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Sample records for bwr fuel assemblies

  1. TRU transmutation type BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BWR fuel assembly is formed by bundling a plurality of fuel rods and a water channel disposed at the center of the assembly by a plurality of spacers. An upper tie plate and a lower tie plate are disposed to upper and lower portions of the fuel rods and the water channel respectively. An upper end plug of the water channel is attached detachably to a cylindrical main body of the water channel. A zircaloy tube incorporating TRU nuclides is contained and secured in the water channel. The zircaloy tube has such a structure as capable of incorporating and sealing oxides or metal materials containing TRU nuclides. Since the zircaloy tube containing TRU nuclides is contained not in fuel region but in the water rod, the loaded uranium amount of fuels is not reduced but the reactivity can be ensured. (I.N.)

  2. Fuel assembly for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly of an BWR type reactor of present invention, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in a regular square lattice like configuration include vibration-filled fuel rods in which granular nuclear fuel materials and granular non-nuclear fuel materials having a smaller neutron absorbing cross sectional area are mixed and filled. With such a constitution, the content of the mixed and filled non-nuclear fuel materials in the vibration filled fuel rods is at least 20% by a volume ratio in average in fuel assemblies. In addition, a burnable poison is optionally added and mixed to the granular mixture of the nuclear fuel material and the diluting granules. With such a constitution, the manufacturing cost can be reduced, and the combustion rate of the nuclear fission materials is increased to improve reactor core characteristics, thereby enabling to obtain sufficient Pu loading amount per assembly, and fuel assemblies excellent in flexibility in design and economic property can be obtained. (T.M.)

  3. Fuel assembly for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly has a 9 x 9 square lattice arrangement having a water channel which occupies an area of 3 x 3 lattice pattern corresponding to 9 fuel rods. Fuel pellets comprise those of not more 7 kinds which have fission products at enrichment degrees different by a spun of not less than 10%. Fuel rods comprise from 4 to 12 first type fuel rods and remaining second type fuel rods. The first type fuel rod is loaded with fuel pellets of fissionable products having an enrichment degree axially different at the upper and the lower portions. The second type fuel rod is loaded with fuel pellets of fissionable products having the same enrichment degree in the vertical direction. With such a constitution, the enrichment degree of fissionable products of fuel pellets in the fuel assembly for a BWR type reactor having different reactor constitution and operation conditions can be used in common. Accordingly, the degree of freedom for the design of the distribution of the enrichment degree is increased. (I.N.)

  4. Fuel assembly for BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fuel assembly of the present invention, fuel rods and one or a plurality of water rods or water channels are bundled by upper and lower tie plates and one or more of spacers, and the outer circumference of the bundle is covered with a channel box. In the present invention, a groove capable of flowing coolants is disposed on the surface of the water rod or the water channel. Specifically, the groove is disposed, continuously or intermittently, at portions corresponding to the first spacer and from the second to the fourth spacers. With such a constitution, coolants stagnating at the upper portion of the spacer due to gas/liquid counter flow limit (CCFL) are caused to flow down passing through the groove easily upon occurrence of LOCA. Accordingly, cooling of fuel rods at the center of the fuel assembly can be promoted, thereby suppressing the temperature elevation on the surface of the fuel rods. (I.S.)

  5. Fuel assembly for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When fuel rods are suddenly oscillated by earthquakes, and a void ratio is abruptly reduced, it is forecast that feed back of negative reactivity due to generation of voids is delayed to cause power increase in a short period of time. Then, in a fuel assembly comprising a large number of fuel rods bundled by an upper tie plate, a lower tie plate and a plurality of spacers and contained in a channel box, stirring means for coolants flowing the periphery of fuel rods are disposed in a lower sub-cool boiling region. Coolants flown into the fuel assembly are directed to fuel rods by the coolant stirring means to mix the coolants, whereby the temperature difference between the periphery of the surface of the fuel rods and bulk coolants is reduced, to decrease a sub-cool void amount. Then, even if the fuel rods are oscillated, the reduction of a sub-cool void ratio is small, which scarcely gives influences of fuel rod oscillation on the power of the reactor core. (N.H.)

  6. Fuel assembly for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fuel assembly of the present invention, a means for mounting and securing short fuel rods is improved. Not only long fuel rods but also short fuel rods are disposed in channel of the fuel assembly to improve reactor safety. The short fuel rods are supported by a screw means only at the lower end plug. The present invention prevents the support for the short fuel rod from being unreliable due to the slack of the screw by the pressure of inflowing coolants. That is, coolant abutting portions such as protrusions or concave grooves are disposed at a portion in the channel box where coolants flowing from the lower tie plate, as an uprising stream, cause collision. With such a constitution, a component caused by the pressure of the flowing coolants is formed. The component acts as a rotational moment in the direction of screwing the male threads of the short fuel rod into the end plug screw hole. Accordingly, the screw is not slackened, and the short fuel rods are mounted and secured certainly. (I.S.)

  7. Asymmetric fuel assembly for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coolant turning introduction member is properly extended at coolant flow channels on the side of control rod of an inner frame for supporting the insertion of a water channel. With such a constitution, the thermal margin of the fuel rods can be made uniform over the entire region of the channel box by supplying coolants uniformly for an asymmetrical fuel assembly which can effectively suppress local peaking coefficient thereby enabling to improve performances at limit power. In addition, in the asymmetrical fuel assembly, a flow vane disposed to the outer frame plate of a spacer is increased in the size at coolant flow channels on the side of the control rod. Then, sufficient amount of coolants can surely be supplied to fuel rods at coolant flow channels on the side of the control rod. (N.H.)

  8. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise

  9. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew D. Hinds

    2001-10-17

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise.

  10. Fuel assembly for BWR-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    74 fuel rods and 2 large diameter water rods are disposed in 9 x 9 square lattice. Both upper and lower ends thereof are bundled by tie plates to constitute a fuel bundle, and the fuel bundle is surrounded by a channel box. Among eight short fuel rods, four short fuel rods are disposed to four corners on the second layer from the outermost circumference of the fuel bundle, and four short fuel rods are disposed to the center of each of the sides at the outermost circumference of the fuel bundle. Eight long fuel rods are disposed in adjacent with the short fuel rods at the outermost circumference of the fuel bundle. Eight long fuel rods are disposed to the second layer from the outermost circumference of the fuel bundle and in adjacent with the former eight long fuel rods. The long fuel rods contain burnable poisons in the fuel pellets filled in the most of upper portion than the upper end of the effective length of the short fuel rod disposed to the outermost circumference of the fuel bundle. (I.N.)

  11. Steam vent tube for BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes an improvement in a fuel bundle for a boiling water reactor having: vertically aligned spaced apart fuel rods for forming a fuel rod group within the fuel bundle for generation of a fission reaction in the presence of water moderator, a lower tie plate for admitting water moderator through the lower tie plate to the interstitial volume between the fuel rods and supporting the vertically aligned and spaced apart fuel rods, an upper tie plate for permitting water and steam to be discharged from the top of the fuel bundle and maintaining the vertically aligned and spaced apart fuel rods in upstanding spaced apart side-by-side relation, a surrounding fuel channel for confining moderator flow along a path over the fuel rods and from the lower tie plate to the upper tie plate. The improvement comprises: a least one steam vent tube overlying at least one of the part length rods; means supporting the stem vent tube in the volume overlying the part length rod, the steam vent tube being supported in the volume of the fuel bundle between the end of the part length rod and the upper tie plate; the steam vent tube defining an opening disposed to the end of the part length rod for the receipt of steam moderator within the void overlying the part length rod; the steam vent tube further defining an opening disposed to the upper tie plant and away from the end of the part length rod for the discharge of steam moderator from the fuel bundle

  12. Calibration of the TVO spent BWR reference fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1989 the Support Programmes of Finland (FSP) and Sweden (SSP) initiated a joint task to cross calibrate the burnup of the IAEA spent BWR reference fuel assembly at the TVO AFR storage facility (TVO KPA-STORE) in Finland. The reference assembly, kept separately under the IAEA seal, is used for verification measurements of spent fuel by GBUV method (SG-NDA-38). The cross calibration was performed by establishing a calibration curve, 244Cm neutron rate versus burnup, using passive neutron assay (PNA) measurements. The declared burnup of the reference assembly was compared with the burnup value deduced from the calibration curve. A calibration line was also established by using the GBUV method with the aid of high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS). Normalization between the two different facilities was performed using sealed neutron and gamma calibration sources. The results of the passive neutron assay show consistency, better than 1 %, between the declared mean burnup of the reference assembly and the burnup deduced from the calibration curve. The corresponding consistency is within +-2 % for the HRGS measurements

  13. Implement of MOX fuel assemblies in the design of the fuel reload for a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time the use of mixed oxides as nuclear fuel is a technology that has been implemented in mixed reloads of fuel for light water reactors. Due to the plutonium production in power reactors, is necessary to realize a study that presents the plutonium use like nuclear fuel. In this work a study is presented that has been carried out on the design of a fuel assembly with MOX to be proposed in the supply of a fuel reload. The fissile relationship of uranium to plutonium is presented for the design of the MOX assembly starting from plutonium recovered in the reprocessing of spent fuel and the comparison of the behavior of the infinite multiplication factor is presented and of the local power peak factor, parameters of great importance in the fuel assemblies design. The study object is a fuel assembly 10 x 10 GNF2 type for a boiling water reactor. The design of the fuel reload pattern giving fuel assemblies with MOX, so the comparison of the behavior of the stop margin for a fuel reload with UO2 and a mixed reload, implementing 12 and 16 fuel assemblies with MOX are presented. The results show that the implement of fuel assemblies with MOX in a BWR is possible, but this type of fuels creates new problems that are necessary to study with more detail. In the development of this work the calculus tools were the codes: INTREPIN-3, CASMO-4, CMSLINK and SIMULATE-3. (Author)

  14. Revaluation on measured burnup values of fuel assemblies by post-irradiation experiments at BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel composition data for 8x8 UO2, Tsuruga MOX and 9x9-A type UO2 fuel assemblies irradiated in BWR plants were measured. Burnup values for measured fuels based on Nd-148 method were revaluated. In this report, Nd-148 fission yield and energy per fission obtained by burnup analyses for measured fuels were applied and fuel composition data for the measured fuel assemblies were revised. Furthermore, the adequacies of revaluated burnup values were verified through the comparison with burnup values calculated by the burnup analyses for the measured fuel assemblies. (author)

  15. Reversible BWR fuel assembly and method of using same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear fuel assembly is described comprising: (a) a flow channel; (b) a lower nozzle assembly structurally attached to the flow channel to form therewith an external envelope; (c) an invertible fuel bundle adapted to be inserted into the envelope, the fuel bundle comprising elongated fuel rods held in a spaced lateral array between top and bottom tie plates. Each of the top and bottom tie plates is substantially identical and has means for supporting the fuel bundle within the envelope in either of two mutually inverted vertical orientations whereby the orientation of the fuel bundle in a flow channel may be reversed during burn-up operation

  16. Impact of the moderation ratio over the performance of different BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Performance of fuel assemblies is assessed using moderation ratio as a merit figure. • Burnup changes moderation ratio operating conditions for the fuel assembly. • After 30 GWd/MT fuel assemblies are working in the over-moderated region. • For an 18-month cycle discharge fuel assembly burnup is over 40 GWd/MT. • For extended cycles or up-rate conditions use of these FA could result in reduced margins to meet safety constraints. - Abstract: Fuel assembly design plays a very important role in the reactor core performance. A fuel assembly has to be designed to achieve safe and efficient performance during its active life inside the nuclear reactor core. Fuel assemblies are designed to be under-moderated to produce a negative moderator temperature coefficient under all operational circumstances. This study assesses the behavior of the infinite multiplication factor (k∞) as a function of the moderation ratio and its dependence on the burnup, for several BWR fuel assemblies. The results show that the moderation ratio at which the fuel assembly transitions from under-moderated to over-moderated changes through the life of the fuel assembly (i.e. with burnup). This study shows that the fuel assembly designs considered, operate in the over-moderated region for burnups over 30 GWd/MT. In a typical 18-month cycle BWR core, even though the fraction of fuel assemblies with burnups over 40 GWd/MT can reach about 50% at the end of cycle the core still meets safety constraints. However, if the fuel assembly designs used were to experience burnups over 45 GWd/MT, the fraction of fuel assemblies operating in the over-moderated region would be high enough to compromise the safety performance of the core

  17. Proving test on thermal-hydraulic performance of BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has conducted a proving test for thermal-hydraulic performance of BWR fuel (high-burnup 8 x 8, 9 x 9) assemblies entrusted by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (NUPEC-TH-B Project). The high-burnup 8 x 8 fuel (average fuel assembly discharge burnup: about 39.5 GWd/t), has been utilized from 1991. And the 9 x 9 fuel (average fuel assembly discharge burnup: about 45 GWd/t), has started to be used since 1999. There are two types (A-type and B-type) of fuel design in 9 x 9 fuel assembly. Using an electrically heated test assembly which simulated a BWR fuel bundle on full scale, flow induced vibration, pressure drop, critical power under steady state condition and post-boiling transition (post-BT) tests were carried out in an out-of pile test facility that can simulate the high pressure and high temperature conditions of BWRs. This paper completed the results of 9 x 9 fuel combined with the previously reported results of high-burnup 8 x 8 fuel. As a result of NUPEC-TH-B Project, the validity of the current BWR thermal-hydraulic design method was confirmed and the reliability of BWR thermo-hydraulic fuel performance was demonstrated. Based on the test data, a new correlation of the estimation of fuel rod vibration amplitude, new post-BT heat transfer and rewet correlations for the estimation of fuel rod surface temperature were developed. (author)

  18. Critical experiments for BWR fuel assemblies with cluster of gadolinia rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadolinia-bearing fuel rods are needed for high-burnup fuels. Strong neutron absorption of gadolinia makes an assembly heterogeneous from the viewpoint of reactor physics. The cluster of gadolinia-bearing fuel rods is useful for higher-burnup fuels than current fuels. Few critical experiments have been reported for fuel assemblies with the cluster of gadolinia-bearing fuel rods. We conducted critical experiments for BWR fuel assemblies with the cluster of gadolinia-bearing fuel rods in the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA). Critical water level and power distribution were measured. Measurements were compared with analyses by a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MCNP, with the JENDL3.3 nuclear data library. (author)

  19. High fidelity analysis of BWR fuel assembly with COBRA-TF/PARCS and trace codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing importance of detailed reactor core and fuel assembly description for light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the sub-channel safety analysis requires high fidelity models and coupled neutronic/thermalhydraulic codes. Hand in hand with advances in the computer technology, the nuclear safety analysis is beginning to use a more detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics. Previously, a PWR core and a 16 by 16 fuel assembly models were developed to test and validate our COBRA-TF/PARCS v2.7 (CTF/PARCS) coupled code. In this work, a comparison of the modeling and simulation advantages and disadvantages of modern 10 by 10 BWR fuel assembly with CTF/PARCS and TRACE codes has been done. The objective of the comparison is making known the main advantages of using the sub-channel codes to perform high resolution nuclear safety analysis. The sub-channel codes, like CTF, permits obtain accurate predictions, in two flow regime, of the thermalhydraulic parameters important to safety with high local resolution. The modeled BWR fuel assembly has 91 fuel rods (81 full length and 10 partial length fuel rods) and a big square central water rod. This assembly has been modeled with high level of detail with CTF code and using the BWR modeling parameters provided by TRACE. The same neutronic PARCS's model has been used for the simulation with both codes. To compare the codes a coupled steady state has be performed. (author)

  20. Supercell burnup model for the physics design of BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A code called SUPERB has been developed for the BWR fuel assembly burnup analyses using supercell model. Each of the characteristic heterogeneities of a BWR fuel assembly like water gap, poisoned pins, control blade etc., is treated by invoking appropriate supercell concept. The burnup model of SUPERB is so devised as to strike a balance between accuracy and speed. This is achieved by building isotopic densities in each fuel pin separately while the depletion equations are solved only in a few groups of pins or burnup zones and the multigroup neutron spectra are differentiated in fewer group of pincell types. Multiple fuel ring burnup is considered only for Gd isotopes. A special empirical formula allows the microscopic cross section of Gd isotopes to be varied even during burnup integration. The supercell model has been tested against Monte Carlo results for the fresh cold clean Tarapur fuel assembly with two Gd fuel pins. The burnup model of SUPERB has been validated against one of the most sophisticated codes LWR-WIMS for a benchmark problem involving all the complexities of a BWR fuel assembly. The agreement of SUPERB results with both Monte Carlo and LWR-WIMS results is found to be excellent. (auth.)

  1. Orificing of water cross inlet in BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel assembly is described comprising a bundle of elongated fuel rods disposed in side-by-side relationship so as to form an array of spaced fuel rods, a tubular flow channel member surrounding the fuel rods so as to direct flow of coolant/moderator fluid along the fuel rods, respective upper and lower tie plates at opposite ends of the fuel rods, and a hollow water cross having confronting side walls and a closed lower end wall at an inlet end. The water cross extends centrally through and disposed within the flow channel member so as to provide within the flow channel member separate compartments and to divide the bundle of fuel rods into mini-bundles being disposed in the respective compartments, the water cross including inlet cross flow means formed in the side walls near a lower end of the water cross above the closed end wall and near lower end portions of each of the mini-bundles of fuel rods, which inlet cross flow means provides both selected flow communication into the interior of the water cross and flow communication between the respective mini-bundles for minimizing maldistribution and equalizing flow

  2. Droplet entrainment and deposition rate models for determination of boiling transition in BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droplet entrainment and deposition rates are of vital importance for mechanistic determination of critical power and location of boiling transition in a BWR fuel assembly. Data from high-pressure, high-temperature steam-water adiabatic experiments conducted in very tall test sections are used to develop a combination of equilibrium entrainment-deposition rate. Application of this combination to the heated tests conducted in a shorter test section of typical height of a BWR fuel assembly shows that correct split of total liquid in form of the film and droplets at the onset of annular-mist flow regime is also important to obtain good prediction of film flow rates/entrainment fraction. The improved model is then applied to simulate critical power tests in annulus and rod bundles. (author)

  3. Assembly Based Modular Ray Tracing and CMFD Acceleration for BWR Cores with Different Fuel Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geometry module of the DeCART direct whole core calculation code has been extended in order to analyze BWR cores which might have a mixed loading of different fuel types. First, an assembly based modular ray tracing scheme was implemented for the Method of Characteristic (MOC) calculation, and a CMFD formulation applicable for unaligned mesh conditions was then developed for acceleration the MOC calculation. The new calculation feature has been validated by comparing DeCART BWR assembly calculations with the MCU Monte Carlo calculations. A good agreement identified by the maximum eigenvalue difference of 120 pcm and the maximum pin power error of about 1% has been achieved. The CMFD scheme is shown to reduce the number of MOC iterations by factors of 12-25 without loss of accuracy. (authors)

  4. Detection of missing rods in a spent BWR fuel assembly by computed gamma emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a computed gamma emission tomography system that has been constructed which allows detection of the cross sectional rod pattern of BWR fuel assemblies. The under water detection head constructed is remote controlled by a laptop computer and it is housing two SiLi detectors. By scanning 32 to 48 views, the position of the water filled inner rod could be clearly detected in each of the three assemblies with cooling times of 2, 4 and 8 years using gamma rays of Pr-144 or Eu-154

  5. BWR fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The General Electric experience base on BWR fuel includes over 29,000 fuel assemblies which contain 1,600,000 fuel rods. Over the last five years, design, process and operating changes have been introduced which have had major effects in improving fuel performance. Monitoring this fuel performance in BWRs has been accomplished through cooperative programs between GE and utilities. Activities such as plant fission product monitoring, fuel sipping and fuel and channel surveillance programs have jointly contributed to the value of this extensive experience base. The systematic evaluation of this data has established well-defined fuel performance trends which provide the assurance and confidence in fuel reliability that only actual operating experience can provide

  6. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  7. Benchmark calculation with MOSRA-SRAC for burnup of a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed the Modular Reactor Analysis Code System MOSRA to improve the applicability of neutronic characteristics modeling. The cell calculation module MOSRA-SRAC is based on the collision probability method and is one of the core modules of the MOSRA system. To test the module on a real-world problem, it was combined with the benchmark program 'Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark Phase IIIC.' In this program participants are requested to submit the neutronic characteristics of burnup calculations for a BWR fuel assembly containing fuel rods poisoned with gadolinium (Gd2O3), which is similar to the fuel assembly at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Because of certain restrictions of the MOSRA-SRAC burnup calculations part of the geometry model was homogenized. In order to verify the validity of MOSRA-SRAC, including the effects of the homogenization, the calculated burnup dependent infinite multiplication factor and the nuclide compositions were compared with those obtained with the burnup calculation code MVP-BURN which had already been validated for many benchmark problems. As a result of the comparisons, the applicability of MOSRA-SRAC module for the BWR assembly has been verified. Furthermore, it can be shown that the effects of the homogenization are smaller than the effects due to the calculation method for both multiplication factor and compositions. (author)

  8. Development of CFD analysis method based on droplet tracking model for BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the minimum critical power ratio (MCPR) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assembly depends on the spacer grid type. Recently, improvement of the critical power is being studied by using a spacer grid with mixing devices attaching various types of flow deflectors. In order to predict the critical power of the improved BWR fuel assembly, we have developed an analysis method based on the consideration of detailed thermal-hydraulic mechanism of annular mist flow regime in the subchannels for an arbitrary spacer type. The proposed method is based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with a droplet tracking model for analyzing the vapor-phase turbulent flow in which droplets are transported in the subchannels of the BWR fuel assembly. We adopted the general-purpose CFD software Advance/FrontFlow/red (AFFr) as the base code, which is a commercial software package created as a part of Japanese national project. AFFr employs a three-dimensional (3D) unstructured grid system for application to complex geometries. First, AFFr was applied to single-phase flows of gas in the present paper. The calculated results were compared with experiments using a round cellular spacer in one subchannel to investigate the influence of the choice of turbulence model. The analyses using the large eddy simulation (LES) and re-normalisation group (RNG) k-ε models were carried out. The results of both the LES and RNG k-ε models show that calculations of velocity distribution and velocity fluctuation distribution in the spacer downstream reproduce the experimental results qualitatively. However, the velocity distribution analyzed by the LES model is better than that by the RNG k-ε model. The velocity fluctuation near the fuel rod, which is important for droplet deposition to the rod, is also simulated well by the LES model. Then, to examine the effect of the spacer shape on the analytical result, the gas flow analyses with the RNG k-ε model were performed

  9. Measurement of pressure drops in prototypic BWR and PWR fuel assemblies in the laminar regime - Pressure drop measurement of laminar air flow in prototypic BWR and PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laminar pressure drops in nuclear fuel assemblies are of interest for evaluating complete loss-of-coolant accident scenarios in spent fuel pools and for performance analyses of dry storage casks. To the knowledge of the authors, this study represents the first attempt to directly quantify pressure losses in prototypic fuel assemblies in the laminar regime. Two commercial fuel assemblies were examined including a 17x17 PWR and a 9x9 BWR. The assemblies were tested in the laminar regime with Reynolds numbers ranging from 10 to 1000, based on the average assembly velocity and hydraulic diameter. Pressure drop measurements were made across individual bundle spans and grid spacers in the mock fuel assemblies using high-sensitivity differential pressure gauges. These gauges are capable of detecting extremely small changes in differential pressure with a resolution of ∼0.02 Pa. This level of sensitivity allows meaningful pressure drop measurements across separate fuel components, even at low Reynolds numbers. The fuel assembly mock-ups were constructed from commercial fuel assembly structural components and stainless steel tubing that is within 0.6 pc of the outer diameter of actual fuel. The outer flow boundary in the BWR assembly bundle was defined by the walls of a prototypic canister. In the PWR assembly, the flow was confined by the walls of different stainless steel storage cells. Two of the PWR storage cell sizes represented dimensions spanning pool and cask cells available in industry. Pressure ports were installed along the length of the assemblies at locations corresponding to the entrance and exit of fuel components. Dry, ambient air was metered into the bottom of each assembly through a flow straightener. The geometries of the tube bundles in 17x17 PWR and 9x9 BWR fuel assemblies are fundamentally different. The PWR bundle has a larger flow area and incorporates more grid spacers compared to the BWR bundle. Additionally, eight of the 74 fuel rods in the 9x9

  10. A BWR fuel channel tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relational database management system with a query language, Reference 1, has been used to develop a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel channel tracking system on a microcomputer. The software system developed implements channel vendor and Nuclear Regulatory Commission recommendations for in-core channel movements between reactor operating cycles. A BWR Fuel channel encloses the fuel bundle and is typically fabricated using Ziracoly-4. The channel serves three functions: (1) it provides a barrier to separate two parallel flow paths, one inside the fuel assembly and the other in the bypass region outside the fuel assembly and between channels; (2) it guides the control rod as it moves between fuel assemblies and provides a bearing surface for the blades; and (3) it provides rigidity for the fuel bundle. All of these functions are necessary in typical BWR core designs. Fuel channels are not part of typical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core designs

  11. Reliability innovations for AREVA NP BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA NP is a supplier of nuclear fuel assemblies and associated core components to light water reactors worldwide, representing today more than 185,000 fuel assemblies on the world market including more than 63,000 fuel assemblies for boiling water reactors (BWRs). ATRIUM trademark 10 fuel assemblies have been supplied to a total of 32 BWR plants worldwide resulting in an operating experience over 20,250 fuel assemblies. ATRIUM trademark 10XP and ATRIUM trademark 10XM are AREVA NP's most recent fuel assembly designs featuring improved fuel utilization and achieving high margins to operating limits while maintaining very good reliability. Nevertheless, fuel failures are still encountered in all modern and advanced fuel assembly designs leading to significant operating limitations or unplanned shutdowns of nuclear power plants. The majority of fuel failures in BWR plants are caused by debris fretting, with PCI induced failures being a second leading cause. AREVA NP runs programs to study these root causes and to develop product solutions as part of the continuous improvement process within the Zero Tolerance for Failure (ZTF) initiative. The focus of the ZTF initiative is to further upgrade BWR fuel assembly reliability to achieve the goal of failure free fuel. In the following, two major product improvements are described that will significantly contribute to this goal: - Improved FUELGUARD trademark Lower Tie Plate - Chamfered Fuel Pellet Design (orig.)

  12. Effect of fraction of voids in the nuclear fuel burned for a 10 X 10 assembly of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major source of uncertainty in BWR reactor physics is associated with the properties of moderation and coolant bypass regions with a very significant impact on nuclear parameters such as: the finite multiplication factor (k∞), area migration of neutrons (M2) and the void coefficient of reactivity (aν). In this work, we assess the effect caused by the presence of voids in the moderator during the burning of fuel in a fuel assembly type SVEA-96 for a BWR; the codes uses as a tool were INTERPIN-3 and CASMO-4. The geometry SVEA-96 is characterized by an assembly subdivided in four sub-bundles, through an internal bypass cross-shaped gap that allows a more uniform distribution of the moderator, providing a better distribution in the neutrons flux, and thus provide a better distribution of energy and burned. This study was conducted for a wide range of void fractions, from 0% (pure liquid) to 100% (pure steam) and covered: 1) The effect caused by the presence of voids during the burning of nuclear fuel 2) the effects of the structure of energy groups including libraries of cross sections based on ENDF/B-4, and 3) the impact of the presence of control rod. The burning range is from 0 G Wd/Mt to 50 G Wd/Mt. (Author)

  13. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor comprises a rectangular parallelopiped channel box and fuel bundles contained in the channel box. The fuel bundle comprises an upper tie plate, a lower tie plate, a plurality of spacers a plurality of fuel rods and a water rod. In each fuel rod, the amount of fission products is reduced at upper and lower end regions of an effective fuel portion than that in other regions of the effective fuel region. In a portion of the fuel rods, fuel pellets containing burnable poisons are disposed at the upper and lower end regions. In addition, the upper and lower portions are constituted with natural uranium. Each of the upper and lower end regions is not greater than 15% of the effective fuel length. Since this can enhance reactivity control effect without worsening fuel economy, the control amount for excess reactivity upon long-term cycle operation can be increased. (I.N.)

  14. Infinite fuel element simulation of pin power distributions and control blade history in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet-Cladding Interaction (PCI) is a well known effect in fuel pins. One possible reason for PCI-effects could be local power excursions in the fuel pins, which can led to a rupture of the fuel cladding tube. From a reactor safety point of view this has to be considered as a violence of the barrier principal in order to retain fission products in the fuel pins. This paper focuses on the pin power distributions in a 2D infinite lattice of a BWR fuel element. Lots of studies related PCI effect can be found in the literature. In this compact, coupled neutronic depletion calculations taking the control history effect into account are described. Depletion calculations of an infinite fuel element of a BWR were carried out with controlled, uncontrolled and temporarily controlled scenarios. Later ones are needed to describe the control blade history (CBH) effect. A Monte-Carlo approach is mandatory to simulate the neutron physics. The VESTA code was applied to couple the Monte-Carlo-Code MCNP(X) with the burnup code ORIGEN. Additionally, CASMO-4 is also employed to verify the method of simulation results from VESTA. The cross sections for Monte Carlo and burn-up calculations are derived from ENDF/B-VII.0. (orig.)

  15. Transportation activities for BWR fuels at NFI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Fuel Industries, LTD. (NFI) supplies fuel assemblies for both PWR and BWR in Japan. We can also manage transportation of the fuel assemblies from our fabrication facilities to the nuclear power plants of Japanese utilities. For the transportation of fuel assembly, we designed and fabricated the transportation containers to meet the requirements of the IAEA regulations, and licensed in Japan. This paper introduced the recent activity and R and D of NFI concerning transportation of BWR fuel assembly. NT-XII transportation container was developed for fresh BWR fuel assemblies. NT-XII container consists of inner container and outer container. Two BWR fuel assemblies with up to 5 wt.-% 235-U enriched are enclosed in an inner container. In the concept of NT-XII container design, we made the best priority to transportation efficiency, as well as ensuring fuel integrity during transportation. NT-XII has been used since 2002 in Japan. Thanks to the lightening weight of containers, the number of containers to be loaded to one transportation truck was increased up to 9 containers (equivalent to 18 fuel assemblies) compared with former type container (NT-IV transportation container) which can be loaded up to 6 containers (equivalent to 12 fuel assemblies). In addition to the design of brand-new container, we promote the improvement of the packaging methods. In Japan, in order to reduce the damage to the fuel rod and fuel spacer while transporting, polyethylene sleeves which are called 'packing separators' are inserted in the rod-to-rod gap of fuel assembly. However, packing separators requires time and cost for the installation at fuel fabrication facility. In the same way, huge time and cost are needed for removal of packing separators at nuclear power plant. For the improvement of preparation efficiency before and after transportation, we investigated the influence of vibration to fuel integrity in case of transportation without packing separators. Based on the above

  16. Investigation of burnup credit implementation for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup Credit allows considering the reactivity decrease due to fuel irradiation in criticality studies for the nuclear fuel cycle. Its implementation requires to carefully analyze the validity of the assumptions made to define the axial profile of the burnup and void fraction (for BWR), to determine the composition of the irradiated fuel and to compute the criticality simulation. In the framework of Burnup Credit implementation for BWR fuel, this paper proposes to investigate part of these items. The studies presented in this paper concern: the influence of the burnup and of the void fraction on BWR spent fuel content and on the effective multiplication factor of an infinite array of BWR assemblies. A code-to-code comparison for BWR fuel depletion calculations relevant to Burnup Credit is also performed. (authors)

  17. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs). A top-level objective of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis program element of the DOE NERI program is to investigate spent fuel treatment and recycling options for current light water reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, this project targets to expand the traditional scope of nuclear fuel management optimization into the following two complementary specific objectives: (1) To develop a direct coupling between the pin-by-pin within-bundle loading control variables and core-wide (bundle-by-bundle) optimization objectives, (2) to extend the methodology developed to explicitly encompass control variables, objectives, and constraints designed to maximize minor actinide incineration in BWR bundles and cycles. The first specific objective is projected to 'uncover' dormant thermal margin made available by employing additional degrees of freedom within the optimization process, while the addition of minor actinides is expected to 'consume' some of the uncovered thermal margin. Therefore, a key underlying goal of this project is to effectively invest some of the uncovered thermal margin into achieving the primary objective.

  18. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To reconstruct a BWR type reactor into a high conversion reactor with no substantial changes for the reactor inner structure such as control rod structure. Constitution: The horizontal cross sectional shape of a channel box is reformed into a square configuration and the arrangement of fuel rods is formed as a trigonal lattice-like configuration. As a method of improving the conversion ratio, there is considered to use a dense lattice by narrowing the distance between fuel rods and trigonal lattice arrangement for fuel rod is advantageous therefor. A square shape cross sectional configuration having equal length both in the lateral and longitudinal directions is suitable for the channel box as a guide upon movement of the control rod. Fuel rods can be arranged with no loss by the trigonal lattice configuration, by which it is possible to improve the neutron moderation, increase the reactor core reactivity and conduct effective fuel combustion. In this way, it is possible to attain the object by inserting the follower portion of the control rod at the earier half and extracting the same at the latter half during the operation period in the reactor core comprising fuel assemblies suitable to a high conversion BWR type reactor having average conversion ratio of about 0.8. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Design of a mixed-oxide fuel assembly to be assessed as a lead test assembly in a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The open and the close cycle are the two alternatives to pursue during power generation. The reprocessing is a mature process that now shows a more competitive economic aspect, making it more attractive than ever. Mexico has not decided what to do with the existing and future depleted fuel assemblies that will be generated from the power operation, thus the direct disposal and the reprocessing are still being considered. To have enough arguments in one or the other alternatives it is necessary to make an assessment of both. This investigation focus in the MOX fuel design assuming that the reprocessing is the option to follow and looking for the lowest impact in power generation. The first step in a reprocessing program is to analyze the performance of four lead test assemblies (LTA's), thus in this investigation we design the corresponding MOX to be used as LTA's and assess their performance through one operational cycle. (author)

  20. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIA: Criticality calculations of BWR spent fuel assemblies in storage and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the final results of Phase IIIA Benchmarks conducted by the Burnup Credit Criticality Calculation Working Group under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The benchmarks are intended to confirm the predictive capability of the current computer code and data library combinations for the neutron multiplication factor (keff) of a layer of irradiated BWR fuel assembly array model. In total 22 benchmark problems are proposed for calculations of keff. The effects of following parameters are investigated: cooling time, inclusion/exclusion of FP nuclides and axial burnup profile, and inclusion of axial profile of void fraction or constant void fractions during burnup. Axial profiles of fractional fission rates are further requested for five cases out of the 22 problems. Twenty-one sets of results are presented, contributed by 17 institutes from 9 countries. The relative dispersion of keff values calculated by the participants from the mean value is almost within the band of ±1%Δk/k. The deviations from the averaged calculated fission rate profiles are found to be within ±5% for most cases. (author)

  1. Manufacturing technology and process for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following recent advanced technologies, processes and requests of the design changes of BWR fuel, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) has upgraded the manufacturing technology and honed its own skills to complete its brand-new automated facility in Tokai in the latter half of 1980's. The plant uses various forms of automation throughout the manufacturing process: the acceptance of uranium dioxide powder, pelletizing, fuel rod assembling, fuel bundle assembling and shipment. All processes are well computerized and linked together to establish the integrated control system with three levels of Production and Quality Control, Process Control and Process Automation. This multi-level system plays an important role in the quality assurance system which generates the highest quality of fuels and other benefits. (author)

  2. Monte Carlo validation of supercell model for BWR fuel assembly calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo method is used to validate a calculational model named as supercell model developed for the evaluation of LWR fuel box parameters. The TAPS reload-2 fuel box is chosen as a benchmark problem for the validation. The box parameters obtained using the supercell model and Monte Carlo method are compared. (auth.)

  3. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of the present invention is to improve the hydrodynamic stability in the fuel channels of BWR type reactors and effectively utilize the coolant driving power corresponding to the reduction due to pressure loss. That is, in a fuel assembly having usual fuel rods and, in addition, water rods and short fuel rods, the structures of water rods, upper tie plates and the spacers are designed from a hydrodynamic point of view, to reduce the pressure loss. On the other hand, a lattice-like flow channel resistance member is disposed to a lower tie plate. The bundle flow rate is made uniform by the flow channel resistance member, and the pressure loss of the tie plate is increased by the reduction of the pressure loss by the arrangement of the short fuel rod and the reduction of the pressure loss described above. Since this increases the ratio of the single phase stream pressure loss in the total reactor core pressure loss, the hydrodynamic stability in the fuel channel is improved. (I.J.)

  4. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor, and prevents aging change of flow rate of coolants leaked from a gap between a lower tie plate and a channel box. That is, in the fuel assembly, a great number of fuel rods and a plurality of water rods are bundled by a plurality of spacers, the upper and the lower ends thereof are supported by upper and lower tie plates, and they are contained in a channel box. Plate-like protrusions are disposed rotatably to the lower tie plate at a position corresponding to the lower end of the channel box. In addition, through holes are disposed on the side wall of the lower tie plate. With such a constitution, the protrusions rotate at a connection portion by hydraulic pressure of leaking coolants, and urge the channel box by the other end to control leakage of coolants. Further, since the through holes are disposed on the side wall of the lower tie plate, pressure difference is caused between the upper and the lower surfaces of the plate of the protrusion, to rotate the protrusions at the connection portion, and the other end of the protrusions presses the channel box to obtain the same effect. (I.S.)

  5. Reactor fueling of BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable the pattern exchange for control rods during burning in Control Cell Core type BWR reactors. Constitution: A plurality of control cells are divided into a plurality of groups such that the control cells is aparted from each other by way of at least two fuel assemblies other than the control cells with respect to the vertical and lateral directions of the reactor core cross section, as well as they are in adjacent with control cells of other groups with respect to the orthogonal direction. This enables to perform the pattern exchange for the control rods during burning in the control cell core with ease, and the control blade and the story effect harmful to the mechanical soundness of fuels can thus be suppressed. (Moriyama, K.)

  6. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIB: Burnup calculations of BWR fuel assemblies for storage and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the final results of the Phase IIIB Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Benchmark was intended to compare the predictability of current computer code and data library combinations for the atomic number densities of an irradiated PWR fuel assembly model. The fuel assembly was irradiated under specific power of 25.6 MW/tHM up to 40 GWd/tHM and cooled for five years. The void fraction was assumed to be uniform throughout the channel box and constant, at 0, 40 and 70%, during burnup. In total, 16 results were submitted from 13 institutes of 7 countries. The calculated atomic number densities of 12 actinides and 20 fission product nuclides were found to be for the most part within a range of ±10% relative to the average, although some results, esp. 155Eu and gadolinium isotopes, exceeded the band, which will require further investigation. Pin-wise burnup results agreed well among the participants. The results in the infinite neutron multiplication factor k∞ also accorded well with each other for void fractions of 0 and 40%; however some results deviated from the averaged value noticeably for the void fraction of 70%. (author)

  7. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIB. Burnup calculations of BWR fuel assemblies for storage and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    The report describes the final results of the Phase IIIB Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Benchmark was intended to compare the predictability of current computer code and data library combinations for the atomic number densities of an irradiated PWR fuel assembly model. The fuel assembly was irradiated under specific power of 25.6 MW/tHM up to 40 GWd/tHM and cooled for five years. The void fraction was assumed to be uniform throughout the channel box and constant, at 0, 40 and 70%, during burnup. In total, 16 results were submitted from 13 institutes of 7 countries. The calculated atomic number densities of 12 actinides and 20 fission product nuclides were found to be for the most part within a range of {+-}10% relative to the average, although some results, esp. {sup 155}Eu and gadolinium isotopes, exceeded the band, which will require further investigation. Pin-wise burnup results agreed well among the participants. The results in the infinite neutron multiplication factor k{sub {infinity}} also accorded well with each other for void fractions of 0 and 40%; however some results deviated from the averaged value noticeably for the void fraction of 70%. (author)

  8. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To improve the thermal and mechanical safety of fuel rods and structural components by making the local power coefficient of jointed fuel rods greater than that of other fuel rods in a fuel assembly. Constitution: In a fuel assembly comprising a plurality of fuel rods bundled by a spacer and held at the upper and the lower positions with tie plates for insertion into a channel, the degree of enrichment of uranium 235 for uranium dioxide fuel pellets charged in jointed fuel rods is adjusted such that the local power coefficient of the jointed fuel rods is made greater than that of the other fuel rods. In the case if the upper tie plate is moved upwardly by the extension of the jointed fuel rods, other fuel rods axially free from the upper tie plate receives no tension, whereby the safety of the fuel assembly can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. Experimental validation of radial reconstructed pin-power distributions in full-scale BWR fuel assemblies with and without control blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total fission rate measurements have been performed on full-size BWR fuel assemblies of type SVEA-96+ in the zero power reactor PROTEUS at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This paper presents comparisons of reconstructed 2D pin fission rates from nodal diffusion calculations to the experimental results in two configurations: one 'regular' (I-1A) and the other 'controlled' (I-2A). Both configurations consist of an array of 3 x 3 SVEA-96+ fuel assemblies moderated with light water at 20 oC. In configuration I-2A, an L-shaped hafnium control blade (half of a real cruciform blade) is inserted adjacent to the north-west corner of the central fuel assembly. To minimise the impact of the surroundings, all measurements were done in fuel pins belonging to the central assembly. The 3 x 3 experimental configuration (test zone) was modelled using the core monitoring and design tools that are applied at the Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant (KKL). These are the 2D transport code HELIOS, used for the cross-section generation, and the 3D, 2-group nodal diffusion code PRESTO-2. The exterior is represented, in the axial and radial directions, by 2-group partial current ratios (PCRs) calculated at the test zone boundary using a 3D Monte Carlo (MCNPX) model of the whole PROTEUS reactor. Sensitivity cases are analysed to show the impact of changes in the 2D lattice modelling on the calculated fission rate distribution and reactivity. Further, the effects of variations in the test zone boundary PCRs and their behaviour in energy are investigated. For the test zone configuration without control blade, the pin-power reconstruction methodology delivers the same level of accuracy as the 2D transport calculations. On the other hand, larger deviations that are inherent to the use of reflected geometry in the lattice calculations are observed for the configuration with the control blade inserted. In the basic (reference) simulation cases, the calculated-to-experimental (C/E) ratios of the total

  10. Crud deposition modeling on BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition of boiling water reactor (BWR) system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance-limiting conditions in a number of plants. The operational impact of performance-limiting conditions involving crud deposition can be detrimental to a BWR operator, resulting in unplanned or increased frequency of fuel inspections, fuel failure and associated radiological consequences, operational restrictions including core power derate and/or forced shutdowns to remove failed fuel, premature discharge of individual bundles or entire reloads, and/or undesirable core design restrictions. To facilitate improved management of crud-related fuel performance risks, EPRI has developed the CORAL (Crud DepOsition Risk Assessment ModeL) tool. This paper presents a summary of the CORAL elements and benchmarking results. Applications of CORAL as a tool for fuel performance risk assessment are also discussed. (author)

  11. Safety analysis of thorium-based fuels in the General Electric Standard BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A denatured (U-233/Th)O2 fuel assembly has been designed which is energy equivalent to and hardware interchangeable with a modern boiling water reactor (BWR) reference reload assembly. Relative to the reference UO2 fuel, the thorium fuel design shows better performance during normal and transient reactor operation for the BWR/6 product line and will meet or exceed current safety and licensing criteria. Power distributions are flattened and thermal operating margins are increased by reduced steam void reactivity coefficients caused by U-233. However, a (U-233/Th)O2-fueled BWR will likely have reduced operating flexibility. A (U-235/Th)O2-fueled BWR should perform similar to a UO2-fueled BWR under all operating conditions. A (Pu/Th)O2-fueled BWR may have reduced thermal margins and similar accident response and be less stable than a UO2-fueled BWR. The assessment is based on comparisions of point model and infinite lattice predictions of various nuclear reactivity parameters, including void reactivity coefficients, Doppler reactivity coefficients, and control blade worths

  12. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel rods enriched with plutonium and fuel rods formed by incorporating combustible poisons in enriched uranium are arranged in square lattice like structure. MOX fuel pellets comprise PuO2 as a fuel material and contain 239Pu, 241Pu as fission products. The gadolinia-incorporated uranium fuel pellets comprise UO2 as a fuel material and gadolinia as a burnable poison incorporated therein and contains 235U as a fuel material. The axial distribution of the concentration of gadolinia contained in the uranium fuel rods is axially divided into three regions in a region less than 1/2 of a fuel effective length, and the concentration of gadolinia is highest at the lowest region, and the concentration of gadolinia is made lower toward the upper regions. With such a constitution, the degree of downward distortion of the axial power distribution is suppressed in a reactor core of a BWR type reactor having a large MOX loading rate. (I.N.)

  13. Fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izutsu, Sadayuki; Fujita, Satoshi [Hitachi Engineering Co. Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Fujimaki, Shingo; Sasagawa, Masaru; Kaneto, Kunikazu; Mochida, Takaaki; Aoyama, Motoo; Shimada, Hidemitsu

    1997-09-09

    Fuel rods enriched with plutonium and fuel rods formed by incorporating combustible poisons in enriched uranium are arranged in square lattice like structure. MOX fuel pellets comprise PuO{sub 2} as a fuel material and contain {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu as fission products. The gadolinia-incorporated uranium fuel pellets comprise UO{sub 2} as a fuel material and gadolinia as a burnable poison incorporated therein and contains {sup 235}U as a fuel material. The axial distribution of the concentration of gadolinia contained in the uranium fuel rods is axially divided into three regions in a region less than 1/2 of a fuel effective length, and the concentration of gadolinia is highest at the lowest region, and the concentration of gadolinia is made lower toward the upper regions. With such a constitution, the degree of downward distortion of the axial power distribution is suppressed in a reactor core of a BWR type reactor having a large MOX loading rate. (I.N.)

  14. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly is composed of a fuel bundle surrounded by a channel box. The fuel bundle comprises a large number of fuel rods and a water rod secured to upper and lower tie plate by way of a plurality of fuel spacers. Grooves (libretti) are formed in the direction along the flowing direction of coolants to at least one of the surface of the fuel rods, the inner surface of the channel box, the surface of the water rod and spacer constituting components. In this case, the lateral width of the libretto in the flowing direction is determined as the minimum thickness of the bottom layer of a layered flow determined by a coolant flow rate. With such a constitution, abrasion resistance relative to coolants is reduced to reduce the pressure loss of fuel assemblies. (I.N.)

  15. Protecting AREVA ATRIUM™ BWR fuel from debris fretting failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, debris fretting has been the leading cause of fuel rod failure in BWR fuel assemblies, costing the industry millions of dollars in lost generation and negatively impacting the working area of plant site personnel. In this paper the focus will be on recent BWR fuel product innovation designed to eliminate debris related failures. Experience feedback from more than three decades of operation history with non-line-of-sight FUELGUARD™ lower tie plate debris filters will be presented. The development and relative effectiveness of successive generations of filtration technology will be discussed. It will be shown that modern, state of the art debris filters are an effective defense against debris fretting failure. Protective measures extend beyond inlet nozzle debris filters. The comprehensive debris resistance features built into AREVA’s newest fuel design, the ATRIUM™ 11, reduce the overall risk of debris entrapment as well as providing a degree of protection from debris that may fall down on the fuel assembly from above, e.g., during refueling operations. The positive recent experience in a debris sensitive plant will be discussed showing that the combination of advanced fuel technology and a robust foreign material exclusion program at the reactor site can eliminate the debris fretting failure mechanism. (author)

  16. ATRIUMTM Fuel - Continuous Upgrading for High Duty BWR Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA NP is a supplier of nuclear fuel assemblies and associated core components to Boiling Water Reactors worldwide, representing today more than 60 000 fuel assemblies. Since first delivered in 1992, ATRIUMTM10 fuel assemblies have now been supplied to a total of 32 BWR plants in the US, Europe, and Asia resulting in an operating experience over 20 000 fuel assemblies. Among them, the latest versions are ATRIUMTM 10XP and ATRIUMTM 10XM fuel assemblies which have been delivered to several utilities worldwide. During six years of operation experience reaching a maximum fuel assembly burnup of 66 MWd/kgU, no fuel failure of ATRIUMTM 10XP/XM occurred. Regular upgrading of the fuel assemblies' reliability and performance has been made possible thanks to AREVA NP's continuous improvement process and the 'Zero tolerance for failure' program. In this frame, the in-core behavior follow-up, manufacturing experience feedback and customer expectations are the bases for setting improvement management objectives. As an example, most fuel rod failures observed in the past years resulted from debris fretting and Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI) generally caused by Missing Pellet Surface. To address these issues, the development of the Improved FUELGUARDTM debris filter was initiated and completed while implementation of chamfered pellets and Cr doped fuel will address PCI aspects. In the case of fuel channel bow issue, efforts to ensure dimensional stability at high burnup levels and under challenging corrosion environments have been done resulting in material recommendations and process developments. All the described solutions will strongly support the INPO goal of 'Zero fuel failures by 2010'. In a longer perspective, the significant trend in nuclear fuel operation is to increase further the discharge burnup and/or to increase the reactor power output. In the majority of nuclear power plants worldwide, strong efforts in power up-rating were made and are still ongoing. Most

  17. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the neutron flux distribution and the power distribution of a fuel assembly in which short fuel rods vary greatly in the vicinity of a boundary where the distribution of uranium amount is different, the reading value of local power range monitors, having the detectors positioned in the vicinity of the boundary is varied. Then in the present invention, the upper end of the effective axial length of fuel rod is so made as not approaching with the detection position of the local power range monitor in a reactor core. Further, the upper end of the effective axial length of fuel rods in a 4 x 4 fuel rod lattice positioned at the corner on the side of the local power range monitor is so made as not approaching the detection position of the local power range monitor. As a result, the change of the neutron flux distribution and power distribution in the vicinity of the position where the detector of the local power range monitor is situated can be extremely reduced. Accordingly, there is no scattering and fluctuation for the reading value by the local power range monitor, to improve the monitoring performance for thermal characteristics in the reactor core. (N.H.)

  18. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross section of a fuel assembly is divided to a first region containing corner portions at which channel fasteners are situated and a second region not containing corner portions. The average enrichment degree of plutonium in the first region is decreased than that of the second region, and the number of fuel rods containing burnable poisons is increased at the first region than that of the second region. In the first region of the fuel assembly, the effect of moderating neutrons is enhanced since the cross section of a moderator flow channel at the outer side of the channel box is large. Therefore, local power peaking is increased in the first region while it is decreased in the second region that opposes to a narrow gap. The average enrichment degree of plutonium in the first region is decreased and that in the second region is increased by so much, to flatten the power distribution. Then, the reduction of the reactivity worth of gadolinia, as burnable poisons, can be suppressed. (N.H.)

  19. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel rods are arranged in a lattice-like structure by way of a plurality of spacers and the lower ends thereof are fixed to a lower tie plate for assembling a fuel rod bundle. The outer circumference is surrounded by a basket having a plurality of openings and the basket is surrounded by a channel box. The basket is connected to a handle at the upper end and to a lower tie plate at the lower end and, further, defined with a scraper at each of openings. Coolants flown from the lower tie plate to the channel box flow the channels between the channel box and the basket and a fuel rod bundle, uprise while forming a two-phase flow and flow out from the upper end of the channel box. Since no upper tie plate is present, pressure loss of coolants flow is reduced, and liquid membranes of coolants are peeled off by the scraper disposed at the opening of the basket, which contributes to the improvement of the limit power. In addition, fuel rods are inspected and cleaned easily. (N.H.)

  20. Recent experience and development of BWR fuel at NFI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the results of recent investigations by Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) conducted in cooperation with BWR electric power companies in Japan regarding high burnup fuel behavior, i.e. fuel cladding corrosion and hydrogen pickup, degradation of pellet thermal conductivity with burnup, and fission gas release. The authors confirmed by pool inspection that 9x9 assemblies irradiated up to 53 GWd/t, which is the maximum burnup in our experience, showed good performance without any harmful phenomena. With respect to the advanced Zr alloy HiFi, it was confirmed that HiFi retained high corrosion resistance and showed low hydrogen pick up and good mechanical properties after six cycles of irradiation. Regarding the high burnup fuel behavior, it was confirmed that the thermal behavior of the fuel, such as pellet thermal conductivity degradation and fission gas release behavior beyond 80 GWd/t, was stable in the extrapolation range of the burnup fuel behavior between about 60-70 GWd/t. In addition, a fuel performance analysis code developed by NFI was verified to predict the data measured beyond 80 GWd/t well. (author)

  1. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To divide fuel rods into several blocks so that fuels may be reversed vertically every block to leave sufficient allowance for reactor stoppage, thus enhancing taking-out combustion quality. Structure: A fuel inserting portion in upper and lower tie plates is designed so that a vertically symmetrical fuel may be inserted. That is, the construction of the fuel rod itself is entirely vertically symmetrical. Fuel regions are symmetrically arranged on uppper and lower ends, and expansion springs are also inserted at upper and lower parts. Outer springs of the fuel rods are always retained at plug portions on upper and lower ends. The fuel rods are of the sub-channel construction consisting of several rods, the fuel rods being separable from one another every sub-channel. Accordingly, the fuel may be reversed every sub-channel. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Experience and reliability of Framatome ANP's PWR and BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on three decades of fuel supply to 169 PWR and BWR plants on four continents, Framatome ANP has a very large database from operating experience feedback. The performance of Framatome PWR and BWR fuel is discussed for the period 1992-2001 with special emphasis on fuel failures, countermeasures and their effectiveness. While PWR fuel performance in most reactors has been good, the performance in some years did suffer from special circumstances that caused grid-to-rod fretting failures in few PWRs. After solving this problem, fuel of all types showed high reliability again. Especially the current PWR fuel products AFA 3G, HTP, Mark B and Mark BW showed a very good operating performance. Fuel reliability of Framatome ANP BWR fuel has been excellent over the last decade with average annual fuel rod failure rates under 1x10-5 since 1991. More than 40% of all BWR fuel failures in the 1992-2001 decade were caused by debris fretting. The debris problem has been remedied with the FUELGUARDTM lower tie plate, and by reactor operators' efforts to control the sources of debris. PCI, the main failure mechanism in former periods, affected only 10 rods. All of these rods had non-liner cladding. (author)

  3. On the domestic fuel channel for BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobe Steel Ltd. started the domestic manufacture of fuel channel boxes for BWRs in 1967, and entered the actual production stage four years after that. Since 1976, the mass production system was adopted with the increase of the demand. The requirements about the surface contamination and the dimensional accuracy over whole length are very strict in the fuel channel boxes, moreover, special consideration must be given so as to prevent the deformation in use. The unique working methods such as electron beam welding, high temperature press forming and so on are employed in Kobe Steel Ltd. to satisfy such strict requirements, therefore the quality of the produced fuel channel boxes is superior to imported ones. At present, the fuel channel boxes domestically made by Kobe Steel Ltd. are used for almost all BWRs in Japan. The functions of fuel channel boxes are to flow boiling coolant uniformly upward, to guide control rods, and to increase the rigidity of fuel assembly. The fuel channel boxes are the square tubes of zircaloy 4 of 134.06 mm inside width, 2.03 mm thickness, and 4118 or 4239 mm length. The progress of the development and the features of the fuel channel boxes and the manufacturing processes are described. Zircaloy plates are formed into channels, and two channels are electron beam-welded after the edge preparation, to make a box. Ultrasonic examination and stress relief treatment are applied, and clips and spacers are welded. (Kako, I.)

