisfy the design constraints for the highest power generating assembly. The results of this study indicate that the proposed SFR assembly design concept, which adopts graphite-moderating rods which are inserted into the fuel assembly, can feasibly minimize the sodium void reactivity coefficient. Single TRU enrichment and an identical fuel slug diameter throughout the SFR core are also achieved because the radial power peak can be flattened by varying the number of moderating rods in each core region.

  19. Evaluation of alternative treatments for spent fuel rod consolidation wastes and other miscellaneous commercial transuranic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, W.A.; Schneider, K.J.; Oma, K.H.; Smith, R.I.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1986-05-01

    Eight alternative treatments (and four subalternatives) are considered for both existing commercial transuranic wastes and future wastes from spent fuel consolidation. Waste treatment is assumed to occur at a hypothetical central treatment facility (a Monitored Retrieval Storage facility was used as a reference). Disposal in a geologic repository is also assumed. The cost, process characteristics, and waste form characteristics are evaluated for each waste treatment alternative. The evaluation indicates that selection of a high-volume-reduction alternative can save almost $1 billion in life-cycle costs for the management of transuranic and high-activity wastes from 70,000 MTU of spent fuel compared to the reference MRS process. The supercompaction, arc pyrolysis and melting, and maximum volume reduction alternatives are recommended for further consideration; the latter two are recommended for further testing and demonstration.

  20. Development of proto-type advanced leaked fuel rod detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyung Chul; Cho, Seong Won; Jeon, Jae Hyuk; Jeong, Jae Cheon; Kim, Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-02-01

    The fuel inspection equipment using ultrasonic signal has been developed its design and configuration in order to get inspection results more accurate and easier than the previous ones. In this task, the system functions are advanced by adopting of state of the art technologies in the field of digital servo control and signal processing. By the above endeavors, the total performance are improved and made to handle easily. 61 tabs., 31 figs., 3 ills., 9 refs. (Author).

  1. Simulation of the BWR experiments CORA-17 and CORA-28 using ATHLET-CD and assessment of BWR modelling. 1{sup st} Technical report. Validation and interpretation of the ATHLET-CD model basis; Simulation der SWR-Versuche CORA-17 und CORA-28 mit dem Programmsystem ATHLET-CD und Bewertung der SWR-Modellbasis. 1. Technischer Fachbericht. Validierung und Interpretation der ATHLET-CD Modellbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, M.; Gremme, F.; Koch, M.K.

    2013-08-15

    The 1st Technical Report was prepared for the research project ''Validation and Interpretation of the ATHLET-CD Model Basis'' funded by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi1501385) and carried out at the Chair of Energy Systems and Energy Economics at Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (RUB). This report provides results of the simulation of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) experiments CORA-17 and -28 with ATHLET-CD Mod. 2.2A. The system code ATHLET-CD (Analysis of Thermal-hydraulics of Leaks and Transients - Core Degradation) is developed by the German Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH. Code results are compared to measurements in order to assess and to analyze the capabilities of the current code version with regard to the modeling of BWR components. The CORA test series was carried out between the years 1987 and 1993 at the former Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), now Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The investigations provided experimental data regarding the material behavior during the early phase of core degradation in Light Water Reactors (LWR). The tests CORA17 and -28 represented a typical BWR arrangement of the fuel rod bundle and provided insights about the bundle behavior during the quenching process (CORA-17) and regarding the influence of a preoxidized bundle (CORA-28), respectively. The simulation results are analyzed and discussed in terms of the thermal bundle behavior, the zirconium oxidation in steam and the resulting hydrogen generation as well as the material relocation. In particular, the recently extended modeling capabilities of the code in terms of the relocation of BWR components like the absorber blade and the canister wall are assessed. The analysis shows that the code captures the thermal behavior in good agreement in both experiments. An even enhanced reproduction of the test CORA-28 is obtained in comparison to a calculation using the previous code version ATHLET-CD Mod

  2. Radionuclide inventories in the discharged fuels of PHWR-220, BWR-160, VVER-1000 and the conceptual ATBR-600 reactors - A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Usha [Light Water Reactors Physics Section, Reactor Physics Design Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: ushapal@barc.gov.in; Jagannathan, V. [Light Water Reactors Physics Section, Reactor Physics Design Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: vjagan@barc.gov.in

    2008-10-15

    Radionuclides content in the discharged fuel of the conceptual thorium breeder reactor ATBR-600 has been assessed and compared against other thermal power reactors considered in Indian nuclear power programme. The contribution of actinides and the fission products inventories in the discharged fuels are separately estimated and assessed. The ATBR-600 reactor is suggested for closed fuel cycle option. The relatively large presence of the unspent plutonium would in fact be recycled. Nonetheless, the data has been presented in the event of operating ATBR-600 like other present day power reactors in a once through fuel cycle mode.

  3. RAMONA analysis of BWR stability at nuclear power plant Brunsbuettel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappes, C.; Velten, R.; Wehle, F. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Huettmann, A.; Schuster, R. [Vattenfall Europe GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    For high power/low flow operating conditions associated with unfavorable core power distributions, BWR operation requires attention with respect to potential power and flow oscillations. Beside stability analyses based on highly validated methodology as RAMONA, also stability measurements are performed in BWR plants. Such measurements usually cover the evaluation of Average Power Range Monitor (APRM) and Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) signals of the BWR core at several operating conditions. This paper presents the numerical simulation of stability phenomena which were recorded in the frame of a stability measurement at the nuclear power plant Brunsbuettel (KKB) on December 12{sup th} 2004 (Cycle 18). The measurement showed a local instability at most investigated operating points and a temporal global instability when the reactor was operated at conditions where four of the eight recirculation pumps were running. The numerical investigation with RAMONA-3 focuses on the operating point with four recirculation pumps when a temporal global instability has been measured. It will be shown that a local destabilization of a single Fuel Assembly (FA) can yield a global instability mode when the reactor is operating under high power and low flow conditions. Such phenomena have already been observed and analyzed for other BWR plants as e.g. Forsmark-1. (orig.)

  4. Power oscillations in BWR reactors; Oscilaciones de potencia en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa P, G. [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx

    2002-07-01

    One of the main problems in the operation of BWR type reactors is the instability in power that these could present. One type of oscillations and that is the objective of this work is the named density wave, which is attributed to the thermohydraulic processes that take place in the reactor core. From the beginnings of the development of BWR reactors, the stability of these has been an important aspect in their design, due to its possible consequences on the fuel integrity. The reactor core operates in two phase flow conditions and it is observed that under certain power and flow conditions, power instabilities appear. Studying this type of phenomena is complex, due to that a reactor core is constituted approximately by 27,000 fuel bars with different distributions of power and flow. The phenomena that cause the instability in BWR reactors continue being matter of scientific study. In the literature mainly in nuclear subject, it can be observed that exist different methods and approximations for studying this type of phenomena, nevertheless, their results are focused to establish safety limits in the reactor operation, instead of studying in depth of the knowledge about. Also in this line sense of the reactor data analysis, the oscillations characteristic frequencies are obtained for trying to establish if the power is growing or decreasing. In addition to that before mentioned in this paper it is presented a rigorous study applying the volumetric average method, for obtaining the vacuum waves propagation velocities and its possible connection with the power oscillations. (Author)

  5. Mobile crud and transportation of radioactivity in BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H-P. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoping (Sweden); LTU, Div. of Chemical Engineering, Lulea (Sweden); Hagg, J. [Ringhals AB, Varobacka (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    Mobile crud is here referred to as a generic term for all types of particles that occur in the reactor water in BWRs and that are able to carry radioactivity. Previous results in this on-going series of studies in Swedish BWRs suggest that there are particles of different origins and function. A share may come from fuel crud and others may come from detachment, precipitation and dissolution processes in different parts of the BWR primary system, as well as from other system parts, such as the turbine/condenser. In addition, crud particles in this sense may come from purely mechanical processes such as degradation of graphite containing parts of the control rod drives. Therefore, the overall aim was to evaluate which particles are responsible for the transportation and distribution of radioactivity and also to clarify the chemical conditions under which they are formed. Furthermore the aim was to draw conclusions about how the chemistry would be like in order to avoid or at least minimize the formation of radioactivity distributing particles. A specific objective has also been to look into the importance of particle size for spreading of radioactivity in the primary system. Different types of crud particles are likely to have different characteristics in terms of function associated with transportation of radioactivity. The fuel crud is radioactive from the source and other types of crud can via surface processes, co-precipitation and other chemical and mechanical processes potentially affect the distribution of radioactivity in the primary system. In order to predict how operating parameters (e.g. stable, full power operation and scram) and chemical parameters (NWC/HWC/Zn, etc.) will affect the activity build-up on the system surfaces, it is important to know how the different types of crud are affected by these and related parameters. Fuel crud fixed on cladding ring samples, as well as mobile crud from the reactor water captured on filters, were examined by

  6. Anisotropic Azimuthal Power and Temperature distribution on FuelRod. Impact on Hydride Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Arramova, Maria [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Hales, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-29

    The degradation of the zirconium cladding may limit nuclear fuel performance. In the high temperature environment of a reactor, the zirconium in the cladding corrodes, releasing hydrogen in the process. Some of this hydrogen is absorbed by the cladding in a highly inhomogeneous manner. The distribution of the absorbed hydrogen is extremely sensitive to temperature and stress concentration gradients. The absorbed hydrogen tends to concentrate near lower temperatures. This hydrogen absorption and hydride formation can cause cladding failure. This project set out to improve the hydrogen distribution prediction capabilities of the BISON fuel performance code. The project was split into two primary sections, first was the use of a high fidelity multi-physics coupling to accurately predict temperature gradients as a function of r, θ , and z, and the second was to use experimental data to create an analytical hydrogen precipitation model. The Penn State version of thermal hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF) was successfully coupled to the DeCART neutronics code. This coupled system was verified by testing and validated by comparison to FRAPCON data. The hydrogen diffusion and precipitation experiments successfully calculated the heat of transport and precipitation rate constant values to be used within the hydrogen model in BISON. These values can only be determined experimentally. These values were successfully implemented in precipitation, diffusion and dissolution kernels that were implemented in the BISON code. The coupled output was fed into BISON models and the hydrogen and hydride distributions behaved as expected. Simulations were conducted in the radial, axial and azimuthal directions to showcase the full capabilities of the hydrogen model.

  7. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this

  8. Heat and Mass Transfer during Hydrogen Generation in an Array of Fuel Bars of a BWR Using a Periodic Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Romero-Paredes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents, the numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer during hydrogen generation in an array of fuel cylinder bars, each coated with a cladding and a steam current flowing outside the cylinders. The analysis considers the fuel element without mitigation effects. The system consists of a representative periodic unit cell where the initial and boundary-value problems for heat and mass transfer were solved. In this unit cell, we considered that a fuel element is coated by a cladding with steam surrounding it as a coolant. The numerical simulations allow describing the evolution of the temperature and concentration profiles inside the nuclear reactor and could be used as a basis for hybrid upscaling simulations.

  9. THERMAL EVALUATION OF THE USE OF BWR MOX SNF IN THE WASTE PACKAGE DESIGN (SCPB: N/A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Wang

    1997-01-23

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) as specified in the Waste Package Implementation Plan (pp. 4-8,4-11,4-24, 5-1, and 5-13; Ref. 5.10) and Waste Package Plan (pp. 3-15,3-17, and 3-24; Ref. 5.9). The design data request addressed herein is: (1) Characterize the conceptual 40 BWR and 24 BWR Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. (2) Characterize the conceptual 44 BWR and 24 BWR Uncanistered Fuel (UCF) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. The purpose of this analysis is to respond to a concern that the long-term disposal thermal issues for the WP Design, if used with SNF designed for a MOX fuel cycle, do not preclude WP compatibility with the MGDS. The objective of this analysis is to provide thermal parameter information for the conceptual WP design with disposal container which is loaded with BWR MOX SNF under nominal MGDS repository conditions. The results are intended to show that the design has a reasonable chance to meet the MGDS design requirements for normal MGDS operation, and to provide the required guidance to determining the major design issues for future design efforts, and to show that the BWR MOX SNF loaded WP performance is similar to an WP loaded with commercial BWR SNF.

  10. Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

  11. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    Fuel is one of the essential components in a reactor. It is within that fuel that nuclear reactions take place, i.e. fission of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium. Fuel is at the core of the reactor, but equally at the core of the nuclear system as a whole. Fuel design and properties influence reactor behavior, performance, and safety. Even though it only accounts for a small part of the cost per kilowatt-hour of power provided by current nuclear power plants, good utilization of fuel is a major economic issue. Major advances have yet to be achieved, to ensure longer in-reactor dwell-time, thus enabling fuel to yield more energy; and improve ruggedness. Aside from economics, and safety, such strategic issues as use of plutonium, conservation of resources, and nuclear waste management have to be addressed, and true technological challenges arise. This Monograph surveys current knowledge regarding in-reactor behavior, operating limits, and avenues for R and D. It also provides illustrations of ongoing research work, setting out a few noteworthy results recently achieved. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - Water reactor fuel: What are the features of water reactor fuel? 9 (What is the purpose of a nuclear fuel?, Ceramic fuel, Fuel rods, PWR fuel assemblies, BWR fuel assemblies); Fabrication of water reactor fuels (Fabrication of UO{sub 2} pellets, Fabrication of MOX (mixed uranium-plutonium oxide) pellets, Fabrication of claddings); In-reactor behavior of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels (Irradiation conditions during nominal operation, Heat generation, and removal, The processes involved at the start of irradiation, Fission gas behavior, Microstructural changes); Water reactor fuel behavior in loss of tightness conditions (Cladding, the first containment barrier, Causes of failure, Consequences of a failure); Microscopic morphology of fuel ceramic and its evolution under irradiation; Migration and localization of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices (The ceramic under

  12. Spent BWR fuel characterisation combining a fork detector with gamma spectrometry. Report on Task JNT A 1071 FIN of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiitta, A.; Hautamaeki, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Turunen, A. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Arlt, R.; Arenas, Carrasco J.; Esmailpour-Kazerouni, K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Schwalbach, P. [Euratom Safeguards Office (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    The LWR spent fuel assemblies have to be verified at the partial defect level before they become difficult to access. According to the IAEA's criteria the partial defect test for spent fuel should be able to detect if half or more of the fuel pins have been removed from an assembly and possibly replaced by dummies. Euratom applies similar criteria. Therefore a standard verification procedure needs to be developed using an appropriate combination of measurements and theoretical calculations. Two experiments with an 'upgraded' fork detector were performed at the TVO KPA Store in September and in December 1999. On the whole, 26 assemblies were measured. In the 'upgraded' fork detector the total neutron count and the gross gamma measurements are complemented with gamma spectroscopic measurement using an integrated measurement head. A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector is placed on the same vertical level as the fission and ionisation chambers. This enables simultaneous gamma and neutron measurements at one location. In the upgraded fork model the fork prongs can also be removed and gamma spectrometric measurements can be done using only the CZT detector. This allows more versatile placement of the target fuel assembly allowing various kind of gamma spectroscopic scanning measurements. In this report a gamma spectroscopy based correction to the gross gamma data is introduced. This corrected gross gamma signal seems to describe more consistently the burnup of the assembly than the {sup 137}Cs intensity obtained by direct gamma spectrometry. Concerning the measured neutron data of assemblies with different enrichments, an enrichment correction method based on calculations made with the ORIGEN-S program is introduced in this report. In addition, the share of {sup 244}Cm neutrons of the total neutron source is derived from the results calculated with the PYVO program. These corrections to the neutron signal seem to improve the correlation of the

  13. Determination of internal pressure and the backfill gas composition of nuclear fuel rods; Determinacion de la presion interna y la composicion del gas de llenado de barras de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, M.A.; Cota S, G.; Merlo S, L.; Fernandez T, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    An important consideration in the nuclear fuel manufacturing is the measurement of the helium atmosphere pressure and its composition analysis inside the nuclear fuel rod. In this work it is presented a system used to measure the internal pressure and to determine the backfill gas composition of fuel rods. The system is composed of an expansion chamber provided of a seals system to assure that when rod is drilled, the gas stays contained inside the expansion chamber. The system is connected to a pressure measurement digital system: Baratron MKS 310-AHS-1000. Range 1000 mm Hg from which the pressure readings are taken when this is stabilized in all the system. After a gas sample is sent toward a Perkin Elmer gas chromatograph, model 8410 with thermal conductivity detector to get the corresponding chromatogram and doing the necessary calculations for obtaining the backfill gas composition of the rod in matter. (Author)

  14. Reactor physics analysis for the design of nuclear fuel lattices with burnable poisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G. [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Guzman, Juan R., E-mail: maestro_juan_rafael@hotmail.com [Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Adolfo Lopez Mateos, San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A fuel rod optimization for the coupled bundle-core design in a BWR is developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An algorithm to minimize the rod power peaking factor is used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fissile content is divided in two factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reactor physics analysis of these factors is performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The algorithm is applied to a typical BWR fuel lattice. - Abstract: The main goals in nuclear fuel lattice design are: (1) minimizing the rod power peaking factor (PPF) in order that the power level distribution is the most uniform; (2) obtaining a prescribed target value for the multiplication factor (k) at the end of the irradiation in order that the fuel lattice reaches the desired reactivity; and (3) obtaining a prescribed target value for the k at the beginning of the irradiation in order that the reactivity excess is neither a high value (to ease the maneuvering of the control systems) nor a low value (to avoid the penalization of the high cost of the burnable poison content). In this work a simple algorithm to design the burnable poison bearing nuclear fuel lattice is presented. This algorithm is based on a reactor physics analysis. The algorithm is focused on finding the radial distribution of the fuel rods having different fissile and burnable poison contents in order to obtain: (1) an adequate minimum PPF; (2) a prescribed target value of the k at the end of the irradiation; and (3) a prescribed target value of the k at the beginning of the irradiation. This algorithm is based on the factorization of the fissile and burnable poison contents of each fuel rod and on the application of the first-order perturbation theory. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated with the design of a fuel lattice composed of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) and gadolinium dioxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) for boiling water reactors (BWR). This algorithm has been accomplished

  15. Instant release of fission products in leaching experiments with high burn-up nuclear fuels in the framework of the Euratom project FIRST- Nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, K.; González-Robles, E.; Kienzler, B.; Curti, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Martínez-Torrents, A.; Roth, O.; Slonszki, E.; Mennecart, T.; Günther-Leopold, I.; Hózer, Z.

    2017-02-01

    The instant release of fission products from high burn-up UO2 fuels and one MOX fuel was investigated by means of leach tests. The samples covered PWR and BWR fuels at average rod burn-up in the range of 45-63 GWd/tHM and included clad fuel segments, fuel segments with opened cladding, fuel fragments and fuel powder. The tests were performed with sodium chloride - bicarbonate solutions under oxidizing conditions and, for one test, in reducing Ar/H2 atmosphere. The iodine and cesium release could be partially explained by the differences in sample preparation, leading to different sizes and properties of the exposed surface areas. Iodine and cesium releases tend to correlate with FGR and linear power rating, but the scatter of the data is significant. Although the gap between the fuel and the cladding was closed in some high burn-up samples, fissures still provide possible preferential transport pathways.

  16. PLUTON: Three-group neutronic code for burnup analysis of isotope generation and depletion in highly irradiated LWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemehov, Sergei E; Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    PLUTON is a three-group neutronic code analyzing, as functions of time and burnup, the change of radial profiles, together with average values, of power density, burnup, concentration of trans-uranium elements, plutonium buildup, depletion of fissile elements, and fission product generation in water reactor fuel rod with standard UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, inhomogeneous MOX, and UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2}. The PLUTON code, which has been designed to be run on Windows PC, has adopted a theoretical shape function of neutron attenuation in pellet, which enables users to perform a very fast and accurate calculation easily. The present code includes the irradiation conditions of the Halden Reactor which gives verification data for the code. The total list of trans-uranium elements included in the calculations consists of {sub 92}U{sup 233-239}, {sub 93}Np{sup 237-239}, {sub 94}Pu{sup 238-243}, {sub 95}Am{sup 241-244} (including isomers), and {sub 96}Cm{sup 242-245}. Poisoning fission products are represented by {sub 54}Xe{sup 131,133,135}, {sub 48}Cd{sup 113}, {sub 62}Sm{sup 149,151,152}, {sub 64}Gd{sup 154-160}, {sub 63}Eu{sup 153,155}, {sub 36}Kr{sup 83,85}, {sub 42}Mo{sup 95}, {sub 43}Tc{sup 99}, {sub 45}Rh{sup 103}, {sub 47}Ag{sup 109}, {sub 53}I{sup 127,129,131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133}, {sub 57}La{sup 139}, {sub 59}Pr{sup 141}, {sub 60}Nd{sup 143-150}, {sub 61}Pm{sup 147}. Fission gases and volatiles included in the code are {sub 36}Kr{sup 83-86}, {sub 54}Xe{sup 129-136}, {sub 52}Te{sup 125-130}, {sub 53}I{sup 127-131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133-137}, and {sub 56}Ba{sup 135-140}. Verification has been performed up to 83 GWd/tU, and a satisfactory agreement has been obtained. (author)

  17. Study of heat transfer in a eccentric fuel rods in a non stop planned shutdown of a PWR type reactor; Estudo da transferencia de calor em uma vareta combustivel excentrica, num desligamento nao planejado de um reator do tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Lava, Deise Diana; Borges, Diogo da Silva; Sampaio, Paulo Augusto Berquo de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: deisedy@gmail.com, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: sampaio@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to conduct a case study in which the fuel pellets are displaced related to the center coating. Therefore, it will be addressed, first, the verification of computer code, comparing the results obtained with analytical solutions. This check is important so that, at a time later, you can use the program to know the fuel rod behavior and coolant channel.

  18. BWR Steam Dryer Alternating Stress Assessment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hambric, S. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ziada, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an overview of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) steam dryer design; the fatigue cracking failures that occurred at the Quad Cities (QC) plants and their root causes; a history of BWR Extended Power Uprates (EPUs) in the USA; and a discussion of steam dryer modifications/replacements, alternating stress mechanisms on steam dryers, and structural integrity evaluations (static and alternating stress).

  19. Impact of Reactor Operating Parameters on Cask Reactivity in BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Betzler, Benjamin R [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of reactor operating parameters used in fuel depletion calculations on spent fuel cask reactivity, with relevance for boiling-water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) applications. Assessments that used generic BWR fuel assembly and spent fuel cask configurations are presented. The considered operating parameters, which were independently varied in the depletion simulations for the assembly, included fuel temperature, bypass water density, specific power, and operating history. Different operating history scenarios were considered for the assembly depletion to determine the effect of relative power distribution during the irradiation cycles, as well as the downtime between cycles. Depletion, decay, and criticality simulations were performed using computer codes and associated nuclear data within the SCALE code system. Results quantifying the dependence of cask reactivity on the assembly depletion parameters are presented herein.

  20. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR; Estabilidad termohidraulica acoplada a la neutronica en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Mpio. Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico); Castlllo D, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gcm9acpp@cfe.gob.mx

    2006-07-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the

  1. Development of a computer program of fast calculation for the pre design of advanced nuclear fuel 10 x 10 for BWR type reactors; Desarrollo de un program de computo de calculo rapido para el prediseno de celdas de combustible nuclear avanzado 10 x 10 para reactores de agua en ebullicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mrpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) a methodology is developed to optimize the design of cells 10x10 of assemble fuels for reactors of water in boil or BWR. It was proposed a lineal calculation formula based on a coefficients matrix (of the change reason of the relative power due to changes in the enrichment of U-235) for estimate the relative powers by pin of a cell. With this it was developed the computer program of fast calculation named PreDiCeldas. The one which by means of a simple search algorithm allows to minimize the relative power peak maximum of cell or LPPF. This is achieved varying the distribution of U-235 inside the cell, maintaining in turn fixed its average enrichment. The accuracy in the estimation of the relative powers for pin is of the order from 1.9% when comparing it with results of the 'best estimate' HELIOS code. With the PreDiCeldas it was possible, at one minimum time of calculation, to re-design a reference cell diminishing the LPPF, to the beginning of the life, of 1.44 to a value of 1.31. With the cell design with low LPPF is sought to even design cycles but extensive that those reached at the moment in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central. (Author)

  2. Coretran/Vipre assembly critical power assessment against Nupec BWR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aounallah, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    This study has been performed, in the framework of the STARS project, to assess CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02 code capability to predict critical heat flux conditions for BWR fuel assemblies. The assessment is based on comparisons of the code results with the NUPEC steady-state critical power measurements on full-scale assemblies tested under a range of flow conditions. Two assembly types were considered, the standard BWR 8 x 8 and the so-called ''high-burnup'' assembly, similar to GE-10. Code modelling options that have a significant impact on the results have been identified, along with code limitations. (author)

  3. Study of heat transfer in 3D fuel rods of the EPRI-9R reactor modified; Estudo da transferencia de calor em varetas combustiveis 3D do reator EPRI-9R 3D modificado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Lava, Deise Diana; Borges, Diogo da Silva; Sampaio, Paulo Augusto Berquo de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: deisedy@gmail.com, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: sampaio@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to conduct a case study of the fuel rods that have the highest and the lowest average power of the EPRI-9R 3D reactor modified , for various positions of the control rods banks. For this, will be addressed the verification of computer code, comparing the results obtained with analytical solutions. This check is important so that, subsequently, it is possible use the program to understand the behavior of the fuel rods and the coolant channel of the EPRI-9R 3D reactor modified. Thus, in view of the scope of this paper, first a brief introducing on the heat transfer is done, including the rod equations and the equation of energy in the channel to allow the analysis of the results.

  4. Copper, clay and granite - the ''seal of eternity'' for nuclear fuel rods. Final disposal of nuclear fuel rods; Kupfer, Lehm und Granit: Das 'Siegel der Ewigkeit' fuer Kernbrennstaebe. Endlagerung von Nuklearbrennstaeben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollrath, K.

