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Sample records for bwr coolant environment

  1. Coolant cleanup system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Araki, Hidefumi.

    1993-01-01

    The cleanup system of the present invention removes impurity ions and floating materials accumulated in a reactor during evaporation of coolants in the nuclear reactor. That is, coolants pass pipelines from a pressure vessel using pressure difference between a high pressure in the pressure vessel and a low pressure at the upstream of a condensate filtration/desalting device of a condensate/feed water system as a driving source, during which cations and floating materials are removed in a high temperature filtration/desalting device and coolants flow into the condensate/feedwater system. Impurities containing anions are removed here by the condensates filtration/desalting device. Then, they return to the pressure vessel while pressurized and heated by a condensate pump, a feed water pump and a feed water heater. At least pumps, a heat exchanger for heating, a filtration/desalting device for removing anions and pipelines connecting them used exclusively for the coolant cleanup system are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  2. Flow rate control systems for coolants for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase spontaneous recycling flow rate of coolants in BWR type reactors when the water level in the reactor decreases, by communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum. Constitution: An opening is provided to the back plate disposed at the lower end of a reactor core shroud for communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum, and an ON-OFF valve actuated by an operation rod is provided to the opening. When abnormal water level or pressure in the reactor is detected by a level metal or pressure meter, the operation rod is driven to open the ON-OFF valve, whereby coolants fed from a jet pump partially flows through the opening to increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants. This can increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants upon spontaneous recycling operation, thereby maintaining the reactor safety and the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. Primary coolant system of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Masanori; Aoki, Yasuko

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a water quality control system for preventing corrosion and for extending working life of structural materials of a BWR-type reactor. Namely, a sensor group 1 and a sensor group 2 are disposed at different positions such as in a feedwater system, a recycling system, main steam pipes, and a pressure vessel, respectively. Each sensor group can record and generate alarms independently. The sensor group 1 for usual monitoring is connected to a calculation device by way of a switch to confirm that the monitored values are within a proper range by the injection of a water quality moderating agent. The sensor group 2 is caused to stand alone or connected with the calculation device by way of a switch optionally. When abnormality should occur in the sensor group 1, the sensor group 2 determines the limit for the increase/decrease of controlling amount of the moderating agent at a portion where the conditions are changed to the most severe direction by using data base. The moderating agent is injected and controlled based on the controlling amount. The system of the present invention can optionally cope with a new sensor and determination for new water quality standards. Then the evaluation/control accuracy of the entire system can be improved while covering up the errors of each sensor. (I.S.)

  4. Time-dependent coolant velocity measurements in an operating BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbesmeyer, D.; Crowe, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method to measure time-dependent fluid velocities in BWR-bundle elements by noise analysis of the incore-neutron-detector signals is shown. Two application examples of the new method are given. The time behaviour of the fluid velocity in the bundle element during a scheduled power excursion of the plant. The change of power was performed by changing the coolant flow through the core The apparent change of the fluid velocity due to thermal elongation of the helix-drive of the TIP-system. A simplified mathematical model was derived for this elongation to use as a reference to check the validity of the new method. (author)

  5. Analysis of multi-dimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a BWR provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in co-current and countercurrent flow under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the Steam Sector Test Facility (SSTF) which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests and integral transients with vessel blowdown and refill were performed. The present of multi-dimensional and parallel channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  6. Analysis of multidimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in cocurrent and countercurrent flow under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the steam sector test facility (SSFT), which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests an integral transients with vessel vlowdown and refill were performed. The presence of multidimensional and parallel-channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  7. General Electric Company analytical model for loss-of-coolant analysis in accordance with 10CFR50 appendix K, amendment No. 3: effect of steam environment on BWR core spray distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    The core spray sparger designs of the BWR/2 through BWR/5 product lines were verified by means of full-scale mock-ups tested in air at various flow conditions. In 1974, an overseas technical partner of General Electric reported that a steam environment changed the individual core spray nozzle patterns when compared to patterns measured in air. This document describes preliminary findings of how a steam environment alters the core spray nozzle pattern, and the actions which General Electric is pursuing to quantify the steam effects

  8. Coolant make-up device for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a coolant make-up device, an opening of a pressure equalizing pipeline in a pressure vessel is disposed in coolants above a reactor core and below a usual fluctuation range of a reactor vessel water level. Further, a float check valve is disposed to the pressure equalizing pipeline for preventing coolants in the pressure vessel flowing into the pipeline. If the water level in the pressure vessel is lowered than the setting position for the float check valve, the float drops by its own weight to open the opening of the pressure equalizing pipeline. Then, steams in the pressure vessel are flown into the pipeline, to equalize the pressure between a coolant storage tank and the pressure vessel of the reactor. Coolants in the coolant storage tank is injected to the pressure vessel by way of the water injection pipeline due to the difference of the pressure head between the water level in the coolants storage tank and the water level in the pressure vessel. If the coolants are lowered than the setting position for the float check value, the float check valve does not close unless the water level is recovered to the setting position for the float valve and, accordingly, the coolant make-up is continued. (N.H.)

  9. The electrochemistry of IGSCC mitigation in BWR coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.

    2002-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the electrochemical mitigation of IGSCC in water-cooled reactor heat transport circuit structural materials. Electrochemical control and mitigation is possible, because of the existence of a critical potential for IGSCC and by the feasibility of modifying the environment to displace the corrosion potential (ECP) to a value that is more negative than the critical value. However, even in cases where the ECP cannot be displaced sufficiently in the negative direction to become more negative than the critical potential, considerable advantage is accrued, because of the roughly exponential dependence of crack growth rate on potential. The most important parameters in affecting electrochemical control over the ECP and crack growth rate are the kinetic parameters (exchange current densities and Tafel constants) for the redox reactions involving the principal radiolysis products of water (O 2 , H 2 , H 2 O 2 ), external solution composition (concentrations of O 2 , H 2 O 2 , and H 2 ), flow velocity, and the conductivity of the bulk environment. The kinetic parameters for the redox reactions essentially determine the charge transfer impedance of the steel surface, which is shown to be one of the key parameters in affecting the magnitude of the coupling current and hence the crack growth rate. The exchange current densities, in particular, are amenable to control by catalysis or inhibition, with the result that surface modification techniques are highly effective in controlling and mitigating IGSCC in reactor coolant circuit materials. (authors)

  10. The electrochemistry of IGSCC mitigation in BWR coolant circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, D.D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    A brief review is presented of the electrochemical mitigation of IGSCC in water-cooled reactor heat transport circuit structural materials. Electrochemical control and mitigation is possible, because of the existence of a critical potential for IGSCC and by the feasibility of modifying the environment to displace the corrosion potential (ECP) to a value that is more negative than the critical value. However, even in cases where the ECP cannot be displaced sufficiently in the negative direction to become more negative than the critical potential, considerable advantage is accrued, because of the roughly exponential dependence of crack growth rate on potential. The most important parameters in affecting electrochemical control over the ECP and crack growth rate are the kinetic parameters (exchange current densities and Tafel constants) for the redox reactions involving the principal radiolysis products of water (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), external solution composition (concentrations of O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}), flow velocity, and the conductivity of the bulk environment. The kinetic parameters for the redox reactions essentially determine the charge transfer impedance of the steel surface, which is shown to be one of the key parameters in affecting the magnitude of the coupling current and hence the crack growth rate. The exchange current densities, in particular, are amenable to control by catalysis or inhibition, with the result that surface modification techniques are highly effective in controlling and mitigating IGSCC in reactor coolant circuit materials. (authors)

  11. Fast measurements of the in-core coolant velocity in a BWR by neutron noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A method to determine in-core coolant velocities from neutron noise within short time intervals has been developed. The accuracy of the method was determined by using a simulation set-up and by using signals of a twin self-powered neutron detector installed in the core of the Dodewaard BWR in the Netherlands. In-core coolant velocities can be estimated within 2.5 s with a standard deviation (due to statistics) less than 2.1%. The method is suitable for velocity monitoring as is shown by the application to a stepwise velocity change of the coolant in a model of a coolant channel of a BWR. The presented technique was applied to determine the variations of the coolant velocity in the Dodewaard core during normal operation and during pressure steps. Only minor variations of the coolant velocity were detected during normal reactor conditions. An increase of those variations with pressure lowering - indicating a lower thermal hydraulic stability - could be detected. A clear velocity response to pressure steps could be determined which was also reflected in the cross-spectrum of the velocity with the vessel pressure and with the in-core neutron flux. (author)

  12. In-core failure of the instrumented BWR rod by locally induced high coolant temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    1985-12-01

    In the BWR type light water loop instrumented in HBWR, a current BWR type fuel rod pre-irradiated up to 5.6 MWd/kgU was power ramped to 50 kW/m. During the ramp, the diameter of the rod was expanded significantly at the bottom end. The behaviour was different from which caused by pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). In the post-irradiation examination, the rod was found to be failed. In this paper, the cause of the failure was studied and obtained the followings. (1) The significant expansion of the rod diameter was attributed to marked oxidation of cladding outer diameter, appeared in the direction of 0 0 -180 0 degree with a shape of nodular. (2) The cladding in the place was softened by high coolant temperature. Coolant pressure, 7MPa intruded the cladding into inside chamfer void at pellet interface. (3) At the place of the significant oxidation, an instrumented transformer was existed and the coolant flow area was very little. The reduction of the coolant flow was enhanced by the bending of the cladding which was caused in pre-irradiation stage. They are considered to be a principal cause of local closure of coolant flow and resultant high temperature in the place. (author)

  13. Filtering device for primary coolant circuits in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Yamamoto, Tetsuo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a filtering device with a large filtering area and requiring less space. Constitution: A condensate inlet for introducing condensates to be filtered of primary coolant circuits, a filtrate exit, a backwash water exit and a bent tube are disposed to a container, and a plurality of hollow thread membrane modules are suspended in the container. The condensates are caused to flow through the condensate inlet, filtered through the hollow thread membrane and then discharged from the filtrate exit. When the filtering treatment is proceeded to some extent, since solid contents captured in the hollow thread membranes are accumulated, a differential pressure is produced between the condensate inlet and the filtrate exit. When the differential pressure reaches a predetermined value, the backwash is conducted to discharge the liquid cleaning wastes through the backwash exit. The bent tube disposed to the container body is used for water and air draining. The hollow thread membranes are formed with porous resin such as of polyethylene. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Corrosion resistance improvement of ferritic steels through hydrogen additions to the BWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.; Jewett, C.W.; Pickett, A.E.; Indig, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Motivated by the success of oxygen suppression for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld sensitized austenitic materials used in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), oxygen suppression, through hydrogen additions to the feedwater was investigated to determine its affect on the corrosion resistance of ferritic and martensitic BWR structural materials. The results of these investigations are presented in this paper, where particular emphasis is placed on the corrosion performance of BWR pressure vessel low alloy steels, carbon steel piping materials and martensitic pump materials. It is important to note that the corrosion resistance of these materials in the BWR environment is excellent. Consequently this investigation was also motivated to determine whether there were any detrimental effects of hydrogen additions, as well as to identify any additional margin in ferritic/martensitic materials corrosion performance

  15. Fatigue management considering LWR coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Heung Bae; Jin, Tae eun

    2000-01-01

    Design fatigue curve for structural material in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments has been a concern ever since the early 1970's. And, recent fatigue test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue lives of carbon steels, low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. For these reasons, fatigue of major components has been identified as a technical issue remaining to be resolved for life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. In the present paper, results of recent investigations by many organizations are reviewed to provide technical justification to support the development of utility approach regarding the management of fatigue considering LWR coolant environments for the purpose of life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. (author)

  16. Generic aging management programs for license renewal of BWR reactor coolant systems components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  17. Generic Aging Management Programs for License Renewal of BWR Reactor Coolant System Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  18. Investigation of decreasing reactor coolant inventory as a mechanism to reduce power during a BWR ATWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, C.E.; Chexal, V.K.; Layman, W.; Hentzen, R.D.; Gose, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    A best-estimate analysis was performed to evaluate the technique of intentionally reducing reactor coolant inventory in order to reduce power during a BWR ATWS event. The ATWS was initiated by closure of the main steam isolation valves. The analysis was performed with the RETRAN-02 computer code utilizing the one-dimensional kinetics option. The one-dimensional cross sections were developed using the SIMULATE-E and SIMTRAN-E computer codes. The MSIV closure transient provides some of the more severe conditions following a postulated failure to scram. In this transient, the only mechanism for removing energy from the vessel is through the safety relief valve system which results in a heating up of the suppression pool fluid. Consequently, the reactor power must be reduced so that the suppression pool temperature limits are not exceeded. Under the proposed emergency procedure guidelines for the ATWS event, the reactor vessel water level will be lowered to reduce system power. This analysis evaluated the dynamic response of the system as the water level was lowered to the top of active fuel evaluation. Correlating the system power and flow patterns to water level was of particular interest in the analysis. Under natural circulating conditions, the system flows, core power, and pressure responses are extremely tightly coupled and the analysis results proved to be very sensitive to the modeling of downcomer, upper plenum, and core regions

  19. BWR fuel assembly bottom nozzle with one-way coolant flow valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor having a flow of coolant/moderator fluid therein, at least one fuel assembly installed in the fluid flow, the fuel assembly is described comprising in combination: a bundle of elongated fuel rods disposed in side-by-side relationship so as to form an array of spaced fuel rods; an outer tubular flow channel surrounding the fuel rods so as to direct the flow of coolant/moderator fluid along the fuel rods; bottom and top nozzles mounted at opposite ends of the flow channel and having an inlet and outlet respectively for allowing entry and exit of the flow of coolant/moderator fluid into and from the flow channel and along the fuel rods therein; and a coolant flow direction control device operatively disposed in the bottom nozzle so as to open the inlet thereof to the flow of coolant/moderator fluid in an inflow direction into the flow channel through the bottom nozzle inlet but close the inlet to the flow of coolant/moderator fluid from the flow channel through the bottom nozzle inlet upon reversal of coolant/moderator fluid flow from the inflow direction

  20. BWR core response to fluctuations in coolant flow and pressure, with implications on noise diagnosis and stability monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomstrand, J.H.; Andersson, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor dynamic tests, utilizing sinuosidal oscillations in pressure and recirculation flow, have been conducted in operating BWRs in Sweden and Finland. Test data recorded, as well as recordings of process noise, have been analyzed in terms of dynamic core properties. The results obtained show good qualitative agreement with model predictions of BWR core dynamics. Model studies can often support interpretation of dynamic information obtained from operating plants. Comparisons between model studies, dynamic tests and process noise may also provide improved understanding of test results and noise patterns; in this way it can be demonstrated that some neutron flux noise is caused by noise in coolant flow and steam flow. From reactor test data nd noise recordings, core stability parameters have been evaluated by a number of methods. These have been found to provide essentially the same results. The cores investigated were found to be very stable under normal operating conditions. In special operating points, outside the normal operating range, higher decay ratios may occur. The experience indicates that for BWR cores, operated at decay ratios above quarter damping, the stability parameters may be identified from the oscillatory behavior of the autocorrelation in the time domain of the neutron flux noise

  1. Fracture assessment of a main reactor coolant pump in a BWR with encountered defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B [Swedish Plant Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1988-12-31

    This document presents a case-study fracture assessment in BWR type reactor components. A cast stainless steel presenting defects due to thermal is studied. The stress analysis performed by aid of a finite element technique shows that a Leak Before Break situation could be expected. Nevertheless, it may be concluded that the cross section of the pump where the defect area was located can withstand very deep cracks before the risk of failure becomes unacceptable. (TEC).