  4. Feasibility studies of computed tomography in partial defect detection of spent BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feasibility studies were made for tomographic reconstruction of a cross-sectional activity distribution of a spent nuclear fuel assembly. The purpose was to determine the number of fuel rods (pins) and localize the positisons where pins are missing. The activity distribution map showing the locations of fuel rods in the assembly was reconstructed. The theoretical part of this work consists of simulation of image reconstruction based on theoretically calculated data from a reference assembly model. Evaluation of different image reconstruction techniques was made. Measurements were made in real facility conditions. Gamma radiation from an irradiated 8 x 8 - 1 BWR fuel assembly was measured through a narrow custom made collimator from different angles and positions. The measured data set was used as projections for reconstructing the activity profile of the assembly in cross-sectional plane

  5. Sub-channel analysis of 8 × 8 and 9 × 9 BWR fuel assemblies with different two-phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Two sub-channel programs verified for boiling water reactor fuel assemblies. • A sub-channel program based on DFM is comparable to advanced two-phase codes. • DFM-based sub-channel program performs the computations with lowest computational cost. • 2FM sub-channel program provides more reliable result. - Abstract: The present study aims at verifying two sub-channel analysis programs, one based on drift-flux model and one based on two-fluid model, by applying them to traditional boiling water reactor fuel assemblies. The calculated parameters by the two sub-channel programs are compared with the predictions of the COBRA-EN code and VIPRE-01 code. The performance of the drift-flux model sub-channel analysis program is comparable to advanced two-phase codes. Agreement among the results of the programs appears to be due to the lack of details in modeling two-phase flow rod bundle transport phenomena, or numerical solution schemes

  6. Design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel for BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present thesis, the modifications made to the axial optimization system based on Tabu Search (BT) for the axial design of BWR fuel type are presented, developed previously in the Nuclear Engineering Group of the UNAM Engineering Faculty. With the modifications what is mainly looked is to consider the particular characteristics of the mechanical design of the GE12 fuel type, used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central (CNLV) and that it considers the fuel bars of partial longitude. The information obtained in this thesis will allow to plan nuclear fuel reloads with the best conditions to operate in a certain cycle guaranteeing a better yield and use in the fuel burnt, additionally people in charge in the reload planning will be favored with the changes carried out to the system for the design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel, which facilitate their handling and it reduces their execution time. This thesis this developed in five chapters that are understood in the following way in general: Chapter 1: It approaches the basic concepts of the nuclear energy, it describes the physical and chemical composition of the atoms as well as that of the uranium isotopes, the handling of the uranium isotope by means of the nuclear fission until arriving to the operation of the nuclear reactors. Chapter 2: The nuclear fuel cycle is described, the methods for its extraction, its conversion and its enrichment to arrive to the stages of the nuclear fuel management used in the reactors are described. Beginning by the radial design, the axial design and the core design of the nuclear reactor related with the fuel assemblies design. Chapter 3: the optimization methods of nuclear fuel previously used are exposed among those that are: the genetic algorithms method, the search methods based on heuristic rules and the application of the tabu search method, which was used for the development of this thesis. Chapter 4: In this part the used methodology to the

  7. BWR SFAT, gross-defect verification of spent BWR fuel. Final report on Task FIN A563 on the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards including BWR SFAT User Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measurement instrument called Spent Fuel Attribute Tester, SFAT, has been designed, fabricated and taken into use by the IAEA in gross defect verification of spent BWR fuel assemblies. The equipment consists of an underwater measurement head connected with cables to a control unit on the bridge of the fuel handling machine as well as to a PMCA for measurement of the gamma spectra. The BWR SFAT is optimized for the AFR interim storage, TVO KPA-STORE, of the TVO Power Company in Olkiluoto, Finland. It has a shape and it is moved like a fuel assembly using the fuel handling machine. No fuel movements are needed. Spent fuel specific radiation from the fission product 137Cs at the gamma-ray energy of 662 keV is detected above the assemblies in the storage rack using a NaI(Tl) detector. In the design and in licensing the requirements of the IAEA, operator and the safety authority have been taken into account. The BWR SFAT allows modifications for other LWR fuel types with minor changes. The work has been carried out under the task FIN A 563 of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards. (orig.) (9 refs., 22 figs.)

  8. Operation and fuel design strategies to minimise degradation of failed BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of failed fuel may result in forced shutdown of the reactor to extract the failed fuel. If this occurs during a time when the price of electricity is high, the cost for this forced shutdown may be very costly. The objective of this paper is to point out the impact of fuel design and also operation strategy on the tendency of failed fuel degradation. The following number of items are discussed in the paper: Failure causes: The dominating causes are debris fretting, PCI and crud/water chemistry related defects. It is recommended to adopt the goal, maximum one defect per year per million rods in the core and to achieve the zero-failure goal for PCI. Models for secondary failure development: Two different secondary degradation scenarios can develop, circumferential cracks or breaks and axial cracks. Models for describing the propagation of secondary defects are given and discussed. The secondary degradation tendency can be delayed and minimized by using fuel cladding with improved corrosion resistance such as cladding with large secondary phase particles and high iron content in the liner layer. Also, the spacer design has a large impact on the tendency for transversal break formation. A spacer that catches the debris at the lower part of the fuel assembly will reduce the risk of getting transversal breaks. On the other hand a spacer that catches the debris in the upper part of the fuel assembly will result in a significant risk of developing transversal breaks in low and intermediate burnup fuel. A new model for data analyses - BwrFuelRelease: A new model, BwrFuelRelease, is presented. This model is an efficient tool for analyses of measured off-gas and reactor water data. The model can replace all currently used methods for analyses of fuel failures. By this model it is possible to detect very small defects, to quantify with high precision the amount of Fissile materials on the core surfaces during operation both with non-defected core and during

  9. Transmutation of minor actinide using thorium fueled BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the methods to conduct transmutation of minor actinide is the use of BWR with thorium fuel. Thorium fuel has a specific behaviour of producing a little secondary minor actinides. Transmutation of minor actinide is done by loading it in the BWR with thorium fuel through two methods, namely close recycle and accumulation recycle. The calculation of minor actinide composition produced, weigh of minor actinide transmuted, and percentage of reminder transmutation was carried SRAC. The calculations were done to equivalent cell modeling from one fuel rod of BWR. The results show that minor actinide transmutation is more effective using thorium fuel than uranium fuel, through both close recycle and accumulation recycle. Minor actinide transmutation weight show that the same value for those recycle for 5th recycle. And most of all minor actinide produced from 5 unit BWR uranium fuel can transmuted in the 6th of close recycle. And, the minimal value of excess reactivity of the core is 12,15 % Δk/k, that is possible value for core operation

  10. Stability and vibration analyses of high power BWR using large assembly with small pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Assembly with Small Pins (LASP) is an evolutionary fuel assembly concept to improve BWRs' economic attractiveness by increasing the core power density. It replaces four traditional assemblies with a single 22x22 large assembly. Previously published steady-state and transient analyses show that, when operating under the same power to flow ratio, the LASP core allows for 20% higher power density than the traditional fuel assemblies while maintaining the same dryout margin. In this study, mechanical vibrations and thermal-hydraulics stability analyses of the LASP core are presented. The modified Paidoussis correlation was used to calculate the vibration amplitude ratio to the fuel pin diameter and to the pin-to-pin gap of the LASP fuel and the reference fuel. The vibration ratios of the LASP are found to be higher than those of the reference core, but well below the acceptable limits. It is possible to add two spacers to the LASP assemblies to preserve the vibration ratios of the reference core. Given a more negative void reactivity coefficient than traditional BWR cores, unstable power and flow oscillations are a potential concern. Characteristics of density-wave oscillations in the LASP core and their sensitivity to operating parameters have been investigated with a linear perturbation analysis. Although the decay ratios for the LASP core are higher than those of a reference core, they are well within the traditional limits. Thus, stability is maintained in the LASP core at 20% higher reactor thermal power than the reference core. (author)

  11. Analysis of assemblies exchange in the core of a reactor BWR; Analisis del intercambio de ensambles en el nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauil U, J. S. [Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Facultad de Ingenieria, Av. Industrias no contaminantes por Anillo Periferico Norte s/n, Apdo. Postal 150 Cordemex, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Fuentes M, L.; Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del Cueto, R., E-mail: san_dino@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The performance of the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR) was evaluated when two assemblies are exchanged during the fuel reload in erroneous way. All with the purpose of analyzing the value of the neutrons effective multiplication factor and the thermal limits for an exchange of assemblies. In their realization the mentioned study was based in a transition cycle of the Unit 1 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. The obtained results demonstrate that when carrying out an exchange between two fuel assemblies in erroneous way, with regard to the original reload, the changes in the neutrons effective multiplication factor do not present a serious problem, unless the exchange has been carried out among a very burnt assembly with one fresh, where this last is taken to the periphery. (Author)

  12. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly construction for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described in which the sub-assemblies carry a smaller proportion of parasitic material than do conventional sub-assemblies. (U.K.)

  13. Radial optimization of a BWR fuel cell using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the application of the Genetic Algorithms (GA) to the optimization of the radial distribution of enrichment in a cell of fuel of a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The optimization process it was ties to the HELIOS simulator, which is a transport code of neutron simulation of fuel cells that has been validated for the calculation of nuclear banks for BWRs. With heterogeneous radial designs can improve the radial distribution of the power, for what the radial design of fuel has a strong influence in the global design of fuel recharges. The optimum radial distribution of fuel bars is looked for with different enrichments of U235 and contents of consumable poison. For it is necessary to define the representation of the solution, the objective function and the implementation of the specific optimization process to the solution of the problem. The optimization process it was coded in 'C' language, it was automated the creation of the entrances to the simulator, the execution of the simulator and the extraction, in the exit of the simulator, of the parameters that intervene in the objective function. The objective function includes four parameters: average enrichment of the cell, average gadolinia concentration of the cell, peak factor of radial power and k-infinite multiplication factor. To be able to calculate the parameters that intervene in the objective function, the one evaluation process of GA was ties to the HELIOS code executed in a Compaq Alpha workstation. It was applied to the design of a fuel cell of 10 x 10 that it can be employee in the fuel assemble designs that are used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. Its were considered 10 different fuel compositions which four contain gadolinia. Three heuristic rules that consist in prohibiting the placement of bars with gadolinia in the ends of the cell, to place the compositions with the smallest enrichment in the corners of the cell and to fix the placement of

  14. Two-phase pressure drop reduction BWR assembly design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dix, G.E.; Crowther, R.L.; Colby, M.J.; Matzner, B.; Elkins, R.B.

    1991-05-21

    This patent describes an improved fuel assembly for a boiling water reactor. It comprises: a fuel channel; a lower tie plate; an upper tie plate; the lower tie plate and the upper tie plate defining a two-dimensional matrix; at least one water rod the fuel rods being partial length rods.

  15. Poolside inspection facility for PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool side inspection programme for LWRs started in India with the inspection of BWR fuel assemblies at Tarapur and this involved sipping, visual inspection, UT and Eddy current testing. In view of the possibility of having WWER type of reactors in our country, a R and D program has been initiated for study of behavior of these types of fuel. The program would involve irradiation, pool side inspection and hot cell examination of specially designed fuel assemblies. Well characterized fuel assemblies irradiated in research reactor are transferred to the fuel pool with the help of fuel transfer system. The fuel assemblies are taken out of the transfer system, sipping test performed and de channeled using under water handling and cutting tools. The fuel pins are then taken out of assembly and loaded on to the stand for underwater UT and Eddy current testing. The details of the handling and inspection facilities provided in pool for inspection of the hexagonal fuel assemblies has been discussed in the text. Dismantling and inspection procedure used for control assembly pins have also been discussed. (author)

  16. Fuel Assembly Damping Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summary the fuel assembly damping data in air/in still water/under flow, released from foreign fuel vendors, compared our data with the published data. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping measurement testing are also briefly discussed. Understanding of each fuel assembly damping mechanisms according to the surrounding medium and flow velocity can support the fuel design improvement in fuel assembly dynamics and structural integrity aspect. Because the upgraded requirements of the newly-developed advanced reactor system will demands to minimize fuel design margin in integrity evaluation, reduction in conservatism of fuel assembly damping can contribute to alleviate the fuel design margin for sure. Damping is an energy dissipation mechanism in a vibrating mechanical structure and prevents a resonant structure from having infinite vibration amplitudes. The sources of fuel assembly damping are various from support friction to flow contribution, and it can be increased by the viscosity or drag of surrounding fluid medium or the average velocity of water flowing. Fuel licensing requires fuel design evaluation in transient or accidental condition. Dynamic response analysis of fuel assembly is to show fuel integrity and requires information on assembly-wise damping in dry condition and under wet or water flowing condition. However, damping measurement test for the full-scale fuel assembly prototype is not easy to carry out because of the scale (fuel prototype, test facility), unsteadiness of test data (scattering, random sampling and processing), instrumentation under water flowing (water-proof response measurement), and noise. LWR fuel technology division in KAERI is preparing the infra structure for damping measurement test of full-scale fuel assembly, to support fuel industries and related research activities. Here is a preliminary summary of fuel assembly damping, published in the literature. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping

  17. Reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of an improved spacer grid for a nuclear fuel assembly comprising fuel rods in a matrix wherein each rod is adapted to be enclosed by a spacer ''cell'' for positioning thereof relative to adjacent rods in the fuel assembly. 7 claims, 12 drawing figures

  18. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  19. BWROPT: A multi-cycle BWR fuel cycle optimization code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottinger, Keith E.; Maldonado, G. Ivan, E-mail: Ivan.Maldonado@utk.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A multi-cycle BWR fuel cycle optimization algorithm is presented. • New fuel inventory and core loading pattern determination. • The parallel simulated annealing algorithm was used for the optimization. • Variable sampling probabilities were compared to constant sampling probabilities. - Abstract: A new computer code for performing BWR in-core and out-of-core fuel cycle optimization for multiple cycles simultaneously has been developed. Parallel simulated annealing (PSA) is used to optimize the new fuel inventory and placement of new and reload fuel for each cycle considered. Several algorithm improvements were implemented and evaluated. The most significant of these are variable sampling probabilities and sampling new fuel types from an ordered array. A heuristic control rod pattern (CRP) search algorithm was also implemented, which is useful for single CRP determinations, however, this feature requires significant computational resources and is currently not practical for use in a full multi-cycle optimization. The PSA algorithm was demonstrated to be capable of significant objective function reduction and finding candidate loading patterns without constraint violations. The use of variable sampling probabilities was shown to reduce runtime while producing better results compared to using constant sampling probabilities. Sampling new fuel types from an ordered array was shown to have a mixed effect compared to random new fuel type sampling, whereby using both random and ordered sampling produced better results but required longer runtimes.

  20. BWROPT: A multi-cycle BWR fuel cycle optimization code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A multi-cycle BWR fuel cycle optimization algorithm is presented. • New fuel inventory and core loading pattern determination. • The parallel simulated annealing algorithm was used for the optimization. • Variable sampling probabilities were compared to constant sampling probabilities. - Abstract: A new computer code for performing BWR in-core and out-of-core fuel cycle optimization for multiple cycles simultaneously has been developed. Parallel simulated annealing (PSA) is used to optimize the new fuel inventory and placement of new and reload fuel for each cycle considered. Several algorithm improvements were implemented and evaluated. The most significant of these are variable sampling probabilities and sampling new fuel types from an ordered array. A heuristic control rod pattern (CRP) search algorithm was also implemented, which is useful for single CRP determinations, however, this feature requires significant computational resources and is currently not practical for use in a full multi-cycle optimization. The PSA algorithm was demonstrated to be capable of significant objective function reduction and finding candidate loading patterns without constraint violations. The use of variable sampling probabilities was shown to reduce runtime while producing better results compared to using constant sampling probabilities. Sampling new fuel types from an ordered array was shown to have a mixed effect compared to random new fuel type sampling, whereby using both random and ordered sampling produced better results but required longer runtimes

  1. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 1. Cask handling experience and decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents a heat transfer and shielding performance test conducted on a Ridihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2023 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The testing effort consisted of three parts: pretest preparations, performance testing, and post-test activities. Pretest preparations included conducting cask handling dry runs and characterizing BWR spent fuel assemblies from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The performance test matrix included 14 runs consisting of two loadings, two cask orientations, and three backfill environments. Post-test activities included calorimetry and axial radiation scans of selected fuel assemblies, in-basin sipping of each assembly, crud collection, video and photographic scans, and decontamination of the cask interior and exterior

  2. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 1. Cask handling experience and decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doman, J.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Guenther, R.J.; Creer, J.M.; King, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report documents a heat transfer and shielding performance test conducted on a Ridihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2023 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The testing effort consisted of three parts: pretest preparations, performance testing, and post-test activities. Pretest preparations included conducting cask handling dry runs and characterizing BWR spent fuel assemblies from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The performance test matrix included 14 runs consisting of two loadings, two cask orientations, and three backfill environments. Post-test activities included calorimetry and axial radiation scans of selected fuel assemblies, in-basin sipping of each assembly, crud collection, video and photographic scans, and decontamination of the cask interior and exterior.

  3. Measurement of uranium and plutonium content in a fuel assembly using the RPI spent fuel assay device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report measurements of the significant parameters, the sensitivities of the slowing-down-time assay device to the fissile contents of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly mock-up of fresh fuel

  4. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear fuel assembly includes and upper yoke, a base, an elongated, outer flow channel disposed substantially along the entire length of the fuel assembly and an elongated, internal, central water cross, formed by four, elongated metal angles, that divides the nuclear fuel assembly into four, separate, elongated fuel sections and that provides a centrally disposed path for the flow of subcooled neutron moderator along the length of the fuel assembly. A separate fuel bundle is located in each of the four fuel sections and includes an upper tie plate, a lower tie plate and a plurality of elongated fuel rods disposed therebetween. Preferably, each upper tie plate is formed from a plurality of interconnected thin metal bars and includes an elongated, axially extending pin that is received by the upper yoke of the fuel assembly for restraining lateral motion of the fuel bundle while permitting axial movement of the fuel bundle with respect to the outer flow channel. The outer flow channel is fixedly secured at its opposite longitudinal ends to the upper yoke and to the base to permit the fuel assembly to be lifted and handled in a vertical position without placing lifting loads or stresses on the fuel rods. The yoke, removably attached at the upper end of the fuel assembly to four structural ribs secured to the inner walls of the outer flow channel, includes, as integrally formed components, a lifting bail or handle, laterally extending bumpers, a mounting post for a spring assembly, four elongated apertures for receiving with a slip fit the axially extending pins mounted on the upper tie plates and slots for receiving the structural ribs secured to the outer flow channel. Locking pins securely attach the yoke to the structural ribs enabling the fuel assembly to be lifted as an entity

  5. BWR fuel cycle optimization using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → OCONN a new system to optimize all nuclear fuel management steps in a coupled way. → OCON is based on an artificial recurrent neural network to find the best combination of partial solutions to each fuel management step. → OCONN works with a fuel lattices' stock, a fuel reloads' stock and a control rod patterns' stock, previously obtained with different heuristic techniques. → Results show OCONN is able to find good combinations according the global objective function. - Abstract: In nuclear fuel management activities for BWRs, four combinatorial optimization problems are solved: fuel lattice design, axial fuel bundle design, fuel reload design and control rod patterns design. Traditionally, these problems have been solved in separated ways due to their complexity and the required computational resources. In the specialized literature there are some attempts to solve fuel reloads and control rod patterns design or fuel lattice and axial fuel bundle design in a coupled way. In this paper, the system OCONN to solve all of these problems in a coupled way is shown. This system is based on an artificial recurrent neural network to find the best combination of partial solutions to each problem, in order to maximize a global objective function. The new system works with a fuel lattices' stock, a fuel reloads' stock and a control rod patterns' stock, previously obtained with different heuristic techniques. The system was tested to design an equilibrium cycle with a cycle length of 18 months. Results show that the new system is able to find good combinations. Cycle length is reached and safety parameters are fulfilled.

  6. High-fidelity multiphysics simulation of BWR assembly with coupled TORT-TD/CTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magedanz, J. [Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State Univ., Reber Building, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States); Perin, Y. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit GRS mbH, Forschungsinstitute, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Avramova, M. [Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State Univ., Reber Building, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States); Pautz, A.; Puente-Espel, F.; Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit GRS mbH, Forschungsinstitute, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the application of the coupled codes TORT-TD and CTF to the pin-by-pin modeling of a BWR fuel assembly with thermal-hydraulic feedback. TORT-TD, developed at GRS, is a time-dependent three dimensional discrete ordinates code. CTF is the PSU's improved version of the subchannel code COBRA-TF, which uses a two-fluid, three-field model to represent two-phase flow with entrained droplets, and is commonly applied to evaluate LWR safety margins. The coupled codes system TORT-TD/CTF, already applied to several PWR cases involving MOX, was adapted from PWR to BWR applications. The purpose of the research described in this paper is to verify the coupling for modeling two-phase flow at the pin cell level. Using an ATRIUM-10 assembly, the system's steady-state capabilities were tested on two cases: one without control blade insertion and another with partially inserted blades. The influence of the neutron absorber on local axial and radial parameters is presented. The description of an inlet flow reduction transient is an example for the time-dependent capability of the coupled system. (authors)

  7. Taking burnup credit for interim storage and transportation system for BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish a realistic burnup credit design system, a calculation system has been developed for determining isotope compositions, burnup, and criticality. The calculation system consists of several modules such as TGBLA, ORIGEN, CITATION, MCNP, and KENO. The TGBLA code is a fuel design code for LWR fuels developed in TOSHIBA Corporation. A compact measurement system for a fuel assembly has been being developed to meet requirements for the burnup determination, the neutron emission-rate evaluation, and the nuclear materials management. For a spent MOX fuel, a neutron emission rate measurement method has been being developed. The system consists of Cd-Te detectors and / or fission chambers. Some model calculations were carried out for the latest design BWR fuels. The effect of taking burnup credit for a transportation cask is shown. (authors)

  8. Two-phase flow scaling laws for a simulated BWR assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dodewaard BWR is cooled via natural circulation. To be able to study the thermohydraulic behaviour of such a nuclear reactor, a freon-cooled scaled version of one fuel assembly of this reactor is designed. The scaling criteria for the design are obtained from a one-dimensional drift flux model. The emphasis in the derivation is on correct development of the flow quality and the different flow regimes that are present inside the assembly. Two distinct regimes have been taken in consideration, the lower part of the assembly in which subcooled boiling is present and the upper part of the assembly which is in thermal equilibrium. The outcome of the analysis is that, by using freon-12 as a modelling fluid, all system set-up parameters are fixed while scaling on all possible flow regimes at the same time: the linear dimensions have to be reduced by a factor of 0.46, the working pressure and the temperature are lowered substantially to 11.6 bar and 48 C respectively and the power consumption of the scaled assembly is only 2% of that of a Dodewaard assembly. ((orig.))

  9. Application of the PDET detector to BWR fuel assemblies: gross defect testing using the spatial distribution of neutron and photon flux

    OpenAIRE

    ROSSA Riccardo; Peerani, Paolo; HAM Young; SITARAMAN Shivakumar

    2013-01-01

    Over 80 per cent of the material placed under safeguards today is in the form of spent fuel and one of the main ways to verify it is by Non-Destructive Assays. The main goal for the safeguards inspections is to verify that some or all the material has not been diverted to other purposes by detecting the eventual gross or partial defect. The European Commission with the JRC-ITU located in Ispra in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is studying the application of a det...

  10. Two-phase pressure drop reduction BWR assembly design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dix, G.E.; Crowther, R.L.; Colby, M.J.; Matzner, B.; Elkins, R.B.

    1992-05-12

    This patent describes a boiling water reactor having discrete bundles of fuel rods confined within channel enclosed fuel assemblies, an improvement to a fuel bundle assembly for placement in the reactor. It comprises a fuel channel having vertically extending walls forming a continuous channel around a fuel assembly volume, the channel being open at the bottom end for engagement to a lower tie plate and open at the upper end for engagement to an upper tie plate; rods for placement within the chamber, each the rod containing fissile material for producing nuclear reaction when in the presence of sufficient moderated neutron flux; a lower tie plate for supporting the bundle of rods within the channel, the lower tie plate for supporting the bundle of rods within the channel, the lower tie plate joining the bottom of the channel to close the bottom end of the channel, the lower tie plate providing defined apertures for the inflow of water in the channel between the rods for the generating of steam during the nuclear reaction; the plurality of fuel rods extending from the lower tie plate wherein a single phase region of the water in the bundle is defined to an upward portion of the bundle wherein a two phase region of the water and steam in the bundle is defined during nuclear steam generating reaction in the fuel bundle.

  11. Two-phase pressure drop reduction BWR assembly design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a boiling water reactor having discrete bundles of fuel rods confined within channel enclosed fuel assemblies, an improvement to a fuel bundle assembly for placement in the reactor. It comprises a fuel channel having vertically extending walls forming a continuous channel around a fuel assembly volume, the channel being open at the bottom end for engagement to a lower tie plate and open at the upper end for engagement to an upper tie plate; rods for placement within the chamber, each the rod containing fissile material for producing nuclear reaction when in the presence of sufficient moderated neutron flux; a lower tie plate for supporting the bundle of rods within the channel, the lower tie plate for supporting the bundle of rods within the channel, the lower tie plate joining the bottom of the channel to close the bottom end of the channel, the lower tie plate providing defined apertures for the inflow of water in the channel between the rods for the generating of steam during the nuclear reaction; the plurality of fuel rods extending from the lower tie plate wherein a single phase region of the water in the bundle is defined to an upward portion of the bundle wherein a two phase region of the water and steam in the bundle is defined during nuclear steam generating reaction in the fuel bundle

  12. Development of alternative materials for BWR fuel springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major sources of radioactivity introduced into reactor water of BWR were estimated fuel crud and in-core materials (especially, fuel springs). Fuel springs are used for fixation of fuel cladding tubes with spacer grid. Those are small parts (total length is only within 25 mm) and so many numbers are loaded simultaneously and then total surfaces area are calculated up to about 200 m2. Fuel springs are located under high radiation field and high oxidative environment. Conventional fuel spring is made of alloy-X750 which is one of nickel-based alloy and is reported to show relatively higher corrosion release rate. 58Co and 60Co will be released directly into reactor water from intensely radio-activated fuel springs surface and increase radioactivity concentrations in primary coolant. Corrosion release control from fuel springs is an important technical item and a development of alternative material instead of alloy-X750 for fuel spring is a key subject to achieve ultra low man-rem exposure BWR plant. In present work, alloy-X718 which started usage for PWR fuel springs and stainless steel type 316L which has many mechanical property data are picked up for alternative materials and compared their corrosion behaviors with conventional material. Corrosion experiment was conducted under vapor-water two phases flow which is simulated fuel cladding surface boiling condition. After exposure, corrosion film formed under corrosion test was analyzed in detail and corrosion film amount and corrosion release amount are estimated among three materials. (authors)

  13. BWR - Spent Fuel Transport and Storage with the TNTM9/4 and TNTM24BH Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swiss Nuclear Utilities have started in 2001 to store spent fuel in dry metallic dual-purpose casks at ZWILAG, the Swiss interim storage facility. BKW FMB Energy Ltd., the Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant owner, is involved in this process and has elected to store its BWR spent fuel in a new high capacity dual-purpose cask, the TNeTeM24BH from the COGEMA Logistics/TRANSNUCLEAR TNTM24 family. The Muehleberg BWR spent fuels are transported by road in a medium size shuttle transport cask and then transferred to a heavy transport/storage cask (dry transfer) in the hot cell of ZWILAG site. For that purpose, COGEMA Logistics designed and supplied: - Two shuttle casks, TNTM9/4, mainly devoted to transport of spent fuel from Muehleberg NPP to ZWILAG. Licensed according to IAEA 1996, the TNTM9/4 is a 40 ton transport cask, for 7 BWR high bum-up spent fuel assemblies. - A series of new high capacity dual-purpose casks, TNTM24BH, holding 69 BWR spent fuels. Two transport campaigns took place in 2003 and 2004. For each campaign, ten TNTM9/4 round trips are performed, and one TNTM24BH is loaded. 5 additional TNTM24BH are being manufactured for BKW, and the next transport campaigns are scheduled from 2006. The TNTM24BH high capacity dual purpose cask and the TNTM9/4 transport cask characteristics and capabilities will then be detailed. (authors)

  14. Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation experience with BWR and PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large data base of fuel performance parameters available to Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP), and the excellent track record of innovation and fuel reliability accumulated over the last twenty-three years, allows SNP to have a clear insight on the characteristics of future developments in the area of fuel design. Following is a description of some of SNP's recent design innovations to prevent failures and to extend burnup capabilities. A goal paramount to the design and manufacture of BWR and PWR fuel is that of zero defects from any case during its operation in the reactor. Progress has already been made in achieving this goal. This paper summarized the cumulative failure rate of SNP fuel rod through January 1992

  15. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: The DF-4 BWR Damaged Fuel experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC, that models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRs. As a part of an ongoing assessment, program, MELCOR has been used to model the ACRR in-pile DF-4 Damaged Fuel experiment. DF-4 provided data for early phase melt progression in BWR fuel assemblies, particularly for phenomena associated with eutectic interactions in the BWR control blade and zircaloy oxidation in the canister and cladding. MELCOR provided good agreement with experimental data in the key areas of eutectic material behavior and canister and cladding oxidation. Several shortcomings associated with the MELCOR modeling of BWR geometries were found and corrected. Twenty-five sensitivity studies were performed on COR, HS and CVH parameters. These studies showed that the new MELCOR eutectics model played an important role in predicting control blade behavior. These studies revealed slight time step dependence and no machine dependencies. Comparisons made with the results from four best-estimate codes showed that MELCOR did as well as these codes in matching DF-4 experimental data

  16. Liquid films and droplet deposition in a BWR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the upper part of boiling water reactors (BWR) the flow regime is dominated by a steam-water droplet flow with liquid films on the nuclear fuel rod, the so called (wispy) annular flow regime. The film thickness and liquid flow rate distribution around the fuel rod play an important role especially in regard to so called dryout, which is the main phenomenon limiting the thermal power of a fuel assembly. The deposition of droplets in the liquid film is important, because this process sustains the liquid film and delays dryout. Functional spacers with different vane shapes have been used in recent decades to enhance droplet deposition and thus create more favorable conditions for heat removal. In this thesis the behavior of liquid films and droplet deposition in the annular flow regime in BWR bundles is addressed by experiments in an adiabatic flow at nearly ambient pressure. The experimental setup consists of a vertical channel with the cross-section resembling a pair of neighboring subchannels of a fuel rod bundle. Within this double subchannel an annular flow is established with a gas-water mixture. The impact of functional spacers on the annular flow behavior is studied closely. Parameter variations comprise gas and liquid flow rates, gas density and spacer shape. The setup is instrumented with a newly developed liquid film sensor that measures the electrical conductance between electrodes flush to the wall with high temporal and spatial resolution. Advanced post-processing methods are used to investigate the dynamic behavior of liquid films and droplet deposition. The topic is also assessed numerically by means of single-phase Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes CFD simulations of the flow in the gas core. For this the commercial code STAR-CCM+ is used coupled with additional models for the liquid film distribution and droplet motion. The results of the experiments show that the liquid film is quite evenly distributed around the circumference of the fuel rods. The

  17. Design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel for BWR reactors; Diseno y optimizacion axial de combustible nuclear para reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia V, M.A

    2006-07-01

    In the present thesis, the modifications made to the axial optimization system based on Tabu Search (BT) for the axial design of BWR fuel type are presented, developed previously in the Nuclear Engineering Group of the UNAM Engineering Faculty. With the modifications what is mainly looked is to consider the particular characteristics of the mechanical design of the GE12 fuel type, used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central (CNLV) and that it considers the fuel bars of partial longitude. The information obtained in this thesis will allow to plan nuclear fuel reloads with the best conditions to operate in a certain cycle guaranteeing a better yield and use in the fuel burnt, additionally people in charge in the reload planning will be favored with the changes carried out to the system for the design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel, which facilitate their handling and it reduces their execution time. This thesis this developed in five chapters that are understood in the following way in general: Chapter 1: It approaches the basic concepts of the nuclear energy, it describes the physical and chemical composition of the atoms as well as that of the uranium isotopes, the handling of the uranium isotope by means of the nuclear fission until arriving to the operation of the nuclear reactors. Chapter 2: The nuclear fuel cycle is described, the methods for its extraction, its conversion and its enrichment to arrive to the stages of the nuclear fuel management used in the reactors are described. Beginning by the radial design, the axial design and the core design of the nuclear reactor related with the fuel assemblies design. Chapter 3: the optimization methods of nuclear fuel previously used are exposed among those that are: the genetic algorithms method, the search methods based on heuristic rules and the application of the tabu search method, which was used for the development of this thesis. Chapter 4: In this part the used methodology to the

  18. Spent fuel assembly hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When spent nuclear fuel is disposed of in a repository, the waste package will include the spent fuel assembly hardware, the structural portion of the fuel assembly, and the fuel pins. The spent fuel assembly hardware is the subject of this paper. The basic constituent parts of the fuel assembly will be described with particular attention on the materials used in their construction. The results of laboratory analyses performed to determine radionuclide inventories and trace impurities also will be described. Much of this work has been incorporated into a US Department of Energy (DOE) database maintained by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This database is documented in DOE/RW-0184 and can be obtained from Karl Notz at ORNL. The database provides a single source for information regarding wastes that may be sent to the repository

  19. Criticality calculations for a spent fuel storage pool for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the methodology for the calculation of the constant of effective multiplication for the arrangement of spent fuel assemblies in the pool of a BWR type reactor is shown. Calculations were done for the pool of spent fuel specified in FSAR and for the assemblies that is thought a conservative composition of high enrichment and without Gadolinium, giving credit to the stainless steel boxes of the frames that keep the assemblies. To carry out this simulation, RECORD and MIXQUIC codes were used. With record code, macroscopic cross sections, two energy groups, for the characteristics of the thought assemblies were obtained. Cross sections, as well as the dimensions of the frames that keep the fuel assemblies were used as input data for MIXQUIC code. With this code, criticality calculations in two dimensions were done, supposing that there is not leak of neutrons along the axial of the main line. Additional calculations, supposing changes in the temperature, distance among fuel assemblies and the thickness of the stainless steel box of the frame were done. The obtained results, including the effect in tolerances due to temperature, weight and thickness, show that the arrangement in the pool, when frames are fully charged, is subcritical by less than 5% in δK. (Author)

  20. Composition and Distribution of Tramp Uranium Contamination on BWR and PWR Fuel Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a joint research project of VGB and AREVA NP GmbH the behaviour of alpha nuclides in nuclear power plants with light water reactors has been investigated. Understanding the source and the behaviour of alpha nuclides is of big importance for planning radiation protection measures for outages and upcoming dismantling projects. Previous publications have shown the correlation between plant specific alpha contamination of the core and the so called 'tramp fuel' or 'tramp uranium' level which is linked to the defect history of fuel assemblies and accordingly the amount of previously washed out fuel from defective fuel rods. The methodology of tramp fuel estimation is based on fission product concentrations in reactor coolant but also needs a good knowledge of tramp fuel composition and in-core distribution on the outer surface of fuel rods itself. Sampling campaigns of CRUD deposits of irradiated fuel assemblies in different NPPs were performed. CRUD analyses including nuclide specific alpha analysis have shown systematic differences between BWR and PWR plants. Those data combined with literature results of fuel pellet investigations led to model improvements showing that a main part of fission products is caused by fission of Pu-239 an activation product of U-238. CRUD investigations also gave a better picture of the in-core composition and distribution of the tramp uranium contamination. It was shown that the tramp uranium distribution in PWR plants is time dependent. Even new fuel assemblies will be notably contaminated after only one cycle of operation. For PWR applies the following logic: the higher the local power the higher the contamination. With increasing burnup the local rod power usually decreases leading to decreasing tramp uranium contamination on the fuel rod surface. This is not applicable for tramp uranium contamination in BWR. CRUD contamination (including the tramp fuel deposits) is much more fixed and is constantly increasing

  1. Fuel assembly reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel failures have been happened in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide, without lost of integrity and safety, mainly for the public, environment and power plants workers. The most common causes of these events are corrosion (CRUD), fretting and pellet cladding interaction. These failures are identified by increasing the activity of fission products, verified by chemical analyses of reactor coolant. Through these analyses, during the fourth operation cycle of Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant, was possible to observe fuel failure indication. This indication was confirmed in the end of the cycle during the unloading of reactor core through leakage tests of fuel assembly, using the equipment called 'In Mast Sipping' and 'Box Sipping'. After confirmed, the fuel assembly reconstitution was scheduled, and happened in April, 2007, where was identified the cause and the fuel rod failure, which was substitute by dummy rods (zircaloy). The cause was fretting by 'debris'. The actions to avoid and prevent fuel assemblies failures are important. The goals of this work are to describe the methodology of fuel assembly reconstitution using the FARE (Fuel Assembly Reconstitution Equipment) system, to describe the results of this task in economic and security factors of the company and show how the fuel assembly failures are identified during operation and during the outage. (author)

  2. Nuclear fuel assembly spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor a fuel element spacer formed of an array of laterally positioned cojoined tubular ferrules each providing a passage for one of the fuel elements, the elements being laterally supported in the ferrules between slender spring members and laterally oriented rigid stops

  3. A classification scheme for LWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With over 100 light water nuclear reactors operating nationwide, representing designs by four primary vendors, and with reload fuel manufactured by these vendors and additional suppliers, a wide variety of fuel assembly types are in existence. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, both the Systems Integration Program and the Characteristics Data Base project required a classification scheme for these fuels. This scheme can be applied to other areas and is expected to be of value to many Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management programs. To develop the classification scheme, extensive information on the fuel assemblies that have been and are being manufactured by the various nuclear fuel vendors was compiled, reviewed, and evaluated. It was determined that it is possible to characterize assemblies in a systematic manner, using a combination of physical factors. A two-stage scheme was developed consisting of 79 assembly types, which are grouped into 22 assembly classes. The assembly classes are determined by the general design of the reactor cores in which the assemblies are, or were, used. The general BWR and PWR classes are divided differently but both are based on reactor core configuration. 2 refs., 15 tabs

  4. Transient and stability analysis of a BWR core with thorium-uranium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779 Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, DF (Mexico)], E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx; Francois, Juan-Luis [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec Mor. (Mexico)

    2008-08-15

    The kinetic response of a boiling water reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium as a nuclear material, in an integrated blanket-seed assembly, is presented in this work. Additionally an in-house code was developed to evaluate this core under steady state and transient conditions including a stability analysis. The code has two modules: (a) the time domain module for transient analysis and (b) the frequency domain module for stability analysis. The thermal-hydraulic process is modeled by a set of five equations, considering no homogeneous flow with drift-flux approximation and non-equilibrium thermodynamic. The neutronic process is calculated with a point kinetics model. Typical BWR reactivity effects are considered: void fraction, fuel temperature, moderator temperature and control rod density. Collapsed parameters were included in the code to represent the core using an average fuel channel. For the stability analysis, in the frequency domain, the transfer function is determined by applying Laplace-transforming to the calculated pressure drop perturbations in each of the considered regions where a constant total pressure drop was considered. The transfer function was used to study the system response in the frequency domain when an inlet flow perturbation is applied. The results show that the neutronic behavior of the core with thorium uranium fuel is similar to a UO{sub 2} core, even during transient conditions. The stability and transient analysis show that the thorium-uranium fuel can be operated safely in current BWRs.

  5. Fuel nozzle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Lacey, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2011-08-30

    A fuel nozzle assembly is provided. The assembly includes an outer nozzle body having a first end and a second end and at least one inner nozzle tube having a first end and a second end. One of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel plenum and a fuel passage extending therefrom, while the other of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel injection hole slidably aligned with the fuel passage to form a fuel flow path therebetween at an interface between the body and the tube. The nozzle body and the nozzle tube are fixed against relative movement at the first ends of the nozzle body and nozzle tube, enabling the fuel flow path to close at the interface due to thermal growth after a flame enters the nozzle tube.

  6. Impact of modeling Choices on Inventory and In-Cask Criticality Calculations for Forsmark 3 BWR Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S. [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Ade, Brian J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowman, Stephen M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauld, Ian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Marshall, William BJ J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Simulation of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel depletion poses a challenge for nuclide inventory validation and nuclear criticality safety analyses. This challenge is due to the complex operating conditions and assembly design heterogeneities that characterize these nuclear systems. Fuel depletion simulations and in-cask criticality calculations are affected by (1) completeness of design information, (2) variability of operating conditions needed for modeling purposes, and (3) possible modeling choices. These effects must be identified, quantified, and ranked according to their significance. This paper presents an investigation of BWR fuel depletion using a complete set of actual design specifications and detailed operational data available for five operating cycles of the Swedish BWR Forsmark 3 reactor. The data includes detailed axial profiles of power, burnup, and void fraction in a very fine temporal mesh for a GE14 (10×10) fuel assembly. The specifications of this case can be used to assess the impacts of different modeling choices on inventory prediction and in-cask criticality, specifically regarding the key parameters that drive inventory and reactivity throughout fuel burnup. This study focused on the effects of the fidelity with which power history and void fraction distributions are modeled. The corresponding sensitivity of the reactivity in storage configurations is assessed, and the impacts of modeling choices on decay heat and inventory are addressed.

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear fuel assembly comprises a cluster of elongated fuel, retained parallel and at the nodal points of a square network by a bottom supporting plate and by spacing grids. The supporting plate is connected to a top end plate via tie-rods which replace fuel pins at certain of the nodal points of the network. The diameter of the tie-rods is equal to that of the pins and both are slidably received in the grids

  8. Appearance detection device for fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a device for detecting the appearance of fuel assemblies for a power plant, in which the device photographs corners of fuel assemblies by a TV-camera to perform detection with higher reliability. Namely, heretofore, fuel assembly to substantially square pillar shape for a BWR and a PWR has been rotated and one or two faces have been detected from the front by the TV-camera. In the present invention, a TV-camera used exclusively for corners is additionally disposed on or near the diagonal line of the corners. With such a constitution, corners of the fuel assemblies can be photographed simultaneously with the conventional appearance test. As a result, since appearance test for the front and the corners can be conducted at the same time, extremely effective detection can be conducted in terms of detection of a rupture of grids and prevention of dead angle. The corners of assemblies which tend to undergo damages upon charge/discharge of fuels can be detected carefully. Accordingly, a highly reliable detection can be conducted. (I.S.)

  9. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly of PWR comprises a fuel bundle portion supported by a plurality of support lattices and an upper and lower nozzles each secured to the upper and lower portions. Leaf springs are attached to the four sides of the upper nozzle for preventing rising of the fuel assembly by streams of cooling water by the contact with an upper reactor core plate. The leaf springs are attached to the upper nozzle so that four leaf springs are laminated. The uppermost leaf spring is bent slightly upwardly from the mounted portion and the other leaf springs are extended linearly from the mounted portion without being bent. The mounted portions of the leaf springs are stacked and secured to the upper nozzle by a bolt obliquely relative to the axial line of the fuel assembly. (I.N.)

  10. BWR Fuel Lattice Design Using an Ant Colony Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Jose L.; Ortiz, Juan J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Depto. de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico Toluca S/N. La Marquesa Ocoyoacac. 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Francois, Juan L.; Martin-del-Campo, Cecilia [Depto. de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532. Jiutepec, Mor. 62550 (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    This paper deals with one of the steps of the nuclear fuel design: the radial fuel lattice design. It can be seen as a combinatorial optimization problem for determining the optimal 2D fuel rods enrichment and gadolinia distribution. In order to solve this optimization problem, the ant colony system technique is proposed. The main idea of the ant colony approach consists of emulating the real ant colony behaviour in their searching for minimum paths between two given points, usually between the nest and a food source. In this case, the environment where the artificial ants move is the space defined by the discrete possible values of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents, the U{sup 235} enrichment, and the valid locations inside the 10x10 BWR fuel lattice array. In order to assess any candidate fuel lattice in the optimization process, the HELIOS neutronic transport code is used. The results obtained in the application of the implemented model show that the proposed technique is a powerful tool to tackle this step of the fuel design. (authors)

  11. BWR Fuel Lattice Design Using an Ant Colony Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with one of the steps of the nuclear fuel design: the radial fuel lattice design. It can be seen as a combinatorial optimization problem for determining the optimal 2D fuel rods enrichment and gadolinia distribution. In order to solve this optimization problem, the ant colony system technique is proposed. The main idea of the ant colony approach consists of emulating the real ant colony behaviour in their searching for minimum paths between two given points, usually between the nest and a food source. In this case, the environment where the artificial ants move is the space defined by the discrete possible values of Gd2O3 contents, the U235 enrichment, and the valid locations inside the 10x10 BWR fuel lattice array. In order to assess any candidate fuel lattice in the optimization process, the HELIOS neutronic transport code is used. The results obtained in the application of the implemented model show that the proposed technique is a powerful tool to tackle this step of the fuel design. (authors)

  12. Study of behavior on bonding and failure mode of pressurized and doped BWR fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of transient behavior on the bonding and the failure mode was made using the pressurized/doped 8 x 8 BWR type fuel rod. The dopant was mullite minerals consisted mainly of silicon and aluminum up to 1.5 w/o. Pressurization of the fuel rod with pure helium was made to the magnitude about 0.6 MPa. As a reference, the non-pressurized/non-doped 8 x 8 BWR fuel rod and the pressurized/7 x 7 BWR fuel rod up to 0.6 MPa were prepared. Magnitude of energy deposition given to the tested fuel rods was 248, 253, and 269 cal/g·fuel, respectively. Obtained results from the pulse irradiation in NSRR are as follows. (1) It was found from the experiment that alternation of the fuel design by the adoption of pressurization up to 0.6 MPa and the use of wider gap up to 0.38 mm could avoid the dopant BWR fuel from the overall bonding. The failure mode of the present dopant fuel was revealed to be the melt combined with rupture. (2) The time of fuel failure of the pressurized/doped 8 x 8 BWR fuel defected by the melt/rupture mode is of order of two times shorter than that of the pressurized/ 7 x 7 BWR defected by the rupture mode. Failure threshold of the pressurized/doped 8 x 8 BWR BWR tended to be lower than that of non-pressurized/non-doped 8 x 8 BWR one. Cracked area of the pressurized/doped 8 x 8 BWR was more wider and magnitude of oxidation at the place is relatively larger than the other tested fuels. (3) Failure mode of the non-pressurized/ 8 x 8 BWR fuel rod was the melt/brittle accompanied with a significant bonding at failed location. While, failure mode of the pressurized/ 7 x 7 BWR fuel rod was the cladding rupture accompanied with a large ballooning. No bonding at failed location of the latter was observed. (author)

  13. MOX fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel assembly of the present invention comprises at least one water rod, first fuel rods filled with uranium/plutonium mixed oxide fuels, second fuel rods having axial length shorter than that of the first fuel rods and third fuel rods containing burnable poisons. If the third fuel rods are arranged on the same row and adjacent columns or on the same column and adjacent row relative to the positions where the second fuel rods are arranged or the position of the water rod replacing fuel rods, in other words, at a position extremely close to them, neutron spectrum is made softer and the neutron flux distribution is made higher. As a result, negative reactivity worth of the burnable poisons contained in the third fuel rods is enhanced, accordingly, a reactivity suppression effect comparable with that in conventional cases can be obtained by so much even if the number of the third fuel rods is reduced. The number of the MOX fuel rods is increased than a conventional case by so much as replacing the third fuel rods with the MOX fuel rods by the reduced amount thereby enabling to improve the efficiency using plutonium. (N.H.)

  14. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To increase the fuel assembly rigidity while making balance in view of the dimension thereby improving the earthquake proofness. Constitution: In a nuclear fuel assembly having a control rod guide thimble tube, the gap between the thimble tube and fuel insert (inner diameter of the guiding thimble tube-outer diameter of the fuel insert) is made greater than 1.0 mm. Further, the wall thickness of the thimble tube is made to about 4 - 5 % of the outer diameter, while the flowing fluid pore cross section S in the thimble tube is set as: S = S0 x A0/A where S0: cross section of the present flowing fluid pore, A: effective cross section after improvement, = Π/4(d2 - D2) in which d is the thimble tube inner diameter and the D is the fuel insert outer diameter. A0: present effective cross section. (Seki, T.)

  15. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  16. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To obtain a nuclear fuel assembly having a function of eliminating corrosion products exfoliating from the surface of a fuel can, thereby reduce the radioactive crud in primary sodium coolant during operation of a FBR type reactor. Constitution: Nickel plates or grids made of metal plate with a nickel coated on the surface thereof are inserted in the upper blanket of a nuclear fuel element and between nuclear fuel element corresponding to the gas plenum. The nickel becomes helpful at high temperature in adsorbing Mn-54 which accounts for a major portion of the corrosion products. (J.P.N.)