    2007-07-01

    After more than 35 years of electricity production from nuclear fuel, the CLAB interim store harbours more than 10,000 spent fuel rods. After a long search for a suitable final disposal concept a solution was found which is based on multiple barriers. Its key feature are hermetically tight welded copper vessels which are encased in betonite clay and deposited at 500 m depth in native granite rock. The moulding and drawing technique used at the Duesseldorf-Reisholz site of Vallourec and Mannesmann Tubes proved suitable for the manufacture of the vessels.

  5. Development for analysis system of rods enrichment of nuclear fuels; Desarrollo de un sistema de analisis de enriquecimiento de barras de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L

    1998-11-01

    Nuclear industry is strongly regulated all over the world and quality assurance is important in every nuclear installation or process related with it. Nuclear fuel manufacture is not the exception. ININ was committed to manufacture four nuclear fuel bundles for the CFE nucleo electric station at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, under General Electric specifications and fulfilling all the requirements of this industry. One of the quality control requisites in nuclear fuel manufacture deals with the enrichment of the pellets inside the fuel bundle rods. To achieve the quality demanded in this aspect, the system described in this work was developed. With this system, developed at ININ it is possible to detect enrichment spikes since 0.4 % in a column of pellets with a 95 % confidence interval and to identify enrichment differences greater than 0.2 % e between homogeneous segments, also with a 95 % confidence interval. ININ delivered the four nuclear fuel bundles to CFE and these were introduced in the core of the nuclear reactor of Unit 1 in the fifth cycle. Nowadays they are producing energy and have shown a correct mechanical performance and neutronic behavior. (Author)

  6. BWR Source Term Generation and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.C. Ryman

    2003-07-31

    This calculation is a revision of a previous calculation (Ref. 7.5) that bears the same title and has the document identifier BBAC00000-01717-0210-00006 REV 01. The purpose of this revision is to remove TBV (to-be-verified) -41 10 associated with the output files of the previous version (Ref. 7.30). The purpose of this and the previous calculation is to generate source terms for a representative boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly for the first one million years after the SNF is discharged from the reactors. This calculation includes an examination of several ways to represent BWR assemblies and operating conditions in SAS2H in order to quantify the effects these representations may have on source terms. These source terms provide information characterizing the neutron and gamma spectra in particles per second, the decay heat in watts, and radionuclide inventories in curies. Source terms are generated for a range of burnups and enrichments (see Table 2) that are representative of the waste stream and stainless steel (SS) clad assemblies. During this revision, it was determined that the burnups used for the computer runs of the previous revision were actually about 1.7% less than the stated, or nominal, burnups. See Section 6.6 for a discussion of how to account for this effect before using any source terms from this calculation. The source term due to the activation of corrosion products deposited on the surfaces of the assembly from the coolant is also calculated. The results of this calculation support many areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR), which include thermal evaluation, radiation dose determination, radiological safety analyses, surface and subsurface facility designs, and total system performance assessment. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (Ref. 7.27, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the

  7. Fuel Performance Calculations for FeCrAl Cladding in BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Sweet, Ryan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Maldonado, G. Ivan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study expands upon previous neutronics analyses of the reactivity impact of alternate cladding concepts in boiling water reactor (BWR) cores and directs focus toward contrasting fuel performance characteristics of FeCrAl cladding against those of traditional Zircaloy. Using neutronics results from a modern version of the 3D nodal simulator NESTLE, linear power histories were generated and supplied to the BISON-CASL code for fuel performance evaluations. BISON-CASL (formerly Peregrine) expands on material libraries implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and the MOOSE framework by providing proprietary material data. By creating material libraries for Zircaloy and FeCrAl cladding, the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod (e.g., strains, centerline fuel temperature, and time to gap closure) were investigated and contrasted.

  8. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    A technical basis for peak reactivity boiling water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) methods was recently generated, and the technical basis for extended BWR BUC is now being developed. In this paper, a number of effects related to extended BWR BUC are analyzed, including three major operational effects in BWRs: the coolant density axial distribution, the use of control blades during operation, and the axial burnup profile. Specifically, uniform axial moderator density profiles are analyzed and compared to previous results and an additional temporal fidelity study combing moderator density profiles for three different fuel assemblies is presented. Realistic control blade histories and cask criticality results are compared to previously generated constructed control blade histories. Finally, a preliminary study of the axial burnup profile is provided.

  9. Development and Testing of CTF to Support Modeling of BWR Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wysocki, Aaron [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-01-29

    This milestone supports developing and assessing COBRA-TF (CTF) for the modeling of boiling water reactors (BWRs). This is achieved in three stages. First, a new preprocessor utility that is capable of handling BWR-specic design elements (e.g., channel boxes and large water rods) is developed. A previous milestone (L3:PHI.CTF.P12.01) led to the development of this preprocessor capability for single assembly models. This current milestone expands this utility so that it is applicable to multi-assembly BWR models that can be modeled in either serial or parallel. The second stage involves making necessary modications to CTF so that it can execute these new models. Specically, this means implementing an outer-iteration loop, specic to BWR models, that equalizes the pressure loss over all assemblies in the core (which are not connected due to the channel boxes) by adjusting inlet mass ow rate. A third stage involves assessing the standard convergence metrics that are used by CTF to determine when a simulation is steady-state. The nal stage has resulted in the implementation of new metrics in the code that give a better indication of how steady the solution is at convergence. This report summarizes these eorts and provides a demonstration of CTF's BWR-modeling capabilities. CASL-U-2016-1030-000

  10. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanic performance of fuel rods MOX in fuel assemblies 10 x 10; Evaluacion del desempeno termo-mecanico barras combustibles MOX en ensambles combustible 10 x 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H., E-mail: hector.hernandez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico) , we have been working in proposals of fuel assemblies that bear to the reduction of the plutonium inventories that exist a global level, plutonium coming from the dismantlement of the nuclear weapons as of the one used as fuel inside the reactors in operation at the present time. For this reason besides carrying out the evaluation of the neutron performance is necessary to realize the evaluation of the thermal-mechanic behavior of the rods that compose a fuel assembly with the purpose of determining if under the operation conditions to those that are subjected the fuel does not surpass the limit established and this causes a failure in the fuel element. In this sense when carrying out the analysis of an fuel element of mixed oxides in an arrangement 10 x 10 is observed that under the established operation conditions for the proposed cycle values that surpass the limit established for fuel failure are not presented, therefore the proposed assembly can be used as reload element in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  11. Shutdown margin for high conversion BWRs operating in Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaposhnik, Y., E-mail: shaposhy@bgu.ac.il [NRCN – Nuclear Research Center Negev, POB 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shwageraus, E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Elias, E. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City 32000, Haifa (Israel)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • BWR core operating in a closed self-sustainable Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle. • Shutdown Margin in Th-RBWR design. • Fully coupled MC with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules. • Thermal–hydraulic analysis includes MCPR observation. - Abstract: Several reactivity control system design options are explored in order to satisfy shutdown margin (SDM) requirements in a high conversion BWRs operating in Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle (Th-RBWR). The studied core has an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure with a single fissile zone “sandwiched” between two fertile blanket zones. The utilization of an originally suggested RBWR Y-shape control rod in Th-RBWR is shown to be insufficient for maintaining adequate SDM to balance the high negative reactivity feedbacks, while maintaining fuel breeding potential, core power rating, and minimum Critical Power Ratio (CPR). Implementation of alternative reactivity control materials, reducing axial leakage through non-uniform enrichment distribution, use of burnable poisons, reducing number of pins as well as increasing pin diameter are also shown to be incapable of meeting the SDM requirements. Instead, an alternative assembly design, based on Rod Cluster Control Assembly with absorber rods was investigated. This design matches the reference ABWR core power and has adequate shutdown margin. The new concept was modeled as a single three-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries, using the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupled with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules.

  12. Status update of the BWR cask simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Durbin, Samuel G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are typically evaluated through detailed numerical analysis of the system's thermal performance. These modeling efforts are performed by the vendor to demonstrate the performance and regulatory compliance and are independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Numerous studies have been previously conducted. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have moved the storage location from above ground to below ground and significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the canister helium pressure. Previous cask performance validation testing did not capture these parameters. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern dry casks. These modern cask designs utilize elevated helium pressure in the sealed canister or are intended for subsurface storage. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above ground and below ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the canister. The symmetric single assembly geometry with well-controlled boundary conditions simplifies interpretation of results. Various configurations of outer concentric ducting will be used to mimic conditions for above and below ground storage configurations

  13. Comparison of prediction models for Cherenkov light emissions from nuclear fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branger, E.; Grape, S.; Jacobsson Svärd, S.; Jansson, P.; Andersson Sundén, E.

    2017-06-01

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) [1] is a tool used by nuclear safeguards inspectors to verify irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage based on the Cherenkov light produced by the assembly. Verifying that no rods have been substituted in the fuel, so-called partial-defect verification, is done by comparing the intensity measured with a DCVD with a predicted intensity, based on operator fuel declaration. The prediction model currently used by inspectors is based on simulations of Cherenkov light production in a BWR 8x8 geometry. This work investigates prediction models based on simulated Cherenkov light production in a BWR 8x8 and a PWR 17x17 assembly, as well as a simplified model based on a single rod in water. Cherenkov light caused by both fission product gamma and beta decays was considered. The simulations reveal that there are systematic differences between the model used by safeguards inspectors and the models described in this publication, most noticeably with respect to the fuel assembly cooling time. Consequently, if the intensity predictions are based on another fuel type than the fuel type being measured, a systematic bias in intensity with respect to burnup and cooling time is introduced. While a simplified model may be accurate enough for a set of fuel assemblies with nearly identical cooling times, the prediction models may differ systematically by up to 18 % for fuels with more varied cooling times. Accordingly, these investigations indicate that the currently used model may need to be exchanged with a set of more detailed, fuel-type specific models, in order minimize the model dependent systematic deviations.

  14. Comparison of results for burning with BWR reactors CASMO and SCALE 6.2 (TRITON / NEWT); Comparacion de los resultados de quemado para reactores BWR con CASMO y SCALE 6.2 (TRITON/NEWT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesado, C.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we compare the results from two codes burned, CASMO and SCALE 6.2 (TRITON). To do this, is simulated all segments corresponding to a boiling water reactor (BWR) using both codes. In addition, to account for different working points, simulations changing the instantaneous variables, these are repeated: void fractions (6 points), fuel temperature (6 points) and control rods (two points), with a total of 72 possible combinations of different instantaneous variables for each segment. After all simulations are completed for each segment, we can reorder the obtained cross sections, as SCALE CASMO both, to create a library of compositions nemtab format. This format is accepted by the neutronic code of nodal diffusion, PARCS v2.7. Finally compares the results obtained with PARCS and with the SIMULATE3 -SIMTAB methodology to level of full reactor. Also, we have made use of the KENO-VI and MCDANCOFF modules belonging to SCALE. The first is a Monte Carlo transport code with which you can validate the value of the multiplier, the second has been used to obtain values of Dancoff factor and increase the accuracy of model SCALE. (Author)

  15. ROD INTERNAL PRESSURE QUANTIFICATION AND DISTRIBUTION ANALYSIS USING FRAPCON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Jessee, Matthew Anderson [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified forWatts BarNuclearUnit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, intercycle assembly movements, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) layers is derived and applied to FRAPCON output data to quantify the RIP and CHS for these fuel rods. SCALE/Polaris is used to quantify fuel rod-specific spectral quantities and the amount of gaseous fission products produced in the fuel for use in FRAPCON inputs. Fuel rods with ZrB2 IFBA layers (i.e., IFBA rods) are determined to have RIP predictions that are elevated when compared to fuel rod without IFBA layers (i.e., standard rods) despite the fact that IFBA rods often have reduced fill pressures and annular fuel blankets. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) are prepared from the distribution of RIP predictions for all standard and IFBA rods. The provided CDFs allow for the determination of the portion of WBN1 fuel rods that exceed a specified RIP limit. Lastly, improvements to the computational methodology of FRAPCON are proposed.

  16. Rodding Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... above-the-knee splint or lightweight plaster or fiberglass splint instead. Bracing may be used after the ... level. Potential Complications Complications from rodding surgery include risks related to:  General anesthesia,  Fractures during the procedure,  ...

  17. On the application of electrochemical techniques for the preparation of {sup 57}Co source core, encapsulation and quality evaluation for radiometric assay of nuclear fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, A.; Kumar, M.; Udhayakumar, J.; Gandhi, S.S.; Venkatesh, M. [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiopharmaceuticals Div.; Satpati, A.K. [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Analytical Chemistry Div.; Nuwad, J.; Shukla, R.; Pillai, C.G.S. [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Chemistry Div.; Venugopal, V. [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry and Isotope Group

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes an electrochemical method for the preparation of {sup 57}Co source to be used in quality evaluation of nuclear fuel rods. The electrolytic cell, the experimental set up used and the process of deposition are described. The effect of various parameters such as pH of the electrolyte, bath temperature, current density, content of cobalt in the bath, electrolyte volume in the cell and deposition time were investigated and optimized for maximum deposition. The texture and morphology of the electrodeposited samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM and EDS analyses. Sources containing {proportional_to} 370 MBq (10 mCi) {sup 57}Co on a circular copper foil of 4 mm diameter could be prepared and encapsulated in an aluminum capsule. Quality assurance tests performed to ensure non-leachability, uniform distribution of activity and stability of the sources gave satisfactory results. (orig.)

  18. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation systems (often referred to as casks) and spent fuel pools (SFPs). This work is divided into two main phases. The first phase investigated the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in SFPs to transportation and storage casks and the validation of reactivity calculations and spent fuel compositions within these methods. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the analysis of the effects of control blade insertion history, and moderator density and burnup axial profiles for extended BWR BUC.

  19. A contribution to the analysis of the thermal behaviour of Fast Breeder fuel rods with UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} fuel; Contribucion al analisis del comportamiento termico de las barras combustibles de UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} de los reactores rapidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Elbel, H.

    1977-07-01

    The fuel of Fast Breeder Reactors which consists of Uranium and Plutonium dioxide is mainly characterized by the amount and distribution of void volume and Plutonium and the amount of oxygen. Irradiation experiments carried out with this fuel have shown that initial structure of the fuel pellet is subjected to large changes during operation. These are consequences of the radial and axial temperature gradients within the fuel rods. (Author) 54 refs.

  20. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-V (Ver.1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-09-01

    A light water fuel analysis code FEMAXI-V is an advanced version which has been produced by integrating FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), high burn-up fuel code EXBURN-I, and a number of functional improvements and extensions, to predict fuel rod behavior in normal and transient (not accident) conditions. The present report describes in detail the basic theories and structure, models and numerical solutions applied, improvements and extensions, and the material properties adopted in FEMAXI-V(Ver.1). FEMAXI-V deals with a single fuel rod. It predicts thermal and mechanical response of fuel rod to irradiation, including FP gas release. The thermal analysis predicts rod temperature distribution on the basis of pellet heat generation, changes in pellet thermal conductivity and gap thermal conductance, (transient) change in surface heat transfer to coolant, using radial one-dimensional geometry. The heat generation density profile of pellet can be determined by adopting the calculated results of burning analysis code. The mechanical analysis performs elastic/plastic, creep and PCMI calculations by FEM. The FP gas release model calculates diffusion of FP gas atoms and accumulation in bubbles, release and increase in internal pressure of rod. In every analysis, it is possible to allow some materials properties and empirical equations to depend on the local burnup or heat flux, which enables particularly analysis of high burnup fuel behavior and boiling transient of BWR rod. In order to facilitate effective and wide-ranging application of the code, formats and methods of input/output of the code are also described, and a sample output in an actual form is included. (author)

  1. Cross-section adjustment techniques for BWR adaptive simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson

    Computational capability has been developed to adjust multi-group neutron cross-sections to improve the fidelity of boiling water reactor (BWR) modeling and simulation. The method involves propagating multi-group neutron cross-section uncertainties through BWR computational models to evaluate uncertainties in key core attributes such as core k-effective, nodal power distributions, thermal margins, and in-core detector readings. Uncertainty-based inverse theory methods are then employed to adjust multi-group cross-sections to minimize the disagreement between BWR modeling predictions and measured plant data. For this work, measured plant data were virtually simulated in the form of perturbed 3-D nodal power distributions with discrepancies with predictions of the same order of magnitude as expected from plant data. Using the simulated plant data, multi-group cross-section adjustment reduces the error in core k-effective to less than 0.2% and the RMS error in nodal power to 4% (i.e. the noise level of the in-core instrumentation). To ensure that the adapted BWR model predictions are robust, Tikhonov regularization is utilized to control the magnitude of the cross-section adjustment. In contrast to few-group cross-section adjustment, which was the focus of previous research on BWR adaptive simulation, multigroup cross-section adjustment allows for future fuel cycle design optimization to include the determination of optimal fresh fuel assembly designs using the adjusted multi-group cross-sections. The major focus of this work is to efficiently propagate multi-group neutron cross-section uncertainty through BWR lattice physics calculations. Basic neutron cross-section uncertainties are provided in the form of multi-group cross-section covariance matrices. For energy groups in the resolved resonance energy range, the cross-section uncertainties are computed using an infinitely-dilute approximation of the neutron flux. In order to accurately account for spatial and

  2. Evaluation of the fuel rod integrity in PWR reactors from the spectrometric analysis of the primary coolant; Avaliacao da integridade de varetas combustiveis em reatores PWR a partir da analise espectrometrica da agua do primario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Iara Arraes

    1999-02-15

    The main objective of this thesis is to provide a better comprehension of the phenomena involved in the transport of fission products, from the fuel rod to the coolant of a PWR reactor. To achieve this purpose, several steps were followed. Firstly, it was presented a description of the fuel elements and the main mechanisms of fuel rod failure, indicating the most important nuclides and their transport mechanisms. Secondly, taking both the kinetic and diffusion models for the transport of fission products as a basis, a simple analytical and semi-empirical model was developed. This model was also based on theoretical considerations and measurements of coolant's activity, according to internationally adopted methodologies. Several factors are considered in the modelling procedures: intrinsic factors to the reactor itself, factors which depend on the reactor's operational mode, isotope characteristic factors, and factors which depend on the type of rod failure. The model was applied for different reactor's operational parameters in the presence of failed rods. The main conclusions drawn from the analysis of the model's output are relative to the variation on the coolant's water activity with the fuel burnup, the linear operation power and the primary purification rate and to the different behaviour of iodine and noble gases. The model was saturated from a certain failure size and showed to be unable to distinguish between a single big fail and many small ones. (author)

  3. Partially-reflected water-moderated square-piteched U(6.90)O2 fuel rod lattices with 0.67 fuel to water volume ratio (0.800 CM Pitch)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Gary A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative funded the design and construction of the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at Sandia National Laboratories. The start-up of the experiment facility and the execution of the experiments described here were funded by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. The 7uPCX is designed to investigate critical systems with fuel for light water reactors in the enrichment range above 5% 235U. The 7uPCX assembly is a water-moderated and -reflected array of aluminum-clad square-pitched U(6.90%)O2 fuel rods.

  4. Modelling of the spent fuel heat-up in the spent fuel pools using one-dimensional system codes and CFD codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazevicius, Audrius; Kaliatka, Algirdas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania). Lab. of Nuclear Installation Safety

    2017-07-15

    The main functions of spent fuel pools are to remove the residual heat from spent fuel assemblies and to perform the function of biological shielding. In the case of loss of heat removal from spent fuel pool, the fuel rods and pool water temperatures would increase continuously. After the saturated temperature is reached, due to evaporation of water the pool water level would drop, eventually causing the uncover of spent fuel assemblies, fuel overheating and fuel rods failure. This paper presents an analysis of loss of heat removal accident in spent fuel pool of BWR 4 and a comparison of two different modelling approaches. The one-dimensional system thermal-hydraulic computer code RELAP5 and CFD tool ANSYS Fluent were used for the analysis. The results are similar, but the local effects cannot be simulated using a one-dimensional code. The ANSYS Fluent calculation demonstrated that this three-dimensional treatment allows to avoid the need for many one-dimensional modelling assumptions in the pool modelling and enables to reduce the uncertainties associated with natural circulation flow calculation.

  5. Morphological analysis of zirconium nuclear fuel retaining rods braided with SiC: Quality assurance and defect identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazoff, Michael V., E-mail: Michael.Glazoff@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3710 (United States); Hiromoto, Robert; Tokuhiro, Akira [University of Idaho, CAES, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • The stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for the safety of nuclear reactors. • To improve zircaloys’ thermal stability in off-normal conditions, coating of SiC filaments is considered because silicon carbide possesses remarkable inertness at high temperatures. • Mathematical morphology was used for automatic defect identification in Zircaloy-4 rods braided with the layer of SiC filament. • The original mathematical morphology algorithms allowing solving the problem of quality assurance were developed. • In nuclear industry, such algorithms are used for the first time. - Abstract: In the after-Fukushima world, the stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for the safety of nuclear reactors. Among the methods explored currently to improve zircaloys’ thermal stability in off-normal conditions, using a protective coat of the SiC filaments is considered because silicon carbide is well known for its remarkable chemical inertness at high temperatures. A typical SiC fiber contains ∼50,000 individual filaments of 5–10 μm in diameter. In this paper, an effort was made to develop and apply mathematical morphology to the process of automatic defect identification in Zircaloy-4 rods braided with the protective layer of the silicon carbide filament. However, the issues of the braiding quality have to be addressed to ensure its full protective potential. We present the original mathematical morphology algorithms that allow solving this problem of quality assurance successfully. In nuclear industry, such algorithms are used for the first time, and could be easily generalized to the case of automated continuous monitoring for defect identification in the future.

  6. Experiment data report: Gap Conductance Test Series, Test GC 1-3 postirradiation examination. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdock, B. A.

    1977-09-01

    The results of the postirradiation examination of four boiling water reactor type, zircaloy-clad, UO/sub 2/-fueled rods tested as part of the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program are discussed. These rods were employed in Gap Conductance Test GC 1-3 which was conducted to obtain experimental data from which test rod gap conductance values could be determined by both the steady state integral kdT and the power oscillation methods. The postirradiation examination results provided will aid in interpreting and understanding the experimental data obtained during Test GC 1-3 and in evaluating the effect of fuel behavior on the fuel rod thermal response and interpreted gap conductances. Fuel rod fill gas composition and pressure and rod power profiles are discussed. Evidence is presented showing that significant amounts of water had been present in two of the four fuel rods during testing. For the two fuel rods that remained intact during the test, measurements of fuel pellet-to-cladding gap, as well as the surface area of the fuel cracks at several axial locations are presented. A total effective radial gap is calculated and the fuel structure and porosity are analyzed.

  7. Development and verification of NRC`s single-rod fuel performance codes FRAPCON-3 AND FRAPTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, C.E.; Cunningham, M.E.; Lanning, D.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The FRAPCON and FRAP-T code series, developed in the 1970s and early 1980s, are used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to predict fuel performance during steady-state and transient power conditions, respectively. Both code series are now being updated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to improve their predictive capabilities at high burnup levels. The newest versions of the codes are called FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN. The updates to fuel property and behavior models are focusing on providing best estimate predictions under steady-state and fast transient power conditions up to extended fuel burnups (> 55 GWd/MTU). Both codes will be assessed against a data base independent of the data base used for code benchmarking and an estimate of code predictive uncertainties will be made based on comparisons to the benchmark and independent data bases.

  8. Monopolar fuel cell stack coupled together without use of top or bottom cover plates or tie rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A monopolar fuel cell stack comprises a plurality of sealed unit cells coupled together. Each unit cell comprises two outer cathodes adjacent to corresponding membrane electrode assemblies and a center anode plate. An inlet and outlet manifold are coupled to the anode plate and communicate with a channel therein. Fuel flows from the inlet manifold through the channel in contact with the anode plate and flows out through the outlet manifold. The inlet and outlet manifolds are arranged to couple to the inlet and outlet manifolds respectively of an adjacent one of the plurality of unit cells to permit fuel flow in common into all of the inlet manifolds of the plurality of the unit cells when coupled together in a stack and out of all of the outlet manifolds of the plurality of unit cells when coupled together in a stack.

  9. Simulation of Thermopower Influence on Fuel Core of Power Rod in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP Active Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Kulikov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems of modern methods for  calculation of designs and materials of nuclear power. A model of numerical analysis for stress-strain state of fuel pins in the NPP active zone is proposed in the paper. The paper contains simulation concerning a fuel core section of a nuclear reactor heat-generating element with subsequent solution of a temperature and thermoelastic problem in computer program complex FEA ANSYS Workbench 11.0. All the obtained results have passed through checking procedure.