  2. Simulations of ex-vessel fuel coolant interactions in a Nordic BWR using MC3D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W.

    2013-08-01

    Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) employ a drywell cavity flooding technique as a nuclear severe accident management strategy. In case of core melt accident where the reactor pressure vessel will fail and the melt will eject from the lower head and fall into a water pool, may be in the form of a continuous jet. It is assumed that the melt jet will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed into the water pool. The melt interaction with a water pool may cause an energetic steam explosion which creates a potential risk towards the integrity of containment, leading to fission products release into the atmosphere. The results of the APRI-7 project suggest that the significant damage to containment structures by steam explosion cannot be ruled according to the state-of-the-art knowledge about corresponding accident scenario. In the follow-up project APRI-8 (2012-2016) one of the goals of the KTH research is to resolve the steam explosion energetics (SEE) issue, developing a risk-oriented framework for quantifying conditional threats to containment integrity for a Nordic type BWR. The present study deals with the premixing and explosion phase calculations of a Nordic BWR dry cavity, using MC3D, a multiphase CFD code for fuel coolant interactions. The main goal of the study is the assessment of pressure buildup in the cavity and the impact loading on the side walls. The conditions for the calculations are used from the SERENA-II BWR case exercise. The other objective was to do the sensitivity analysis of the parameters in modeling of fuel coolant interactions, which can help to reduce uncertainty in assessment of steam explosion energetics. The results show that the amount of liquid melt droplets in the water (region of void<0.6) is maximum even before reaching the jet at the bottom. In the explosion phase, maximum pressure is attained at the bottom and the maximum impulse on the wall is at the bottom of the wall. The analysis is carried out using two different

  3. Simulations of ex-vessel fuel coolant interactions in a Nordic BWR using MC3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) employ a drywell cavity flooding technique as a nuclear severe accident management strategy. In case of core melt accident where the reactor pressure vessel will fail and the melt will eject from the lower head and fall into a water pool, may be in the form of a continuous jet. It is assumed that the melt jet will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed into the water pool. The melt interaction with a water pool may cause an energetic steam explosion which creates a potential risk towards the integrity of containment, leading to fission products release into the atmosphere. The results of the APRI-7 project suggest that the significant damage to containment structures by steam explosion cannot be ruled according to the state-of-the-art knowledge about corresponding accident scenario. In the follow-up project APRI-8 (2012-2016) one of the goals of the KTH research is to resolve the steam explosion energetics (SEE) issue, developing a risk-oriented framework for quantifying conditional threats to containment integrity for a Nordic type BWR. The present study deals with the premixing and explosion phase calculations of a Nordic BWR dry cavity, using MC3D, a multiphase CFD code for fuel coolant interactions. The main goal of the study is the assessment of pressure buildup in the cavity and the impact loading on the side walls. The conditions for the calculations are used from the SERENA-II BWR case exercise. The other objective was to do the sensitivity analysis of the parameters in modeling of fuel coolant interactions, which can help to reduce uncertainty in assessment of steam explosion energetics. The results show that the amount of liquid melt droplets in the water (region of void<0.6) is maximum even before reaching the jet at the bottom. In the explosion phase, maximum pressure is attained at the bottom and the maximum impulse on the wall is at the bottom of the wall. The analysis is carried out using two different

  4. Radionuclide buildup in BWR [boiling water reactor] reactor coolant recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Marley, A.W.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-12-01

    Since the spring of 1985, thermoluminescent dosimeter, dose rate, and gamma spectral data have been acquired on the contamination of boiling water reactor primary coolant recirculation systems as part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded study. Data have been gathered for twelve facilities by taking direct measurements and/or obtaining plant and vendor data. The project titled, ''Effectiveness and Safety Aspects of Selected Decontamination Processes'' (October 1983) initially reviewed the application of chemical decontamination processes on primary coolant recirculation system piping. Recontamination of the system following pipe replacement or chemical decontamination was studied as a second thrust of this program. During the course of this study, recontamination measurements were made at eight different commercial boiling water reactors. At four of the reactors the primary coolant recirculation system piping was chemically decontaminated. At the other four the piping was replaced. Vendor data were obtained from two boiling water reactors that had replaced the primary coolant recirculation system piping. Contamination measurements were made at two newly operating boiling water reactors. This report discusses the results of these measurements as they apply to contamination and recontamination of boiling water reactor recirculation piping. 16 refs., 29 figs., 9 tabs

  5. Thermalydraulic processes in the reactor coolant system of a BWR under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) incorporate many unique structural features that make their expected response under severe accident conditions very different from that predicted in the case of pressurized water reactor accident sequences. Automatic main steam isolation valve (MIV) closure as the vessel water level approaches the top of the core would cause reactor vessel isolation while automatic recirculation pump trip would limit the in-vessel flows to those characteristic of natural circulation (as disturbed by vessel relief valve actuation). This paper provides a discussion of the BWR control blade, channel box, core plate, control rod guide tube, and reactor vessel safety relief valve (SRV) configuration and the effects of these structural components upon thermal hydraulic processes within the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions. The dominant BWR severe accident sequences as determined by probabilistic risk assessment are described and the expected timing of events for the unmitigated short-term station blackout severe accident sequence at the Peach Bottom atomic power station is presented

  6. Comparisons of ROSA-III and FIST BWR loss of coolant accident simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Kanji; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Koizumi, Yasuo

    1985-10-01

    A common understanding and interpretation of BWR system response and the controlling phenomena in LOCA transients has been achieved through the evaluation and comparison of counterpart tests performed in the ROSA-III and FIST test facilities. These facilities, which are designed to simulate the thermal-hydraulic response of BWR systems, are operated respectively by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the General Electric Company. Comparison is made between three types of counterpart tests, each performed under similar tests conditions in the two facilities. They are large break, small break, and steamline break LOCA's. The system responses to these tests in each facility are quite similar. The sequence of events are similar, and the timing of these events are similar. Differences that do occur are due to minor differences in modeling objectives, facility scaling, and test conditions. Parallel channel flow interactions effects in the ROSA-III four channel (half length) core, although noticeable in the large break test, do not result in major differences with the single channel response in FIST. In the small break tests the timing of events is offset by the earlier ADS actuation in FIST. The steamline test responses are similar except there is no heatup in FIST, resulting from a different ECCS trip modeling. Overall comparisons between ROSA-III and FIST system responses in LOCA tests is very good. (author)

  7. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, Eugene E.; Shack, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC. The

  8. Definition of loss-of-coolant accident radiation source. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-02-01

    Meaningful qualification testing of nuclear reactor components requires a knowledge of the radiation fields expected in a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The overall objective of this program is to define the LOCA source terms and compare these with the output of various simulators employed for radiation qualification testing. The basis for comparison will be the energy deposition in a model reactor component. The results of the calculations are presented and some interpretation of the results given. The energy release rates and spectra were validated by comparison with other calculations using different codes since experimental data appropriate to these calculations do not exist.

  9. Simulation of a large break loss of coolant (LBLOCA), without actuation of the emergency injection systems (ECCS) for a BWR-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Lopez M, R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the analysis of scenario for the loss of coolant case was realized with break at the bottom of a recirculation loop of a BWR-5 with containment type Mark II and a thermal power of 2317 MWt considering that not have coolant injection. This in order to observe the speed of progression of the accident, the phenomenology of the scenario, the time to reach the limit pressure of containment venting and the amount of radionuclides released into the environment. This simulation was performed using the MELCOR code version 2.1. The scenario posits a break in one of the shear recirculation loops. The emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and the reactor core isolation cooling (Rcic) have not credit throughout the event, which allowed achieve greater severity on scenario. The venting of the primary containment was conducted via valve of 30 inches instead of the line of 24 inches of wet well, this in order to have a larger area of exhaust of fission products directly to the reactor building. The venting took place when the pressure in the primary containment reached the 4.5 kg/cm 2 and remained open for the rest of the scenario to maximize the amount released of radionuclides to the atmosphere. The safety relief valves were considered functional they do not present mechanical failure or limit their ability to release pressure due to the large number of performances in safety mode. The results of the analysis covers about 48 hours, time at which the accident evolution was observed; behavior of level, pressure in the vessel and the fuel temperature profile was analyzed. For progression of the scenario outside the vessel, the pressure and temperature of the primary containment, level and temperature of the suppression pool, the hydrogen accumulation in the container and the radionuclides mass released into the atmosphere were analyzed. (Author)

  10. IGSCC in cold worked austenitic stainless steel in BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B.; Lindblad, B.

    1989-09-01

    The survey shows that austenitic stainless steels in a cold worked condition can exhibit IGSCC in BWR environment. It is also found that IGSCC often is initiated as a transgranular crack. Local stresses and surface defects very often acts as starting points for IGSCC. IGSCC due to cold working requires a cold working magnitude of at leas 5%. During cold working a formation of mechanical martensite can take place. The transgranular corrosion occurs in the martensitic phase due to sensitation. The crack propagates integranularly due to anodic solvation of α'-martensite. Sensitation of the martensitic phase is fasten in BCC-structures than in a FCC-structures mainly due to faster diffusion of chromium and carbon which cause precipitation of chromium carbides. Experiments show that a carbon content as low as 0.008% is enough for the formation of 68% martensite and for sensitation. Hydrogen induced cracking is regarded as a mechanism which can accelerate IGSCC. Such cracking requires a hydrostatic stress near the crack tip. Since the oxide in the crack tip is relatively impermeable to hydrogen, cracks in the oxide layer are required for such embrittlement. Hydrogen induced embrittlement of the martensitic phase, at the crack tip, can cause crack propagation. Solution heat treated unstabilized stainless steels are regarded to have a good resistance to IGSCC if they have not undergone cold working. In general, though, Mo-alloyed steels have a better resistance to IGSCC in BWR environment. Regarding the causes for IGSCC, the present literature survey shows that many mechanisms are suggested. To provide a safer ground for the estimation of crack propagation rates, SA recommends SKI to finance a project with the aim to determine the crack propagation rate on proper material. (authors) (65 refs.)

  11. Modeling of SCC initiation and propagation mechanisms in BWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Hans, E-mail: Hans.Hoffmeister@hsu-hh.de [Institute for Failure Analysis and Failure Prevention ISSV e.V., c/o Helmut Schmidt University of the Federal Armed Forces, D-22039 Hamburg (Germany); Klein, Oliver [Institute for Failure Analysis and Failure Prevention ISSV e.V., c/o Helmut Schmidt University of the Federal Armed Forces, D-22039 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that SSC in BWR environments includes anodic crack propagation and hydrogen assisted cracking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen cracking is triggered by crack tip acidification following local impurity accumulations and subsequent phase precipitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We calculate effects of pH, chlorides, potentials and stress on crack SCC growth rates at 288 Degree-Sign C. - Abstract: During operation of mainly BWRs' (Boiling Water Reactors) excursions from recommended water chemistries may provide favorite conditions for stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Maximum levels for chloride and sulfate ion contents for avoiding local corrosion are therefore given in respective water specifications. In a previously published deterministic 288 Degree-Sign C - corrosion model for Nickel as a main alloying element of BWR components it was demonstrated that, as a theoretically worst case, bulk water chloride levels as low as 30 ppb provide local chloride ion accumulation, dissolution of passivating nickel oxide and precipitation of nickel chlorides followed by subsequent local acidification. In an extension of the above model to SCC the following work shows that, in a first step, local anodic path corrosion with subsequent oxide breakdown, chloride salt formation and acidification at 288 Degree-Sign C would establish local cathodic reduction of accumulated hydrogen ions inside the crack tip fluid. In a second step, local hydrogen reduction charges and increasing local crack tip strains from increasing crack lengths at given global stresses are time stepwise calculated and related to experimentally determined crack critical cathodic hydrogen charges and fracture strains taken from small scale SSRT tensile tests pieces. As a result, at local hydrogen equilibrium potentials higher than those of nickel in the crack tip solution, hydrogen ion reduction initiates hydrogen crack propagation that is enhanced with

  12. Optimal estimate of the coolant flow in the assemblies of a BWR of natural circulation in real time; Estimacion optima del flujo de refrigerante en los ensambles de un BWR de circulacion natural en tiempo real