  17. An intelligent spent fuel database for BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present aim is to establish an intelligent database of Spent Fuel Data (including physical fuel data and reactor operating history information) to support burnup credit analyses for Boiling Water Reactor Fuel. At a later date, information of Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel and existing Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) data for benchmarking fuel composition calculations may be integrated into the database. (author)

  18. Transfer of fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel assemblies of a nuclear reactor are transferred during fueling or refueling or the like by a crane. The work-engaging fixture of the crane picks up an assembly, removes it from this slot, transfers it to the deposit site and deposits it in its slot at the deposit site. The control for the crane includes a strain gauge connected to the crane line which raises and lowers the load. The strain gauge senses the load on the crane. The signal from the strain gauge is compared with setpoints; a high-level setpoint, a low-level setpoint and a slack-line setpoint. If the strain gauge signal exceeds the high-level setpoint, the line drive is disabled. This event may occur during raising of a fuel assembly which encounters resistance. The high-level setpoint may be overridden under proper precautions. The line drive is also disabled if the strain gauge signal is less than the low-level setpoint. This event occurs when a fuel assembly being deposited contacts the bottom of its slot or an obstruction in, or at the entry to the slot. To preclude lateral movement and possible damage to a fuel assembly suspended from the crane line, the traverse drive of the crane is disabled once the strain-gauge exceets the lov-level setpoint. The traverse drive can only be enabled after the strain-gauge signal is less than the slack-line set-point. This occurs when the lines has been set in slack-line setting. When the line is tensioned after slack-li ne setting, the traverse drive remains enabled only if the line has been disconnected from the fuel assembly

  19. Feasibility of plutonium use in BWR reactors. A way to dispose of the spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the convenience of a closed fuel cycle, preliminary calculations have been done to evaluate which option will be the most attractive to follow from an economic point of view. Currently in Mexico, there is no defined policy for high level waste, so it is necessary to perform several studies to help define a possible strategy focused on the spent fuel. The calculations shown here indicate that from the economic point of view, recycling could be an expensive solution or at least more expensive than the once-through option. 1. Introduction. The BWR reactors of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant have an electrical output of 654 MWe each, and the core contains 444 fuel assemblies. To reach the 18-month cycle currently established for operation, it is necessary to load around 112 fresh fuel assemblies (1/4 of the core, approximately) after each operation cycle, resulting in 112 spent fuel assemblies being discharged from the reactor. The BWR fuel assembly (FA) contains approximately 180 Kg of heavy metal (uranium). After discharge and reprocessing, the amount recovered will be 94% uranium and 1% plutonium, which means 169.2 kg of uranium and 1.8 Kg of reactor grade plutonium. If a once-through cycle is considered for both reactors, the amount of fuel assemblies through their entire life of operation will be 112 fuel assemblies/cycle multiplied by the number cycles minus one plus the initial load of the reactor. This produces 3244 assemblies for each reactor, resulting in a total of 6488 fuel assemblies or 1622 ton of high radioactive waste. When recycling the spent fuel of both reactors, practically all the fuel discharged will be reprocessed except for the last four cycles (if the plant is planning to close and there is no license extension). This would result in 1448 UOX assemblies plus 612 MOX fuel assemblies as spent fuel from both reactors, or the equivalent to 515 ton of high radioactive waste. So, when using recycling, the amount of spent fuel is reduced to

  20. Method of loading fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To shorten the fuel assembly loading time by loading fuel assembly group as one body into the reactor core. Method: A fuel assembly is fed from an auxiliary reactor building via a pit crane into the reactor container, and is stood from lateral position to vertical position. Further, the fuel assemblies are moved laterallyiin a pool of the container, and every four assembly groups are formed by an aligning jig. These assembly groups are associated into one body and loaded into the container. Thus, the round trip time of the crane in the fuel assembly loading work can be shortened. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. Experience of Areva in fuel services for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA being an integrated supplier of fuel assemblies has included in its strategy to develop services and solutions to customers who desire to improve the performance and safety of their fuel. These services go beyond the simple 'after sale' services that can be expected from a fuel supplier: The portfolio of AREVA includes a wide variety of services, from scientific calculations to fuel handling services in a nuclear power plant. AREVA is committed to collaborate and to propose best-in-class solutions that really make the difference for the customer, based on 40 years of Fuel design and manufacturing experience. (Author)

  2. Fuel assembly supporting structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For use in forming the core of a pressurized-water reactor, a fuel assembly supporting structure for holding a bundle of interspaced fuel rods, is formed by interspaced end pieces having holes in which the end portions of control rod guide tubes are inserted, fuel rod spacer grids being positioned by these guide tubes between the end pieces. The end pieces are fastened to the end portions of the guide tubes, to integrate the supporting structure, and in the case of at least one of the end pieces, this is done by means which releases that end piece from the guide tubes when the end pieces receive an abnormal thrust force directed towards each other and which would otherwise place the guide tubes under a compressive stress that would cause them to buckle. The spacer grids normally hold the fuel rods interspaced by distances determined by nuclear physics, and buckling of the control rod guide tubes can distort the fuel rod spacer grids with consequent dearrangement of the fuel rod interspacing. A sudden loss of pressure in a pressurized-water reactor pressure vessel can result in the pressurized coolant in the vessel discharging from the vessel at such high velocity as to result in the abnormal thrust force on the end pieces of each fuel assembly, which could cause buckling of the control rod guide tubes when the end pieces are fixed to them in the normal rigid and unyielding manner

  3. BWR simulation in a stationary state for the evaluation of fuel cell design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the simulation of a BWR in order to evaluate the performance of a set of fuel assemblies under stationary state in three dimensions (3-D) is presented. 15 cases selected from a database containing a total of 18225 cases are evaluated. The main selection criteria were based on the results of the design phase of the power cells in two dimensions (2-D) and 3-D initial study. In 2-D studies the parameters that were used to qualify and select the designs were basically the local power peaking factor and neutron multiplication factor of each fuel cell. In the initial 3-D study variables that defined the quality of results, and from which the selection was realized, are the margins to thermal limits of reactor operation and the value of the effective multiplication factor at the end of cycle operation. From the 2-D and 3-D results of the studies described a second 3-D study was realized, where the optimizations of the fuel reload pattern was carried out. The results presented in this paper correspond to this second 3-D study. It was found that the designs of the fuel cell they had a similar behavior to those provided by the fuel supplier of reference BWR. Particularly it noted the impact of reload pattern on the cold shut down margin. An estimate of the operation costs of reference cycle analyzed with each one designed reload batch was also performed. As a result a positive difference (gain) up to 10,347 M/US D was found. (Author)

  4. Artificial intelligence applied to fuel management in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work two techniques of artificial intelligence, neural networks and genetic algorithms were applied to a practical problem of nuclear fuel management; the determination of the optimal fuel reload for a BWR type reactor. This is an important problem in the design of the operation cycle of the reactor. As a result of the application of these techniques, comparable or even better reloads proposals than those given by expert companies in the subject were obtained. Additionally, two other simpler problems in reactor physics were solved: the determination of the axial power profile and the prediction of the value of some variables of interest at the end of the operation cycle of the reactor. Neural networks and genetic algorithms have been applied to solve many problems of engineering because of their versatility but they have been rarely used in the area of fuel management. The results obtained in this thesis indicates the convenience of undertaking further work on this area and suggest the application of these techniques of artificial intelligence to the solution of other problems in nuclear reactor physics. (Author)

  5. Fuel assemblies chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NPP Paks found a thermal-hydraulic anomaly in the reactor core during cycle 14 that was caused by corrosion product deposits on fuel assemblies (FAs) that increased the hydraulic resistance of the FAs. Consequently, the coolant flow through the FAs was insufficient resulting in a temperature asymmetry inside the reactor core. Based on this fact NPP Paks performed differential pressure measurements of all fuel assemblies in order to determine the hydraulic resistance and subsequently the limit values for the hydraulic acceptance of FAs to be used. Based on the hydraulic investigations a total number of 170 FAs was selected for cleaning. The necessity for cleaning the FAs was explained by the fact that the FAs were subjected to a short term usage in the reactor core only maximum of 1,5 years and had still a capacity for additional 2 fuel cycles. (authors)

  6. Method of assembling nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films are formed to the surface of a fuel rod for preventing the occurrence of injuries at the surface of the fuel rod. That is, in a method of assembling a nuclear fuel assembly by inserting fuel rods into lattice cells of a support lattice, thin films of polyvinyl alcohol are formed to a predetermined thickness at the surface of each of the fuel rods and, after insertion of the fuel rods into the lattice cells, the nuclear fuel assemblies are dipped into water or steams to dissolve and remove the thin films. Since polyvinyl alcohol is noncombustible and not containing nuclear inhibitive material as the ingredient, they cause no undesired effects on plant facilities even if not completely removed from the fuel rods. The polyvinyl alcohol thin films have high strength and can sufficiently protect the fuel rod. Further, scraping damages caused by support members of the support lattice upon insertion can also be prevented. (T.M.)

  7. Design of a fuel recharge for a BWR using advanced optimization systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel recharge design for a BWR reactor it was carried out, which includes the design of four fuel cells to form an assembly, the accommodation design of fresh and partially consumed assemblies and the control bars pattern design to use along an operation cycle. The three stages were approached as optimization problems using different computational tools, each one of those includes an objective function to measure quantitatively the evolution of the different candidate solutions. With the tool used in the fuel cells design that makes use of the tabu search technique its were obtained cells that showed to be lightly more reactive that other similar taken as reference. With the four designed cells it was formed a fuel assembly that turn out to have an average enrichment lightly smaller to the one of another assembly similar taken as reference. In the recharge pattern design it was used another optimization tool, also based on tabu search to obtain the accommodation of 108 fresh fuels and 336 partially consumed, fulfilling the conditions imposed to operate with the core strategies with control cells (CCC) and of low leakage. A Haling calculation reported that with the obtained accommodation it was achievement to increase in 8% the cycle length with regard to the one obtained using a similar reference pattern. In the design of the control bars patterns it was used a tool based on the use of the genetic algorithms to obtain the placement patterns of the control bars along an operation cycle. The search tool only uses the bars of the A2 sequence and it makes use of the 1/8 symmetry of the core, with that the number of used control bars it decreases at 5. Also the use of control bars in intermediate positions is also avoided. With the obtained patterns a cycle length is obtained that is lightly bigger to the reported value in a Haling calculation. (Author)

  8. Central position detection method for fuel assembly and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a method for detecting a central position of a fuel assembly by an image processing technique without influenced by a deviation of the central position of the fuel assembly depending on the accuracy for the stoppage of an underwater vehicle and rattling of fuels in a fuel basket. Namely, a characteristic amount comparing method and a linear detecting method are utilized by image processing techniques. Images are taken by a camera disposed at a predetermined position, and common characteristically shaped portions of each of the top portions of fuel assemblies are detected based on the photographed images. The central position at the top of the fuel assembly is detected based on the characteristic. In a case of a BWR fuel assembly, a channel fastener screw portion and a handle at the top of the fuel constitute the characteristic portions. The longitudinal component of the handle is detected by the linear method, and the aperture like circular portion of the channel fastener screw portion is detected by the characteristic amount comparing method. In a case of a PWR type fuel assembly, two positioning pin holes at a fuel top corner portion are detected using the characteristic amount comparing method. The central position of the fuel assembly is detected based on each of the results. (I.S.)

  9. BWR spent-fuel measurements with the ION-1/fork detector and a calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray and neutron measurements were made on about 50 irradiated boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies using the Los Alamos National Laboratory ION-1/fork detector. The assemblies were placed in a dry storage cask (DOE's REA-2023) at the General Electric Morris Operation (GE-MO) as part of a program to evaluate the cask performance. Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted the program. PNL compared axial radiation profiles developed from ION-1/fork measurements with calculated profiles to interpret the temperature distributions within the cask. The gamma-ray profiles correlated with heat-emission rates measured with a calorimeter, which suggests that the ION-1/fork detector is much faster than the more direct calorimeter. In addition, the radiation profiles from the ION-1/fork detector can prevent cask loadings with undesirable heat source distributions. The detector also provides safeguards information by verifying the declared exposures and cooling times. The genuineness of the assemblies is thus confirmed just before the filling and sealing of a cask. The ION-1/fork detector was permanently installed in the GE-MO fuel storage pond for 1 year without any breakdowns or significant maintenance required. Data were gathered for 9 months and analyzed using techniques developed during previous measurement campaigns. A few anomalies were found in generally satisfactory results. The detector's ease of use, reliability, and reproducibility were excellent

  10. Methods of RECORD, an LWR fuel assembly burnup code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RECORD computer code is a detailed rector physics code for performing efficient LWR fuel assembly calculations, taking into account most of the features found in BWR and PWR fuel designs. The code calculates neutron spectrum, reaction rates and reactivity as a function of fuel burnup, and it generates the few-group data required for use in full scale core simulation and fuel management calculations. The report describes the methods of the RECORD computer code and the basis for fundamental models selected, and gives a review of code qualifications against measured data. (Auth. /RF)

  11. Nuclear fuel assembly spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer for use in a fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor having thin, full-height divider members, slender spring members and laterally oriented rigid stops and wherein the total amount of spacer material, the amount of high neutron cross section material, the projected area of the spacer structure and changes in cross section area of the spacer structure are minimized whereby neutron absorption by the spacer and coolant flow resistance through the spacer are minimized

  12. BWR-spent fuel transport and storage with the TN trademark 9/4 and TN trademark 24BH casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swiss Nuclear Utilities have started in 2001 to store spent fuel in dry metallic dual-purpose casks in ZWILAG, the Swiss interim storage facility. BKW FMB Energy Ltd., as Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant owner, is involved in this process and has selected to store its spent fuel, a new high capacity dual-purpose cask, the TN trademark 24BH. For the transport in a medium size cask, COGEMA LOGISTICS has developed a new cask, the TN trademark 9/4, to replace the NTL9 cask, which performed numerous transports of BWR spent fuel in the past decades. Licensed IAEA 1996, the TN trademark 9/4 is a 40 ton transport cask, for 7 BWR high burn-up spent fuel assemblies. The spent fuel assemblies can be transferred in the ZWILAG hot cell in the TN trademark 24BH cask. The first use of these casks took place in 2003. Ten TN trademark 9/4 transports were performed, and one TN trademark 24BH was loaded. After a brief presentation of the operational aspects, the paper will focus on the TN trademark 24BH high capacity dual purpose cask, the TN trademark 9/4 transport cask and describe in detail their characteristics and possibilities

  13. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I

  14. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Huffer

    2004-09-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I.

  15. Validation of SCALE (SAS2H) Isotopic Predictions for BWR Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.

    1998-01-01

    Thirty spent fuel samples obtained from boiling-water-reactor (BWR) fuel pins have been modeled at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the SAS2H sequence of the SCALE code system. The SAS2H sequence uses transport methods combined with the depletion and decay capabilities of the ORIGEN-S code to estimate the isotopic composition of fuel as a function of its burnup history. Results of these calculations are compared with chemical assay measurements of spent fuel inventories for each sample. Results show reasonable agreement between measured and predicted isotopic concentrations for important actinides; however, little data are available for most fission products considered to be important for spent fuel concerns (e.g., burnup credit, shielding, source-term calculations, etc.). This work is a follow-up to earlier works that studied the ability to predict spent fuel compositions in pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) fuel pins. Biases and uncertainties associated with BWR isotopic predictions are found to be larger than those of PWR calculations. Such behavior is expected, as the operation of a BWR is significantly more complex than that of a PWR plant, and in general the design of a BWR has a more heterogeneous configuration than that of a PWR. Nevertheless, this work shows that the simple models employed using SAS2H to represent such complexities result in agreement to within 5% (and often less than 1%) or less for most nuclides important for spent fuel applications. On the other hand, however, the set of fuel samples analyzed represent a small subset of the BWR fuel population, and results reported herein may not be representative of the full population of BWR spent fuel.

  16. Design of a fuel recharge for a BWR using advanced optimization systems; Diseno de una recarga de combustible para un BWR empleando sistemas avanzados de optimizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez M, J.L. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Francois L, J.L.; Martin del Campo, M. C. [FI. UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jlhm@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The fuel recharge design for a BWR reactor it was carried out, which includes the design of four fuel cells to form an assembly, the accommodation design of fresh and partially consumed assemblies and the control bars pattern design to use along an operation cycle. The three stages were approached as optimization problems using different computational tools, each one of those includes an objective function to measure quantitatively the evolution of the different candidate solutions. With the tool used in the fuel cells design that makes use of the tabu search technique its were obtained cells that showed to be lightly more reactive that other similar taken as reference. With the four designed cells it was formed a fuel assembly that turn out to have an average enrichment lightly smaller to the one of another assembly similar taken as reference. In the recharge pattern design it was used another optimization tool, also based on tabu search to obtain the accommodation of 108 fresh fuels and 336 partially consumed, fulfilling the conditions imposed to operate with the core strategies with control cells (CCC) and of low leakage. A Haling calculation reported that with the obtained accommodation it was achievement to increase in 8% the cycle length with regard to the one obtained using a similar reference pattern. In the design of the control bars patterns it was used a tool based on the use of the genetic algorithms to obtain the placement patterns of the control bars along an operation cycle. The search tool only uses the bars of the A2 sequence and it makes use of the 1/8 symmetry of the core, with that the number of used control bars it decreases at 5. Also the use of control bars in intermediate positions is also avoided. With the obtained patterns a cycle length is obtained that is lightly bigger to the reported value in a Haling calculation. (Author)

  17. Experimental data report for test TS-5 Reactivity Initiated Accident test in the NSRR with pre-irradiated BWR fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents experimental data for Test TS-5 which was the fifth test in a series of Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) tests using pre-irradiated BWR fuel rods, performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in January, 1993. Test fuel rod used in the Test TS-5 was a short-sized BWR (7x7) type rod which was re-fabricated from a commercial rod irradiated in the Tsuruga Unit 1 power reactor of Japan Atomic Power Co. The fuel had an initial enrichment of 2.79% and a burnup of 26GWd/tU. A pulse irradiation of the test fuel rod was performed under a cooling condition of stagnant water at atmospheric pressure and at ambient temperature which simulated a BWR's cold start-up RIA event. The nominal energy deposition of 117±5cal/g·fuel (98±4cal/g·fuel in peak fuel enthalpy) was subjected to the test fuel rod and no fuel failure was observed in the test. The test fuel was pulse irradiated in a flow shroud which simulates fuel/water ratio in the commercial assembly. Descriptions on test conditions, test procedures, transient behavior of the test rod during the pulse irradiation, and results of pre-pulse and post-pulse irradiation examinations are described in this report. (author)

  18. Development of prediction method of void fraction distribution in fuel assemblies for use in safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The establishment of code system for BWR safety analysis is now in progress at Institute of Nuclear Safety (INS), in order to predict the onset of boiling transition (BT) in nuclear fuel assemblies in any thermal-hydraulic condition without relying on the thermal-hydraulic characteristic data provided by licensee. The prediction method for void fraction distribution across cross section of BWR fuel assemblies has been developed based on multi-dimensional two-fluid model. Lift forces working on bubbles and void diffusion that can not be handled with one-dimensional analysis were considered. Comparisons between calculated results and experimental data obtained from thermal-hydraulic tests of PWR and BWR mock-up fuel assemblies showed good agreement. Lift force models have been empirical and further studies were needed, but the calculations showed the possibility of applying these models to multi-dimensional gas-liquid two-phase flow analysis. (author)

  19. Behavior of small-sized BWR fuel under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work was performed on this small-sized BWR fuel, where Zr liner and rod prepressurization were taken as experimental parameters. Experiment was done under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) belonged to Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Major remarks obtained are as follows: (1) Three different types of the fuel rods consisted of (a) Zr lined/pressurized (0.65MPa), (b) Zr lined/non-pressurized and (c) non-Zr lined/pressurized (o.65MPa) were used, respectively. Failure thresholds of these were not less than that (260 cal/g·fuel) described in Japanese RIA Licensing Guideline. Small-sized BWR and conventional 8 x 8 BWR fuels were considered to be in almost the same level in failure threshold. Failure modes of the three were (a) cladding melt/brittle, (b) cladding melt/brittle and (c) rupture by large ballooning, respectively. (2) The magnitude of pressure pulse at fuel fragmentation was also studied by lined/pressurized and non-lined/pressurized fuels. Above the energy deposition of 370 cal/g·fuel, mechanical energy (or pressure) was found to be released from these fragmented fuels. No measurable difference was, however, observed between the tested fuels and NSRR standard (and conventional 8 x 8 BWR) fuels. (3) It is worthy of mentioning that Zr liner tended to prevent the cladding from large ballooning. Non-lined/pressurized fuel tended to cause wrinkle deformation at cladding. Hence, cladding external was notched much by the wrinkles. (4) Time to fuel failure measured from the tested BWR fuels (pressurization < 0.6MPA) was longer than that measured from PWR fuels (pressurization < 3.2MPa). The magnitude of the former was of the order of 3 ∼ 6s, while that of the latter was < 1s. (J.P.N.)

  20. Fuel design with low peak of local power for BWR reactors with increased nominal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Federal Commission of Electricity recently announcement the beginning of the works related with the increase of the power to 120% of the original nominal one in the Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of the Laguna Verde Central (CLV): In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) are carried out studies of the impact on the design of the recharge of derived fuel of this increase. One of the main effects of the power increase type that it is promoting, is the increment of the flow of generated vapor, what takes, to a bigger fraction of vacuum in the core presenting increased values of the maximum fraction to the limit, so much of the ratio of lineal heat generation (XFLPD) as of the ratio of critic power (MFLCPR). In the made studies, it is found that these fractions rise lineally with the increase of the nominal power. Considering that the reactors of the CLV at the moment operate to 105% of the original nominal power, it would imply an increment of the order of 13.35% in the XFLPD and in the MFLCPR operating to a nominal power of 120% of the original one. This would propitiate bigger problems to design appropriately the fuel cycle and the necessity, almost unavoidable, of to resort to a fuel assembly type more advanced for the recharges of the cores. As option, in the ININ the feasibility of continuing using the same type of it fuel assembles that one has come using recently in the CLV, the type GE12 is analyzed. To achieve it was outlined to diminish the peak factor of local power (LPPF) of the power cells that compose the fuel recharge in 13.35%. It was started of a fuel design previously used in the recharge of the unit 1 cycle 12 and it was re-design to use it in the recharge design of the cycle 13 of the unit 1, considering an increase to 120% of the original power and the same requirements of cycle extension. For the re-design of the fuel assembly cell it was used the PreDiCeldas computer program developed in the ININ. It was able to diminish the LPPF

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising fuel elements arranged in a supporting frame composed of two end pieces, one at the top and the other at the bottom, on which are secured the ends of a number of vertical tubes, each end piece comprising a plane bottom on which two series of holes are made for holding the tubes and for the passage of the coolant. According to the invention, the bottom of each end piece is fixed to an internal plate fitted with the same series of holes for holding the tubes and for the fluid to pass through. These holes are of oblong section and are fitted with fixing elements cooperating with corresponding elements for securing these tubes by transversal movement of the inside plate

  2. Estimation of the coolant flow through a natural circulation BWR fuel channel applying and equivalent electrical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the design and implementation of an advanced controller for a reduced order model of a BWR reactor core cooled by natural circulating water, which allows real time estimates of coolant flows through fuel assemblies about standard neutron flux strings. Nuclear power plants with boiling water reactors control individual fuel assembly coolant flows by forced circulation using external or internal water pumps and different core support plate orifices. These two elements reduce flow dependency on local channel pressure drops. In BWR reactors using only natural circulation coolant flows, these two elements are not available and therefore individual channel coolant flows are highly dependent in local conditions, such as power distributions and local pressure drops. Therefore it is expected that grater uncertainties in these variables be used during safety, fuel management and other analysis, which in turns may lead to increased operation penalties, such as tighter operating limits. The objective of this work is to asses by computer simulations means to reduce uncertainties in the measurement of fuel assembly coolant flows and eventually the associated penalties. During coolant phase transitions, pressure drops and local power may alter local natural circulation through fuel assemblies and flow estimates can be helped or not by control rod moves. This work presents the construction of an optimal controller for a core flow estimator based on a reduced order model of the coolant going though the reactor vessel components and nuclear core. This model is to be driven by plant signals from standard BWR instrumentation in order to estimate the coolant flows in selected fuel assemblies about a LPRM string. For this purpose an equivalent electrical model has been mathematically developed and numerically tested. The power-flow maps of typical BRW are used as steady state references for this equivalent model. Once these were fully reproduced for steady state

  3. Seismic behaviour of fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general approach for the dynamic time-history analysis of the reactor core is presented in this paper as a part of the fuel assembly qualification program. Several detailed core models are set up to reflect the placement of the fuel assemblies within the core shroud. Peak horizontal responses are obtained for each model for the motions induced from earthquake. The dynamic responses such as fuel assembly shear force, bending moment and displacement, and spacer grid impact loads are carefully investigated. Also, the sensitivity responses are obtained for the earthquake motions and the fuel assembly non-linear response characteristics are discussed. (Author) 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab

  4. Seismic behaviour of fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Heuy Gap; Jhung, Myung Jo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-01

    A general approach for the dynamic time-history analysis of the reactor core is presented in this paper as a part of the fuel assembly qualification program. Several detailed core models are set up to reflect the placement of the fuel assemblies within the core shroud. Peak horizontal responses are obtained for each model for the motions induced from earthquake. The dynamic responses such as fuel assembly shear force, bending moment and displacement, and spacer grid impact loads are carefully investigated. Also, the sensitivity responses are obtained for the earthquake motions and the fuel assembly non-linear response characteristics are discussed. (Author) 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  5. BWR fuel reloads design using a Tabu search technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a system to design optimized boiling water reactor fuel reloads. This system is based on the Tabu Search technique along with the heuristic rules of Control Cell Core and Low Leakage. These heuristic rules are a common practice in fuel management to maximize fuel assembly utilization and minimize core vessel damage, respectively. The system uses the 3-D simulator code CM-PRESTO and it has as objective function to maximize the cycle length while satisfying the operational thermal limits and cold shutdown constraints. In the system tabu search ideas such as random dynamic tabu tenure, and frequency-based memory are used. To test this system an optimized boiling water reactor cycle was designed and compared against an actual operating cycle. Numerical experiments show an improved energy cycle compared with the loading patterns generated by engineer expertise and genetic algorithms

  6. BWR fuel reloads design using a Tabu search technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Alejandro E-mail: jacm@nuclear.inin.mx; Alonso, Gustavo E-mail: galonso@nuclear.inin.mx; Morales, Luis B. E-mail: lbm@servidor.unam.mx; Martin del Campo, Cecilia; Francois, J.L.; Valle, Edmundo del E-mail: edmundo@esfm.ipn.mx

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a system to design optimized boiling water reactor fuel reloads. This system is based on the Tabu Search technique along with the heuristic rules of Control Cell Core and Low Leakage. These heuristic rules are a common practice in fuel management to maximize fuel assembly utilization and minimize core vessel damage, respectively. The system uses the 3-D simulator code CM-PRESTO and it has as objective function to maximize the cycle length while satisfying the operational thermal limits and cold shutdown constraints. In the system tabu search ideas such as random dynamic tabu tenure, and frequency-based memory are used. To test this system an optimized boiling water reactor cycle was designed and compared against an actual operating cycle. Numerical experiments show an improved energy cycle compared with the loading patterns generated by engineer expertise and genetic algorithms.

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a nuclear fuel assembly comprising a nuclear fuel bundle in which a plurality of nuclear rods are bond by an upper tie plate, spacers and lower tie plate and a channel box containing them, the inner surface of the channel box and the surface of the lower tie plate opposing thereto are fabricated into step-like configuration respectively and the two fabricated surfaces are opposed to each other to constitute a step-like labyrinth flow channel. With such a configuration, when a fluid flows from higher pressure to lower pressure side, pressure loss is caused due to fluid friction in proportion with the length of the flow channel, due to the change of the flowing direction and, further, in accordance with deceleration or acceleration at each of the stepped portions. The total for each of the pressure loses constitutes the total pressure loss in the labyrinth. That is, if the pressure difference between the inside and the outside of the channel box is identical, the amount of leakage is reduced by so much as the increase of the total pressure loss, to thereby improve the stability of the reactor core and fuel economy. (T.M.)

  8. Effects of radial void distribution within fuel assembly on assembly neutronic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of radial subchannel-wise void distribution in a fuel assembly on assembly neutronic characteristics has been investigated using the assembly calculation code SRAC95 and the subchannel analysis code THERMIT2. With the iterative calculation of assembly calculation and the subchannel analysis (Method 1), subchannel-wise void fraction distribution, pin-power distribution and the infinite multiplication factor of the assembly are calculated. The results are compared with the result of the assembly calculation using uniform void distribution as input (Method 2). The calculation is performed for two assembly configurations in the present study: one is a fuel assembly that does not include a water rod (Case 1) and the other is the assembly that includes a water rod (Case 2). The differences in the infinite multiplication factor and pin-power peaking factor between the two methods are small in both cases. In typical BWR fuel assemblies that are investigated in the present study, the method that does not consider the radial subchannel-wise void fraction distribution within a fuel assembly (Method 2) is accurate enough for practical applications. (author)

  9. Physics of BWR MOX fuel results of an international benchmark study by the OECD/NEA nuclear science committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a theoretical benchmark of boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly containing MOX fuel rods are summarised. This study was carried out by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles (WPPR). A modern 10 x 10 BWR design with large internal water structure was chosen for this exercise. It corresponds to an ATRIUM 10 (10-9Q) type with symmetrical water gaps. About 30 solutions were submitted by approximately 20 participants using a dozen different code systems with data from well-known state-of-the-art evaluated nuclear data files, a response which underlines the widespread interest in BWR MOX physics. The discrepancies between the participants for the infinite multiplication factor from beginning of life through burn-ups up to 50 MWd/kg are relatively small (less than 1%). The effect due to diverse evaluated data libraries, e.g. JEF and ENDF represents about 1%. The peaking factor is a local value, more dependent on the methods used in the codes, and with lower compensation effects than for reactivity. The discrepancies are larger in value and there are inconsistencies in the location of the peak. The average values with and without the extreme values differ by 2%, implying that the extreme values could be outside the acceptable range. Other parameters examined include the behaviour of the peaking factor under cold conditions, the evolution of peaking factor with burn-up and the effect of voiding the assembly. Close attention was also paid to the depletion behaviour of gadolinia and the burn-up evolution of the heavy metals. The paper describes the results from this benchmark study and draws conclusions on the consistency of the different solutions provided and provides recommendations for the most effective methods. (author)

  10. Basic evaluation on nuclear characteristics of BWR high burnup MOX fuel and core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOX fuel will be used in existing commercial BWR cores as a part of reload fuels with equivalent operability, safety and economy to UO2 fuel in Japan. The design concept should be compatible with UO2 fuel design. High burnup UO2 fuels are being developed and commercialized step by step. The MOX fuel planned to be introduced in around year 2000 will use the same hardware as UO2 8 x 8 array fuel developed for a second step of UO2 high burnup fuel. The target discharge exposure of this MOX fuel is about 33 GWd/t. And the loading fraction of MOX fuel is approximately one-third in an equilibrium core. On the other hand, it becomes necessary to minimize a number of MOX fuels and plants utilizing MOX fuel, mainly due to the fuel economy, handling cost and inspection cost in site. For the above reasons, it needed to developed a high burnup MOX fuel containing much Pu and a core with a large amount of MOX fuels. The purpose of this study is to evaluate basic nuclear fuel and core characteristics of BWR high burnup MOX fuel with batch average exposure of about 39.5 GWd/t using 9 x 9 array fuel. The loading fraction of MOX fuel in the core is within a range of about 50% to 100%. Also the influence of Pu isotopic composition fluctuations and Pu-241 decay upon nuclear characteristics are studied. (author). 3 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  11. Fuel assembly supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent fuel assembly from lifting by forming through holes in the entrance nozzle and the connection pipe respectively opposed to each other and forming an expanded portion and inserting therein a stopper member at the position where the two holes are joined. Constitution: A through hole is formed in a connection tube slanted upwardly and inwardly from a high pressure plenum to the inside of the connection tube. While on the other hand, another through hole slanted with same angle is also formed to the reduced diameter portion of an entrance nozzle at the position corresponding to the above hole in the connection tube. Further, an expanded diameter section is formed to the inside of the connection tube and the outside of the reduced diameter section of the entrance nozzle, and a steel ball is mounted therein. (Kawakami, Y.)

  12. Validation of BWR advanced core and fuel nuclear designs with power reactor measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power reactor measurements have been important in validating the reliability, performance characteristics and economics of BWR advanced core and fuel designs. Such measurements go beyond the data obtainable from normal reactor operation and provide detailed benchmark data necessary to verify design and licensing computer design and simulation models. In some cases, such as in the validation of the performance of zirconium barrier pellet-cladding-interaction (PCI) resistant cladding, the BWR power reactor measurements have subjected the advanced fuel design to operating conditions more severe than normal operating conditions, thereby providing nuclear-thermal-mechanical-corrosion performance data for accelerated or extended conditions of operation. In some cases destructive measurements have been carried out on BWR power reactor fuel to provide microscopic and macroscopic data of importance in validating design and licensing analysis methods. There is not uniform agreement among core and fuel designers on the needs for special power reactor core and fuel measurements for validation of advanced designs. The General Electric approach has been to error on the side of extensive, detailed measurements so as to assure reliable performance licensing and economic design and predictive capability. This paper is a summary of some of the validative power reactor measurements that have been carried out on advanced BWR core and fuel designs. Some comparisons of predictions with the data are summarized

  13. Manufacturing method of fuel assembly and channel box for the fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An MOX fuel assembly to be used for a BWR type reactor comprises a channel box, a great number of fuel rod bundles and a water rod. BP members incorporated with a burnable neutron absorbing poison (BP) are buried in the vicinity of corners of four sides of the channel box in the longitudinal direction. The channel box is formed by fitting the BP members in concaves formed in the longitudinal direction of zircaloy plates, laminating other zircaloy plates and welding the seams. Then, hot rolling, cold rolling and annealing are conducted to form them into a single plate. Integrated two single plates after bending treatment are abutted and welded, and heat-treatment is applied to complete the channel box. With such a constitution, since the BP member is not brought into contact with reactor water directly, crevice corrosion or galvanic corrosion can be prevented. (I.N.)

  14. Fission gas release and related behaviours of BWR fuel under steady and transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) have been carried out on five lead use assemblies of current BWR Step II type fuel (Step II LUA) irradiated up to 47.8 GWd/t burn-up. Our database for fission gas release (FGR) has been extended to 51 GWd/t in rod burn-up and to 61 GWd/t in pellet burn-up. Furthermore, 25 segment rods of burn-up range from 43 to 61 GWd/t were power ramped and some of them were examined destructively. The FGR fraction of base irradiated Step II LUAs was less than that of the previous types of fuel rods, indicating the effectiveness of design improvements to reduce fission gas release and that of ramped segment rods showed a dependency on ramp terminal power, burn-up and cumulative holding time. Though the work is still in progress, some preliminary results of FGR and extensive PIEs, focusing on local data of fission product release and pellet microstructure, are presented. (author)

  15. Optimization of fuel cells for BWR based in Tabu modified search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advances in the development of a computational system for the design and optimization of cells for assemble of fuel of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are presented. The method of optimization is based on the technique of Tabu Search (Tabu Search, TS) implemented in progressive stages designed to accelerate the search and to reduce the time used in the process of optimization. It was programed an algorithm to create the first solution. Also for to diversify the generation of random numbers, required by the technical TS, it was used the Makoto Matsumoto function obtaining excellent results. The objective function has been coded in such a way that can adapt to optimize different parameters like they can be the enrichment average or the peak factor of radial power. The neutronic evaluation of the cells is carried out in a fine way by means of the HELIOS simulator. In the work the main characteristics of the system are described and an application example is presented to the design of a cell of 10x10 bars of fuel with 10 different enrichment compositions and gadolinium content. (Author)

  16. Inert matrix fuel assembly as an option for the Laguna Verde NPP fuel reloads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of large amounts of reactor and weapons grade plutonium in the world shows the necessity of anticipating situations for the use and disposition of it. Because Light Water Reactor (LWRs) prevail on the stage of electric energy generation by nuclear power, it is important to take into account the potential of these reactors to reduce the plutonium inventory. Several studies performed in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) show that reactor and weapons grade plutonium can effectively be burned in these reactors, in assemblies with fertile-free fuel, and maintaining reactivity control and other safety issues at least comparable to those related to the standard fuel normally used. The Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, currently carries out research on diverse alternatives to use Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) as an option to fuel reloads for the two BWR/5 Units at the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant. This work presents first the neutronic analysis of a fuel assembly conceptual design, which contains a combination of plutonium oxide (in an inert matrix) fuel rods, uranium oxide fuel rods, and uranium oxide with gadolinia fuel rods. Then, simulations for three different fuel assembly reload options were performed for Unit 1. Results of reactor operation from the different reload options are presented. The results obtained with reload fuel using inert matrix fuel assemblies observe a decrease in the length of operation cycle in the plant. However, the mass of uranium used is minor to require for make all fuel assemblies. (author)

  17. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Interfacial Bonding Efficiency Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF, also known as “used nuclear fuel” [UNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. Additional CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods; two specimens failed, and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 × 107 cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the SNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, eleven SNF rod segments from the Limerick BWR were tested using the ORNL CIRFT equipment; one test under static conditions and ten tests under dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at a maximum curvature of 4.0 m-1. The specimen did not show any sign of failure during three repeated loading cycles to a similar maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitudes varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of

  18. COBRA-SFS [Spent-Fuel Storage] thermal-hydraulic analyses of the CASTOR-1C and REA 2023 BWR storage casks containing consolidated spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consolidation of spent nuclear fuel rods is being considered as one option for more efficient and compact storage of reactor spent fuel assemblies. In this concept, rods from two disassembled spent fuel assemblies will be consolidated in a space originally intended to store a single unconsolidated assembly. The thermal performance of consolidated fuel rods in dry storage, especially in multiassembly storage systems, is one of the major issues that must be addressed prior to implementation. In this study, Pacific Northwest Laboratory researchers performed thermal-hydraulic analyses for both the REA 2023 cask and the CASTOR-1C cask containing either unconsolidated or consolidated BWR spent fuel assemblies. The objective was to determine the effect of consolidating spent fuel assemblies on the temperature distributions within both types of casks. Two major conclusions resulted from this study. First, a lumping technique (combining rods and flow channels), which reduces the number of computational nodes required to model complex multiassembly geometries, could be used for both unconsolidated and consolidated rods with negligible effect on prediction accuracies. Second, with a relatively high thermal conductivity backfill gas (e.g., helium), the predicted peak fuel rod temperature in a canister of consolidated rods generating the same amount of heat as an unconsolidated assembly is essentially the same as the peak temperature in the unconsolidated assembly. In contrast, with a relatively low thermal conductivity backfill gas (e.g., nitrogen), the opposite is true and the predicted peak temperature in a consolidated canister is significantly higher than in an unconsolidated assembly. Therefore, when rods are consolidated, selection of the backfill gas is important in maintaining peak rod temperatures below allowable values for rods with relatively high decay heat generation rates

  19. Investigation of the load change behaviour of PWR- and BWR fuel rods at positive power ramps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following irradiation experiments have been performed to determine the operational behaviour of fuel rods in LWR during power ramps: a) power ramp experiment in the nuclear power plant of Obrigheim (KWO) with 6 PWR test fuel rods at a burnup of about 14 MWd/kgU. No fuel rod defects have been found. b) preirradiation of 45 segmented fuel rods in KWO and of 8 segmented fuel rods in the reactor of Wuergassen; the preirradiated segments will be ramped at HFR Petten. c) power ramp experiments at HBWR with 8 BWR test fuel rods at burnups of 4-14 MWd/kgU; ramping caused no defects. (orig.)

  20. Prediction of the local power factor in BWR fuel cells by means of a multilayer neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To the beginning of a new operation cycle in a BWR reactor the reactivity of this it increases by means of the introduction of fresh fuel, the one denominated reload fuel. The problem of the definition of the characteristics of this reload fuel represents a combinatory optimization problem that requires significantly a great quantity of CPU time for their determination. This situation has motivated to study the possibility to substitute the Helios code, the one which is used to generate the new cells of the reload fuel parameters, by an artificial neuronal network, with the purpose of predicting the parameters of the fuel reload cell of a BWR reactor. In this work the results of the one training of a multilayer neuronal net that can predict the local power factor (LPPF) in such fuel cells are presented. The prediction of the LPPF is carried out in those condition of beginning of the life of the cell (0.0 MWD/T, to 40% of holes in the one moderator, temperature of 793 K in the fuel and a moderator temperature of 560 K. The cells considered in the present study consist of an arrangement of 10x10 bars, of those which 92 contains U235, some of these bars also contain a concentration of Gd2O3 and 8 of them contain only water. The axial location inside the one assembles of recharge of these cells it is exactly up of the cells that contain natural uranium in the base of the reactor core. The training of the neuronal net is carried out by means of a retro-propagation algorithm that uses a space of training formed starting from previous evaluations of cells by means of the Helios code. They are also presented the results of the application of the neuronal net found for the prediction of the LPPF of some cells used in the real operation of the Unit One of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power station. (Author)

  1. Effects of Void Uncertainties on Pin Power Distributions and the Void Reactivity Coefficient for a 10X10 BWR Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jatuff, F.; Krouthen, J.; Helmersson, S.; Chawla, R

    2004-03-01

    A significant source of uncertainty in Boiling Water Reactor physics is associated with the precise characterisation of the axially-dependent neutron moderation properties of the coolant inside the fuel assembly channel, and the corresponding effects on reactor physics parameters such as the lattice neutron multiplication, the neutron migration length, and the pin-by-pin power distribution. In this paper, the effects of particularly relevant void fraction uncertainties on reactor physics parameters have been studied for a BWR assembly of type Westinghouse SVEA-96 using the CASMO-4, HELIOS/PRESTO-2 and MCNP4C codes. The SVEA-96 geometry is characterised by the sub-division of the assembly into four different sub-bundles by means of an inner bypass with a cruciform shape. The study has covered the following issues: (a) the effects of different cross-section data libraries on the void coefficient of reactivity, for a wide range of void fractions; (b) the effects due to a heterogeneous vs. homogeneous void distribution inside the sub-bundles; and (c) the consequences of partly inserted absorber blades producing different void fractions in different sub-bundles. (author)

  2. Optimization of fuel cells for BWR based in Tabu modified search; Optimizacion de celdas de combustible para BWR basada en busqueda Tabu modificada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J.L. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Palomera P, M.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Posgrado en Ingenieria en Computacion, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: cmcm@fi-b.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The advances in the development of a computational system for the design and optimization of cells for assemble of fuel of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are presented. The method of optimization is based on the technique of Tabu Search (Tabu Search, TS) implemented in progressive stages designed to accelerate the search and to reduce the time used in the process of optimization. It was programed an algorithm to create the first solution. Also for to diversify the generation of random numbers, required by the technical TS, it was used the Makoto Matsumoto function obtaining excellent results. The objective function has been coded in such a way that can adapt to optimize different parameters like they can be the enrichment average or the peak factor of radial power. The neutronic evaluation of the cells is carried out in a fine way by means of the HELIOS simulator. In the work the main characteristics of the system are described and an application example is presented to the design of a cell of 10x10 bars of fuel with 10 different enrichment compositions and gadolinium content. (Author)

  3. Fuel performance annual report for 1981. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.; Tokar, M.

    1982-12-01

    This annual report, the fourth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1981 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel problems, fuel design changes and fuel surveillance programs, and high-burnup fuel experience are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included.

  4. Actinides record, power calculations and activity for present isotopes in the spent fuel of a BWR; Historial de actinidos y calculos de potencia y actividad para isotopos presentes en el combustible gastado de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez C, P.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Lucatero, M. A., E-mail: pastor.enriquez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The administration of spent fuel is one of the more important stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, and this has become a problem of supreme importance in countries that possess nuclear reactors. Due to this in this work, the study on the actinides record and present fission products to the discharge of the irradiated fuel in a light water reactor type BWR is shown, to quantify the power and activity that emit to the discharge and during the cooling time. The analysis was realized on a fuel assembly type 10 x 10 with an enrichment average of 3.69 wt % in U-235 and the assembly simulation assumes four cycles of operation of 18 months each one and presents an exposition of 47 G Wd/Tm to the discharge. The module OrigenArp of the Scale 6 code is the computation tool used for the assembly simulation and to obtain the results on the actinides record presents to the fuel discharge. The study covers the following points: a) Obtaining of the plutonium vector used in the fuel production of mixed oxides, and b) Power calculation and activity for present actinides to the discharge. The results presented in this work, correspond at the same time immediate of discharge (0 years) and to a cooling stage in the irradiated fuel pool (5 years). (Author)

  5. Use of high energy gamma emission tomography for partial defect verification of spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility to use passive gamma emission tomography for revealing non-destructively the rod structure of spent BWR fuel assemblies has been studied in cooperation with the Finnish Support Programme to the IAEA Safeguards (task FIN A98) and the Technical University of Budabest in Hungary. The ultimate goal is to develop partial verification methods for verification of spent nuclear fuel. The task included experimental measurements of irradiated BWR assemblies using underwater measurement techniques together with computer analysis of the measured data as well as computer simulation of tomographic measurements. The results obtained show that rod-level partial defect verification of spent LWR fuel assemblies is feasible using computed gamma emission tomography. This report describes the results of this project. (orig.). (7 refs., 29 figs., 2 tabs.)

  6. Swivel base for fuel assembly storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An invention is described the principal object of which is to provide a nuclear fuel assembly storage rack capable of supporting spent fuel assemblies without generating stresses in the fuel assemblies. The storage rack consists of a lower and upper support for supporting and retaining the spent fuel assemblies in their vertical positions. Relief from any stresses in the fuel assembly during storage is obtained by the provision of a swivel base in the lower support. (U.K.)

  7. BN-600 fuel elements and fuel assemblies operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given to the data on fuel burnup of standard fuel assemblies of the BN-600 reactor first core charge and that for modified core; data on operation ability of fuel assemblies of the first charge type are given. Data on main results of primary post-irradiation examination of fuel assemblies and fuel elements and maximal values of fuel burnup, achieved in particular fuel assemblies of BN-600 reactor are presented. 4 figs.; 1 tab

  8. GNS experience of CASTOR cask loading for storage and transport of spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With over 25 years of experience in the design, manufacturing, assembly and loading of CASTOR registered casks, GNS is one of the worldwide leading suppliers of casks for the transport and storage of spent fuel assemblies as well as for canisters with vitrified high level wastes. GNS products are used at around 30 sites worldwide for a wide range of inventories from pressurized and boiling water reactor fuels (PWR and BWR), thorium high-temperature reactor fuels (THTR) and research reactor fuels to vitrified high-active wastes (HAW) from reprocessing plants

  9. Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trianti, Nuri; Su'ud, Zaki; Arif, Idam; Riyana, EkaSapta

    2014-09-01

    Neutronic performance of small long-life boiling water reactors (BWR) with thorium nitride based fuel has been performed. A recent study conducted on BWR in tight lattice environments (with a lower moderator percentage) produces small power reactor which has some specifications, i.e. 10 years operation time, power density of 19.1 watt/cc and maximum excess reactivity of about 4%. This excess reactivity value is smaller than standard reactivity of conventional BWR. The use of hexagonal geometry on the fuel cell of BWR provides a substantial effect on the criticality of the reactor to obtain a longer operating time. Supported by a tight concept lattice where the volume fraction of the fuel is greater than the moderator and fuel, Thorium Nitride give good results for fuel cell design on small long life BWR. The excess reactivity of the reactor can be reduced with the addition of gadolinium as burnable poisons. Therefore the hexagonal tight lattice fuel cell design of small long life BWR that has a criticality more than 20 years of operating time has been obtained.

  10. Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronic performance of small long-life boiling water reactors (BWR) with thorium nitride based fuel has been performed. A recent study conducted on BWR in tight lattice environments (with a lower moderator percentage) produces small power reactor which has some specifications, i.e. 10 years operation time, power density of 19.1 watt/cc and maximum excess reactivity of about 4%. This excess reactivity value is smaller than standard reactivity of conventional BWR. The use of hexagonal geometry on the fuel cell of BWR provides a substantial effect on the criticality of the reactor to obtain a longer operating time. Supported by a tight concept lattice where the volume fraction of the fuel is greater than the moderator and fuel, Thorium Nitride give good results for fuel cell design on small long life BWR. The excess reactivity of the reactor can be reduced with the addition of gadolinium as burnable poisons. Therefore the hexagonal tight lattice fuel cell design of small long life BWR that has a criticality more than 20 years of operating time has been obtained

  11. Radial optimization of a BWR fuel cell using genetic algorithms; Optimizacion radial de una celda de combustible BWR usando algoritmos geneticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo M, C.; Carmona H, R.; Oropeza C, I.P. [UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: cmcm@fi-b.unam.mx

    2006-07-01

    The development of the application of the Genetic Algorithms (GA) to the optimization of the radial distribution of enrichment in a cell of fuel of a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The optimization process it was ties to the HELIOS simulator, which is a transport code of neutron simulation of fuel cells that has been validated for the calculation of nuclear banks for BWRs. With heterogeneous radial designs can improve the radial distribution of the power, for what the radial design of fuel has a strong influence in the global design of fuel recharges. The optimum radial distribution of fuel bars is looked for with different enrichments of U{sup 235} and contents of consumable poison. For it is necessary to define the representation of the solution, the objective function and the implementation of the specific optimization process to the solution of the problem. The optimization process it was coded in 'C' language, it was automated the creation of the entrances to the simulator, the execution of the simulator and the extraction, in the exit of the simulator, of the parameters that intervene in the objective function. The objective function includes four parameters: average enrichment of the cell, average gadolinia concentration of the cell, peak factor of radial power and k-infinite multiplication factor. To be able to calculate the parameters that intervene in the objective function, the one evaluation process of GA was ties to the HELIOS code executed in a Compaq Alpha workstation. It was applied to the design of a fuel cell of 10 x 10 that it can be employee in the fuel assemble designs that are used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. Its were considered 10 different fuel compositions which four contain gadolinia. Three heuristic rules that consist in prohibiting the placement of bars with gadolinia in the ends of the cell, to place the compositions with the smallest enrichment in the corners of the cell and to fix

  12. FUEL ASSEMBLY SHAKER TEST SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Sanborn, Scott E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2013-05-30

    This report describes the modeling of a PWR fuel assembly under dynamic shock loading in support of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) shaker test campaign. The focus of the test campaign is on evaluating the response of used fuel to shock and vibration loads that a can occur during highway transport. Modeling began in 2012 using an LS-DYNA fuel assembly model that was first created for modeling impact scenarios. SNL’s proposed test scenario was simulated through analysis and the calculated results helped guide the instrumentation and other aspects of the testing. During FY 2013, the fuel assembly model was refined to better represent the test surrogate. Analysis of the proposed loads suggested the frequency band needed to be lowered to attempt to excite the lower natural frequencies of the fuel assembly. Despite SNL’s expansion of lower frequency components in their five shock realizations, pretest predictions suggested a very mild dynamic response to the test loading. After testing was completed, one specific shock case was modeled, using recorded accelerometer data to excite the model. Direct comparison of predicted strain in the cladding was made to the recorded strain gauge data. The magnitude of both sets of strain (calculated and recorded) are very low, compared to the expected yield strength of the Zircaloy-4 material. The model was accurate enough to predict that no yielding of the cladding was expected, but its precision at predicting micro strains is questionable. The SNL test data offers some opportunity for validation of the finite element model, but the specific loading conditions of the testing only excite the fuel assembly to respond in a limited manner. For example, the test accelerations were not strong enough to substantially drive the fuel assembly out of contact with the basket. Under this test scenario, the fuel assembly model does a reasonable job of approximating actual fuel assembly response, a claim that can be verified through

  13. 44 BWR Waste Package Loading Curve Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of average initial boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of fuel into a potential 44 BWR waste package (WP). The potential WP design is illustrated in Attachment I. The scope of this calculation covers a range of initial enrichments from 1.5 through 5.0 weight percent U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 50 GWd/mtU

  14. 44 BWR Waste Package Loading Curve Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2001-11-05

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of average initial boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of fuel into a potential 44 BWR waste package (WP). The potential WP design is illustrated in Attachment I. The scope of this calculation covers a range of initial enrichments from 1.5 through 5.0 weight percent U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 50 GWd/mtU.

  15. Connection between end plates and rods in a BWR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the connection between the end plates and the rods of a BWR fuel element is analytically formulated. The behaviour of the springs coupling the rods with the upper plate is analyzed with particular detail since the deformation of these springs affects the forces at the interface of the fuel element structure components. A tool is given to design the springs according to some considerations regarding the mechanical strength of the interacting components as well as the influence of the possible geometrical unevennes of the system that can arise during the fuel element lifetime. (Cali', G.P.)

  16. Effect of bundle size on BWR fuel bundle critical power performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of the bundle size on the BWR fuel bundle critical power performance was studied. For this purpose, critical power tests were conducted with both 6 x 6 (36 heater rods) and 12 x 12 (144 heater rods) size bundles in the GE ATLAS heat transfer test facility located in San Jose, California. All the bundle geometries such as rod diameter, rod pitch and rod space design are the same except size of flow channel. Two types of critical power tests were performed. One is the critical power test with uniform local peaking pattern for direct comparison of the small and large bundle critical power. Other is the critical power test for lattice positions in the bundle. In this test, power of a group of four rods (2 x 2 array) in a lattice region was peaked higher to probe the critical power of that lattice position in the bundle. In addition, the test data were compared to the COBRAG calculations. COBRAG is a detailed subchannel analysis code for BWR fuel bundle developed by GE Nuclear Energy. Based on these comparisons the subchannel model was refined to accurately predict the data obtained in this test program, thus validating the code capability of handling the effects of bundle size on bundle critical power for use in the study of the thermal hydraulic performance of the future advance BWR fuel bundle design. The author describes the experimental portion of the study program

  17. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    utilized or referenced, justification has been provided as to why the data can be utilized for BWR fuel.

  18. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mertyurek, Ugur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    utilized or referenced, justification has been provided as to why the data can be utilized for BWR fuel.

  19. Investigation of Burnup Credit Issues in BWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations for long-term-disposal criticality safety of spent nuclear fuel requires the application of burnup credit because of the large mass of fissile material that will be present in the repository. Burnup credit calculations are based on depletion calculations that provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents, followed by criticality calculations to assess the value of keff for a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of probabilistically derived events. In order to ensure that the depletion calculation is conservative, it is necessary to both qualify and quantify assumptions that can be made in depletion models used to characterize spent fuel. Most effort in the United States this decade has focused on burnup issues related to pressurized-water reactors. However, requirements for the permanent disposal of fuel from boiling-water reactors has necessitated development of methods for prediction of spent fuel contents for such fuels. Concomitant with such analyses, validation is also necessary. This paper provides a summary of initial efforts at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to better understand and validate spent fuel analyses for boiling-water-reactor fuel

  20. Scaling laws and design aspects of a natural-circulation-cooled simulated boiling water reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the thermohydraulic behavior of a natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assembly, such as void drift, flow pattern distribution, and stability, a scaled loop geometry is designed. For modeling the steam/water flow in a BWR fuel assembly, scaling criteria are derived using the one-dimensional drift-flux model. Thermal equilibrium and subcooled boiling conditions are treated separately, resulting in one overall set of criteria. Scaling on all flow regimes that can be present in a normal fuel assembly leads to fixing both the assembly mass flux and the geometric dimensions. When Freon-12 is used as a modeling fluid, model assembly dimensions must be 0.46 of the prototype. Total power consumption must be reduced by a factor 50. To sustain cooling by natural circulation, a modeled chimney and downcomer are included

  1. Comparison of metaheuristic optimization techniques for BWR fuel reloads pattern design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► This paper shows a performance comparison of several optimization techniques for fuel reload in BWR. ► Genetic Algorithms, Neural Networks, Tabu Search and several Ant Algorithms were used. ► All optimization techniques were executed under same conditions: objective function and an equilibrium cycle. ► Fuel bundles with minor actinides were loaded into the core. ► Tabu search and Ant System were the best optimization technique for the studied problem. -- Abstract: Fuel reload pattern optimization is a crucial fuel management activity in nuclear power reactors. Along the years, a lot of work has been done in this area. In particular, several metaheuristic optimization techniques have been applied with good results for boiling water reactors (BWRs). In this paper, a comparison of different metaheuristics: genetic algorithms, tabu search, recurrent neural networks and several ant colony optimization techniques, were applied, in order to evaluate their performance. The optimization of an equilibrium core of a BWR, loaded with mixed oxide fuel composed of plutonium and minor actinides, was selected to be optimized. Results show that the best average values are obtained with the recurrent neural networks technique, meanwhile the best fuel reload was obtained with tabu search. However, according to the number of objective functions evaluated, the two fastest optimization techniques are tabu search and Ant System.