  10. Coolant Density and Control Blade History Effects in Extended BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase investigates the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used for spent fuel pools to spent fuel storage and transportation casks and the validation of reactivity (keff) calculations and predicted spent fuel compositions. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents work performed to date investigating some aspects of extended BUC. (The technical basis for application of peak reactivity methods to BWR fuel in storage and transportation systems is presented in a companion paper.) Two reactor operating parameters are being evaluated to establish an adequate basis for extended BWR BUC: (1) the effect of axial void profile and (2) the effect of control blade utilization during operation. A detailed analysis of core simulator data for one cycle of a modern operating BWR plant was performed to determine the range of void profiles and the variability of the profile experienced during irradiation. Although a single cycle does not provide complete data, the data obtained are sufficient to determine the primary effects and to identify conservative modeling approaches. These data were used in a study of the effect of axial void profile. The first stage of the study was determination of the necessary moderator density temporal fidelity in depletion modeling. After the required temporal fidelity was established, multiple void profiles were used to examine the effect on cask reactivity. The results of these studies are being used to develop recommendations for conservatively modeling the void profile effects for BWR depletion calculations. The second operational parameter studied was control blade history. Control blades are inserted in

  11. Modelling the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod; Etude de l'impact de la fissuration des combustibles nucleaires oxyde sur le comportement normal et incidentel des crayons combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, Th

    2006-03-15

    This thesis aims to model the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod. Fuel cracking has two main consequences. It relieves the stress in the pellet, upon which the majority of the mechanical and physico-chemical phenomena are dependent. It also leads to pellet fragmentation. Taking fuel cracking into account is therefore necessary to adequately predict the mechanical loading of the cladding during the course of an irradiation. The local approach to fracture was chosen to describe fuel pellet cracking. Practical considerations brought us to favour a quasi-static description of fuel cracking by means of a local damage models. These models describe the appearance of cracks by a local loss of rigidity of the material. Such a description leads to numerical difficulties, such as mesh dependency of the results and abrupt changes in the equilibrium state of the mechanical structure during unstable crack propagations. A particular attention was paid to these difficulties because they condition the use of such models in engineering studies. This work was performed within the framework of the ALCYONE fuel performance package developed at CEA/DEC/SESC which relies on the PLEIADES software platform. ALCYONE provides users with various approaches for modelling nuclear fuel behaviour, which differ in terms of the type geometry considered for the fuel rod. A specific model was developed and implemented to describe fuel cracking for each of these approaches. The 2D axisymmetric fuel rod model is the most innovative and was particularly studied. We show that it is able to assess, thanks to an appropriate description of fuel cracking, the main geometrical changes of the fuel rod occurring under normal and off-normal operating conditions. (author)

  12. Morphological Analysis of Zirconium Nuclear Fuel Retaining Rods Braided with SiC: Quality Assurance and Defect Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael V Glazoff; Robert Hiromoto; Akira Tokuhiro

    2014-08-01

    In the after-Fukushima world, the stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for the safety of nuclear reactors. Among the methods explored currently to improve zircaloys’ thermal stability in off-normal conditions, using a protective coat of the SiC filaments is considered because silicon carbide is well known for its remarkable chemical inertness at high temperatures. A typical SiC fiber contains ~50,000 individual filaments of 5 – 10 µm in diameter. In this paper, an effort was made to develop and apply mathematical morphology to the process of automatic defect identification in Zircaloy-4 rods braided with the protective layer of the silicon carbide filament. However, the issues of the braiding quality have to be addressed to ensure its full protective potential. We present the original mathematical morphology algorithms that allow solving this problem of quality assurance successfully. In nuclear industry, such algorithms are used for the first time, and could be easily generalized to the case of automated continuous monitoring for defect identification in the future.

  13. Radiation field control at the latest BWR plants -- design principle, operational experience and future subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Energy Research Lab., Ibaraki (Japan); Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie [Hitachi Works, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Improvements of operational procedures to control water chemistry, e.g., nickel/iron control, as well as application of hardware improvements for reducing radioactive corrosion products resulted in an extremely low occupational exposure of less than 0.5 man.Sv/yr without any serious impact on the radwaste system, for BWR plants involved in the Japanese Improvement and Standardization Program. Recently, {sup 60}C radioactively in the reactor water has been increasing due to less crud fixation on the two smooth surfaces of new type high performance fuels and to the pH drop caused by chromium oxide anions released from stainless steel structures and pipings. This increase must be limited by changes in water chemistry, e.g., applications of modified nickel/iron ratio control and weak alkali control. Controlled water chemistry to optimize three points, the plant radiation level and integrities of fuel and structural materials, is the primary future subject for BWR water chemistry.

  14. Application of a genetic algorithm for the optimization of enrichment zoning and Gadolinia fuel (UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) rod designs in OPR1000s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae Je; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    A new effective methodology for optimizing the enrichment of low-enriched zones as well as gadolinia fuel (UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) rod designs in PLUS7 fuel assemblies was developed to minimize the maximum peak power in the core and to maximize the cycle lifetime. An automated link code was developed to integrate the genetic algorithm (GA) and the core design code package of ALPHA/PHOENIX-P/ANC and to generate and evaluate the candidates to be optimized efficiently through the integrated code package. This study introduces an optimization technique for the optimization of gadolinia fuel rod designs in order to effectively reduce the peak powers for a few hot assemblies simultaneously during the cycle. Coupled with the gadolinia optimization, the optimum enrichments were determined using the same automated code package. Applying this technique to the reference core of Ulchin Unit 4 Cycle 11, the gadolinia fuel rods in each hot assembly were optimized to different numbers and positions from their original designs, and the maximum peak power was decreased by 2.5%, while the independent optimization technique showed a decrease of 1.6% for the same fuel assembly. The lower enrichments at the fuel rods adjacent to the corner gap (CG), guide tube (GT), and instrumentation tube (IT) were optimized from the current 4.1, 4.1, 4.1 w/o to 4.65, 4.2, 4.2 w/o. The increase in the cycle lifetime achieved through this methodology was 5 effective full-power days (EFPD) on an ideal equilibrium cycle basis while keeping the peak power as low as 2.3% compared with the original design.

  15. Evidence of tellurium iodide compounds in a power-ramped irradiated UO{sub 2} fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desgranges, L., E-mail: lionel.desgranges@cea.fr [CEA/DEN/DEC CE Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Riglet-Martial, Ch.; Aubrun, I.; Pasquet, B.; Roure, I.; Lamontagne, J.; Blay, T. [CEA/DEN/DEC CE Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-06-15

    The existence of tellurium iodide compounds was evidenced in power-ramped UO{sub 2} irradiated fuel by means of post-test SIMS analysis that showed both volatile fission product releases from the pellet centre and precipitates composed of these volatile fission products on the fuel periphery. Thermodynamic calculations confirmed the stability of TeI{sub x} gaseous phases in equilibrium with irradiated UO{sub 2}. Both the experimental and theoretical results offer a strong incentive to consider TeI{sub x} compounds for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the cladding during a power ramp instead of CsI since TeI{sub x} compounds are more corrosive to Zircaloy cladding than CsI.

  16. Friction measuring device for control rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tomomi.

    1994-03-18

    In the present invention, judgment for friction of control rods conducted upon periodical inspection of a BWR type power plant is conducted by automatic analysis and evaluation by digitalizing data of an operation pressure and an differential pressure of control rods. That is, a differential pressure detection means detects a pressure and a differential pressure of driving water of a control rod driving source. A data processing device conducts digital analysis and store data from the differential pressure detection means, as well as compares the data with set values to automatically judge the friction of the control rod to diagnose abnormality based on the changing trend of the analyzed data. According to the device of the present invention, data measured for the friction of a great number of control rods can be analyzed and judged automatically in a short period of time. Accordingly, evaluation can be conducted accurately even by less skilled operators. Further, when an abnormality is detected, the diagnosis thereof is conducted, so that the operation is simplified and an operator's burden upon inspection can be mitigated. (I.S.).

  17. AREVA NP approach to fuel reliability using a combination CFD fuel deposition modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keheley, T.; Pop, M. [AREVA, AREVA NP Inc. (United States); Bhandari, G. [CD-adapco (United States)

    2011-07-01

    With the current goal of zero fuel failures by 2010 at operating nuclear power plants in the Usa, it is important to be able to predict risk associated with crud deposition on fuel as close to reality as possible. AREVA has performed finely-resolved (CFD) thermal hydraulic analyses on the regions of interest of fuel assemblies for a number of years. This work was able to clearly show contrasts in thermal-hydraulic conditions, i.e., fluid velocities, fluid temperature, void fraction, shear rates, etc., all very consistent with the reported pattern of crud. More recently, this analysis was coupled to AREVA NP's model of crud formation to predict the pattern of accumulation surrounding a peripheral rod, resulting in a Level IV AREVA BWR Crud Risk Assessment Tool. This paper presents an example of the use of this combination of codes at two axial regions in a BWR: downstream of the grid spacer at the approximate elevation of peak lift-off (measured crud accumulation) and a short distance upstream of the grid spacer still in the presence of boiling but at an off-peak axial location with respect to observed crud accumulation. The predicted propensity for some species (e.g., ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) accumulation on the peripheral rod surface is markedly higher in the peak zone compared to the off-peak location. The distributions of other crud-relevant species on the fuel rod surface and with crud depth have also been calculated. The results suggest the influence of local flow conditions on the location and nature of crud formation. A closer examination of the results of the AREVA NP CFD combined with crud deposition predictive methodology shows that the distribution of deposition species on a rod surface at the peak axial location has no simple relationship to heat flux, axial flow velocity, channel average fluid temperature, and local void fraction. That is why a combination of detailed thermo-hydraulics and localized chemistry effects, as achieved by the AREVA NP code

  18. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed from 1962–1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967.a The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, relative fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector” (see Reference 1). The experiment studied in this evaluation was the second of the series and had the fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular pitch. One critical configuration was found (see Reference 3). Once the critical configuration had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U,bc and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configuration are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively.

  19. THERMAL EVALUATION OF THE USE OF BWR MOX SNF IN THE MULTI-PURPOSE CANISTER (MPC) WITH ACD DISPOSAL CONTAINER (SCPB: N/A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.L. Lotz

    1995-11-13

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) as specified in the Waste Package Implementation Plan (pp. 4-8,4-11,4-24,5-1, and 5-13; Ref. 5.10) and Waste Package Plan (pp. 3-15,3-17, and 3-24; Ref. 5.9). The design data request addressed herein is: (1) Characterize the conceptual 40 BWR Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. (2) Characterize the conceptual 24 BWR Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. The purpose of this analysis is to respond a concern that the long-term disposal thermal issues for the Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Subsystem Design, if used with SNF designed for a MOX fuel cycle, do not preclude MPC compatibility with the MGDS. The objective of this analysis is to provide thermal parameter information for the conceptual MPC design with disposal container which is loaded with BWR MOX SNF under nominal MGDS repository conditions. The results are intended to show that the design has a reasonable chance to meet the MGDS design requirements for normal MGDS operation, to provide the required guidance to determining the major design issues for future design efforts, and to show that the BWR MOX SNF loaded MPC performance is similar to an MPC loaded with commercial BWR SNF. Future design efforts will focus on specific MPC vendor designs and BWR MOX SNF designs when they become available.

  20. Assessment of PCMI Simulation Using the Multidimensional Multiphysics BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen R. Novascone; Jason D. Hales; Benjamin W. Spencer; Richard L. Williamson

    2012-09-01

    Since 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a next-generation nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. BISON is built using INL’s Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment, or MOOSE. MOOSE is a massively parallel, finite element-based framework to solve systems of coupled non-linear partial differential equations using the Jacobian-FreeNewton Krylov (JFNK) method. MOOSE supports the use of complex two- and three-dimensional meshes and uses implicit time integration, which is important for the widely varied time scales in nuclear fuel simulation. MOOSE’s object-oriented architecture minimizes the programming required to add new physics models. BISON has been applied to various nuclear fuel problems to assess the accuracy of its 2D and 3D capabilities. The benchmark results used in this assessment range from simulation results from other fuel performance codes to measurements from well-known and documented reactor experiments. An example of a well-documented experiment used in this assessment is the Third Risø Fission Gas Project, referred to as “Bump Test GE7”, which was performed on rod ZX115. This experiment was chosen because it allows for an evaluation of several aspects of the code, including fully coupled thermo-mechanics, contact, and several nonlinear material models. Bump Test GE7 consists of a base-irradiation period of a full-length rod in the Quad-Cities-1 BWR for nearly 7 years to a burnup of 4.17% FIMA. The base irradiation test is followed by a “bump test” of a sub-section of the original rod. The bump test takes place in the test reactor DR3 at Risø in a water-cooled HP1 rig under BWR conditions where the power level is increased by about 50% over base irradiation levels in the span of several hours. During base irradiation, the axial power profile is flat. During the bump test, the axial power profile changes so that the bottom half of the rod is at approximately 50% higher power than at the base

  1. Reactor core stability monitoring method for BWR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemoto, Shigeru; Ebata, Shigeo.

    1992-09-01

    In an operation for a BWR type reactor, reactor power is usually increased or decreased by controlling both of control rods and reactor core flow rate. Under a certain condition, the reactor core is made unstable by the coupling of nuclear and thermohydrodynamic characteristics in the reactor. Therefore, the reactor power and the reactor core flow rate are changed within a range predetermined by a design calculation. However, if reactor core stability can be always measured and monitored, it is useful for safe operation, as well as an existent operation range can be extended to enable more effective operation. That is, autoregressive a coefficient is determined successively on real time based on fluctuation components of neutron flux signals. Based on the result, an amplification ratio, as a typical measure of the reactor core stability, is determined on a real time. A time constant of the successive calculation for the autoregressive coefficient can be made variable by the amplification ratio. Then, the amplification ratio is estimated at a constant accuracy. With such procedures, the reactor core stability can be monitored successively in an ON-line manner at a high accuracy, thereby enabling to improve the operation performance. (I.S.).

  2. Verification of the Advanced Nodal Method on BWR Core Analyses by Whole-Core Heterogeneous Transport Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinya Kosaka

    2000-11-12

    Recent boiling water reactor (BWR) core and fuel designs have become more sophisticated and heterogeneous to improve fuel cycle cost, thermal margin, etc. These improvements, however, tend to lead to a strong interference effect among fuel assemblies, and it my cause some inaccuracies in the BWR core analyses by advanced nodal codes. Furthermore, the introduction of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel will lead to a much stronger interference effect between MOX and UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies. However, the CHAPLET multiassembly characteristics transport code was developed recently to solve two-dimensional cell-heterogeneous whole-core problems efficiently, and its results can be used as reference whole-core solutions to verify the accuracy of nodal core calculations. In this paper, the results of nodal core calculations were compared with their reference whole-core transport solutions to verify their accuracy (in k{sub eff}, assembly power and pin power via pin power reconstruction) of the advanced nodal method on both UO{sub 2} and MOX BWR whole-core analyses. Especially, it was investigated if there were any significant differences in the accuracy between MOX and UO{sub 2} results.

  3. Study of a criticality accident involving fuel rods and water outside a power reactor; Etude d'un accident de criticite mettant en presence des crayons combustibles et de l'eau hors reacteur de puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beloeil, L

    2000-05-30

    It is possible to imagine highly unlikely but numerous accidental situations where fuel rods come into contact with water under conditions close to atmospheric values. This work is devoted to modelling and simulation of first instants of the power excursion that may result from such configurations. We show that void effect is a preponderant feedback for most severe accidents. The formation of a vapour film around the rods is put forward and confirmed with the help of experimental transients using electrical heating. We propose then a vapour/liquid flow model able to reproduce void fraction evolution. The vapour film is treated as a compressible medium. Conservation balance equations are solved on a moving mesh with a two-dimensional scheme and boundary conditions taking notice of interfacial phenomena and axial escape possibility. Movements of the liquid phase are modelled through a non-stationary integral equation and a dissipative term suited to the particular geometry of this flow. The penetration of energy into the liquid is also calculated. Thus, the coupling of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic modules gives results in excellent agreement with experiments. Next, neutronic phenomena into the fuel pellet, their feedback effects and the distribution of power through the rod are numerically translated. For each developed module, validation tests are provided. Then, it is possible to simulate the first seconds of the whole criticality accident. Even if this calculation tool is only a way of study as a first approach, performed simulations are proving coherent with reported data on recorded accidents. (author)

  4. Solution of the transport equation in stationary state, in one and two dimensions, for BWR assemblies using nodal methods; Solucion de la ecuacion de transporte en estado estacionario, en 1 y 2 dimensiones, para ensambles tipo BWR usando metodos nodales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xolocostli M, J.V

    2002-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to solve the neutron transport equation in one and two dimensions (slab geometry and X Y geometry, respectively), with no time dependence, for BWR assemblies using nodal methods. In slab geometry, the nodal methods here used are the polynomial continuous (CMPk) and discontinuous (DMPk) families but only the Linear Continuous (also known as Diamond Difference), the Quadratic Continuous (QC), the Cubic Continuous (CC), the Step Discontinuous (also known as Backward Euler), the Linear Discontinuous (LD) and the Quadratic Discontinuous (QD) were considered. In all these schemes the unknown function, the angular neutron flux, is approximated as a sum of basis functions in terms of Legendre polynomials, associated to the values of the neutron flux in the edges (left, right, or both) and the Legendre moments in the cell, depending on the nodal scheme used. All these schemes were implemented in a computer program developed in previous thesis works and known with the name TNX. This program was modified for the purposes of this work. The program discreetizes the domain of concern in one dimension and determines numerically the angular neutron flux for each point of the discretization when the number of energy groups and regions are known starting from an initial approximation for the angular neutron flux being consistent with the boundary condition imposed for a given problem. Although only problems with two-energy groups were studied the computer program does not have limitations regarding the number of energy groups and the number of regions. The two problems analyzed with the program TNX have practically the same characteristics (fuel and water), with the difference that one of them has a control rod. In the part corresponding to two-dimensional problems, the implemented nodal methods were those designated as hybrids that consider not only the edge and cell Legendre moments, but also the values of the neutron flux in the corner points

  5. GOTHIC MODEL OF BWR SECONDARY CONTAINMENT DRAWDOWN ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, P.N.

    2004-10-06

    This article introduces a GOTHIC version 7.1 model of the Secondary Containment Reactor Building Post LOCA drawdown analysis for a BWR. GOTHIC is an EPRI sponsored thermal hydraulic code. This analysis is required by the Utility to demonstrate an ability to restore and maintain the Secondary Containment Reactor Building negative pressure condition. The technical and regulatory issues associated with this modeling are presented. The analysis includes the affect of wind, elevation and thermal impacts on pressure conditions. The model includes a multiple volume representation which includes the spent fuel pool. In addition, heat sources and sinks are modeled as one dimensional heat conductors. The leakage into the building is modeled to include both laminar as well as turbulent behavior as established by actual plant test data. The GOTHIC code provides components to model heat exchangers used to provide fuel pool cooling as well as area cooling via air coolers. The results of the evaluation are used to demonstrate the time that the Reactor Building is at a pressure that exceeds external conditions. This time period is established with the GOTHIC model based on the worst case pressure conditions on the building. For this time period the Utility must assume the primary containment leakage goes directly to the environment. Once the building pressure is restored below outside conditions the release to the environment can be credited as a filtered release.

  6. HEDL contribution to SRL fuel recycle program. Quarterly report, January--March 1977. [Sensitivity analysis of LMFBR fuel fabrication cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J.F.

    1977-08-01

    Research on LWR fuel cycle is being done in the following categories: economic studies (sensitivity analysis of LMFBR fuel fabrication costs), spent fuel receipt and storage (failure of PWR and BWR fuel assemblies), fuel materials preparation or finishing processes, reduction of TRU waste generation, and environmental impacts. 12 tables. (DLC)

  7. Comparative analysis of results between CASMO, MCNP and Serpent for a suite of Benchmark problems on BWR reactors; Analisis comparativo de resultados entre CASMO, MCNP y SERPENT para una suite de problemas Benchmark en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xolocostli M, J. V.; Vargas E, S.; Gomez T, A. M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Reyes F, M. del C.; Del Valle G, E., E-mail: vicente.xolocostli@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, UP - Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper a comparison is made in analyzing the suite of Benchmark problems for reactors type BWR between CASMO-4, MCNP6 and Serpent code. The Benchmark problem consists of two different geometries: a fuel cell of a pin and assembly type BWR. To facilitate the study of reactors physics in the fuel pin their nuclear characteristics are provided to detail, such as burnt dependence, the reactivity of selected nuclide, etc. With respect to the fuel assembly, the presented results are regarding to infinite multiplication factor for burning different steps and different vacuum conditions. Making the analysis of this set of Benchmark problems provides comprehensive test problems for the next fuels generation of BWR reactors with high extended burned. It is important to note that when making this comparison the purpose is to validate the methodologies used in modeling for different operating conditions, if the case is of other BWR assembly. The results will be within a range with some uncertainty, considering that does not depend on code that is used. Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN (Mexico) has accumulated some experience in using Serpent, due to the potential of this code over other commercial codes such as CASMO and MCNP. The obtained results for the infinite multiplication factor are encouraging and motivate the studies to continue with the generation of the X S of a core to a next step a respective nuclear data library is constructed and this can be used by codes developed as part of the development project of the Mexican Analysis Platform of Nuclear Reactors AZTLAN. (Author)

  8. Neutron Flux Depression in the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}(15 to 30%) Fuel Rods from IVO-FR2-Vg7-Irradiation Experiment; Depresion de flujo neutronico en las barras combustibles de UO2-PuO2(15 al 30%) del experimento de irradiacion IVO-FR2-Vg7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J.; Fernandez, J. L.

    1983-07-01

    The thermal-neutron flux depression within a fuel rod has a great influence in the radial temperature profile of the rod, especially for high enrichment fuel. For this reason, a study was made about the UO{sub 2}-PUO{sub 2} (15 to 30% PUO{sub 2}) fuel pins for the KfK-JEN joint irradiation program IVO, in the FR2 reactor. Different methods (diffusion, Bonalumi, successive generations) were compared and a new approach (parabolic approximation) was developed. (Author) 22 refs.

  9. Search Greedy for radial fuel optimization; Busqueda Greddy para optimizacion radial de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, J. J.; Castillo, J. A. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Pelta, D. A. [Universidad de Granada, ETS Ingenieria Informatica y Telecomunicaciones, C/Daniel Saucedo Aranda s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)]. e-mail: jjortiz@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-07-01

    In this work a search algorithm Greedy is presented for the optimization of fuel cells in reactors BWR. As first phase a study was made of sensibility of the Factor of Pick of Local Power (FPPL) of the cell, in function of the exchange of the content of two fuel rods. His way it could settle down that then the rods to exchange do not contain gadolinium, small changes take place in the value of the FPPL of the cell. This knowledge was applied later in the search Greedy to optimize fuel cell. Exchanges of rods with gadolinium takes as a mechanism of global search and exchanges of rods without gadolinium takes as a method of local search. It worked with a cell of 10x10 rods and 2 circular water channels in center of the same one. From an inventory of enrichments of uranium and concentrations of given gadolinium and one distribution of well-known enrichments; the techniques finds good solutions that the FPPL minimizes, maintaining the factor of multiplication of neutrons in a range appropriate of values. In the low part of the assembly of a lot of recharge of a cycle of 18 months the cells were placed. The values of FPPL of the opposing cells are similar or smaller to those of the original cell and with behaviors in the nucleus also comparable to those obtained with the original cell. The evaluation of the cells was made with the code of transport CASMO-IV and the evaluation of the nucleus was made by means of the one simulator of the nucleus SIMULATE-3. (Author)

  10. Interpretation of the VENUS VIP-BWR program with APOLLO2.8 reference and optimized MOC schemes for 8 x 8 UO{sub 2} and MOX BWR assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise, P., E-mail: patrick.blaise@cea.f [CEA - Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de CADARACHE - DEN/CAD/DER/SPRC, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Vidal, J.-F.; Santamarina, A.; Bernard, D. [CEA - Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de CADARACHE - DEN/CAD/DER/SPRC, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2010-11-15

    The interpretation of the VIP-BWR program conducted in the CEN.SCK Mol VENUS critical facility (Belgium), has been performed with the new APOLLO2.8 product and its CEA2005V4.1 library based on the JEFF3.1.1 file. Both reference SHEM-MOC (281groups without equivalence) and Optimized BWR 26G (26 groups with equivalence) schemes are used for UO{sub 2} and MOX BWR assembly calculations. The VIP-BWR program was aimed to provide an experimental database for BWR neutronics tools in mixed Gd poisoned configurations with 8 x 8 UO{sub 2} and MOX assemblies. The experimental conditions are relatively representative of actual industrial BWR core characteristics, at least in terms of void fraction. Measured pin-by-pin power distributions enable to exact valuable information at various interfaces. For fresh (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-Gd) and recycled UO{sub 2} (UO{sub 2} only) cores loadings, the information is given through the 'UO{sub 2}' core. In the case of partial MOX loadings (UO{sub 2}/MOX interface), the power distributions are available through the 'T-MOX' core. All critical sizes are predicted within 1 with SHEM-MOC reference calculation scheme. For UO{sub 2} core, the (C-E) on k{sub eff} are (95 {+-} 266) pcm and (203 {+-} 266) pcm for SHEM-MOC and Optimized scheme respectively. For MOX core, the results are (87 {+-} 214) pcm and (283 {+-} 214) pcm. The uncertainties take into account both measurement uncertainties and technological uncertainties such as enrichment, clad thicknesses, grid pitch or fuel densities. Average (C-E)/E on radial fission rate distributions are in excellent agreement in the UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}-Gd assemblies. In mixed loading cores, the calculation shows an over prediction in the MOX fuel pin. This points out a systematic swing between UO{sub 2} and MOX. For average fission rates in UO{sub 2}, the C/E results are within {+-} 0.2% with SHEM-MOC and OptimizedBWR26G. For average power in MOX, the C/E results are within {+-}0

  11. Modeling of the PWR fuel mechanical behaviour and particularly study of the pellet-cladding interaction in a fuel rod; Contribution a la modelisation du comportement mecanique des combustibles REP sous irradiation, avec en particulier le traitement de l`interaction pastille-gaine dans un crayon combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourdequin, N.

    1995-05-01

    In Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power plants, fuel cladding constitutes the first containment barrier against radioactive contamination. Computer codes, developed with the help of a large experimental knowledge, try to predict cladding failures which must be limited in order to maintain a maximal safety level. Until now, fuel rod design calculus with unidimensional codes were adequate to prevent cladding failures in standard PWR`s operating conditions. But now, the need of nuclear power plant availability increases. That leads to more constraining operating condition in which cladding failures are strongly influenced by the fuel rod mechanical behaviour, mainly at high power level. Then, the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) becomes important, and is characterized by local effects which description expects a multidimensional modelization. This is the aim of the TOUTATIS 2D-3D code, that this thesis contributes to develop. This code allows to predict non-axisymmetric behaviour too, as rod buckling which has been observed in some irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS. By another way, PCI is influenced by under irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS which includes a densification model and a swelling model. The latter can only be used in standard operating conditions. However, the processing structure of this modulus provides the possibility to include any type of model corresponding with other operating conditions. In last, we show the result of these fuel volume variations on the cladding mechanical conditions. (author). 25 refs., 89 figs., 2 tabs., 12 photos., 5 appends.