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: julfi_jg@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The present work exposes the design and the implementation of an advanced controller that allows estimating the coolant flow in the fuel assemblies of a BWR reactor of natural circulation in real time. To be able to reduce the penalizations that are established in the calculations of the operation limits due to the magnitude of the uncertainties in the coolant flows of a natural circulation reactor, is the objective of this research. In this work the construction of the optimal controller that allows estimating the coolant flows in a fuel channels group of the reactor is shown, as well as the operation of this applied to a reduced order model that simulates the dynamics of a natural circulation reactor. The controller design required of an estimator of the valuation variables not directly of the plant and of the estimates use of the local distributions of the coolant flow. The controller construction of the estimator was based mathematically in the filter Kalman whose algorithm allows to be carried out an advanced control of the system. To prove the estimator operation was development a simplified model that reproduces the basic dynamics of the flowing coolant in the reactor, which works as observer of the system, this model is coupled by means of the estimator controller to a detail model of the plant. The results are presented by means of graphics of the interest variables and the estimate flow, and they are documented in the chart that is presented at the end of this article. (Author)

  13. Correlating activity incorporation with properties of oxide films formed on material samples exposed to BWR and PWR coolants in Finnish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Buddas, T.; Halin, M.; Kvarnstroem, R.; Tompuri, K. [Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Loviisa Power Plant, Loviisa (Finland); Helin, M.; Muttilainen, E.; Reinvall, A. [Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland)

    2002-07-01

    The extent of activity incorporation on primary circuit surfaces in nuclear power plants is connected to the chemical composition of the coolant, to the corrosion behaviour of the material surfaces and to the structure and properties of oxide films formed on circuit surfaces due to corrosion. Possible changes in operational conditions may induce changes in the structure of the oxide films and thus in the rate of activity incorporation. To predict these changes, experimental correlations between water chemistry, oxide films and activity incorporation, as well as mechanistic understanding of the related phenomena need to be established. In order to do this, flow-through cells with material samples and facilities for high-temperature water chemistry monitoring have been installed at Olkiluoto unit 1 (BWR) and Loviisa unit 1 (PWR) in spring 2000. The cells are being used for two major purposes: To observe the changes in the structure and activity levels of oxide films formed on material samples exposed to the primary coolant. Correlating these observations with the abundant chemical and radiochemical data on coolant composition, dose rates etc. collected routinely by the plant, as well as with high-temperature water chemistry monitoring data such as the corrosion potentials of relevant material samples, the redox potential and the high-temperature conductivity of the primary coolant. We describe in this paper the scope of the work, give examples of the observations made and summarize the results on oxide films that have been obtained during one full fuel cycle at both plants. (authors)

  14. Fuel gases generation in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in a nuclear power plant with reactor type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaices, M.; Salaices, E.; Ovando, R.; Esquivias, J.

    2011-11-01

    During an accident design base of coolant loos, the hydrogen gas can accumulate inside the primary contention as a result of several generation mechanisms among those that are: 1) the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant, 2) the metals corrosion for the solutions used in the emergency cooling and dew of the contention, and 3) the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency. In this work the contribution of each generation mechanism to the hydrogen total in the primary contention is analyzed, considering typical inventories of zirconium, zinc, aluminum and fission products in balance cycle of a reactor type BWR. In the analysis the distribution model of fission products and hydrogen production proposed in the regulator guide 1.7, Rev. 2 of the US NRC was used. The results indicate that the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation at the end of a period of 24 hours of initiate the accident is the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency continued by the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding with the reactor coolant, and lastly the aluminum and zinc oxidation present in the primary contention. However, the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant is the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation in the first moments after the accident. This study constitutes the first part of the general analysis of the generation, transport and control of fuel gases in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in BWRs. (Author)

  15. Technical report on material selection and processing guidelines for BWR [boiling water reactor] coolant pressure boundary piping: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazelton, W.S.; Koo, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    This report provides the technical bases for the NRC staff's revised recommended methods to control the intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of BWR piping. For piping that does not fully comply with the material selection, testing, and processing guideline combinations of this document, varying degrees of augmented inservice inspection are recommended. This revision also includes guidance and NRC staff recommendations (not requirements) regarding crack evaluation and weld overlay repair methods for long-term operation or for continuing interim operation of plants until a more permanent solution is implemented

  16. Effects of Cr and Nb contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type Ni-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in a simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune

    1995-01-01

    In order to discuss the effects of chromium and niobium contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type nickel-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR primary coolant environment, a series of creviced bent-beam (CBB) tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-purity water environment. Chromium, niobium, and titanium as alloying elements improved the resistivity to stress-corrosion cracking, whereas carbon enhanced the susceptibility to it. Alloy-chemistry-based correlations have been defined to predict the relative resistances of alloys to stress-corrosion cracking. A strong correlation was found, for several heats of alloys, between grain-boundary chromium depletion and the susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking

  17. Simulation of a large break loss of coolant (LBLOCA), without actuation of the emergency injection systems (ECCS) for a BWR-5; Simulacion de un escenario de perdida de refrigerante grande (LBLOCA), sin actuacion de los sistemas de inyeccion de emergencia (ECCS) para un reactor BWR-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Lopez M, R., E-mail: jaime.cardenas@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper the analysis of scenario for the loss of coolant case was realized with break at the bottom of a recirculation loop of a BWR-5 with containment type Mark II and a thermal power of 2317 MWt considering that not have coolant injection. This in order to observe the speed of progression of the accident, the phenomenology of the scenario, the time to reach the limit pressure of containment venting and the amount of radionuclides released into the environment. This simulation was performed using the MELCOR code version 2.1. The scenario posits a break in one of the shear recirculation loops. The emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and the reactor core isolation cooling (Rcic) have not credit throughout the event, which allowed achieve greater severity on scenario. The venting of the primary containment was conducted via valve of 30 inches instead of the line of 24 inches of wet well, this in order to have a larger area of exhaust of fission products directly to the reactor building. The venting took place when the pressure in the primary containment reached the 4.5 kg/cm{sup 2} and remained open for the rest of the scenario to maximize the amount released of radionuclides to the atmosphere. The safety relief valves were considered functional they do not present mechanical failure or limit their ability to release pressure due to the large number of performances in safety mode. The results of the analysis covers about 48 hours, time at which the accident evolution was observed; behavior of level, pressure in the vessel and the fuel temperature profile was analyzed. For progression of the scenario outside the vessel, the pressure and temperature of the primary containment, level and temperature of the suppression pool, the hydrogen accumulation in the container and the radionuclides mass released into the atmosphere were analyzed. (Author)

  18. Fracture toughness of irradiated wrought and cast austenitic stainless steels in BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Gruber, E.E.; Shack, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness of wrought and cast austenitic stainless steels (SSs) that were irradiated to a fluence of ∼ 1.5 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV) * (∼ 2.3 dpa) at 296-305 o C. To evaluate the possible effects of test environment and crack morphology on the fracture toughness of these steels, all tests were conducted in normal-water-chemistry boiling water reactor (BWR) environments at ∼ 289 o C. Companion tests were also conducted in air on the same material for comparison. The fracture toughness J-R curves for SS weld heat-affected-zone materials in BWR water were found to be comparable to those in air. However, the results of tests on sensitized Type 304 SS and thermally aged cast CF-8M steel suggested a possible effect of water environment. The available fracture toughness data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to assess the potential for radiation embrittlement of reactor-core internal components. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components are also discussed. (author)

  19. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented

  20. Investigation on the electrochemical properties and crack growth rates of stainless steels in BWR alkaline environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.H.; Hsu, T.Y.; Huang, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    Increasing pH of reactor water to mildly alkaline is considered as one of the mitigating water chemistry strategies to reduce the activity release of radioactive oxides and suppress the growth rate of stress corrosion cracking. However, only limited experimental data are currently available in the published literature, it is imperative to perform additional tests to verify the effectiveness of slightly alkaline reactor water. Because the electrochemical behavior and SCC are intricately related, this study will attempt to investigates the electrochemical properties and measures the crack growth rates (CGRs) of type 304 stainless steel (SS) in both normal water chemistry (200 ppb O 2 , neutral pH 25 ) and alkaline chemistry (200 ppb O 2 , pH 25 = 8.0). The additive for pH control is potassium hydroxide (KOH). The crack growth rate was monitored by reversing DC potential drop technique. The electrochemical measurements include AC impedance measurement and potential pulsing test to measure the repassivation behavior. The characteristics of electrochemical properties and its effect on stress corrosion crocking in BWR alkaline environments have been further examined. (author)

  1. Opening of through-wall cracks in BWR coolant lines due to the application of severe overloads II: a simple approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple theoretical analysis gives an estimate of the opening area associated with a through-wall crack in a pipe when this is subject to an imposed rotation at its ends. The crack-opening area is expressed in terms of the crack size, and the plastic rotation at the cracked cross-section, where plastic deformation is assumed to be confined. The results are relevant to the integrity of boiling water reactor coolant systems during accident conditions

  2. Effect of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel on deformation behavior and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility in BWR simulated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Kain, V.; Dey, G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) components in boiling water reactor (BWR has been a serious issue and is generic in nature. Initial cracking incidences were attributed to weld induced sensitisation and low temperature sensitisation which was mitigated by the use of low carbon grade of SS and molybdenum and nitrogen containing nuclear grade SS. However, IGSCC has occurred in these SS in the non-sensitised condition which was attributed to residual weld induced strain. Strain hardening in SS has been identified as a major cause for enhanced IGSCC susceptibility in BWR environment. Nitrogen in SS has a significant effect on the strain hardening characteristics and has potential to affect the IGSCC susceptibility in BWR environment. Type 304LN stainless steel is a candidate material for use in future reactors with long design life like the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR), in which the operating conditions are similar to BWR. This study reports the effect of nitrogen in type 304LN stainless steel on the strain hardening behaviour and deformation characteristics and its effect on the IGSCC susceptibility in BWR/AHWR environment. Two heats of type 304LN stainless steel were used containing different levels of nitrogen, 0.08 and 0.16 wt % (SS alloys A and B, respectively). Both the SS was strain hardened by cross rolling at 200℃ to simulate the strain hardened regions having higher IGSCC susceptibility in BWRs. Tensile testing was done at both room temperature and 288℃(temperature simulating operating BWR conditions) and the effect of nitrogen on the tensile properties were established. Tensile testing was done at strain rates similar to the crack tip strain rates associated with a growing IGSCC in SS. Detailed transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies were done to establish the effect of nitrogen on the deformation modes. Results indicated twinning was the major mode of deformation during cross rolling while

  3. Evaluation of the cracking by stress corrosion in nuclear reactor environments type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was studied in sensitized, solution annealed 304 steel, and in 304-L welded with a heat treatment that simulated the radiation induced segregation, by the slow strain rate test technique, in a similar environment of a boiling water reactor (BWR), 288 C, 8 MPa, low conductivity and a electrochemical corrosion potential near 200 mV. vs. standard hydrogen electrode (She). The electrochemical noise technique was used for the detection of the initiation and propagation of the cracking. The steels were characterized by metallographic studies with optical and scanning electronic microscopy and by the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation of single loop and double loop. In all the cases, the steels present delta ferrite. The slow strain rate tests showed that the 304 steel in the solution annealed condition is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), such as in a normalized condition showed granulated. In the sensitized condition the steel showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking, followed by a transition to TGSCC. The electrochemical noise time series showed that is possible associated different time sequences to different modes of cracking and that is possible detect sequentially cracking events, it is means, one after other, supported by the fractographic studies by scanning electron microscopy. The parameter that can distinguish between the different modes of cracking is the re passivation rate, obtained by the current decay rate -n- in the current transients. This is due that the re passivation rate is a function of the microstructure and the sensitization. Other statistic parameters like the localized index, Kurtosis, Skew, produce results that are related with mixed corrosion. (Author)

  4. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ryoichi; Sato, Takashi; Osaki, Masahiko; Hirayama, Fumio; Watabe, Atsushi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively eliminate radioactive substances released upon loss of coolant accidents in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A high pressure gas jetting device having a plurality of small aperture nozzles is provided above a spray nozzle, that is, at the top of a dry well. The jetting device is connected to a vacuum breaker provided in a pressure suppression chamber. Upon loss of coolant accident, coolants are sprayed from the spray nozzle and air or nitrogen is jetted from the gas jetting device as well. Then, the gases in the dry well are disturbed, whereby radioactive iodine at high concentration liable to be accumulated in the dry well is forced downwardly, dissolved in the spray water and eliminated. (Ikeda, J.)