  2. Nuclear fuel assembly debris filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel assembly having fuel rods held in a spaced array by grid assemblies, guide tubes extending through the grid assemblies and attached at their upper and lower ends to an upper end fitting and a lower end fitting, the end fittings having openings therethrough for coolant flow, and a debris filter. The debris filter comprises: a plate attached to the bottom periphery of and spanning the lower end fitting; and the plate having substantially triangular-shaped flow holes therethrough that each measure approximately 0.181 inch from the base to the apex with the majority of the triangular- shaped flow holes arranged in groups of four to define square clusters that each measure approximately 0.405 inch on each side whereby the portions of the plate between the flow holes in each cluster are diagonally oriented relative to the sides of the plate

  3. Radial distribution of UO2 and Gd2O3 in fuel cells of a BWR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel system that is used at the moment in a power plant based on power reactors BWR, includes as much like the one of its substantial parts to the distribution of the fissile materials like a distribution of burnt poisons within each one of the cells which they constitute the fuel assemblies, used for the energy generation. Reason why at the beginning of a new operation cycle in a reactor of this type, the reactivity of the nucleus should be compensated by the exhaustion of the assemblies that it moves away of the nucleus for their final disposition. This compensation is given by means of the introduction of the recharge fuel, starting from the UO2 enriched in U235, and of the Gadolinium (Gd2O3). The distribution of these materials not only defines the requirements of energy generation, but in certain measures also the form in that the margins will behave to the limit them thermal during the operation of the reactor. These margins must be taken into account for the safe and efficient extraction of the energy of the fuel. In this work typical fuel cells appear that are obtained by means of the use of a emulation model of an ants colony. This model allows generating from a possible inventory of values of enrichment of U235, as well as of concentration of Gadolinium a typical fuel cell, which consists of an arrangement of lOxlO rods, of which 92 contain U235, some of these rods contain a concentration of Gd2O3 and 8 of the total contain only water. The search of each cell finishes when the value of the Local Peak Power Factor (LPPF) in the cell reaches a minimal value, or when a pre established value of iterations is reached. The cell parameters are obtained from the results of the execution of the code HELIOS, which incorporates like a part integral of the search algorithm. (Author)

  4. Experience of MOX-fuel operation in the Gundremmingen BWR plant: Nuclear characteristics and in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After 4 years of good experience with MOX-fuel operation in the BWR plants Gundremmingen units B and C the number of inserted MOX-FAs will be increased in the future continuously. Until now all MOX-FAs are in good condition. Furthermore calculations and measurements concerning zero power tests and tip measurements are in good agreement as expected: all results lead to the conclusion that MOX-FAs can be calculated with the same precision as uranium-FAs. (author)

  5. Comparison study of the thermal mechanical performance of fuel rods during BWR fuel preconditioning operations using the computer codes FUELSIM and FEMAXI-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R., E-mail: rafael.pantoja10@yahoo.com.m [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The safety of nuclear power plants requires monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behaviour under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, pre-conditioning simulations are necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod during any power ramp, and mainly during reactor startup, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with array 8 x 8, and the other one from a 10 x 10 fuel assembly design, and a comparison of the thermal-mechanical performance between the two different rod designs is performed. The performance simulations were performed by the code FUELSIM, and compared against results previously obtained from similar simulation with the code FEMAXI-V. (Author)

  6. Test plan for thermogravimetric analyses of BWR spent fuel oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary studies indicated the need for additional low-temperature spent fuel oxidation data to determine the behavior of spent fuel as a waste form for a tuffy repository. Short-term thermogravimetric analysis tests were recommended in a comprehensive technical approach as the method for providing scoping data that could be used to (1) evaluate the effects of variables such as moisture and burnup on the oxidation rate, (2) determine operative mechanisms, and (3) guide long-term, low-temperature oxidation testing. The initial test series studied the temperature and moisture effects on pressurized water reactor fuel as a function of particle and grain size. This document presents the test matrix for studying the oxidation behavior of boiling water reactor fuel in the temperature range of 140 to 225/degree/C. 17 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  7. System for assembling nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automatic system is described for assembling nuclear fuel elements, in particular those employing mixed oxide fuels. The system includes a sealing mechanism which allows movement during the assembling of the fuel element along the assembly stations without excessive release of contaminants. (U.K.)

  8. Fuel assembly for a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boiling water reactor fuel assembly is described which has vertical fuel rods and guide tubes positioned below the fuel rods and receiving control rod fingers and acting as water pipes, the guide tubes each being formed of a plurality of parts including a part secured to a grid plate positioned in the fuel assembly container, and low parts which fit into holes formed in the bottom of the fuel assembly. There is a flexible connection between the upper and lower parts of the guide tubes to allow for a certain tolerance in the procedure of manufacturing the various parts to allow insertion of the fuel rod bundle into the fuel assembly container

  9. CFD prediction of flow and phase distribution in fuel assemblies with spacers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglart, H.; Nylund, O. [ABB Atom AB, Vasteras (Switzerland); Kurul, N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling and computation of multi-dimensional two-phase flows in BWR fuel assemblies. The modeling principles are presented based on using a two-fluid model in which lateral interfacial effects are accounted for. This model has been used to evaluate the velocity fields of both vapor and liquid phases, as well as phase distribution, between fuel elements in geometries similar to BWR fuel bundles. Furthermore, this model has been used to predict, in a detailed mechanistic manner, the effects of spacers on flow and phase distribution between, and pressure drop along, fuel elements. The related numerical simulations have been performed using a CFD computer code, CFDS-FLOW3D.

  10. Thermal hydraulic test apparatus to develop advanced BWR fuel bundles with spectral shift rods (SSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced water rod (WR) called the spectral shift rod (SSR), which replaces a conventional WR in a BWR fuel bundle, enhances the BWR's merit of uranium saving through the spectral shift operation. The SSR consists of an inlet hole, a wide ascending path, a narrow descending path and an outlet hole. The inlet hole locates below a lower tie plate (LTP) and the outlet hole is set above it. In the SSR, water boils by neutron and gamma-ray heating and water level is formed in the ascending path. This SSR water level can be controlled by core flow rate, which amplifies core void fraction change, resulting in the amplified spectral shift effect. Steady state and transient tests were conducted to evaluate SSR thermal-hydraulic characteristics under BWR operation condition. The several types of SSR configuration were tested, which covers SSR design in both next generation and conventional BWRs. In this paper, the test apparatus overview and measurement systems especially two phase water level measures in the SSR are presented. (author)

  11. Design study of Thorium-232 and Protactinium-231 based fuel for long life BWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trianti, N.; Su'ud, Z.; Riyana, E. S.

    2012-06-01

    A preliminary design study for the utilization of thorium added with 231Pa based fuel on BWR type reactor has been performed. In the previous research utilization of fuel based Thorium-232 and Uranium-233 show 10 years operation time with maximum excess-reactivity about 4.075% dk/k. To increase reactor operation time and reduce excess-reactivity below 1% dk/k, Protactinium (Pa-231) is used as Burnable Poison. Protactinium-231 has very interesting neutronic properties, which enable the core to reduce initial excess-reactivity and simultaneously increase production of 233U to 231Pa in burn-up process. Optimizations of the content of 231Pa in the core enables the BWR core to sustain long period of operation time with reasonable burn-up reactivity swing. Based on the optimization of fuel element composition (Th and Pa) in various moderation ratio we can get reactor core with longer operation time, 20 ˜ 30 years operation without fuel shuffling or refuelling, with average power densities maximum of about 35 watt/cc, and maximum excess-reactivity 0.56% dk/k.

  12. BUTREN-RC an hybrid system for the recharges optimization of nuclear fuels in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The obtained results with the hybrid system BUTREN-RC are presented that obtains recharges of nuclear fuel for a BWR type reactor. The system has implemented the methods of optimization heuristic taboo search and neural networks. The optimization it carried out with the technique of taboo search, and the neural networks, previously trained, were used to predict the behavior of the recharges of fuel, in substitution of commercial codes of reactor simulation. The obtained recharges of nuclear fuel correspond to 5 different operation cycles of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant, Veracruz in Mexico. The obtained results were compared with the designs of this cycles. The energy gain with the recharges of fuel proposals is of approximately 4.5% with respect to those of design. The time of compute consumed it was considerably smaller that when a commercial code for reactor simulation is used. (Author)

  13. Sphere-pac versus pellet UO2 fuel in de Dodewaard BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative testing of UO2 sphere-pac and pellet fuel rods under LWR conditions has been jointly performed by the Netherlands Utilities Research Centre (KEMA) in Arnhem, the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) at Petten and the Netherlands Joint Nuclear Power Utility (GKN) at Dodewaard. This final report summarizes the highlights of this 1968-1988 program with strong emphasis on the fuel rods irradiated in the Dodewaard BWR. The conclusion reached is that under normal LWR conditions sphere-pac UO2 in LWR fuel rods offers better resistance against stress corrosion cracking of the cladding, but that under fast, single step, power ramping conditions pellet UO2 in LWR fuel rods has a better resistance against hoop stress failure of the cladding. 128 figs., 36 refs., 19 tabs

  14. BWR simulation in a stationary state for the evaluation of fuel cell design; Simulacion de un reactor BWR en estado estacionario para la evaluacion del diseno de celdas de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del C, R.; Castillo M, A., E-mail: joseluis.montes@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper the simulation of a BWR in order to evaluate the performance of a set of fuel assemblies under stationary state in three dimensions (3-D) is presented. 15 cases selected from a database containing a total of 18225 cases are evaluated. The main selection criteria were based on the results of the design phase of the power cells in two dimensions (2-D) and 3-D initial study. In 2-D studies the parameters that were used to qualify and select the designs were basically the local power peaking factor and neutron multiplication factor of each fuel cell. In the initial 3-D study variables that defined the quality of results, and from which the selection was realized, are the margins to thermal limits of reactor operation and the value of the effective multiplication factor at the end of cycle operation. From the 2-D and 3-D results of the studies described a second 3-D study was realized, where the optimizations of the fuel reload pattern was carried out. The results presented in this paper correspond to this second 3-D study. It was found that the designs of the fuel cell they had a similar behavior to those provided by the fuel supplier of reference BWR. Particularly it noted the impact of reload pattern on the cold shut down margin. An estimate of the operation costs of reference cycle analyzed with each one designed reload batch was also performed. As a result a positive difference (gain) up to 10,347 M/US D was found. (Author)

  15. Comparison of reconstructed radial pin total fission rates with experimental results in full scale BWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total fission rate measurements have been performed on full size BWR fuel assemblies of type SVEA-96+ in the zero power reactor PROTEUS at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This work presents comparisons of reconstructed 2D pin fission rates in two configurations, I-1A and I-2A. Both configurations contain, in the central test zone, an array of 3x3 SVEA-96+ fuel elements moderated with light water at 20 deg. C. In configuration I-2A, an L-shaped hafnium control blade (half of a real cruciform blade) is inserted adjacent to the NW corner of the central fuel element. To minimize the impact of the surroundings, all measurements were done in fuel pins belonging to the central assembly. The 3x3 experimental configuration was modeled using the core monitoring and design tools that are applied at the Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant (KKL). These are the 2D transport code HELIOS, used for the cross-section generation, and the 3D, 2-group nodal diffusion code PRESTO-2. The exterior is represented, in the axial and radial directions, by 2-group albedos calculated at the test zone boundary using a full-core 3D MCNPX model. The calculated-to-experimental (C/E) ratios of the total fission rates have a standard deviation of 1.3% in configuration I-1A (uncontrolled) and 3.2% in configuration I-2A (controlled). Sensitivity cases are analyzed to show the impact of certain parameters on the calculated fission rate distribution and reactivity. It is shown that the relative pin fission rate is only weakly dependent on these parameters. In cases without a control blade, the pin power reconstruction methodology delivers the same level of accuracy as 2D transport calculations. On the other hand, significant deviations, that are inherent to the use of reflected geometry in the lattice calculations, are observed in cases when the control blade is inserted. (authors)

  16. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanical performance of fuel rods of a BWR during a power ramp using the FUELSIM code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To avoid the risk to environment due to release of radioactive material, because of occurrence of an accident, it is the priority of the design and performance of the diverse systems of safety of a commercial nuclear power plant. The safety of nuclear power plants requires, therefore, monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behavior under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. The main application of the thermal-mechanical analysis codes is the prediction of occurrence of conditions and/or phenomena that could lead to the deterioration or even mechanical failure of the fuel rod cladding, as, for example, the pellet-cladding interaction. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, fuel preconditioning operations refer to the operational procedures employed to reduce the fuel rod failure probability due to fuel-cladding interaction, specially during reactor startup. Preconditioning simulations are therefore necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR 5/6, as those two nuclear reactors in Laguna Verde, Veracruz, is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with an array 8 x 8

  17. MOX fuel use in a BWR with extended power up-rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Use of MOX fuel is assessed for a BWR under a extended power uprate (EPU). ► EPU conditions reduce the maximum amount of MOX fuel to be loaded. ► The use of MOX fuel affects mainly the core neutronics and not to the thermal hydraulics. ► Start up of an equilibrium mixed UO2–MOX core under EPU does not present stability problems. -- Abstract: Although MOX fuel coming from reprocessed depleted uranium fuels has been used as a recycling strategy by countries like France and Japan it is not a common policy in the 30 countries that uses nuclear power, nowadays it seems to be a more direct alternative to reduce the depleted fuel interim storage. Previously, the spent fuel pools of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant were redesigned to host the total operating life depleted fuel under its original nominal power condition, however the plant has been up-rated to 120% of its original nominal power increasing the number of depleted fuel forecasted. This new situation makes necessary the analysis of alternatives, being one of them recycling. The current paper assesses the viability of using MOX fuel in the up-rated Power Plant; the design of the boiling water reactor MOX fuel addresses the two main constraints of its use: shutdown margin and reactor stability. Fuel design proposed sets the appropriate MOX enrichment and the maximum MOX fuel batch reload that does not imply any modification to the reactor control systems to avoid an extra economical cost due to its use.

  18. Development of neural network for predicting local power distributions in BWR fuel bundles considering burnable neutron absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neural network model is under development to predict the local power distribution in a BWR fuel bundle as a high speed simulator of precise nuclear physical analysis model. The relation between 235U enrichment of fuel rods and local peaking factor (LPF) has been learned using a two-layered neural network model ENET. The training signals used were 33 patterns having considered a line symmetry of a 8x8 assembly lattice including 4 water rods. The ENET model is used in the first stage and a new model GNET which learns the change of LPFs caused by burnable neutron absorber Gadolinia, is added to the ENET in the second stage. Using this two-staged model EGNET, total number of training signals can be decreased to 99. These training signals are for zero-burnup cases. The effect of Gadolinia on LPF has a large nonlinearity and the GNET should have three layers. This combined model of EGNET can predict the training signals within 0.02 of LPF error, and the LPF of a high power rod is predictable within 0.03 error for Gadolinia rod distributions different from the training signals when the number of Gadolinia rods is less than 10. The computing speed of EGNET is more than 100 times faster than that of a precise nuclear analysis model, and EGNET is suitable for scoping survey analysis. (author)

  19. Failure thresholds of high burnup BWR fuel rods under RIA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient deformation of high burnup boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rods was measured and failure limit was examined under simulated reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions. Brittle cladding failure occurred at a small hoop strain of about 0.4% during an early phase of the pulse irradiation tests at the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR). Strain rates were in an order of tens %/s at the time of the failure. Comparison of the results with thermal expansion of pellets suggested that the cladding deformation was caused by thermal expansion of the pellets. In other words, the influence of fission gases in the pellets was small in the early phase deformation. Separate effect tests were conducted to examine influence of the cladding temperature on the cladding failure behavior. Influence of the pulse width on the failure threshold was discussed in terms of the strain rate, magnitude of the deformation and temperature of the cladding for high burnup BWR fuel rods under the RIA conditions. (author)

  20. An assessment of entrainment correlations for the dryout prediction in BWR fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal-hydraulic analysis in BWR fuel bundles usually includes calculations of detailed annular flow characteristics up to the point of dryout. State-of-the-art methods numerically resolve the governing balance equations for the relevant fields (i.e. droplet, liquid film and steam) for the system and geometry of interest (e.g. a BWR fuel bundle). However, constitutive relations are needed to close the system of equations and are fundamental to an accurate solution. One of the most important constitutive relations to consider is the droplet entrainment rate from the annular liquid film, which has an integrated effect upon the film flowrate axial distribution from the onset of annular flow (thick film) up to the dryout location (very thin film). However, currently available entrainment correlations are often developed for a relatively limit range of experimental conditions, which may not fully cover the range of applications. In this paper, we present a collection of publicly available droplet entrainment rate measurements (more than 1000 points) that have been stored into an electronic format and is used to assess the performance of several published entrainment correlations. Even though large scatter was observed for all 6 tested correlations, the model developed by Okawa et al. was shown to yield the best overall performance. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the radial design of fuel cells in an operation cycle of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is continuation of one previous in the one that the application of the optimization technique called Tabu search to the radial design of fuel cells of boiling water reactors (BWR, Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The objective function used in the optimization process only include neutron parameters (k-infinite and peak of radial power) considering the cell at infinite media. It was obtained to reduce the cell average enrichment completing the characteristics of reactivity of an original cell. The objective of the present work is to validate the objective function that was used for the radial design of the fuel cell (test cell), analyzing the operation of a one cycle of the reactor in which fuels have been fresh recharged that contain an axial area with the nuclear database of the cell designed instead of the original cell. For it is simulated it with Cm-Presto the cycle 10 of the reactor operation of the Unit 1 of the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (U1-CNLV). For the cycle evaluation its were applied so much the simulation with the Haling strategy, as the simulation of the one cycle with control rod patterns and they were evaluated the energy generation and several power limits and reactivity that are used as design parameters in fuel reloads of BWR reactors. The results at level of an operation cycle of the reactor, show that the objective function used in the optimization and radial design of the cell is adequate and that it can induce to one good use of the fuel. (Author)

  2. Fuel assembly self-excited vibration and test methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PWR fuel assemblies normally experience low amplitude, random vibration under normal reactor flow conditions. This normal fuel assembly vibration has almost no impact on grid-rod fretting wear. However, some fuel assembly designs experience a high resonant fuel assembly vibration under normal axial flow conditions. This anomalous fuel assembly vibration is defined as fuel assembly self-excitation vibration (FASE), because the assembly vibrates resonantly without any external periodic excitation force. Fuel assembly self-excitation vibration can cause severe grid-rod fretting if the assembly operates at the flow rate, which causes high fuel assembly vibration. This paper will describe the characteristics of fuel assembly self-excitation vibration and the test methodology to identify the fuel assembly vibration. Several fuel assembly designs are compared under standard test conditions. The causes for the fuel assembly self-excitation vibration are analyzed and discussed. The test acceptance criteria are defined for newly developed PWR fuel assemblies. (authors)

  3. Development of neural network simulating power distribution of a BWR fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neural network model is developed to simulate the precise nuclear physics analysis program code for quick scoping survey calculations. The relation between enrichment and local power distribution of BWR fuel bundles was learned using two layers neural network (ENET). A new model is to introduce burnable neutron absorber (Gadolinia), added to several fuel rods to decrease initial reactivity of fresh bundle. The 2nd stages three layers neural network (GNET) is added on the 1st stage network ENET. GNET studies the local distribution difference caused by Gadolinia. Using this method, it becomes possible to survey of the gradients of sigmoid functions and back propagation constants with reasonable time. Using 99 learning patterns of zero burnup, good error convergence curve is obtained after many trials. This neural network model is able to simulate no learned cases fairly as well as the learned cases. Computer time of this neural network model is about 100 times faster than a precise analysis model. (author)

  4. Optimization of fuel reloads for a BWR using the ant colony system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work some results obtained during the development of optimization systems are presented, which are employees for the fuel reload design in a BWR. The systems use the ant colony optimization technique. As first instance, a system is developed that was adapted at travel salesman problem applied for the 32 state capitals of Mexican Republic. The purpose of this implementation is that a similarity exists with the design of fuel reload, since the two problems are of combinatorial optimization with decision variables that have similarity between both. The system was coupled to simulator SIMULATE-3, obtaining good results when being applied to an operation cycle in equilibrium for reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  5. Simulation of Irradiated BWR fuel rod (TS) test in NSRR using FRAP-T6 and NSR-77

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Series of pulse irradiation tests have been performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate irradiated fuel rod performance under the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions. Five tests, called Tests TS-1 through TS-5, were conducted in a period from 1989 to 1993 with irradiated 7x7 type BWR fuel rods provided from a commercial power plant. Simulation calculations of the TS tests were carried out with the FRAP-T6 code, which is widely used in the world to estimate fuel performance under various accident conditions, and with the NSR77 code, which describes fresh fuel rod performance well in the NSRR tests. Results of the calculation are compiled in this report and applicability of the codes to the irradiated BWR fuel rod tests is discussed. (author)

  6. Impact Analysis for Fuel Assemblies in Spent Fuel Storage Rack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and structural integrity evaluation of a spent fuel storage rack (SFSR) utilized for storing and protecting the spent fuel assemblies generated during the operation of a reactor are very important in terms of nuclear safety and waste management. The objective of this study is to show the validity of the SFSR design as well as fuel assembly through a structural integrity evaluation based on a numerical analysis. In particular, a dynamic time history analysis considering the gaps between the fuel assemblies and the walls of the storage cell pipes in the SFSR was performed to check the structural integrity of the fuel assembly and storage cell pipe

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly identification using computer vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an improved method of remotely identifying irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies. The method uses existing in-cell TV cameras to input an image of the notch-coded top of the fuel assemblies into a computer vision system, which then produces the identifying number for that assembly. This system replaces systems that use either a mechanical mechanism to feel the notches or use human operators to locate notches visually. The system was developed for identifying fuel assemblies from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor, but could be used for other reactor assembly identification, as appropriate

  8. Fuel loading and control rod patterns optimization in a BWR using tabu search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the QuinalliBT system, a new approach to solve fuel loading and control rod patterns optimization problem in a coupled way. This system involves three different optimization stages; in the first one, a seed fuel loading using the Haling principle is designed. In the second stage, the corresponding control rod pattern for the previous fuel loading is obtained. Finally, in the last stage, a new fuel loading is created, starting from the previous fuel loading and using the corresponding set of optimized control rod patterns. For each stage, a different objective function is considered. In order to obtain the decision parameters used in those functions, the CM-PRESTO 3D steady-state reactor core simulator was used. Second and third stages are repeated until an appropriate fuel loading and its control rod pattern are obtained, or a stop criterion is achieved. In all stages, the tabu search optimization technique was used. The QuinalliBT system was tested and applied to a real BWR operation cycle. It was found that the value for k eff obtained by QuinalliBT was 0.0024 Δk/k greater than that of the reference cycle

  9. Fuel fire tests of selected assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydd, G.; Spindola, K.; Askew, G. K.

    1982-04-01

    A varing assortment of clothing assemblies was tested in the Fuel Fire Test Facility at the Naval Air Development Center. Included was a Nomex-Kevlar Cloque Coverall which had relatively good protection from fuel flames.

  10. Spent fuel from the Finnish Triga research reactor in the surroundings of BWR spent fuel final disposal repository. Safety assessment and comparison to the risks of the BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Finnish Triga reactor, a 250 kW research reactor, has been in operation since 1962. According to the current operating license of our reactor we have to achieve a binding agreement between our Research Centre and the domestic Nuclear Power Companies about the possibility to use the Olkiluoto final disposal facility for our spent fuel. Naturally there is also the possibility to make an agreement with USDOE about the return of our spent fuel back to USA. In case of the domestic final disposal solution the main safety aspects, which have to be analyzed and compared to the spent fuel coming from the nuclear power plants, are the criticality safety, the solubility of the fuel (UZrHx) to water and the existence of some moving and long-lived radioactive isotopes. The criticality safety calculations show that it is possible to load safely all the TRIGA fuel elements in one heavy final disposal canister. A simple safety analysis for the Triga fuel has been carried out in order to evaluate the long term risks of the final disposal. For the analysis a few scenarios from the TILA-99 safety assessment have been chosen. These scenarios will give a good picture of the potential risk of disposed Triga fuel compared to BWR fuel. TILA-99 safety assessment includes about 100 calculated different scenarios for the spent fuel so it's not reasonable to calculate them all for the Triga fuel. The main result is that the risks from the final disposal of Triga fuel are minor compared to BWR mainly due to smaller activity inventories. (author)

  11. Design report of the disposal canister for twelve fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, H. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Salo, J.P. [Posiva Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    The report provides a summary of the design of the canister for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The canister structure consists of a cylindrical massive nodular graphite cast iron insert covered by a 50 mm thick copper overlay. The capacity of the canister is 12 assemblies of BWR or VVER 440 fuel. The canister shall be tight with a high probability for about 100 000 years. The good and long lasting tightness requires: (1) The good initial tightness that is achieved by high quality requirements and extensive quality control, (2) The good corrosion resistance, which is obtained by the overpack of oxygen free copper, and (3) Mechanical strength of the canister, that is ensured by analyses (the following loads are considered: hydrostatic pressure, even and uneven swelling pressure of bentonite, thermal effects, and elevated hydrostatic pressure during glaciation. The allowed stresses and strains are set in such a way that reasonable engineering safety factors are obtained in all assessed design base loading cases). The canister shall limit the radiation dose rate outside the canister to minimise the radiolysis of the water in the vicinity of the canister. The canister insert shall keep the fuel assemblies in a subcritical configuration even if the void in the canister is filled with water due to postulated leakage. The design basis of the canister is set, the performed analyses are summarised and the results are assessed and discussed in the report. (orig.) 35 refs.

  12. Design report of the disposal canister for twelve fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides a summary of the design of the canister for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The canister structure consists of a cylindrical massive nodular graphite cast iron insert covered by a 50 mm thick copper overlay. The capacity of the canister is 12 assemblies of BWR or VVER 440 fuel. The canister shall be tight with a high probability for about 100 000 years. The good and long lasting tightness requires: (1) The good initial tightness that is achieved by high quality requirements and extensive quality control, (2) The good corrosion resistance, which is obtained by the overpack of oxygen free copper, and (3) Mechanical strength of the canister, that is ensured by analyses (the following loads are considered: hydrostatic pressure, even and uneven swelling pressure of bentonite, thermal effects, and elevated hydrostatic pressure during glaciation. The allowed stresses and strains are set in such a way that reasonable engineering safety factors are obtained in all assessed design base loading cases). The canister shall limit the radiation dose rate outside the canister to minimise the radiolysis of the water in the vicinity of the canister. The canister insert shall keep the fuel assemblies in a subcritical configuration even if the void in the canister is filled with water due to postulated leakage. The design basis of the canister is set, the performed analyses are summarised and the results are assessed and discussed in the report. (orig.)

  13. Preliminary study on characteristics of equilibrium thorium fuel cycle of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main objectives behind the transuranium recycling ideas is not merely to utilize natural resource that is uranium much more efficiently, but to reduce the environmental impact of the radio-toxicity of the nuclear spent fuel. Beside uranium resource, there is thorium which has three times abundance compared to that of uranium which can be utilized as nuclear fuel. On top of that thorium is believed to have less radio-toxicity of spent fuel since its produce smaller amount of higher actinides compared to that of uranium. However, the studies on the thorium utilization in nuclear reactor in particular in light water reactors (LWR) are not performed intensively yet. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the characteristics of thorium fuel cycle in LWR, especially boiling water reactor (BWR). To conduct the comprehensive investigations we have employed the equilibrium burnup model (1-3). The equilibrium burnup model is an alternative powerful method since its can handle all possible generated nuclides in any nuclear system. Moreover, this method is a simple time independent method. Hence the equilibrium burnup method could be very useful for evaluating and forecasting the characteristics of any nuclear fuel cycle, even the strange one, e.g. all nuclides are confined in the reactor1). We have employed 1368 nuclides in the equilibrium burnup calculation where 129 of them are heavy metals (HMs). This burnup code then is coupled with SRAC cell calculation code by using PIJ module to compose an equilibrium-cell burnup code. For cell calculation, 26 HMs, 66 fission products (FPs) and one pseudo FP have been utilized. The JENDL 3.2 library has been used in this study. References: 1. A. Waris and H. Sekimoto, 'Characteristics of several equilibrium fuel cycles of PWR', J. Nucl. Sci. Technol., 38, p.517-526, 2001 2. A. Waris, H. Sekimoto, and G. Kastchiev, Influence of Moderator-to-Fuel Volume Ratio on Pu and MA Recycling in Equilibrium Fuel Cycles of

  14. Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Assembly Axial Design Optimization Using Tabu Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the implementation of the tabu search (TS) optimization method to a boiling water reactor's (BWR's) fuel assembly (FA) axial design is described. The objective of this implementation is to test the TS method for the search of optimal FA axial designs. This implementation has been linked to the reactor core simulator CM-PRESTO in order to evaluate each design proposed in a reactor cycle operation. The evaluation of the proposed fuel designs takes into account the most important safety limits included in a BWR in-core analysis based on the Haling principle. Results obtained show that TS is a promising method for solving the axial design problem. However, it merits further study in order to find better adaptation of the TS method for the specific problem

  15. Evaluation of thermal, mechanical and fission gas release behavior for BWR fuel rods with Teto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code (TETO) was developed to carry out thermal-mechanical analysis and fission gas release in fuel rod elements of the BWR type. This program was especially designed for use in the simulations made with the Fuel Management System (FMS) from Scandpower. Using experimental correlations this code models the phenomena of swelling, fission gas release and fracture for fuel pellets and cladding that can occur during irradiation cycles. This code differs from other programs in that it uses a simplified model to obtain the temperature profile along the cooling channel with the supposition that there exists a two-phase flow. This profile is used to determine the radial temperature distribution. The code calculates the axial and radial temperature distributions along the fuel rod at half the distance of the pellet's length; in other words there are as many axial points as pellets. Also, the program models the experimental correlation for swelling and fission gas releases and performs a thermal-elastic analysis for fuel pellets and cladding. (author)

  16. Global Nuclear Fuel launches GNF{sub 3} and NSF: The most reliable BWR fuel just got better

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantonwine, P.; Schneider, R.; Hunt, B.

    2015-11-01

    Bases on evolutionary design changes and advanced technology developed by Global Nuclear Fuel (GNF), the GNF3 fuel assembly is designed to offer customers with improved fuel economics, increased performance and flexibility in operation while maintaining the superior reliability of GNF2, the most reliable design in GNFs history. In addition to improved fuel utilization and performance, GNF3 is designed and manufactured to be more resistant to debris capture, to eliminate channel control blade interference concerns, and to exhibit to best available corrosion resistance of any boiling water reactor fuel. While delivering fuel cycle savings and reliability benefits with GNF3, GNF maintains a similar licensing and operating basis to GNF2, thereby minimizing fuel transition risks. GNF3 is available in lead use assembly quantities to customers today. Eight GNF3 lead use assemblies are in operation at two utilities in the USA GNF3 is scheduled to be available for full reloads in 2018. (Author)

  17. Qualification of helium measurement system for detection of fuel failures in a BWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, I.; Sihver, L.; Loner, H.; Grundin, A.; Helmersson, J.-O.; Ledergerber, G.

    2014-05-01

    There are several methods for surveillance of fuel integrity during the operation of a boiling water reactor (BWR). The detection of fuel failures is usually performed by analysis of grab samples of off-gas and coolant activities, where a measured increased level of ionizing radiation serves as an indication of new failure or degradation of an already existing one. At some nuclear power plants the detection of fuel failures is performed by on-line nuclide specific measurements of the released fission gases in the off-gas system. However, it can be difficult to distinguish primary fuel failures from degradation of already existing failures. In this paper, a helium measuring system installed in connection to a nuclide specific measuring system to support detection of fuel failures and separate primary fuel failures from secondary ones is presented. Helium measurements provide valuable additional information to measurements of the gamma emitting fission gases for detection of primary fuel failures, since helium is used as a fill gas in the fuel rods during fabrication. The ability to detect fuel failures using helium measurements was studied by injection of helium into the feed water systems at the Forsmark nuclear power plant (NPP) in Sweden and at the nuclear power plant Leibstadt (KKL) in Switzerland. In addition, the influence of an off-gas delay line on the helium measurements was examined at KKL by injecting helium into the off-gas system. By using different injection rates, several types of fuel failures with different helium release rates were simulated. From these measurements, it was confirmed that the helium released by a failed fuel can be detected. It was also shown that the helium measurements for the detection of fuel failures should be performed at a sampling point located before any delay system. Hence, these studies showed that helium measurements can be useful to support detection of fuel failures. However, not all fuel failures which occurred at

  18. Fuel design with low peak of local power for BWR reactors with increased nominal power; Diseno de un combustible con bajo pico de potencia local para reactores BWR con potencia nominal aumentada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia C, R.; Montes, J.L.; Hernandez, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Castillo, A. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mrpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The Federal Commission of Electricity recently announcement the beginning of the works related with the increase of the power to 120% of the original nominal one in the Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of the Laguna Verde Central (CLV): In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) are carried out studies of the impact on the design of the recharge of derived fuel of this increase. One of the main effects of the power increase type that it is promoting, is the increment of the flow of generated vapor, what takes, to a bigger fraction of vacuum in the core presenting increased values of the maximum fraction to the limit, so much of the ratio of lineal heat generation (XFLPD) as of the ratio of critic power (MFLCPR). In the made studies, it is found that these fractions rise lineally with the increase of the nominal power. Considering that the reactors of the CLV at the moment operate to 105% of the original nominal power, it would imply an increment of the order of 13.35% in the XFLPD and in the MFLCPR operating to a nominal power of 120% of the original one. This would propitiate bigger problems to design appropriately the fuel cycle and the necessity, almost unavoidable, of to resort to a fuel assembly type more advanced for the recharges of the cores. As option, in the ININ the feasibility of continuing using the same type of it fuel assembles that one has come using recently in the CLV, the type GE12 is analyzed. To achieve it was outlined to diminish the peak factor of local power (LPPF) of the power cells that compose the fuel recharge in 13.35%. It was started of a fuel design previously used in the recharge of the unit 1 cycle 12 and it was re-design to use it in the recharge design of the cycle 13 of the unit 1, considering an increase to 120% of the original power and the same requirements of cycle extension. For the re-design of the fuel assembly cell it was used the PreDiCeldas computer program developed in the ININ. It was able to diminish the LPPF

  19. Assembly mechanism for nuclear fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to an assembly mechanism for nuclear power reactor fuel bundles using a novel, simple and inexpensive means. The mechanism is readily operable remotely, avoids separable parts and is applicable to fuel assemblies in which the upper tie plate is rigidly mounted on the tie rods which hold it in place. (UK)

  20. A parametric study and comparison of BWR fuel depletion calculations using CASMO-4, MCNPX, and SCALE/TRITON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CASMO-4 is a multigroup two-dimensional transport code for LWR lattice physics calculations. MCNPX and TRITON/T6-Depl are two general-purpose transport codes with depletion capability for various fuel designs. MCNPX can use continuous-energy cross sections while TRITON currently only supports multigroup depletion calculations. This study presented a systematic comparison of these three codes for depletion calculations of a typical BWR fuel assembly. Key parameters for sensitivity studies were neutron cross-section libraries, burnup steps, modeling of poison rods, inclusion of additional nuclides for depletion, thermal expansion, pin-by-pin depletion, and Dancoff factors. The CASMO-4 results were arbitrarily taken as a reference base on which the differences of MCNPX or TRITON calculations were evaluated. Useful observations from the comparisons were as follows: The ENDF/B-VII cross-section library gave the most consistent result with CASMO-4. At least five radially subdivided zoning of a Gd-bearing rod was necessary for depletion calculations. MCNPX calculations were more sensitive to choices of burnup steps and numbers of nuclides being traced in fuel inventory than TRITON did. Applying the same thermal expansion corrections in TRITON reduced its differences with CASMO-4 in the middle of cycle. Pin-by-pin depletion is necessary but only slightly changed k∞ profiles in this case compared with average depletion. Using more accurate Dancoff factors in TRITON resulted in an excellent agreement of k∞ values with CASMO-4 at the early stage of burnup, but they still gradually deviated at later burnups. Overall, both MCNPX and TRITON predicted k∞ profiles in this problem were within 500 pcm agreement with CASMO-4 in the entire burnup period. (author)

  1. Prediction of the local power factor in BWR fuel cells by means of a multilayer neural network; Prediccion del factor local de potencia en celdas de combustible BWR mediante una red neuronal multicapas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Perusquia C, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Francois, J.L.; Martin del Campo M, C. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jlmt@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    To the beginning of a new operation cycle in a BWR reactor the reactivity of this it increases by means of the introduction of fresh fuel, the one denominated reload fuel. The problem of the definition of the characteristics of this reload fuel represents a combinatory optimization problem that requires significantly a great quantity of CPU time for their determination. This situation has motivated to study the possibility to substitute the Helios code, the one which is used to generate the new cells of the reload fuel parameters, by an artificial neuronal network, with the purpose of predicting the parameters of the fuel reload cell of a BWR reactor. In this work the results of the one training of a multilayer neuronal net that can predict the local power factor (LPPF) in such fuel cells are presented. The prediction of the LPPF is carried out in those condition of beginning of the life of the cell (0.0 MWD/T, to 40% of holes in the one moderator, temperature of 793 K in the fuel and a moderator temperature of 560 K. The cells considered in the present study consist of an arrangement of 10x10 bars, of those which 92 contains U{sup 235}, some of these bars also contain a concentration of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 8 of them contain only water. The axial location inside the one assembles of recharge of these cells it is exactly up of the cells that contain natural uranium in the base of the reactor core. The training of the neuronal net is carried out by means of a retro-propagation algorithm that uses a space of training formed starting from previous evaluations of cells by means of the Helios code. They are also presented the results of the application of the neuronal net found for the prediction of the LPPF of some cells used in the real operation of the Unit One of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power station. (Author)

  2. Development of neural network for analysis of local power distributions in BWR fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neural network model has been developed to learn the local power distributions in a BWR fuel bundle. A two layers neural network with total 128 elements is used for this model. The neural network learns 33 cases of local power peaking factors of fuel rods with given enrichment distribution as the teacher signals, which were calculated by a fuel bundle nuclear analysis code based on precise physical models. This neural network model studied well the teacher signals within 1 % error. It is also able to calculate the local power distributions within several % error for the different enrichment distributions from the teacher signals when the average enrichment is close to 2 %. This neural network is simple and the computing speed of this model is 300 times faster than that of the precise nuclear analysis code. This model was applied to survey the enrichment distribution to meet a target local power distribution in a fuel bundle, and the enrichment distribution with flat power shape are obtained within short computing time. (author)

  3. Fuel sub-assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly for a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor comprises a bundle of spaced fuel pins within a tubular wrapper or sleeve. The wrapper is extended at one end by a tubular neutron shield of massive steel and the other end, has a spike extension whereby the sub-assembly can be located by plugging into a support structure. The invention provides that lateral displacement of individual fuel pin-containing wrappers to accommodate dimensional changes within the fuel assembly is effected by movement of each wrapper relative to its spike extension. (author)

  4. Optimization of fuel reloads for a BWR using the ant colony system; Optimizacion de recargas de combustible para un BWR usando el sistema de colonia de hormigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel E, J. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Ingenieria, Cerro de Coatepec s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 50110 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ortiz S, J. J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: jaime.es.jaime@gmail.com

    2009-10-15

    In this work some results obtained during the development of optimization systems are presented, which are employees for the fuel reload design in a BWR. The systems use the ant colony optimization technique. As first instance, a system is developed that was adapted at travel salesman problem applied for the 32 state capitals of Mexican Republic. The purpose of this implementation is that a similarity exists with the design of fuel reload, since the two problems are of combinatorial optimization with decision variables that have similarity between both. The system was coupled to simulator SIMULATE-3, obtaining good results when being applied to an operation cycle in equilibrium for reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  5. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 2. Pre- and post-test decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses conducted in support of performance testing of a Ridhihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2033 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The cask testing program was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and by General Electric at the latters' Morris Operation (GE-MO) as reported in Volume I. The analyses effort consisted of performing pretest calculations to (1) select spent fuel for the test; (2) symmetrically load the spent fuel assemblies in the cask to ensure lateral symmetry of decay heat generation rates; (3) optimally locate temperature and dose rate instrumentation in the cask and spent fuel assemblies; and (4) evaluate the ORIGEN2 (decay heat), HYDRA and COBRA-SFS (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) computer codes. The emphasis of this second volume is on the comparison of code predictions to experimental test data in support of the code evaluation process. Code evaluations were accomplished by comparing pretest (actually pre-look, since some predictions were not completed until testing was in progress) predictions with experimental cask testing data reported in Volume I. No attempt was made in this study to compare the two heat transfer codes because results of other evaluations have not been completed, and a comparison based on one data set may lead to erroneous conclusions

  6. Operational experience for the latest generation of ATRIUM trademark 10 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA NP's ATRIUM trademark 10 product family was first introduced to the BWR market in 1992. Lead test campaigns confirmed the outstanding product performance and justified introduction of reload quantities. Further development of particular product features was demonstrated and implemented in the fuel design to meet highest expectations for reliability and fuel economics. The latest generation called ATRIUM trademark 10XP and subsequently ATRIUM trademark 10XM was introduced in 2002 and 2005, respectively. The first lead test assemblies completed their operation successfully after seven cycles. (orig.)

  7. Thermal Analysis of a TREAT Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadias, Dionissios [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, Arthur E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-07-09

    The objective of this study was to explore options as to reduce peak cladding temperatures despite an increase in peak fuel temperatures. A 3D thermal-hydraulic model for a single TREAT fuel assembly was benchmarked to reproduce results obtained with previous thermal models developed for a TREAT HEU fuel assembly. In exercising this model, and variants thereof depending on the scope of analysis, various options were explored to reduce the peak cladding temperatures.

  8. Solution of the transport equation in stationary state, in one and two dimensions, for BWR assemblies using nodal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work is to solve the neutron transport equation in one and two dimensions (slab geometry and X Y geometry, respectively), with no time dependence, for BWR assemblies using nodal methods. In slab geometry, the nodal methods here used are the polynomial continuous (CMPk) and discontinuous (DMPk) families but only the Linear Continuous (also known as Diamond Difference), the Quadratic Continuous (QC), the Cubic Continuous (CC), the Step Discontinuous (also known as Backward Euler), the Linear Discontinuous (LD) and the Quadratic Discontinuous (QD) were considered. In all these schemes the unknown function, the angular neutron flux, is approximated as a sum of basis functions in terms of Legendre polynomials, associated to the values of the neutron flux in the edges (left, right, or both) and the Legendre moments in the cell, depending on the nodal scheme used. All these schemes were implemented in a computer program developed in previous thesis works and known with the name TNX. This program was modified for the purposes of this work. The program discreetizes the domain of concern in one dimension and determines numerically the angular neutron flux for each point of the discretization when the number of energy groups and regions are known starting from an initial approximation for the angular neutron flux being consistent with the boundary condition imposed for a given problem. Although only problems with two-energy groups were studied the computer program does not have limitations regarding the number of energy groups and the number of regions. The two problems analyzed with the program TNX have practically the same characteristics (fuel and water), with the difference that one of them has a control rod. In the part corresponding to two-dimensional problems, the implemented nodal methods were those designated as hybrids that consider not only the edge and cell Legendre moments, but also the values of the neutron flux in the corner points

  9. Study of intermediate configurations during the fuel reload in BWRs; Estudio de configuraciones intermedias durante la recarga de combustible en BWR's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes M, L.; Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del C, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Jacinto C, S., E-mail: luis.fuentes@inin.gob.mx [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Yucatan, Calle 60 No. 491-A por 57, 97000 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The criticality state of the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR) was evaluated, during the reload process for the intermediate states between the load pattern of cycle end and the beginning of the next, using the information of the load pattern of the operation cycles 13 and 14 of Unit 1 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. For this evaluation the codes CASMO-4 and Simulate-3 for conditions of the core in cold were used. The strategy consisted on moving assemblies with 4 burned cycles of the reactor core. Later on were re situated the remaining assemblies, placing them in the positions to occupy in the next operation cycle. Finally, was carried out the assemblies load of fresh fuel. In each realized change, it was observing the behavior of the k-effective value that is the parameter used to evaluate the criticality state of each state of the core change. In a second stage, was designed a program that builds in automatic way each one of the intermediate cores and also analyzes the criticality state of the reactor core after each withdrawal, re situated and load of fuel assemblies. (Author)

  10. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pinakin

    2010-07-13

    A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

  11. Development of a fuzzy logic method to build objective functions in optimization problems: application to BWR fuel lattice design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we develop a methodology based on the use of the Fuzzy Logic technique to build multi-objective functions to be used in optimization processes applied to in-core nuclear fuel management. As an example, we selected the problem of determining optimal radial fuel enrichment and gadolinia distributions in a typical 'Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)' fuel lattice. The methodology is based on the use of the mathematical capability of Fuzzy Logic to model nonlinear functions of arbitrary complexity. The utility of Fuzzy Logic is to map an input space into an output space, and the primary mechanism for doing this is a list of if-then statements called rules. The rules refer to variables and adjectives that describe those variables and, the Fuzzy Logic technique interprets the values in the input vectors and, based on the set of rules assigns values to the output vector. The methodology was developed for the radial optimization of a BWR lattice where the optimization algorithm employed is Tabu Search. The global objective is to find the optimal distribution of enrichments and burnable poison concentrations in a 10*10 BWR lattice. In order to do that, a fuzzy control inference system was developed using the Fuzzy Logic Toolbox of Matlab and it has been linked to the Tabu Search optimization process. Results show that Tabu Search combined with Fuzzy Logic performs very well, obtaining lattices with optimal fuel utilization. (authors)

  12. Method of straightening a bowed nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of removing bow in a nuclear fuel assembly is disclosed. The fuel assembly has top and bottom ends fittings and a plurality of longitudinally extending thimble tube members interconnecting top and bottom end fittings. At least two transverse fuel rod support grids are axially spaced along the thimble tube members. A plurality of fuel rods are transversely spaced and supported by the fuel rod support grids. In one embodiment, a weight of known magnitude is secured on the bottom end fitting and the fuel assembly is raised with the weight secured thereon so that the weight exerts a downward force on the fuel assembly for straightening the fuel assembly and eliminating compressive stresses within the fuel assembly. In another embodiment, the bottom end fitting is secured onto the upender used for transporting fuel assemblies into and out of the containment building and the fuel assembly is pulled for straightening the fuel assembly and eliminating compressive stresses within the fuel assembly. (Author)

  13. Seismic response of nuclear fuel assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlaváč Z.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical modelling and computer simulation of the seismic response of fuel assembly components. The seismic response is investigated by numerical integration method in time domain. The seismic excitation is given by two horizontal and one vertical synthetic accelerograms at the level of the pressure vessel seating. Dynamic response of the hexagonal type nuclear fuel assembly is caused by spatial motion of the support plates in the reactor core investigated on the reactor global model. The modal synthesis method with condensation is used for calculation of the fuel assembly component displacements and speeds on the level of the spacer grid cells.

  14. Irradiated MTR fuel assemblies sipping test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the procedure and methodology used to perform sipping test with the IEA-R1 fuel assemblies at the storage pool, and presents the results obtained for Cs-137 sipping water activity for each fuel assembly analyzed. Discussion is made correlating corrosion pits to the activity values measured. A Cs-137 leaking rate is determined which can be compared to the criteria established for canning spent fuel assemblies inside the pool of for shipment abroad. 3 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  15. Fuel assembly identification for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard refers to fuel assemblies of light-water power reactors. It contains stipulations for uniform marking in order that the fuel assemblies may be identified. A figure consisting of 8 alpha-numerical characters is used for marking, the first three of which represent the operator who ordered the fuel assembly, while the four characters to follow symbolize a series number. The last character serves as a test mark to scrutinize reading mistakes. The alpha-numerical characters include the Arabic numerals 0-9 and, following them, the letters A-Y of the German alphabet, leaving out B, F, I, O, Q, Z (30 characters). (orig./HP)

  16. Fuel assembly identification for power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard refers to fuel assemblies of light-water power reactors. It contains stipulations for uniform marking in order that the fuel assemblies may be identified. A figure consisting of 8 alpha-numerical numbers is used for marking, the first three of which represent the operator who ordered the fuel assembly, while the four numbers to follow symbolize a series number. The last number serves as a test mark to scrutinize reading mistakes. The alpha-numerical numbers include the Arabic numerals 0-9 and, following them, the letters A-Y of the German alphabet, leaving out B, F, I, O, Q, Z (30 characters). (orig./HP)

  17. Fission gas release and pellet microstructure change of high burnup BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UO2 fuel, with and without Gadolinium, irradiated for three, five, and six irradiation cycles up to about 60 GWd/t pellet burnup in a commercial BWR were studied. The fission gas release and the rim effect were investigated by the puncture test and gas analysis method, OM (optical microscope), SEM (scanning electron microscope), and EPMA (electron probe microanalyzer). The fission gas release rate of the fuel rods irradiated up to six cycles was below a few percent; there was no tendency for the fission gas release to increase abruptly with burnup. On the other hand, microstructure changes were revealed by OM and SEM examination at the rim position with burnup increase. Fission gas was found depleted at both the rim position and the pellet center region using EPMA. There was no correlation between the fission gas release measured by the puncture test and the fission gas depletion at the rim position using EPMA. However, the depletion of fission gas in the center region had good correlation with the fission gas release rate determined by the puncture test. In addition, because the burnup is very large at the rim position of high burnup fuel and also due to the fission rate of the produced Pu, the Xe/Kr ratio at the rim position of high burnup fuel is close to the value of the fission yield of Pu. The Xe/Kr ratio determined by the gas analysis after the puncture test was equivalent to the fuel average but not to the pellet rim position. From the results, it was concluded that fission gas at the rim position was released from the UO2 matrix in high burnup, however, most of this released fission gas was held in the porous structure and not released from the pellet to the free volume. (author)

  18. Sipping inspection method for fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To shorten the periodical inspection time required for sipping inspection (failed fuel inspection) in PWR type reactors or the likes by mounting a plurality of a fuel assemblies in a sipping can to thereby inspect the plurality of fuel assemblies simultaneously. Method: Upon sipping inspection of fuels temporarily stored in a spent fuel storage pool, a plurality of fuel assemblies are mounted in a sipping can. Then, after placing a cover, N2 gases are caused to flow as carrier gas from a gas container by the operation to valves. Then, N2 gases are circulated by a jet pump and water in the can is sucked by a water pump. A radioactivity detector such as a scintillation counter is provied to a part of the loop for measuring the amount of the radioactivity in the portion where water is passed to check whether leakage is present or not. (Horiuchi, T.)

  19. Status of thermal-hydraulic performance evaluation of BWR fuels based on three-field subchannel code NASCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes basic requirements for improvements of a subchannel code from the view point of a BWR fuel design. Considering recent trends of design modifications of BWR fuels, it is desirable that influences of lattice sizes, spacer geometries, a number and location of partial length rods and other coolant mixing structures to the boiling transition will be evaluated numerically. In addition, experimental databases of the boiling transition can be expanded based on the subchannel analyses so that reliability of the critical power evaluation will be enhanced. A status of NASCA's component models and high temperature/high pressure tests of the boiling transition was reviewed. From the practical point of views, it was noted that more efforts are necessary for improving predictability of spacer geometries and partial length rods. (author)

  20. Mixed-oxide fuel decay heat analysis for BWR LOCA safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel decay heat behavior is analyzed for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) safety evaluation. The physical reasoning on why the decay heat power fractions of MOX fuel fission product (FP) are significantly lower than the corresponding decay heat power fractions of uranium-oxide (UOX) fuel FP is illustrated. This is primarily due to the following physical phenomena. -The recoverable energies per fission of plutonium (Pu)-239 and Pu-241 are significantly higher than those of uranium (U)-235 and U-238. Consequently, the fission rate required to produce the same amount of power in MOX fuel is significantly lower than that in UOX fuel, which leads to lower subsequent FP generation rate and associated decay heat power in MOX fuel than those in UOX fuel. - The effective FP decay energy per fission of Pu-239 is significantly lower than the corresponding effective FP decay energy per fission of U-235, e.g., Pu-239's 10.63 Mega-electron-Volt (MeV) vs. U-235's 12.81 MeV at the cooling time 0.2 second. This also leads to lower decay heat power in MOX fuel than that in UOX fuel. The FP decay heat is shown to account for more than 90% of the total decay heat immediately after shutdown. The FP decay heat results based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI)/American Nuclear Society (ANS)-5.1-1979 standard method are shown very close to the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method are shown very close to but mostly slightly lower than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method are shown significantly larger than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 standard method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. (authors)

  1. An assessment of the transportation costs of shipping non-fuel assembly hardware to FWMS facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines the cost of using Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Initiative I casks for transporting 62,700 MTU of spent fuel plus associated non-fuel assembly hardware (NFAH) between reactor sites and either a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) or a repository facility. The study further considers the benefits of increasing the cell size of the Initiative I BWR cask baskets to accommodate the fuel plus channels (which also would decrease the capacity of the cask to carry BWR fuel without channels) and the use of a commercial, non-spent-fuel cask to carry compacted NFAH that could not be shipped integrally. Costs that are developed involve transportation charges, capital costs for casks, and canning costs of NFAH that have been separated from the fuel. The results indicate that significant cost savings are possible if NFAH is accepted into the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS) that is either integral with the spent fuel, or consolidated if it has been separated. Shipment of unconsolidated NFAH is very expensive. Transportation costs for shipping to a western repository are approximately 50 to 75% higher than the costs for shipping to an eastern MRS

  2. Experimental data report for Test TS-1 Reactivity Initiated Accident Test in NSRR with pre-irradiated BWR fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents experimental data for Test TS-1 which was the first in a series of tests, simulating Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions using pre-irradiated BWR fuel rods, performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in October, 1989. Test fuel rod used in the Test TS-1 was a short-sized BWR (7 x 7) type rod which was fabricated from a commercial rod provided from Tsuruga Unit 1 power reactor. The fuel had an initial enrichment of 2.79 % and burnup of 21.3 GWd/t (bundle average). Pulse irradiation was performed at a condition of stagnant water cooling, atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature using a newly developed double container-type capsule. Energy deposition of the rod in this test was evaluated to be about 61 cal/g·fuel (55 cal/g·fuel in peak fuel enthalpy) and no fuel failure was observed. Descriptions on test conditions, test procedures, fuel burnup measurements, transient behavior of the test rod during pulse irradiation and results of post pulse irradiation examinations are contained in this report. (author)

  3. Dimension detection device for fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a device of facilitating remote and automatic inspection for the outer diameter of spacers and the length of springs of fuel assemblies to be used in a nuclear power plant. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises a mechanism for vertically supporting and rotating the fuel assemblies, a sensor holding frame equipped with a displacement sensor for detecting dimension, a mechanism for vertically moving the holding frame, and a mechanism for horizontally moving the holding frame. The dimension of the fuel assemblies is detected based on the moving amount of the horizontally moving mechanism. Even if the fuel assemblies are twisted, tilted or deviated to front-to-back or right-to-left direction, data can be collected/amended based on the displacement of each mechanisms. According to the device of the present invention, since automatic and remote inspection is possible, an operator's radiation exposure can be reduced. (I.S.)