  12. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor; Diseno de una recarga mixta con ensambles MOX de mayor relacion de moderacion para un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  13. Genusa Bepu methodologies for the safety analysis of BWRs; Metodologias Bepu de Genusa para el analisis de seguridad de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, M.; Garcia, J.; Goodson, C.; Ibarra, L.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the BEPU methodologies developed by General Electric-Hitachi (GEH) for the evaluation of the BWR reactor safety analysis based on the TRACG best-estimate code. These methodologies are applicable to a wide range of events, operational transients (AOO), anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and instability events; to different BWR types operating commercially. General Electric (GE( designs and other vendors, including Generation III+ESBWR; to the new operation strategies, and to all types of BWR fuel. Their application achieves, among other benefits, a better understanding of the overall plant response and an improvement in margins to the operating limits; thus, the increase of flexibility in reactor operation and reduction in generation costs. (Author)

  14. Development of a prototype pin-by-pin fine mesh calculation code for BWR core analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Akio; Yamane, Yoshihiro [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Kosaka, Shinya; Hirano, Gou [TEPCO SYSTEMS CORPORATION, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    A prototype core analysis code for BWR, SUBARU, which is based on the three-dimensional pin-by-pin fine-mesh calculation, is being developed. The SUBARU code has several features, e.g., incorporation of the SP3 transport theory, capability to treat the staggered meshes, and so on. In this paper, to estimate the prediction accuracy of this core analysis code, a hypothetical 2D ABWR core which is consisted by 8x8 low-enrichment UO{sub 2} fuel assembly, 9x9 high-enrichment UO{sub 2} fuel assembly, and 10x10 MOX fuel assembly is analyzed. To investigate the prediction accuracy, we compared the pin-wise fission rate distribution which was obtained by the cell-heterogeneous transport calculation by MOC. To evaluate the computational costs, a hypothetical 3D ABWR core is also used. These results suggest that SUBARU would have enough accuracy and reasonable calculation costs for the reference BWR core analysis when further investigation is taken into account. (authors)

  15. Analysis of assemblies exchange in the core of a reactor BWR; Analisis del intercambio de ensambles en el nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauil U, J. S. [Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Facultad de Ingenieria, Av. Industrias no contaminantes por Anillo Periferico Norte s/n, Apdo. Postal 150 Cordemex, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Fuentes M, L.; Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del Cueto, R., E-mail: san_dino@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The performance of the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR) was evaluated when two assemblies are exchanged during the fuel reload in erroneous way. All with the purpose of analyzing the value of the neutrons effective multiplication factor and the thermal limits for an exchange of assemblies. In their realization the mentioned study was based in a transition cycle of the Unit 1 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. The obtained results demonstrate that when carrying out an exchange between two fuel assemblies in erroneous way, with regard to the original reload, the changes in the neutrons effective multiplication factor do not present a serious problem, unless the exchange has been carried out among a very burnt assembly with one fresh, where this last is taken to the periphery. (Author)

  16. Obtention control bars patterns for a BWR using Tabo search; Obtencion de patrones de barras de control para un BWR usando busqueda Tabu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, A.; Ortiz, J.J.; Alonso, G. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico 52045 (Mexico); Morales, L.B. [UNAM, IIMAS, Ciudad Universitaria, D. F. 04510 (Mexico); Valle, E. del [IPN, ESFM, Unidad Profesional ' Adolfo Lopez Mateos' , Col. Lindavista 07738, D. F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: jacm@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The obtained results when implementing the technique of tabu search, for to optimize patterns of control bars in a BWR type reactor, using the CM-PRESTO code are presented. The patterns of control bars were obtained for the designs of fuel reloads obtained in a previous work, using the same technique. The obtained results correspond to a cycle of 18 months using 112 fresh fuels enriched at the 3.53 of U-235. The used technique of tabu search, prohibits recently visited movements, in the position that correspond to the axial positions of the control bars, additionally the tiempo{sub t}abu matrix is used for to manage a size of variable tabu list and the objective function is punished with the frequency of the forbidden movements. The obtained patterns of control bars improve the longitude of the cycle with regard to the reference values and they complete the restrictions of safety. (Author)

  17. Residual stress analysis in BWR pressure vessel attachments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, R.J.; Leung, C.P. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)); Pont, D. (FRAMASOFT+CSI, 69 - Lyon (France). Div. of Framatome)

    1992-06-01

    Residual stresses from welding processes can be the primary driving force for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR components. Thus, a better understanding of the causes and nature of these residual stresses can help assess and remedy SCC. Numerical welding simulation software, such as SYSWELD, and material property data have been used to quantify residual stresses for application to SCC assessments in BWR components. Furthermore, parametric studies using SYSWELD have revealed which variables significantly affect predicted residual stress. Overall, numerical modeling techniques can be used to evaluate residual stress for SCC assessments of BWR components and to identify and plan future SCC research.

  18. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P. [ABB Atom, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions.

  19. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Arai, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  20. BWR Anticipated Transients Without Scram Leading to Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng L. Y.; Baek J.; Cuadra, A.; Aronson, A.; Diamond, D.; Yarsky, P.

    2013-11-10

    Anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in aboiling water reactor (BWR) were simulated in order to understand reactor response and determine the effectiveness of automatic and operator actions to mitigate this beyond-design-basis accident. The events of interest herein are initiated by a turbine trip when the reactor is operating in the expanded operating domainMELLLA+ [maximum extended load line limit plus]. In these events the reactor may initially be at up to 120% of the original licensed thermal power (OLTP) and at flow rates as low as 80% of rated.For these (and similar) ATWS events the concern isthat when the reactor power decreases in response to a dual recirculation pump trip, the core will become unstable and large amplitude oscillations will begin. The occurrence of these power oscillations, if left unmitigated, may result in fuel damage, and the amplitude of the poweroscillations may hamper the effectiveness of the injection of dissolved neutron absorber through the standby liquid control system (SLCS).

  1. BWR/5 Pressure-Suppression Pool Response during an SBO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ortiz-Villafuerte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP/SCDAPSIM Mod 3.4 has been used to simulate a station blackout occurring at a BWR/5 power station. Further, a simplified model of a wet well and dry well has been added to the NSSS model to study the response of the primary containment during the evolution of this accident. The initial event leading to severe accident was considered to be a LOOP with simultaneous scram. The results show that RCIC alone can keep the core fully covered, but even in this case about 30% of the original liquid water inventory in the PSP is vaporized. During the SBO, without RCIC, this inventory is reduced about 5% more within six hours. Further, a significant pressure rise occurs in containment at about the time when a sharp increase of heat generation occurs in RPV due to cladding oxidation. Failure temperature of fuel clad is also reached at this point. As the accident progresses, conditions for containment venting can be reached in about nine hours, although there still exists considerable margin before reaching containment design pressure. Detailed information of accident progress in reactor vessel and containment is presented and discussed.

  2. Results of Post Irradiation Examinations of VVER Leaky Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markov, D.; Perepelkin, S.; Polenok, V.; Zhitelev, V.; Mayorshina, G. [Head of Fuel Research Department, JSC ' SSC RIAR' , 433510, Dimitrovgrad-10, Ulyanovsk region (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    The most important requirement imposed on fuel elements is to maintain integrity of fuel rod claddings under operation, storage and transportation, since it is directly related to the operational safety. However, failed rod claddings are sometimes observed under reactor operation. Identification and unloading of fuel assemblies with leaky rods from VVER is available only at the time of planned preventive maintenance. An unscheduled reactor shutdown due to the excess of coolant activity limit as well as a preterm unloading of the fuel assembly cause economic damage to nuclear plant. Therefore, models and calculation codes were developed to forecast coolant contamination and failed fuel rod behavior. Criteria based on calculations were set to determine the admissible number of the failed rods in core and the opportunity to continue the reactor operation or pre-term unloading of the fuel assembly with the failed rods. Nevertheless, to prevent the fuel rod failure (for unfailing operation) it is necessary to reveal disadvantages of the design, fabrication method and fuel operation conditions, and to eliminate defects. The most complete and significant information about spent fuel assemblies may be received following the post irradiation material examinations. In order to reveal failure origins and mechanism of changes in VVER fuel and failed rod cladding condition depending on the operation, the examinations of 12 VVER-1000 fuel assemblies and 3 VVER-440 fuel assemblies, operated under normal conditions up to the fuel burnup 13..47 MWd/kgU were carried out. To evaluate the rod cladding condition, reveal defects and determine their parameters, the ultrasonic control of cladding integrity, surface visual inspection, eddy current defectoscopy, measurement of geometrical parameters were applied. In separate cases we used the metallography, measured the hydrogen percentage and carried out the mechanical tests of o-ring samples. The pellet condition was evaluated in

  3. Data report of BWR post-CHF tests. Transient core thermal-hydraulic test program. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Itoh, Hideo; Kiuchi, Toshio; Watanabe, Hironori; Kimura, Mamoru; Anoda, Yoshinari [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    JAERI has been performing transient core thermal-hydraulic test program. In the program, authors performed BWR/ABWR DBE simulation tests with a test facility, which can simulate BWR/ABWR transients. The test facility has a 4 x 4 bundle core simulator with 15-rod heaters and one non-heated rod. Through the tests, authors quantified the thermal safety margin for core cooling. In order to quantify the thermal safety margin, authors collected experimental data on post-CHF. The data are essential for the evaluation of clad temperature transient when core heat-up occurs during DBEs. In comparison with previous post-CHF tests, present experiments were performed in much wider experimental condition, covering high clad temperature, low to high pressure and low to high mass flux. Further, data at wider elevation (lower to higher elevation of core) were obtained in the present experiments, which make possible to discuss the effect of axial position on thermal-hydraulics, while previous works usually discuss the thermal-hydraulics at the position where the first heat-up occurs. This data report describes test procedure, test condition and major experimental data of post-CHF tests. (author)

  4. Tie rod insertion test

    CERN Multimedia

    B. LEVESY

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting coil is inserted in the outer vaccum tank and supported by a set of tie rods. These tie rods are made of titanium alloy. This test reproduce the final insertion of the tie rods inside the outer vacuum tank.

  5. BWR water chemistry guidelines and PWR primary water chemistry guidelines in Japan – Purpose and technical background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka, E-mail: kawamuh@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Hirano, Hideo [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Katsumura, Yousuke [University of Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Shunsuke [Tohoku University (Japan); Mizuno, Takayuki [Mie University (Japan); Kitajima, Hideaki; Tsuzuki, Yasuo [Japan Nuclear Safety Institute (Japan); Terachi, Takumi [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (Japan); Nagase, Makoto; Usui, Naoshi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan); Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Shoda, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Takao [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Framework of BWR/PWR water chemistry Guidelines in Japan are presented. • Guideline necessity, definitions, philosophy and technical background are mentioned. • Some guideline settings for control parameters and recommendations are explaines. • Chemistry strategy is also mentioned. - Abstract: After 40 years of light water reactor (LWR) operations in Japan, the sustainable development of water chemistry technologies has aimed to ensure the highest coolant system component integrity and fuel reliability performance for maintaining LWRs in the world; additionally, it aimed to achieve an excellent dose rate reduction. Although reasonable control and diagnostic parameters are utilized by each boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) owner, it is recognized that specific values are not shared among everyone involved. To ensure the reliability of BWR and PWR operation and maintenance, relevant members of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish guidelines for water chemistry. The Japanese BWR and PWR water chemistry guidelines provide strategies to improve material and fuel reliability performance as well as to reduce dosing rates. The guidelines also provide reasonable “control values”, “diagnostic values” and “action levels” for multiple parameters, and they stipulate responses when these levels are exceeded. Specifically, “conditioning parameters” are adopted in the Japanese PWR primary water chemistry guidelines. Good practices for operational conditions are also discussed with reference to long-term experience. This paper presents the purpose, technical background and framework of the preliminary water chemistry guidelines for Japanese BWRs and PWRs. It is expected that the guidelines will be helpful as an introduction to achieve safety and reliability during operations.

  6. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of FeCrAl cladding with updated properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, suitability for normal operation must also be demonstrated. This research is focused on modeling the integral thermo-mechanical performance of FeCrAl-cladded fuel during normal reactor operation. Preliminary analysis has been performed to assess FeCrAl alloys (namely Alkrothal 720 and APMT) as a suitable fuel cladding replacement for Zr-alloys, using the MOOSE-based, finite-element fuel performance code BISON and the best available thermal-mechanical and irradiation-induced constitutive properties. These simulations identify the effects of the mechanical-stress and irradiation response of FeCrAl, and provide a comparison with Zr-alloys. In comparing these clad materials, fuel rods have been simulated for normal reactor operation and simple steady-state operation. Normal reactor operating conditions target the cladding performance over the rod lifetime (~4 cycles) for the highest-power rod in the highest-power fuel assembly under reactor power maneuvering. The power histories and axial temperature profiles input into BISON were generated from a neutronics study on full-core reactivity equivalence for FeCrAl using the 3D full core simulator NESTLE. Evolution of the FeCrAl cladding behavior over time is evaluated by using steady-state operating conditions such as a simple axial power profile, a constant cladding surface temperature, and a constant fuel power history. The fuel rod designs and

  7. COBRA-IV-I: an interim version of COBRA for thermal-hydraulic analysis of rod bundle nuclear fuel elements and cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, C.L.; Stewart, C.W.; Cena, R.J.; Rowe, D.S.; Sutey, A.M.

    1976-03-01

    The COBRA-IV-I computer code uses the subchannel analysis approach to determine the enthalpy and flow distribution in rod bundles for both steady-state and transient conditions. The steady-state and transient solution schemes used in COBRA-IIIC are still available in COBRA-IV-I as the implicit solution scheme option. In addition to these techniques, a new explicit solution scheme is now available which allows the calculation of severe transients involving flow reversals, recirculations, expulsion and reentry flows, with a pressure or flow boundary condition specified. Significant storage compaction and reduced running times have been achieved to allow the calculation of problems involving hundreds of subchannels.

  8. Using Finite Model Analysis and Out of Hot Cell Surrogate Rod Testing to Analyze High Burnup Used Nuclear Fuel Mechanical Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL

    2014-07-01

    Based on a series of FEA simulations, the discussions and the conclusions concerning the impact of the interface bonding efficiency to SNF vibration integrity are provided in this report; this includes the moment carrying capacity distribution between pellets and clad, and the impact of cohesion bonding on the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod system. As progressive de-bonding occurs at the pellet-pellet interfaces and at the pellet-clad interface, the load ratio of the bending moment carrying capacity gradually shifts from the pellets to the clad; the clad starts to carry a significant portion of the bending moment resistance until reaching the full de-bonding state at the pellet-pellet interface regions. This results in localized plastic deformation of the clad at the pellet-pellet-clad interface region; the associated plastic deformations of SS clad leads to a significant degradation in the stiffness of the surrogate rod. For instance, the flexural rigidity was reduced by 39% from the perfect bond state to the de-bonded state at the pellet-pellet interfaces.

  9. Automatic boiling water reactor control rod pattern design using particle swarm optimization algorithm and local search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cheng-Der, E-mail: jdwang@iner.gov.tw [Nuclear Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, No. 1000, Wenhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Chaung [National Tsing Hua University, Department of Engineering and System Science, 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► The PSO algorithm was adopted to automatically design a BWR CRP. ► The local search procedure was added to improve the result of PSO algorithm. ► The results show that the obtained CRP is the same good as that in the previous work. -- Abstract: This study developed a method for the automatic design of a boiling water reactor (BWR) control rod pattern (CRP) using the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The PSO algorithm is more random compared to the rank-based ant system (RAS) that was used to solve the same BWR CRP design problem in the previous work. In addition, the local search procedure was used to make improvements after PSO, by adding the single control rod (CR) effect. The design goal was to obtain the CRP so that the thermal limits and shutdown margin would satisfy the design requirement and the cycle length, which is implicitly controlled by the axial power distribution, would be acceptable. The results showed that the same acceptable CRP found in the previous work could be obtained.

  10. Modal properties of the flexural vibrating package of rods linked by spacer grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeman V.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the modelling and modal analysis of the large package of identical parallel rods linked by transverse springs (spacer grids placed on several level spacings. The rod discretization by finite element method is based on Rayleigh beam theory. For the cyclic and central symmetric package of rods (such as fuel rods in nuclear fuel assembly the system decomposition on the identical revolved rod segments was applied. A modal synthesis method with condensation is used for modelling of the whole system. The presented method is the first step for modelling the nuclear fuel assembly vibration caused by excitation determined by the support plate motion of the reactor core.

  11. On the interaction between fuel crud and water chemistry in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiaxin Chen [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-01-01

    This report has surveyed the current understanding about the characteristics of fuel crud, its deposition and dissolution behaviour, the influences of water chemistry, and the radioactivity transport in nuclear power plants. The references were mainly sought for from the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) database and some internal reports of Studsvik Material AB. The characteristics of fuel crud from discharged fuel rods have been extensively investigated over the last three decades. Fuel crud mainly consists of iron, nickel and chromium oxides. For BWR fuel crud the main phases are hematite and nonstoichiometric nickel ferrite spinels. For PWR fuel crud the main phases are nonstoichiometric nickel ferrite and nickel metal or nickel oxide. Fuel crud is usually thin and relatively porous in the outer layer but dense in the inner layer. Important information is lacking about the adhesion property of crud particles or agglomerates on fuel rods. Little, if any, information is reported about the characteristics of fuel crud before discharging in pool. It is uncertain if the fuel crud can, after pool discharge, largely preserve its characteristics appearing during reactor operation. Deposition behaviour of corrosion products on fuel rods, in both solid particles and ionic forms in reactor water, has been well studied in the simulated reactor water environments without irradiation. The influences on deposition rate of pH, heat flux, particle size, crud concentration, and flow rate have also been studied in detail. Most of the experimental observations may be qualitatively explained by the theories developed. However, the importance of each influencing parameter remains largely unknown in the complicated reactor water environments, because irradiation, among various influencing factors, may play an important role. The behaviour of crud dissolution has been extensively studied in various reactor water environments. Generally speaking, the more easily crud

  12. Boiling water reactor radiation shielded Control Rod Drive Housing Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baversten, B.; Linden, M.J. [ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations, Windsor, CT (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Control Rod Drive (CRD) mechanisms are located in the area below the reactor vessel in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Specifically, these CRDs are located between the bottom of the reactor vessel and above an interlocking structure of steel bars and rods, herein identified as CRD Housing Supports. The CRD Housing Supports are designed to limit the travel of a Control Rod and Control Rod Drive in the event that the CRD vessel attachement went to fail, allowing the CRD to be ejected from the vessel. By limiting the travel of the ejected CRD, the supports prevent a nuclear overpower excursion that could occur as a result of the ejected CRD. The Housing Support structure must be disassembled in order to remove CRDs for replacement or maintenance. The disassembly task can require a significant amount of outage time and personnel radiation exposure dependent on the number and location of the CRDs to be changed out. This paper presents a way to minimize personal radiation exposure through the re-design of the Housing Support structure. The following paragraphs also delineate a method of avoiding the awkward, manual, handling of the structure under the reactor vessel during a CRD change out.

  13. Fuel radial design using Path Relinking; Diseno radial de combustible usando Path Relinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos S, Y. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The present work shows the obtained results when implementing the combinatory optimization technique well-known as Path Re linking (Re-linkage of Trajectories), to the problem of the radial design of nuclear fuel assemblies, for boiling water reactors (BWR Boiling Water Reactor by its initials in English), this type of reactors is those that are used in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central, Veracruz. As in any other electric power generation plant of that make use of some fuel to produce heat and that it needs each certain time (from 12 to 14 months) to make a supply of the same one, because this it wears away or it burns, in the nucleolectric plants to this activity is denominated fuel reload. In this reload different activities intervene, among those which its highlight the radial and axial designs of fuel assemblies, the patterns of control rods and the multi cycles study, each one of these stages with their own complexity. This work was limited to study in independent form the radial design, without considering the other activities. These phases are basic for the fuel reload design and of reactor operation strategies. (Author)

  14. NUCLEAR DATA UNCERTAINTY AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS WITH XSUSA FOR FUEL ASSEMBLY DEPLETION CALCULATIONS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zwermann, W; Aures, A; Gallner, L; Hannstein, V; Krzykacz-Hausmann, B; Velkov, K; Martinez, J.S

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to nuclear data are performed with depletion calculations for BWR and PWR fuel assemblies specified in the framework of the UAM-LWR Benchmark Phase II...

  15. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

  16. Validation of the ultrasonic and Eddy current techniques to inspect the accommodation of the elements of (CRDH) control rod drive; Validacion de las tecnicas de ultrasonidos y corrientes inducidas para inspeccionar los alojamientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.; Gomez, P.; Sanchez, J.; Resa, P.

    2013-07-01

    Tecnatom development in the past with ultrasonic inspection procedures to examine vessels BWR of several Central nuclear (CRDH) control rod drive elements, accommodations. In each case, inspection techniques have relied on both the volume of required test postulated defects. Also, taking into account the possible access to the component, developed mechanical equipments of different characteristics.

  17. Commissioning of a passive rod scanner at INB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fabio da Silva; Oliveira, Carlos A.; Palheiros, Franklin, E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: franklin@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Engenharia do Combustivel; Fernandez, Pablo Jesus Piñer, E-mail: pineiro@tecnatom.es [Tecnatom, San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    For the 21st reload for Angra 1, a shift from Standard to Advanced fuel design will be introduced, where the fuel assemblies under the new design will contain fuel rods with axial blanket, in line with ELETRONUCLEAR's requirement for a higher energy efficient reactor fuel. Additionally, fuel rods for Angra 2 and 3, using gadolinium type burnable poison, have to be submitted to inspections due to the demand for the same type of inspection, which cannot be certified at INB currently. In keeping with CNEN regulations, every fuel-assembly component must be inspected and certified by a qualified method. Nevertheless, INB lacks the means to perform the certification-required inspection aimed at determining the uranium enrichment and presence of gadolinium pellets inside the closed rods. Hence, the use is necessary of a scanner capable of inspecting differently enriched fuel rods and/or gadolinium pellets (axial blanket). This work aims to present the recent Passive Rod Scanner installed at INB with most advance technology in the area, making possible to completely fulfill Angra 1, 2 and 3 rods inspection at INB Resende site. (author)

  18. An overview of the BWR ECCS strainer blockage issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkiz, A.W.; Marshall, M.L. Jr.; Elliott, R. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This Paper provides a brief overview of actions taken in the mid 1980s to resolve Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-43, {open_quotes}Containment Emergency Sump Performance,{close_quotes} and their relationship to the BWR strainer blockage issue; the importance of insights gained from the Barseback-2 (a Swedish BWR) incident in 1992 and from ECCS strainer testing and inspections at the Perry nuclear power plant in 1992 and 1993; an analysis of an US BWR/4 with a Mark I containment; an international community sharing of knowledge relevant to ECCS strainer blockage, additional experimental programs; and identification of actions needed to resolve the strainer blockage issue and the status of such efforts.

  19. Rod internal pressure quantification and distribution analysis using Frapcon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson [ORNL; Wieselquist, William A [ORNL; Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State University, University Park

    2015-09-01

    This report documents work performed supporting the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) under work breakdown structure element 1.02.08.10, ST Analysis. In particular, this report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT- 15OR0810036, Quantify effects of power uncertainty on fuel assembly characteristics, within work package FT-15OR081003 ST Analysis-ORNL. This research was also supported by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (http://www.casl.gov), an Energy Innovation Hub (http://www.energy.gov/hubs) for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified for Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. A methodology is developed which tracks inter-cycle assembly movements and assembly batch fabrication information to build individual FRAPCON inputs for each evaluated WBN1 fuel rod. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from the zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) layer is derived and applied to FRAPCON output data to quantify the RIP and CHS for these types of fuel rods. SCALE/Polaris is used to quantify fuel rodspecific spectral quantities and the amount of gaseous fission products produced in the fuel for use in FRAPCON inputs. Fuel rods with ZrB2 IFBA layers (i.e., IFBA rods) are determined to have RIP predictions that are elevated when compared to fuel rod without IFBA layers (i.e., standard rods) despite the fact that IFBA rods often have reduced fill pressures and annular fuel pellets. The primary contributor to elevated RIP predictions at burnups less than and greater than 30 GWd

  20. Why Rods and Cocci

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bacteria exhibit a wide variety of shapes but the commonly studied species of bacteria are generally either spherical in shape which are called cocci (singular coccus) or have a cylindrical shape and are called rods or bacilli (singular bacillus). In reality rods and cocci are the ends of a continuum. Sonle of the cocci are.

  1. ENUSA-TECNATOM collaboration project: improvements to the system of inspection by UT's circular fresh fuel rod welding; Proyecto colaboraci0n ENUSA-TECNATOM: Mejoras en el sistema de inspeccion por UT de la soldadura circular de la barra combustible fresca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.; Toral, M.; Moraleda, J.; Quinones, D.