  5. Effect of yield strength on stress corrosion crack propagation under PWR and BWR environments of hardened stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castano, M.L.; Garcia, M.S.; Diego, G. de; Gomez-Briceno, D. [CIEMAT, Nuclear Fission Department, Structural Materials Program, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Core components of light water reactor (LWR), mainly made of austenitic stainless steels (SS), subjected to stress and exposed to relatively high fast neutron flux may suffer a cracking process termed as Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Neutron radiation leads to critical modifications in material characteristics, which can modify their stress corrosion cracking (SCC) response. Current knowledge highlights three fundamental factors, induced by radiation, as primary contributors to IASCC of core materials: Radiation Induced Segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries, Radiation Hardening and Radiolysis. Most of the existing literature on IASCC is focussed on the influence of RIS, mainly chromium depletion, which can promote IASCC in oxidizing environments, such a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) under normal water chemistry. However, in non-oxidizing environments, such as primary water of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) or BWR hydrogen water chemistry, the role played by chromium depletion at grain boundary on IASCC behaviour of highly irradiated material is irrelevant. One important issue with limited study is the effect of radiation induced hardening. The role of hardening on IASCC is became stronger considered, especially for environments where other factors, like micro-chemistry, have no significant influence. To formulate the mechanism of IASCC, a well-established method is to isolate and quantify the effect of individual parameters. The use of unirradiated material and the simulation of the irradiation effects is a procedure used with success for evaluating the influence of irradiation effects. Radiation hardening can be simulated by mechanical deformation and, although some differences exist in the types of defects produced, it is believed that the study of the SCC behaviour of unirradiated materials with different hardening levels would contribute to the understanding of IASCC mechanism. In order to evaluate the influence of hardening on the

  6. Tritium in liquid phase in a BWR-5 like Laguna Verde; Tritio en fase liquida en un BWR-5 como Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Vargas A, A.; Cardenas J, J., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Veracruz-Medellin Km 7.5, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In boiling water reactors (BWR), the tritium (H{sub 3}) takes place mainly as a result of ternary fissions in the nuclear reactors, of those which 75% are in gaseous form and 25% in liquid form. In the liquid phase, the tritium is transported to the pipes of the primary coolant toward condensed tanks or tanks of drainage excesses of radioactive equipment, located in external areas of a BWR, as well as to the processes of radioactive wastes to be able to be directed to the liquid effluents. For that reason, is necessary to know the possible routes of the transport and processes of the tritium in a BWR to control this radioisotope in the site of the event of leaks in equipment s and buried pipes, avoiding that emigrates toward underground flowing and an impact to the environment and to the people in general. (Author)

  7. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fatigue design curves for structural materials do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Recent test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping materials in light water reactor (LWR) environments. Fatigue tests have been conducted on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steel in air and LWR environments to evaluate the effects of various material and loading variables, e.g., steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) in water, and strain range, on fatigue lives of these steels. The results confirm the significant decrease in fatigue life in water. The environmentally assisted decrease in fatigue life depends both on strain rate and DO content in water. A decrease in strain rate from 0.4 to 0.004%/s decreases fatigue life by a factor of ∼ 8. However, unlike carbon and low-alloy steels, environmental effects are more pronounced in low-DO than in high-DO water. At ∼ 0.004%/s strain rate, reduction in fatigue life in water containing <10 ppb D is greater by a factor of ∼ 2 than in water containing ≥ 200 ppb DO. Experimental results have been compared with estimates of fatigue life based on the statistical model. The formation and growth of fatigue cracks in austenitic stainless steels in air and LWR environments are discussed

  8. Reactor primary coolant system pipe rupture study. Progress report No. 33, January--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The pipe rupture study is designed to extend the understanding of failure-causing mechanisms and to provide improved capability for evaluating reactor piping systems to minimize the probability of failures. Following a detailed review to determine the effort most needed to improve nuclear system piping (Phase 1), analytical and experimental efforts (Phase 2) were started in 1965. This progress report summarizes the recent accomplishments of a broad program in (a) basic fatigue crack growth rate studies focused on LWR primary piping materials in a simulated BWR primary coolant environment, (b) at-reactor tests of the effect of primary coolant environment on the fatigue behavior of piping steels, (c) studies directed at quantifying weld sensitization in Type 304 stainless steel, (d) support studies to characterize the electrochemical potential behavior of a typical BWR primary water environment and (e) special tests related to simulation of fracture surfaces characteristic of IGSCC field failures

  9. Tritium in liquid phase in a BWR-5 like Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijerina S, F.; Vargas A, A.; Cardenas J, J.

    2011-11-01

    In boiling water reactors (BWR), the tritium (H 3 ) takes place mainly as a result of ternary fissions in the nuclear reactors, of those which 75% are in gaseous form and 25% in liquid form. In the liquid phase, the tritium is transported to the pipes of the primary coolant toward condensed tanks or tanks of drainage excesses of radioactive equipment, located in external areas of a BWR, as well as to the processes of radioactive wastes to be able to be directed to the liquid effluents. For that reason, is necessary to know the possible routes of the transport and processes of the tritium in a BWR to control this radioisotope in the site of the event of leaks in equipment s and buried pipes, avoiding that emigrates toward underground flowing and an impact to the environment and to the people in general. (Author)

  10. The corrosion potential of stainless steel in BWR environment comparison of data and modeling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molander, Anders; Ullberg, Mats

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion potential measurements have been performed in Swedish BWRs during 25 years using commercially available monitoring equipment. Today, such measurements are performed on a routine basis in the BWRs on hydrogen water chemistry in Sweden. Measurements are usually performed at several monitoring locations in the plants. During the years, variations in the corrosion potential between different reactor cycles have been observed. Also, the corrosion potential can vary significantly during the reactor year. The changes have not always been easy to explain. Examples of in-plant data are given, demonstrating the need for a better understanding and for improved modeling tools. These examples were used as starting points for developing improved methods for corrosion potential modeling. A new tool recently developed, The Virtual ECP Laboratory, is described and applications to BWR conditions including some unexpected experimental corrosion potential responses are given. (author)

  11. Corrosion fatigue studies on F82H mod. martensitic steel in reducing water coolant environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maday, M F; Masci, A [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia

    1998-03-01

    Load-controlled low cycle fatigue tests have been carried out on F82H martensitic steel in 240degC oxygen-free water with and without dissolved hydrogen, in order to simulate realistic coolant boundary conditions to be approached in DEMO. It was found that water independently of its hydrogen content, determined the same fatigue life reduction compared to the base-line air results. Water cracks exhibited in their first propagation stages similar fracture morphologies which were completely missing on the air cracks, and were attributed to the action of an environment related component. Lowering frequency gave rise to an increase in F82H fatigue lifetimes without any change in cracking mode in air, and to fatigue life reduction by microvoid coalescence alone in water. The data were discussed in terms of (i) frequency dependent concurrent processes for crack initiation and (ii) frequency-dependent competitive mechanisms for crack propagation induced by cathodic hydrogen from F82H corrosion. (author)

  12. The development of robotic system for inspecting and repairing NPP primary coolant system of high-level radioactive environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Ki Ho; Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Suk Yeoung; Kim, Chang Hoi; Seo, Yong Chil; Lee, Young Kwang; Lee, Yong Bum; Cho, Jai Wan; Lee, Jae Kyung; Lee, Yong Deok

    1997-07-01

    This project aims at developing a robotic system to automatically handle inspection and maintenance of NPP safety-related facilities in high-level radioactive environment. This robotic system under development comprises two robots depending on application fields - a mobile robot and multi-functional robot. The mobile robot is designed to be used in the area of primary coolant system during the operation of NPP. This robot enables to overcome obstacles and perform specified tasks in unstructured environment. The multi-functional robot is designed for performing inspection and maintenance tasks of steam generator and nuclear reactor vessel during the overhaul periods of NPP. Nuclear facilities can be inspected and repaired all the time by use of both the mobile robot and the multi-functional robot. Human operator, by teleoperation, monitors the movements of such robots located at remote task environment via video cameras and controls those remotely generating desired commands via master manipulator. We summarize the technology relating to the application of the mobile robot to primary coolant system environment, the applicability of the mobile robot through 3D graphic simulation, the design of the mobile robot, the design of its radiation-hardened controller. We also describe the mechanical design, modeling, and control system of the multi-functional robot. Finally, we present the design of the force-reflecting master and the modeling of virtual task environment for a training simulator. (author). 47 refs., 16 tabs., 43 figs.

  13. The development of robotic system for inspecting and repairing NPP primary coolant system of high-level radioactive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Ki Ho; Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Suk Yeoung; Kim, Chang Hoi; Seo, Yong Chil; Lee, Young Kwang; Lee, Yong Bum; Cho, Jai Wan; Lee, Jae Kyung; Lee, Yong Deok.

    1997-07-01

    This project aims at developing a robotic system to automatically handle inspection and maintenance of NPP safety-related facilities in high-level radioactive environment. This robotic system under development comprises two robots depending on application fields - a mobile robot and multi-functional robot. The mobile robot is designed to be used in the area of primary coolant system during the operation of NPP. This robot enables to overcome obstacles and perform specified tasks in unstructured environment. The multi-functional robot is designed for performing inspection and maintenance tasks of steam generator and nuclear reactor vessel during the overhaul periods of NPP. Nuclear facilities can be inspected and repaired all the time by use of both the mobile robot and the multi-functional robot. Human operator, by teleoperation, monitors the movements of such robots located at remote task environment via video cameras and controls those remotely generating desired commands via master manipulator. We summarize the technology relating to the application of the mobile robot to primary coolant system environment, the applicability of the mobile robot through 3D graphic simulation, the design of the mobile robot, the design of its radiation-hardened controller. We also describe the mechanical design, modeling, and control system of the multi-functional robot. Finally, we present the design of the force-reflecting master and the modeling of virtual task environment for a training simulator. (author). 47 refs., 16 tabs., 43 figs

  14. BWR zinc addition Sourcebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Alfred J.

    2014-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have been injecting zinc into the primary coolant via the reactor feedwater system for over 25 years for the purpose of controlling primary system radiation fields. The BWR zinc injection process has evolved since the initial application at the Hope Creek Nuclear Station in 1986. Key transitions were from the original natural zinc oxide (NZO) to depleted zinc oxide (DZO), and from active zinc injection of a powdered zinc oxide slurry (pumped systems) to passive injection systems (zinc pellet beds). Zinc addition has continued through various chemistry regimes changes, from normal water chemistry (NWC) to hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC with noble metals (NobleChem™) for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of reactor internals and primary system piping. While past reports published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) document specific industry experience related to these topics, the Zinc Sourcebook was prepared to consolidate all of the experience gained over the past 25 years. The Zinc Sourcebook will benefit experienced BWR Chemistry, Operations, Radiation Protection and Engineering personnel as well as new people entering the nuclear power industry. While all North American BWRs implement feedwater zinc injection, a number of other BWRs do not inject zinc. This Sourcebook will also be a valuable resource to plants considering the benefits of zinc addition process implementation, and to gain insights on industry experience related to zinc process control and best practices. This paper presents some of the highlights from the Sourcebook. (author)

  15. Coolant clean-up system in the primary coolant circuit for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Michio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the quality of coolants at a prescribed level by distillating coolants in the primary coolant circuit for a BWR type reactor to remove impurities therefrom, taking out the condensates from the top of the distillation column and extracting impurities in a concentrated state from the bottom. Constitution: Coolant water for cooling the core is recycled by a recycling pump by way of a recycling pipeway in a reactor. The coolants extracted from an extraction pipeway connected to the recycling pipeway are fed into a distillation column, where distillation is taken place. Impurities in the coolants, that is, in-core corrosion products, fission products generated in the reactor core, etc. are separated by the distillation, concentrated and solidified in the bottom of the distillation column. While on the other hand, condensates removed with the impurities, that is, coolants cleaned-up are recycled to the coolant water for cooling the reactor core. (Moriyama, K.)

  16. Correlations between the electrochemical behaviour and surface film composition of TZM alloy exposed to divertor water coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maday, M.-F.; Giorgi, R.; Dikonimos-Makris, T.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been carried out on TZM alloy surfaces after short and long immersion tests in high temperature (250 C) aqueous environments simulating possible fusion reactor coolant conditions during operation. Phase identification by XPS was used in connection with the open circuit potential trends to suggest plausible hypotheses about TZM corrosion behaviour in the various chemical environments considered in this study. It was proposed that exposure of TZM to oxidizing water conditions produced poorly protective layers, which consist essentially of low (IV) and intermediate (V) valency Mo oxides/hydroxides. Conversely the results obtained in deaerated and reducing water conditions suggested that barrier films could develop in these environments: the phases exhibit a bilayered structure and consisted of an inner tetravalent Mo oxide/hydroxide and an outer hexavalent Mo oxide. The protective properties of such layers were attributed to the hexavalent Mo species. (orig.)

  17. Robotics in the nuclear environment-inspection and repairs inside the primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.; Marcel Tortolano

    2005-01-01

    The increase in the lifetime of the power plants and the ageing of materials require the intervention inside the components to carry out controls and possibly repairs in the event of discovered defects. Within this framework, EDF is investigating the feasibility of robotized repairs of the components and pipes of the main primary coolant system of a nuclear power plant. For several years, EDF R and D has engaged projects whose subject of study is the possibility of repairing components such as the main vessel; the pressurizer or the primary coolant pipes with the help of robots and dedicated tools. INTERVENTIONS INSIDE PRIMARY COOLANT PIPES: Studies undertaken by EDF highlighted that certain zones, particularly in pipe connections, can be affected by thermal fatigue which causes crackling defects or crackings. In anticipation of this phenomenon which would affect primary pipes and to avoid their replacements, EDF R and D has been studying the feasibility of examining and repairing these zones using robots. Robotized repair consists in introducing into the pipe while passing by the vessel, a 6 degrees of freedom manipulator mounted on a mobile carrier. This robot implements and carries out the trajectories of the different processes of repair: - Precise localization of the defects, - Elimination (possibly sampling) of the defects by machining, - Control that the defects were eliminated, - Weld metal buildup if the repair cavity is too deep, - Grinding followed by a new control of the surface. These studies and tests were conducted in the laboratory of EDF R and D in Chatou. The sequence of operations included machining by grinding and milling, profilometric control, dye penetrant testing, TIG welding and ultrasonic examinations. The results of the tests, executed on full scale models of components, are satisfactory and show the advantages of robotics compared with classical methods. ROBOTIZED INTERVENTIONS IN THE REACTOR VESSEL: Another difficult issue is the

  18. Characterization of oxide films formed on steels in a BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takashi; Ohashi, Kenya; Kashimura, Eiji; Furutani, Yasumasa

    1988-01-01

    Environmental effects on corrosion bahaviors and properties of oxide films were evaluated for austenitic stainless and carbon steels in high-temperature water simulating a Boiling Water Reactor condition. The existence ratios of Cr and OH - in oxide films formed on stainless steel decreased and those of Fe, Ni and O 2- increased with increases of temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration. Changes of pH in the test region did not affect the composition of these species. These results indicated that Cr tended to combine with OH - , i.e., Cr existed as hydroxides or oxyhydroxides. Further, Fe and Ni tended to form spinel type oxides, which were indentified by XRD. In addition, the corrosion resistance of stainless steel was higher than that of carbon steel in all environments. The protectivity of magnetite films on carbon steel increased with temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration and pH. However, Ni ferrite, formed on stainless steel, further improved the corrosion resistance under such conditions. On the other hand, as the solubility of magnetite increased with decreases in the above mentioned factors, the corrosion resistance of carbon steel decreased. But, even under such conditions Cr, contained in stainless steel, tended to form stable films and suppressed corrosion. (author)

  19. Corrosion of pre-oxidized nickel alloy X-750 in simulated BWR environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzi, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.tuzi@chalmers.se [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Lai, Haiping [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Göransson, Kenneth [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, SE-721 63 Västerås (Sweden); Thuvander, Mattias; Stiller, Krystyna [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Samples of pre-oxidized Alloy X-750 were exposed to a simulated boiling water reactor environment in an autoclave at a temperature of 286 °C and a pressure of 80 bar for four weeks. The effect of alloy iron content on corrosion was investigated by comparing samples with 5 and 8 wt% Fe, respectively. In addition, the effect of two different surface pre-treatments was investigated. The microstructure of the formed oxide scales was studied using mainly electron microscopy. The results showed positive effects of an increased Fe content and of removing the deformed surface layer by pickling. After four weeks of exposure the oxide scale consists of oxides formed in three different ways. The oxide formed during pre-oxidization at 700 °C, mainly consisting of chromia, is partly still present. There is also an outer oxide consisting of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals, reaching a maximum size of 3 μm, which has formed by precipitation of dissolved metal ions. Finally, there is an inner nanocrystalline and porous oxide, with a metallic content reflecting the alloy composition, which has formed by corrosion.