  4. Development of a computer program of fast calculation for the pre design of advanced nuclear fuel 10 x 10 for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) a methodology is developed to optimize the design of cells 10x10 of assemble fuels for reactors of water in boil or BWR. It was proposed a lineal calculation formula based on a coefficients matrix (of the change reason of the relative power due to changes in the enrichment of U-235) for estimate the relative powers by pin of a cell. With this it was developed the computer program of fast calculation named PreDiCeldas. The one which by means of a simple search algorithm allows to minimize the relative power peak maximum of cell or LPPF. This is achieved varying the distribution of U-235 inside the cell, maintaining in turn fixed its average enrichment. The accuracy in the estimation of the relative powers for pin is of the order from 1.9% when comparing it with results of the 'best estimate' HELIOS code. With the PreDiCeldas it was possible, at one minimum time of calculation, to re-design a reference cell diminishing the LPPF, to the beginning of the life, of 1.44 to a value of 1.31. With the cell design with low LPPF is sought to even design cycles but extensive that those reached at the moment in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central. (Author)

  5. Establishment of China Nuclear Fuel Assembly Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENPeng; ZHANGYing-chao; LIUTing-jin; JINYong-li

    2003-01-01

    During researching, designing, manufacturing and post irradiation, a large amount of data on fuel assembly of China nuclear power plants has been accumulated. It is necessary to collect the data together,so that the researchers, designers, manufactures and managers could use the data conveniently. It was proposed to establish a China Nuclear Fuel Assembly Database through the Internet on workstations during the year of 2003 to 2006, so the data would be shared in China nuclear industry.

  6. Evaluation of FSV-1 cask for the transport of LWR irradiated fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Model FSV-1 spent fuel shipping cask was designed by General Atomic Company (GA) to service the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) nuclear generating station, a High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). This report presents an evaluation of the suitability of the FSV-1 cask for the transport of irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies from both Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The FSV-1 cask evaluation parameters covered a wide spectrum of LWR fuel assemblies, based on burnup in Megawatt Days/Metric Ton of Heavy Metal (MWD/MTHM) and years of decay since irradiation. The criteria for suitability included allowable radiation dose rates, cask surface and interior temperatures and the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the complete shipping system

  7. Fluid flow test for KMRR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this test program is to obtain the experimental data of pressure drop and subchannel flow distribution for the KMRR (Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor) fuel assembly, and to investigate mechanical integrity of the fuel assembly and flow tube in the test flow condition. The experimental data produced through this study are applicable to the KMRR fuel design and thermal-hydraulic analysis of the reactor. Pressure drop correlations for each types of fuels were developed which can be applicable over Reynolds number of 6x9x102∼8.0x104. Local velocity in the subchannels of the fuel assemblies was measured with laser doppler velocimeter system, and the velocitily distribution was also calculated with a computer program developed through this study. The experimental data are used as input for the core thermal margin analysis and safety analysis in steady/accident conditions of the KMRR. (Author)

  8. Hydrogen uptake of BWR fuel rods. Power history effects at long irradiation times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA LTP (Low Temperature Process) Zircaloy-2 cladding for Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) in both RXA (Recrystallized Annealed) and CWSR (Cold Worked Stress Relieved) metallurgical states, has an optimized microstructure with an optimum size of SPP (Secondary Phase Particles) that has reduced the nodular corrosion to a minimum while maintaining a good uniform corrosion performance with acceptable hydrogen pickup. Classically hydrogen uptake is described by the Hydrogen Pick-Up Fraction (HPUF), which is the ratio of the hydrogen generated by uniform oxidation that is eventually picked up by the metal to the total hydrogen generated by oxidation. In the past, the hydrogen uptake database showed a low HPUF with hydrogen concentration close to the saturation value of the metal at operating temperature and correspondingly little hydride formation. The hydrogen concentration was correlated with irradiation time via the HPUF (at an almost constant corrosion and hydrogen production rate). Recently, some significantly higher hydrogen concentration values (300 wppm and more) have been measured for medium and high burnup rods. This effect was also observed on four AREVA fuel rods from BWR (Boiling Water Reactors). This prompted a thorough analysis of the hydrogen pickup database as well as material and environmental factors influencing corrosion and hydrogen uptake. The most important outcome of the investigation was that a low power – low steam condition is associated with increased hydrogen pickup. The linear power is a proxy variable for low heat flux and low steam quality in the coolant, which were identified as important parameters for physical processes that could explain the enhanced hydrogen uptake in some cases. The paper will present the database of the enhanced hydrogen uptake measured in European power reactors and demonstrate the effect of power history on the uptake process. Power histories with high hydrogen uptake included extended low power periods later in

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly with fuel rod removal means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly is described for a nuclear reactor. The assembly has a bottom nozzle, at least one longitudinally extending control rod guide thimble attached to and projecting upwardly from the bottom nozzle and transverse grids spaced along the thimble. An organized array of elongated fuel rods are transversely spaced and supported by the grids and axially captured between the bottom nozzle and a top nozzle. The assembly comprises: (a) a transversely extending adapter plate formed by an arrangement of integral cross-laced ligaments defining a plurality of coolant flow openings; (b) means for mounting the adapter plate on an upper end portion of the thimble and spaced axially above and disposed transversely over the upper ends of all of the fuel rods present in the fuel assembly such that ones of the ligaments overlie corresponding ones of the fuel rods so as to prevent the fuel rods from moving upwardly through the coolant flow openings; and (c) removable plug means confined within the adapter plate and positioned over and spaced axially above selected ones of the fuel rods in providing access to at least one fuel rod for removal thereof upwardly through the axially spaced adapter plate without removing the top nozzle from the fuel assembly

  10. Thermal-hydraulic stability tests for newly designed BWR rod bundle (step-III fuel type A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal-hydraulic stability tests have been performed on electrically heated bundles to simulate the newly designed Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuels in a parallel channel test loop. The objective of the current experimental program is to investigate how the newly designed bundle could improve the thermal-hydraulic stability. Measurements of the thermal-hydraulic instability thresholds in two vertical rod bundles have been conducted in steam-water two-phase flow conditions at the TOSHIBA test loop. Fluid conditions were BWR operating conditions of 7 MPa system pressure, 1.0-2.0x106 kg/m2/h inlet mass flux and 28-108 kJ/kg inlet subcooling. The parallel channel test loop consists of a main bundle of 3x3 indirectly heated rods of 1/9 symmetry of 9x9 full lattice and a bypass bundle of 8x8. These are both simulated BWR rod bundles in respect of rod diameter, heated length, rod configuration, fuel rod spacer, core inlet hydraulic resistance and upper tie plate. There are three types of the 3x3 test bundles with different configurations of a part length rod of two-thirds the length of the other rods and an axial power shape. The design innovation of the part length rod for a 9x9 lattice development, though addition of more fuel rods increases bundle pressure drop, reduces pressure drop in the two-phase portion of the bundle, and enhances the thermal hydraulic stability. Through the experiments, the parameter dependency on the channel stability threshold is obtained for inlet subcooling, inlet mass flux, inlet flow resistance, axial power shape and part length rod. The main conclusion is that the stability threshold is about 10% greater with the part length rod than without the part length rod. The new BWR bundle consisting of the part length rod has been verified in respect of thermal hydraulic stability performance. (author)

  11. Artificial intelligence applied to fuel management in BWR type reactors; Inteligencia artificial aplicada a la administracion de combustible en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J

    1998-10-01

    In this work two techniques of artificial intelligence, neural networks and genetic algorithms were applied to a practical problem of nuclear fuel management; the determination of the optimal fuel reload for a BWR type reactor. This is an important problem in the design of the operation cycle of the reactor. As a result of the application of these techniques, comparable or even better reloads proposals than those given by expert companies in the subject were obtained. Additionally, two other simpler problems in reactor physics were solved: the determination of the axial power profile and the prediction of the value of some variables of interest at the end of the operation cycle of the reactor. Neural networks and genetic algorithms have been applied to solve many problems of engineering because of their versatility but they have been rarely used in the area of fuel management. The results obtained in this thesis indicates the convenience of undertaking further work on this area and suggest the application of these techniques of artificial intelligence to the solution of other problems in nuclear reactor physics. (Author)

  12. Fuel assembly support structure for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To restrict a part or whole of injected molten fuel within a predetermined area by constructing interior surfaces of walls and bottom of a molten fuel container with high-melting materials, fixing at an upper opening a fuel assembly support cover, and forming a thru-hole in the bottom. Constitution: A plurality of cover-fitted support elements for fuel assemblies are mounted and fixed on the supports in the reactor container, with leg pipes inserted in insert holes. Fuel assemblies are fitted in insert holes of the support elements to make up the core. If the power increases due to an accident, causing failure of fuel cans installed in bundle in the assemblies, most of the molten fuel falls to the bottom of the container. As the bottom is graded down from center to periphery, the molten fuel settles much in the peripheral area, but the part is lined with high-melting material so that the part will not be melted. (Yoshihara, H.)

  13. Fuel assembly for a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel assembly of a boiling water reactor contains a number of vertical fuel rods with their lower ends against a bottom tie plate. The rods are positioned by spacers, which are fixed to the canning. The upward motion is reduced by the top plate of a special design. (G.B.)

  14. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designs of nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grids for supporting and spacing fuel elements are described which do not utilize resilient grid plate protrusions in the peripheral band but retain the advantages inherent in the combination resilient and rigid protrusion cells. (U.K.)

  15. Grid structure for nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described is a nuclear fuel element support system comprising an egg-crate-type grid made up of slotted vertical portions interconnected at right angles to each other, the vertical portions being interconnected by means of cross straps which are dimpled midway between their ends to engage fuel elements disposed within openings formed in the egg-crate assembly. The cross straps are disposed at an angle, other than a right angle, to the vertical portions of the assembly whereby their lengths are increased for a given span, and the total elastic deflection capability of the cell is increased. The assembly is particularly adapted for computer design and automated machine tool fabrication

  16. DNB analysis with mechanistic models for PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to predict the DNB heat flux of PWR fuel assemblies and the critical power of BWR fuel bundles, the Boiling Transition Analysis Code CAPE' has been developed in the IMPACT project. The CAPE code for PWR includes three analysis modules, subchannel analysis module, three-dimensional two-phase flow analysis module, and DNB evaluation module. The subchannel module uses drift-flux model to identify the hottest subchannel. The three-dimensional two-phase flow analysis module uses nonhomogeneous and nonequilibrium two fluid model to analyze the detailed three-dimensional two-phase flow behaviors such as void distribution. For DNB heat flux prediction, the DNB evaluation module uses the Weisman model in which is a mechanistic DNB evaluation model. This paper describes the analysis models, analysis techniques and the results of validation by rod bundle test analysis. To date, the average difference between calculated and 11 measured values was -0.6% with a standard deviation of 7.0%. (author)

  17. Grid for nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A grid of improved design for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly which includes a multiplicity of interleaved straps enclosed in a peripheral frame which forms a grid of egg-crate configuration is described. Each cell formed by the grid straps, except those containing control rod guide tubes, supports a fuel rod which is held in place by springs projecting laterally inwardly into each cell from the grid straps. The springs extend parallel to the fuel rods and are spaced at 900 intervals around the rod. Further, each of two adjacent springs contact a fuel rod at two points along its length and each of the other two adjacent springs contact the fuel rod at one point thus imparting strength and flexibility to the fuel assembly containing such grids

  18. Apparatus and method for assembling fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear fuel element assembling method and apparatus is preferably operable under programmed control unit to receive fuel rods from storage, arrange them into axially aligned stacks of closely monitored length, and transfer the stacks of fuel rods to a loading device for insertion into longitudinal passages in the fuel elements. In order to handle large numbers of one or more classifications of fuel rods or other cylindrical parts, the assembling apparatus includes at least two feed troughs each formed by a pair of screw members with a movable table having a plurality of stacking troughs for alignment with the feed troughs and with a conveyor for delivering the stacks to the loading device, the fuel rods being moved along the stacking troughs upon a fluid cushion. 23 claims, 6 figures

  19. Fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of the patent is a spacer design applicable, primarily, to LWR, and especially, though not specifically PWR, fuel assemblies. The spacer consists of an egg-box type of assembly formed of interlocking pressed plates giving a square lattice whose openings accommodate fuel pins or regulating rods. The pressed plates are formed to provide pressed-out spring-like flanges which hold the fuel pins in position and guide the regulating rods. Additional pressed-out flanges ensure the correct configuration of the spacer structure. The spacer is designed to present as little resistance as possible to coolant flow. (JIW)

  20. Reconstitutable fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reconstitutable fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor which includes a mechanical, rather than metallurgical, arrangement for connecting control rod guide thimbles to the top and bottom nozzles of a fuel assembly. Multiple sleeves enclosing control rod guide thimbles interconnect the top nozzle to the fuel assembly upper grid. Each sleeve is secured to the top nozzle by retaining rings disposed on opposite sides of the nozzle. Similar sleeves enclose the lower end of control rod guide thimbles and interconnect the bottom nozzle with the lowermost grid on the assembly. An end plug fitted in the bottom end of each sleeve extends through the bottom nozzle and is secured thereto by a retaining ring. Should it be necessary to remove a fuel rod from the assembly, the retaining rings in either the top or bottom nozzles may be removed to release the nozzle from the control rod guide thimbles and thus expose either the top or bottom ends of the fuel rods to fuel rod removing mechanisms

  1. BWR 90: The ABB advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced fight water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and the total power generation costs have been low. In the development of BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to the reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher dim that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Thus, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The work is scheduled for completion in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with the 'evolutionary' design BWR 90+. The primary design goal is to develop the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is

  2. HYTHEST, Dependence of Fuel Fabrication Tolerances on Hydraulics of BWR, PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: HYTHEST is a Monte Carlo programme. With this programme it is possible to study statistically the influence that the random variation of the independent parameters subjected to fabrication tolerances (fuel density and enrichment, geometric dimension) have on dependent thermal hydraulic variables (temperatures, vapour quality, pressure drop) in a PWR and BWR reactor core. 2 - Method of solution: According to the spot model, a random core is built up, choosing in every region of core the values of the independent parameters with the aid of a random sampling routine. Next with a detailed thermal hydraulic calculation routine the values of the dependent variables are calculated in this random sampled core. This procedure is repeated according to a Monte Carlo technique choosing as many random cores as necessary. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: 900 maximum number of Monte Carlo histories; 220 maximum number of intervals in the channel; 50 maximum number of points in which the interval Ymax-Ymin must be subdivided

  3. Studies on the fission gas release behaviour of BWR and experimental MOX fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission gas release data were generated on 13 fuel elements from the two boiling water reactors (BWRs) at the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). The burn-up of these fuel elements varied from 3 000 to 24 000 MWd/t. The fuel elements were taken from fuel assemblies that were irradiated at different core locations in single and multiple irradiation cycles. A new fission gas measuring set-up was designed and fabricated to analyse fuel elements with low void volumes and low fission gas releases. Fifteen experimental mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pins were fabricated and irradiated in the pressurised water loop (PWL) of the CIRUS reactor to burn-ups ranging from 2 000 MWd/t to 16 000 MWd/t. The fission gas release from MOX fuels was predicted with the computer code PROFESS using the fuel fabrication and irradiation data. The results from the fission gas release measurements from some of the irradiated MOX fuel elements are compared with those predicted using the code. (author)

  4. Nuclear fuel bundle disassembly and assembly tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear power reactor fuel bundle is described which has a plurality of tubular fuel rods disposed in parallel array between two transverse tie plates. It is secured against disassembly by one or more locking forks which engage slots in tie rods which position the transverse plates. Springs mounted on the fuel and tie rods are compressed when the bundle is assembled thereby maintaining a continual pressure against the locking forks. Force applied in opposition to the springs permits withdrawal of the locking forks so that one tie plate may be removed, giving access to the fuel rods. An assembly and disassembly tool facilitates removal of the locking forks when the bundle is to be disassembled and the placing of the forks during assembly of the bundle. (U.S.)

  5. Development of underwater high-definition camera for the confirmation test of core configuration and visual examination of BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to develop underwater High-Definition camera for the confirmation test of core configuration and visual examination of BWR fuels in order to reduce the time of these tests and total cost regarding to purchase and maintenance. The prototype model of the camera was developed and examined in real use condition in spent fuel pool at HAMAOKA-2 and 4. The examination showed that the ability of prototype model was either equaling or surpassing to conventional product expect for resistance to radiation. The camera supposes to be used in the dose rate condition of under about 10 Gy/h. (author)

  6. WWER-440 fuel cycles possibilities using improved fuel assemblies design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Practically five years cycle has been achieved in the last years at NPP Dukovany. There are two principal means how it could be achieved. First, it is necessary to use fuel assemblies with higher fuel enrichment and second, to use fuel loading with very low leakage. Both these conditions are fulfilled at NPP Dukovany at this time. It is known, that the fuel cycle economy can be improved by increasing the fuel residence time in the core up to six years. There are at least two ways how this goal could be achieved. The simplest way is to increase enrichment in fuel. There exists a limit, which is 5.0 w % of 235U. Taking into account some uncertainty, the calculation maximum is 4.95 w % of 235U. The second way is to change fuel assembly design. There are several possibilities, which seem to be suitable from the neutron - physical point of view. The first one is higher mass content of uranium in a fuel assembly. The next possibility is to enlarge pin pitch. The last possibility is to 'omit' FA shroud. This is practically unrealistic; anyway, some other structural parts must be introduced. The basic neutron physical characteristics of these cycles for up-rated power are presented showing that the possibilities of fuel assemblies with this improved design in enlargement of fuel cycles are very promising. In the end, on the basis of neutron physical characteristics and necessary economical input parameters, a preliminary evaluation of economic contribution of proposals of advanced fuel assemblies on fuel cycle economy is presented (Authors)

  7. A practical optimization procedure for radial BWR fuel lattice design using tabu search with a multiobjective function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimization procedure based on the tabu search (TS) method was developed for the design of radial enrichment and gadolinia distributions for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel lattices. The procedure was coded in a computing system in which the optimization code uses the tabu search method to select potential solutions and the HELIOS code to evaluate them. The goal of the procedure is to search for an optimal fuel utilization, looking for a lattice with minimum average enrichment, with minimum deviation of reactivity targets and with a local power peaking factor (PPF) lower than a limit value. Time-dependent-depletion (TDD) effects were considered in the optimization process. The additive utility function method was used to convert the multiobjective optimization problem into a single objective problem. A strategy to reduce the computing time employed by the optimization was developed and is explained in this paper. An example is presented for a 10x10 fuel lattice with 10 different fuel compositions. The main contribution of this study is the development of a practical TDD optimization procedure for BWR fuel lattice design, using TS with a multiobjective function, and a strategy to economize computing time

  8. Behavior of irradiated BWR fuel under reactivity-initiated-accident conditions. Results of tests FK-1, -2 and -3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rods with burnups of 41 to 45 GWd/tU were pulse-irradiated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate the fuel behavior during a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) at cold startup. BWR fuel segment rods of 8 x 8BJ (STEP I) type from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 3 were refabricated into short test rods, and they were subjected to prompt enthalpy insertion from 293 to 607 J/g (70 to 145 cal/g) within about 20 ms. The fuel cladding had enough ductility against the prompt deformation due to pellet cladding mechanical interaction. The plastic hoop strain reached 1.5% at the peak location. The cladding surface temperature locally reached about 600 degC. Recovery of irradiation defects in the cladding due to high temperature during the pulse irradiation was indicated via X-ray diffractometry. The amount of fission gas released during the pulse irradiation was from 3.1% to 8.2% of total inventory, depending on the peak fuel enthalpy and the normal operation conditions. (author)

  9. Polymer electrolyte membrane assembly for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An electrolyte membrane for use in a fuel cell can contain sulfonated polyphenylether sulfones. The membrane can contain a first sulfonated polyphenylether sulfone and a second sulfonated polyphenylether sulfone, wherein the first sulfonated polyphenylether and the second sulfonated polyphenylether sulfone have equivalent weights greater than about 560, and the first sulfonated polyphenylether and the second sulfonated polyphenylether sulfone also have different equivalent weights. Also, a membrane for use in a fuel cell can contain a sulfonated polyphenylether sulfone and an unsulfonated polyphenylether sulfone. Methods for manufacturing a membrane electrode assemblies for use in fuel cells can include roughening a membrane surface. Electrodes and methods for fabricating such electrodes for use in a chemical fuel cell can include sintering an electrode. Such membranes and electrodes can be assembled into chemical fuel cells.

  10. Corrosion and hydrogen pick-up behaviors of cladding and structural components in BWR high burnup 9x9 lead use assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high burnup BWR 9x9 lead use fuel assemblies, which have been designed for maximum assembly burnup of 55 GWd/t in Japan, have been examined after irradiations to confirm the reliability of the current safety evaluation methodology, and to accumulate data to judge the adequacy to apply it to the future higher burnup fuel. After 3 and 5 cycle irradiations, post irradiation examinations were performed for both 9x9 Type-A and Type-B fuel assemblies. Both Type LUAs utilize Zry-2 claddings, while there are deviation in the contents of impurity and alloying elements between Type-A and Type-B, especially in Fe and Si concentration. Measured oxide thicknesses of fuel rods showed no significant difference between after 3 and 5 cycle irradiation except for some rods at corner position in Type B LUA. The axial profile of hydrogen concentration and oxide thickness for the corner rods in Type B LUA after 5 cycle irradiation had peaks at the second lowest span from the bottom. The maximum oxide thickness is about 50 μm on the surface facing the bundle outside at the second lowest span and dense hydrides layer (Hydride rim) is observed in peripheral region of cladding showing unexpected high hydrogen concentration. The results of calculated thermal-hydraulic conditions show that the thermal neutron flux at the corner position was higher than the other position. On the other hand, the void fraction and the mass flux were relatively lower at the corner position. The oxide thickness on spacer band and spacer cell of Zry-2 increases from 3 to 5 cycle irradiations. Spacer band of Zry-4 showed significantly thick oxide after 5 cycle irradiations but Hydrogen concentration was relatively small in contrast its obviously thick oxide in comparison with Zry-2 spacer bands. The large increase in hydrogen concentration was measured in Zry-2 spacers after 5 cycle irradiations and the evaluated hydrogen pick-up rate also increased remarkably. (authors)

  11. WWER-440 fuel cycles possibilities using modified fuel assemblies design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nearly equilibrium five-year cycle has been achieved at Dukovany NPP over the last years. This means that working fuel assemblies with an average enrichment of 4.25 w % (control assemblies) with an average enrichment of 3.82 w %) are normally loaded and reloaded for five years. Operation at uprated thermal power (105% of the original one, increase from 1375 MWt to 1444 MWt) is being prepared by use of working fuel assemblies with an average enrichment of 4.38 w % (control assemblies with an average enrichment of 4.25 w %). With the aim of fuel cycle economy improvement, the fuel residence time in the core has to be prolonged up to six years with one cycle duration time up to 18 months and preserving loadings with very low leakage. In order to achieve this goal, at least neutron-physical characteristics of fuel assemblies must be improved and such changes should be evaluated from other viewpoints. Some particular changes have already been analyzed earlier. Designs of new fuel assemblies with higher (and in the central part of a fuel assemblies the highest possible, i.e. 4.95 w %) enrichment with preserving low pin power non-uniformity are described in the presented paper. An fuel assemblies with an average enrichment of 4.66 w % (lower than originally evaluated) containing six fuel pins with 3.35 w % Gd2O3 content was selected in the end. Fuel pins have bigger pellet diameter, bigger pin pitch and thinner fuel assemblies shroud. A newly designed fuel assemblies was evaluated from the viewpoint of physics (pin power non-uniformity, criticality of fuel at transport and storage and determination of basic quantities for spent fuel storage purposes by ORIGEN code), thermo-hydraulics (comparison of subchannel output temperatures and the departure from nucleate boiling ratio - DNBR) and mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to simulate an fuel assemblies subject to the loads during its six- year lifetime whereas normal working conditions were taken into

  12. Thermomechanical evaluation of BWR fuel elements for procedures of preconditioned with FEMAXI-V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The limitations in the burnt of the nuclear fuel usually are fixed by the one limit in the efforts to that undergo them the components of a nuclear fuel assembly. The limits defined its provide the direction to the fuel designer to reduce to the minimum the fuel failure during the operation, and they also prevent against some thermomechanical phenomena that could happen during the evolution of transitory events. Particularly, a limit value of LHGR is fixed to consider those physical phenomena that could lead to the interaction of the pellet-shirt (Pellet Cladding Interaction, PCI). This limit value it is related directly with an PCI limit that can be fixed based on experimental tests of power ramps. This way, to avoid to violate the PCI limit, the conditioning procedures of the fuel are still required for fuel elements with and without barrier. Those simulation procedures of the power ramp are carried out for the reactor operator during the starting maneuvers or of power increase like preventive measure of possible consequences in the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel. In this work, the thermomechanical behavior of two different types of fuel rods of the boiling water reactor is analyzed during the pursuit of the procedures of fuel preconditioning. Five diverse preconditioning calculations were carried out, each one with three diverse linear ramps of power increments. The starting point of the ramps was taken of the data of the cycle 8 of the unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. The superior limit superior of the ramps it was the threshold of the lineal power in which a fuel failure could be presented by PCI, in function of the fuel burnt. The analysis was carried out with the FEMAXI-V code. (Author)

  13. Grid for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer grid for nuclear fuel rods is formed of generally identical metal straps arranged in crossed relation to define a multiplicity of cells adapted to receive elongated fuel elements or the like. The side walls of each cell have openings for intercell mixing of coolant and tabs from edges of the openings defining helical coolant deflectors in the cells. Tabs from adjacent side walls are fixedly secured together to provide rigidifying flanges for the grid. Spring fingers at the ends of the cells provide for holding fuel rods against fixed stops

  14. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pinakin; Urko, Willam

    2008-01-29

    A modular multi-stack fuel-cell assembly in which the fuel-cell stacks are situated within a containment structure and in which a gas distributor is provided in the structure and distributes received fuel and oxidant gases to the stacks and receives exhausted fuel and oxidant gas from the stacks so as to realize a desired gas flow distribution and gas pressure differential through the stacks. The gas distributor is centrally and symmetrically arranged relative to the stacks so that it itself promotes realization of the desired gas flow distribution and pressure differential.

  15. Fuel assembly for a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly for a boiling water reactor comprises a plurality of fuel rods which constitute four partial bundles and are surrounded by a fuel channel system comprising one partial tube for each partial bundle. Each of the four partial bundles rests on a bottom tie plate and is positioned with respect to the others by means of a common top tie plate which is provided with a lifting loop which is sufficiently strong to be able to lift the four partial bundles simultaneously, a major part of the lifting force being transmitted to said bottom tie plates via a plurality of supporting fuel rods

  16. Blockages in LMFBR fuel assemblies: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J T; Fontana, M H

    1977-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations performed in the United States, Germany, Great Britain, and Japan on the effects of partial flow blockages in liquid-metal fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies are reviewed and the results presented. Generalized models are developed from experimental data obtained for blockages of various sizes, shapes, and porosity, with and without pins, utilizing water and sodium as the coolant. Generally, the recirculating flow in the wake behind a blockage is a relatively effective heat transfer mechanism. Experiments where sodium boiling was made to occur behind the blockages indicate that boiling is stable for the configurations tested; these results are predicted by analytical models. Blockages at the inlet of fuel assemblies tend to have insignificant effects in the fuel assembly unless flow is reduced grossly and therefore would be detectable. Blockages in the heat generating zone have to be quite large to cause sodium boiling under normal reactor operating conditions.

  17. Core and transition fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A core and a transition fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor are described. They have a first fuel assembly including structure for laterally spacing parallel and coextending fuel rods positioned at preselected core elevations and also a second fuel assembly including lateral spacing structure at preselected core elevations at least one of which is different than the elevations of the spacing structure of the first fuel assembly. The transition fuel assembly is positioned between the first and second assemblies and includes lateral spacing structure positioned at each core elevation where the first and second fuel assemblies have a spacing structure. The transition fuel assembly ensures that contact among the fuel assemblies of the core is through the spacing structures. 9 claims

  18. Criticality evaluation of BWR MOX fuel transport packages using average Pu content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently in France, criticality studies in transport configurations for Boiling Water Reactor Mixed Oxide fuel assemblies are based on conservative hypothesis assuming that all rods (Mixed Oxide (Uranium and Plutonium), Uranium Oxide, Uranium and Gadolinium Oxide rods) are Mixed Oxide rods with the same Plutonium-content, corresponding to the maximum value. In that way, the real heterogeneous mapping of the assembly is masked and covered by a homogeneous Plutonium-content assembly, enriched at the maximum value. As this calculation hypothesis is extremely conservative, COGEMA LOGISTICS has studied a new calculation method based on the average Plutonium-content in the criticality studies. The use of the average Plutonium-content instead of the real Plutonium-content profiles provides a highest reactivity value that makes it globally conservative. This method can be applied for all Boiling Water Reactor Mixed Oxide complete fuel assemblies of type 8 x 8, 9 x 9 and 10 x 10 which Plutonium-content in mass weight does not exceed 15%; it provides advantages which are discussed in our approach. With this new method, for the same package reactivity, the Pu-content allowed in the package design approval can be higher. The COGEMA LOGISTICS' new method allows, at the design stage, to optimise the basket, materials or geometry for higher payload, keeping the same reactivity

  19. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanical performance of fuel rods of a BWR during a power ramp using the FUELSIM code; Evaluacion del desempeno termomecanico de barras de combustible de un reactor BWR durante una rampa de potencia utilizando el codigo FUELSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R.

    2010-07-01

    To avoid the risk to environment due to release of radioactive material, because of occurrence of an accident, it is the priority of the design and performance of the diverse systems of safety of a commercial nuclear power plant. The safety of nuclear power plants requires, therefore, monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behavior under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. The main application of the thermal-mechanical analysis codes is the prediction of occurrence of conditions and/or phenomena that could lead to the deterioration or even mechanical failure of the fuel rod cladding, as, for example, the pellet-cladding interaction. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, fuel preconditioning operations refer to the operational procedures employed to reduce the fuel rod failure probability due to fuel-cladding interaction, specially during reactor startup. Preconditioning simulations are therefore necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR 5/6, as those two nuclear reactors in Laguna Verde, Veracruz, is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with an array 8 x 8

  20. Fluid flow test for KMRR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydraulic and velocity measurment tests were carried out for the KMRR fuel assembly. Two types of the KMRR fuel assembly are consist of longitudinally finned rods. Experimental data of the pressure drops and friction factors for the KMRR fuel assemlby were produced. The measurement technique for the turbulent flow structure in subchannels using the LDV was obtained. The measurement of the experimental constant of the thermal hydraulic analysis code was investigated. The results in this study are used as the basic data for the development of an analysis code. The measurement technique acquired in this study can be applied to the KMRR thermal hydraulic commissioning test and development of the domestic KMRR fuel fabrication. (Author)

  1. Nuclear fuel assembly identification using computer vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method of identifying fuel assemblies has been developed. The method uses existing in-cell TV cameras to read the notch-coded handling sockets of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) assemblies. A computer looks at the TV image, locates the notches, decodes the notch pattern, and produces the identification number. A TV camera is the only in-cell equipment required, thus avoiding complex mechanisms in the hot cell. Assemblies can be identified in any location where the handling socket is visible from the camera. Other advantages include low cost, rapid identification, low maintenance, and ease of use

  2. Fabrication of PWR fuel assembly and CANDU fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the project of localization of nuclear fuel fabrication, the R and D to establish the fabrication technology of CANDU fuel bundle as well as PWR fuel assembly was carried out. The suitable boss height and the prober Beryllium coating thickness to get good brazing condition of appendage were studied in the fabrication process of CANDU fuel rod. Basic Studies on CANLUB coating method also were performed. Problems in each fabrication process step and process flow between steps were reviewed and modified. The welding conditions for top and bottom nozzles, guide tube, seal and thimble screw pin were established in the fabrication processes of PWR fuel assembly. Additionally, some researches for a part of PWR grid brazing problems are also carried out

  3. A subchannel and CFD analysis of void distribution for the BWR fuel bundle test benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Wang-Kee; Hwang, Dae-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Jun, E-mail: jjjeong@pusan.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► We analyzed subchannel void distributions using subchannel, system and CFD codes. ► The mean error and standard deviation at steady states were compared. ► The deviation of the CFD simulation was greater than those of the others. ► The large deviation of the CFD prediction is due to interface model uncertainties. -- Abstract: The subchannel grade and microscopic void distributions in the NUPEC (Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation) BFBT (BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Tests) facility have been evaluated with a subchannel analysis code MATRA, a system code MARS and a CFD code CFX-10. Sixteen test series from five different test bundles were selected for the analysis of the steady-state subchannel void distributions. Four test cases for a high burn-up 8 × 8 fuel bundle with a single water rod were simulated using CFX-10 for the microscopic void distribution benchmark. Two transient cases, a turbine trip without a bypass as a typical power transient and a re-circulation pump trip as a flow transient, were also chosen for this analysis. It was found that the steady-state void distributions calculated by both the MATRA and MARS codes coincided well with the measured data in the range of thermodynamic qualities from 5 to 25%. The results of the transient calculations were also similar to each other and very reasonable. The CFD simulation reproduced the overall radial void distribution trend which produces less vapor in the central part of the bundle and more vapor in the periphery. However, the predicted variation of the void distribution inside the subchannels is small, while the measured one is large showing a very high concentration in the center of the subchannels. The variations of the void distribution between the center of the subchannels and the subchannel gap are estimated to be about 5–10% for the CFD prediction and more than 20% for the experiment.

  4. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grid having grid straps provided with spring clips bent to widthwise encircle the grid straps and having their two ends welded together. Spring portions compressibly contact the fuel rods. The spring clips may have pairs of separated flat portions, straddling the control rod guide thimble in adjacent thimble cells so as not to interfere with the guide thimbles. The spring clips are made of a material having good radiation stress relaxation properties. (author)

  5. Advanced BWR core component designs and the implications for SFD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the DF-4 boiling water reactor (BWR) severe fuel damage (SFD) experiment conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories in 1986, no experimental data base existed for guidance in modeling core component behavior under postulated severe accident conditions in commercial BWRs. This paper will present the lessons learned from the DF-4 experiment (and subsequent German CORA BWR SFD tests) and the impact on core models in the current generation of SFD codes. The DF-4 and CORA BWR test assemblies were modeled on the core component designs circa 1985; that is, the 8 x 8 fuel assembly with two water rods and a cruciform control blade constructed of B4C-filled tubelets. Within the past ten years, the state-of-the-art with respect to BWR core component development has out-distanced the current SFD experimental data base and SFD code capabilities. For example, modern BWR control blade design includes hafnium at the tips and top of each control blade wing for longer blade operating lifetimes; also water rods have been replaced by larger water channels for better neutronics economy; and fuel assemblies now contain partial-length fuel rods, again for better neutronics economy. This paper will also discuss the implications of these advanced fuel assembly and core component designs on severe accident progression and on the current SFD code capabilities

  6. An Enhancement of Visual Test Performance for Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the overhaul period of the nuclear power plant, integrity of the neutron-irradiated fuel assembly is evaluated. Nuclear regulations require that nuclear power plants meet the design, operation, and inspection requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (B and PV). Section XI of the ASME B and PV Code provides the specific requirements for inspecting the systems, structures, and components; Section V of the ASME Code provides requirements for inspection methods, including volumetric (e.g., ultrasonic testing), surface (e.g., eddy current testing), and visual testing (VT). Visual testing of neutron irradiated fuel assembly is conducted generally for a variety of purposes, for example to detect discontinuities and imperfections on the surface of fuel rods, to detect evidence of leakage from end-cap welds, and to determine the general mechanical and structural condition of one. VT is performed remotely using video camera. As the neutron-irradiated fuel assembly is a high dose-rate gamma-ray source, approximately a few kGy, radiation hardened underwater camera is used in the VT of the fuel assembly. Utilities today follow the EPRI guidelines for VT-1 tests on nuclear components (BWR Vessel and Internals Project-3 1995). The VT-1 guidelines specify which areas around a weld should be examined, how to measure the sizes of indications found, and how to test the resolving power of the visual equipment used for the test. The EPRI guidelines use two 12μm (0.0005-in.) wires or notches as a resolution calibration standard. According to the EPRI guidelines (BWRVIP-03 1995), the camera systems employed were marginally able to detect the 0.0005-inch (12-μm) diameter wire on a steel background. In the some future, it is required that the VT of nuclear fuel assembly follows the EPRI VT-1 guideline. In order to meet the VT-1 guideline, any system used in VT (ranging from the naked eye to a digital closed-circuit TV system

  7. An Enhancement of Visual Test Performance for Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jung Cheol [Korea Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    In the overhaul period of the nuclear power plant, integrity of the neutron-irradiated fuel assembly is evaluated. Nuclear regulations require that nuclear power plants meet the design, operation, and inspection requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (B and PV). Section XI of the ASME B and PV Code provides the specific requirements for inspecting the systems, structures, and components; Section V of the ASME Code provides requirements for inspection methods, including volumetric (e.g., ultrasonic testing), surface (e.g., eddy current testing), and visual testing (VT). Visual testing of neutron irradiated fuel assembly is conducted generally for a variety of purposes, for example to detect discontinuities and imperfections on the surface of fuel rods, to detect evidence of leakage from end-cap welds, and to determine the general mechanical and structural condition of one. VT is performed remotely using video camera. As the neutron-irradiated fuel assembly is a high dose-rate gamma-ray source, approximately a few kGy, radiation hardened underwater camera is used in the VT of the fuel assembly. Utilities today follow the EPRI guidelines for VT-1 tests on nuclear components (BWR Vessel and Internals Project-3 1995). The VT-1 guidelines specify which areas around a weld should be examined, how to measure the sizes of indications found, and how to test the resolving power of the visual equipment used for the test. The EPRI guidelines use two 12{mu}m (0.0005-in.) wires or notches as a resolution calibration standard. According to the EPRI guidelines (BWRVIP-03 1995), the camera systems employed were marginally able to detect the 0.0005-inch (12-{mu}m) diameter wire on a steel background. In the some future, it is required that the VT of nuclear fuel assembly follows the EPRI VT-1 guideline. In order to meet the VT-1 guideline, any system used in VT (ranging from the naked eye to a digital closed-circuit TV

  8. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer grid for a nuclear fuel assembly is described. It consists of a lattice of grid plates forming multiple cells that are penetrated by fuel elements. Resilient protrusions and rigid protrusions projecting into the cells from the plates bear against the fuel element to effect proper support and spacing. Pairs of intersecting grid plates, in a longitudinally spaced relationship, cooperate with other plates to form a lattice wherein each cell contains adjacent panels having resilient protrusions arranged opposite adjacent panels having rigid protrusions. The peripheral band bounding the lattice is provided solely with rigid protrusions projecting into the peripheral cells. 8 claims

  10. RBMK fuel assemblies: Current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety enhancement measures implemented since 1986 have led to substantial burnup reduction in the RBMK fuel assemblies and consequently to economical losses. With the purpose to compensate the losses, computer analysis and experiments were performed during the last decade. The works were aimed at the RBMK fuel charge perfection to reduce void reactivity effect and to increase fuel burnup. The paper presents principle results of the studies which are currently under implementation or are supposed to be implemented in the nearest future. (author)

  11. Appearance detection device for fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevent invention provides an appearance detection device which improves accuracy of images on a display and facilitates editing and selection of images upon detection of appearance of a reactor fuel assembly. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises (1) television cameras movable along fuel assemblies of a reactor, (2) a detection means for detecting the positions of the television cameras, (3) a convertor for converting analog image signals of the television cameras to digital image signals, (4) a memory means for sampling a predetermined portion of the images of the television camera and storing it together with the position signal obtained by the detection means and (5) a computer for selecting a plurality of images and positions from the above-mentioned means and joining them to one or a plurality of static images of the fuel assembly. At least two television cameras are disposed oppositely with each other. Then, position signals of the television cameras are designated by the stored sampling signals, and the fuel assembly at the position can be displayed quickly. It is scrolled, compressed or enlarged and formed into images. (I.S.)

  12. Transport container for unirradiated fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a space-saving construction of a transport container for unirradiated fuel assemblies with a high security against the occurrence of a critical state under emergency conditions. The container has an internal and external part. The interspace is filled with a highly neutron absorbing material consisting of boron glass or ceramic particles coated with a cured resin film. 2 figs

  13. Measurement Protocols for Optimized Fuel Assembly Tags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the measurement protocols for optimized tags that can be applied to standard fuel assemblies used in light water reactors. This report describes work performed by the authors at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for NA-22 as part of research to identify specific signatures that can be developed to support counter-proliferation technologies.

  14. MCTP, a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of a fuel rod of BWR type reactors (Neutron part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of the fuel rods of the BWR type reactors of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde is developed. The code solves the diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates with several energy groups. The code, likewise, calculates the temperature distribution and power distribution in those fuel rods. The code is denominated Multi groups With Temperatures and Power (MCTP). In the code, the energy with which the fission neutrons are emitted it is divided in six groups. They are also considered the produced perturbations by the changes in the temperatures of the materials that constitute the fuel rods, the content of fission products, the uranium consumption and in its case the gadolinium, as well as the plutonium production. In this work there are present preliminary results obtained with the code, using data of operation of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  15. Thermomechanical evaluation of BWR fuel elements for procedures of preconditioned with FEMAXI-V; Evaluacion termomecanica de elementos combustible BWR para procedimientos de preacondicionado con FEMAXI-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H.; Lucatero, M.A.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: hhl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The limitations in the burnt of the nuclear fuel usually are fixed by the one limit in the efforts to that undergo them the components of a nuclear fuel assembly. The limits defined its provide the direction to the fuel designer to reduce to the minimum the fuel failure during the operation, and they also prevent against some thermomechanical phenomena that could happen during the evolution of transitory events. Particularly, a limit value of LHGR is fixed to consider those physical phenomena that could lead to the interaction of the pellet-shirt (Pellet Cladding Interaction, PCI). This limit value it is related directly with an PCI limit that can be fixed based on experimental tests of power ramps. This way, to avoid to violate the PCI limit, the conditioning procedures of the fuel are still required for fuel elements with and without barrier. Those simulation procedures of the power ramp are carried out for the reactor operator during the starting maneuvers or of power increase like preventive measure of possible consequences in the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel. In this work, the thermomechanical behavior of two different types of fuel rods of the boiling water reactor is analyzed during the pursuit of the procedures of fuel preconditioning. Five diverse preconditioning calculations were carried out, each one with three diverse linear ramps of power increments. The starting point of the ramps was taken of the data of the cycle 8 of the unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. The superior limit superior of the ramps it was the threshold of the lineal power in which a fuel failure could be presented by PCI, in function of the fuel burnt. The analysis was carried out with the FEMAXI-V code. (Author)

  16. Coupled BWR calculations with the numerical nuclear reactor software system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Numerical Nuclear Reactor (NNR) is a software suite for integrated high-fidelity reactor core simulations including neutronic and thermal-hydraulic feedback. Using solution modules with formulations to reflect the multi-dimensional nature of the system, NNR offers a comprehensive core modeling capability with pin-by-pin representation of fuel assemblies and coolant channels. Originally developed for pressurized water reactors, the NNR analysis capabilities have recently been extended for boiling water reactor (BWR) applications as part of EPRI Fuel Reliability Program. The neutronics methodology is extended to treat non-periodic structure of BWR fuel assemblies, and a new Eulerian two-phase CFD boiling heat transfer model has been integrated with the software system. This paper summarizes the experience with, and results of, the first-of-a-kind coupled calculations as demonstration of a fully-integrated, high-fidelity simulation capability for assessment of margin to crud-induced failure from fuel-duty perspective. (authors)

  17. Calibration of spent fuel measurement assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LVR-15 research reactor (Czech Republic) had been converted from the highly enriched IRT-2M to the low enriched IRT-4M fuel. For the possibility of the independent pre-transport evaluation of IRT-2M burnup, a spectrometric system was developed. This spectrometric system consists of the fuel holder, the collimator and the portable Canberra Big MAC HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detector. In order to have well reproducible and reliable experimental data for modeling of the measurement system, calibration with the 110mAg isotope with known activity was performed. This isotope was chosen for having energies similar to isotopes measured in fuel assemblies. The 110mAg isotope was prepared by irradiating of the silver foil in LVR-15 research reactor; its activity was evaluated in the LVR-15's spectrometric laboratory. From the measured data, an efficiency curve of the spectrometric system has been determined. The experimental data were compared to the calculation results with the MCNPX model of the spectrometric system. - Highlights: • Calibration of research reactor spent fuel measurement assembly. • On-site prepared 110mAg isotope used for the measurement. • Calculated self-shielding factor for the IRT-2M fuel. • Applicable to other research reactor fuel geometries

  18. Method of straightening a bowed nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a method of removing the bow in a nuclear fuel assembly, the fuel assembly having top and bottom end fittings, a plurality of longitudinally extending thimble tube members interconnecting top and bottom end fittings, at least two transverse fuel rod support grids axially spaced along the thimble tube members, and a plurality of fuel rods transversely spaced and supported by the fuel rod support grids, the method comprising the steps of securing the bottom end fitting to a predetermined location under water within the containment building of a nuclear fuel reactor and pulling vertically upward along the longitudinal axis of the nuclear fuel assembly with a force on the top end fitting so that a force of between three thousand and four thousand pounds is exerted on the nuclear fuel assembly for substantially straightening the fuel assembly and eliminating most of the compressive stresses within the fuel assembly

  19. Solution of the transport equation in stationary state, in one and two dimensions, for BWR assemblies using nodal methods; Solucion de la ecuacion de transporte en estado estacionario, en 1 y 2 dimensiones, para ensambles tipo BWR usando metodos nodales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xolocostli M, J.V

    2002-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to solve the neutron transport equation in one and two dimensions (slab geometry and X Y geometry, respectively), with no time dependence, for BWR assemblies using nodal methods. In slab geometry, the nodal methods here used are the polynomial continuous (CMPk) and discontinuous (DMPk) families but only the Linear Continuous (also known as Diamond Difference), the Quadratic Continuous (QC), the Cubic Continuous (CC), the Step Discontinuous (also known as Backward Euler), the Linear Discontinuous (LD) and the Quadratic Discontinuous (QD) were considered. In all these schemes the unknown function, the angular neutron flux, is approximated as a sum of basis functions in terms of Legendre polynomials, associated to the values of the neutron flux in the edges (left, right, or both) and the Legendre moments in the cell, depending on the nodal scheme used. All these schemes were implemented in a computer program developed in previous thesis works and known with the name TNX. This program was modified for the purposes of this work. The program discreetizes the domain of concern in one dimension and determines numerically the angular neutron flux for each point of the discretization when the number of energy groups and regions are known starting from an initial approximation for the angular neutron flux being consistent with the boundary condition imposed for a given problem. Although only problems with two-energy groups were studied the computer program does not have limitations regarding the number of energy groups and the number of regions. The two problems analyzed with the program TNX have practically the same characteristics (fuel and water), with the difference that one of them has a control rod. In the part corresponding to two-dimensional problems, the implemented nodal methods were those designated as hybrids that consider not only the edge and cell Legendre moments, but also the values of the neutron flux in the corner points

  20. Thermal-hydraulic stability tests for newly designed BWR rod bundle (step-III fuel type B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Step-III Fuel Type B is a new fuel design for high burn-up operation in BWRs in Japan. The fuel design uses a 9x9 - 9 rod bundle to accommodate the high fuel duty of high burn-up operation and a square water-channel to provide enhanced neutron moderation. The objective of this study is to confirm the thermal-hydraulic stability performance of the new fuel design by tests which simulate the parallel channel configuration of the BWR core. The stability testing was performed at the NFI test loop. The test bundle geometry used for the stability test is a 3x3 heater rod bundle which has about 1/8 of the cross section area of the full size 9x9 - 9 rod bundle. Full size heater rods were used to simulate the fuel rods. For parallel channel simulation, a bypass channel with a 6x6 - 8 heater rod bundle was connected in parallel with the 3x3 rod bundle test channel. The stability test results showed typical flow oscillation features which have been described as density wave oscillations. The stationary limit cycle oscillation extended flow amplitudes to several tens of a percent of the nominal value, during which periodic dry-out and re-wetting were observed. The test results were used for verification of a stability analysis code, which demonstrated that the stability performance of the new fuel design has been conservatively predicted. (author)

  1. Experimental data report for test TS-3 Reactivity Initiated Accident test in the NSRR with pre-irradiated BWR fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents experimental data for Test TS-3 which was the third test in a series of Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) tests using pre-irradiated BWR fuel rods, performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in September, 1990. Test fuel rod used in the Test TS-3 was a short-sized BWR (7 x 7) type rod which was re-fabricated from a commercial rod irradiated in the Tsuruga Unit 1 power reactor of Japan Atomic Power Co. The fuel had an initial enrichment of 2.79 % and a burnup of 26 Gwd/tU. A pulse irradiation of the test fuel rod was performed under a cooling condition of stagnant water at atmospheric pressure and at ambient temperature which simulated a BWR's cold start-up RIA event. The energy deposition of the fuel rod in this test was evaluated to be 94 ± 4 cal/g · fuel (88 ± 4 cal/g · fuel in peak fuel enthalpy) and no fuel failure was observed. Descriptions on test conditions, test procedures, transient behavior of the test rod during the pulse irradiation, and results of pre-pulse and post-pulse irradiation examinations are described in this report. (author)

  2. Assembly mechanism for nuclear fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of a nuclear power reactor fuel bundle having tie rods fastened to a lower tie plate and passing through openings in the upper tie plate with the assembled bundle secured by rotatable locking sleeves which engage slots provided in the upper tie plate. Pressure exerted by helical springs mounted around each of the fuel rods urge the upper tie plate against the locking sleeves. The bundle may be disassembled after depressing the upper tie plate and rotating the locking sleeves to the unlocked position

  3. Assembly mechanism for nuclear fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to a nuclear power reactor fuel bundle of the type wherein several rods are mounted in parallel array between two tie plates which secure the fuel rods in place and are maintained in assembled position by means of a number of tie rods secured to both of the end plates. Improved apparatus is provided for attaching the tie rods to the upper tie plate by the use of locking lugs fixed to rotatable sleeves which engage the upper tie plate. (auth)

  4. Reactor and fuel assembly design for improved fuel utilization in liquid moderated thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved reactor and fuel assembly design is disclosed wherein a light water reactor is initially run with undermoderated fuel assemblies to take advantage of increased conversion ratio, and after a suitable period of operation, the neutron spectrum for the undermoderated assemblies is shifted to lower energies to increase reactivity by withdrawing a number of fuel rods from the assemblies. The increased reactivity allows for continued operation of the modified assembly, and the fuel rods which are removed are used to construct similar assemblies which are also capable of continued operation. The improved reactor and fuel assembly design results in improved fuel utilization and neutron economy and reduced control requirements for the reactor

  5. Testing bench for spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of a program for realizing pressurized water reactors, the D. Tech. SECS-SELECI of the French Atomic Energy Commission has transformed and adapted the shielded cell CLEMENTINE at SACLAY so that nondestructive and destructive tests could be carried out on complete 900 MW power reactor assemblies. Various operations have been carried out on both pins and assemblies since 1978. The work on the cell equipment has led to the development of a metrological test bench for examining irradiated fuels. This equipment includes a support for the assembly, a vertical girder and a displaceable tool-carrying trolley. This trolley, which moves along the Z-axis, is provided with tools for the metrological examinations associated with the displacement of the XY table, the assembly being remote controlled from a working zone situated in front of the cell. Visual examination of the four faces of the assembly is performed by displacing mirrors, which reflect the image of the object out of the cell onto a TV camera. Vertical measurements are made using optical sighting and comparing the lengths of objects with a graduated standard scale rigidly attached to the bench. Measurements made in a horizontal plane along a given Z-axis take the displacement of the sighting marks fixed to the mechanism into consideration. The displacement of this mechanism is a function of the number of pulses imparted to the system. A laser device is used to obtain the required pin spacing at various different heights in the assemblies

  6. FUEL ASSEMBLY SHAKER AND TRUCK TEST SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Sanborn, Scott E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2014-09-25

    This study continues the modeling support of the SNL shaker table task from 2013 and includes analysis of the SNL 2014 truck test campaign. Detailed finite element models of the fuel assembly surrogate used by SNL during testing form the basis of the modeling effort. Additional analysis was performed to characterize and filter the accelerometer data collected during the SNL testing. The detailed fuel assembly finite element model was modified to improve the performance and accuracy of the original surrogate fuel assembly model in an attempt to achieve a closer agreement with the low strains measured during testing. The revised model was used to recalculate the shaker table load response from the 2013 test campaign. As it happened, the results remained comparable to the values calculated with the original fuel assembly model. From this it is concluded that the original model was suitable for the task and the improvements to the model were not able to bring the calculated strain values down to the extremely low level recorded during testing. The model needs more precision to calculate strains that are so close to zero. The truck test load case had an even lower magnitude than the shaker table case. Strain gage data from the test was compared directly to locations on the model. Truck test strains were lower than the shaker table case, but the model achieved a better relative agreement of 100-200 microstrains (or 0.0001-0.0002 mm/mm). The truck test data included a number of accelerometers at various locations on the truck bed, surrogate basket, and surrogate fuel assembly. This set of accelerometers allowed an evaluation of the dynamics of the conveyance system used in testing. It was discovered that the dynamic load transference through the conveyance has a strong frequency-range dependency. This suggests that different conveyance configurations could behave differently and transmit different magnitudes of loads to the fuel even when travelling down the same road at

  7. Method for the detection of defective nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is applied an ultrasonic transmitter on a tape carrier by means of which the ultrasonic transmitter can be guided underwater between the fuel assemblies. If a fuel assembly is defective, i.e. filled with water, the reflection coefficient at the front interface between cladding and inner space of the fuel assembly will decrease. Essential parts of the ultrasonic signal will move through the liquid and will not be reflected until the backward liquid/metal interface of the fuel assembly. This impulse echo is different from that of the gas-filled fuel assembly. (DG)

  8. Advanced membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Seung; Pivovar, Bryan S

    2014-02-25

    A method of preparing advanced membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for use in fuel cells. A base polymer is selected for a base membrane. An electrode composition is selected to optimize properties exhibited by the membrane electrode assembly based on the selection of the base polymer. A property-tuning coating layer composition is selected based on compatibility with the base polymer and the electrode composition. A solvent is selected based on the interaction of the solvent with the base polymer and the property-tuning coating layer composition. The MEA is assembled by preparing the base membrane and then applying the property-tuning coating layer to form a composite membrane. Finally, a catalyst is applied to the composite membrane.