    2014-07-01

    Enusa and Tecnatom have embarked on a road of technological and commercial collaboration that aims to firstly, the continuous improvement of the means of production of fuel from the factory in Juzbado, but uses the joint technological capital to diversify their business global opportunities. This collaboration has emerged a new line for control by UT of welding circular fresh fuel rod and the development of an equipment for sale to the CINF in Yibin fuel factory. The characteristics of these projects are presented in this paper. (Author)

  2. Evaluation of the internal pressure in UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} rods of fuel assemblies 10 x 10 with the FEMAXI-Vi code; Evaluacion de la presion interna en barras de UO{sub 2} y UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} de ensambles combustibles 10 x 10 con el codigo FEMAXI-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H.; Lucatero, M. A., E-mail: hector.hernandez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    Inside the acceptable criterions of fuel licensing are some that should be fulfilled in relation to the internal pressure of the fuel rods. These criterions are related with the loss of mechanical integrity due to the load excess in the pressure inside the jacket, as well as by the pressure that exercises the pellet on the jacket at the time of suffering the swelling by irradiation. This work shows the calculation of the increment of the internal pressure of the fuel rods caused by the swelling contribution of the pellets and by the accumulation of the fission gases inside the hole, pellet-jacket, in function of the burned for values of the lineal heat generation reason (LHGR) mean of fuel rods in arrangements 10 x 10. (author)

  3. Coupling of the four design stages in the management of nuclear fuel; Acoplamiento de las cuatro etapas de diseno en la administracion de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinez R, R. L.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the main characteristics of the system to solve the four stages of the nuclear fuel management are presented; the above for boiling water reactors (BWR). The novelty of the system is that a complete solution is obtained in a coupled way; the involved stages are fuel lattice design, fuel assembly design, fuel reload design and control rod pattern design. To do this, in each stage of the process some heuristics techniques are applied, and each stage has its own objective function. The used heuristic techniques are neural network and a hybrid between scatter search and path re linking for fuel lattice design; for fuel assembly design a simple local search was applied and finally, for both fuel reload and control rod pattern designs, the tabu search technique was used. The system have two loops, one external loop and one internal loop, the first one starts with fuel lattice design and concludes with control rod pattern design; on the other hand, the internal loop executes an iterative process between both fuel reload design and control rod pattern designs, to start this loop a seed fuel reload is required, which is obtained applying Haling principle. The internal loop is finished when four iterations were achieved, while the external loop is finished when two iterations were achieved, this number of iterations was fixed due to the great quantity of required computational resources. An 18- months equilibrium cycle was considered to have a reference value to compare against the obtained results with our system, this cycle have two fuel fresh batches with the same average uranium enrichment, but different gadolinia content. The above cycle achieved a 10,896 Mwd/Tu of energy and was divided into 12 burnup steps. The obtained results show the advantage to solve the complete problem in a coupled way, even though a great quantity of computational resources are used. It is necessary to note that the energy value was not achieved in all cases, only in some

  4. Effect of bundle size on cladding deformation in LOCA simulation tests. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, R.H.; Crowley, J.L.; Longest, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    Two LOCA simulation tests were conducted to investigate the effects of temperature uniformity and radial restraint boundary conditions on Zircaloy cladding deformation. In one of the tests (B-5), boundary conditions typical of a large array were imposed on an inner 4 x 4 square array by two concentric rings of interacting guard fuel pin simulators. In the other test (B-3), the boundary conditions were imposed on a 4 x 4 square array by a non-interacting heated shroud. Test parameters conducive to large deformation were selected in order to favor rod-to-rod interactions. The tests showed that rod-to-rod interactions play an important role in the deformation process.

  5. MOX fuel assembly and reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hidemitsu; Aoyama, Motoo

    1997-09-25

    A MOX fuel assembly capable of increasing plutonium charge while securing the effect of reactivity control, and a reactor core comprising the same. The assembly comprises fuel rods including MOX fuel rods containing MOX fuel pellets incorporated there and a water rod arranged in the form of a square lattice. The MOX fuel rods include those containing burnable poisons, and the percentage Nfr(%) of the number of the MOX fuel rods containing burnable poisons based on the total number of the fuel rods and the mean weight percentage Cag(%) of the burnable poisons contained in the MOX fuel rods satisfy at least either of the following requirements: -1.7 Cag + 21.8 {<=} Nfr {<=} -4.4 Cag + 56.1, 0.5 {<=} Cag {<=} 5.0. (author) figs.

  6. Control rod testing apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, R.R.; Ashman, C.M.

    1987-06-02

    A control rod testing apparatus is described comprising: a first guide means having a vertical cylindrical opening for grossly guiding a control rod; a second guide means having a vertical cylindrical opening for grossly guiding a control rod. The first and second guide means are supported at axially spaced locations with the openings coaxial; and a substantially cylindrical subassembly having a vertical cylindrical opening therethrough. The subassembly is trapped coaxial with and between the first and second guide means, and the subassembly radially floats with respect to the first and second guide means.

  7. BWR stability using a reducing dynamical model; Estabilidad de un BWR con un modelo dinamico reducido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J. M.; Blazquez Martinez, J. B.

    1990-07-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical structure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations is non-linear. Simple parametric calculation of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author)

  8. Axial Rod Coupling Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, David R

    2003-01-01

    .... The axial rod and coupling has been designed to withstand external survival loads ( 8.3 kN (1,870 lb) for Ring 5), and to maintain its length to within 7 microns after disassembly and reassembly...

  9. Critical Configuration and Physics Mesaurements for Graphite Reflected Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.27-CM Pitch)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950's efforts were made to study 'power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles'. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in FY 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program's effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments served as a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated 253 stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. 'The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.' The experiment studied within this evaluation was the first of the series and had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Information for this evaluation was compiled from Reference 1 and 2, reports on subsequent experiments in the series, and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

  10. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Beryllium Reflected Assemblies of U(93.15)O₂ Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch and 7-Tube Clusters)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Margaret A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Briggs, J. Blair [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Murphy, Michael F. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mihalczo, John T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  11. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2014-03-01

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one Na

  12. Optimized Control Rods of the BR2 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalcheva, Silva; Koonen, E.

    2007-09-15

    At the present time the BR-2 reactor uses control elements with cadmium as neutron absorbing part. The lower section of the control element is a beryllium assembly cooled by light water. Due to the burn up of the lower end of the cadmium section during the reactor operation, the presently used rods for reactivity control of the BR-2 reactor have to be replaced by new ones. Considered are various types Control Rods with full active part of the following materials: cadmium (Cd), hafnium (Hf), europium oxide (Eu2O3) and gadolinium (Gd2O3). Options to decrease the burn up of the control rod material in the hot spot, such as use of stainless steel in the lower active part of the Control Rod are discussed. Comparison with the characteristics of the presently used Control Rods types is performed. The changing of the characteristics of different types Control Rods and the perturbation effects on the reactor neutronics during the BR-2 fuel cycle are investigated. The burn up of the Control Rod absorbing material, total and differential control rods worth, macroscopic and effective microscopic absorption cross sections, fuel and reactivity evolution are evaluated during approximately 30 operating cycles.

  13. Alternate Fuel Cycle Technologies/Thorium Fuel Cycle Technology Programs. Quarterly report for period 1 April--30 June 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondra, B.L.

    1978-08-01

    Voloxidation and dissolution studies: rotary-kiln heat-transfer tests are under way using a small rotary kiln along with the development of a mathematical model to determine kiln-heat-flux profiles necessary to maintain a desired temperature gradient. The erosion/corrosion test for evaluating materials of construction is operational. Fuel from a BWR (Big Rock Point) yielded more fine solid residue on dissolution than in previous tests with PWR fuel. Two additional parametric voloxidation tests with H.B. Robinson fuel compared air vs pure oxygen atmospheres at 550{sup 0}C; overall tritium release and subsequent fuel dissolution were equivalent. Thorium dissolution studies: the dissolution rate of thoria in fluoride-catalyzed 8 to 14 M HNO{sub 3} (100{sup 0}C) was max between 0.04 to 0.06 M HF; at higher fluoride concentrations, ThF{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O precipitated. The rate of zircaloy dissolution continued to increase with increasing fluoride concentration. Stainless-steel-clad (Th,U)0{sub 2} fuel rods irradiated in the NRX reactor were sheared, voloxidized, and dissolved. {le}10% of the tritium was released during voloxidation in air at 600{sup 0}C. Carbon-14 removal from off-gas and fixation: carbon dioxide removal with Linde 13X molecular sieves to less than 100 ppB was experimentally verified using 300 ppM CO in air. Decontamination factors from 3000 to 7500 were obtained for CO{sub 2} removal in the gas-slurry stirred-tank reactor with CA(OH){sub 2}.or Ba(0H){sub 2}/sup .8H2O./. With Ba(OH){sub 2}.H{sub 2}0{sup 2} in a fixed-bed column, decontamination factors of about 30,000 were obtained.

  14. A thermodynamic model for noble metal alloy inclusions in nuclear fuel rods and application to the study of loss-of-coolant accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Matthew Haigh

    Metal alloy inclusions comprised of Mo, Pd, Rh, Ru, and Tc (the so-called "noble" metals) develop in CANDU fuel pellets as a result of fission. The thermochemical behaviour of this alloy system during severe accident conditions is of interest in connection with computations of loss of volatile compounds of these elements by reaction with steam-hydrogen gas mixtures that develop in the system as a result of water reacting with the Zircalloy cladding. This treatment focuses on the development of thermodynamic models for the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc quinary system. A reasonable prediction was made by modelling the ten binary phase diagrams, five of these evaluations being original to this work. This process provides a complete treatment for the five solution phases (vapour, liquid, bcc-solid, fcc-solid, and cph-solid) in this alloy system, as well as self-consistent Gibbs energies of formation for the Mo 5Ru3 intermetallic phase, and two intermediate phases in the Mo-Tc system. The resulting collection of properties, when treated by Gibbs energy minimization, permits phase equilibria to be computed for specified temperatures and compositions. Experimental work in support of this treatment has been performed. Measurements of the solidus and liquidus temperatures for Pd-Rh alloys were made using differential thermal analysis. These measurements confirm that the liquid solution exhibits positive deviation from Raoult's law. Experimental work as a visiting research engineer at AECL (Chalk River) was performed using a custom developed Knudsen cell/mass spectrometer. The Pd partial pressure was measured above multi-component alloys of known composition over a range of temperatures. These are correlated to predicted activities of Pd from the developed thermodynamic model in the multi-component alloy. The thermodynamic treatment developed for the noble metal alloy inclusions has been combined with considerable other data and applied to selected loss-of-coolant-accident scenarios to

  15. Dynamic behavior of upper hydraulic drive control rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiaotian [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: lixiaotian@tsinghua.edu.cn; He Shuyan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2006-12-15

    A 200 MW nuclear heating reactor (NHR) was developed based on the 5 MW testing heating reactor (THR-5). In order to improve its features, the INET was used to optimize its structure design. One task was to design the upper hydraulic drive control rod, which is located at the upper part of the reactor core, so that the fuel rod in each corner of the bundle will not be removed as they are in the THR-5. A program based on the method of characteristics was run to investigate the dynamic behavior of the upper hydraulic control rod drive system. The steady-state and dynamic characteristics of the control rod were studied. The influence of the reactor temperature and structure parameters on the operation reliability was investigated. Finally the optimal design parameters of the upper hydraulic drive control rod were obtained.

  16. Recent trends in the mitigation of the IGSCC through modifications in the water chemistry of BWR reactors; Tendencias recientes en la mitigacion del IGSCC mediante modificaciones en la quimica del agua de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz S, A.; Robles, E.F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    During the last years, the Nuclear Power stations had been that to adequate or to modify the parameters and operational conditions, attempting to maintain and to safeguard the integrity and functionality of its components and systems, as well as the personnel safety involved in its operation. In a Boiling water reactor (BWR), the chemical control of the water, constitutes one of the fundamental aspects to get a sure and reliable operation, having as main objectives: (a) The protection of the reactor vessel, of the structural materials of the same one and of the pipes and components of those recirculation systems against the Intergranular stress corrosion phenomena (IGSCC); (b) To guarantee the integrity of the nuclear fuel minimizing the corrosion phenomena in the fuel elements; and (c) The reduction of the operational dose of the personnel involved directly in the operation and maintenance by means of the control of the activated corrosion products. (Author)

  17. Condensate polishing guidelines for PWR and BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, P.; Crinigan, P.; Graham, B.; Kohlmann, R.; Crosby, C.; Seager, J.; Bosold, R.; Gillen, J.; Kristensen, J.; McKeen, A.; Jones, V.; Sawochka, S.; Siegwarth, D.; Keeling, D.; Polidoroff, T.; Morgan, D.; Rickertsen, D.; Dyson, A.; Mills, W.; Coleman, L.

    1993-03-01

    Under EPRI sponsorship, an industry committee, similar in form and operation to other guideline committees, was created to develop Condensate Polishing Guidelines for both PWR and BWR systems. The committee reviewed the available utility and water treatment industry experience on system design and performance and incorporated operational and state-of-the-art information into document. These guidelines help utilities to optimize present condensate polisher designs as well as be a resource for retrofits or new construction. These guidelines present information that has not previously been presented in any consensus industry document. The committee generated guidelines that cover both deep bed and powdered resin systems as an integral part of the chemistry of PWR and BWR plants. The guidelines are separated into sections that deal with the basis for condensate polishing, system design, resin design and application, data management and performance and management responsibilities.

  18. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake [ISOGO Nuclear Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data.

  19. Numerical analysis on reduction of radioactive actinides by recycling of nuclear fuel; Analisis numerico sobre reduccion de actinidos radiactivos por reciclado de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balboa L, H. E.

    2014-07-01

    Worldwide, human growth has reached unparalleled levels historically, this implies a need for more energy, and just in 2007 was consumed in the USA 4157 x 10{sup 9} kWh of electricity and there were 6 x 10{sup 9} metric tons of carbon dioxide, which causes a devastating effect on our environment. To this problem, a solution to the demand for non-fossil energy is nuclear energy, which is one of the least polluting and the cheapest among non-fossil energy; however, a problem remains unresolved the waste generation of nuclear fuels. In this work the option of a possible transmutation of actinides in a nuclear reactor of BWR was analyzed, an example of this are the nuclear reactors at the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant, which have generated spent fuel stored in pools awaiting a decision for final disposal or any other existing alternative. Assuming that the spent fuel was reprocessed to separate useful materials and actinides such as plutonium and uranium remaining, could take these actinides and to recycle them inside the same reactor that produced them, so il will be reduced the radiotoxicity of spent fuel. The main idea of this paper is to evaluate by means of numeric simulation (using the Core Management System (CMS)) the reduction of minor actinides in the case of being recycled in fresh fuel of the type BWR. The actinides were introduced hypothetically in the fuel pellets to 6% by weight, and then use a burned in the range of 0-65 G Wd/Tm, in order to have a better panorama of their behavior and thus know which it is the best choice for maximum reduction of actinides. Several cases were studied, that is to say were used as fuels; the UO{sub 2} and MOX. Six different cases were also studied to see the behavior of actinides in different situations. The CMS platform calculation was used for the analysis of the cases presented. Favorable results were obtained, having decreased from a range of 35% to 65% of minor actinides initially introduced in the fuel rods

  20. Experimental investigation of effect of spacer on two phase turbulent mixing rate in subchannels of pressure tube type BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Shashi Kant; Sinha, S.L. [National Institute of Technology, Raipur (India). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Chandraker, D.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Reactor Design and Development Group

    2017-11-15

    Turbulent mixing rate between adjacent subchannels in a two-phase flow has been known to be strongly dependent on the flow pattern. The most important aspect of turbulent motion is that the velocity and pressure at a fixed point do not remain constant with time even in steady state but go through very irregular high frequency fluctuations. These fluctuations influence the diffusion of scalar and vector quantities. The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a vertical pressure tube type, heavy water moderated and boiling light water cooled natural circulation based reactor. The fuel bundle of AHWR contains 54 fuel rods set in three concentric rings of 12, 18 and 24 fuel rods. This fuel bundle is divided into number of imaginary interacting flow channel called subchannels. Alteration from single phase to two phase flow situation occurs in reactor rod bundle with raise in power. The two phase flow regimes like bubbly, slug-churn, and annular flow are generally encountered in reactor rod bundle. Prediction of thermal margin of the reactor has necessitated the investigation of turbulent mixing rate of coolant between these subchannels under these flow regimes. Thus, it is fundamental to estimate the effect of spacer grids on turbulent mixing between subchannels of AHWR rod bundle.

  1. Morphoelastic rods. Part I: A single growing elastic rod

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, D.E.

    2013-02-01

    A theory for the dynamics and statics of growing elastic rods is presented. First, a single growing rod is considered and the formalism of three-dimensional multiplicative decomposition of morphoelasticity is used to describe the bulk growth of Kirchhoff elastic rods. Possible constitutive laws for growth are discussed and analysed. Second, a rod constrained or glued to a rigid substrate is considered, with the mismatch between the attachment site and the growing rod inducing stress. This stress can eventually lead to instability, bifurcation, and buckling. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  3. Prony's method application for BWR instabilities characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Ramírez, J. Ramón, E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Alonso, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.alonso@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Ed. 9, Lindavista, D.F. 07300 (Mexico); Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier, E-mail: javier.ortiz@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Prony's method application for BWR instability events. • Several BWR instability benchmark are assessed using this method. • DR and frequency are obtained and a new parameter is proposed to eliminate false signals. • Adequate characterization of in-phase and out-of-phase events is obtained. • The Prony's method application is validated. - Abstract: Several methods have been developed for the analysis of reactor power signals during BWR power oscillations. Among them is the Prony's method, its application provides the DR and the frequency of oscillations. In this paper another characteristic of the method is proposed to determine the type of oscillations that can occur, in-phase or out-of-phase. Prony's method decomposes a given signal in all the frequencies that it contains, therefore the DR of the fundamental mode and the first harmonic are obtained. To determine the more dominant pole of the system a normalized amplitude W of the system is calculated, which depends on the amplitude and the damping coefficient. With this term, it can be analyzed which type of oscillations is present, if W of the fundamental mode frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is in-phase, if W of the first harmonic frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is out-of-phase. The method is applied to several stability benchmarks to assess its validity. Results show the applicability of the method as an alternative analysis method to determine the type of oscillations occurred.

  4. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR`s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karjunen, T. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Laitinen, T.; Piippo, J.; Sirkiae, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR`s as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs.

  5. Results of automatic system implementation for the friction control rods execution in Cofrentes nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M., E-mail: mpalomo@iqn.upv.es [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (UPV) (Spain); Urrea, M., E-mail: matias.urrea@iberdrola.es [Iberdrola Generacion S.A. Valencia (Spain). C.N. Cofrentes; Curiel, M., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.com [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales (LAINSA), Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos, A., E-mail: a.arnaldos@titaniast.com [TITANIA Servicios Teconologicos, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show the obtained results in Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant (Spain) of Control Rods PCC/24 Friction Test Procedure. In order to perform this, a Control Rod Friction Test System has been developed. Principally, this system consists on software and data acquisition hardware that obtains and analyzes the control rod pressure variation on which the test is being made. The PCC/24 Procedure objective is to detect an excessive friction in the control rod movement that could cause a CRD (Control Rod Drive) movement slower than usual. This test is necessary every time that an anomalous alteration is produced in the reactor core that could affect to a fuel rod, and it is executed before the time measure of control rods rapid scram test of the affected rods. This test has to be carried out to all the reactor control rods and takes valuable time during plant refuelling. So, by means of an automatic system to perform the test, we obtain an important time saving during refuelling. On the other hand, the on-line monitoring of the control rod insertion and changes in differential pressure, permits a control rod operation fast and safe validation. Moreover, an automatic individual report of every rod is generated by the system and a final global result report of the entire test developed in refuelling is generated. The mentioned reports can be attached directly to the procedure documents obtaining an office data processing important saving time.(author)

  6. Results of automatic system implementation for the friction control rods execution in Cofrentes nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiel, M. [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Palomo, M. J. [ISIRYM, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, Valencia (Spain); Urrea, M. [Iberdrola Generacion S. A., Central Nuclear Cofrentes, Carretera Almansa Requena s/n, 04662 Cofrentes, Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos, A., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.co [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this presentation is to show the obtained results in Cofrentes nuclear power plant (Spain) of control rods Pcc/24 friction test procedure. In order to perform this, a control rod friction test system has been developed. Principally, this system consists on software and data acquisition hardware that obtains and analyzes the control rod pressure variation on which the test is being made. The Pcc/24 procedure objective is to detect an excessive friction in the control rod movement that could cause a control rod drive movement slower than usual. This test is necessary every time that an anomalous alteration is produced in the reactor core that could affect to a fuel rod, and it is executed before the time measure of control rods rapid scram test of the affected rods. This test has to be carried out to all the reactor control rods and takes valuable time during plant refuelling. So, by means of an automatic system to perform the test, we obtain an important time saving during refuelling. On the other hand, the on-line monitoring of the control rod insertion and changes in differential pressure, permits a control rod operation fast and safe validation. Moreover, an automatic individual report of every rod is generated by the system and a final global result report of the entire test developed in refuelling is generated. The mentioned reports can be attached directly to the procedure documents obtaining an office data processing important saving time. (Author)

  7. Considerations for sensitivity analysis, uncertainty quantification, and data assimilation for grid-to-rod fretting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Pernice

    2012-10-01

    Grid-to-rod fretting is the leading cause of fuel failures in pressurized water reactors, and is one of the challenge problems being addressed by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors to guide its efforts to develop a virtual reactor environment. Prior and current efforts in modeling and simulation of grid-to-rod fretting are discussed. Sources of uncertainty in grid-to-rod fretting are also described.

  8. Cone rod dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs (prevalence 1/40,000 are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP, also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7. Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far. The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs, CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs, and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs. It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is

  9. Safety and licensing issues that are being addressed by the Power Burst Facility test programs. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results of the experimental program being conducted in the Power Burst Facility and the relationship of these results to certain safety and licensing issues. The safety issues that were addressed by the Power-Cooling-Mismatch, Reactivity Initiated Accident, and Loss of Coolant Accident tests, which comprised the original test program in the Power Burst Facility, are discussed. The resolution of these safety issues based on the results of the thirty-six tests performed to date, is presented. The future resolution of safety issues identified in the new Power Burst Facility test program which consists of tests which simulate BWR and PWR operational transients, anticipated transients without scram, and severe fuel damage accidents, is described.

  10. Trace Assessment for BWR ATWS Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.; Arantxa Cuadra, Gilad Raitses, Arnold Aronson

    2010-04-22

    A TRACE/PARCS input model has been developed in order to be able to analyze anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor. The model is based on one developed previously for the Browns Ferry reactor for doing loss-of-coolant accident analysis. This model was updated by adding the control systems needed for ATWS and a core model using PARCS. The control systems were based on models previously developed for the TRAC-B code. The PARCS model is based on information (e.g., exposure and moderator density (void) history distributions) obtained from General Electric Hitachi and cross sections for GE14 fuel obtained from an independent source. The model is able to calculate an ATWS, initiated by the closure of main steam isolation valves, with recirculation pump trip, water level control, injection of borated water from the standby liquid control system and actuation of the automatic depres-surization system. The model is not considered complete and recommendations are made on how it should be improved.

  11. Neutron dosimetry. Environmental monitoring in a BWR type reactor; Dosimetria de neutrones. Monitoreo ambiental en un reactor del tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavera D, L.; Camacho L, M.E

    1991-01-15

    The measurements carried out on reactor dosimetry are applied mainly to the study on the effects of the radiation in 108 materials of the reactor; little is on the environmental dosimetry outside of the primary container of BWR reactors. In this work the application of a neutron spectrometer formed by plastic detectors of nuclear traces manufactured in the ININ, for the environmental monitoring in penetrations around the primary container of the unit I of the Laguna Verde central is presented. The neutron monitoring carries out with purposes of radiological protection, during the operational tests of the reactor. (Author)

  12. BWR Refill-Reflood Program, Task 4. 7 - model development: basic models for the BWR version of TRAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, J G.M.; Chu, K H; Shaug, J C

    1983-09-01

    TRAC (Transient Reactor Analysis Code) is a computer code for best estimate analysis of the thermal hydraulic conditions in a reactor system. The constitutive correlations for shear and heat transfer developed for the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) version of TRAC are described. A universal flow regime map has been developed to tie the regimes for shear and heat transfer into a consistent package. New models in the areas of interfacial shear, interfacial heat transfer and thermal radiation have been introduced. Improvements have also been made to the constitutive correlations and the numerical methods. All the models have been implemented into the GE version TRACB02 and extensively tested against data.

  13. Hydrogen injection in BWR and related radiation chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigure, Kenkichi; Takagi, Junichi; Shiraishi, Hirotsugu

    Hydrogen injection to feed water systems in boiling water reactors (BWR) has drawn wide attention as one of the possible countermeasures to the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304 type stainless steel piping. To confirm the effectiveness of the hydrogen injection, a computer simulation of the complicated radiolysis reactions was carried out. The result of the simulation showed that the reactor water data monitored at the usual sampling points in actual plants reflect mainly the reactions in the downcomer portion but not in the reactor core in BWR. The calculation claimed approximately 300 ppb hydrogen in feed water to reduce the oxygen concentration in the recirculation lines to a negligible level, while one order of magnitude higher level of hydrogen is necessary to suppress oxygen in the reactor core. The computer simulation requires many radiation chemical data as in-put, among which are G values of initial products for water radiolysis at high temperature. An experimental approach was made to confirm the G values for high temperature radiolysis of water. The result does not seem to be consistent with the high temperature G values reported by Burns.

  14. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development.

  15. THERMAL EVALUATION OF THE CONCEPTUAL 24 BWR UCF TUBE BASKET DESIGN DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.L. Lotz

    1995-12-18

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) as specified in the Waste Package Implementation Plan (pp. 4-8,4-11,4-24,5-1, and 5-13; Ref. 5.10) and Waste Package Plan (pp. 3-15,3-17, and 3-24; Ref. 5.9). The design data request addressed herein is: (1) Characterize the conceptual 24 boiling water reactor (BWR) uncanistered fuel (UCF) waste package (WP) to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment. The purpose of this analysis is to respond to a concern that the long-term disposal thermal issues for the UCF waste package do not preclude UCF waste package compatibility with the MGDS. The objective of this analysis is to provide thermal parameter information for the conceptual UCF WP design under nominal MGDS repository conditions. The results are intended to show that the design has a reasonable chance to meet the MGDS design requirements for normal MGDS operation and to provide the required guidance to determining the major design issues for future design efforts. Future design efforts will focus on UCF design changes as further design and operations information becomes available.

  16. Analysis of fission product transport under terminated LOCA conditions. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieseke, J.A.; Baybutt, P.; Jordan, H.; Denning, R.S.; Wooton, R.O.

    1977-12-30

    An analytical model was developed to allow preditions of the source term to the containment as dependent on release from the fuel pins and deposition within the primary system. The model was developed into a flexible computer code adaptable to various geometrical arrangements and flow paths. The calculational framework was established in such a way to permit, in principle, the determination of particle and vapor transport and deposition in a general system of control volumes connected by fluid flow in an arbitrary way. This framework requires as input the rate of fission product release to the primary flow, as a function of time for each vapor and particulate species to be considered, and a complete, time dependent, thermal-hydraulic description of the system. TRAP-PWR, TRAP-BWR and TRACK computer codes are specializations, described in detail in the text of this report, of the general framework. The nature of these specializations depends strongly on the degree of detail with which the transporting fluid medium is modeled.