  20. Impact on radioecological conditions in the environment of a BWR power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, I.S.; Hegde, A.G.; Kamath, P.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Survey Laboratory at Tarapur has monitored environment of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) right from the preoperational period in 1965 and then during the operational phase. Impact of release of radioactive effluents - liquid wastes to the sea and gaseous wastes through stack - of the TAPS on environmental radioactivity levels is described. 60 Co is absent from the TAPS colony air particulate sample, but is found to the extent of 5x10 -3 pCi/M 3 in samples at site since 1972. 131 I is found in the range of 1 to 5 pCi/g in the goat thyroids in the downwind area from 1971. Cumulative radiation dose in population centres as measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters has not shown any detectable increase, except the two villages in direction of prevailing wind 2 km away from TAPS. The cumulative dose in these two villages showed an increase of 5 to 10 mr/year from 1971. No detectable increase in radioactivity is found in vegetation close to the TAPS. Offshore seawaters beyond 5 km have not shown any signjficant concentrations of radionuclides, but the near shore waters along the coast showed increased activity of radioiodine and radiocesium. The silt has shown an increased 60 Co activity. The near shore sea food o organisms have shown the pick-up and build-up of sup(131)I, sup(134,137)Cs and sup(60)Co. Internal dose to the populations in the vicinity is above the natural preoperational background but within the recommended limits. The waste treatment processes at TAPS were augmented in 1973-74 by addition of storage tanks for: (1) the decay of short-lived nuclides and (2) removal of radiocobalt and radiocesium by flocculation vermiculite column absorption process. With this augmentation, levels of radioactivity ir sea water, silt and seafood have shown a declining trend. (M.G.B.)

  1. IGSCC crack propagation rate measurement in BWR environments. Executive summary of a Round Robin study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    that a complete transition is made from the transgranular fatigue pre-crack to an intergranular stress corrosion crack. Retarded or completely stalled crack growth was best addressed by imposing very gentle unloading cycles to re-initiate and sustain crack growth. While comparatively little of the total testing time successfully produced meaningful crack growth rates, the data exhibit the expected high crack growth rates in high dissolved oxygen environments. This is an important conclusion, as U.S. industry efforts have shown that a remarkably different growth rate is predicted based on statistical analyses of a broader collection of scattered crack growth rate data in sensitized type 304 stainless steel. The scatter in the data clearly dilutes all trends in SCC response, as the correlation, e.g., with corrosion potential (all other effects normalized in the correlation model) is quite weak - in addition to the dependence on crack growth being shallow. The origin of the weak correlation, shallow dependence, and poor agreement with other sets of well-controlled data is a myriad of experimental and interpretational complexities and flaws, so that the mean of such data is the mean of the flaws, not the mean of the true SCC response. In focusing on a single stress intensity and high dissolved oxygen / corrosion potential conditions, this program obviously does not address the broad range of important stress corrosion cracking dependencies on stress intensity, corrosion potential, aqueous impurities, temperature, degree of sensitization, irradiation, material type, etc. However, it invaluably elucidates the complexities involved in generating and interpreting stress corrosion cracking data. It also underscores the crucial overall role of developing a fundamental understanding of SCC and a recognition of the common elements or 'linkages' among SCC susceptible materials. These are necessary because of the sophistication required to generate high quality SCC data, and the

  2. IGSCC crack propagation rate measurement in BWR environments. Executive summary of a Round Robin study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, Peter L. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-12-31

    that a complete transition is made from the transgranular fatigue pre-crack to an intergranular stress corrosion crack. Retarded or completely stalled crack growth was best addressed by imposing very gentle unloading cycles to re-initiate and sustain crack growth. While comparatively little of the total testing time successfully produced meaningful crack growth rates, the data exhibit the expected high crack growth rates in high dissolved oxygen environments. This is an important conclusion, as U.S. industry efforts have shown that a remarkably different growth rate is predicted based on statistical analyses of a broader collection of scattered crack growth rate data in sensitized type 304 stainless steel. The scatter in the data clearly dilutes all trends in SCC response, as the correlation, e.g., with corrosion potential (all other effects normalized in the correlation model) is quite weak - in addition to the dependence on crack growth being shallow. The origin of the weak correlation, shallow dependence, and poor agreement with other sets of well-controlled data is a myriad of experimental and interpretational complexities and flaws, so that the mean of such data is the mean of the flaws, not the mean of the true SCC response. In focusing on a single stress intensity and high dissolved oxygen / corrosion potential conditions, this program obviously does not address the broad range of important stress corrosion cracking dependencies on stress intensity, corrosion potential, aqueous impurities, temperature, degree of sensitization, irradiation, material type, etc. However, it invaluably elucidates the complexities involved in generating and interpreting stress corrosion cracking data. It also underscores the crucial overall role of developing a fundamental understanding of SCC and a recognition of the common elements or `linkages` among SCC susceptible materials. These are necessary because of the sophistication required to generate high quality SCC data, and the

  3. Kohonen mapping of the crack growth under fatigue loading conditions of stainless steels in BWR environments and of nickel alloys in PWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna

    2008-01-01

    In this study, crack growth rate data under fatigue loading conditions generated by Argonne National Laboratories and published in 2006 were analyzed [O.K. Chopra, B. Alexandreanu, E.E. Gruber, R.S. Daum, W.J. Shack, Argonne National Laboratory, NUREG CR 6891-series ANL 04/20, Crack Growth Rates of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Heat Affected Zone in BWR Environments, January, 2006; B. Alexandreanu, O.K. Chopra, H.M. Chung, E.E. Gruber, W.K. Soppet, R.W. Strain, W.J. Shack, Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, vol. 34 in the NUREG/CR-4667 series annual report of Argonne National Laboratory program studies for Calendar (Annual Report 2003). Manuscript Completed: May 2005, Date Published: May 2006], and reported by DoE [B. Alexandreanu, O.K. Chopra, W.J. Shack, S. Crane, H.J. Gonzalez, NRC, Crack Growth Rates and Metallographic Examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from Field Components and Laboratory Materials Tested in PWR Environments, NUREG/CR-6964, May 2008]. The data collected were measured on austenitic stainless steels in BWR (boiling water reactor) environments and on nickel alloys in PWR (pressurized water reactor) environments. The data collected contained information on material composition, temperature, conductivity of the environment, oxygen concentration, irradiated sample information, weld information, electrochemical potential, load ratio, rise time, hydrogen concentration, hold time, down time, maximum stress intensity factor (K max ), stress intensity range (ΔK max ), crack length, and crack growth rates (CGR). Each position on that Kohonen map is called a cell. A Kohonen map clusters vectors of information by 'similarities.' Vectors of information were formed using the metal composition, followed by the environmental conditions used in each experiments, and finally followed by the crack growth rate (CGR) measured when a sample of pre-cracked metal is set in an environment and the sample is cyclically loaded

  4. Requirements of coolants in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, O. A. M.

    2014-11-01

    This study discussed the purposes and types of coolants in nuclear reactors to generate electricity. The major systems and components associated with nuclear reactors are cooling system. There are two major cooling systems utilized to convert the heat generated in the fuel into electrical power. The primary system transfers the heat from the fuel to the steam generator, where the secondary system begins. The steam formed in the steam generator is transferred by the secondary system to the main turbine generator, where it s converted into electricity after passing through the low pressure turbine. There are various coolants used in nuclear reactors-light water, heavy water and liquid metal. The two major types of water-cooled reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) but pressurized water reactors are more in the world. Also discusses this study the reactors and impact of the major nuclear accidents, in the April 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was the product operators, and in the March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan was the product of earthquake of magnitude 9.0, the accidents caused the largest uncontrolled radioactive release into the environment.(Author)

  5. BWR Refill-Reflood Program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.L.

    1983-09-01

    The BWR Refill-Reflood Program is part of the continuing Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) research in the United States which is jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Electric Power Research Institute, and the General Electric Company. The current program expanded the focus of this research to include full scale experimental evaluations of multidimensional and multichannel effects during system refill. The program has also made major contributions to the BWR version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) which has been developed cooperatively with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for application to BWR transients. A summary description of the complete program is provided including the principal findings and main conclusions of the program. The results of the program have shown that multidimensional and parallel channel effects have the potential to significantly improve the system response over that observed in single channel tests

  6. Kinematics of two-phase mixture level motion in BWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Stritar, A.

    1985-01-01

    A model is presented for predicting two-phase mixture level elevations in BWR systems. The model accounts for the particular geometry and conditions in a BWR system during Small-Break Loss of Coolant Accidents. The model presented here is particularly suitable for efficient, high-speed simulations on small minicomputers. The model has been implemented and tested. Results are shown from BWR ATWS simulations

  7. Development of a BWR core burn-up calculation code COREBN-BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Yuichi; Okumura, Keisuke

    1992-05-01

    In order to evaluate core performances of BWR type reactors, the three dimensional core burnup calculation code COREBN-BWR and the fuel management code HIST-BWR have been developed. In analyses of BWR type reactors, thermal hydraulics calculations must be coupled with neutronics calculations to evaluate core performances, because steam void distribution changes according to the change of the power distribution. By installing new functions as follows to the three dimensional core burnup code COREBN2 developed in JAERI for PWR type reactor analyses, the code system becomes to be applicable to burnup analyses of BWR type reactors. (1) Macroscopic cross section calculation function taking into account of coolant void distribution. (2) Thermal hydraulics calculation function to evaluate core flow split, coolant void distribution and thermal margin. (3) Burnup calculation function under the Haling strategy. (4) Fuel management function to incorporate the thermal hydraulics information. This report consists of the general description, calculational models, input data requirements and their explanations, detailed information on usage and sample input. (author)

  8. Recycling systems for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Akio; Yamamoto, Fumiaki; Fukumoto, Ryuji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To stabilize the coolant flowing characteristics and reactor core reactivity. Constitution: The recycling system in a BWR type reactor comprises a recycling pump disposed to the outside of a reactor pressure vessel, a ring header connected to the recycling pump through main pipe ways, and a plurality of pipes branched from and connected with the ring header and connected to a plurality of jet pumps within the pressure vessel. Then, by making the diameter for the pipeways of each of the branched pipes different from each other, the effective cross-sectional area is varied to thereby average the coolant flow rate supplied to each of the jet pumps. (Seki, T.)

  9. A fracture mechanics approach for estimating fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. B.; Chopra, O. K.

    2000-01-01

    A fracture mechanics approach for elastic-plastic materials has been used to evaluate the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels. The fatigue life of such steel, defined as the number of cycles required to form an engineering-size crack, i.e., 3-mm deep, is considered to be composed of the growth of (a) microstructurally small cracks and (b) mechanically small cracks. The growth of the latter was characterized in terms of ΔJ and crack growth rate (da/dN) data in air and LWR environments; in water, the growth rates from long crack tests had to be decreased to match the rates from fatigue S-N data. The growth of microstructurally small cracks was expressed by a modified Hobson relationship in air and by a slip dissolution/oxidation model in water. The crack length for transition from a microstructurally small crack to a mechanically small crack was based on studies on small crack growth. The estimated fatigue S-N curves show good agreement with the experimental data for these steels in air and water environments. At low strain amplitudes, the predicted lives in water can be significantly lower than the experimental values

  10. TEM/STEM study of Zircaloy-2 with protective FeAl(Cr) layers under simulated BWR environment and high-temperature steam exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donghee; Mouche, Peter A.; Zhong, Weicheng; Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Was, Gary S.; Heuser, Brent J.

    2018-04-01

    FeAl(Cr) thin-film depositions on Zircaloy-2 were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with respect to oxidation behavior under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions and high-temperature steam. Columnar grains of FeAl with Cr in solid solution were formed on Zircaloy-2 coupons using magnetron sputtering. NiFe2O4 precipitates on the surface of the FeAl(Cr) coatings were observed after the sample was exposed to the simulated BWR environment. High-temperature steam exposure resulted in grain growth and consumption of the FeAl(Cr) layer, but no delamination at the interface. Outward Al diffusion from the FeAl(Cr) layer occurred during high-temperature steam exposure (700 °C for 3.6 h) to form a 100-nm-thick alumina oxide layer, which was effective in mitigating oxidation of the Zircaloy-2 coupons. Zr intermetallic precipitates formed near the FeAl(Cr) layer due to the inward diffusion of Fe and Al. The counterflow of vacancies in response to the Al and Fe diffusion led to porosity within the FeAl(Cr) layer.