  9. Exponential experiments on PWR spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Exponential experiment system which is composed of a neutron detector, a signal analysis system and a neutron source, Cf-252 has been installed in order to experimentally determine the neutron effective multiplication factor for PWR spent fuel assembly. The axial background neutron flux is measured as a preliminary performance test. From the results, the spacer grid position is determined to be consistent with the design specifications within a 2.3% relative error. The induced fission neutron for four of the assemblies is also measured by scanning the neutron source, Cf-252 or the neutron detector. The exponential decay constants have been evaluated by the application of Poisson regression to the net induced fission neutron counts. It was revealed that the average exponential decay constants for the C15, J14, G23 and J44 assemblies were determined to be 0.130, 0.127, 0.125 and 0.121, respectively. (author)

  10. Non-destructive γ-ray spectrometry and analysis on spent fuel assemblies of the JPDR-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-destructive gamma-ray spectrometry was carried out on the spent fuel assemblies of the whole core of JPDR-I which was a BWR. These data were analyzed by considering power distribution, spatial variation of neutron spectrum, and history of reactor operation. The burnup and the Pu/U atom ratio in each assembly were derived from the non-destructively measured distributions of 137Cs activity and 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio, respectively, by using calibration curves established for fuel specimens of a standard assembly of the core. The results were compared with calculational ones based on the operational data, and good correlations were found between them. The total amount of plutonium build-up in the core estimated from the non-destructive measurements agreed quite well with the amount obtained from reprocessing. (author)

  11. Assembly mechanism for nuclear fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of securing a fuel bundle to permit easy remote disassembly is described. Fuel rods are held loosely between end plates, each end of the rods fitting into holes in the end plates. At the upper end of each fuel rod there is a spring pressing against the end plate. Tie rods are used to hold the end plates together securely. The lower end of each tie rod is screwed into the lower end plate; the upper end of each tie rod is attached to the upper end plate by means of a locking assembly described in the patent. In order to remove the upper tie plate during the disassembly process, it is necessary only to depress the tie plate against the pressure of the springs surrounding the fuel rods and then to rotate each locking sleeve on the tie rods from its locked to its unlocked position. It is then possible to remove the tie plate without disassembling the locking assembly. (LL)

  12. Automatic determination of BWR fuel loading patterns based on K.E. technique with core physics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis oof a computerized search method, a prototype for a fuel loading pattern expert system has been developed to support designers in core design for BWRs. The method was implemented by coupling rules and core physics simulators into an inference engine to establish an automated generate-and-test cycle. A search control mechanism, which prunes paths to be searched and selects appropriate rules through the interaction with the user, was also introduced to accomplish an effective search. The constraints in BWR core design are: (1) cycle length more than L, (2) core shutdown margin more than S, and (3) thermal margin more than T. Here L, S, and T are the specified minimum values. In this system, individual rules contain the manipulation to improve the core shutdown margin explicitly. Other items were taken into account only implicitly. Several applications to the test cases were carried out. It was found that the results were comparable with those obtained by human expert engineers. Broad applicability of the present method in the BWR core design domain was proved

  13. Experimental studies on seismic behavior of PWR fuel assembly rows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To qualify fuel assembly seismic resistance and to promote the development of new spacer grid designs, FRAMATOME (fuel division) and CEA have launched a large scale experimental program which will lead to improved models for safety analyses. The tests performed on reduced scale fuel assemblies were devoted to analyzing the assembly behavior during seismic motion. The aim of this paper is to present the main results of tests performed on rows of 5 and 13 assemblies

  14. 44-BWR WASTE PACKAGE LOADING CURVE EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of initial boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of spent nuclear fuel into the 44 BWR waste package configuration as provided in Attachment IV. This calculation is an application of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). The scope of this calculation covers a range of enrichments from 0 through 5.0 weight percent (wt%) U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 40 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel applications. The intended use of these results will be in establishing BWR waste package configuration loading specifications. Limitations of this evaluation are as follows: (1) The results are based on burnup credit for actinides and selected fission products as proposed in YMP (2003, Table 3-1) and referred to as the ''Principal Isotopes''. Any change to the isotope listing will have a direct impact on the results of this report. (2) The results of 100 percent of the current BWR projected waste stream being able to be disposed of in the 44-BWR waste package with Ni-Gd Alloy absorber plates is contingent upon the referenced waste stream being sufficiently similar to the waste stream received for disposal. (3) The results are based on 1.5 wt% Gd in the Ni-Gd Alloy material and having no tuff inside the waste package. If the Gd loading is reduced or a process to introduce tuff inside the waste package is defined, then this report would need to be reevaluated based on the alternative materials

  15. Methodology to Access Fuel Assembly Dimension Stability on Design Stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel assembly dimension stability (growth and distortion) is important fuel performance characteristic. Excessive growth leads to extreme axial force which can provoke significant fuel assembly distortion and, ultimately, fuel assembly component structural failure. Fuel assembly distortion may adversely affect fuel handling, RCCA insertability, plant operation, etc. Thus, fuel assembly dimension stability should be assessed during design stage to ensure that predicted growth and distortion are acceptable such no restriction on plant safety and plant operation are required. Traditionally, fuel assembly dimensional stability has not been explicitly addressed during design stage. The strong design, operating experience and lead test assemblies operation data have been required to conclude that a particular design has adequate dimensional stability. Sometimes, the new design implementation was not successful due to limited design and operating experience. A systematic methodology has been developed to explicitly address fuel assembly dimensional stability and reduce risk associated with implementing a new fuel assembly design. A detailed mechanical fuel assembly model has been developed. The model includes all fuel assembly components which contribute to fuel assembly dimensional stability. Innovative skeleton structure and explicit spacer grid models have been proposed to simulate fuel assembly component and their interaction. The required material properties have been updated to be consistent with currently available fuel material inventory. The fuel assembly component testing program has been updated to provide information required to develop the detailed fuel assembly model. The computer code SAVAN has been used to facilitate fuel assembly dimension stability assessment. SAVAN is a two-dimensional finite element analysis code developed by ENUSA. Westinghouse, ENUSA and KNF have agreed to upgrade the original SAVAN code to the new methodology. The upgraded SAVAN

  16. Fuel assembly inspection stand at NPP cooling pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stand for the RBMK fuel assembly inspection under conditions of the fuel cooling pool is described. Results of experimental testing the techniques and stand equipment at the Ignalinskaya NPP are presented. The stand provides for visual control using the TSU-24M television system; eddy current examination of peripheral fuel elements; identification of failed fuel elements; measurement of diameters of peripheral fuel elements and gaps between them; registration of fuel element assembly carriage coordinates and turn angle; measurement of fuel assembly cross dimensions, bending and twist using ultrasonic transducers; drive control; carriage positioning; drive control by setting transducers in operational position

  17. Removal and replacement of fuel rods in nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus for replacing components of a nuclear fuel assembly stored in a pit under about 10 m. of water. The fuel assembly is secured in a container which is rotatable from the upright position to an inverted position in which the bottom nozzle is upward. The bottom nozzle plate is disconnected from the control-rod thimbles by means of a cutter for severing the welds. To guide and provide lateral support for the cutter a fixture including bushings is provided, each encircling a screw fastener and sealing the region around a screw fastener to trap the chips from the severed weld. Chips adhering to the cutter are removed by a suction tube of an eductor. (author)

  18. Fuel injection assembly for use in turbine engines and method of assembling same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Jonathan Dwight; Johnson, Thomas Edward; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2015-12-15

    A fuel injection assembly for use in a turbine engine is provided. The fuel injection assembly includes an end cover, an endcap assembly, a fluid supply chamber, and a plurality of tube assemblies positioned at the endcap assembly. Each of the tube assemblies includes housing having a fuel plenum and a cooling fluid plenum. The cooling fluid plenum is positioned downstream from the fuel plenum and separated from the fuel plenum by an intermediate wall. The plurality of tube assemblies also include a plurality of tubes that extends through the housing. Each of the plurality of tubes is coupled in flow communication with the fluid supply chamber and a combustion chamber positioned downstream from the tube assembly. The plurality of tube assemblies further includes an aft plate at a downstream end of the cooling fluid plenum. The plate includes at least one aperture.

  19. Safety of WWER-440 fuel assembly transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective multiplication factor was calculated for a fuel assembly system in special trasport cases when flooded with water. The cases are wooden boxes lined with cadmium sheets 0.5 mm in thickness and with textile. The outer shell consists of 8 mm steel sheet. The calculation was carried out for an indefinite lattice of cases with fuel assemblies, the cases touching each other. It was assumed that the lattice was completely flooded. The wood composition was taken to be C 50%, O 44%, H 6%. The outer steel shell was replaced by pure iron. Soaking of wood was neglected as it is a long-term process. The calculation was carried out using programs THETA and CELLPAR-II, effective cross sections for the superthermal region were taken from ABBN and for the thermal region from the THETA program library. The calculated value of the effective multiplication factor shows that in no case can a chain reaction take place in the assembly lattice containing cases immersed in water and contacting each other. This calculated example represents a configuration with the highest effective multiplication factor value. The transport cases are thus satisfactory from the safety aspect. (J.F.)

  20. Interface ring for gas turbine fuel nozzle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Timothy A.; Schilp, Reinhard

    2016-03-22

    A gas turbine combustor assembly including a combustor liner and a plurality of fuel nozzle assemblies arranged in an annular array extending within the combustor liner. The fuel nozzle assemblies each include fuel nozzle body integral with a swirler assembly, and the swirler assemblies each include a bellmouth structure to turn air radially inwardly for passage into the swirler assemblies. A radially outer removed portion of each of the bellmouth structures defines a periphery diameter spaced from an inner surface of the combustor liner, and an interface ring is provided extending between the combustor liner and the removed portions of the bellmouth structures at the periphery diameter.

  1. Spent fuel assembly source term parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Containment of cask contents by a transport cask is a function of the cask body, one or more closure lids, and various bolting hardware, and seals associated with the cavity closure and other containment penetrations. In addition, characteristics of cask contents that impede the ability of radionuclides to move from an origin to the external environment also provide containment. In essence, multiple release barriers exist in series in transport casks, and the magnitude of the releasable activity in the cask is considerably lower than the total activity of its contents. A source term approach accounts for the magnitude of the releasable activity available in the cask by assessing the degree of barrier resistance to release provided by material characteristics and inherent barriers that impede the release of radioactive contents. Standardized methodologies for defining the spent-fuel transport packages with specified regulations have recently been developed. An essential part of applying the source term methodology involves characterizing the response of the spent fuel under regulatory conditions of transport. Thermal and structural models of the cask and fuel are analyzed and used to predict fuel rod failure probabilities. Input to these analyses and failure evaluations cover a wide range of geometrical and material properties. An important issue in the development of these models is the sensitivity of the radioactive source term generated during transport to individual parameters such as temperature and fluence level. This paper provides a summary of sensitivity analyses concentrating on the structural response and failure predictions of the spent fuel assemblies

  2. Simulations of ex-vessel fuel coolant interactions in a Nordic BWR using MC3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) employ a drywell cavity flooding technique as a nuclear severe accident management strategy. In case of core melt accident where the reactor pressure vessel will fail and the melt will eject from the lower head and fall into a water pool, may be in the form of a continuous jet. It is assumed that the melt jet will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed into the water pool. The melt interaction with a water pool may cause an energetic steam explosion which creates a potential risk towards the integrity of containment, leading to fission products release into the atmosphere. The results of the APRI-7 project suggest that the significant damage to containment structures by steam explosion cannot be ruled according to the state-of-the-art knowledge about corresponding accident scenario. In the follow-up project APRI-8 (2012-2016) one of the goals of the KTH research is to resolve the steam explosion energetics (SEE) issue, developing a risk-oriented framework for quantifying conditional threats to containment integrity for a Nordic type BWR. The present study deals with the premixing and explosion phase calculations of a Nordic BWR dry cavity, using MC3D, a multiphase CFD code for fuel coolant interactions. The main goal of the study is the assessment of pressure buildup in the cavity and the impact loading on the side walls. The conditions for the calculations are used from the SERENA-II BWR case exercise. The other objective was to do the sensitivity analysis of the parameters in modeling of fuel coolant interactions, which can help to reduce uncertainty in assessment of steam explosion energetics. The results show that the amount of liquid melt droplets in the water (region of void<0.6) is maximum even before reaching the jet at the bottom. In the explosion phase, maximum pressure is attained at the bottom and the maximum impulse on the wall is at the bottom of the wall. The analysis is carried out using two different

  3. Fuel assembly with a flute for water distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel assembly is arranged so that groups of fuel rods are enclosed into walls. The top end of the assembly has a peripherical distribution channel which recieves water for emergency cooling and distributes it evenly over the fuel rods. (G.B.)

  4. Optical matrix for nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to detect the presence of fuel rods, it was selected a reflection optical transducer, which provides a measurable electrical signal when the beam at a certain distance is interrupted then there is a reflection causing a excitation to the sensor that provides a change of state at the output of transducer. This step is coupled through an operational amplifier which drives the opto coupler circuit isolating this step of the interface and a personal computer. This work presents the description of components, designs, signal coupler and opto isolater circuit, interface circuit and tutorial assemble program. (Author)

  5. BUTREN-RC an hybrid system for the recharges optimization of nuclear fuels in a BWR; BUTREN-RC un sistema hibrido para la optimizacion de recargas de combustible nuclear en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J.; Castillo M, J.A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The obtained results with the hybrid system BUTREN-RC are presented that obtains recharges of nuclear fuel for a BWR type reactor. The system has implemented the methods of optimization heuristic taboo search and neural networks. The optimization it carried out with the technique of taboo search, and the neural networks, previously trained, were used to predict the behavior of the recharges of fuel, in substitution of commercial codes of reactor simulation. The obtained recharges of nuclear fuel correspond to 5 different operation cycles of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant, Veracruz in Mexico. The obtained results were compared with the designs of this cycles. The energy gain with the recharges of fuel proposals is of approximately 4.5% with respect to those of design. The time of compute consumed it was considerably smaller that when a commercial code for reactor simulation is used. (Author)

  6. BWR spent fuel transport and storage system for KKL: TN trademark 52L, TN trademark 97L, TN trademark 24 BHL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LEIBSTADT (KKL) nuclear power plant in Switzerland has opted to ship spent fuel to a central facility called ZWILAG for interim storage. In the mid-nineties, COGEMA LOGISTICS was contracted by KKL for the supply of the TN trademark a52L and TN trademark 97L transport and storage casks for BWR fuel types. In 2003, KKL also ordered from COGEMA LOGISTICS the supply of six TNae24 BHL transport and storage casks. This paper shows how all the three cask designs have responded to the KKL needs to ship and store BWR spent fuel. In addition, it highlights the already significant operational feedback of the TN trademark 52L and TN trademark 97L casks by the KKL and ZWILAG operators

  7. The repair of irradiated fuel assemblies of RBMK-1500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988 the irradiated fuel assemblies RBMK-1500 examination stand was put into operation at unit 2 of Ignalina NPP. The examination stand was intended to research irradiated fuel assemblies. Some destructive and non-destructive examinations of irradiated fuel assemblies have been developed together with Research Institute of Atomic Reactors. Since 1991 the examination stand has been using for visual examination of irradiated fuel assemblies before loading into the reactor. Visual examination revealed some irradiated fuel assemblies with damaged heat exchange intensifying (HEI) grids. Such defects do not allow loading fuel assemblies into the reactor. In 1996 the examination stand was completed with the module allowed to repair damaged heat exchange intensifying grids. Special fuel rod safety margins were calculated for such fuel assemblies. In 1997 five irradiated fuel assemblies RBMK-1500 were repaired and loaded into the reactor of unit 2. At the moment all repaired fuel assemblies are under control in accordance with the experiment. There have not been any failures. (author)

  8. Spacer grid for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear fuel assembly grid (12) having four substantially solid perimeter plates (28) forming a rigid quadangle (20) surrounding the fuel elements (36) and having stop surfaces (32) formed on the internal surfaces thereof for contacting each adjacent fuel element. A plurality of interlaced strips (24) are attached to and extend from each plate to the oppositely facing plate, forming a lattice of regularly spaced openings (16) through which the fuel elements traverse the grid. These strips are of two types, the first consisting of two perpendicular center strips (44,44') that divide the grid into four symmetric quadrants, each center strip having a spring tab (48') projecting into each opening (16') contiguous to the center strip. The second type of interlaced strip consists of the remainder of the strips (52), half of which are oriented parallel to one center strip and the other half are oriented parallel to other center strip. The second type, or interior, strips have a generally undulating bent stop surface (50) such that one bend (56) projects into each adjacent contiguous opening on the side of the interior strip facing the respective parallel center strip. Each interior strip also has a spring tab (48'') projecting into each adjacent contiguous opening on the side of the interior strip opposite the respective parallel center strip

  9. BWR 90+ - Nuclear power plant for 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BWR 90+ is a boiling water reactor, based on the previous models BWR90 and BWR75, and on the operational experiences gained with six reactors of the previous generation. The development work started in 1994 in co-operation with Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO). At present all the boiling water reactor owners participate the cooperation. The objectives of the development were: (1) to develop a boiling water reactor of competitive price level and short construction time, and which meets the latest safety requirements, (2) to itemize the technologies improving the security and competitivity of present plants, and (3) to maintain the expertise of the personnel of the companies participating the development work, and improving the BWR- technology. High power output and short construction time reduce the power generation costs. Large amount of fuel assemblies leads to higher safety margins. Reduction of scram groups from 18 to 16 reduces the amount of components, the assembly space and costs. The reactor technical data is as follows: Thermal power output 4250 MWth; electric power output 1500 MWe, construction time 1500 days, costs 1500 pounds/kWe, no. of fuel assemblies 872, no. of scram groups 16, turbines 1, the capacity factor 90% and the duration of service outage 3 weeks. Specific features of BWR90+ are: short construction time and low costs, risk for connection between wet and dry spaces has been minimized, reactor core remains covered by water during loss-of-coolant accident caused by fuel replacement, Passive collection and cooling of core-melt inside the containment, the containment is not the first wall against the spreading of core-melt, steam explosions and core- concrete interactions have low probabilities, high gas- volume of wet-space reduces the pressure increase during a severe accident, filter-equipped gas removal system forms the final overpressure shield, the containment is cylindrical, and the plant is equipped with digital instrumentation and control

  10. Verification of a BWR code package by gamma scan measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-burnup 8 x 8 fuel with a large central water rod (called step 2 fuel) has been recently introduced to the latest Japanese boiling water reactor (BWR) plants. Lanthanum-140 gamma intensity is almost directly related to nodal powers. By gamma scan measurement, the axial distribution of 140La in the exposed fuel was measured at the end of cycle (EOC) 1 and was compared with the calculation by a BWR code package TGBLA/LOGOS. The multienrichment fuel-type core (MEC) design was adopted for the initial cycle core of the plants. The MEC design contains three different enrichment types of fuels to simulate the equilibrium cycles, achieve much higher discharge exposure, and save fuel cycle cost, and the low-enrichment fuels are loaded in periphery and in control cells. Such MEC design could be a challenge to the BWR design methods because of the large spectrum mismatch among the fuel assemblies of the different enrichments. The aforementioned comparison has shown that the accuracy of the TGBLA/LOGOS code package is satisfactory

  11. Process development and fabrication for sphere-pac fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welty, R.K.; Campbell, M.H.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium fuel rods containing sphere-pac fuel have been fabricated for in-reactor tests and demonstrations. A process for the development, qualification, and fabrication of acceptable sphere-pac fuel rods is described. Special equipment to control fuel contamination with moisture or air and the equipment layout needed for rod fabrication is described and tests for assuring the uniformity of the fuel column are discussed. Fuel retainers required for sphere-pac fuel column stability and instrumentation to measure fuel column smear density are described. Results of sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication campaigns are reviewed and recommended improvements for high throughput production are noted.

  12. In-mast sipping for VVER-440 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in-core sipping facility of the Jaslovske Bohunice nuclear power station installed by Siemens has proved to work satisfactorily since 1986. The process of in-mast sipping reduces the number of fuel assembly handling steps and, as a consequence, also the time spent on fuel assembly inspection and exchange in the reactor. While fuel assemblies are being handled, their cladding tubes are inspected for leakages. Inspection has indicated the operation of VVER reactors to be reliable. (orig.)

  13. Spring and stop assembly for nuclear fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A removable spring and stop assembly is described for use with a nuclear fuel bundle in a nuclear reactor core. The assembly includes a bolt threaded through a top section of a stop member by which the assembly (and a flow channel) is secured to the fuel bundle, the adjacent end threads of the bolt. The stop member is upset or deformed by which the bolt is captured in the assembly. (U.S.)

  14. Fuel assembly unlatching and handling gripper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A refueling machine is provided with a latching/unlatching rod which is provided with a hexagonally configured head portion for mated engagement with a hexagonally configured socket defined within a latching/unlatching screw of a fuel assembly whereby the fuel assembly may be securely mechanically connected to the lower core support plate of the reactor internals. The latching/unlatching rod is fixedly connected to a housing which is co-axially disposed within a torque tube, secured to the lower end of a spur gear rotatably engaged with a drive spur gear through means of an idler gear whereby torque is transmitted to the torque tube. The torque tube has a square-shaped configuration in cross-section, and the housing has similarly configured flanged portions for cooperation therewith whereby rotary torque is transmitted to the housing and the latching/unlatching rod. The housing latching/unlatching rod, and torque tube are all co-axially disposed within the refuelling machine gripper tube and outer stationary mast, and a dual winch drive system is provided for independently controlling the vertical movements of the gripper tube and latching/unlatching rod respectively. (author)

  15. Nuclear fuel assembly debris resistant bottom nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A debris resistant bottom nozzle useful in a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor is described, the bottom nozzle comprising: (a) support means adapted to rest on a lower core plate of a nuclear reactor; and (b) a plate fixed on the support means and being of a substantial solid configuration with a plurality of spaced cut-out regions therein adapted to align directly above inlet holes in the lower core plate; and (c) a plurality of open separate criss-cross structures, each of the criss-cross structures fixed to the plate and extending across one of the cut-out regions therein, the criss-cross structures defining individual openings small enough in cross-sectional size to filter out debris of damage-inducing size larger than 0.190 inch in width otherwise collects in unoccupied spaces of a lowermost grid of the fuel assembly, but large enough in size to let pass debris of nondamage-inducing size which otherwise passes through the unoccupied spaced of the lowermost grid

  16. Nuclear data uncertainty and sensitivity analysis with XSUSA for fuel assembly depletion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to nuclear data are performed with depletion calculations for BWR and PWR fuel assemblies specified in the framework of the UAM-LWR Benchmark Phase II. For this, the GRS sampling based tool XSUSA is employed together with the TRITON depletion sequences from the SCALE 6.1 code system. Uncertainties for multiplication factors and nuclide inventories are determined, as well as the main contributors to these result uncertainties by calculating importance indicators. The corresponding neutron transport calculations are performed with the deterministic discrete-ordinates code NEWT. In addition, the Monte Carlo code KENO in multi-group mode is used to demonstrate a method with which the number of neutron histories per calculation run can be substantially reduced as compared to that in a calculation for the nominal case without uncertainties, while uncertainties and sensitivities are obtained with almost the same accuracy.

  17. MELCOR/SNAP analysis of Chinshan (BWR/4) Nuclear Power Plant spent fuel pool for the similar Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinshan nuclear power plant (NPP), a BWR/4 plant, is the first NPP in Taiwan. After Fukushima NPP event occurred, there is more concern for the safety of NPPs in Taiwan. Therefore, in order to estimate the safety of Chinshan NPP spent fuel pool, by using MELCOR 2.1 and SNAP 2.2.7 codes, INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, R.O.C.) performed the safety analysis of Chinshan NPP spent fuel pool (SFP). There were two main steps in this research. The first step was the establishment of Chinshan NPP SFP MELCOR/SNAP model. And the transient analysis under the SFP cooling system failure condition was performed. Besides, in order to study the detailed thermal-hydraulic performance of this transient, TRACE was used in this analysis. CFD data from INER report was used to compare with the results of MELCOR and TRACE. The next step was the fuel rod performance analysis by using FRAPTRAN and TRACE's results. Besides, the animation model of Chinshan NPP SFP was presented using the animation function of SNAP with MELCOR analysis results. (author)

  18. Model for the analysis of transitories and stability of a BWR reactor with fuel of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it is described the thermo hydraulic and neutronic pattern used to simulate the behavior of a nucleus of thorium-uranium under different conditions of operation. The analysed nucleus was designed with base to assemblies that operate under the cover-seed concept. The pattern was proven to conditions of stationary state and transitory state. Here it is only presented the simulation of the one SCRAM manual and it is compared in the behavior of a nucleus with UO2. Additionally one carries out an analysis of stability taking into account the four corners that define the area of stability of the map flow-power and to conditions of 100% of flow and 100% of power. The module of stability is based on the pattern of Lahey and Podowsky to estimate the drops of pressure during a perturbation. It is concludes that the behavior of this nucleus is not very different to the one shown by the nuclei loaded with the fuel of UO2. (Author)

  19. Advanced and flexible genetic algorithms for BWR fuel loading pattern optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work proposes advances in the implementation of a flexible genetic algorithm (GA) for fuel loading pattern optimization for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). In order to avoid specific implementations of genetic operators and to obtain a more flexible treatment, a binary representation of the solution was implemented; this representation had to take into account that a little change in the genotype must correspond to a little change in the phenotype. An identifier number is assigned to each assembly by means of a Gray Code of 7 bits and the solution (the loading pattern) is represented by a binary chain of 777 bits of length. Another important contribution is the use of a Fitness Function which includes a Heuristic Function and an Objective Function. The Heuristic Function which is defined to give flexibility on the application of a set of positioning rules based on knowledge, and the Objective Function that contains all the parameters which qualify the neutronic and thermal hydraulic performances of each loading pattern. Experimental results illustrating the effectiveness and flexibility of this optimization algorithm are presented and discussed.

  20. Seismic behavior of a fuel assembly in the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general approach to the dynamic time-history analysis of the reactor core is presented in this paper as a part of the fuel assembly qualification program. Several detailed core models are set up to reflect the placement of the fuel assemblies within the core shroud. Peak horizontal responses are obtained for each model for the motions induced from earthquake. The dynamic responses such as fuel assembly deflected shapes and spacer grid impact loads are carefully investigated. Also, the sensitivity responses are obtained for the earthquake motions and the fuel assembly non-linear response characteristics are discussed

  1. Optimization of analysis best-estimate of a fuel element BWR with Code STAR-CCM+; Optimizacion del analisis best-estimate de un elemento combustible BWR con el codigo STAR-CCM+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado Canada, E.; Concejal Barmejo, A.; Jimenez Varas, G.; Solar Martinez, A.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the project is the evaluation of the code STAR-CCM +, as well as the establishment of guidelines and standardized procedures for the discretization of the area of study and the selection of physical models suitable for the simulation of BWR fuel. For this purpose several of BFBT experiments have simulated [1] provide a data base for the development of experiments for measuring distribution of fractions of holes to changes in power in order to find the most appropriate models for the simulation of the problem. (Author)

  2. MCTP, a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of a fuel rod of BWR type reactors (Neutron part); MCTP, un codigo para el analisis termo-mecanico de una barra combustible de reactores tipo BWR (Parte Neutronica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: hhl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of the fuel rods of the BWR type reactors of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde is developed. The code solves the diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates with several energy groups. The code, likewise, calculates the temperature distribution and power distribution in those fuel rods. The code is denominated Multi groups With Temperatures and Power (MCTP). In the code, the energy with which the fission neutrons are emitted it is divided in six groups. They are also considered the produced perturbations by the changes in the temperatures of the materials that constitute the fuel rods, the content of fission products, the uranium consumption and in its case the gadolinium, as well as the plutonium production. In this work there are present preliminary results obtained with the code, using data of operation of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  3. Calculation of activity content and related properties in PWR and BWR fuel using ORIGEN 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report lists the conditions for calculations of the core inventory for a PWR and BWR. The calculations have been performed using the computer code ORIGEN 2. The amount (grams), the total radioactivity (bequerels), the thermal power (watts), the radioactivity from theα-decay (bequerels), and the neutron emission (neutrons/sec) from the core after the last burnup have been determined. All the parameters have been calculated as a function of the burnup and the natural decay, the latter over a time period of 0-1.0E07 years. The calculations have been performed for 68 heavy nuclides, 60 daughter nuclides, to the heavy nuclides with atomic numbers under 92, 852 fission products and 7 light nucli ides. The most important results are listed. (author)

  4. Method and device for cleaning spent fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spent fuel assembly is immersed in a liquid metal in a pot disposed below a cleaning vessel which is under the floor of an argon gas cell, and the liquid metal in the pot is heated by a heater disposed at the periphery of the cleaning vessel, and the spent fuel assembly is preheated by the heated liquid metal. Then, in a state where the spent fuel is pulled up from the pot in the cleaning vessel, heating gases are blown to the fuel assembly from above, high temperature argon gases are blown to wash out the liquid metals deposited on the spent fuel assembly. In this way, the spent fuel assembly can be heated to a predetermined preheating temperature in a short period of time. Since the amount of the liquid metal to be recovered by a vapor trap is reduced, the capacity of a storage tank exclusively used for vapor trap can be reduced. (T.M.)

  5. Hydraulic reinforcement of channel at lower tie-plate in BWR fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes an apparatus in a fuel bundle for confining fuel rods for the generation of steam in a steam water mixture passing interior of the fuel bundle. The fuel bundle includes: a lower tie-plate for supporting the fuel rods and permitting flow from the lower exterior portion of the fuel bundle into the interior portion of the fuel bundle; a plurality of fuel rods. The fuel rods supported on the lower tie-plate extending upwardly to and towards the upper portion of the fuel bundle for the generation of steam in a passing steam and water mixture interior of the fuel bundle; an upper tie-plate for maintaining the fuel rods in side-by-side relation and permitting a threaded connection between a plurality of the fuel rods with the threaded connection being at the upper and lower tie-plate. The upper tie-plate permitting escape of a steam water mixture from the top of the fuel bundle; a fuel bundle channel; and a labyrinth seal configured in the lower tie-plate

  6. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.; Wehle, F.; Opel, S.; Velten, R. [AREVA, AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  7. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  8. Zirconium fuel cladding corrosion prediction in fuel assembly operation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritsky, V.G.; Berezina, I.G., E-mail: kritsky@givnipiet.spb.ru, E-mail: alemaskina@givnipiet.ru [Leading Inst. ' VNIPIET' , Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    At present, the work to extend fuel cycles is carried out at NPP with VVER reactors. With the increase of fuel assembly burn-up to 70-100 MWd/kg U and linear power, the local coolant «nucleate boiling» is inevitable which in combination with coolant «acidification» alongside with the existing water chemistry norms will increase zirconium alloy corrosion. The rate of Zr alloy corrosion under reactor irradiation depends on temperature and heat flux through fuel cladding, coolant chemistry (concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, OH{sup -}, O{sub 2}, hydrogen, ammonia, strong alkalis - LiOH, KOH, pH, ets.), steam content, alloy composition and some other parameters. A generalized model for calculating Zr alloys corrosion, which take into account the above-mentioned factors, was developed: K = k{sub 1}e {sup -}ΣvQ{sub 1}/R(T+ΔT) + k{sub 2} 1/1 - α + β Φ{sup n} where K{sub 1}, K{sub 2} are the coefficients depending on the water chemistry conditions and composition of Zr alloys; α is the value of steam content; Φ is a neutron flux; n is the coefficient depending on the fuel assembly type; β is the coefficient considering the impact of impurities suppressing the radiolysis, Q{sub 1} is energy contributions of alloying components and water impurities to oxide formation, v{sub i} - stehiometry coefficient. This model allows to predict a fuel cladding corrosion taking into account the alloys composition, water chemistry and fuel burn-up. The model was verified with the help of autoclave and reactor tests for commercial and modified Zr alloys. The activation energy of oxidation process is calculating on the base of ideal mixed oxide formation model. The success of such approach makes possible to propose a generalized model for calculating the corrosion of different Zr alloys in all types of water chemistry environments of old and new LWRs. (author)

  9. Analysis of the FeCrAl Accident Tolerant Fuel Concept Benefits during BWR Station Blackout Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being considered for fuel concepts with enhanced accident tolerance. FeCrAl alloys have very slow oxidation kinetics and good strength at high temperatures. FeCrAl could be used for fuel cladding in light water reactors and/or as channel box material in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To estimate the potential safety gains afforded by the FeCrAl concept, the MELCOR code was used to analyze a range of postulated station blackout severe accident scenarios in a BWR/4 reactor employing FeCrAl. The simulations utilize the most recently known thermophysical properties and oxidation kinetics for FeCrAl. Overall, when compared to the traditional Zircaloy-based cladding and channel box, the FeCrAl concept provides a few extra hours of time for operators to take mitigating actions and/or for evacuations to take place. A coolable core geometry is retained longer, enhancing the ability to stabilize an accident. Finally, due to the slower oxidation kinetics, substantially less hydrogen is generated, and the generation is delayed in time. This decreases the amount of non-condensable gases in containment and the potential for deflagrations to inhibit the accident response.

  10. Assembly mechanism for nuclear fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a nuclear power reactor fuel bundle having tie rods fastened to a lower tie plate and passing through openings in the upper tie plate, the assembled bundle is secured by locking lugs fixed to rotatable locking sleeves which engage the upper tie plate. Pressure exerted by helical springs mounted around each of the tie rods urge retaining lugs fixed to a retaining sleeve associated with respective tie rods into a position with respect to the locking sleeve to prevent accidental disengagement of the upper plate from the locking lugs. The bundle may be disassembled by depressing the retaining sleeves and rotating the locking lugs to the disengaged position, and then removing the upper tie plate

  11. Method of welding nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a method of welding tabs projecting outwardly from grip straps in a fuel assembly grid to a control rod guide thimble positioned in a cell in the grid including providing a weld guide having openings therein which receive dimples on the strap when the weld guide is placed in a cell adjacent to the cell containing the control rod guide thimble. The weld guide includes an opening which falls into alignment with a tab so that when a welding gun electrode is placed through the opening and into contact with a tab, the other electrode is automatically centered on its tab thus permitting accurate spot welding of the parts. To make a second spot weld on the same tab but at a point outwardly from the first spot weld, a second weld guide having an opening therein displaced a greater distance from a reference point on the weld guide, is placed in the same cell and the welding process repeated

  12. Separator assembly for use in spent nuclear fuel shipping cask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholz, James A.

    1983-01-01

    A separator assembly for use in a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask has a honeycomb-type wall structure defining parallel cavities for holding nuclear fuel assemblies. Tubes formed of an effective neutron-absorbing material are embedded in the wall structure around each of the cavities and provide neutron flux traps when filled with water.

  13. Evaluation of the radial design of fuel cells in an operation cycle of a BWR reactor; Evaluacion del diseno radial de celdas de combustible en un ciclo de operacion de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez C, J.; Martin del Campo M, C. [Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jgco@ver.megared.net.mx

    2003-07-01

    This work is continuation of one previous in the one that the application of the optimization technique called Tabu search to the radial design of fuel cells of boiling water reactors (BWR, Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The objective function used in the optimization process only include neutron parameters (k-infinite and peak of radial power) considering the cell at infinite media. It was obtained to reduce the cell average enrichment completing the characteristics of reactivity of an original cell. The objective of the present work is to validate the objective function that was used for the radial design of the fuel cell (test cell), analyzing the operation of a one cycle of the reactor in which fuels have been fresh recharged that contain an axial area with the nuclear database of the cell designed instead of the original cell. For it is simulated it with Cm-Presto the cycle 10 of the reactor operation of the Unit 1 of the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (U1-CNLV). For the cycle evaluation its were applied so much the simulation with the Haling strategy, as the simulation of the one cycle with control rod patterns and they were evaluated the energy generation and several power limits and reactivity that are used as design parameters in fuel reloads of BWR reactors. The results at level of an operation cycle of the reactor, show that the objective function used in the optimization and radial design of the cell is adequate and that it can induce to one good use of the fuel. (Author)

  14. Transient assembly of active materials fueled by a chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekhoven, Job; Hendriksen, Wouter E.; Koper, Ger J. M.; Eelkema, Rienk; van Esch, Jan H.

    2015-09-01

    Fuel-driven self-assembly of actin filaments and microtubules is a key component of cellular organization. Continuous energy supply maintains these transient biomolecular assemblies far from thermodynamic equilibrium, unlike typical synthetic systems that spontaneously assemble at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we report the transient self-assembly of synthetic molecules into active materials, driven by the consumption of a chemical fuel. In these materials, reaction rates and fuel levels, instead of equilibrium composition, determine properties such as lifetime, stiffness, and self-regeneration capability. Fibers exhibit strongly nonlinear behavior including stochastic collapse and simultaneous growth and shrinkage, reminiscent of microtubule dynamics.

  15. HEDL contribution to SRL fuel recycle program. Quarterly report, January--March 1977. [Sensitivity analysis of LMFBR fuel fabrication cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J.F.

    1977-08-01

    Research on LWR fuel cycle is being done in the following categories: economic studies (sensitivity analysis of LMFBR fuel fabrication costs), spent fuel receipt and storage (failure of PWR and BWR fuel assemblies), fuel materials preparation or finishing processes, reduction of TRU waste generation, and environmental impacts. 12 tables. (DLC)

  16. Precharacterization Report for Instrumented Fuel Assembly (IFA)-527

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, M. E.; Bradley, E. R.; Daniel, J. L.; Davis, N. C.; Lanning, D. D.; Williford, R. E.

    1981-07-01

    This report is a resource document covering the rationale, design, fabrication, and preirradiation characterization of instrumented fuel assembly (IFA)-527. This assembly is being irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) in Norway as part of the Experimental Support and Development of Single-Rod Fuel Codes Program conducted by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the Fuel Behavior Research Branch of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Data from this assembly will be used to better understand light water reactor (LWR) fuel behavior under normal operating conditions.

  17. AXIAL: a system for boiling water reactor fuel assembly axial optimization using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system named AXIAL is developed based on the genetic algorithms (GA) optimization method, using the 3D steady state simulator code Core-Master-PRESTO (CM-PRESTO) to evaluate the objective function. The feasibility of this methodology is investigated for a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assembly (FA). The axial location of different fuel compositions is found in order to minimize the FA mean enrichment needed to obtain the cycle length under the safety constraints. Thermal limits are evaluated at the end of cycle using the Haling calculation; the hot excess reactivity and the shutdown margin at the beginning of cycle are also evaluated. The implemented objective function is very flexible and complete, incorporating all the thermal and reactivity limits imposed during fuel design analysis; furthermore, additional constraints can be easily introduced in order to obtain an improved solution. The results show a small improvement in the FA average enrichment obtained with the system related to the reference case that has been studied. The results show that the system converge to an optimal solution, it is observed that the mean fuel enrichment decreases while all the constraints are satisfied. A comparison was also performed using one-point and two-points crossover operator and the results of a sensitivity study for different mutation percentage are also showed

  18. Dynamic modelling of PWR fuel assembly for seismic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibration and snap back tests have shown that the behaviour of PWR fuel assemblies was non linear : the fuel assembly eigenfrequencies decrease with the excitation level or with the motion amplitude, which was supposed to be due to the slippage of the fuel rods through the grids. Up to now the fuel assembly models were linear and composed by one beam alone representing both the guide thimbles and the fuel rods or by two beams (one for the guide thimbles and one for the fuel rods). The stiffness of such models' were adjusted to fit with the measured eigenfrequency corresponding to a given amplitude. The aim of this paper is to identify the influence of the slippage between grids and fuel rods on the dynamic behaviour of the fuel assembly. For that purpose a non linear fuel assembly model is proposed representing explicitly the slippage phenomenon and is applied to the reduced scale fuel assemblies which have been tested in the framework of a collaboration between FRAMATOME and CEA-DMT. Comparisons between calculations and experiments will be presented and the limitation of this model will be also discussed

  19. Impact analysis of modifying the composition of the nuclear fuel of a BWR with beryllium oxide; Analisis del impacto de modificar la composicion del combustible nuclear de un BWR con oxido de berilio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo V, J. M.; Morales S, J. B., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The beryllium oxide (Be O) presents excellent physical properties, especially its high thermal conductivity that contrasts clearly with that of the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) used at the present as fuel in a great number of nuclear plants. The present work models a nuclear reactor cooled by light water in boiling with two external recirculation loops (BWR/5) using the code for the transitory analysis and postulated accidents Trac-B F1, implementing a UO{sub 2} mixture and different fractions of Be O, with the objective of improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel. The numeric results and the realized analyses indicate that when adding a fraction in volume of 10% the central temperature decreases in 30.4% in stationary state, while during the large break loss of coolant accident the peak cladding temperature diminishes in 7%. Although the real interaction of the mixture has not been determined experimentally, the obtained results are promising. (Author)

  20. RBMK-1500 fuel assemblies repair experience at Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ignalina nuclear power plant (INPP) is located in the north-east of Lithuania, closer to the borders with Belarus and Latvia. There are 2 units at INPP, each of which is equipped with RBMK-1500 reactor. The RBMK-1500 is a graphite moderated, channel-type, boiling water reactor. Its design thermal power is 4800 MW. However, for safety reasons, these reactors are currently running at reduced power of maximum 4200 MW. The RBMK-1500 reactor is the most advanced version of RBMK design and the RBMK-1500 fuel assembly has advanced version too. The fuel assembly contains two fuel bundles. Each bundle has 18 fuel rods arranged within two concentric rings in a central carried rod. The lower bundle of the fuel assembly is provided with an end grid and ten spacing grids. The top bundle has additionally 18 specifically design spacers, which act as turbulence enhances to improve the heat transfer characteristics. The hoop has 12 inclined grooves from which a steam and water mixture gets additional turbulence. In 1988 the irradiated fuel assemblies RBMK-1500 examination stand was put into operation at unit 2 of Ignalina NPP. The examination stand was intended to research irradiated fuel assemblies. Some destructive and non-destructive examinations of irradiated fuel assemblies have been developed together with Research Institute of Atomic Reactors. Since 1991 the examination stand has been using for visual examination of irradiated fuel assemblies before loading into the reactor. Visual examination apparented some irradiated fuel assemblies with damaged heat exchange intensifying (HEI) grids. Such defects do not allow to load a fuel assemblies into the reactor. In 1996 the examination stand was completed with the module allowed to repair damaged heat exchange intensifying grids. Special fuel rod safety margins were calculated for such fuel assemblies. Till now it have been repaired 15 and loaded into reactor 9 fuel assemblies with damaged hoop of HEI grid skeleton at unit 2

  1. Spacing grid for a nuclear fuel sub-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a fuel pin spacing grid for a nuclear fuel sub-assembly. The grid includes several strips shaped to form a hexagonal honeycomb cell assembly. The cells are of one piece construction, each cell being formed from an individual strip. Every other side of the cell has an opening, the other sides being continuous. Each continuous side includes a shaped part acting as guide for a fuel pin

  2. Methodology and results of operational calculations of fuel temperature in fuel elements of the BN-600 reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article presents methodology of peak fuel temperature determination and computational investigations of fuel temperature condition in fuel elements of fuel assemblies of various types during the BN-600 reactor operation. The effect of sodium uranate in the gap between fuel and cladding of the fuel element on the heat transfer processes is considered

  3. A comparison between genetic algorithms and neural networks for optimizing fuel recharges in BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the results of a genetic algorithm (AG) and a neural recurrent multi state network (RNRME) for optimizing the fuel reload of 5 cycles of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant (CNLV) are presented. The fuel reload obtained by both methods are compared and it was observed that the RNRME creates better fuel distributions that the AG. Moreover a comparison of the utility for using one or another one techniques is make. (Author)

  4. Thermomechanical analysis of a fuel rod in a BWR reactor using the FUELSIM code; Analisis termomecanico de una barra de combustible de un reactor BWR utilizando el codigo FUELSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Ortiz V, J.; Araiza M, E. [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: rapaca78@yahoo.com.mx

    2009-10-15

    The thermomechanical behaviour of a fuel rod exposed to irradiation is a complex process in which are coupled great quantity of interrelated physical-chemical phenomena, for that analysis of rod performance in the core of a nuclear power reactor is realized generally with computation codes that integrate several phenomena expected during the time life of fuel rod in the core. An application of this type of thermomechanical codes is to predict, inside certain reliability margin, the design parameters that would be required to adjust, in order to get a better economy or rod performance, for a systematic approach to the fuel design optimization. FUELSIM is a thermomechanical code based on the models of FRAPCON code, which was developed under auspice of Nuclear Regulatory Commission of USA. FUELSIM allows iterative calculations like part of its programming structure, allowing search of extreme cases of behaviour, probabilistic analysis (or statistical), parametric analysis (or sensibility) and also can include as entrance data to the uncertainties associated with production data, code parameters and associated models. In this work is reported a first analysis of thermomechanical performance of a typical fuel rod used in a BWR 5/6. Results of maximum temperatures are presented in the fuel center and of axial deformation, for the 10 axial nodes in that the active longitude of fuel rod was divided. (Author)

  5. Method of handling and/or storing a nuclear fuel assembly consisting of an elongated frame that contains fuel rods and fuel assembly designed specially for this method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assure subcriticality during handling, transport and/ore storage of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies and additional body containing a neutron absorbing material and touching beside the fuel rods is fixed to the frame of the fuel assembly. This body has a handle with an adapted coupling element mounted on a holding device for handling and/or storage of the fuel assembly. (orig./RW)

  6. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, October 1977--September 1978. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1978-10-01

    This quarterly/annual report reviews and summarizes the activities performed in support of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP) during Fiscal Year 1978 with emphasis on those activities that transpired during the quarter ending September 30, 1978. Significant progress has been made in achieving the primary objectives of the program, i.e., to demonstrate commercially viable fuel concepts with improved fuel - cladding interaction (FCI) behavior. This includes out-of-reactor experiments to support the fuel concepts being evaluated, initiation of instrumented test rod experiments in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), and fabrication of the first series of demonstration rods for irradiation in the Big Rock Point Reactor (BRPR).

  7. Thermal-hydraulics in BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the heat transferring flow in BWRs, the heightening of heat transfer performance accompanying the development of new fuel for the purpose of reducing spent fuel generation and the improvement of fuel economy, the heightening of performance and the reduction of size of various heat exchangers, the development of the safety devices, of which the constitution is simple, the reliability is high, and the operation is easy, and so on are expected. As for ABWRs, thermal output is 3926 MW, and electricity output is 1356 MW. The system constitution of ABWR is shown. The main change from BWR to ABWR is the adoption of internal pumps, reinforced concrete containment vessels and electric control rod drive. For evaluating the limit output of high burnup fuel assemblies, the subchannel analysis and the effect that spacers exert to the limit output are explained. The heat transferring flow in moisture separation heater, condenser and feed water heater is reported. The heat transferring flow in passive containment vessel cooling system of water wall type and condensing type is described. (K.I.)

  8. BWR control rod patterns and fuel loading optimization using heuristic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show the results obtained with the OCOTH system to optimize the Fuel Reloads Design and Control Rod Patterns Design in a Boiling Water Reactor. Our system solves both problems in a coupled way. We used the 3-dimensional CM-PRESTO code to evaluate the solutions quality. The process has three stages. In the first step we obtain a Fuel Reload Design 'seed' using the Haling's principle. The followings steps are an iterative process between the Control Rod Patterns Designs and Fuel Reloads Design. Control Rod Patterns Design is proposed for the Fuel Reload Design 'seed' and then Control Rod Patterns Design is used to find a new Fuel Reload Design. Both processes are coupled in an iterative loop until a criterion stop is fulfilled. In the whole process, the genetic algorithms, neural networks and ant colony system optimization techniques were used. (authors)

  9. The influence of fuel assembly characteristics on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve fuel utilization and nuclear plant economy, most nuclear plants of China adopt increased fuel enrichment and long cycle analysis. Core power distribution will be worse with these advanced items. Radial and axial peak increase too. This is a challenge to reactor safety. Since the fuel assembly is the most important part of a reactor core, fuel assembly characteristics affect reactor safety a lot. A few aspects of influence on reactor safety are discussed in this paper as a reference for fuel assembly design. A better fuel assembly design can increase heat exchange ability, especially in cold wall cells. The grids nearby core outlet can efficiently mix the flow of hot channel and average channel to decrease DNBR. In safety analysis, we always suppose the center of center assembly is the hot channel, but sometimes based on actual power distribution the hot channel occurs at side cell or corner cell. So the distribution of grids pressure drop coefficients can affect the minimum DNBR. A better fuel assembly design can help to spread core power distribution, decrease radial and axial peak efficiently. To spread core power distribution, different neutronic poisons are added into fuel pellet by different ways, and then the relative effects on reactor safety are different. At the same time, better fuel assembly design should leave enough margins for reactor safety to handle high burnup condition and so on. Fuel pellet and clad capabilities are getting worse versus increasing fuel burnup. This is a challenge to reactor safety, so more attentions should be paid to fuel burnup characteristics. (author)

  10. Sipping test of fuel assemblies in LVR-15 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LVR-15 reactor is a light water research type which is situated at NRI in Rez near Prague. The poster describes the procedure and methodology used for sipping test of the fuel assemblies. These tests are designed to evaluate the leakage of fuel and fission products from the tested fuel assembly. From 1995 to 2003 there have been performed about 200 tests. Examples of results of sipping water activity measurements are presented. The values of activities of 137Cs and 134Cs are used for decision if the fuel assembly can be used in reactor core, transported to storage pool or if it is necessary to put the fuel assembly into the special protective can. The used limits of activities are discussed. (author)

  11. Optical fiber scope for inspecting fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since a fiber scope has only one objective section, it has to observe a plurality of places successively. Then, if the time for the observation is long, the objective section is deteriorated by radiation rays, which causes a problem of interrupting the observation and increasing operator's radiation dose. In view of the above, one or two light guides are combined with an image guide to form one objective section, and a plurality of them are formed in parallel and gathered as a comb-like shape. A prism is put into a window of the objective section and resins are filled or a glass cover is attached, to make the objective section smooth and flat. Compared with the case of using only one objective section, it is no more necessary for successive observation, and objection can be conducted at one time. For example, if a fiber scope having nine objective sections is used for observing 8 x 8 arrangement fuel assembly, the observation time is shortened to 1/9. Since the prism, the glass cover, and the resins are used for making the window flat, cruds deposited between the optical fiber and a reflection mirror are easily removed, to obtain clear images. (N.H.)

  12. Burnup monitoring of VVER-440 spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the results of the experiments performed on spent VVER-440 fuel assemblies at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Hungary. The fuel assemblies submerged in the service pit were examined by high-resolution gamma spectrometry (HRGS). The assemblies were moved to the front of a collimator tube built in the concrete wall of the pit in the reactor block at the NPP, and lifted down and up under water for scanning by the refueling machine. The HPGe detector was placed behind the collimator in an outside staircase. The measurements involved scanning of the assemblies along their length of all the 6 sides, at 5-12 measurement positions side by side. Axial and azimuthal burnup profiles were taken in this way. Assembly groups for measurements were selected according to their burnup (10–50 GWd/tU) and special positions (e. g. control assembly, neighbour of control assembly). Burnup differences were well observable between assembly sides looking towards the center of the core and opposite directions. Also, burnup profiles were different for control assemblies and normal (working) fuel assemblies. The ratio of the measured activities of Cs-134 and Cs-137 was evaluated by relative efficiency (intrinsic) calibration. Measurement uncertainty is around 3 %. Taking into account irradiation history and cooling time (i. e.the time elapsed since the discharge of the assembly out of the core), the activity ratio Cs-134/Cs-137 shows good correlation with the declared burnup.