  17. HORIZONTAL LIFTING OF 5 DHLW/DOE LONG, 12-PWR LONG AND 24-BWR WASTE PACKAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. de la Brosse

    2001-05-17

    The objective of this calculation was to determine the structural response of a 12-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Long, a 24-Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and a 5-Defense High Level Waste/Department of Energy (DHLW/DOE)--Long spent nuclear fuel waste packages lifted in a horizontal position. The scope of this calculation was limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of maximum stress intensities in the trunnion collar sleeves. In addition, the maximum stress intensities in the inner and outer shells of the waste packages were presented for illustrative purposes. The information provided by the sketches (Attachments I, II and III) is that of the potential design of the types of waste packages considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for these designs only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with the ''Technical work plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 7). AP-3.12Q, Calculations (Ref. 13), was used to perform the calculation and develop the document.

  18. The Physical Mechanism of Core-Wide and Local Instabilities at the Forsmark-1 BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Analytis, G. Th. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland). Lab. for Thermohydraulics; Hennig, D. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland). Lab. for Reactor Physics and Systems Engineering; Karlsson, J. K.-H. [Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    1998-10-01

    During the last 15 years, the problem of BWR instabilities has attracted the attention of a number of researchers. From the theoretical point of view, one would be interested in physically understanding the mechanisms responsible for the in- and out-of-phase core wide power oscillations observed at certain operating points of the power-flow map in different BWRs. From the practical point of view, one must try to avoid these `incidents` since either locally, or globally, the power may substantially exceed the prescribed levels. In this work, we shall use RAMONA3-12 and analyse a rather unusual instability incident at Forsmark-1 in which in addition to the core-wide fundamental spatial mode oscillation, there were local large amplitude power oscillations at different radial positions in the core. We were able to reproduce these unusual experimental findings by assuming that there are large amplitude Density Wave Oscillations (DWOs) in different bundles, induced by the fact that these bundles were not seated properly into the lower fuel support plate. (author) 17 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Thermal behavior analysis of PWR fuel during RIA at various fuel burnups using modified theatre code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaz Amjad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fuel irradiation and burnup causes geometrical and dimensional changes in the fuel rod which affects its thermal resistance and ultimately affects the fuel rod behavior during steady-state and transient conditions. The consistent analysis of fuel rod thermal performance is essential for precise evaluation of reactor safety in operational transients and accidents. In this work, analysis of PWR fuel rod thermal performance is carried out under steady-state and transient conditions at different fuel burnups. The analysis is performed by using thermal hydraulic code, THEATRe. The code is modified by adding burnup dependent fuel rod behavior models. The original code uses as-fabricated fuel rod dimensions during steady-state and transient conditions which can be modified to perform more consistent reactor safety analysis. AP1000 reactor is considered as a reference reactor for this analysis. The effect of burnup on steady-state fuel rod parameters has been investigated. For transient analysis, hypothetical reactivity initiated accident was simulated by considering a triangular power pulse of variable pulse height (relative to the full power reactor operating conditions and pulse width at different fuel burnups which corresponds to fresh fuel, low and medium burnup fuels. The effect of power pulse height, pulse width and fuel burnup on fuel rod temperatures has been investigated. The results of reactivity initiated accident analysis show that the fuel failure mechanisms are different for fresh fuel and fuel at different burnup levels. The fuel failure in fresh fuel is expected due to fuel melting as fuel temperature increases with increase in pulse energy (pulse height. However, at relatively higher burnups, the fuel failure is expected due to cladding failure caused by strong pellet clad mechanical interaction, where, the contact pressure increases beyond the cladding yield strength.

  20. Safety analysis methodology for Chinshan nuclear power plant spent fuel pool under Fukushima-like accident condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hao-Tzu [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China). Research Atomic Energy Council; Li, Wan-Yun; Wang, Jong-Rong; Tseng, Yung-Shin; Chen, Hsiung-Chih; Shih, Chunkuan; Chen, Shao-Wen [National Tsing Hua Univ., HsinChu, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science

    2017-03-15

    Chinshan nuclear power plant (NPP), a BWR/4 plant, is the first NPP in Taiwan. After Fukushima NPP disaster occurred, there is more concern for the safety of NPPs in Taiwan. Therefore, in order to estimate the safety of Chinshan NPP spent fuel pool (SFP), by using TRACE, MELCOR, CFD, and FRAPTRAN codes, INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, R.O.C.) performed the safety analysis of Chinshan NPP SFP. There were two main steps in this research. The first step was the establishment of Chinshan NPP SFP models. And the transient analysis under the SFP cooling system failure condition (Fukushima-like accident) was performed. In addition, the sensitive study of the time point for water spray was also performed. The next step was the fuel rod performance analysis by using FRAPTRAN and TRACE's results. Finally, the animation model of Chinshan NPP SFP was presented by using the animation function of SNAP with MELCOR analysis results.

  1. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors; Estudios de fragilizacion en aceros de vasija de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A{sup 2}. (Author)

  2. Metallic Reactor Fuel Fabrication for SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Ko, Young-Mo; Woo, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The metal fuel for an SFR has such advantages such as simple fabrication procedures, good neutron economy, high thermal conductivity, excellent compatibility with a Na coolant, and inherent passive safety 1. U-Zr metal fuel for SFR is now being developed by KAERI as a national R and D program of Korea. The fabrication technology of metal fuel for SFR has been under development in Korea as a national nuclear R and D program since 2007. The fabrication process for SFR fuel is composed of (1) fuel slug casting, (2) loading and fabrication of the fuel rods, and (3) fabrication of the final fuel assemblies. Fuel slug casting is the dominant source of fuel losses and recycled streams in this fabrication process. Fabrication on the rod type metallic fuel was carried out for the purpose of establishing a practical fabrication method. Rod-type fuel slugs were fabricated by injection casting. Metallic fuel slugs fabricated showed a general appearance was smooth.

  3. Methods and results of a PSA level 2 for a German BWR of the 900 MWe class

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loffler, H.; Sonnenkalb, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koln (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    On behalf of the federal Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety (BMU) GRS has performed a PSA level 2 for a BWR type 69 NPP of the 900 MWe class, equipped with a N{sub 2} inerted steel containment and a pressure suppression system. Integral deterministic accident analyses have been performed with the computer code MELCOR 1.8.5. Additional analyses have been done for those events and phenomena which are not or not sufficiently covered by MELCOR. The probabilistic event tree analysis begins with the core damage states received from PSA level 1, and it ends with the definition of release categories and the determination of their frequencies. Uncertainties about the frequency of core damage states and about events during the accident progression are taken into account by means of Monte Carlo simulations. If there is a core damage state there is a high probability (>50 %) for a very high and rapid release of radionuclides into the environment. This high conditional probability is due to the very low probability to retain a partly destroyed core inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and because the containment almost certainly fails at the bottom of the control rod drives room after melt release from the failed RPV. (authors)

  4. Improving the reliability of fuel Enusa; Mejora de la fiabilidad del combustible en Enusa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choithramani, S.; Quecedo, M.

    2015-07-01

    ENUSA is committed to providing our customers with fuel designs that meet their needs for operational efficiency, power, energy, performance and reliability. ENUSAs current fuel designs, covering BWR and PWR technologies, incorporate highest performance with proven reliability features developed along nuclear power operation history. As of January 2015, ENUSA has manufactured more than 20.000 fuel assemblies (around half BWR and half PWR), with operating conditions reflecting varying reactor power densities, cycle lengths, operating strategies and water chemistry environments. This experience brings the knowledge to model our fuel behavior and acts as the principal instrument to identify and characterize the failure mechanisms of our fuel. Based on the information obtained from all this years of operation, ENUSA has progressively developed and implemented numerous mitigating actions identified upon the knowledge on failure mechanisms, which are the bases for the fuel reliability improvement program. Contemporaneously to this implementation, a positive trend on ENUSA fuel reliability has been observed. (Author)

  5. Simulation in 3 dimensions of a cycle 18 months for an BWR type reactor using the Nod3D program; Simulacion en 3 dimensiones de un ciclo de 18 meses para un reactor BWR usando el programa Nod3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, N.; Alonso, G. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: nhm@nuclear.inin.mx; Valle, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The development of own codes that you/they allow the simulation in 3 dimensions of the nucleus of a reactor and be of easy maintenance, without the consequent payment of expensive use licenses, it can be a factor that propitiates the technological independence. In the Department of Nuclear Engineering (DIN) of the Superior School of Physics and Mathematics (ESFM) of the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) a denominated program Nod3D has been developed with the one that one can simulate the operation of a reactor BWR in 3 dimensions calculating the effective multiplication factor (kJJ3, as well as the distribution of the flow neutronic and of the axial and radial profiles of the power, inside a means of well-known characteristics solving the equations of diffusion of neutrons numerically in stationary state and geometry XYZ using the mathematical nodal method RTN0 (Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec of index zero). One of the limitations of the program Nod3D is that it doesn't allow to consider the burnt of the fuel in an independent way considering feedback, this makes it in an implicit way considering the effective sections in each step of burnt and these sections are obtained of the code Core Master LEND. However even given this limitation, the results obtained in the simulation of a cycle of typical operation of a reactor of the type BWR are similar to those reported by the code Core Master LENDS. The results of the keJ - that were obtained with the program Nod3D they were compared with the results of the code Core Master LEND, presenting a difference smaller than 0.2% (200 pcm), and in the case of the axial profile of power, the maxim differs it was of 2.5%. (Author)

  6. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    An engineering plant analyzer has been developed at BNL for realistically and accurately simulating transients and severe abnormal events in BWR power plants. Simulations are being carried out routinely with high fidelity, high simulation speed, at low cost and with unsurpassed user convenience. The BNL Plant Analyzer is the only operating facility which (a) simulates more than two orders-of-magnitude faster than the CDC-7600 mainframe computer, (b) is accessible and fully operational in on-line interactive mode, remotely from anywhere in the US, from Europe or the Far East (Korea), via widely available IBM-PC compatible personal computers, standard modems and telephone lines, (c) simulates both slow and rapid transients seven times faster than real-time in direct access, and four times faster in remote access modes, (d) achieves high simulation speed without compromising fidelity, and (e) is available to remote access users at the low cost of $160 per hour.

  7. Oxide evolution on Alloy X-750 in simulated BWR environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzi, Silvia; Göransson, Kenneth; Rahman, Seikh M. H.; Eriksson, Sten G.; Liu, Fang; Thuvander, Mattias; Stiller, Krystyna

    2016-12-01

    In order to simulate the environment experienced by spacer grids in a boiling water reactor (BWR), specimens of the Ni-based Alloy X-750 were exposed to a water jet in an autoclave at a temperature of 286 °C and a pressure of 80 bar. The oxide microstructure of specimens exposed for 2 h, 24 h, 168 h and 840 h has been investigated mainly using electron microscopy. The specimens suffer mass loss due to dissolution during exposure. At the same time a complex layered oxide develops. After the longest exposure the oxide consists of two outer spinel layers consisting of blocky crystals, one intermediate layer of nickel oxide interspersed with Ti-rich oxide needles, and an inner layer of oxidized base metal. The evolution of the oxide leading up to this structure is discussed and a model is presented.

  8. Study of a fuel assembly for the nuclear reactor of IV generation cooled with supercritical water; Estudio de un ensamble de combustible para el reactor nuclear de generacion IV enfriado con agua supercritica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: albrm29@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (MX)

    2011-11-15

    In this work a neutron study is presented about a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to the center of the arrangement, for a nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water (SCWR). The SCWR reactor was chosen by the characteristics of its design, mainly because is based in light water reactors (PWR and BWR), and the operational experience that has of them allow to use models and similar programs to simulate the fuel and the nucleus of this type of reactors. To develop the necessary models and to carry out the design and analysis of the SCWR reactor, the neutron codes MCNPX and Helios were used. The reason of using both codes, is because the code MCNPX used thoroughly in the neutron simulation of these reactors, it has been our reference code to analyze the results obtained with the Helios code which results are more efficient because its calculation times are minors. In the nucleus design the same parameters for both codes were considered. The results show that the design with Helios is a viable option to simulate these reactors since their values of the neutrons multiplication factor are very similar to those obtained with MCNPX. On the other hand, it could be corroborated that the CASMO-4 code is inadequate to simulate the fuel to the temperature conditions and water pressure in the SCWR. (Author)

  9. Control Rod Drive Mechanism Installed in the Internal of Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M. H.; Choi, S.; Park, J. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, D. O.; Hur, N. S.; Hur, H.; Yu, J. Y

    2008-09-15

    This report describes the review results and important technologies related to the in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism. Generally, most of the CRDMs used in the PWR are attached outside of the reactor pressure vessel, and the pernetration of the vessel head can not avoid. However, in-vessel type CRDMs, which are installed inside the reactor vessel, can eliminate the possibility of rod ejection accidents and the penetration of the vessel head, and provide a compact design of the reactor vessel and containment. There are two kinds of in-vessel type CRDM concerning the driving force-driven by a driving motor and by a hydraulic force. Motor driven CRDMs have been mainly investigated in Japan(MRX, IMR, DRX, next generation BWR etc.), and developed the key components such as a canned motor, an integrated rod position indicator, a separating ball-nut and a ball bearing that can operate under the water conditions of a high temperature and pressure. The concept of hydraulically driven CRDMs have been first reported by KWU and Siemens for KWU 200 reactor, and Argentina(CAREM) and China(NHR-5, NHR-200) have been developed the internal CRDM with the piston and cylinder of slightly different geometries. These systems are driven by the hydraulic force which is produced by pumps outside of the reactor vessel and transmitted through a pipe penetrating the reactor vessel, and needs complicated control and piping systems including pumps, valves and pipes etc.. IRIS has been recently decided the internal CRDMs as the reference design, and an analytical and experimental investigations of the hydraulic drive concept are performed by POLIMI in Italy. Also, a small French company, MP98 has been developed a new type of control rods, called 'liquid control rods', where reactivity is controlled by the movement of a liquid absorber in a manometer type device.

  10. Thermal breeder fuel enrichment zoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capossela, Harry J.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of a thermal breeder reactor having regions of higher than average moderator concentration are disclosed. The fuel modules of the reactor core contain at least two different types of fuel elements, a high enrichment fuel element and a low enrichment fuel element. The two types of fuel elements are arranged in the fuel module with the low enrichment fuel elements located between the high moderator regions and the high enrichment fuel elements. Preferably, shim rods made of a fertile material are provided in selective regions for controlling the reactivity of the reactor by movement of the shim rods into and out of the reactor core. The moderation of neutrons adjacent the high enrichment fuel elements is preferably minimized as by reducing the spacing of the high enrichment fuel elements and/or using a moderator having a reduced moderating effect.

  11. 3-D rod ejection analysis using a conservative methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Ho; Park, Jin Woo; Park, Guen Tae; Um, Kil Sup; Ryu, Seok Hee; Lee, Jae Il; Choi, Tong Soo [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The point kinetics model which simplifies the core phenomena and physical specifications is used for the conventional rod ejection accident analysis. The point kinetics model is convenient to assume conservative core parameters but this simplification loses large amount of safety margin. The CHASER system couples the three-dimensional core neutron kinetics code ASTRA, the sub-channel analysis code THALES and the fuel performance analysis code FROST. The validation study for the CHASER system is addressed using the NEACRP three-dimensional PWR core transient benchmark problem. A series of conservative rod ejection analyses for the APR1400 type plant is performed for both hot full power (HFP) and hot zero power (HZP) conditions to determine the most limiting cases. The conservative rod ejection analysis methodology is designed to properly consider important phenomena and physical parameters.

  12. Feasibility study of boiling water reactor core based on thorium-uranium fuel concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779, Col Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois Lacouture, Juan Luis; Martin del Campo, Cecilia [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ingenieria, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Mor. (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, Mexico D.F. 09340 (Mexico)], E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx

    2008-01-15

    The design of a boiling water reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using the thorium-uranium (blanket-seed) concept in the same integrated fuel assembly is presented in this paper. The lattice design uses the thorium conversion capability to {sup 233}U in a BWR spectrum. A core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of one effective full power year in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main core operating parameters were obtained. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The economic analysis shows that the fuel cycle cost of the proposed core design can be competitive with a standard uranium core design. Finally, a comparison of the toxicity of the spent fuel showed that the toxicity is lower in the thorium cycle than in other fuel cycles (UO{sub 2} and MOX uranium and plutonium) in the case of the once through cycle for light water reactors (LWR)

  13. Metrology Determination in hot cell of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Sung Ho; Min, D.K.; Kim, E.K.; Hwang, Y.H.; Lee, H.G.; You, G.S.; Koo, G.S.; Koo, D.S.; Hong, S.B

    1999-03-01

    The defects and dimensional changes of irradiated fuel rods are due to several causes during the operation of reactor. The severity of dimensional changes might bring trouble in reactor operation. The dimensional data such as diameter changes and length changes of irradiated fuel rods are invaluable to designs of fuel rods and integrity evaluation of fuel rods. In this report, the standard gauges for measuring the dimensional changes of fuel rods are manufactured. The development of profilometry examination technology enabled motor control system using personal computer to measure diameter on each occasion 0.01 mm in length of irradiated fuel rods. By programming the process of profilometry examination, the measuring data of the dimensional changes can be stored and analyzed with personal computer. (Author). 4 refs., 5 tabs., 18 figs.

  14. Optimal estimate of the coolant flow in the assemblies of a BWR of natural circulation in real time; Estimacion optima del flujo de refrigerante en los ensambles de un BWR de circulacion natural en tiempo real

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: julfi_jg@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The present work exposes the design and the implementation of an advanced controller that allows estimating the coolant flow in the fuel assemblies of a BWR reactor of natural circulation in real time. To be able to reduce the penalizations that are established in the calculations of the operation limits due to the magnitude of the uncertainties in the coolant flows of a natural circulation reactor, is the objective of this research. In this work the construction of the optimal controller that allows estimating the coolant flows in a fuel channels group of the reactor is shown, as well as the operation of this applied to a reduced order model that simulates the dynamics of a natural circulation reactor. The controller design required of an estimator of the valuation variables not directly of the plant and of the estimates use of the local distributions of the coolant flow. The controller construction of the estimator was based mathematically in the filter Kalman whose algorithm allows to be carried out an advanced control of the system. To prove the estimator operation was development a simplified model that reproduces the basic dynamics of the flowing coolant in the reactor, which works as observer of the system, this model is coupled by means of the estimator controller to a detail model of the plant. The results are presented by means of graphics of the interest variables and the estimate flow, and they are documented in the chart that is presented at the end of this article. (Author)

  15. Physics principles to achieve comparable fission power from fertile and fissile rods of the conceptual ATBR/FTBR reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Usha [Light Water Reactors Physics Section, Reactor Physics Design Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)], E-mail: ushapal@barc.gov.in; Jagannathan, V. [Light Water Reactors Physics Section, Reactor Physics Design Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)], E-mail: vjagan@barc.gov.in

    2008-09-15

    Loading of seedless fertile rods has been used as the central principle to maximize fertile to fissile conversion in the two thorium breeder reactor concepts, viz. ATBR and FTBR [Jagannathan, V., Pal, Usha, Karthikeyan, R., Ganesan, S., Jain, R.P., Kamat, S.U., 2001. ATBR - a thorium breeder reactor concept for an early induction of thorium in an enriched uranium reactor. Nuclear Technology 133, 1-32; Jagannathan, V., Pal, Usha, Karthikeyan, R., Raj Devesh, Srivastava, Argala, Ahmad Khan, Suhail, 2007. Reactor physics ideas to design novel reactors with faster fissile growth. In: Paper accepted for oral presentation in 'ICENES 2007 - 13th International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems, 3--8 June 2007, Istanbul, Turkey]. At fresh state the seedless thoria rods will produce practically no fission power, or nearly thousand times less fission rate compared to the seed fuel rods. Hence it is conceived that the fuel assembly would be constituted by assembling the fresh seed rods with one fuel cycle irradiated fertile thoria rods. Even in this state there is a wide disparity between the fissile content of these rods. By judicious choice of the rod dimensions and their relative locations, a degree of balance in the fission rate is achieved in the fresh state of seeded rods. Remarkably as the burnup proceeds the initially seedless fertile rods have a continuous growth of fissile content up to an asymptotic value for a given spectrum and the fissile content in seeded rods monotonically decreases. If the discharge burnup is sufficiently large by design, it is seen that the power share of the initially seedless fertile rods can even exceed that of the seed fuel rods. The physics principles of achieving this characteristic are presented in this paper.

  16. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  17. Fuel safety research 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    The Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is in charge of research activity which covers almost research items related to fuel safety of water reactor in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are being conducted by using some unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) of JAERI. The research to confirm the safety of high burn-up fuel and MOX fuel under accident conditions is the most important item among them. The laboratory consists of following five research groups corresponding to each research fields; Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). Research group of radionuclides release and transport behavior from irradiated fuel under severe accident conditions (VEGA group). The research conducted in the year 2001 produced many important data and information. They are, for example, the fuel behavior data under BWR power oscillation conditions in the NSRR, the data on failure-bearing capability of hydrided cladding under LOCA conditions and the FP release data at very high temperature in steam which simulate the reactor core condition during severe accidents. This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 2001 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  18. The Third ATLAS ROD Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Poggioli, L.

    A new-style Workshop After two successful ATLAS ROD Workshops dedicated to the ROD hardware and held at the Geneva University in 1998 and in 2000, a new style Workshop took place at LAPP in Annecy on November 14-15, 2002. This time the Workshop was fully dedicated to the ROD-TDAQ integration and software in view of the near future integration activities of the final RODs for the detector assembly and commissioning. More precisely, the aim of this workshop was to get from the sub-detectors the parameters needed for T-DAQ, as well as status and plans from ROD builders. On the other hand, what was decided and assumed had to be stated (like EB decisions and URDs), and also support plans. The Workshop gathered about 70 participants from all ATLAS sub-detectors and the T-DAQ community. The quite dense agenda allowed nevertheless for many lively discussions, and for a dinner in the old town of Annecy. The Sessions The Workshop was organized in five main sessions: Assumptions and recommendations Sub-de...

  19. Development of controllers with high reliability for BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asami, K.; Iida, H.; Eki, Y.; Hirose, M.; Ito, T. (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1980-09-01

    Owing to the problems in system operation due to recent energy situation and the increase of nuclear power generation, high reliability and high rate of operation are required for nuclear power stations. In Hitachi Ltd., in order to meet these needs, efforts were exerted positively to make the controllers for BWR plants reliable. In this paper, three representative examples among them are described. The digital type flow rate control system for feed water recirculation ''D-FRC'' and the digital, electronic hydraulic type turbine control system ''D-EHC'' were developed by applying digital control technology and multiplication techniques, aiming at the high reliability of the most important control systems for nuclear power stations. The analog trip module enabled to attain high reliability and to reduce radiation exposure by improving preventive maintainability. Owing to the recent energy situation, the needs of safety and the high rate of operation in nuclear power stations have increased, but the attainment of high reliability in hardwares only has its limit, and the high reliability of systems is required. The measures for improving the reliability, the constitution of the D-FRC and its watching and diagnosing functions, the achievement of high quality control and the outline of the D-EHC and the analog trip module are described.

  20. A New Methodology for Early Anomaly Detection of BWR Instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, K. N.

    2005-11-27

    The objective of the performed research is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the anomalies as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small anomalies. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on anomaly detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.

  1. Beta and gamma dose calculations for PWR and BWR containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, D.B.

    1989-07-01

    Analyses of gamma and beta dose in selected regions in PWR and BWR containment buildings have been performed for a range of fission product releases from selected severe accidents. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that safety-related equipment could experience during the selected severe accident sequences. The resulting dose calculations demonstrate the extent to which design basis accident qualified equipment could also be qualified for the severe accident environments. Surry was chosen as the representative PWR plant while Peach Bottom was selected to represent BWRs. Battelle Columbus Laboratory performed the source term release analyses. The AB epsilon scenario (an intermediate to large LOCA with failure to recover onsite or offsite electrical power) was selected as the base case Surry accident, and the AE scenario (a large break LOCA with one initiating event and a combination of failures in two emergency cooling systems) was selected as the base case Peach Bottom accident. Radionuclide release was bounded for both scenarios by including spray operation and arrested sequences as variations of the base scenarios. Sandia National Laboratories used the source terms to calculate dose to selected containment regions. Scenarios with sprays operational resulted in a total dose comparable to that (2.20 /times/ 10/sup 8/ rads) used in current equipment qualification testing. The base case scenarios resulted in some calculated doses roughly an order of magnitude above the current 2.20 /times/ 10/sup 8/ rad equipment qualification test region. 8 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Key Parameters for Operator Diagnosis of BWR Plant Condition during a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the key information needed from nuclear power plant instrumentation to guide severe accident management and mitigation for boiling water reactor (BWR) designs (specifically, a BWR/4-Mark I), estimate environmental conditions that the instrumentation will experience during a severe accident, and identify potential gaps in existing instrumentation that may require further research and development. This report notes the key parameters that instrumentation needs to measure to help operators respond to severe accidents. A follow-up report will assess severe accident environmental conditions as estimated by severe accident simulation model analysis for a specific US BWR/4-Mark I plant for those instrumentation systems considered most important for accident management purposes.

  3. CIRFT Data Update and Data Analyses for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Reliability Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this research is to collect experimental data on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from pressurized water reactors (PWRs), including the H. B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station (HBR), Catawba Nuclear Station, North Anna Nuclear Power Station (NA), and the Limerick Nuclear Power Station (LMK) boiling water reactor (BWR).

  4. Used Fuel Testing Transportation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Best, Ralph E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Maheras, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); England, Jeffery L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); LeDuc, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-25

    This report identifies shipping packages/casks that might be used by the Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign Program (UFDC) to ship fuel rods and pieces of fuel rods taken from high-burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies to and between research facilities for purposes of evaluation and testing. Also identified are the actions that would need to be taken, if any, to obtain U.S. Nuclear Regulatory (NRC) or other regulatory authority approval to use each of the packages and/or shipping casks for this purpose.