  11. BWR emergency procedure guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, J.S.; Karner, E.F.; Stratman, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes plans for dealing with reactor accidents developed by the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Owners' Group in response to post-Three Mile Island US NRC requirements. The devised Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs), applicable to all BWRs, are symptom-based rather than event-based. According to the EPGs, the operator does not need to identify what event is occurring in the plant in order to decide what action to take, but need only observe the symptoms (values and trends of key control parameters) which exist and take appropriate action to control these symptoms. The original objective was to provide reactor operator guidance in responding to a small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), but subsequent revisions have included other types of reactor accidents. Topics considered include the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) control guideline, the primary containment control guideline, the secondary containment control guideline, the radioactivity release control guideline, multiple failures vs. the design basis, safe limits vs. technical specifications, the technical status, licensing, and implementation. The EPGs are based upon maintaining both adequate core cooling and primary containment integrity

  12. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 2 – Zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, David; LaBrier, Daniel; Ali, Amir; Blandford, Edward D.; Howe, Kerry J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Zinc release is limited to less than 1 mg/L in TSP-buffered solution under a variety of conditions (pH, temperature, zinc source). • Zinc release in high-temperature non-TSP-buffered environment is approximately 25 mg/L. • Long-term zinc release is controlled by passivation (without TSP) and zinc solubility (with TSP). • Precipitation and solubility of zinc phosphate limit the release of zinc. - Abstract: Bench experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of zinc from metallic zinc-bearing surfaces under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at a nuclear power generating facility. The experiments showed that in non-buffered (acidic) environments, measurable quantities of zinc are released from zinc-bearing surfaces. Precipitation and solubility of phosphate-based corrosion products, such as zinc phosphate, limit the release of zinc from zinc-bearing surfaces. These experiments have found that under a variety of conditions, including variations of temperature, pH, and across different zinc-bearing surfaces, the release of zinc into solution is limited to <1 mg/L when phosphate is present. When phosphate is not present, zinc release is instead bounded by a markedly higher saturation limit which is a strong function of the solution temperature.

  13. Deterministic estimation of crack growth rates in steels in LWR coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.; Lu, P.C.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the authors extend the coupled environment fracture model (CEFM) for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized Type 304SS in light water reactor heat transport circuits by incorporating steel corrosion, the oxidation of hydrogen, and the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, in addition to the reduction of oxygen (as in the original CEFM), as charge transfer reactions occurring on the external surfaces. Additionally, the authors have incorporated a theoretical approach for estimating the crack tip strain rate, and the authors have included a void nucleation model to account for ductile failure at very negative potentials. The key concept of the CEFM is that coupling between the internal and external environments, and the need to conserve charge, are the physical and mathematical constraints that determine the rate of crack advance. The model provides rational explanations for the effects of oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, hydrogen, conductivity, stress intensity, and flow velocity on the rate of crack growth in sensitized Type 304 in simulated LWR in-vessel environments. They propose that the CEFM can serve as the basis of a deterministic method for estimating component life times

  14. BWR 90: The ABB advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced fight water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and the total power generation costs have been low. In the development of BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to the reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher dim that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Thus, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The work is scheduled for completion in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with the 'evolutionary' design BWR 90+. The primary design goal is to develop the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is

  15. Research on coolant radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jei Won; Kim, W. H.; Park, Y. J.; Im, J. K.; Jung, Y. J.; Jee, K. Y.; Choi, K. C.

    2004-04-01

    The final objective of this study is to develop the technology on the reduction of radioactive material formed in reactor coolant circuit. The contents of this study are composed of the simulation of primary cooling system, chemistry measurement technology in the high-temperature high-pressure environments, and coolant chemistry control technology. The main results are as follows; High-temperature and high-pressure loop system was designed and fabricated, which is to inducing CRUD growth condition on the surface of cladding. The high-temperature pH measurement system was established with YSZ sensing electrode and Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The performance of pH electrode was confirmed in the temperature range 200∼280 .deg. C. Coolant chemistry control technologies such as the neutron irradiation technique of boric acid solution, the evaluation on high-temperature electrochemical behavior of coolant, and the measurement of physicochemical properties of micro-particles were developed. The results of this study can be useful for the understanding of chemical phenomena occurred in reactor coolant and for the study on the reduction of radioactive material in primary coolant, which will be carried out in the next research stage

  16. Microstructure and hydrothermal corrosion behavior of NITE-SiC with various sintering additives in LWR coolant environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, Chad M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kim, Young -Jin [GE Global Research Center, Schenectady, NY (United States); Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Nano-infiltration and transient eutectic phase (NITE) sintering was developed for fabrication of nuclear grade SiC composites. We produced monolithic SiC ceramics using NITE sintering, as candidates for accident-tolerant fuels in light-water reactors (LWRs). In this work, we exposed three different NITE chemistries (yttria-alumina [YA], ceria-zirconia-alumina [CZA], and yttria-zirconia-alumina [YZA]) to autoclave conditions simulating LWR coolant loops. The YZA was most corrosion resistant, followed by CZA, with YA being worst. High-resolution elemental analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) X-ray mapping combined with multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) datamining helped explain the differences in corrosion. YA-NITE lost all Al from the corroded region and the ytttria reformed into blocky precipitates. The CZA material lost all Al from the corroded area, and the YZA – which suffered the least corrosion –retained some Al in the corroded region. Lastly, the results indicate that the YZA-NITE SiC is most resistant to hydrothermal corrosion in the LWR environment.

  17. Chemical environment for strainers at loss of coolant conditions in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Erixon, S.

    1997-02-01

    The present report describes the chemical environment in the neighbourhood of the strainer as a function of time after a large to medium-sized LOCA has started in a PWR. It also outlines some of the possible consequences for strainer filtration throughout the LOCA process. The most important factor for strainer behaviour is the presence of material that could be filtered onto the strainer. Examples of materials which could cause problems at strainer filtration are insulation fibers, concrete, corrosion products, paints, organic materials etc. A felt of fibrous material will probably form rapidly due to mechanical filtration on the strainers after start of recirculation. The chemistry of the strainer environment is characterized by relatively high concentrations of boric acid, lithium hydroxide and phosphate in the short time frame. Dissolved concrete and pyrolytic, acidic products could be important after 24 h. pH will be high from the very beginning of the LOCA and thereafter increase due to dissolution of Na 3 PO 4 12H 2 O placed in baskets in the containment. Mechanically induced filtration would probably be the main cause of differential pressure build-up over the strainer felt as long as pH is high enough in the sump water. pH would remain high as long as large amounts of pyrolytic products are not formed. A high pH is essential to prevent fines and small particles to coagulate and deposit which will subsequently cause differential pressure build-up over the strainers. During the first time period of strainer filtration differential pressure build-up due to mechanically induced felt growth will occur. There could also be some contribution from positively charged or almost neutral fines and particles of mineral wool, Caposil, Minileit, and organic material if present. However, this is not foreseen as a major problem as positively charged particles should be in minority. If pyrolytic production of large amounts of acidic material starts, pH could drop

  18. Pattern recognition model to estimate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at crevices and pit sites of 304 SS in BWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna [Penn State University, 212 Earth-Engineering Science Building, University Park, PA 16801 (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Many publications have shown that crack growth rates (CGR) due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of metals is dependent on many parameters related to the manufacturing process of the steel and the environment to which the steel is exposed. Those parameters include, but are not restricted to, the concentration of chloride, fluoride, nitrates, and sulfates, pH, fluid velocity, electrochemical potential (ECP), electrolyte conductivity, stress and sensitization applied to the steel during its production and use. It is not well established how combinations of each of these parameters impact the CGR. Many different models and beliefs have been published, resulting in predictions that sometimes disagree with experimental observations. To some extent, the models are the closest to the nature of IGSCC, however, there is not a model that fully describes the entire range of observations, due to the difficulty of the problem. Among the models, the Fracture Environment Model, developed by Macdonald et al., is the most physico-chemical model, accounting for experimental observations in a wide range of environments or ECPs. In this work, we collected experimental data on BWR environments and designed a data mining pattern recognition model to learn from that data. The model was used to generate CGR estimations as a function of ECP on a BWR environment. The results of the predictive model were compared to the Fracture Environment Model predictions. The results from those two models are very close to the experimental observations of the area corresponding to creep and IGSCC controlled by diffusion. At more negative ECPs than the potential corresponding to creep, the pattern recognition predicts an increase of CGR with decreasing ECP, while the Fracture Environment Model predicts the opposite. The results of this comparison confirm that the pattern recognition model covers 3 phenomena: hydrogen embrittlement at very negative ECP, creep at intermediate ECP, and IGSCC

  19. Pattern recognition model to estimate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at crevices and pit sites of 304 SS in BWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna

    2004-01-01

    Many publications have shown that crack growth rates (CGR) due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of metals is dependent on many parameters related to the manufacturing process of the steel and the environment to which the steel is exposed. Those parameters include, but are not restricted to, the concentration of chloride, fluoride, nitrates, and sulfates, pH, fluid velocity, electrochemical potential (ECP), electrolyte conductivity, stress and sensitization applied to the steel during its production and use. It is not well established how combinations of each of these parameters impact the CGR. Many different models and beliefs have been published, resulting in predictions that sometimes disagree with experimental observations. To some extent, the models are the closest to the nature of IGSCC, however, there is not a model that fully describes the entire range of observations, due to the difficulty of the problem. Among the models, the Fracture Environment Model, developed by Macdonald et al., is the most physico-chemical model, accounting for experimental observations in a wide range of environments or ECPs. In this work, we collected experimental data on BWR environments and designed a data mining pattern recognition model to learn from that data. The model was used to generate CGR estimations as a function of ECP on a BWR environment. The results of the predictive model were compared to the Fracture Environment Model predictions. The results from those two models are very close to the experimental observations of the area corresponding to creep and IGSCC controlled by diffusion. At more negative ECPs than the potential corresponding to creep, the pattern recognition predicts an increase of CGR with decreasing ECP, while the Fracture Environment Model predicts the opposite. The results of this comparison confirm that the pattern recognition model covers 3 phenomena: hydrogen embrittlement at very negative ECP, creep at intermediate ECP, and IGSCC

  20. Probabilistic analyses of failure in reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    LLNL is performing probabilistic reliability analyses of PWR and BWR reactor coolant piping for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Specifically, LLNL is estimating the probability of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in the reactor coolant loop piping in PWR plants, and in the main stream, feedwater, and recirculation piping of BWR plants. In estimating the probability of DEGB, LLNL considers two causes of pipe break: pipe fracture due to the growth of cracks at welded joints (direct DEGB), and pipe rupture indirectly caused by the seismically-induced failure of critical supports or equipment (indirect DEGB)

  1. LWR primary coolant pipe rupture test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitoshi, Shyoji

    1978-01-01

    The rupture test rig for primary coolant pipes is constructed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to verify the reliability of the primary coolant pipes for both PWRs and BWRs. The planned test items consisted of reaction force test, restraint test, whip test, jet test and continuous release test. A pressure vessel of about 4 m 3 volume, a circulating pump, a pressurizer, a heater, an air cooler and the related instrumentation and control system are included in this test rig. The coolant test condition is 160 kg/cm 2 g, 325 deg C for PWR test, and 70 kg/cm 2 g, saturated water and steam for BWR test, 100 ton of test load for the ruptured pipe bore of 8B Schedule 160, and 20 lit/min. discharge during 20 h for continuous release of coolant. The maximum pit internal pressure was estimated for various pipe diameters and time under the PWR and BWR conditions. The spark rupturing device was adopted for the rupture mechanics in this test rig. The computer PANAFACOM U-300 is used for the data processing. This test rig is expected to operate in 1978 effectively for the improvement of reliability of LWR primary coolant pipes. (Nakai, Y.)

  2. Review on research of small break loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bo Jinhai; Wang Fei

    1998-01-01

    The Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) and its research art-of -work are reviewed. A typical SBLOCA process in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and the influence of break size, break location and reactor coolant pump on the process are described. The existing papers are classified in two categories: experimental and numerical modeling, with the primary experimental apparatuses in the world listed and the research works on SBLOCA summarized

  3. The BWR Stability Issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to supply general information about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) stability. The main concerned topics are: phenomenological aspects, experimental database, modelling features and capabilities, numerical models, three-dimensional modelling, BWR system performance during stability, stability monitoring and licensing aspects.