  13. Boiling water reactors with uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. Report 5: Analysis of the reactivity coefficients and the stability of a BWR loaded with MOx fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a part of the project titled 'Boiling Water Reactors With Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide (MOx) Fuel'. The aim of this study is to model the impact of a core loading pattern containing MOx bundles upon the main characteristics of a BWR (reactivity coefficients, stability, etc.). For this purpose, the Core Management System (CMS) codes of Studsvik Scandpower are used. This package is constituted by CASMO-4/TABLES-3/SIMULATE-3. It has been shown in previous reports that these codes are able to accurately represent and model MOx bundles. This report is thus devoted to the study of BWR cores loaded (partially or totally) with MOx bundles. The plutonium quality used is the Pu type 2016 (mostly Pu-239, 56 %, and Pu-240, 26 %), but a variation of the plutonium isotopic vector was also investigated, in case of a partial MOx loading. One notices that the reactivity coefficients do not present significant changes in comparison with a full UOx loading. Nevertheless, two main problems arise: the shutdown margin at BOC is lower than 1 % and the stability to in-phase oscillations is slightly decreased. (The SIMULATE-3 version used for this study does not contain the latest MOx enhancements described in literature, since these code developments have not been provided to the department. Nevertheless, as the nominal average enrichment of the MOx bundles is 5.41 % (total amount of plutonium), which can still be considered as a relatively low enrichment, the accuracy of the CMS codes is acceptable without the use of the MOx improvements for this level of Pu enrichment

  14. Methodology of thermalhydraulic tests of fuel assemblies for WWER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present 11 units with WWER-1000 are in operation in Ukraine. The NPPs are provided with nuclear fuel from Russia. The fuel assemblies are fabricated and delivered to Ukrainian NPPs from Russia. However the contemporary tendencies of nuclear energy development in the world assume a diversification of nuclear fuel vendors. Therefore the creation of the own nuclear fuel cycle of Ukraine is in mind in the strategy of nuclear energy development of Ukraine. As a part of the fuel assemblies fabrication process complex of the thermalhydraulic tests should be carried out to confirm design characteristics of the fuel assemblies before they are loaded in the reactor facility. The experimental basis and scientific infrastructure for the thermalhydraulic tests arrangement and realization of the programs and procedures for the core equipment examination are under consideration. (author)

  15. Framatome experience in fuel assembly repair and reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1985, FRAMATOME has build up extensive experience in the poolside replacement of fuel rods for repair or R and D purposes and the reconstitution of fuel assemblies (i.e. replacement of a damaged structure to enable reuse of the fuel rod bundle). This experience feedback enables FRAMATOME to improve in steps the technical process and the equipment used for the above operations in order to enhance their performance in terms of setup, flexibility, operating time and safety. In parallel, the fuel assembly and fuel rod designs have been modified to meet the same goals. The paper will describe: - the overall experience of FRAMATOME with UO2 fuel as well as MOX fuel; the usual technical process used for fuel replacement and the corresponding equipment set; - the usual technical process for fuel assembly reconstitution and the corresponding equipment set. This process is rather unique since it takes profit of the specific FRAMATOME fuel assembly design with removable top and bottom nozzles, so that fuel rods insertion by pulling through in the new structure is similar to what is done in the manufacturing plant; - the usual inspections done on the fuel rods and/or the fuel assembly; - the design of the new reconstitution equipment (STAR) compared with the previous one as well as their comparative performance. The final section will be a description of the alternative reconstitution process and equipment used by FRAMATOME in reactors in which the process cannot be used for several reasons such as compatibility or administrative authorization. This process involves the pushing of fuel rods into the new structure, requiring further precautions. (author)

  16. BWR 90 and BWR 90+: Two advanced BWR design generations from ABB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced light water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and total power generation costs have been low. When developing the BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to a reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher than that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Hence, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The review work was completed in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with an 'evolutionary' design called BWR 90+, which aims at developing the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is performed by ABB Atom

  17. Bottom grid mounted debris trap for a fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor including nuclear fuel rods, each fuel rod in the fuel assembly having a cladding tube and a lower end plug attached to the tube, at least a bottom grid supporting each and everyone of the fuel rods in an organized array and disposed in spaced relationship above the lower end plugs of the fuel rods. A bottom nozzle is disposed in spaced relationship below the bottom grid and is disposed below the lower end plugs of the fuel rods. A coolant flows upwardly through the bottom nozzle and to the bottom grid. A trap is included for catching debris carried by the flowing coolant to substantially prevent the same from reaching the bottom grid. The debris trap comprises: a fuel rod nonsupport structure disposed completely across the entire expanse of the fuel assembly and axially between the bottom nozzle and the bottom grid and generally aligned with the lower end plugs of the fuel rods. The structure forms hollow cells each being open at opposite ends and defining a central cavity which receives one of the fuel rod lower end plugs in nonsupporting and noncontacting relationship while providing for passage of coolant flow therethrough from the bottom nozzle to the bottom grid. Each of the fuel rod lower end plugs extends into a respective hollow cell of the structure

  18. Stress analysis of screws in the fuel channel fastener assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The function of fuel channel fastener assembly is to keep enough clearance between fuel channels, allowing the insertion of control rod and fixing the channel on the fuel bundle. The assembly device is not safety related component, however, in case of the screw breaking, it may cause loose parts, which might adversely affect the normal operation of inserting and pulling fuel assemblies, and/or the movement of the control rods. In this paper, the possible loading conditions applied to the fuel channel fastener assembly are considered to analyze the stress state in screw. In order to assess the improper positioning of fuel channel, explicit finite element procedures is employed to simulate the complex contact/impact behaviors occurring between the fastener assembly and the neighboring fuel channel or the fuel rack, in which the effects of dynamic impact on the screw and initial contact speed are the main concern. The analysis results reveal that the reduced neck close to the screw head has the highest stress. If the external loads drive the stress up to the yielding limit, crack initiation will occur on the screw neck and thereby, under the tensile loadings and reactor core environment, initiating intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) on the screw

  19. The JAERI code system for evaluation of BWR ECCS performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of respective computer code system of BWR and PWR for evaluation of ECCS has been conducted since 1973 considering the differences of the reactor cooling system, core structure and ECCS. The first version of the BWR code system, of which developmental work started earlier than that of the PWR, has been completed. The BWR code system is designed to provide computational tools to analyze all phases of LOCAs and to evaluate the performance of the ECCS including an ''Evaluation Model (EM)'' feature in compliance with the requirements of the current Japanese Evaluation Guideline of ECCS. The BWR code system could be used for licensing purpose, i.e. for ECCS performance evaluation or audit calculations to cross-examine the methods and results of applicants or vendors. The BWR code system presented in this report comprises several computer codes, each of which analyzes a particular phase of a LOCA or a system blowdown depending on a range of LOCAs, i.e. large and small breaks in a variety of locations in the reactor system. The system includes ALARM-B1, HYDY-B1 and THYDE-B1 for analysis of the system blowdown for various break sizes, THYDE-B-REFLOOD for analysis of the reflood phase and SCORCH-B2 for the calculation of the fuel assembl hot plane temperature. When the multiple codes are used to analyze a broad range of LOCA as stated above, it is very important to evaluate the adequacy and consistency between the codes used to cover an entire break spectrum. The system consistency together with the system performance are discussed for a large commercial BWR. (author)

  20. Fuel assembly assessment from CVD image analysis: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate commissioned a feasibility study of automatic assessment of fuel assemblies from images obtained with the digital Cerenkov viewing device currently in development. The goal is to assist the IAEA inspectors in evaluating the fuel since they typically have only a few seconds to inspect an assembly. We report results here in two main areas: Investigation of basic image processing and recognition techniques needed to enhance the images and find the assembly in the image; Study of the properties of the distributions of light from the assemblies to determine whether they provide unique signatures for different burn-up and cooling times for real fuel or indicate presence of non-fuel. 8 refs, 27 figs

  1. Transport of fresh MOX fuel assemblies for MONJU initial core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport of fresh MOX fuel assemblies for prototype FBR MONJU initial core started in July 1992 and ended in March 1994. As much as 205 fresh MOX fuel assemblies were transported in nine transport missions. The packaging for fuel assemblies, which has shielding and shock absorbing material inside, meets IAEA regulatory requirements for type B(U) packaging. Moreover, this packaging design features such advanced technologies as high-performance neutron shielding material and automatic hold-down mechanism for fuel assemblies. Every effort was paid to execute safe transport in conjunction with the cooperation of every competent organization. No transport accident occurred during the transport and all the transport missions were successfully completed on schedule. (author)

  2. The development of flow test technology for PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI has an extensive program to develope PWR fuel assembly. In relation to the program, development of flow test technology is needed to evaluate the thermal hydraulic compactibility and mechanical integrity of domestically fabricated nuclear fuels. A high-pressure and high-temperature flow test facility was designed to test domestically fabricated fuel assembly. The test section of the facility has capacity of a 6x6 full length PWR fuel assembly. A flow test rig was designed and installed at Cold Test Loop to carry out model experiments with 5x5 rod assembly under atmosphere pressure to get information about the characteristics of pressure loss of spacer grids and velocity distribution in the subchannels. LDV measuring technology was established using TSI's Laser Dopper Velocimeter 9100-3 System

  3. The Delft desire facility for studies on (natural circulation) BWR primary system statics and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A test facility for research on BWR core statics and dynamics was designed and built in Delft. The loop, DESIRE, consists of a BWR fuel assembly, a riser, condenser and a downcorner section. Freon-12 is used as a coolant. Presently, research on this facility is focused on investigations of the physical aspects of natural-circulation cooling and reactor kinetic stability. To this end, an artificial feedback from in-core void fraction to heating power is being established. The void fraction is determined on a sub-channel level by measuring the transmission of a collimated gamma beam

  4. The Model of Temperature Dynamics of Pulsed Fuel Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarchenko, E A; Popov, A K

    2002-01-01

    Heat exchange process differential equations are considered for a subcritical fuel assembly with an injector. The equations are obtained by means of the use of the Hermit polynomial. The model is created for modelling of temperature transitional processes. The parameters and dynamics are estimated for hypothetical fuel assembly consisting of real mountings: the powerful proton accelerator and the reactor IBR-2 core at its subcritica l state.

  5. Parallel processing of neutron transport in fuel assembly calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Group constants, which are used for reactor analyses by nodal method, are generated by fuel assembly calculations based on the neutron transport theory, since one or a quarter of the fuel assembly corresponds to a unit mesh in the current nodal calculation. The group constant calculation for a fuel assembly is performed through spectrum calculations, a two-dimensional fuel assembly calculation, and depletion calculations. The purpose of this study is to develop a parallel algorithm to be used in a parallel processor for the fuel assembly calculation and the depletion calculations of the group constant generation. A serial program, which solves the neutron integral transport equation using the transmission probability method and the linear depletion equation, was prepared and verified by a benchmark calculation. Small changes from the serial program was enough to parallelize the depletion calculation which has inherent parallel characteristics. In the fuel assembly calculation, however, efficient parallelization is not simple and easy because of the many coupling parameters in the calculation and data communications among CPU's. In this study, the group distribution method is introduced for the parallel processing of the fuel assembly calculation to minimize the data communications. The parallel processing was performed on Quadputer with 4 CPU's operating in NURAD Lab. at KAIST. Efficiencies of 54.3 % and 78.0 % were obtained in the fuel assembly calculation and depletion calculation, respectively, which lead to the overall speedup of about 2.5. As a result, it is concluded that the computing time consumed for the group constant generation can be easily reduced by parallel processing on the parallel computer with small size CPU's

  6. Information to be requested from the NSSS vendor for fuel management capability for BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of the nuclear, thermal-hydraulic, and mechanical parameters necessary according to the design of BWRs, is listed. This parameters are necessary to perform the fuel elements management and design, and it must be supplied by the Reactor Manufacturer to the Utility. (Author) 18 refs

  7. Experience in monitoring the BWR fuel behaviour and fission product releases during off-normal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station has accumulated over 33 reactor years of operating experience in monitoring Boiling Water Reactor fuel behaviour. The sudden and sharp increases in the fission product releases were experienced in the earlier years due to gross fuel failures caused by mechanical damage (lifting of certain core internals) or due to certain operating practices and transients. Data on fission product releases under such gross fuel failure conditions is presented and discussed with evaluation of the incident and corrective actions taken. An apparent correlation observed in incidents of fuel failures and certain operating system transients are discussed. Conventionally for the BWRs sum of six fission gas release rate measured at Steam Jet Air Ejectors is correlated with fission gas radiation monitor reading to work out alarm and trip settings - modifications are suggested to improve reliability and effectiveness in monitoring of fission gas release rates. Appropriate data for fission product deposition and characterisation of coolant crud long lived fission products is also presented. (author). 6 refs, 15 figs, 9 tabs

  8. Information to be requested from the NSSS vendor for fuel management capability for BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.; Esteban, A.; Gomez, M.; Leira, G.; Martinez, R.; Serrano, J.

    1975-07-01

    A set of the nuclear, thermal-hydraulic, and mechanical parameters necessary according to the design of BWRs, is listed. This parameters are necessary to perform the fuel elements management and design, and it must be supplied by the Reactor Manufacturer to the Utility. (Author) 18 refs.

  9. Removal and replacement of fuel rods in nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To remove the bottom nozzle of a nuclear fuel assembly, the nozzle plate must be disconnected from the control-rod thimbles. For nozzles whose control-rod thimbles are connected to the nozzle plate by screw fasteners having lock pins welded to the nozzle plate, a cutter for severing the welds is provided. The cutter is rotated by a motor at the work position through a long floating shaft. A long feed shaft operated by a thumb nut at the work position feeds the floating shaft and cutter downwardly through the weld. The bushings extend from a bushing plate, each encircling a screw fastener. Each bushing has a yieldable sleeve for sealing the region around a screw fastener to trap the chips from the severed weld. The cutter is indexed from weld to weld by indexing plates. To remove chips adhering to the cutter, the suction tube of a suction-pump-operated eductor is inserted in the auxiliary hole and the cutter is inserted in the bushing and chips are removed by suction. By inserting the suction tube into the bushings which seal the regions around the screw fasteners and enabling the eductor, the captured chips may be removed. Once the welds are severed the screw-fasteners may be unscrewed and removed by the eductor. The bottom nozzle may then be removed

  10. Fuel assembly bottom nozzle with integral debris trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly is described for a nuclear reactor including nuclear fuel rods, at least one grid supporting the fuel rods in an organized array, and at least one guide thimble supporting the grid, an improved bottom nozzle disposed adjacent and below the grid, supporting the guide thimble and adapted to allow flow of liquid coolant into the fuel assembly, the improved bottom nozzle comprising: (a) means spaced below the grid and a lower end of the fuel rods and supporting the guide thimble and allowing flow of coolant into the fuel assembly; (b) means mounted about the supporting means and extending toward but spaced from the grid and lower end of the fuel rods so as to define an open region between the supporting means and the grid and lower end of the fuel rods; and (c) a trap disposed within the open region and on the supporting means, the trap being adapted for passage of the guide thimble through to the supporting means and flow of the coolant for capturing and retaining debris carried by the flowing coolant within the trap to substantially prevent entry of debris into the fuel assembly

  11. Taking burnup credit for interim storage and transportation system for BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the back-end issues of nuclear fuel cycle, selection of reprocessing or one-through is a big issue. For both of the cases, a reasonable interim storage and transportation system is required. This study proposes an advanced practical monitoring and evaluation system. The system features the followings: (l) Storage racks and transportation casks taking credit for burnup. (2) A burnup estimation system using a compact monitor with Cd- Te detectors and fission chambers. (3) A neutron emission-rate evaluation methodology, especially important for high burnup MOX fuels. (4) A nuclear materials management system for safeguards. Current storage system and transport casks are designed on the basis of a fresh fuel assumption. The assumption is too conservative. Taking burnup credit gives a reasonable design while keeping conservatism. In order to establish a reasonable burnup credit design system, a calculation system has been developed for determining isotope compositions, burnup, and criticality. The calculation system consists of some modules such as TGBLA, ORIGEN, CITATION, MCNP and KENO. The TGBLA code is a fuel design code for LWR fuels developed in TOSHIBA Corporation. The code takes operational history such as, power density, void fraction into account. This code is applied to the back-end issues for a more accurate design of a storage and a transportation system. The ORIGEN code is well-known one-point isotope depletion code. In the calculation system, the code calculates isotope compositions using libraries generated from the TGBLA code. The CITATION code, the MCNP code, and the KENO code are three dimensional diffusion code, continuous energy Monte Carlo code, discrete energy Monte Carlo code, respectively. Those codes calculate k- effective of the storage and transportation systems using isotope compositions generated from the ORIGEN code. The CITATION code and the KENO code are usually used for practical designs. The MCNP code is used for reference

  12. Fuel services progress in visual examination and measurements on fuel assemblies and associated core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA NP Fuel Services have many years of experience in visual examination and measurements on fuel assemblies and associated core components by using state of the art cameras and measuring technologies. The used techniques allow the surface and dimensional characterization of materials and shapes by visual examination. Based on these techniques measurements without contact to the measuring object, under water and with adequate accuracy are possible. New enhanced and sophisticated technologies for fuel services are such as: - Endoscopy at fuel assemblies; - Photogrammetry for measuring the deformation of a fuel assembly or fuel channel; - Shielded color cameras for use under water and close inspection of a fuel assembly. I. Endoscopy at fuel assemblies: Post irradiation programs requires, if manifestations are given, that spacer cells shall be inspected to check soundness of spacer springs. The inspection enforces the extraction of one or several fuel rods at reactor site in order to allow the accessibility of the spacer cells. AREVA NP Fuel Services developed a proportioned endoscope, which permits examination of fuel assembly spacers. The endoscope is designed to be inserted top down into a spacer cell. A 'short endoscope' enables the inspection of the upper spacers; a longer one, which is under development, will enable the inspection of all the spacers of a fuel assembly. II. Photogrammetry for measuring the deformation of a fuel assembly or fuel channel: Manual picture analysis methods for measuring parts or the whole fuel assembly are used at AREVA NP Fuel Services for years. Now, research is done to get a computer assist photogrammetry system for analyzing the pictures. The system consist of a waterproofed HD digital camera which is connected with a computer for remote control of the camera as well picture analyzing and a long handle tool to run the camera into the pool. On the computer an especial software for analyzing pictures by photogrammetry is

  13. Scratch preventing method of assembling nuclear fuel bundles, and the assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a method of assembling a bundle of nuclear fuel elements for service in a nuclear reactor. It comprises a group of fuel rod elements each arranged in a space apart, parallel array and thus secured by each element traversing through a series of spacing units positioned at intervals along the length of the grouped fuel rod elements and having openings for receiving the fuel rod elements traversing therethrough, consisting essentially of the steps of: providing a scratch resisting, temporary protective barrier consisting of a water soluble coating of sodium silicate covering the outer surface of the fuel rod elements, then assembling the fuel bundle by passing each of the fuel rod elements through the openings of a series of spacing units positioned at intervals to fit together an adjoined composite fuel bundle assembly of a spaced apart parallel array of the fuel rod elements secured with spacing units, and removing the scratch resisting, temporary protective barrier consisting of water soluble coating of sodium silicate from the assembled fuel bundle with hot water

  14. Design of an equilibrium nucleus of a BWR type reactor based in a Thorium-Uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the design of the reactor nucleus of boiling water using fuel of thorium-uranium is presented. Starting from an integral concept based in a type cover-seed assemble is carried out the design of an equilibrium reload for the nucleus of a reactor like that of the Laguna Verde Central and its are analyzed some of the main design variables like the cycle length, the reload fraction, the burnt fuel, the vacuum distribution, the generation of lineal heat, the margin of shutdown, as well as a first estimation of the fuel cost. The results show that it is feasible to obtain an equilibrium reload, comparable to those that are carried out in the Laguna Verde reactors, with a good behavior of those analyzed variables. The cost of the equilibrium reload designed with the thorium-uranium fuel is approximately 2% high that the uranium reload producing the same energy. It is concluded that it is convenient to include burnable poisons, type gadolinium, in the fuel with the end of improving the reload design, the fuel costs and the margin of shutdown. (Author)

  15. A comparison of crud phases appearing on some Swedish BWR fuel rods using Laser Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous investigations showed that laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) can be used as a phase specific analytical tool for radioactive fuel crud samples and also for details in the underlying layer of zirconium dioxide. It is relatively easy to record Raman spectra that discriminate between chemical phases for all crud oxides of interest. The method has therefore been recommended for crud investigations within the Swedish program. At ideal conditions the resolution is about 1 μm, permitting detailed position determination of crud phases in the sample. Therefore LRS is a very good complement to X-ray diffraction (XRD). The methods for sample preparation and handling of radioactive crud samples for LRS turn out to be relatively simple. A detailed LRS study on fuel crud samples from Barsebaeck 2, Forsmark 2, Forsmark 3 and Ringhals 1 was performed in this work. All of those Swedish BWRs were operated at different conditions at the time of sampling. The chemistry regimes covered NWC, HWC and other variable conditions. Also different types of fuel, exposure times and sampling positions were selected. (authors)

  16. Serpent: an alternative for the nuclear fuel cells analysis of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last ten years the diverse research groups in nuclear engineering of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (UNAM, IPN), as of research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ) as well as the personnel of the Nuclear Plant Management of the Comision Federal de Electricidad have been using the codes Helios and /or CASMO-4 in the generation of cross sections (X S) of nuclear fuel cells of the cores corresponding to the Units 1 and 2 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Both codes belong to the Studsvik-Scandpower Company who receives the payment for the use and their respective maintenance. In recent years, the code Serpent appears among the nuclear community distributed by the OECD/Nea which does not has cost neither in its use neither in its maintenance. The code is based on the Monte Carlo method and makes use of the processing in parallel. In the Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of the IPN, the personnel has accumulated certain experience in the use of Serpent under the direction of personal of the ININ; of this experience have been obtained for diverse fuel burned, the infinite multiplication factor for three cells of nuclear fuel, without control bar and with control bar for a known thermodynamic state fixed by: a) the fuel temperature (Tf), b) the moderator temperature (Tm) and c) the vacuums fraction (α). Although was not realized any comparison with the X S that the codes Helios and CASMO-4 generate, the results obtained for the infinite multiplication factor show the prospective tendencies with regard to the fuel burned so much in the case in that is not present the control bar like when it is. The results are encouraging and motivate to the study group to continue with the X S generation of a core in order to build the respective library of nuclear data as a following step and this can be used for the codes PARCS, of USA NRC, DYN3D of HZDR, or others developed locally in the IPN

  17. The formation process of the pellet-cladding bonding layer in high burnup BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bonding formation process was studied by EPMA analysis, XRD measurements, and SEM/TEM observations for the oxide layer on a cladding inner surface and the pellet-cladding bonding layer in irradiated fuel rods. Specimens were prepared from fuels which had been irradiated to the pellet average burnups of 15, 27, 42 and 49 GWd/t in BWRs. In the lower burnup specimens of 15 and 27 GWd/t, no bonding layer was found, while the higher burnup specimens of 42 and 49 GWd/t had a typical bonding layer about 10 to 20 μm thick. A bonding layer which consisted of two regions was found in the latter fuels. One region of the inner surface of the Zr liner cladding was made up mainly of ZrO2 with a small amount of dissolved UO2. The structure of this ZrO2 consisted of cubic polycrystals a few nanometers in size, while no monoclinic crystals were found. The other region, near the pellet surface, had both a cubic solid solution of (U,Zr)O2 and amorphous phase in which the concentrations of UO2 and ZrO2 changed continuously. Even in the lower burnup specimens having no bonding layer, cubic ZrO2 phase was identified in the cladding inner oxide layer. The XRD measurements were consistent with the TEM results of the absence of the monoclinic ZrO2 phase. Phase transformation and amorphization were attributed to fission damage, since such phenomena have never been observed in the cladding outer surface. Phase transformation from monoclinic to cubic ZrO2 and amorphization by irradiation damage of fission products were discussed in connection with the formation mechanism and conditions of the bonding layer. (author)

  18. BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study has been to examine TVO-I oscillation incident, which occured in February 22.1987 and to find out safety implications of oscillations in ATWS incidents. Calculations have been performed with RAMONA-3B and TRAB codes. RAMONA-3B is a BWR transient analysis code with three-dimencional neutron kinetics and nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous thermal hydraulics. TRAB code is a one-dimencional BWR transient code which uses methods similar to RAMONA-3B. The results have shown that both codes are capable of analyzing of the oscillation incidents. Both out-of-phase and in-phase oscillations are possible. If the reactor scram fails (ATWS) during oscillations the severe fuel failures are always possible and the reactor core may exceed the prompt criticality

  19. Post DNB heat transfer experiments for PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) and Mitsubishi performed heat transfer experiments on post DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) for the pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies under the sponsorship of the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) as one of a series of fuel assembly verification tests. Based on the obtained experimental data, a new evaluation model for the fuel rod heat transfer behavior after DNB was developed. A large safety margin, which had remained in the present thermal-hydraulic design that did not allow DNB, was confirmed by applying the developed model to the PWR plant safety analysis. (author)

  20. Tomographic imaging of severely disrupted fuel assemblies tested in TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of CT codes is under development in the Reactor Analysis and Safety Division of Argonne National Laboratory for use as a post-test examination tool to analyze segments of the final fuel-bundle configuration of TREAT tests. This paper presents the results of CT analysis for fuel assemblies using neutron radiography. Fuel relocation following overpower transients in the TREAT reactor is examined for sections of the assemblies, and results are compared to metallographic sections. Further improvements are expected to increase the use and reliability of CT analysis as a standard post-test examination tool

  1. Comparison of heuristic optimization techniques for the enrichment and gadolinia distribution in BWR fuel lattices and decision analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Different metaheuristic optimization techniques were compared. • The optimal enrichment and gadolinia distribution in a BWR fuel lattice was studied. • A decision making tool based on the Position Vector of Minimum Regret was applied. • Similar results were found for the different optimization techniques. - Abstract: In the present study a comparison of the performance of five heuristic techniques for optimization of combinatorial problems is shown. The techniques are: Ant Colony System, Artificial Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithms, Greedy Search and a hybrid of Path Relinking and Scatter Search. They were applied to obtain an “optimal” enrichment and gadolinia distribution in a fuel lattice of a boiling water reactor. All techniques used the same objective function for qualifying the different distributions created during the optimization process as well as the same initial conditions and restrictions. The parameters included in the objective function are the k-infinite multiplication factor, the maximum local power peaking factor, the average enrichment and the average gadolinia concentration of the lattice. The CASMO-4 code was used to obtain the neutronic parameters. The criteria for qualifying the optimization techniques include also the evaluation of the best lattice with burnup and the number of evaluations of the objective function needed to obtain the best solution. In conclusion all techniques obtain similar results, but there are methods that found better solutions faster than others. A decision analysis tool based on the Position Vector of Minimum Regret was applied to aggregate the criteria in order to rank the solutions according to three functions: neutronic grade at 0 burnup, neutronic grade with burnup and global cost which aggregates the computing time in the decision. According to the results Greedy Search found the best lattice in terms of the neutronic grade at 0 burnup and also with burnup. However, Greedy Search is

  2. Guideline for design requirement on KALIMER driver fuel assembly duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes design requirements which are needs for designing the driver fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER as design guidance. The driver fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER consists of fuel rods, mounting rail, nosepiece, duct with pad, handling socket with pad. Fuel rod consists of top end plug, bottom end plug with solid ferritic-martensitic steel rod and key way, fuel slug, cladding, and wire wrap. In the assembly, the rods are in a triangular pitch array, and the rod bundle attaches to the nosepiece with mounting rails. The bottom end of the assembly duct is formed by a long nosepiece which provides the lower restraint function and the coolant inlet. It contains functional requirements, performance and operational requirements, interfacing systems requirements, core restraint and interface requirements, design limits and strength requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements. The design requirements are intended to be used for the design of the driver fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER. (author). 16 refs., 4 figs

  3. ABB. CASE's GUARDIANTM Debris Resistant Fuel Assembly Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABB CE's experience, that 72% of all recent fuel-rod failures are caused by debris fretting, is typical. In response to this problem, ABB Combustion Engineering began supplying in the late 1980s fuel assemblies with a variety of debris resistant features, including both long-end caps and small flow holes. Now ABB CAE has developed an advanced debris resistant design concept, GUARDIANTM, which has the advantage of capturing and retaining more debris than other designs, while displacing less plenum or active fuel volume than the long end-cap design. GUARDIANTM design features have now been implemented into four different assembly designs. ABB CASE's GUARDIANTM fuel assembly is an advanced debris-resistant design which has both superior filtering performance and uniquely, excellent debris retention, Retention effectively removes the debris from circulation in the coolant so that it is not able to threaten the fuel again. GUARDIANTM features have been incorporated into four ABB. CAE fuel assembly designs. These assemblies are all fully compatible with the NSLS, and full-batch operation with GUARDIANTM began in 1992. The number of plants of both CAE and non-CAE design which accept GUARDIANTM for debris protection is expected to grow significantly during the next few years

  4. Preliminary thermal hydraulic analysis of hyper fuel assembly using Matra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sub-channel analysis of HYPER fuel assembly was performed using MATRA which is a subchannel analysis code developed by KAERI based on COBRA-IV-I. The MATRA code was considered for comparison between codes and assessing the capability of overcoming the limitation of the SLTHEN code used in the previous works. Two types of single fuel assembly, i.e., average assembly and hot assembly were considered for the present work. The predicted peak cladding temperatures of the average and hot assemblies were 536,2 C and 653,8 C, respectively with the reference design parameters. The comparison of results obtained by two codes shows that there is a good agreement for the predicted thermal hydraulic behaviour. It is judged that MATRA as well as SLTHEN is a very useful tool for thermal hydraulic design of the HYPER core and MATRA can be used to make up for the limitation of SLTHEN. (author)

  5. Effect of Heterogeneity of JSFR Fuel Assemblies to Power Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor JSFR is an oxide fueled system rated at 1,500 MWe. The core is composed of large fuel assemblies with an inner duct for each assembly. Thus, the assembly heterogeneity is rather strong. The purpose of the present paper is to make clear the effect of the heterogeneity to assembly and core characteristics, especially to power distribution. The inner duct is located at one corner of a hexagonal assembly, and the effect of the location has been investigated. We have compared the power distribution when the inner duct is always located near the core center and/or far from the core center. The power at the core center increased and decreased by ~10%, respectively compared to the case when the inner duct is randomly located. Thus, the location has important effect to power distribution. (author)

  6. Nuclear Fuel Assembly Assessment Project and Image Categorization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A project has been underway to add digital imaging and processing to the inspection of nuclear fuel by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The ultimate goals are to provide the inspector not only with the advantages of Ccd imaging, such as high sensitivity and digital image enhancements, but also with an intelligent agent that can analyze the images and provide useful information about the fuel assemblies in real time. The project is still in the early stages and several interesting sub-projects have been inspired. Here we give first a review of the work on the fuel assembly image analysis and then give a brief status report on one of these sub-projects that concerns automatic categorization of fuel assembly images. The technique could be of benefit to the general challenge of image categorization

  7. Nuclear Fuel Assembly Assessment Project and Image Categorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Lindblad, T.; Waldemark, K. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Hildingsson, Lars [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-07-01

    A project has been underway to add digital imaging and processing to the inspection of nuclear fuel by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The ultimate goals are to provide the inspector not only with the advantages of Ccd imaging, such as high sensitivity and digital image enhancements, but also with an intelligent agent that can analyze the images and provide useful information about the fuel assemblies in real time. The project is still in the early stages and several interesting sub-projects have been inspired. Here we give first a review of the work on the fuel assembly image analysis and then give a brief status report on one of these sub-projects that concerns automatic categorization of fuel assembly images. The technique could be of benefit to the general challenge of image categorization

  8. Statistical methods in the mechanical design of fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical design of a fuel assembly is still being mainly performed in a de terministic way. This conservative approach is however not suitable to provide a realistic quantification of the design margins with respect to licensing criter ia for more and more demanding operating conditions (power upgrades, burnup increase,..). This quantification can be provided by statistical methods utilizing all available information (e.g. from manufacturing, experience feedback etc.) of the topic under consideration. During optimization e.g. of the holddown system certain objectives in the mechanical design of a fuel assembly (FA) can contradict each other, such as sufficient holddown forces enough to prevent fuel assembly lift-off and reducing the holddown forces to minimize axial loads on the fuel assembly structure to ensure no negative effect on the control rod movement.By u sing a statistical method the fuel assembly design can be optimized much better with respect to these objectives than it would be possible based on a deterministic approach. This leads to a more realistic assessment and safer way of operating fuel assemblies. Statistical models are defined on the one hand by the quanti le that has to be maintained concerning the design limit requirements (e.g. one FA quantile) and on the other hand by the confidence level which has to be met. Using the above example of the holddown force, a feasible quantile can be define d based on the requirement that less than one fuel assembly (quantile > 192/19 3 [%] = 99.5 %) in the core violates the holddown force limit w ith a confidence of 95%. (orig.)

  9. Development of quality assurance methods for low enriched fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) fuel development program has furthered the technology of low enriched uranium fuels, much effort has been expended to specify requirements, perform appropriate inspections, and to qualify experimental fuel plates and assemblies for irradiation. A great deal of consideration has been given to generate examinations and criteria that are both applicable to the unique fuel types being developed and consistent with industry practices for inspecting plate-type reactor fuel. Recent developments in quality assurance (QA) methodologies have given a heightened confidence in satisfactory fuel plate performance. At the same time, recommendations are given to further develop a system suitable for the testing and acceptance of production fuel elements containing low enriched uranium fuels. (author)

  10. The development of flow test technology for PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to design and construct a high temperature and pressure flow test facility and to develop flow test technology for the evaluation of PWR fuel performance. For the nuclear fuel safety aspect it is of importance to evaluate the thermalhydraulic compatibility and mechanical integrity of a newly designed fuel through the design verification test. The PWR-Hot Test Loop facility is under construction to be used to perform a pressure drop test, a lift force test and a fretting corrosion test of a fullsize PWR fuel assembly at reactor operating conditions. This facility was designed to be used to produce the hydraulic parameters of the existing PWR fuel assemblies(14x14FA, 16x16FA, 17x17FA) and to verify a design of advanced fuel assemblies (KAFA-I and KAFA-II) developed by KAERI. The PWR-Cold Test Loop facility with the 5x5 Rod Bundles in the test section was designed and installed to carry out the flow distribution study by means of Laser Doppler Velocimeter. The LDV techniques have been developed and used to measure the flow velocity and turbulent intensity for evaluating mixing effects of a newly designed spacer grid with and without mixing vanes, cross flow between the fuel assemblies and a turbulent model. (Author)

  11. Thermomechanical evaluation of the fuel assemblies fabricated in the ININ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pilot plant of fuel production of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) provided to the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (CNLV) four fuel assemblies type GE9B. The fuel irradiation was carried out in the unit 1 of the CNLV during four operation cycles, highlighting the fact that in their third cycle the four assemblies were placed in the center of the reactor core. In the Nuclear Systems Department (DSN) of the ININ it has been carried out studies to evaluate their neutron performance and to be able to determine the exposure levels of this fuels. Its also outlines the necessity to carry out a study of the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rods that compose the assemblies, through computational codes that simulate their performance so much thermal as mechanical. For such purpose has been developing in the DSN the FETMA code, together with the codes that compose the system Fuel Management System (FMS), which evaluates the thermomechanical performance of fuel elements. In this work were used the FETMA and FEMAXI codes (developed by JAERI) to study the thermomechanical performance of the fuel elements manufactured in the ININ. (Author)

  12. Irradiation of the experimental fuel assemblies with uranium-plutonium fuel in the BN-600 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design features of experimental fuel assemblies (EFA) with uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel specific aspects of their arrangement within the BN-600 reactor core, conditions and basic results of EFA with the fuel mentioned in the BN-600 reactor are described

  13. Results of VVER-440 fuel assembly head benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the WWER-440/213 type reactors, the core outlet temperature field is monitored with in-core thermocouples, which are installed above 210 fuel assemblies. These measured temperatures are used in determination of the fuel assembly powers and they have important role in the reactor power limitation. For these reasons, correct interpretation of the thermocouple signals is an important question. In order to interpret the signals in correct way, knowledge of the coolant mixing in the assembly heads is necessary. Computational Fluid Dynamics codes and experiments can help to understand better these mixing processes and they can provide information which can support the more adequate interpretation of the thermocouple signals. This benchmark deals with the 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling of the coolant mixing in the heads of the profiled fuel assemblies with 12,2 mm rod pitch. Two assemblies of the twenty third cycle of the Paks NPPs Unit 3 are investigated. One of them has symmetrical pin power profile and another possesses inclined profile. In this benchmark, the same fuel assemblies are investigated by the participants thus the results calculated with different codes and models can be compared with each other. Aims of benchmark was comparison of participants results with each other and with in-core measurement data of the Paks NPP in order to test the different Computational Fluid Dynamics codes and applied Computational Fluid Dynamics models. This paper contains OKB 'GIDROPRESSs' results of Computational Fluid Dynamics calculations this benchmark. Results are:-In-core thermocouple signals above the selected assemblies;-Deviations between the in- ore thermocouple signals and the outlet average coolant temperatures of the assemblies;-Axial velocity and temperature profiles along three diameters at the level of the thermocouple;- Axial velocity and temperature distributions in the cross section at the level of the thermocouple;-Axial velocity and temperature

  14. Surface harmonics method for burnup calculations of VVER-1000 fuel assemblies with uranium and MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of the SUHAM-U code for burnup calculations of VVER-1000 fuel assemblies with uranium and MOX fuel is described. Developed SUHAM-U code has capacity to calculate burnup in each fuel or poison zone of each cell of VVER-1000 fuel assembly. In so doing Surface Harmonics Method is used for calculation of the detail neutron spectra in fuel assembly at separated burnup values. Verification of SUHAM-U code by burnup calculations of VVER-1000 fuel assemblies with uranium and MOX fuel has been carried out. Comparisons were carried out with calculations by UNK and RECOL codes. UNK code uses the first collisions probabilities method for solution of the neutron transport equation and RECOL code uses Monte-Carlo method with point-wise continues energy presentation of cross-sections. The main conclusion of all comparisons is the SUHAM-U code calculates the fuel burnup of VVER-1000 fuel assemblies with uranium and MOX fuel with enough high accuracy. Time expenditures are adduced. (authors)

  15. Surface harmonics method for burnup calculations of VVER-1000 fuel assemblies with uranium and MOX fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Davidenko, V. D.; Polismakov, A. A.; Tsibulsky, V. F. [Russian Research Center Kurchatov Inst., Nuclear Reactor Inst., 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    Development of the SUHAM-U code for burnup calculations of VVER-1000 fuel assemblies with uranium and MOX fuel is described. Developed SUHAM-U code has capacity to calculate burnup in each fuel or poison zone of each cell of VVER-1000 fuel assembly. In so doing Surface Harmonics Method is used for calculation of the detail neutron spectra in fuel assembly at separated burnup values. Verification of SUHAM-U code by burnup calculations of VVER-1000 fuel assemblies with uranium and MOX fuel has been carried out. Comparisons were carried out with calculations by UNK and RECOL codes. UNK code uses the first collisions probabilities method for solution of the neutron transport equation and RECOL code uses Monte-Carlo method with point-wise continues energy presentation of cross-sections. The main conclusion of all comparisons is the SUHAM-U code calculates the fuel burnup of VVER-1000 fuel assemblies with uranium and MOX fuel with enough high accuracy. Time expenditures are adduced. (authors)

  16. Microscopic examinations of a sphere-pac and a pellet UO2 fuel rod, irradiated during 1530 days in the Dodewaard BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventy sphere-pac and seventy standard pellet UO2 fuel rods operated simultaneously without failures in the Dodewaard BWR at axial average powers of 16-20 kW/m up to axial average burnups of 16-30 MWd/kg UO2. Peak powers were about 43 kW/m and occurred early in life at about 2 MWd/kg UO2. Peak burnups were 36 MWd/kg UO2. The non-destructive post-irradiation examinations, reported earlier, resulted in the conclusion that the measured differences between sphere-pac and pellet UO2 rods were in effect insignificant. The destructive post-irradiation examinations, in particular optical microscopy, SEM and EPMA on rod cross sections, exhibited some significant differences between sphere-pac and standard pellet UO2 rod behaviour during normal operation in the Dodewaard BWR. The extent of UO2 sintering and of outward movement of cesium in the central region of the fuel column were substantially smaller in the sphere-pac rod. The absence of an as-fabricated fuel-cladding gap in sphere-pac rods results in lower central fuel temperatures than in pellet rods, at least during the early in life period when the amount of released fission gas is still small. The presence of radial cracks in the outer, not sintered, regions of the pellet fuel column constitute direct paths for outward transport of volatile fission products from the hot sintered central region towards the inner cladding surface. This makes pellet rods sensitive for stress corrosion cracking of the zircaloy cladding wall. 20 figs.; 13 refs.; 13 tabs

  17. Falling the fuel assembly in core mesh of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accident reflecting drop of a fuel assembly (FA) in core mesh during the overload operations in the INP AS RUz research reactor is observed. Calculations and analysis of the accident situation were carried out for the reactor cores formed from fully high enriched IRT-3M type fuel (36% enrichment on '235U), the first mixed core consisting from 16 IRT-3M and 4 IRT-4M with low enriched fuel (19.7% enrichment on 235U), and the core fully formed from low enriched fuel. (authors)

  18. Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karl J.

    2010-08-24

    Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

  19. Radiological safety aspects of uranium fuel fabrication facilities at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Health Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is operating a Health Physics Unit at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad which carried out radiological, industrial hygiene and environmental surveillances. Nuclear Fuel Complex has two batteries of plants - one for natural UO2 fuel bundles for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) and the other for enriched UO2 fuel assemblies for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) in the country. For natural UO2 fuel the Uranium Oxide Plant (UOP) converts magnesium diuranate to UO2 powder. The Ceramic Fuel Fabrication Plant (CFFP) processes the UO2 powder to dense sintered UO2 pellets and further to fuel assemblies for PHWR. The Enriched Uranium Oxide Plant (EUOP) starts with uranium hexa-fluoride and converts to UO2 powder and Enriched Fuel Fabrication Plant (EFFP) processes the UO2 powder to sintered pellets and fuel assemblies for BWR

  20. Method of testing fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stresses occurring in the fuel assemblies are simulated by power excursions. For this purpose the fuel assembly is placed in the neutron field of a test reactor and for a short time can be exposed to the much higher neutron field of a pulsed reactor. One possibility of design provides for the test and the pulsed reactor lying one above the other, separated by a neutron absorber and penetrated by a common irradiation channel. The fuel assembly then is to be moved from the position in the test reactor to the position in the pulsed reactor. The other possibility is to make the irradiation duct pass along the gap between both reactors and, by means of a tube-shaped absorber, open one or the other irradiation field. (DG)

  1. CFD Analysis for a Fuel Assembly of GRR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal-hydraulic analysis was conducted on the research reactor core for improvement on the primary cooling system of GRR(Greece Research Reactor)-1. In order to design a primary cooling system, key data were provided by the thermal-hydraulic analysis. The COOLOD code was employed to carry out the thermal-hydraulic analysis, but it was for one-dimensional calculation and single channel analysis. It can't reproduce the three-dimensional flow in complex geometries. Although pressure drop through the fuel assembly was one of the most important values to design the primary cooling system, there was no data of it from an experiment or an estimation. It should be certain that the flow distribution between coolant channels was even, since all coolant channels of a plate type fuel assembly were completely separated from each other. However, those can be obtained by conducting an experiment, a quite long time and financial resources contribute to preventing an experiment. Regarding these, the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) method was a very useful alternative to reach a solution to these problems. The CFD method provide reliable and useful predictions instead of experiments due to its applicability to complex shapes which were as real as possible. This is a summary report of CFD analysis for a plate type fuel assembly of GRR-1. In this study, flow distribution between each coolant channel of the fuel assembly was predicted. In order to estimate the pressure drop through the fuel assembly, many calculations were done for various flow rate conditions. A correlation between pressure drop to flow rate was yielded from those calculation results. Temperature distribution was estimated on the fuel plates of assembly at normal operation, and was compared with the prediction results obtained by the COOLOD code. Finally, it was predicted whether or not the uncovered core can be maintained under the core melting point only by air cooling of natural circulation, when the loss

  2. DISSOLUTION OF IRRADIATED MURR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyser, E.

    2010-06-17

    A literature survey on the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel from the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been performed. This survey encompassed both internal and external literature sources for the dissolution of aluminum-clad uranium alloy fuels. The most limiting aspect of dissolution in the current facility configuration involves issues related to the control of the flammability of the off-gas from this process. The primary conclusion of this work is that based on past dissolution of this fuel in H-Canyon, four bundles of this fuel (initial charge) may be safely dissolved in a nitric acid flowsheet catalyzed with 0.002 M mercuric nitrate using a 40 scfm purge to control off-gas flammability. The initial charge may be followed by a second charge of up to five bundles to the same dissolver batch depending on volume and concentration constraints. The safety of this flowsheet relies on composite lower flammability limits (LFL) estimated from prior literature, pilot-scale work on the dissolution of site fuels, and the proposed processing flowsheet. Equipment modifications or improved LFL data offer the potential for improved processing rates. The fuel charging sequence, as well as the acid and catalyst concentrations, will control the dissolution rate during the initial portion of the cycle. These parameters directly impact the hydrogen and off-gas generation and, along with the purge flowrate determine the number of bundles that may be charged. The calculation approach within provides Engineering a means to determine optimal charging patterns. Downstream processing of this material should be similar to that of recent processing of site fuels requiring only minor adjustments of the existing flowsheet parameters.

  3. Serpent: an alternative for the nuclear fuel cells analysis of a BWR; SERPENT: una alternativa para el analisis de celdas de combustible nuclear de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva A, L.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: lidi.s.albarran@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In the last ten years the diverse research groups in nuclear engineering of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (UNAM, IPN), as of research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ) as well as the personnel of the Nuclear Plant Management of the Comision Federal de Electricidad have been using the codes Helios and /or CASMO-4 in the generation of cross sections (X S) of nuclear fuel cells of the cores corresponding to the Units 1 and 2 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Both codes belong to the Studsvik-Scandpower Company who receives the payment for the use and their respective maintenance. In recent years, the code Serpent appears among the nuclear community distributed by the OECD/Nea which does not has cost neither in its use neither in its maintenance. The code is based on the Monte Carlo method and makes use of the processing in parallel. In the Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of the IPN, the personnel has accumulated certain experience in the use of Serpent under the direction of personal of the ININ; of this experience have been obtained for diverse fuel burned, the infinite multiplication factor for three cells of nuclear fuel, without control bar and with control bar for a known thermodynamic state fixed by: a) the fuel temperature (T{sub f}), b) the moderator temperature (T{sub m}) and c) the vacuums fraction (α). Although was not realized any comparison with the X S that the codes Helios and CASMO-4 generate, the results obtained for the infinite multiplication factor show the prospective tendencies with regard to the fuel burned so much in the case in that is not present the control bar like when it is. The results are encouraging and motivate to the study group to continue with the X S generation of a core in order to build the respective library of nuclear data as a following step and this can be used for the codes PARCS, of USA NRC, DYN3D of HZDR, or others developed locally

  4. Measuring device for effective multiplication factors of a fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Makoto

    1988-11-14

    Purpose: To measure the effective multiplication factor of a fuel assembly without using an external neutron source. Constitution: Neutron absorbers disposed on the surface of a fuel assembly incorporating a spontaneous neutron source so as to put the surface of the assembly therebetween is moved. As the neutron absorber, a cadmium plate is most suitable, but boron, gadolinium or disprosium may also be used. Neutron counting rate phi upon setting the distance between the neutron absorbers and the surface of the fuel assembly to greater than 2 cm and neutron counting rate phi' upon setting it to less than 2 cm are measured by neutron detectors. The effective multiplication factor of the fuel assembly is calculated based on the results of both of the measurements according to the following equation: K = (A(phi/phi')-1)/(AB(phi/phi'-1)) According to this method, exchange for the external neutron source is no more required, and the maintenance is easier and working efficiency is higher as compared with the prior art. Further, since phi/phi' can be determined in one identical detector in a short period of time, the measuring error can be reduced. (Horiuchi, T.).

  5. A spent fuel assemblies monitoring device by nondestructive analysis 'PYTHON'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monitoring of spent fuel assemblies (16 x 16 UOX) in KWG-reactor pool with the use of non-destructive methods (total Gamma and neutron counting) allow the control of average burn-up and the extremity burn-up. The measurements allow a safety-criticality control before loading the fuel assemblies into the transport casks. A device called PYTHON has been tested and qualified in France. This paper presents a description of the industrial PYTHON device and the results of the measurements. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear fuel element and method for its fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within a special gas-permeable container particles of the ternary alloy Zr, Ni and Ti are contained in the fuel assembly for the BWR or PWR. Position and shape of the ternary alloy allow to remove water, water vapor and reactive gases from the fuel assembly utilizing the getter properties of this alloy. Moreover, the alloy is arranged at the coldest position of the fuel assembly, any inverse reaction thus being prevented. (DG)

  7. Nuclear imaging of the fuel assembly in ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First results from the analysis of neutron image data collected on implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium capsules during the 2011-2012 National Ignition Campaign are reported. The data span a variety of experimental designs aimed at increasing the stagnation pressure of the central hotspot and areal density of the surrounding fuel assembly. Images of neutrons produced by deuterium–tritium fusion reactions in the hotspot are presented, as well as images of neutrons that scatter in the surrounding dense fuel assembly. The image data are compared with 1D and 2D model predictions, and consistency checked using other diagnostic data. The results indicate that the size of the fusing hotspot is consistent with the model predictions, as well as other imaging data, while the overall size of the fuel assembly, inferred from the scattered neutron images, is systematically smaller than models' prediction. Preliminary studies indicate these differences are consistent with a significant fraction (20%–25%) of the initial deuterium-tritium fuel mass outside the compact fuel assembly, due either to low mode mass asymmetry or high mode 3D mix effects at the ablator-ice interface

  8. Advanced PWR fuel assembly development programs in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both KNFC and Westinghouse have continued to focus on developing products that will meet the challenge of increasing fuel duty requirements in Korea. These higher duty conditions include higher energy core designs through improved plant capacity factors, power uprate, extended fuel burnup, peaking factor increases, and more severe coolant chemistry (including high lithium concentration). Recent advanced fuel development activities in Korea include implementation of the 17x17 Robust Fuel Assembly (RFA), which is currently in operation with excellent performance in the United States and Europe, as well as the 16x16 PLUS7TM fuel assembly for use in KSNP plants. KNFC and Westinghouse are jointly developing advanced fuel that will meet future fuel duty challenges of 17x17 and 16x16 Westinghouse type plants. This paper focuses on advanced fuel assembly development programs that are underway and how these designs demonstrate improved margins under high duty plant operating conditions. In designing for these high duty conditions key design considerations for the various operational modes (i.e. power uprating, high burnup, long cycles, etc.) must be identified. These design considerations will include the traditional factors such as safety margin (DNB and LOCA), fuel rod design margin (e.g. corrosion, internal pressure, etc.) and mechanical design margins, among others. In addressing these design considerations, the fundamental approach is to provide additional design margin through materials, mechanical, and thermal performance enhancements, to assure flawless fuel performance. The foundation of all fuel designs is the product development process used to meet the demands of modern high duty operation including power uprating, high burnup, longer cycles, and high-lithium coolant chemistries. These advanced fuel assembly designs incorporate features that provide improved mechanical design margin, as well as thermal performance margin (DNB). Enhanced grid designs result in a

  9. Process for assembling a nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before insertion into the spacers, the fuel rocks are coated with a self-hardening layer of water-soluble polyvinyl and/or polyether polymer to prevent scratches on the cladding tubes. After insertion, the protective conting is removed by means of water. (orig.)

  10. Lateral Stiffness Analysis of Fuel Assembly as Contact Condition for PGSFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the fuel assembly bowing in the core, the lateral stiffness analysis is needed. In the fuel assembly, there are two load pads. One is the top load pad (TLP) and the other is above the core load pad (ACLP). These load pads supply the impact surface among the fuel assemblies. In this paper, the lateral stiffness analysis of the fuel assembly as the core contact condition will be executed using the finite element method. The lateral stiffness of a fuel assembly is established by the FE method. These analysis results will be utilized in a fuel assembly bowing analysis in the core

  11. Nuclear fuel assembly with large coolant conducting tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor comprising elongated fuel rods each containing a column of nuclear fuel; support means providing support positions for retaining the fuel rods in spaced array including a lower tie plate engaging the lower ends of the fuel rods; a nose piece extending from the lower tie plate and forming a coolant receiving chamber; a large diameter elongated coolant conducting tube extending upward through the assembly and occupying the space of the fuel rods, the coolant conducting tube having an opening at its lower end for receiving coolant and an opening at its upper end for discharging coolant; at least one space axially positioned intermediate between the upper and lower ends of the fuel rods for laterally supporting the fuel rods and the coolant conducting tube; and a mounting member for the large diameter coolant conducting tube. The lower end of the mounting member engaging the lower tie plate and the upper end of the mounting member is secured to the lower end of the coolant conducting tube. The mounting member has a relatively small diameter and is relatively flexible compared to the large diameter coolant conducting tube. In the event of lateral displacement of the upper end of the large diameter coolant conducting tube, excessive lateral forces on the spacer are avoided

  12. Nuclear fuel assembly with large coolant conducting tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, H.L.; Dunlap, T.G.; Johnson, E.B.; Matzner, B.

    1987-06-23

    This patent describes a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor comprising elongated fuel rods each containing a column of nuclear fuel; support means providing support positions for retaining the fuel rods in spaced array including a lower tie plate engaging the lower ends of the fuel rods; a nose piece extending from the lower tie plate and forming a coolant receiving chamber; a large diameter elongated coolant conducting tube extending upward through the assembly and occupying the space of the fuel rods, the coolant conducting tube having an opening at its lower end for receiving coolant and an opening at its upper end for discharging coolant; at least one space axially positioned intermediate between the upper and lower ends of the fuel rods for laterally supporting the fuel rods and the coolant conducting tube; and a mounting member for the large diameter coolant conducting tube. The lower end of the mounting member engaging the lower tie plate and the upper end of the mounting member is secured to the lower end of the coolant conducting tube. The mounting member has a relatively small diameter and is relatively flexible compared to the large diameter coolant conducting tube. In the event of lateral displacement of the upper end of the large diameter coolant conducting tube, excessive lateral forces on the spacer are avoided.