  5. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  6. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, L.R. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming {open_quotes}World Class{close_quotes} performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance.

  7. Application of the FFTBM method and the power relative contribution to the discharge transitory of the recirculation pumps of a BWR; Aplicacion del metodo FFTBM y de la contribucion relativa de potencia al transitorio de disparo de las bombas de recirculacion de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo D, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Fuentes M, L., E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In this work was realized the simulation of the discharge transitory of both recirculation pumps of a BWR with the Simulate-3K code. This type of transitory is used in the stability analyses for the licensing of the fuel reload. An analysis of the precision of the simulation is also presented, using the FFTBM method jointly with the power relative contribution. This way, instead of determining the total precision of the calculation, a weighed precision is obtained by the contribution of each relevant parameter of the transitory. The results show that the precision of the simulation is acceptable due to the small magnitude of the merit figure of the width total average. The error in the merit figure comes mainly from the parameters total flow in the core and temperature of the fuel in the core. (Author)

  8. Control of the neutronic and thermohydraulic conditions of power ramps in an irradiation loop for PWR fuel rod; Controle des conditions neutroniques et thermohydrauliques des rampes de puissance dans une boucle d`irradiation de combustibles de reacteur a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, D.J.F.

    1993-09-10

    In order to study the power transients effects on PWR fuel rod clad, ramp tests in a pressurized water loop, are carried out at OSIRIS reactor. The present thesis deals with the on-line control of the device, during power ramp and conditioning irradiation. Based on a convolution-type resolution of the kinetics equations, a dynamic compensation of the Silver self-powered neutron detector was developed. With this method, the uncertainty of the ramp end-point is lower than 1%, thus it is very suited for monitoring both transient, as well as steady state conditions. Furthermore, a thermohydraulic model of the irradiation device is described: heat transfer equations, including gamma heating in materials, are solved to obtain temperatures and thermal fluxes of steady states. Results from the model and temperature measurements of the coolant are used together for fuel power determination, in real time. The clad external temperature profile is also calculated and displayed, to improve the irradiation monitoring. (author), 51 refs., 12 annexes, 66 figs.

  9. Design of a redundant meteorological station for a BWR reactor; Diseno de una estacion meteorologica redundante para un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, R.; Celis del Angel, L.; Bucio, F.; Rivero, T.; Palacios, J. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: ramses@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-07-01

    In this work the design of a meteorological station for a reactor type BWR is proposed. Two independent channels of data acquisition that allow him to have a bigger readiness is exposed. It is incorporate sensors without mobile parts to measure speed, wind direction and pluvial precipitation. It also counts, with sensors of global solar radiation, net radiation, barometric pressure, relative humidity and ambient temperature; with them they are possible to be calculated, moreover, other variables as temperature differential, dew point and atmospheric stability. The sensors are placed on a tower to different heights and send their information (each second) to a local registration system, the one which in turn, it remits the data to the monitoring office so that a computer is linked with the system, display and management the information in real time and automatic way. The redundant structure allows that in the event of maintenance the data acquisition is not interrupted, even if the information is transferred to another place. In all the station sections it is used protocols of standard communication to allow that a great quantity of devices can be connected without major problem. The above-mentioned would allow to the operators in the control room to have reliable information during the whole time of the reactor operation. (Author)

  10. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor; Identificacion de modelos de orden reducido de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez S, A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: augusto@correo.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  11. COST IMPACT OF ROD CONSOLIDATION ON THE VIABILITY ASSESSMENT DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Lancaster

    1999-03-29

    The cost impact to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System of using rod consolidation is evaluated. Previous work has demonstrated that the fuel rods of two assemblies can be packed into a canister that can fit into the same size space as that used to store a single assembly. The remaining fuel assembly hardware can be compacted into the same size canisters with a ratio of 1 hardware canister per each 6 to 12 assemblies. Transportation casks of the same size as currently available can load twice the number of assemblies by placing the compacted assemblies in the slots currently designed for a single assembly. Waste packages similarly could contain twice the number of assemblies; however, thermal constraints would require considering either a low burnup or cooling. The analysis evaluates the impact of rod consolidation on CRWMS costs for consolidation at prior to transportation and for consolidation at the Monitored Geological Repository surface facility. For this study, no design changes were made to either the transport casks or waste packages. Waste package designs used for the Viability Assessment design were employed but derated to make the thermal limits. A logistics analysis of the waste was performed to determine the number of each waste package with each loading. A review of past rod consolidation experience found cost estimates which range from $10/kgU to $32/kgU. $30/kgU was assumed for rod consolidation costs prior to transportation. Transportation cost savings are about $17/kgU and waste package cost savings are about $21/kgU. The net saving to the system is approximately $500 million if the consolidation is performed prior to transportation. If consolidation were performed at the repository surface facilities, it would cost approximately $15/kgU. No transportation savings would be realized. The net savings for consolidation at the repository site would be about $400 million dollars.

  12. Development of an Input Model to MELCOR 1.8.5 for the Oskarshamn 3 BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Lars [Lentek, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    An input model has been prepared to the code MELCOR 1.8.5 for the Swedish Oskarshamn 3 Boiling Water Reactor (O3). This report describes the modelling work and the various files which comprise the input deck. Input data are mainly based on original drawings and system descriptions made available by courtesy of OKG AB. Comparison and check of some primary system data were made against an O3 input file to the SCDAP/RELAP5 code that was used in the SARA project. Useful information was also obtained from the FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report) for O3 and the SKI report '2003 Stoerningshandboken BWR'. The input models the O3 reactor at its current state with the operating power of 3300 MW{sub th}. One aim with this work is that the MELCOR input could also be used for power upgrading studies. All fuel assemblies are thus assumed to consist of the new Westinghouse-Atom's SVEA-96 Optima2 fuel. MELCOR is a severe accident code developed by Sandia National Laboratory under contract from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). MELCOR is a successor to STCP (Source Term Code Package) and has thus a long evolutionary history. The input described here is adapted to the latest version 1.8.5 available when the work began. It was released the year 2000, but a new version 1.8.6 was distributed recently. Conversion to the new version is recommended. (During the writing of this report still another code version, MELCOR 2.0, has been announced to be released within short.) In version 1.8.5 there is an option to describe the accident progression in the lower plenum and the melt-through of the reactor vessel bottom in more detail by use of the Bottom Head (BH) package developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory especially for BWRs. This is in addition to the ordinary MELCOR COR package. Since problems arose running with the BH input two versions of the O3 input deck were produced, a NONBH and a BH deck. The BH package is no longer a separate package in the new 1

  13. Fuel cell design using a new heuristic method; Diseno de celdas de combustible mediante un nuevo metodo heuristico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Castillo M, A., E-mail: joseluis.montes@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper a new method for the pre-design of a typical fuel cell with a structural array of 10 x 10 fuel elements for a BWR is presented. The method is based on principles of maximum dispersion and minimum peaks of local power within the array of fuel elements. The pre-design of the fuel cells is made by simulation in two dimensions (2-D) through the cells physics code CASMO-4. For this purpose of pre-design the search process is guided by an objective function which is a combination of the main neutronic parameters of the fuel cell. The results show that the method is a promising tool that could be used for the design of fuel cells for use in a nuclear plant BWR. (Author)

  14. Experimental determination of spectral indices by scanning of fuel rod in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor; Determinacao experimental de indices espectrais por varredura gama de vareta combustivel no reator IPEN/MB-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanaro, Leda Cristina Cabelo Bernardes

    2009-07-01

    In this work, the spectral indexes 28{rho}{sup *} and 25{delta}{sup *}, and gamma efficiency factor in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor were determined experimentally employing a rod scanning technique. In the case of 28{rho}{sup *}, this method has the advantage of eliminating most of the correction factors derived from the calculations. Only the fission yield factor and the relative fission rate in the {sup 235}U remain in the determination of the 25{delta}{sup *}. The experiments were performed with different thicknesses of cadmium sleeves: 0.55 mm, 1.10 mm and 2.20 mm. The final experimental uncertainty achieved in the experiment, less that 1 %, and the excellent geometrical and material data characterization of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor allow to use the results as benchmark for validate calculation methods and related nuclear data libraries. The comparison between calculated values and experimental values was performed by employing the MCNP-5 code and the nuclear data libraries: ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-3.3 and JEFF-3.1. The results demonstrate that the difference among libraries is very small. Also, the comparison between calculated values and experimental values shows that there has been considerable progress in the recent nuclear data libraries. The best result is obtained with ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library, and the highest discrepancy was obtained with JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.3 nuclear data libraries. (author)

  15. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors; Metodos aplicados para la mitigacion del dano por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencia de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  16. Parametric and experimentally informed BWR Severe Accident Analysis Utilizing FeCrAl - M3FT-17OR020205041

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Larry J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howell, Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being considered as advanced fuel cladding concepts with enhanced accident tolerance. At high temperatures, FeCrAl alloys have slower oxidation kinetics and higher strength compared with zirconium-based alloys. FeCrAl could be used for fuel cladding and spacer or mixing vane grids in light water reactors and/or as channel box material in boiling water reactors (BWRs). There is a need to assess the potential gains afforded by the FeCrAl accident-tolerant-fuel (ATF) concept over the existing zirconium-based materials employed today. To accurately assess the response of FeCrAl alloys under severe accident conditions, a number of FeCrAl properties and characteristics are required. These include thermophysical properties as well as burst characteristics, oxidation kinetics, possible eutectic interactions, and failure temperatures. These properties can vary among different FeCrAl alloys. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has pursued refined values for the oxidation kinetics of the B136Y FeCrAl alloy (Fe-13Cr-6Al wt %). This investigation included oxidation tests with varying heating rates and end-point temperatures in a steam environment. The rate constant for the low-temperature oxidation kinetics was found to be higher than that for the commercial APMT FeCrAl alloy (Fe-21Cr-5Al-3Mo wt %). Compared with APMT, a 5 times higher rate constant best predicted the entire dataset (root mean square deviation). Based on tests following heating rates comparable with those the cladding would experience during a station blackout, the transition to higher oxidation kinetics occurs at approximately 1,500°C. A parametric study varying the low-temperature FeCrAl oxidation kinetics was conducted for a BWR plant using FeCrAl fuel cladding and channel boxes using the MELCOR code. A range of station blackout severe accident scenarios were simulated for a BWR/4 reactor with Mark I containment. Increasing the FeCrAl low-temperature oxidation rate

  17. Calculations for a BWR Lattice with Adjacent Gadolinium Pins Using the Monte Carlo Cell Code Serpent v.1.1.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ferraro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo neutron transport codes are usually used to perform criticality calculations and to solve shielding problems due to their capability to model complex systems without major approximations. However, these codes demand high computational resources. The improvement in computer capabilities leads to several new applications of Monte Carlo neutron transport codes. An interesting one is to use this method to perform cell-level fuel assembly calculations in order to obtain few group constants to be used on core calculations. In the present work the VTT recently developed Serpent v.1.1.7 cell-oriented neutronic calculation code is used to perform cell calculations of a theoretical BWR lattice benchmark with burnable poisons, and the main results are compared to reported ones and with calculations performed with Condor v.2.61, the INVAP's neutronic collision probability cell code.

  18. Measuring device for purging water flow rate in control rod drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Hiroshi.

    1993-11-12

    The device of the present invention enables highly accurate measurement for an amount of purging water supplied to control rod drives of a BWR type reactor. That is, purging water is supplied from an inlet of a scram line of the control rod drives. A temperature measuring portion is disposed, for measuring temperature fluctuation of purging water, to a hydropressure control unit for providing pressure and flow rate of water required for supplying the purging water and scram operation. An instrumentation section is disposed for calculating the flow rate of purging water based on the measured data obtained in the section. An output device is disposed for outputting a flow rate value of the purging water based on the result of the calculation obtained therein. With such a constitution, flow rate of the purging water can be measured quantitatively at the hydropressure control unit. Accordingly, influences, such as fluctuation of reactor core temperature are reduced, and accuracy for the measurement of the purging water flow rate is improved. As a result, reactor safety and maintainability can be improved. (I.S.).

  19. Effects of B4C control rod degradation under severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Si-Won; Park, Sang-Gil; Han, Sang-Ku [Atomic Creative Technology Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Boron carbide (B4C) is widely used as absorber material in western boiling water reactor (BWR), some PWR, EPR and Russian RBMK and VVERs. B4C oxidation is one of the important phenomena of in-vessel. In the present paper, the main results and knowledge gained regarding the B4C control rod degradation from above mentioned experiments are reviewed and arranged to inform its significance on the severe accident consequences. In this paper, the role of B4C control rod oxidation and the subsequent degradation on the severe accident consequences is reviewed with available literature and report of previous experimental program regarding the B4C oxidation. From this review, it seems that the contribution of this B4C oxidation on the accident progression to the further severe accident situation is not negligible. For the future work, the extensive experimental data interpretation will be performed to assess quantitatively the effect of B4C oxidation and degradation on the various postulated severe accident conditions.

  20. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor; Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, F.J. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Fuentes C, P. [ITT, Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fjmc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  1. Control rods in LMFBRs: a physics assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, H.F.; Collins, P.J.

    1982-08-01

    This physics assessment is based on roughly 300 control rod worth measurements in ZPPR from 1972 to 1981. All ZPPR assemblies simulated mixed-oxide LMFBRs, representing sizes of 350, 700, and 900 MWe. Control rod worth measurements included single rods, various combinations of rods, and Ta and Eu rods. Additional measurements studied variations in B/sub 4/C enrichment, rod interaction effects, variations in rod geometry, neutron streaming in sodium-filled channels, and axial worth profiles. Analyses were done with design-equivalent methods, using ENDF/B Version IV data. Some computations for the sensitivities to approximations in the methods have been included. Comparisons of these analyses with the experiments have allowed the status of control rod physics in the US to be clearly defined.

  2. Solution to the transport equation with anisotropic dispersion in a BWR type assembly using the AZTRAN code; Solucion de la ecuacion de transporte con dispersion anisotropica en un ensamble tipo BWR usando el codigo AZTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chepe P, M. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Xolocostli M, J. V.; Gomez T, A. M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: liaison.web@gmail.com [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07730 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Due to the current computing power, the deterministic codes for analyzing nuclear reactors that have been used for several years are becoming more relevant, since much more precise solution techniques can be used; the last century would have been very difficult, since memory and processor capacities were very limited or had high prices on the components. In this work we analyze the effect of the anisotropic dispersion of the effective dispersion section, compared to the isotropic dispersion. The anisotropy implementation was carried out in the AZTRAN transport code, which is part of the AZTLAN platform for nuclear reactors analysis (in development). The AZTRAN code solves the Boltzmann transport equation in one, two and three dimensions at steady state, using the multi-group technique for energy discretization, the RTN-0 nodal method in spatial discretization and for angular discretization the discrete ordinates without considering anisotropy originally. The effect of the anisotropy dispersion on the effective multiplication factor and the axial and radial power on a fuel assembly BWR type are analyzed. (Author)

  3. Analysis CFD for the hydrogen transport in the primary containment of a BWR; Analisis CFD para el transporte de hidrogeno en la contencion primaria de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez P, D. A.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Edificio 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: guerreroazteca_69@hotmail.com [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    This study presents a qualitative and quantitative comparison among the CFD GASFLOW and OpenFOAM codes which are related with the phenomenon of hydrogen transport and other gases in the primary containment of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). GASFLOW is a commercial license code that is well validated and that was developed in Germany for the analysis of the gases transport in containments of nuclear reactors. On the other hand, OpenFOAM is an open source code that offers several evaluation solvers for different types of phenomena; in this case, the solver reacting-Foam is used to analyze the hydrogen transport inside the primary containment of the BWR. The results that offer the solver reacting-Foam of OpenFOAM are evaluated in the hydrogen transport calculation and the results are compared with those of the program of commercial license GASFLOW to see if is viable the use of the open source code in the case of the hydrogen transport in the primary containment of a BWR. Of the obtained results so much quantitative as qualitative some differences were identified between both codes, the differences (with a percentage of maximum error of 4%) in the quantitative results are small and they are considered acceptable for this analysis type, also, these differences are attributed mainly to the used transport models, considering that OpenFOAM uses a homogeneous model and GASFLOW uses a heterogeneous model. (Author)

  4. Signal analysis of acoustic and flow-induced vibrations of BWR main steam line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G., E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Prieto-Guerrero, A. [División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Núñez-Carrera, A. [Comisión Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Doctor Barragán 779, Col. Narvarte, México, D.F. 03020 (Mexico); Vázquez-Rodríguez, A. [División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Centeno-Pérez, J. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas Unidad Profesional “Adolfo López Mateos”, Av. IPN, s/n, México, D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Espinosa-Martínez, E.-G. [Departamento de Sistemas Energéticos, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, D.F. 04510 (Mexico); and others

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Acoustic and flow-induced vibrations of BWR are analyzed. • BWR performance after extended power uprate is considered. • Effect of acoustic side branches (ASB) is analyzed. • The ASB represents a reduction in the acoustic loads to the steam dryer. • Methodology developed for simultaneous analyzing the signals in the MSL. - Abstract: The aim of this work is the signal analysis of acoustic waves due to phenomenon known as singing in Safety Relief Valves (SRV) of the main steam lines (MSL) in a typical BWR5. The acoustic resonance in SRV standpipes and fluctuating pressure is propagated from SRV to the dryer through the MSL. The signals are analyzed with a novel method based on the Multivariate Empirical Mode Decomposition (M-EMD). The M-EMD algorithm has the potential to find common oscillatory modes (IMF) within multivariate data. Based on this fact, we implement the M-EMD technique to find the oscillatory mode in BWR considering the measurements obtained collected by the strain gauges located around the MSL. These IMF, analyzed simultaneously in time, allow obtaining an estimation of the effects of the multiple-SRV in the MSL. Two scenarios are analyzed: the first is the signal obtained before the installation of the acoustic dampers (ASB), and the second, the signal obtained after installation. The results show the effectiveness of the ASB to damp the strong resonances when the steam flow increases, which represents an important reduction in the acoustic loads to the steam dryer.

  5. Rod and lamellar growth of eutectic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trepczyńska-Łent

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents adaptation problem of lamellar growth of eutectic. The formation of rod eutectic microstructure was investigated systematically. A new rod eutectic configuration was observed in which the rods form with elliptical cylindrical shape. A new interpretation of the eutectic growth theory was proposed.

  6. Solitary waves on nonlinear elastic rods. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Lomdahl, P. S.

    1987-01-01

    In continuation of an earlier study of propagation of solitary waves on nonlinear elastic rods, numerical investigations of blowup, reflection, and fission at continuous and discontinuous variation of the cross section for the rod and reflection at the end of the rod are presented. The results...

  7. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  8. Assessment of the Prony's method for BWR stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier, E-mail: javier.ortiz@inin.gob.m [Gerencia de Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carr. Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Edo. Mexico 52750 (Mexico); Castillo-Duran, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.m [Gerencia de Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carr. Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Edo. Mexico 52750 (Mexico); Palacios-Hernandez, Javier C., E-mail: javier.palacios@inin.gob.m [Gerencia de Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carr. Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Edo. Mexico 52750 (Mexico)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: This paper describes a method to determine the degree of stability of a BWR. Performance comparison between Prony's and common AR techniques is presented. Benchmark data and actual BWR transient data are used for comparison. DR and f results are presented and discussed. The Prony's method is shown to be a robust technique for BWR stability. - Abstract: It is known that Boiling Water Reactors are susceptible to present power oscillations in regions of high power and low coolant flow, in the power-flow operational map. It is possible to fall in one of such instability regions during reactor startup, since both power and coolant flow are being increased but not proportionally. One other possibility for falling into those areas is the occurrence of a trip of recirculation pumps. Stability monitoring in such cases can be difficult, because the amount or quality of power signal data required for calculation of the stability key parameters may not be enough to provide reliable results in an adequate time range. In this work, the Prony's Method is presented as one complementary alternative to determine the degree of stability of a BWR, through time series data. This analysis method can provide information about decay ratio and oscillation frequency from power signals obtained during transient events. However, so far not many applications in Boiling Water Reactors operation have been reported and supported to establish the scope of using such analysis for actual transient events. This work presents first a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results obtained by Prony's method and those results obtained by the participants of the Forsmark 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactor Stability Benchmark using diverse techniques. Then, a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results is performed for four real BWR transient event data, using Prony's method and two other techniques based on an autoregressive modeling. The four

  9. Fuel performance evaluation for the CAFE experimental device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Hirota, Leandro T., E-mail: claudia.giovedi@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP/CEA), Ipero, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares; Gomes, Daniel S.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Fuel rod cladding material is the second barrier to prevent the release of radioactive inventories in a PWR reactor. In this sense, an important safety aspect is to assess the fuel behavior under operational conditions. This can be made by means of fuel performance codes and confirmed by experimental measurements. In order to evaluate the fuel behavior of fuel rods in steady-state conditions, it was designed an experimental irradiation device, the Nuclear Fuel Irradiation Circuit (CAFE-Mod1). This device will allow controlling the surface rod temperature, to measure the power associated to the rod and the evolution of fission gas release for a typical PWR fuel pin. However, to support the experimental irradiation program, it is extremely important to simulate the experimental conditions using a fuel performance code. The aim of this paper is to evaluate some parameters and aspects related to the fuel rod behavior during the irradiation program. This evaluation was carried out by means of an adapted fuel performance code. Obtained results have shown that besides of the variation observed for parameters, such as, fuel temperature and fission gas release as a function of fuel enrichment level, the fuel rod integrity was preserved in all studied conditions. (author)

  10. ATRIUM™ 11 – Validation of performanceand value for BWR operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colet, S.; Garner, N.L.; Graebert, R.; Koch, R.; Mollard, P.

    2015-07-01

    AREVA’s ATRIUM™ 11 advanced fuel design for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is the result of a product development program designed to realize a strict set of performance and reliability objectives complying with the industry market demand. The validation of ATRIUM™ 11 performance is given by the now completed out of pile thermal hydraulic and mechanical tests, the results of poolside examinations of initiated lead fuel assembly programs as well as the results of fuel cycle analyses taking benefit of enhanced fuel reliability and operational flexibility. The coming three years will complete the in-service qualification program leading to the anticipated reload deliveries in Europe in 2018 and leading to reload readiness in the US in 2019. The ATRIUM™ 11 Lead Fuel Assembly program is running in Europe since 2012 and in the USA since 2015 and the first irradiation experience data give as-expected results in term of mechanical and thermal-mechanical behavior as well as levels of corrosion. The large gains in term of fuel cycle economy by switching from 10x10 fuel to ATRIUM™ 11 fuel are illustrated specifically for a 1300 MWe US type reactor featuring a symmetric lattice and operated on a 24 month basis. The analytical tools necessary to support cycle design and licensing were initiated in parallel with the product development and, where required by regulatory authorities, submitted for review in time to allow for approval in parallel with the completion of the in-service qualification program. (Author)

  11. Exploiting rod technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-06-01

    ROD development was proceeding apace until recent budgetary decisions caused funding support for ROD development to be drastically reduced. The funding which was originally provided by DARPA and the Balanced Technology Initiative (BTI) Office has been cut back to zero from $800K. To determine the aeroballistic coefficients of a candidate dart, ARDEC is currently supporting development out of its own 6.2 funds at about $100K. ARDEC has made slow progress toward achieving this end because of failures in the original dart during testing. It appears that the next dart design to be tested will diverge from the original concept visualized by DARPA and Science and Technology Associates (STA). STA, the design engineer, takes exception to these changes on the basis of inappropriate test conditions and insufficient testing. At this time, the full resolution of this issue will be difficult because of the current management structure, which separates the developer (ARDEC) from the designer (STA).

  12. CFD Analysis of Localised Crud Effects on the Flow of Coolant in Nuclear Rod Bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Cinosi, N; Walker, SP

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that crud deposits on a number of adjacent fuel rods might reduce coolant flow rates in associated sub-channels. Such reduced flow rates could then worsen thermal-hydraulic conditions, such as margin to saturated boiling, fuel surface temperature, and the DNB ratio. We report the results of a detailed computational fluid dynamics study of the flow pattern in a partially-crudded rod bundle. Values obviously depend on, for example, the thickness of crud assumed, but sub-ch...

  13. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste.

  14. Reflood experiments in rod bundles with flow blockages due to clad ballooning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S.K.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, B.J.; Park, J.K.; Youn, Y.J.; Choi, H.S.; Song, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Clad ballooning and the resulting partial flow blockage are one of the major thermal-hydraulic concerns associated with the coolability of partially blocked cores during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Several in-pile tests have shown that fuel relocation causes a local power accumulation and a high thermal coupling between the clad and fuel debris in the ballooned regions. However, previous experiments in the 1980s did not take into account the fuel relocation phenomena and resulting local power increase in the ballooned regions. The present paper presents the results of systematic investigations on the coolability of rod bundles with flow blockages. The experiments were mainly performed in 5 x 5 rod bundles, 2 x 2 rod bundles and other test facilities. The experiments include a reflood heat transfer, single-phase convective heat transfer, flow redistributions phenomena, and droplet break-up behavior. The effects of the fuel relocation and resulting local power increase were investigated using a 5 x 5 rod bundle. The fuel relocation phenomena increase the peak cladding temperature.

  15. A study on the nuclear characteristics of enriched gadolinia burnable absorber rods; the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chung Chan; Zee, Quun; Song, J. S.; Cho, B. O.; Joo, H. G.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, H. Y.; Cho, J. Y.; Kim, K. S

    2001-12-01

    An analysis model using MICBURN-3/CASMO-3 is established for the enriched gadolinia burnable absorber rods. A homogenized cross section editing code, PROLOG, is modified so that it can handle such a fuel assembly that includes two different types of gadolinia rods. Study shows that Gd-155 and Gd-157 are almost same characteristics in suppressing the excess reactivity and it is recommended to enrich both odd number isotopes, Gd-155 and Gd-157. To minimize power peakings, various placements of gadolinia rods are tested. Also initial reactivity holddown and gadolinia burnout time are parametrized with respect to the number of gadolinia rods and gadolinia weight fractions. Cycle length increases by 8 days if enriched gadolinia rods are used in the commercial nuclear power plant such as YGN-3 with 2 year-cycle-length. The nuclear characteristics such as soluble boron concentrations and power distributions are almost same. The maximum power of the gadolinia rods are slightly increased but gadolinia contents are reduced. For SMART with ultra longer cycle length and soluble boron-free operation concept cycle length can be extended by maximum 90 days due to increased fuel loading.