  4. Compact modular BWR (CM-BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennern, Larry; Boardman, Charles; Carroll, Douglas G.; Hida, Takahiko

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary assessment has shown that a small 350 MWe BWR reactor can be placed within a close fitting steel containment vessel that is 7.1 meters inside diameter. This allows the technology and manufacturing capability currently used to fabricate large ABWR reactor vessels to be used to provide a factory fabricated containment vessel for a 350 MWe BWR. When a close fitted steel containment is combined with a passive closed loop isolation condenser system and a natural circulating reactor system that contains a large water inventory, primary system leaks cannot uncover the core. This eliminates many of the safety systems needed in response to a LOCA that are common to large, conventional plant designs including. Emergency Core Flooding, Automatic Depressurization System, Active Residual Heat Removal, Safety Related Auxiliary Cooling, Safety Related Diesel Generators, Hydrogen Re-Combiners, Ex-vessel Core Retention and Cooling. By fabricating the containment in a factory and eliminating most of the conventional safety systems, the construction schedule is shortened and the capital cost reduced to levels that would not otherwise be possible for a relatively small modular BWR. This makes the CM-BWR a candidate for applications where smaller incremental power additions are desired relative to a large ALWR or where the local infrastructure is not able to accommodate a conventional ALWR plant rated at 1350 MWe or more. This paper presents a preliminary design description of a Compact Modular BWR (CM-BWR) whose design features dramatically reduce the size and cost of the reactor building and associated safety systems. (author)

  5. BWR fuel clad behaviour following LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Vyas, K.N.; Dinesh Babu, R.

    1996-01-01

    Flow and pressure through the fuel coolant channel reduce rapidly following a loss of coolant accident. Due to stored energy and decay heat, fuel and cladding temperatures rise rapidly. Increase in clad temperature causes deterioration of mechanical properties of clad material. This coupled with increase of pressure inside the cladding due to accumulation of fission gases and de-pressurization of coolant causes the cladding to balloon. This phenomenon is important as it can reduce or completely block the flow passages in a fuel assembly causing reduction of emergency coolant flow. Behaviour of a BWR clad is analyzed in a design basis LOCA. Fuel and clad temperatures following a LOCA are calculated. Fission gas release and pressure is estimated using well established models. An elasto-plastic analysis of clad tube is carried out to determine plastic strains and corresponding deformations using finite-element technique. Analysis of neighbouring pins gives an estimate of flow areas available for emergency coolant flow. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Iron crud supply device to reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Takao.

    1993-01-01

    In a device for supplying iron cruds into reactor coolants in a BWR type power plant, a system in which feed water containing iron cruds is supplied to the reactor coolants after once passing through an ion exchange resin is disposed. As a result, iron cruds having characteristics similar with those of naturally occurring iron cruds in the plant are obtained and they react with ionic radioactivity, to form composite oxides. Then, iron cruds having high performance of being secured to the surface of a fuel cladding tube can be supplied to the reactor coolants, thereby enabling to greatly reduce the density of reactor water ionic radioactivity. In its turn, dose rate on the surface of pipelines can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce operators' radiation exposure dose in the plant. Further, contamination of a condensate desalting device due to iron cruds can be prevented, and further, the density of the iron cruds supplied can easily be controlled. (N.H.)

  7. New mathematical method for the solution of gas-gas equilibria with special application to HTGR primary-coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongartz, K.

    1983-07-01

    A new mathematical method and corresponding computer program have been developed that provide a general method for the numerical solution of an equilibrium problem involving the chemical interactions of gaseous species. The method and computer code were developed to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of impurity gases, such as CO, CO 2 , H 2 , H 2 O, CH 4 , and O 2 , which may be approached as the result of gaseous chemical reactions occurring within the hot primary coolant helium of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The method, however, can be applied to any gas mixture

  8. Advances in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Mary L.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water chemistry control with examples of plant experiences at U.S. designed BWRs. Water chemistry advances provide some of the most effective methods for mitigating materials degradation, reducing fuel performance concerns and lowering radiation fields. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials remains a high priority and improved techniques that have been demonstrated in BWRs will be reviewed, specifically hydrogen injection combined with noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and the newer on-line noble metal application process (OLNC). Hydrogen injection performance, an important part of SCC mitigation, will also be reviewed for the BWR fleet, highlighting system improvements that have enabled earlier injection of hydrogen including the potential for hydrogen injection during plant startup. Water chemistry has been significantly improved by the application of pre-filtration and optimized use of ion exchange resins in the CP (condensate polishing) and reactor water cleanup (RWCU) systems. EPRI has monitored and supported water treatment improvements to meet water chemistry goals as outlined in the EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines, particularly those for SCC mitigation of reactor internals and piping, minimization of fuel risk due to corrosion and crud deposits and chemistry control for radiation field reduction. In recent years, a significant reduction has occurred in feedwater corrosion product input, particularly iron. A large percentage of plants are now reporting <0.1 ppb feedwater iron. The impacts to plant operation and chemistry of lower feedwater iron will be explored. Depleted zinc addition is widely practiced across the fleet and the enhanced focus on radiation reduction continues to emphasize the importance of controlling radiation source term. In addition, shutdown chemistry control is necessary to avoid excessive release of activated corrosion products from fuel

  9. Simulation of decreasing reactor power level with BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwoto; Zuhair; Rivai, Abu Khalid

    2002-01-01

    Study on characteristic of BWR using Desktop PC Based Simulator Program was analysed. This simulator is more efficient and cheaper for analyzing of characteristic and dynamic respond than full scope simulator for decreasing power level of BW. Dynamic responses of BWR reactor was investigated during the power level reduction from 100% FP (Full Power) which is 3926 MWth to 0% FP with 25% steps and 1 % FP/sec rate. The overall results for core flow rate, reactor steam flow, feed-water flow and turbine-generator power show tendency proportional to reduction of reactor power. This results show that reactor power control in BWR could be done by control of re-circulation flow that alter the density of water used as coolant and moderator. Decreasing the re-circulation flow rate will decrease void density which has negative reactivity and also affect the position of control rods

  10. Development of alternative materials for BWR fuel springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruma, Y.; Osato, T.; Yamazaki, K.

    2002-01-01

    Major sources of radioactivity introduced into reactor water of BWR were estimated fuel crud and in-core materials (especially, fuel springs). Fuel springs are used for fixation of fuel cladding tubes with spacer grid. Those are small parts (total length is only within 25 mm) and so many numbers are loaded simultaneously and then total surfaces area are calculated up to about 200 m 2 . Fuel springs are located under high radiation field and high oxidative environment. Conventional fuel spring is made of alloy-X750 which is one of nickel-based alloy and is reported to show relatively higher corrosion release rate. 58 Co and 60 Co will be released directly into reactor water from intensely radio-activated fuel springs surface and increase radioactivity concentrations in primary coolant. Corrosion release control from fuel springs is an important technical item and a development of alternative material instead of alloy-X750 for fuel spring is a key subject to achieve ultra low man-rem exposure BWR plant. In present work, alloy-X718 which started usage for PWR fuel springs and stainless steel type 316L which has many mechanical property data are picked up for alternative materials and compared their corrosion behaviors with conventional material. Corrosion experiment was conducted under vapor-water two phases flow which is simulated fuel cladding surface boiling condition. After exposure, corrosion film formed under corrosion test was analyzed in detail and corrosion film amount and corrosion release amount are estimated among three materials. (authors)

  11. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 1 – Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Kerry J., E-mail: howe@unm.edu [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Mitchell, Lana, E-mail: lmitchell@alionscience.com [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Kim, Seung-Jun, E-mail: skim@lanl.gov [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Blandford, Edward D., E-mail: edb@unm.edu [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Kee, Ernest J., E-mail: erniekee@gmail.com [South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company, P.O. Box 270, Wadsworth, TX 77483 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Trisodium phosphate (TSP) causes aluminum corrosion to cease after 24 h of exposure. • Chloride, iron, and copper have a minimal effect on the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Zinc can reduce the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Aluminum occasionally precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated solubility for Al(OH){sub 3}. • Corrosion and solubility equations can be used to calculate the solids generated during a LOCA. - Abstract: Bench experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum from metallic aluminum surfaces under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident at a nuclear power generating facility. The experiments showed that TSP is capable of passivating the aluminum surface and preventing continued corrosion after about 24 h at the conditions tested. A correlation that describes the rate of corrosion including the passivation effect was developed from the bench experiments and validated with a separate set of experiments from a different test system. The saturation concentration of aluminum was shown to be well described by the solubility of amorphous aluminum hydroxide for the majority of cases, but instances have been observed when aluminum precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated aluminum hydroxide solubility. Based on the experimental data and previous literature, an equation was developed to calculate the saturation concentration of aluminum as a function of pH and temperature under conditions representative of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a TSP-buffered pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment. The corrosion equation and precipitation equation can be used in concert with each other to calculate the quantity of solids that would form as a function of time during a LOCA if the temperature and pH profiles were known.

  12. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 1 – Aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, Kerry J.; Mitchell, Lana; Kim, Seung-Jun; Blandford, Edward D.; Kee, Ernest J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Trisodium phosphate (TSP) causes aluminum corrosion to cease after 24 h of exposure. • Chloride, iron, and copper have a minimal effect on the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Zinc can reduce the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Aluminum occasionally precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated solubility for Al(OH) 3 . • Corrosion and solubility equations can be used to calculate the solids generated during a LOCA. - Abstract: Bench experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum from metallic aluminum surfaces under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident at a nuclear power generating facility. The experiments showed that TSP is capable of passivating the aluminum surface and preventing continued corrosion after about 24 h at the conditions tested. A correlation that describes the rate of corrosion including the passivation effect was developed from the bench experiments and validated with a separate set of experiments from a different test system. The saturation concentration of aluminum was shown to be well described by the solubility of amorphous aluminum hydroxide for the majority of cases, but instances have been observed when aluminum precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated aluminum hydroxide solubility. Based on the experimental data and previous literature, an equation was developed to calculate the saturation concentration of aluminum as a function of pH and temperature under conditions representative of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a TSP-buffered pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment. The corrosion equation and precipitation equation can be used in concert with each other to calculate the quantity of solids that would form as a function of time during a LOCA if the temperature and pH profiles were known

  13. BWR startup and shutdown activity transport control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.E., E-mail: sgarcia@epri.com [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, A.J., E-mail: jgiannelli@finetech.com, E-mail: ajarvis@finetech.com [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, New Jersey (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper summarizes BWR industry experience on good practices for controlling the transport of corrosion product activity during shutdowns, particularly refueling outages, and for startup chemistry control to minimize IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking). For shutdown, overall goals are to minimize adverse impacts of crud bursts and the time required to remove activated corrosion products from the reactor coolant during the shutdown process prior to refueling, and to assist plants in predicting and controlling radiation exposure during outages. For startup, the overall goals are to highlight conditions during early heatup and startup when sources of reactor coolant oxidants are high, when there is a greater likelihood for chemical excursions associated with refueling outage work activities, and when hydrogen injection is not available to mitigate IGSCC due to system design limitations. BWR water chemistry has changed significantly in recent years with the adoption of hydrogen water chemistry, zinc addition and noble metal chemical applications. These processes have, in some instances, resulted in significant activity increases during shutdown evolutions, which together with reduced time for cleanup because of shorter outages, has consequently increased outage radiation exposure. A review several recent outages shows that adverse effects from these conditions can be minimized, leading to the set of good practice recommendations for shutdown chemistry control. Most plants lose the majority of their hydrogen availability hours during early startup because feedwater hydrogen injection systems were not originally designed to inject hydrogen below 20% power. Hydrogen availability has improved through modifications to inject hydrogen at lower power levels, some near 5%. However, data indicate that IGSCC is accelerated during early startup, when dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide levels are high and reactor coolant temperatures are in the 300 to 400 {sup o

  14. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the 13 N content in the containment atmosphere. 13 N is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/ 13 N+ 4 He. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium 13 N concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  15. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/Nl3+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  16. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1979-08-01

    The present paper deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process H1+016 → N13+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m -3 and 7 kBq m -3 for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge (Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. (Auth.)

  17. Development of new irradiation facility for BWR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yuji; Magome, Hirokatsu; Iida, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    In JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), about the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel and the stress corrosion cracking of reactor core composition apparatus concerning the long-term use of the light water reactor (BWR), in order to check the influence of the temperature, pressure, and water quality, etc on BWR condition. The water environmental control facility which performs irradiation assisted stress corrosion-cracking (IASCC) evaluation under BWR irradiation environment was fabricated in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor). This report is described the outline of manufacture of the water environmental control facility for doing an irradiation test using the saturation temperature capsule after JMTR re-operation. (author)

  18. Development of advanced BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Masatoshi

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese technology and domestic production of BWR type nuclear power plants have been established through the experiences in the construction and operation of BWRs in addition to the technical agreement with the General Electric Co. In early days, the plants experienced some trouble such as stress corrosion cracking and some inconvenience in the operation and maintenance. The government, electric power companies and BWR manufacturers have endeavored to standardize and improve the design of LWRs for the purpose of improving the safety, reliability and the rate of operation and reducing the radiation exposure dose of plant workers. The first and second stages of the standardization and improvement of LWRs have been completed. Five manufacturers of BWRs in the world have continued the conceptual design of a new version of BWR power plants. It was concluded that this is the most desirable version of BWR nuclear power stations, but the technical and economic evaluation must be made before the commercial application. Six electric power companies and three manufacturers of BWRs in Japan set up the organization to develop the technology in cooperation. The internal pump system, the new control rod drive mechanism and others are the main features. (Kako, I.)

  19. BWR water chemistry impurity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Korhonen, S.; Renstroem, K.; Hofling, C.G.; Rebensdorff, B.