  13. Reassembling Procedure of the Fuel Assemblies for the Nuclear Power Ship ''Mutsu''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan's first voyage utilized by nuclear power was made by the nuclear powered ship ''Mutsu'' in 1990. After a research voyage in 1992, decommissioning work of the nuclear reactor for ''Mutsu'' was started to change it from the nuclear power ship to an ordinary power ship. Thirty-four irradiated fuel assemblies of ''Mutsu'' were removed from the reactor and transported to the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) in Nuclear Science Research Institute (NSRI) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). ''Mutsu'' fuel assemblies were loaded into a hot cell of RFEF using the roof gate as the top loading procedure. After the reliability confirmation tests, fuel assemblies were reassembled for reprocessing. To perform the reliability confirmation tests and reassembling, new devices were developed and installed in the hot cells, ''Fuel assembly transportation device'' for transporting the fuel assemblies between the hot cells, ''Upper nozzle cutting device'' for removing the upper nozzle from the fuel assembly, ''Fuel rod drawing device'' for drawing a fuel rod from the fuel assembly and so on. Thirty-four fuel assemblies were reassembled as six PWR type fuel assemblies in order to adjust the acceptable specifications of the reprocessing plant in JAEA: the shape of fuel assembly is the same as the PWR type commercial reactor fuel and the average enrichment of uranium in the assembly is under 4.0%. This paper reports the reassembling techniques of the ''Mutsu'' irradiated fuel assemblies for reprocessing. (author)

  14. Manipulator for fuel assemblies in a spent fuel pool, especially for a LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel manipulator has - a travelling crane moving longitudinally: - a carriage moving on the travelling crane in a direction perpendicular to its motion so that the carriage is positioned over each assembly, - a telescopic rod carried by the carriage and terminating in a vertically mobile grapple, - a tubular shielded hood on the carriage extending downwards to house the rod, grapple and fuel assembly and maintaining a biologically acceptable level of radiation above the surface of the pool

  15. Sensitivity/uncertainty analysis for BWR configurations of Exercise I-2 of UAM benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the uncertainties in prediction of lattice-averaged parameters, input data of core neutronics codes, Exercise I-2 of the OECD benchmark for uncertainty analysis in modeling (UAM) was proposed. This work aims to perform a sensitivity/uncertainty analysis of the BWR configurations defined in the benchmark for the purpose of Exercise I-2. Criticality calculations are done for a 7x7 BWR fresh fuel assembly at HFP in four configurations: single unrodded fuel assembly, rodded fuel assembly, assembly/reflector and assembly in a color-set. The SCALE6.1 code package is used to propagate cross section covariance data through lattice physics calculations to both k-effective and two-group assembly-homogenized cross sections uncertainties. Computed sensitivities and uncertainties for all configurations are analyzed and compared. It was found that uncertainties are very similar for the four test-problems, showing that the influence of the assembly environment on uncertainty prediction is very small. (author)

  16. Evaluation of PWR and BWR assembly benchmark calculations. Status report of EPRI computational benchmark results, performed in the framework of the Netherlands' PINK programme (Joint project of ECN, IRI, KEMA and GKN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on calculational benchmarks on single pin cell and multipin assemblies as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. First a short update of methods used by the various institutes involved is given as well as an update of the status with respect to previous performed pin-cell calculations. Problems detected in previous pin-cell calculations are inspected more closely. Detailed discussion of results of multipin assembly calculations is given. The assembly consists of 9 pins in a multicell square lattice in which the central pin is filled differently, i.e. a Gd pin for the BWR assembly and a control rod/guide tube for the PWR assembly. The results for pin cells showed a rather good overall agreement between the four participants although BWR pins with high void fraction turned out to be difficult to calculate. With respect to burnup calculations good overall agreement for the reactivity swing was obtained, provided that a fine time grid is used. (orig.)

  17. Criticality assessment of fuel assemblies with missing fuel rods - an intractable problem?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In current certificates of package approval the arrangement of water and guide tubes within the array of fuel rods of a fuel assembly is specified in detail. Fuel assemblies with deviating water and guide tube arrangements or missing rods are not allowed to be loaded into the casks. The reason behind is that the reactivity of a standard fuel assembly increases if some rods are removed. For a certain number and arrangement of missing rods a maximum of reactivity is reached. Due to the missing fissile material the reactivity will decrease again if further rods are then removed. For the comprehensive assessment of the maximum of reactivity all possible configurations of fuel rods and missing rods have to be investigated. The paper describes the problem at hand in detail giving estimates for the complexity of the analysis

  18. Spacer grid for a PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spacer grid defines a block of square section cells each accommodating one fuel rod and is made up of interlocking flat strips welded together and made of zirconium alloy. A spring of nickel alloy is secured between each peripheral strip. The strip defining the wall of each of those cells opposite strip carries rigid bosses pressed out of the strip. The rods in those cells are gripped between bosses and spring sections. 7 figs

  19. Spacer grid for reducing bowing in a nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bi-metallic spacer grid having a zircaloy perimeter strip consisting of oppositely facing, thin walled metal plates for closely surrounding the array of fuel rods. A rigid, stainless steel cross member extends between internal surfaces of the oppositely facing perimeter plates. In the preferred embodiment, the perimeter plates have cantilevered portions extending above and below the main body of the perimeter strip. The cross members interact with the enlarged portion by urging them outward relative to the perimeter strip as the fuel assembly heats up during operation. The outwardly projecting interface surfaces of each assembly mechanically interact with the interface surfaces of adjacent assemblies providing a mechanical restraint which limits bowing of the assembly. The effectiveness of the spacer grids in limiting bowing is therefore not dependent upon controlling the mechanisms responsible for causing bow. When the reactor is in a cold condition such as during refueling , the exterior dimensions of the spacer grids are the same as those of the other zircaloy grids, which assures adequate clearance for insertion and withdrawal of individual fuel assemblies

  20. ROSA-III system description for fuel assembly, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ROSA (Rig of Safety Assessment)-III System with fuel assembly No.4 and its instrumentations are described. The informations are necessary to understand and analyze the experimental data obtained from loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs) conducted in the ROSA-III facility. (author)

  1. Experimental study of new generation WWER-1000 fuel assemblies at JSC NCCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental program for the study of fuel assembly thermomechanical stability has been established together with RF SSC IPPE and Russian Scientific Center Kurchatov Institute. Assembly fragments and small dummy models of fuel assembly skeletons and fuel rod bundles have been used for the tests. The test results are used for the design selection, verification of the design codes and substantiation of operating capacity of fuel assemblies with a rigid skeleton. The mechanical characteristics of units make it possible to perform fuel assembly strength and rigidity calculations, including the cases of abnormal operation. The mechanical characteristics of the skeleton and fuel rod bundle dummy models make it possible to check for the adequacy of the fuel assembly design model. The mechanical characteristics obtained during fuel rods bundle push through experiments make it possible to substantiate the fuel assembly serviceability under the conditions of fuel rods bundle and skeleton interaction

  2. Post-irradiation examination of Fugen reactor fuel assembly at reactor fuel examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-irradiation examination of the first assembly of a monitoring program for Heavy Water Reactor ''Fugen'' of PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation) has been executed since Oct. 1983 at the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility, JAERI Tokai (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai Research Establishment). The fuel assembly is a cylindrical cluster, with 4,400mm length, composed of 28 rods in 3 concentric circles, 12 spring-grid spacers and the upper and lower tie plates. The fuel is plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (0.8 w/o), and the material of cladding tube is Zry-2. The average burnup of the fuel assembly is about 13,600 MWd/t. This paper describes the methods and some results on the post irradiation examination items as follows: 1. Radioactive measurement of water in transportation cask; 2. Visual inspection of the fuel assembly in dry cell, before and after removing the crud, by ultrasonic vibration method; 3. Chemical analyses and radioactive measurement of the crud materials; 4. Dimensional measurement of assembly length and rod-rod gaps, before and after removing the crud; 5. Disassembly and dimensional measurement of rod-rod gaps in the inner circles; 6. Several nondestructive testing techniques of fuel rods. (author)

  3. A new SCWR fuel assembly with two-row fuel rods between the hexagonal moderator channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We propose a SCWR fuel assembly with two-row fuel rods between the hexagonal moderator channels. • The new concept can resolve the contradiction between uniform and sufficient moderation. • Structural size and thermal–hydraulic performance are taken account of in the fuel assembly. • Larger infinite multiplication factor and smaller local power peaking factor could be obtained. • Two two-row hexagonal fuel assembly concepts are proposed for the engineering application. - Abstract: A new hexagonal fuel assembly (FA) design which has two rows of fuel rods between the hexagonal moderator channels is proposed for the thermal supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR). The new concept is well considered for the performance of uniform moderation and sufficient moderation, and with respect to structural size and thermal–hydraulic performance. The neutron physical performance of the two-row hexagonal FA with acceptable configuration is discussed. The results show clearly that a better balance between uniform moderation and sufficient moderation can be obtained in the two-row hexagonal fuel assembly

  4. Vibration Pre-characterization of Partial Fuel Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To check applicability to a conventional reactor core and compatibility with a present fuel design requires hydraulic vibration testing for the annular fuel design in the form of a fuel bundle. Objective of the hydraulic vibration testing (or flow induced vibration testing) is to understand vibration behavior of an oscillating structure submerged in fluid flow and find out relationship between vibration responses of a structure and flow characteristics. Along the same line, a partial fuel test assembly (PFTA) was made in 4x4 arrays with 12 dummy annular fuel rods and 5 combination-type spacer grids of cantilever and vortex dimple spring as shown in Fig. 1. To be more focus for effects of the inner channel fluid mass on the dynamics of an annular fuel test assembly, mass-equivalent simulated lead pellets were eliminated in dummy fuel rods. A series of vibration testing using UMAP (underwater modal test equipment) in ambient and under still water were performed to identify dynamic characteristics of PFTA and evaluate the effects of test parameters and conditions. Objective of the test is to evaluate UMAP performances and prepare backup data for future response analysis of hydraulic vibration testing

  5. Nuclear fuel assembly top nozzle with improved arrangement of hold-down leaf spring assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, C.N.

    1991-06-26

    A fuel assembly has a top nozzle which includes a lower adapter plate and a plurality of guide structures which are attached to an extend along the periphery of the lower plate and upwardly therefrom. The top nozzle also includes an upper hold-down plate supported by a plurality of leaf spring assemblies. The upper plate is mounted to the guide structures for vertical slidable movement relative thereto. The leaf spring assemblies are provided in a non-peripheral arrangement relative to the periphery of the lower plate in which the assemblies are provided in a non-peripheral arrangement relative to the periphery of the lower plate in which the assemblies cross the interior of the lower plate in a diagonal fashion between adjacent ones of the guide structures. (author).

  6. Behaviour of spent fuel assemblies during extended storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the final report of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on Behaviour of Spent Fuel Assemblies During Extended Storage (BEFAST, Phase I, 1981-86). It contains the results on wet and dry spent fuel storage technologies obtained from 11 institutes (10 countries: Austria, Canada, Czechoslovakia, Finland, German Democratic Republic, Hungary, Japan, Sweden, USA and USSR) participating in the BEFAST CRP during the time period 1981-86. Names of participating institutes and chief investigators are given. The interim spent fuel storage has been recognized as an important independent step in the nuclear fuel cycle. Due to the delay in commercial reprocessing of spent fuel in some cases it should be stored up to 30-50 years or more before reprocessing or final disposal. This programme was evaluated by all its participants and observers as very important and helpful for the nuclear community and it was decided to continue it further (1986-91) as BEFAST, Phase II

  7. Method and apparatus for dismantling and disposing of fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to apparatus and a method for dismantling, shearing, and compacting a fuel assembly frame skeleton. It uses an apparatus capable of hanging or being supported in the transfer canal of the spent fuel pit of the fuel handling building. This apparatus includes a bottom nozzle shear which is held under water to shear off the bottom nozzle and convey it to a scrap transfer bin. Then the remaining portion is brought to a skeleton compactor and shear, also held under water. The compacted skeleton is sheared into a number of smaller portions. After compacting and shearing, the individual portions are fed to the scrap transfer bin. The compacted and sheared skeleton assembly may be placed into a container that is adapted to hold four skeletons for off-site removal

  8. Determination of mixing factors for VVER-440 fuel assembly head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CFD models have been developed for the heads of the old, the present and new type VVER-440 fuel assemblies using the experiences of former validation process. With these models, temperature distributions were investigated in typical assemblies and in-core thermocouple signals were calculated. The analyses show that coolant mixing is intensive but not-perfect in the assembly heads. Difference between the thermocouple signal and cross-sectional average temperature at measurement level depends on the assembly type. Using the models, weight factors of the rod bundle regions for the in-core thermocouple have been determined. With these factors, the thermocouple signals were estimated and results were statistically tested using the registered data of the Hungarian nuclear power plant. This test shows that deviations between measured and calculated temperatures can be significantly decreased and consequently monitoring uncertainties can be reduced with using the weight factors. (author)

  9. Influence of fuel bundle loading errors on the subcriticality during refueling campaigns for the present BWR cores of KRB-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of real fuel assembly inventories as they are presently available in KRB-II, the influence of fuel bundle loading errors on the subcriticality during refueling campaigns was investigated with the calculational methods of the incore fuel management. To this, control rod cells which show the least shut-down reactivity were considered and less reactive fuel assemblies were successively exchanged with fuel assemblies of highest possible reactivity from distant core regions. The results show that the total shut-down reactivity is only reduced by a comparatively small amount. The stuck rod shut-down reactivity, on the other hand, is strongly diminished with increasing number of locally concentrated mislocated fuel assemblies of highest possible reactivity. Thus, unintentional criticality cannot be reached during refueling campaigns with all control rods inserted. In conjunction with the deliberate withdrawal of one control rod, two or three mislocated fuel assemblies can cause criticality, depending on the absolute value of the realized stuck rod shut-down reactivity. (orig.)

  10. Refueling machine mounted fuel assembly inspection T.V. cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a refueling machine comprising a trolley, movable within a horizontal plane above fuel assemblies in a reactor core of a nuclear reactor facility, an outer, stationary mast fixedly mounted to the trolley and extending vertically downwardly therefrom, and an inter mast coaxially mounted within the outer mast and telescopically movable therein. A gripper assembly is fixedly secured to the lower end of the inner mast for attachment to the fuel assemblies for movement of the fuel assemblies into the outer mast and in and out of the reactor core. A basket-type framework surrounds the lower end of the stationary mast and vertically mounted television cameras are fixedly attached to the basket-type framework with their lenses oriented vertically downwardly. Light sources are fixedly attached to the basket-type framework below the television cameras and support cables are secured to the basket-type framework for moving the basket-type framework vertically relative to the stationary mast

  11. Verification of the Advanced Nodal Method on BWR Core Analyses by Whole-Core Heterogeneous Transport Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent boiling water reactor (BWR) core and fuel designs have become more sophisticated and heterogeneous to improve fuel cycle cost, thermal margin, etc. These improvements, however, tend to lead to a strong interference effect among fuel assemblies, and it my cause some inaccuracies in the BWR core analyses by advanced nodal codes. Furthermore, the introduction of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel will lead to a much stronger interference effect between MOX and UO2 fuel assemblies. However, the CHAPLET multiassembly characteristics transport code was developed recently to solve two-dimensional cell-heterogeneous whole-core problems efficiently, and its results can be used as reference whole-core solutions to verify the accuracy of nodal core calculations. In this paper, the results of nodal core calculations were compared with their reference whole-core transport solutions to verify their accuracy (in keff, assembly power and pin power via pin power reconstruction) of the advanced nodal method on both UO2 and MOX BWR whole-core analyses. Especially, it was investigated if there were any significant differences in the accuracy between MOX and UO2 results

  12. Calculation of the BN-600 fuel assemblies mode in a gas medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potentiality of calculated modeling of temperature conditions of warming up elements of spent fuel assemblies of the BN-600 reactor during their transportation within gaseous medium is shown. The calculated modeling of spent fuel assemblies warming up in gaseous medium, their residual heat release values being different, permits substantiating and optimizing safe conditions of post-reactor handling of the fuel assemblies

  13. Design of Neptunium-bearing Fuel Assembly for Transmutation Research in CEFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to have a better understanding of irradiation performance of the fuel containing neptunium, an experimental assembly is designed for future irradiation in CEFR. There is only one fuel pin in the assembly with neptunium content of 5%. Temperature monitors and neutron fluence detectors are attached. The report presents the basic structure of the fuel pin and the assembly. (author)

  14. Effect of Heterogeneity of JSFR Fuel Assemblies to Power Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conclusion: 1) Strong heterogeneity of JSFR assemblies was successfully calculated by BACH. 2) Verification test of BACH: • Infinite assembly model; • Color set model; • Good agreement with Monte-Carlo results. 3) Core calculations 3 models for inner duct was used; inward model, outward model and homogeneous model. • keff difference between the inward and out ward model → 0.3%Δk; • ~20% effect on flux and power distributions. Therefore, we have to pay careful attention for the location of inner duct in fuel loading of JSFR

  15. The Welding Process of the Small In-pile Testing Fuel Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The small in-pile testing fuel assembly is designed for high performance fuel assembly study. It has two parts of which are four fuel element with double layer cladding and a detect system for measurement of testing pressure and temperature. The fuel element is composed of UO2 pellets, the stainless steel cladding and end caps. The detect system is direct contact with the fuel element by electron beam welding. In the fabrication of the assembly, some special welding technologies are

  16. Vibration Characteristics of a Plate Type Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, J.S.; Kim, H.J.; Tahk, Y.W.; Oh, J.Y.; Lee, B.H. [Nuclear Fuel Design for Research Reactor, KAERI, 305-353 Daeduck Daero 1045, Yuseong-Ku, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    A flat fuel plate and a box type fuel assembly for a research reactor were modeled to be finite element meshes of the ANSYS to predict dynamic characteristics, such as natural frequencies and mode shapes. These characteristics provide the basic information about their vibrations. If the model is properly prepared, it can be used for further calculations of the dynamic behaviors under the SSE or even in the static stress calculation. With the FE Model, the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of a fuel plate and a FA were obtained in air and in water environments. The effects of fluid surrounding the fuel plate and the FA as well as the combs on the natural vibration of the FA are discussed. (author)

  17. Neutron resonance transmission analysis of reactor spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method called Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) is under study which would use a pulsed neutron beam for nondestructive isotopic assay of a complete spent fuel assembly. Neutrons removed from the collimated beam by absorption or scattering in the resonances of the various isotopes in the spent fuel appear as dips in the neutron transmission. The method is completely insensitive to matrix materials such as oxide, fuel cladding, and other structural members. Measurements on spent fuel buttons using the NBS linac as a pulsed neutron source demonstrate a high accuracy capability for the isotopes 234235236238U, 239240241242Pu, 241Am, 243Am, and several fission products. The NRTA method offers high speed and modest operational cost, and it can be implemented with commercially available medical or radiographic γ-ray generators adapted for neutron production. (Auth.)

  18. Analysis of the sub-channel of SCWR two-row fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the COBRA-Ⅳ code, a new sub-channel code system developed for the supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) fuel assembly is analyzed. In order to optimize the SCWR fuel assembly design, a sub-channel analysis of two rows SCWR fuel assembly is performed, including steady-state and transient calculation. For the steady-state calculation, several channel's parameters are selected to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of the fuel assemblies. Based on the steady-state results, two transient calculations (change of fuel rod power and change of coolant flow) are carried out to estimate the dynamic behavior of the fuel assemblies. The results achieved so far indicate a good applicability of the sub-channel code for the SCWR fuel assembly analysis, which is good for the future optimization of SCWR fuel assembly design. (authors)

  19. The Technology Trend of Japanese Patent for the Nuclear Fuel Assembly Inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jeong, Kyung Min; Suh, Yong Chil; Kim, Chang Hoi; Shin, Jung Cheol

    2008-06-15

    Japanese technology patents for the nuclear fuel assembly inspection unit, from the year 1993 to the year 2006, were investigated. The fuel rods which contain fissile material are grouped together in a closely-spaced array within the fuel assembly. Various kinds of reactor including the PWR reactor are being operated in Japan. There are many kinds of nuclear fuel assemblies in Japan, and the shape and the size of these nuclear fuel assemblies are various also. As the structure of these various fuel assemblies is a regular square as the same as the Korean one, the inspection method described in Japanese technology patent can be applied to the inspection of the nuclear fuel assembly of the Korea. This report focuses on advances in VIT(visual inspection test) of nuclear fuel assembly using the state-of-the-art CCD camera system.

  20. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) For Fuel Assembly Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troy Unruh; Michael Reichenberger; Phillip Ugorowski

    2013-09-01

    Neutron sensors capable of real-time measurement of thermal flux, fast flux, and temperature in a single miniaturized probe are needed in irradiation tests required to demonstrate the performance of candidate new fuels, and cladding materials. In-core ceramic-based miniature neutron detectors or “Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors” (MPFDs) have been studied at Kansas State University (KSU). The first MPFD prototypes were tested in various neutron fields at the KSU TRIGA research reactor with successful results. Currently, a United States Department of Energy-sponsored joint KSU/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) effort is underway to develop a high-temperature, high-pressure version of the MPFD using radiation-resistant, high temperature materials, which would be capable of withstanding irradiation test conditions in high performance material and test reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, this more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, existing and advanced reactor designs, high performance MTRs, and transient test reactors has the potential to lead to higher accuracy and resolution data from irradiation testing, more detailed core flux measurements and enhanced fuel assembly processing. Prior evaluations by KSU indicate that these sensors could also be used to monitor burn-up of nuclear fuel. If integrated into nuclear fuel assemblies, MPFDs offer several advantages to current spent fuel management systems.

  1. Rapid fuel drawer scanner for fast critical assembly safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated scanning system incorporating highly efficient collimated neutron and high purity germanium gamma detectors with an on-line microprocessor has been developed to perform rapid inventorying of uranium and plutonium fuel drawers from fast critical assemblies. On-line least-squares fit procedures provide quantitative comparisons at a rate exceeding two drawers per minute. For plutonium-containing fuel, the neutron scan data can be related to the included 240Pu isotopic mass; individual 239Pu, 241Pu, and 241Am isotopic contents are obtained from simultaneous scans of the appropriate isolated gamma lines

  2. Device for transferring fast nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a device for transferring fuel assemblies between a storage position near the reactor vessel and a position where the irradiated assemblies are evacuated and the provision of new assemblies for the reactor. This device can be dismantled and is movable as a whole for its successive use on several reactors and includes: - a platform mounted so as to rotate on a support made to rest on the structure of the reactor, the platform having at least one opening then being horizontal and mobile about a vertical axis to bring the opening successively in position with vertical wells giving access to the storage and evacuation positions of the assemblies provided in the reactor structure, - at least one hopper that can contain one assembly in a vertical position, located on the upper surface of the platform around the opening provided in it and fitted with a winch for the vertical moving of the assemblies inside the wells and the hopper, when these follow each other by rotation of the platform, - at least one connecting device carried on the platform for connecting the hopper and wells when these are in line

  3. Design of an equilibrium nucleus of a BWR type reactor based in a Thorium-Uranium fuel; Diseno de un nucleo de equilibrio de un reactor tipo BWR basado en un combustible de Torio-Uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, J.L.; Nunez C, A. [Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Facultad de Ingenieria-UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In this work the design of the reactor nucleus of boiling water using fuel of thorium-uranium is presented. Starting from an integral concept based in a type cover-seed assemble is carried out the design of an equilibrium reload for the nucleus of a reactor like that of the Laguna Verde Central and its are analyzed some of the main design variables like the cycle length, the reload fraction, the burnt fuel, the vacuum distribution, the generation of lineal heat, the margin of shutdown, as well as a first estimation of the fuel cost. The results show that it is feasible to obtain an equilibrium reload, comparable to those that are carried out in the Laguna Verde reactors, with a good behavior of those analyzed variables. The cost of the equilibrium reload designed with the thorium-uranium fuel is approximately 2% high that the uranium reload producing the same energy. It is concluded that it is convenient to include burnable poisons, type gadolinium, in the fuel with the end of improving the reload design, the fuel costs and the margin of shutdown. (Author)

  4. Effect of 17 X 17 fuel assembly geometry on DNB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of tests was run in which the DNB heat flux was determined in axially uniform heated rod bundles of both 17 x 17 (.374'' rod) and 14 x 14 (.422'' rod) reactor fuel assembly geometry. The purposes of this test series were (1) to assess the DNB performance of .374'' fuel rod assembly design, (2) to verify the present design DNB methods for .374'' rod geometry and (3) to obtain a body of data which will later be used to develop a new correlation. The comparison of the uniform to previously reported non-uniform axial heat flux DNB test results using the .422'' rod geometry showed that use of the non-uniform heat flux F-factor used with existing correlations brings the two sets into agreement. 10 references

  5. Numerical benchmarks for MTR fuel assemblies with burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a preliminary version of a set of burn-up dependent numerical benchmarks of MTR fuel assemblies using burnable poisons. The numerical benchmark calculations were carried out using two different types of calculation methodologies: Monte Carlo methodology using MCNP-ORIGEN coupled codes and deterministic methodology using CONDOR collision probabilities code. The main purpose of this work is to provide a numerical benchmark for several geometries, for example number and diameter of the Cadmium wires. The numerical benchmark provides meat and Cadmium numerical density information and the geometry and material data of the calculated systems. These benchmarks provide information for the validation of MTR FA cell codes. This paper is the preliminary work of a 3 dimensional numerical benchmark for research reactors using MTR fuel assemblies with burnable poisons. A short description of the MCNP and ORIGEN coupling method and the CONDOR code are given in the present paper. (author)

  6. Russian fuel assemblies implementation experience at SUNPP-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper contains general information on switching SUNPP Unit 2 to usage of alternative design fuel assemblies. There are 3 Units in operation at SUNPP with total electrical capacity of 3000 MWt, and each of them has its own specific characteristics. The fuel of alternative design (TVS-A) manufactured by TVEL Corporation with gadolinium burnable absorber integrated into fuel elements has been operating at Unit 2 since 2005. Implementation of modified fuel is considered as design changes, and therefore it should be approved, and according to the Law of Ukraine 'On use of nuclear Energy and Radiation Safety' all necessary approval should undergo the State expertise on nuclear and radiation safety. Transient fuel cycles (containing both TVS and TVS-A) was performed by SUNPP's physicists (by means of KASKAD computer code) by use recommendations of RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' experts and was approved in according to the existing procedure. The paper also contains detailed information on the specific characteristics of the SUNPP Unit 2 reactor core, main stages in course of implementation of new fuel types, characteristics of 'mixed' fuel cycles, comparison of calculated and measured power distribution, comparison of calculated and experimental data (Authors)

  7. Process and device for fabricating nuclear fuel assembly grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for fabricating PWR fuel assembly grids consists to place the grid of which the constituent parts are held firmly in place within a frame into a sealed chamber full of inert gas. This chamber can rotate about an axis. The welding on one face at a time is carried out with a laser beam orthogonal to the axis orientation of the device. The laser source is outside of the chamber and the beam penetrates via a transparent view port

  8. Dynamics of nuclear fuel assemblies in vertical flow channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DYNMOD is a computer program designed to predict the dynamic behaviour of nuclear fuel assemblies in axial flow. The calculations performed by DYNMOD and the input data required by the program are described in this report. Examples of DYNMOD usage and a brief assessment of the accuracy of the dynamic model are also presented. It is intended that the report will be used as a reference manual by users of DYNMOD

  9. FIRST STEP blanket structure and fuel assembly design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FIRST STEP (Fusion, Inertial, Reduced Requirement Systems Test for Special Nuclear Material, Tritium, and Energy Production) is an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) plant designed to produce tritium, SNM, and energy using near-term technology. It is an integrated facility that will serve as a test bed for fusion power plant technology. The design of the blanket structure and blanket fuel assembly for wetted-wall FIRST STEP reactors is presented here

  10. A CFD Simulation Process for Fast Reactor Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt D. Hamman; Ray A. Berry

    2010-09-01

    A CFD modeling and simulation process for large-scale problems using an arbitrary fast reactor fuel assembly design was evaluated. Three-dimensional flow distributions of sodium for several fast reactor fuel assembly pin spacing configurations were simulated on high performance computers using commercial CFD software. This research focused on 19-pin fuel assembly “benchmark” geometry, similar in design to the Advanced Burner Test Reactor, where each pin is separated by helical wire-wrap spacers. Several two-equation turbulence models including the k–e and SST (Menter) k–? were evaluated. Considerable effort was taken to resolve the momentum boundary layer, so as to eliminate the need for wall functions and reduce computational uncertainty. High performance computers were required to generate the hybrid meshes needed to predict secondary flows created by the wire-wrap spacers; computational meshes ranging from 65 to 85 million elements were common. A general validation methodology was followed, including mesh refinement and comparison of numerical results with empirical correlations. Predictions for velocity, temperature, and pressure distribution are shown. The uncertainty of numerical models, importance of high fidelity experimental data, and the challenges associated with simulating and validating large production-type problems are presented.

  11. A CFD simulation process for fast reactor fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamman, Kurt D., E-mail: Kurt.Hamman@inl.go [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Berry, Ray A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    A CFD modeling and simulation process for large-scale problems using an arbitrary fast reactor fuel assembly design was evaluated. Three-dimensional flow distributions of sodium for several fast reactor fuel assembly pin spacing configurations were simulated on high performance computers using commercial CFD software. This research focused on 19-pin fuel assembly 'benchmark' geometry, similar in design to the Advanced Burner Test Reactor, where each pin is separated by helical wire-wrap spacers. Several two-equation turbulence models including the k-{epsilon} and SST (Menter) k-{omega} were evaluated. Considerable effort was taken to resolve the momentum boundary layer, so as to eliminate the need for wall functions and reduce computational uncertainty. High performance computers were required to generate the hybrid meshes needed to predict secondary flows created by the wire-wrap spacers; computational meshes ranging from 65 to 85 million elements were common. A general validation methodology was followed, including mesh refinement and comparison of numerical results with empirical correlations. Predictions for velocity, temperature, and pressure distribution are shown. The uncertainty of numerical models, importance of high fidelity experimental data, and the challenges associated with simulating and validating large production-type problems are presented.

  12. Fuel assembly simulations using LRGR-CFD and CGCFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the traditional fuel assembly simulation approaches using system codes, subchannel codes or porous medium approaches, as well as detailed CFD simulations to analyze single sub channels, a Low Resolution Geometry Resolving (LRGR) CFD approach and a Coarse-Grid-CFD (CGCFD) approach is taken. Both methods are based on a low resolution mesh that allows the capture of large and medium scale flow features such as recirculation zones, which cannot be reproduced by the system codes, subchannel codes and porous media approaches. The LRGR approach allows for instance fine-tuning the porous parameters which are important input for a porous medium approach. However, it should be noted that the prediction of detailed flow features such as secondary flows is not feasible. Using this approach, the consequences of flow blockages for detection possibilities and cladding temperatures can be discussed. Within the Coarse-Grid CFD approach a subgrid model (SGM) accounts for sub grid volumetric forces which are derived from validated CFD simulations. The volumetric forces take account of the non resolved physics due to the coarse mesh. The CGCFD approach with SGM can be applied to simulate complete fuel assemblies or even complete cores capturing the unique features of the complex flow induced by the fuel assembly geometry and its spacers. In such a case, grids with a very low grid resolution are employed. The current paper discusses and presents both, the CGCFD and the LRGR approaches. (author)

  13. The Dit nuclear fuel assembly physics design code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DIT is the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) nuclear fuel assembly design code. It belongs to a class of codes, all similar in structure and strategy, which may be characterized by the spectrum and spatial calculations being performed in 2D and in a single job step for the entire assembly. The forerunner of this class of codes is the U.K.A.E.A. WIMS code, the first version of which was completed 25 years ago. The structure and strategy of assembly spectrum codes have remained remarkably similar to the original concept thus proving its usefulness. As other organizations, including C-E, have developed their own versions of the concept, many important variations have been added which significantly influence the accuracy and performance of the resulting computational tool. This paper describes and discusses those features which are unique to the DIT code and which might be of interest to the community of fuel assembly physics design code users and developers

  14. The DIT nuclear fuel assembly physics design code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DIT code is the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) nuclear fuel assembly design code. It belongs to a class of codes, all similar in structure and strategy, that may be characterized by the spectrum and spatial calculations being performed in two dimensions and in a single job step for the entire assembly. The forerunner of this class of codes is the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority WIMS code, the first version of which was completed 25 yr ago. The structure and strategy of assembly spectrum codes have remained remarkably similar to the original concept thus proving its usefulness. As other organizations, including C-E, have developed their own versions of the concept, many important variations have been added that significantly influence the accuracy and performance of the resulting computational tool. Those features, which are unique to the DIT code and which might be of interest to the community of fuel assembly physics design code users and developers, are described and discussed

  15. Structural investigation of fuel rods basing on dynamic model of heat flow phenomena in fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural investigation of reactor materials are usually by calculations determining the working conditions of particulars elements of fuel assemblies or the hole reactor core. For this analysis the mathematical model of heat flow phenomena was proposed which enable the calculations of temperature field within the assembly. The differential equations for mass, energy and momentum of cooling medium conservation in coaxial and transversal flow direction enable the steady state and transient analysis for the cases of change in heat flow in cooling medium velocity and the pressure in the assembly. The introduced empire correlation which are completing the set of equations make possible the analysis for violent changes of cladding temperature of fuel elements for cooling medium in two-phase flow. The computer program basing on the presented model was prepared for the calculations of initial parameters necessary for beginning the cladding and fuel material structural investigations. (author)

  16. Debris-retaining trap for a fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly is described for a nuclear reactor including nuclear fuel rods, at least one grid supporting the fuel rods in an organized array, an end flowing through the end nozzle and into the fuel assembly, a trap for capturing and retaining debris carried by the flowing coolant to prevent entry of debris into the fuel assembly, the debris trap comprising: (a) a hollow enclosure disposed adjacent the end nozzle on an opposite side from the grid, the enclosure being composed of a material which is permeable to the liquid coolant but impermeable to debris carried by the coolant; (b) the hollow enclosure has upper and lower walls spaced apart and interconnected at their peripheries so as to extend across the direction of liquid coolant flow through the end nozzle and define a debris capturing the retaining chamber within the enclosure; (c) means on the hollow enclosure defining at least one opening into the chamber of the enclosure through the lower wall; (d) lower debris-retaining means located within the chamber of the hollow enclosure and surrounding the opening into the chamber, the lower debris-retaining means has a configuration which serves to retain debris carried by coolant into the chamber through the opening from exiting through the opening; and (e) upper flow-diffusing means is located within the chamber of the hollow enclosure and is spaced generally above and aligned with the lower debris-retaining means and the opening. The upper flow-diffusing means has a configuration which substantially uniformly distributes across the bottom nozzle the flow of coolant into the chamber through the opening

  17. Vibration characteristics of the KSNP fuel assembly with newly developed top and bottom end pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel assembly is exposed to various exciting sources such as fluid induced vibration, circulating pump, earthquake, and loss of coolant accident. To maintain its integrity under these vibratory circumstances, vibration characteristics of fuel assembly should be thoroughly understood, and should be well reflected into fuel assembly design. In this study, the fuel assembly for Korea Standard Nuclear Plants (KSNP) is modeled as a uniform beam with reactor end condition and, based on the model, the vibration characteristics of the fuel assemblies with not only conventional upper and lower end fittings but also newly developed ones are evaluated by using the frequency equation which was derived by Fourier Sine series. In the case of introducing newly developed upper and lower end fittings to the fuel assembly for KSNP, it is expected that natural frequency of the fuel assembly be lowered a little due to the boundary condition change, but the difference is negligible

  18. Optimized fuel assemblies for modern PWRs - design features and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliability, cost effectiveness, increased operational flexibility and easy handling are the focal aspects of the Siemens fuel assembly generation FOCUS. In the plants of the latest S MENS PWR generation, Konvoi, the 18x18 FOCUS fuel assemblies in particular have demonstrated consistently reliable performance. A modern fuel assembly design is characterized by its modular structure consisting of indispensable and optional technical features, adapted to the needs and wishes of the customers. FOCUS (Fuel assembly with Optimized Cladding and Upgraded Structure) stands for such a fuel assembly design, marking fuel assemblies equipped with an advanced cladding material and Zircaloy spacer grids in the active area featuring mixing vanes and a hang-up resistant envelope as the essential parts. Options exist for other fuel assembly components

  19. Inter fuel-assembly thermal-hydraulics for the ELSY square open reactor core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lead-cooled reactor is one of the six proposed innovative reactor types by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). In Europe, the lead-cooled reactor design is known as the European Lead-cooled System (ELSY), which is a 600 MWe medium size fast reactor. The reference design of the ELSY core foresees square open (wrapper-less) fuel-assemblies with a staggered arrangement. In this design, the fuel rods in a fuel-assembly are separated by 3.4 mm. The gap between fuel rods of neighboring fuel-assemblies is 5.5 mm. In other words, the reference gap size between fuel-assemblies is larger than the gap between fuel rods within a fuel-assembly. This article discusses the involved inter fuel-assembly thermal-hydraulics between neighboring fuel-assemblies in the ELSY core. For this purpose as a starting point a validated Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS)-based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach is adopted. Moreover, bare fuel rods are considered in the present analyses that serve as a step towards inclusion of a spacer grid when its design is fixed. As the next step, the fuel-assemblies are numerically arranged with different gap sizes of 2.1 mm and 3.4 mm in order to analyze the influence of gap size on the inter fuel-assembly thermal-hydraulics. As a final step, analyses on the influence of different power levels of neighboring fuel-assemblies in the ELSY core are presented based on the reference ELSY core design. These inter-fuel assembly thermal hydraulic analyses lead to a conservative Nusselt number correlation for calculating maximum surface temperature of bare fuel rods that are located in the gap region between neighboring fuel-assemblies having different power levels. Such correlations, when implemented, will improve the applicability of system codes.

  20. Development of an ultrasonic cleaning method for fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost all radiation buildup in light water reactors is the result of the deposition of activated corrosion and wear products in out-of-core areas. After operation, a significant quantity of corrosion and wear products is deposited on the fuel rods as crud. At refueling shutdowns, these activation products are available for removal. If they can be quickly and easily removed, buildup of radioactivity on out-of-core surfaces and individual exposure dose can be greatly reduced. After studying various physical cleaning methods (e.g., water jet and ultrasonic), the ultrasonic cleaning method was selected as the most effective for fuel assembly cleaning. The ultrasonic cleaning method is especially able to efficiently clean the fuel without removing the channel box. The removed crud in the channel box would be swept out to the filtration unit. Parameter survey tests were carried out to evaluate the optimum conditions for ultrasonic cleaning using a mock-up of a short section of fuel assembly with the channel box. The ultrasonic device used was a 600-W ultrasonic transducer operating at 26-kHz ultrasonic frequency

  1. Development of an ultrasonic cleaning method for fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heki, H.; Komura, S.; Kato, H.; Sakai, H. (Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki City (Japan)); Hattori, T. (Tokyo Electric Power Co., Kashiwazaki-shi (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    Almost all radiation buildup in light water reactors is the result of the deposition of activated corrosion and wear products in out-of-core areas. After operation, a significant quantity of corrosion and wear products is deposited on the fuel rods as crud. At refueling shutdowns, these activation products are available for removal. If they can be quickly and easily removed, buildup of radioactivity on out-of-core surfaces and individual exposure dose can be greatly reduced. After studying various physical cleaning methods (e.g., water jet and ultrasonic), the ultrasonic cleaning method was selected as the most effective for fuel assembly cleaning. The ultrasonic cleaning method is especially able to efficiently clean the fuel without removing the channel box. The removed crud in the channel box would be swept out to the filtration unit. Parameter survey tests were carried out to evaluate the optimum conditions for ultrasonic cleaning using a mock-up of a short section of fuel assembly with the channel box. The ultrasonic device used was a 600-W ultrasonic transducer operating at 26-kHz ultrasonic frequency.

  2. Tomographic techniques for safeguards measurements of nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist Saleh, Tobias

    2007-10-15

    Nuclear power is currently experiencing increased interest over the world. New nuclear reactors are being built and techniques for taking care of the nuclear waste are being developed. This development puts new demands and standards to safeguards, i.e. the international efforts for ensuring the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. New measuring techniques and devices are continuously being developed for enhancing the ability to detect diversion of fissile material. In this thesis, tomographic techniques for application in safeguards are presented. Tomographic techniques can non-destructively provide information of the inner parts of an object and may thus be used to control that no material is missing from a nuclear fuel assembly. When using the tomographic technique described in this thesis, the radiation field around a fuel assembly is first recorded. In a second step, the internal source distribution is mathematically reconstructed based on the recorded data. In this work, a procedure for tomographic safeguards measurements is suggested and the design of a tomographic measuring device is presented. Two reconstruction algorithms have been specially developed and evaluated for the application on nuclear fuel; one algorithm for image reconstruction and one for reconstructing conclusive data on the individual fuel rod level. The combined use of the two algorithms is suggested. The applicability for detecting individual removed or replaced rods has been demonstrated, based on experimental data

  3. Tomographic techniques for safeguards measurements of nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is currently experiencing increased interest over the world. New nuclear reactors are being built and techniques for taking care of the nuclear waste are being developed. This development puts new demands and standards to safeguards, i.e. the international efforts for ensuring the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. New measuring techniques and devices are continuously being developed for enhancing the ability to detect diversion of fissile material. In this thesis, tomographic techniques for application in safeguards are presented. Tomographic techniques can non-destructively provide information of the inner parts of an object and may thus be used to control that no material is missing from a nuclear fuel assembly. When using the tomographic technique described in this thesis, the radiation field around a fuel assembly is first recorded. In a second step, the internal source distribution is mathematically reconstructed based on the recorded data. In this work, a procedure for tomographic safeguards measurements is suggested and the design of a tomographic measuring device is presented. Two reconstruction algorithms have been specially developed and evaluated for the application on nuclear fuel; one algorithm for image reconstruction and one for reconstructing conclusive data on the individual fuel rod level. The combined use of the two algorithms is suggested. The applicability for detecting individual removed or replaced rods has been demonstrated, based on experimental data

  4. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis Of Thorium-Based Annular Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyu Hyun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Thermal hydraulic characteristics of thorium-based fuel assemblies loaded with annular seed pins have been analyzed using AMAP combined with MATRA, and compared with those of the existing thorium-based assemblies. MATRA and AMAP showed good agreements for the pressure drops at the internal sub-channels. The pressure drop generally increased in the cases of the assemblies loaded with annular seed pins due to the larger wetted perimeter, but an exception existed. In the inner sub-channels of the seed pins, mass fluxes were high due to the grid form losses in the outer sub-channels. About 43% of the heat generated from the seed pin flowed into the inner sub-channel and the rest into the outer sub-channel, which implies the inner to outer wall heat flux ratio was approximately 1.2. The maximum temperatures of the annular seed pins were slightly above 500 deg. C. The MDNBRs of the assemblies loaded with annular seed pins were higher than those of the existing assemblies. Due to the fact that inter-channel mixing cannot occur in the inner sub-channels, temperatures and enthalpies were higher in the inner sub-channels. (author)

  5. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis Of Thorium-Based Annular Fuel Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal hydraulic characteristics of thorium-based fuel assemblies loaded with annular seed pins have been analyzed using AMAP combined with MATRA, and compared with those of the existing thorium-based assemblies. MATRA and AMAP showed good agreements for the pressure drops at the internal sub-channels. The pressure drop generally increased in the cases of the assemblies loaded with annular seed pins due to the larger wetted perimeter, but an exception existed. In the inner sub-channels of the seed pins, mass fluxes were high due to the grid form losses in the outer sub-channels. About 43% of the heat generated from the seed pin flowed into the inner sub-channel and the rest into the outer sub-channel, which implies the inner to outer wall heat flux ratio was approximately 1.2. The maximum temperatures of the annular seed pins were slightly above 500 deg. C. The MDNBRs of the assemblies loaded with annular seed pins were higher than those of the existing assemblies. Due to the fact that inter-channel mixing cannot occur in the inner sub-channels, temperatures and enthalpies were higher in the inner sub-channels. (author)

  6. BWR Source Term Generation and Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This calculation is a revision of a previous calculation (Ref. 7.5) that bears the same title and has the document identifier BBAC00000-01717-0210-000061. The purpose of this revision is to remove TBV (to-be-verified) -41 10 associated with the output files of the previous version (Ref. 7.30). The purpose of this and the previous calculation is to generate source terms for a representative boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly for the first one million years after the SNF is discharged from the reactors. This calculation includes an examination of several ways to represent BWR assemblies and operating conditions in SAS2H in order to quantify the effects these representations may have on source terms. These source terms provide information characterizing the neutron and gamma spectra in particles per second, the decay heat in watts, and radionuclide inventories in curies. Source terms are generated for a range of burnups and enrichments (see Table 2) that are representative of the waste stream and stainless steel (SS) clad assemblies. During this revision, it was determined that the burnups used for the computer runs of the previous revision were actually about 1.7% less than the stated, or nominal, burnups. See Section 6.6 for a discussion of how to account for this effect before using any source terms from this calculation. The source term due to the activation of corrosion products deposited on the surfaces of the assembly from the coolant is also calculated. The results of this calculation support many areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR), which include thermal evaluation, radiation dose determination, radiological safety analyses, surface and subsurface facility designs, and total system performance assessment. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (Ref. 7.27, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the Quality

  7. Calculation of the linear heat generation rates which violate the thermomechanical limit of plastic deformation of the fuel cladding in function of the burn up of a BWR fuel rod type; Calculo de las razones de generacion de calor lineal que violen el limite termomecanico de deformacion plastica de la camisa en funcion del quemado de una barra combustible tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Hernandez L, H. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mal@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    The linear heat generation rates (LHGR) for a BWR type generic fuel rod, as function of the burnup that violate the thermomechanical limit of circumferential plastic deformation of the can (canning) in nominal operation in stationary state of the fuel rod are calculated. The evaluation of the LHGR in function of the burnt of the fuel, is carried out under the condition that the deformation values of the circumferential plastic deformation of the can exceeds in 0.1 the thermomechanical value operation limit of 1%. The results of the calculations are compared with the generation rates of linear operation heat in function of the burnt for this fuel rod type. The calculations are carried out with the FEMAXI-V and RODBURN codes. The results show that for exhibitions or burnt between 0 and 16,000 M Wd/tU a minimum margin of 160.8 W/cm exists among LHGR (439.6 W/cm) operation peak for the given fuel and maximum LHGR of the fuel (calculated) to reach 1.1% of circumferential plastic deformation of the can, for the peak factor of power of 1.40. For burnt of 20,000 MWd/tU and 60,000 MWd/tU exist a margin of 150.3 and 298.6 W/cm, respectively. (Author)

  8. Operation experience of WWER-440 fuel assemblies and measures to increase fuel reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents technical data for the fuel cycles used in 14 WWER-440 reactors of B-213 type situated outside CIS-territory on the basis of the 2001 operational results. The paper reflects the dynamics of average and maximum fuel burnup as well as information on the annual rate of the leaking fuel rods for the above reactor group identified during the 1997-2001 discharge period. As an example of work performed by RIAR in 2001 the paper brings forth the PIE-results of a leaking WWER-440 fuel assemblies (FAs). It is reported that the reason behind the leaking and failed fuel rods of the FA was interaction with a foreign object being in the coolant flow. The paper describes the measures taken by the NPPs together with the Supplier (JSC TVEL) and Manufacturer (JSC MSZ) to enhance the fuel operational safety. (author)

  9. Irradiation-induced dimensional changes of fuel compacts and graphite sleeves of OGL-1 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data are summarized on irradiation-induced dimensional changes of fuel compacts and graphite sleeves of the first to ninth OGL-1 fuel assemblies. The range of fast-neutron fluence is up to 4 x 1024 n/m2 (E > 0.18 MeV); and that of irradiation temperature is 900 - 1400 deg C for fuel compacts and 800 - 1050 deg C for graphite sleeves. The dimensional change of the fuel compacts was shrinkage under these test conditions, and the shrinkage fraction increased almost linearly with fast-neutron fluence. The shrinkage fraction of the fuel compacts was larger by 20 % in the axial direction than in the radial direction. Influence of the irradiation temperature on the dimensional-change behavior of the fuel compacts was not observed clearly; presumably the influence was hidden by scatter of the data because of low level of the fast-neutron fluence and the resultant small dimensional changes. (author)

  10. Changes to Irradiation Conditions of VVER-1000 Surveillance Specimens Resulting from Fuel Assemblies with Greater Fuel Height

    OpenAIRE

    Panferov Pavel; Kochkin Viacheslav; Erak Dmitry; Makhotin Denis; Reshetnikov Alexandr; Timofeev Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the work was to obtain experimental data on the influence of newtype fuel assemblies with higher fuel rods on the irradiation conditions of surveillance specimens installed on the baffe of VVER-1000. For this purpose, two surveillance sets with container assemblies of the same design irradiated in reactors with different fuel assemblies in the core were investigated. Measurements of neutron dosimeters from these sets and retrospective measurements of 54Mn activity accumulated in ea...

  11. Nuclear material attractiveness: an assessment of used-fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the material attractiveness of used-fuel assemblies in a hypothetical scenario in which terrorists steal one or more assemblies in order to use the special nuclear materials (SNM) within an assembly in a nuclear explosive device. For assessing material attractiveness, this paper uses the Figure of Merit (FOM) that was used in earlier studies to examine the attractiveness of the SNM associated with the reprocessing of used light water reactor (LWR) fuel by various reprocessing schemes. However, for a theft scenario the mass used in the Acquisition Factor of the FOM is the mass of the stolen object conta ining SNM ; whereas the mass used for analyzing the material attractiveness of the products of various reprocessing schemes in the earlier studies was a fraction of the bare critical mass in recognition that a successful proliferator must avoid a criticality accident. This paper will indicate how long after discharge the radiation emanating from a cooling assembly is no longer self-protecting. Additionally, this paper will give the time scale for the SNM within the assembly to become more attractive. These studies were performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and are based on the calculation of ''attractiveness levels'' that has been couched in terms chosen for consistency with those normally used for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and key findings will be presented. Additionally, this paper discusses how the results presented herein impact the application of safeguards and the securitization of SNM, and how they could be used to help inform policy makers.

  12. In-core sipping method for the identification of failed fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The failed fuel assembly identification system is an important safety system which ensures safe operations of reactor and immediate treatment of failed fuel rod cladding. The system uses an internationally recognized method to identify failed fuel assemblies in a reactor with fuel element cases. The in-core sipping method is customary used to identify failed fuel assemblies during refueling or after fuel rod cladding failure accidents. The test is usually performed after reactor shutdown by taking samples from each fuel element case while the cases are still in their original core positions. The sample activity is then measured to identify failed fuel assemblies. A failed fuel assembly identification system was designed for the NHR-200 based on the properties of the NHR-200 and national requirements. the design provides an internationally recognized level of safety to ensure the safety of NHR-200

  13. Control assembly for controlling a fuel cell system during shutdown and restart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Ramki; Berntsen, George; Carlson, Glenn L.; Farooque, Mohammad; Beachy, Dan; Peterhans, Stefan; Bischoff, Manfred

    2010-06-15

    A fuel cell system and method in which the fuel cell system receives and an input oxidant gas and an input fuel gas, and in which a fuel processing assembly is provided and is adapted to at least humidify the input fuel gas which is to be supplied to the anode of the fuel cell of the system whose cathode receives the oxidant input gas via an anode oxidizing assembly which is adapted to couple the output of the anode of the fuel cell to the inlet of the cathode of the fuel cell during normal operation, shutdown and restart of the fuel cell system, and in which a control assembly is further provided and is adapted to respond to shutdown of the fuel cell system during which input fuel gas and input oxidant gas cease to be received by the fuel cell system, the control assembly being further adapted to, when the fuel cell system is shut down: control the fuel cell system so as to enable a purging gas to be able to flow through the fuel processing assembly to remove humidified fuel gas from the processing assembly and to enable a purging gas to be able to flow through the anode of the fuel cell.

  14. Development of a computer program of fast calculation for the pre design of advanced nuclear fuel 10 x 10 for BWR type reactors; Desarrollo de un program de computo de calculo rapido para el prediseno de celdas de combustible nuclear avanzado 10 x 10 para reactores de agua en ebullicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mrpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) a methodology is developed to optimize the design of cells 10x10 of assemble fuels for reactors of water in boil or BWR. It was proposed a lineal calculation formula based on a coefficients matrix (of the change reason of the relative power due to changes in the enrichment of U-235) for estimate the relative powers by pin of a cell. With this it was developed the computer program of fast calculation named PreDiCeldas. The one which by means of a simple search algorithm allows to minimize the relative power peak maximum of cell or LPPF. This is achieved varying the distribution of U-235 inside the cell, maintaining in turn fixed its average enrichment. The accuracy in the estimation of the relative powers for pin is of the order from 1.9% when comparing it with results of the 'best estimate' HELIOS code. With the PreDiCeldas it was possible, at one minimum time of calculation, to re-design a reference cell diminishing the LPPF, to the beginning of the life, of 1.44 to a value of 1.31. With the cell design with low LPPF is sought to even design cycles but extensive that those reached at the moment in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central. (Author)

  15. Handling process of assemblies and fuel pins during the re-loading of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this invention is to propose a process of handling assemblies and fuel pins, when reloading a nuclear reactor enclosing assemblies comprising a skeleton closed at the two ends inside of which fuel pins are disposed in vertical position. The reloading is made with the reactor vessel opened, and comprises: the transfer of fuel assemblies from a position to another in the reactor, the replacements of defective or spent assemblies by new assemblies and different controls using the surrounding swimming pool. Every replaced assembly is taken from the reactor vessel, put in a transfer container and transported in horizontal position in the fuel swimming pool near the reactor, this process allows a better re-use of the fuel pins which have not been completely spent in the changed assemblies using the skeletons of this assemblies during unloading

  16. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  17. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array

  18. Fuel gases generation in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in a nuclear power plant with reactor type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During an accident design base of coolant loos, the hydrogen gas can accumulate inside the primary contention as a result of several generation mechanisms among those that are: 1) the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant, 2) the metals corrosion for the solutions used in the emergency cooling and dew of the contention, and 3) the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency. In this work the contribution of each generation mechanism to the hydrogen total in the primary contention is analyzed, considering typical inventories of zirconium, zinc, aluminum and fission products in balance cycle of a reactor type BWR. In the analysis the distribution model of fission products and hydrogen production proposed in the regulator guide 1.7, Rev. 2 of the US NRC was used. The results indicate that the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation at the end of a period of 24 hours of initiate the accident is the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency continued by the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding with the reactor coolant, and lastly the aluminum and zinc oxidation present in the primary contention. However, the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant is the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation in the first moments after the accident. This study constitutes the first part of the general analysis of the generation, transport and control of fuel gases in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in BWRs. (Author)

  19. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time

  20. Manufacture of a Dual-Cooled Fuel Assembly Mockup for Mechanical Characterization Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaeyong; Kim, Hyungkyu; Yoon, Kyungho; Lee, Kanghee; Kang, Heungseok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    All components were made of stainless steel 304 for research. A DUO fuel assembly mockup was assembled by mechanical fastening and laser welding methods with them. The conceptual feasibility of each component was checked through it. In this paper, manufactured items for a DUO fuel and a DUO fuel assembly are briefly described. Although the research of a DUO fuel has been done by USA, they have just focused on pellets, not mechanical parts such as TEP/BEP, GTs, and SGs. We designed and manufactured them and assembled a DUO fuel assembly. The realizable possibility of a DUO fuel assembly was checked. Mechanical characterization tests will be performed to measure the DUO fuel's mechanical properties such as bending rigidity, modal characteristics, impact durability, etc.