  16. Current and anticipated use of thermal-hydraulic codes for BWR transient and accident analyses in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Kenji; Ebata, Shigeo [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    This paper summarizes the current and anticipated use of the thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes for the BWR transient and accident analyses in Japan. The codes may be categorized into the licensing codes and the best estimate codes for the BWR transient and accident analyses. Most of the licensing codes have been originally developed by General Electric. Some codes have been updated based on the technical knowledge obtained in the thermal hydraulic study in Japan, and according to the BWR design changes. The best estimates codes have been used to support the licensing calculations and to obtain the phenomenological understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena during a BWR transient or accident. The best estimate codes can be also applied to a design study for a next generation BWR to which the current licensing model may not be directly applied. In order to rationalize the margin included in the current BWR design and develop a next generation reactor with appropriate design margin, it will be required to improve the accuracy of the thermal-hydraulic and neutronic model. In addition, regarding the current best estimate codes, the improvement in the user interface and the numerics will be needed.

  17. Status of Readiness to Receive and Store Sister Rods from the R&D Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschman, Steven Craig [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    While low burn-up fuel [that characterized as having a burn-up of less than 45 gigawatt days per metric ton uranium (GWD/MTU)] has been stored for nearly three decades, the storage of high burn-up used fuels is more recent. The DOE has funded a High Burn-Up (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project to confirm the behavior of used high burn-up fuel under prototypic conditions. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is leading a project team to develop and implement the Test Plan to collect this data from a UNF dry storage system containing high burn-up fuel. As part of that project, 25 “sister” fuel rods have been selected, removed from assemblies, and placed in a fuel container ready for shipment to a national laboratory. This report documents that status of readiness to receive the fuel if that fuel were to be sent to Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  18. Hydrodynamic Experiments for a Flow Distribution of a 61-pin Wire-wrapped Rod Bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. K.; Euh, D. J.; Choi, H. S.; Kim, H. M.; Ko, Y. J.; Lee, D. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Choi, S. R. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Fuel assembly of the SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast breeder Reactor) type reactor generally has wire spacers which are wrapped around each fuel pin helically in axial direction. The configuration of a helical wire spacer guarantees the fuel rods integrity by providing the bundle rigidity, proper spacing between rods and promoting coolant mixing between subchannels. It is important to understand the flow characteristics in such a triangular array wire wrapped rod bundle in a hexagonal duct. The experimental work has been undertaken to quantify the friction and mixing parameters which characterize the flow distribution in subchannels for the KAERI's own bundle geometric configuration. This work presents the hydrodynamic experimental results for the flow distribution and the pressure drop in subchannels of a 61-pin wire wrapped rod bundle which has been fabricated considering the hydraulic similarity of the reference reactor. Hydrodynamic experiments for a 61-pin wire wrapped test assembly has been performed to provide the data of a flow distribution and pressure losses in subchannels for verifying the analysis capability of subchannel analysis codes for a KAERI's own prototype SFR reactor. Three type of sampling probes have been specially designed to conserve the shape of the flow area for each type of subchannels. All 126 subchannels have been measured to identify the characteristics of the flow distribution in a 37-pin rod assembly. Pressure drops at the interior and the edge subchannels have been also measured to recognize the friction losses of each type of subchannels.

  19. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    1998-01-01

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  20. Mox fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    2001-05-15

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion. characteristics of the assembly.

  1. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    2001-07-17

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  2. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantrowitz, M.L.; Rosenstein, R.G.

    1998-10-13

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly. 38 figs.

  3. Degradation in steam of 60 cm-long B4C control rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, C.; Drouan, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the framework of nuclear reactor core meltdown accident studies, the degradation of boron carbide control rod segments exposed to argon/steam atmospheres was investigated up to about 2000 °C in IRSN laboratories. The sequence of the phenomena involved in the degradation has been found to take place as expected. Nevertheless, the ZrO2 oxide layer formed on the outer surface of the guide tube was very protective, significantly delaying and limiting the guide tube failure and therefore the boron carbide pellet oxidation. Contrary to what was expected, the presence of the control rod decreases the hydrogen release instead of increasing it by additional oxidation of boron compounds. Boron contents up to 20 wt.% were measured in metallic mixtures formed during degradation. It was observed that these metallic melts are able to attack the surrounding fuel rods, which could have consequences on fuel degradation and fission product release kinetics during severe accidents.

  4. Compact Hybrid Laser Rod and Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, George E. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid fiber rod includes a fiber core and inner and outer cladding layers. The core is doped with an active element. The inner cladding layer surrounds the core, and has a refractive index substantially equal to that of the core. The outer cladding layer surrounds the inner cladding layer, and has a refractive index less than that of the core and inner cladding layer. The core length is about 30 to 2000 times the core diameter. A hybrid fiber rod laser system includes an oscillator laser, modulating device, the rod, and pump laser diode(s) energizing the rod from opposite ends. The rod acts as a waveguide for pump radiation but allows for free-space propagation of laser radiation. The rod may be used in a laser resonator. The core length is less than about twice the Rayleigh range. Degradation from single-mode to multi-mode beam propagation is thus avoided.

  5. Analysis of results of AZTRAN and AZKIND codes for a BWR; Analisis de resultados de los codigos AZTRAN y AZKIND para un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Vallejo Q, J. A.; Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Xolocostli M, J. V.; Rodriguez H, A.; Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: gbo729@yahoo.com.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents an analysis of results obtained from simulations performed with the neutron transport code AZTRAN and the kinetic code of neutron diffusion AZKIND, based on comparisons with models corresponding to a typical BWR, in order to verify the behavior and reliability of the values obtained with said code for its current development. For this, simulations of different geometries were made using validated nuclear codes, such as CASMO, MCNP5 and Serpent. The results obtained are considered adequate since they are comparable with those obtained and reported with other codes, based mainly on the neutron multiplication factor and the power distribution of the same. (Author)

  6. Multivariate analysis of gamma spectra to characterize used nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, Jamie; Orton, Christopher; Schwantes, Jon

    2017-04-01

    The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor provides an efficient means to monitor the process conditions in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities to support process verification and validation. The MIP Monitor applies multivariate analysis to gamma spectroscopy of key stages in the reprocessing stream in order to detect small changes in the gamma spectrum, which may indicate changes in process conditions. This research extends the MIP Monitor by characterizing a used fuel sample after initial dissolution according to the type of reactor of origin (pressurized or boiling water reactor; PWR and BWR, respectively), initial enrichment, burn up, and cooling time. Simulated gamma spectra were used to develop and test three fuel characterization algorithms. The classification and estimation models employed are based on the partial least squares regression (PLS) algorithm. A PLS discriminate analysis model was developed which perfectly classified reactor type for the three PWR and three BWR reactor designs studied. Locally weighted PLS models were fitted on-the-fly to estimate the remaining fuel characteristics. For the simulated gamma spectra considered, burn up was predicted with 0.1% root mean squared percent error (RMSPE) and both cooling time and initial enrichment with approximately 2% RMSPE. This approach to automated fuel characterization can be used to independently verify operator declarations of used fuel characteristics and to inform the MIP Monitor anomaly detection routines at later stages of the fuel reprocessing stream to improve sensitivity to changes in operational parameters that may indicate issues with operational control or malicious activities.

  7. Decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Status report Task 2: process evaluation. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divine, J.R.; Woodruff, E.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Zima, G.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program to reduce occupational exposure and waste volumes, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Eleven processes or solvents were examined for their behavior in decontaminating BWR carbon steel samples. The solvents included NS-1, a proprietary solvent of Dow Chemical Corporation, designed for BWR use, and AP-Citrox, a well-known, two-step process designed for PWR stainless steel; it was used to provide a reference for later comparison to other systems and processes. The decontamination factors observed in the tests performed in a small laboratory scale recirculating loop ranged from about 1 (no effect) to 222 (about 99.6% of the initial activity removed. Coordinated corrosion measurements were made using twelve chemical solvents and eight metal alloys found in a range of reactor types.

  8. Passive BWR integral LOCA testing at the Karlstein test facility INKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, Robert [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Wagner, Thomas [AREVA GmbH, Karlstein am Main (Germany); Leyer, Stephan [TH Univ. of Applied Sciences, Deggendorf (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    KERENA is an innovative AREVA GmbH boiling water reactor (BWR) with passive safety systems (Generation III+). In order to verify the functionality of the reactor design an experimental validation programme was executed. Therefore the INKA (Integral Teststand Karlstein) test facility was designed and erected. It is a mockup of the BWR containment with integrated pressure suppression system. In March 2013 the first integral test - Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) - was executed. The main target was to demonstrate the ability of the passive systems to ensure core coverage, decay heat removal and to maintain the containment within defined limits. The results of the test showed that the passive safety systems are capable to bring the plant to stable conditions meeting all required safety targets with sufficient margins. (orig.)

  9. Development of membrane moisture separator for BWR off-gas system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, H.; Kawamura, S. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Kumasaka, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Nishikubo, M. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    In BWR plant off-gas treatment systems, dehumidifiers are used to maintain noble gas adsorption efficiency in the first half of the charcoal hold-up units. From the perspective of simplifying and reducing the cost of such a dehumidification system, Japanese BWR utilities and plant fabricators have been developing a dehumidification system employing moisture separation membrane of the type already proven in fields such as medical instrumentation and precision measuring apparatus. The first part of this development involved laboratory testing to simulate the conditions found in an actual off-gas system, the results of which demonstrated satisfactory results in terms of moisture separation capability and membrane durability, and suggested favorable prospects for application in actual off-gas systems. Further, in-plant testing to verify moisture separation capability and membrane durability in the presence of actual gases is currently underway, with results so far suggesting that the system is capable of obtaining good moisture separation capability. (author)

  10. Study on reactor vessel replacement (RVR) for 1100 MW class BWR plants in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, J.; Kawamura, S. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Aoki, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Mori, T. [Toshiba Corp., Yokihama (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Plant Life Management (PLM) is being studied in Japan, and reactor vessel replacement (RVR) is being considered as one option. Since reactor internals, except for reusable parts, and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are replaced, the RVR provides an effective technology for extending the service life of nuclear power plants substantially. At ICONE 7, we reported on the technical viability of the RVR for BWR4-type 800 MWe class plants. This time, we rationalized the RVR method through a study for BWR5-type 1100 MWe class plants to reduce the RVR duration and evaluated the technical viability and the economic efficiency of the method. In addition, we discuss how to dispose of the RPV to complete a scenario of the process from the RVR to its final disposal. (author)

  11. LMFBR fuel assembly design for HCDA fuel dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacko, Robert E.; Tilbrook, Roger W.

    1984-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor having an upper axial blanket region disposed in a plurality of zones within the fuel assembly. The characterization of a zone is dependent on the height of the axial blanket region with respect to the active fuel region. The net effect of having a plurality of zones is to establish a dispersal flow path for the molten materials resulting during a core meltdown accident. Upward flowing molten material can escape from the core region and/or fuel assembly without solidifying on the surface of fuel rods due to the heat sink represented by blanket region pellets.

  12. Current understanding on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of BWR reactor pressure vessel steels in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, K.; Nishiyama, T. [TEPCO (Japan); Soneda, N.; Dohi, K.; Nishida, K.; Nomoto, A. [CRIEPI (Japan); Ohta, T. [Japan Atomic Power Co. (Japan); Ishimaru, Y. [Chugoku EPCO (Japan); Yoneda, H. [Hokuriku EPCO (Japan); Lida, J. [Tohoku EPCO (Japan); Yuya, H. [Chubu EPCO (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels has been of concern primarily for the pressurized water reactors (PWRs). After long operation experiences, we are now becoming aware of the situation that the neutron irradiation embrittlement is also of concern for some of the boiling water reactors (BWRs) particularly with Cu-containing RPV steels. The surveillance data of Cu-containing BWR RPV steels show relatively larger shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of fracture toughness than predicted by the embrittlement correlation method developed in late eighties and early nineties. Accurate evaluation of the amount of embrittlement is now very important for long-term operation of BWRs. In this paper, we will describe the neutron irradiation embrittlement of BWR RPVs in Japan. Some of the materials that show relatively large transition temperature shifts are investigated to understand the causes of embrittlement using state-of-the-art microstructural characterization techniques. Furthermore, some archive materials of such RPVs are irradiated in a material testing reactor with high neutron flux to understand the effect of flux on transition temperature shifts and corresponding microstructural changes. Microstructural evolution under irradiation, solute clustering in particular could explain the differences in transition temperature shift of the analyzed specimens. Larger BWR RPVs, which have larger water gaps, receive less neutron irradiation and harmful impurities in steels such as copper are well controlled since 1980 so irradiation embrittlement in BWR vessels can now be considered a concern only in old and small plants. All the new information obtained through these activities was considered in the development of new embrittlement correlation that is now adopted in JEAC 4201- 2007 of Japan Electric Association

  13. Analysis of BWR/Mark III drywell failure during degraded core accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The potential for a hydrogen detonation due to the accumulation of a large amount of hydrogen in the drywell region of a BWR Mark III containment is analyzed. Loss of integrity of the drywell wall causes a complete bypass of the suppression pool and leads to pressurization of the containment building. However, the predicted peak containment pressure does not exceed the estimates of containment failure pressure.

  14. A spacer grid hysteretic model for the structural analysis of spent fuel assemblies under impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, P.R.; Kurkchubasche, I. [ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Seager, K.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-12-31

    This paper presents a methodology for determining the response of spent fuel assembly spacer grids subjected to transport cask impact loading. The spacer grids and their interaction with rod-to-rod loading are the most critical components governing the structural response of spent fuel assemblies. The purpose of calculating the assembly response is to determine the resistance to failure of spent fuel during regulatory transport. The failure frequency computed from these analyses is used in calculating category B spent fuel cask containment source term leakage rates for licensing calculations. Without defensible fuel rod failure frequency prediction calculations, assumptions of 100% fuel failure must be made, leading to leak tight cask design requirements.

  15. Identification and assessment of BWR in-vessel severe accident mitigation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cleveland, J.C.; Kress, T.S.; Petek, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This report provides the results of work carried out in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program to develop a technical basis for evaluating the effectiveness and feasibility of current and proposed strategies for boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accident management. First, the findings of an assessment of the current status of accident management strategies for the mitigation of in-vessel events for BWR severe accident sequences are described. This includes a review of the BWR Owners` Group Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGSs) to determine the extent to which they currently address the characteristic events of an unmitigated severe accident and to provide the basis for recommendations for enhancement of accident management procedures. Second, where considered necessary, new candidate accident management strategies are proposed for mitigation of the late-phase (after core damage has occurred) events. Finally, recommendations are made for consideration of additional strategies where warranted, and two of the four candidate strategies identified by this effort are assessed in detail: (1) preparation of a boron solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and (2) containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if the injection systems cannot be restored.

  16. Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff`s basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff`s assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  17. Transient dry out in Forsmark 2 during a fast pump runback - course of events, fuel investigations and measures taken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramenblad, Eric; Schrire, David [Vattenfall Nuclear Fuel, Jaemtlandsgatan 99, 162 87 Stockholm (Sweden); Schroeder, Bjoern [Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB, 172 03 Oesthammar (Sweden)

    2009-06-15

    Swedish BWRs operate under the condition that dry out is not accepted for anticipated transients. To guarantee this, extensive work has been done regarding plant models, methodology development and full scope SAR analyses. In addition to this, every cycle is analyzed in detail to determine an operating limit for the minimum critical power ratio (OLMCPR). A course of events on June 13 led about 84 fuel assemblies of Forsmark 2 to exceed the safety limit minimum CPR and 18 of these experienced dry out. This had not been anticipated beforehand, hence, the OLMCPR was too low and did not protect the fuel against the transient dryout. The calculations are made up out of two separate cases. First the plant response was analyzed with the Westinghouse code BISON. Global variables like total core flow, the neutron flux (APRM) and steam dome pressure were determined. After this, boundary conditions regarding inlet temperature, core pressure drop, core power and axial power profile are used on a specific hot channel. The calculations were also compared to those that were available from the plant log, showing good agreement. Vattenfall and the fuel vendors did independent best estimate hot channel analyses to calculate what impact the transient might have had on the fuel. The agreement between different codes (GE: TRACG, Areva: HECHAN and Vattenfall: BISON/SLAVE) was very good showing that the maximum outside cladding temperature was around 450 deg. C. Since the transient leads to a decrease in power and the dry out was of such short duration, it was only the cladding and the outer part of the pellet that experienced a higher temperature than during normal full power operation. The impact on the cladding temperature when rewetting is not credited was also studied, and assuming uncertainties regarding rod power, channel flow and gap size. Rewetting had only a slight impact on the maximum temperature but, of course, a major impact on the duration. The other uncertainties added up

  18. Passive neutron assay of irradiated nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsue, S.T.; Stewart, J.E.; Kaieda, K.; Halbig, J.K.; Phillips, J.R.; Lee, D.M.; Hatcher, C.R.

    1979-02-01

    Passive neutron assay of irradiated nuclear fuel has been investigated by calculations and experiments as a simple, complementary technique to the gamma assay. From the calculations it was found that the neutron emission arises mainly from the curium isotopes, the neutrons exhibit very good penetrability of the assemblies, and the neutron multiplication is not affected by the burnup. From the experiments on BWR and PWR assemblies, the neutron emission rate is proportional to burnup raised to 3.4 power. The investigations indicate that the passive neutron assay is a simple and useful technique to determine the consistency of burnups between assemblies.

  19. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels; Dano por radiacion en materiales estructurales de vasijas de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A{sup 2}). (Author)

  20. Logical model for the control of a BWR turbine;Modelo logico para el control de una turbina de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas O, Y. [Universidad del Valle de Mexico, Campus Toluca, Av. Las Palmas No. 136, Col. San Jorge Pueblo Nuevo, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R., E-mail: yonaeton@hotmail.co [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    In this work a design of a logical model is presented for the turbine control of a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model is sought to implement later on inside the thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The logical model is developed for the control and protection of the turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control will be been able to use for one or several turbines in series. The quality of the present design of the logical model of the turbine control is that it considers the most important parameters in the operation of a turbine, besides that they have incorporated to the logical model the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a detailed model. The development of the logical model of a turbine will be of utility in the short and medium term to carry out analysis on the turbine operation with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction, specific steps of the turbine to feed other equipment s, in addition to analyze the separate and the integrated effect. (Author)

  1. Decay profiles of {beta} and {gamma} for a radionuclide inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor; Perfiles de decaimiento de radiacion {beta} y {gamma} para un inventario de radionuclidos en ciclo de equilibrio de un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaices, M.; Sandoval, S.; Ovando, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas. Gerencia de Energia Nuclear, Av. Reforma 113 Col. Palmira. 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: sal@iie.org.mx

    2007-07-01

    Presently work the {beta} and {gamma} radiation decay profiles for a radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor is presented. The profiles are presented in terms of decay in the activity of the total inventory as well as of the chemical groups that conform the inventory. In the obtaining of the radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle the ORIGEN2 code, version 1 was used, which simulates fuel burnup cycles and it calculates the evolution of the isotopic composition as a result of the burnt one, irradiation and decay of the nuclear fuel. It can be observed starting from the results that the decrease in the activity for the initial inventory and the different chemical groups that conform it is approximately proportional to the base 10 logarithm of the time for the first 24 hours of having concluded the burnt one. It can also be observed that the chemical groups that contribute in more proportion to the total activity of the inventory are the lanthanides-actinides and the transition metals, with 39% and 28%, respectively. The groups of alkaline earth metals, halogens, metalloids, noble gases and alkaline metals, contribute with percentages that go from the 8 to 5%. The groups that less they contribute to the total activity of the inventory they are the non metals and semi-metals with smaller proportions that 1%. The chemical groups that more contribute to the energy of {beta} and {gamma} radiation its are the transition metals and the lanthanides-actinides with a change in the order of importance at the end of the 24 hours period. The case of the halogens is of relevance for the case of the {gamma} radiation energy due that occupying the very near third site to the dimensions of the two previous groups. Additionally, the decay in the activity for the total inventory and the groups that conform it can be simulated by means of order 6 polynomials or smaller than describe its behavior appropriately. The results presented in this work, coupled

  2. Spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity. Annual report, FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bailey, W.J.; Bradley, E.R.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Langstaff, D.C.

    1981-09-01

    During program FY 1980 staff members of the Spent Fuel and Fuel Pool Component Integrity Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) completed the following major tasks: represented DOE on the international Behavior of Fuel Assemblies in Storage (BEFAST) Committee; the program manager, A.B. Johnson, Jr., participated in an International Survey of Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage Experience, which was conducted jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency (Vienna) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (Paris); provided written testimony and cross statement for the Proposed Rulemaking on Storage and Disposal of Nuclear Waste; acquired and began examination of the world's oldest pool-stored Zircaloy-clad fuel from the Shippingport reactor, stored approx. 21 years in deionized water; acquired and began examination of stainless-clad spent fuel from the Connecticut Yankee Reactor (PWR); negotiated for specimens from components stored in spent fuel pools at fuel storage facilities from the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina, Zion (PWR) spent fuel pool, Zion, Illinois, and La Crosse (BWR) spent fuel pool, La Crosse, Wisconsin; planned for examinations in FY 81 of specimens from the three spent fuel pools; investigated a low-temperature stress corrosion cracking mechanism that developed in piping at a few PWR spent fuel pools. This report summarizes the results of these activities and investigations. Details are provided in the presentationsand publications generated under this program and summarized in Appendix A.

  3. Critical Power in 7-Rod Tight Lattice Bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Kureta, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) has recently becomes of great concern. The RMWR is expected to promote the effective utilization of uranium recourse. The RMWR is based on water-cooled reactor technology, with achieved under lower core water volume and water flow rate. In comparison with the current light water reactors whose water-to-fuel volume ratio is about 2-3, in the RMWR, this value is reduced to less than 0.5. Thereby, there is a need to research its cooling characteristics. Experimental research on critical power in tight lattice bundle that simulates the RMWR has been carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The bundle consists one center rod and six peripheral rods. The 7 rods are arranged on a 14.3mm equilateral triangular pitch. Each rod is 13mm in outside diameter. An axial 12-step power distribution is employed to simulate the complicate heating condition in RMWR. Experiments are carried out under G=100-1400kg/m2s, Pex=2-8.5MPa. Effects of mass velocity, inlet temperature, pressure, radial peaking factor and axial peaking factor on critical power and critical quality are discussed. Compared with axial uniform heating condition, the axial non-uniform heating condition causes an obvious decrease in critical quality. Arai correlation, which is the only correlation that has been optimized for tight lattice condition, is verified with the present experimental data. The correlation is found to be able to give reasonable prediction only around RMWR nominal operating condition.

  4. PWR FLECHT SEASET 163-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task data report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse report No. 13, August-October 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loftus, M J; Hochreiter, L E; McGuire, M F; Valkovic, M M

    1983-10-01

    This report presents data from the 163-Rod Bundle Blow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Systems Effects and Separate Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The task consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. These tests were designed to determine effects of flow blockage and flow bypass on reflooding behavior and to aid in the assessment of computational models in predicting the reflooding behavior of flow blockage in rod bundle arrays.

  5. Tipping Time of a Quantum Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrikar, Onkar

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of a quantum rod, pivoted at its lower end on an impenetrable floor and restricted to moving in the vertical plane under the gravitational potential, is studied analytically under the approximation that the rod is initially localized to a "small-enough" neighbourhood around the point of classical unstable equilibrium. It is shown…

  6. Computing Temperatures In Optically Pumped Laser Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program presents new model solving temperature-distribution problem for laser rods of finite length and calculates both radial and axial components of temperature distributions in these rods. Contains several self-checking schemes to prevent over-writing of memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  7. Self-contact for rods on cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.H.M. van der Heijden; M.A. Peletier (Mark); R. Planqué (Robert)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe study self-contact phenomena in elastic rods that are constrained to lie on a cylinder. By choosing a particular set of variables to describe the rod centerline the variational setting is made particularly simple: the strain energy is a second-order functional of a single scalar

  8. Improvement to the pattern of control rods of the equilibrium cycle of 18 months for the CLV using bio-inspired algorithms; Mejora del patron de barras de control del ciclo de equilibrio de 18 meses para la CLV empleando algoritmos bio-inspirados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia, R.; Ortiz, J.J.; Montes, J.L. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: rpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    Nowadays in the National Institute of Nuclear Research are carried out studies with some bio-inspired optimization techniques to improve the performance of the fuel cycles of the boiling water reactors of the Laguna Verde power plant (CLV). In the present work two bio-inspired techniques were applied with the purpose of improving the performance of a balance cycle of 18 months developed for the CLV: genetic algorithms (AG) and systems based on ants colonies (SCH). The design of the reference cycle it represents in several aspects an optimal cycle proposed starting from the experience of several operation decades with the boiling water reactors (BWR initials for Boiling Water Reactor) in the world. To try to improve their performance is beforehand a difficult challenge and it puts on test the feasibility of the optimization methods in the reloads design. The study of the bio-inspired techniques was centered exclusively on the obtaining of the control rod patterns (PBC) trying to overcome the capacity factor reached in the design of the reference cycle. It was fixed the cycle length such that the decrease of the coast down period would represent an increase of the capacity factor of the cycle; so that, it diminishes the annual cost associated with the capital cost of the plant. As consequence of the study, was found that the algorithm based on the ants colonies reaches to diminish the coast down period in five and half days respect to the original balance cycle, what represents an annual saving of $US 74,000. Since the original cycle was optimized, the above-mentioned, shows the ability of the SCH for the optimization of the cycle design. With the AG it was reach to approach to the original balance cycle with a coast down period greater in seven days estimating an annual penalization of $US 130,000. (Author)