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory studies were made on the effect of water impurities on environmental cracking in simulated BWR water of stainless steel, low alloy steel and nickel-base alloys. Constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests were run in simulated normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or start-up environment. Sulfate, chloride and copper with chloride added to the water at levels of a fraction of a ppM were found to be extremely deleterious to all kinds of materials except Type 316 NG. Other detrimental impurities were fluoride, silica and some organic acids, although acetic acid was beneficial. Nitrate and carbon dioxide were fairly inoccuous. Corrosion fatigue and constant load tests on compact tension specimens were run in simulated normal BWR water chemistry (NWC) or hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), without impurities or with added sulfate or carbon dioxide. For sensitized Type 304 SS in NWC, 0.1 ppM sulfate increased crack propagation rates in constant load tests by up to a factor of 100, and in fatigue tests up to a factor of 10. Also, cracking in Type 316 nuclear grade SS and Alloy 600 was enhanced, but to a smaller degree. Carbon dioxide was less detrimental than sulfate. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  1. Predicted Variations of Water Chemistry in the Primary Coolant Circuit of a Supercritical Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Liu, Hong-Ming; Lee, Min

    2012-09-01

    except for the core channel and the upper plenum. The [O 2 ] at the lower water rod was higher than that at the middle water rod due to the decomposition of H 2 O 2 . The lower plenum exhibited a high [O 2 ] simply because the [O 2 ] in the lower water rod region was higher. In the core channel region, the [H 2 O 2 ] slowly increased as the coolant moved upward, and it turned into a drastic increase as the coolant became supercritical. Although the [H 2 ] in all selected regions was higher than that in a commercial boiling water reactor (BWR), the [H 2 O 2 ] and [O 2 ] were even higher those in a BWR. In summary, it was predicted that the coolant environment in an SCWR could be highly oxidizing, and the structural components would therefore suffer from a more serious corrosion problem than those in a commercial BWR. (authors)

  2. Hydrogen injection device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the increasing ratio of main steam system dose rate due to N-16 activity due to excess hydrogen injection in the hydrogen injection operation of BWR type reactors. Constitution: There are provided a hydrogen injection mechanism for injecting hydrogen into primary coolants of a BWR type reactor, and a chemical injection device for injecting chemicals such as methanol, which makes nitrogen radioisotopes resulted in the reactor water upon hydrogen injection non-volatile, into the pressure vessel separately from hydrogen. Injected hydrogen and the chemicals are not reacted in the feedwater system, but the reaction proceeds due to the presence of radioactive rays after the injection into the pressure vessel. Then, hydrogen causes re-combination in the downcomer portion to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration. Meanwhile, about 70 % of the chemicals is supplied by means of a jet pump directly to the reactor core, thereby converting the chemical form of N-16 in the reactor core more oxidative (non-volatile). (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. Maximum thermal loading test of BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Yoshimura, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Satoshi; Ishizuka, Takao.

    1987-01-01

    Various proving tests on the reliability of nuclear power plants have been conducted at the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center and at the Japan Power Plant Engineering and Inspection Corporation. The tests were initiated at the request of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). Toshiba undertook one of the proving tests on the reliability of nuclear fuel assembly; the maximum thermal loading test of BWR fuel assembly from the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center. These tests are part of the proving tests mentioned above, and their purpose is to confirm the reliability of the thermal hydraulic engineering techniques. Toshiba has been engaged for the past nine years in the design, fabrication and testing of the equipment. For the project, a test model fuel assembly was used to measure the critical power of the BWR fuel assembly and the void and fluidity of the coolant. From the test results, it has been confirmed that the heat is transferred safely from the fuel assembly to the coolant in the BWR nuclear power plant. In addition, the propriety and reliability of the thermal hydraulic engineering techniques for the fuel assembly have been proved. (author)

  4. BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valtonen, K.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to examine TVO-I oscillation incident, which occured in February 22.1987 and to find out safety implications of oscillations in ATWS incidents. Calculations have been performed with RAMONA-3B and TRAB codes. RAMONA-3B is a BWR transient analysis code with three-dimencional neutron kinetics and nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous thermal hydraulics. TRAB code is a one-dimencional BWR transient code which uses methods similar to RAMONA-3B. The results have shown that both codes are capable of analyzing of the oscillation incidents. Both out-of-phase and in-phase oscillations are possible. If the reactor scram fails (ATWS) during oscillations the severe fuel failures are always possible and the reactor core may exceed the prompt criticality

  5. Assessment of the Prony's method for BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier; Castillo-Duran, Rogelio; Palacios-Hernandez, Javier C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper describes a method to determine the degree of stability of a BWR. → Performance comparison between Prony's and common AR techniques is presented. → Benchmark data and actual BWR transient data are used for comparison. → DR and f results are presented and discussed. → The Prony's method is shown to be a robust technique for BWR stability. - Abstract: It is known that Boiling Water Reactors are susceptible to present power oscillations in regions of high power and low coolant flow, in the power-flow operational map. It is possible to fall in one of such instability regions during reactor startup, since both power and coolant flow are being increased but not proportionally. One other possibility for falling into those areas is the occurrence of a trip of recirculation pumps. Stability monitoring in such cases can be difficult, because the amount or quality of power signal data required for calculation of the stability key parameters may not be enough to provide reliable results in an adequate time range. In this work, the Prony's Method is presented as one complementary alternative to determine the degree of stability of a BWR, through time series data. This analysis method can provide information about decay ratio and oscillation frequency from power signals obtained during transient events. However, so far not many applications in Boiling Water Reactors operation have been reported and supported to establish the scope of using such analysis for actual transient events. This work presents first a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results obtained by Prony's method and those results obtained by the participants of the Forsmark 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactor Stability Benchmark using diverse techniques. Then, a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results is performed for four real BWR transient event data, using Prony's method and two other techniques based on an autoregressive modeling. The four

  6. Coolant leakage detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To surely detect the coolant leakage at a time when the leakage amount is still low in the intra-reactor inlet pipeway of FBR type reactor. Constitution: Outside of the intra-reactor inlet piping for introducing coolants at low temperature into a reactor core, an outer closure pipe is furnished. The upper end of the outer closure pipe opens above the liquid level of the coolants in the reactor, and a thermocouple is inserted to the opening of the upper end. In such a structure, if the coolants in the in-reactor piping should leak to the outer closure pipe, coolants over-flows from the opening thereof, at which the thermocouple detects the temperature of the coolants at a low temperature, thereby enabling to detect the leakage of the coolants at a time when it is still low. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. The development of emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR Candu type of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mursid Djokolelono.

    1976-01-01

    Emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR-Candu type of nuclear power plant are reviewed. In PWR and BWR the emergency cooling can be catagorized as active high pressure, active low pressure, and a passive one. The PWR uses components of the shutdown cooling system: whereas the BWR uses components of pressure suppression contaiment. HWR Candu also uses the shutdown cooling system similar to the PWR except some details coming out from moderator coolant separation and expensive cost of heavy water. (author)

  8. TRAC-BWR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.L.; Rouhani, S.Z.

    1983-01-01

    The TRAC-BD1/MOD1 code containing many new or improved models has been assembled and is undergoing developmental assessment and testing and should be available shortly. The preparation of the manual for this code version is underway and should be available to the USNRC and their designated contractors by April of 1984. Finally work is currently underway on a fast running version of TRAC-BWR which will contain a one-dimensional neutron kinetics model

  9. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I

  10. Safeguarding of emergency core cooling in case of loss-of-coolant accidents with insulation material release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointner, W.; Broecker, A.

    2012-01-01

    The report on safeguarding of emergency core cooling in case of loss-of-coolant accidents with insulation material release covers the following issues: assessment of the relevant status for PWR, evaluation of the national and international (USA, Canada, France) status, actualization of recommendations, transferability from PWR to BWR. Generic studies on the core cooling capability in case of insulation material release in BWR-type reactors were evaluated.

  11. HANARO secondary coolant management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Duk.

    1998-02-01

    In this report, the basic theory for management of water quality, environmental factors influencing to the coolant, chemicals and its usage for quality control of coolant are mentioned, and water balance including the loss rate by evaporation (34.3 m 3 /hr), discharge rate (12.665 m 3 /hr), concentration ratio and feed rate (54.1 m 3 /hr) are calculated at 20 MW operation. Also, the analysis data of HANSU Limited for HANARO secondary coolant (feed water and circulating coolant) - turbidity, pH, conductivity, M-alkalinity, Ca-hardness, chloride ion, total iron ion, phosphoric ion and conversion rate are reviewed. It is confirmed that the feed water has good quality and the circulating coolant has been maintained within the control specification in general, but some items exceeded the control specification occasionally. Therefore it is judged that more regular discharge of coolant is needed. (author). 6 refs., 17 tabs., 18 figs

  12. Feedwater control system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, Jun-ichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the water level control performance in BWR type reactor by regulating the water level set to the reactor depending on the rate of change in the recycling amount of coolant to thereby control the fluctuations in the water level resulted in the reactor within an aimed range even upon significant fluctuations in the recycling flow rate. Constitution: The recycling flow rate of coolant in the reactor is detected and the rate of its change with time is computed to form a rate of change signal. The rate of change signal is inputted to a reactor level setter to amend the actual reactor water level demand signal and regulate the water level set to the reactor water depending on the rate of change in the recycling flow rate. Such a regulation method for the set water level enables to control the water level fluctuation resulted in the reactor within the aimed range even upon the significant fluctuation in the recycling flow rate and improve the water level control performance of the reactor, whereby the operationability for the reactor is improved to enhance the operation rate. (Moriyama, K.)

  13. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to coolant channels for pressurised water and boiling water reactors and the arrangement described aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel rods and the coolant. Baffle means extending axially within the channel are provided and disposed relative to the fuel rods so as to restrict flow oscillations occurring within the coolant from being propagated transversely to the axis of the channel. (UK)

  14. Design and fabrication of magnetic coolant filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, B. N.

    2017-07-01

    Now a day's use of coolants in industry has become dominant because of high production demands. Coolants not only help in speeding up the production but also provide many advantages in the metal working operation. As the consumption of coolants is very high a system is badly in need, so as to recirculate the used coolant. Also the amount of hazardous waste generated by industrial plants has become an increasingly costly problem for the manufactures and an additional stress on the environment. Since the purchase and disposal of the spent cutting fluids is becoming increasingly expensive, fluid recycling is a viable option for minimizing the cost. Separation of metallic chips from the coolants by using magnetic coolant separation has proven a good management and maintenance of the cutting fluid. By removing the metallic chips, the coolant life is greatly extended, increases the machining quality and reduces downtime. Above being the case, a magnetic coolant filter is developed which utilizes high energy permanent magnets to develop a dense magnetic field along a narrow flow path into which the contaminated coolant is directed. The ferromagnetic particles captured and aligned by the dense magnetic field, from the efficient filter medium. This enables the unit to remove ferromagnetic particles from the coolant. Magnetic coolant filters use the principle of magnetic separation to purify the used coolant. The developed magnetic coolant separation has the capability of purifying 40 litres per minute of coolant with the size of the contaminants ranging from 1 µm to 30 µm. The filter will be helpful in saving the production cost as the cost associated with the proposed design is well justified by the cost savings in production. The magnetic field produced by permanent magnets will be throughout the area underneath the reservoir. This produces magnetic field 30mm above the coolant reservoir. Very fine particles are arrested without slip. The magnetic material used will not

  15. BWR internals life assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, M.L.; Stancavage, P.P.

    1988-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) internal components play an important role in power plant life extension. Many important internals were not designed for easy removal and changes in material properties and local environmental effects due to high radiation makes stress corrosion cracking more likely and more difficult to correct. Over the past several years, operating experience has shown that inspection, monitoring and refurbishment can be accomplished for internal structures with existing technology. In addition, mitigation techniques which address the causes of degradation are available to assure that life extension targets can be met. This paper describes the many considerations and aspects when evaluating life extension for reactor vessel internals

  16. Studies of Corrosion of Cladding Materials in Simulated BWR-environment Using Impedance Measurements. Part I: Measurements in the Pre-transition Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, Stefan; Ahlberg, Elisabet; Andersson, Ulf

    2004-09-01

    The corrosion of three Zircaloy 2 cladding materials, LK2, LK2+ and LK3, have been studied in-situ in an autoclave using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Measurements were performed in simulated BWR water at temperatures up to 288 deg C. The impedance spectra were successfully modelled using equivalent circuits. When the oxide grew thicker during the experiments, a change-over from one to two time constants was seen, showing that a layered structure was formed. Oxide thickness, oxide conductivity and effective donor density were evaluated from the impedance data. The calculated oxide thickness at the end of the experiments was consistent with the value obtained from SEM. It was shown that the difference in oxide growth rate between the investigated materials is small in the pre-transition region. The effective donor density, which is a measure of electronic conductivity, was found to be lower for the LK3 material compared to the other two materials

  17. Metallurgical factors that contribute to cracking in BWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    During the fall of 1974 and early winter of 1975, cracks have been discovered in the 4 in. bypass lines of several Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) in the United States. Further, similar cracks were discovered at two BWR's in Japan during the same period. More recently, cracks have been discovered in the core spray piping and in a furnace-sensitized ''safe end'' and adjacent ''dutchman'' at the Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 2. Although inspections at all other U.S. BWR's have not disclosed further instances of cracking in core spray piping, leaking cracks have been found in the core spray piping of two BWR's overseas. Metallurgical examinations of these cracks are not yet complete. The following observations have been made to date. All cracks (except those in the furnace-sensitized safe end and dutchman) occurred in seamless type 304 stainless steel piping or in elbows fabricated from such piping, in the outer heat affected zone of either field or shop welds, in lines isolated from the main primary coolant flow during full power operation, except for the not yet examined cracks in the Monticello bypass lines. The cracks are exclusively intergranular, and occur in metal that has been lightly sensitized by the welding process, with only intermittent grain boundary carbides. They developed in the areas of peak axial residual stresses from welding rather than in the most heavily sensitized areas. No fatigue striations have been found on the fracture surfaces. The evidence received to date strongly indicates that these cracks were caused by intergranular stress corrosion of weld-sensitized stainless steel by BWR water containing greater than 0.2 ppM oxygen. The possible role of fatigue or alternating stresses in this corrosion is not clear. Further, not all the cracks detected to date necessarily have occurred by the same mechanism

  18. Characteristics of axial splits in failed BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysell, G.; Grigoriev, V.

    2000-01-01

    Secondary cladding defects in BWR fuel sometimes have the shape of long axial cracks or ''splits''. Due to the large open UO 2 surfaces exposed to the water, fission product and UO 2 release to the coolant can reach excessive levels leading to forced shut downs to remove the failed fuel rods. A number of such fuel rods have been examined in Studsvik over the last 10 years. The paper describes observations from the PIE of long cracks and discusses the driving force of the cracks. Details such as starting cracks, macroscopic and microscopic fracture surface appearance, cross sections of cracks, hydride precipitates, location and degree of plastic deformation are given. (author)

  19. The noise analysis and the BWR operation map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazquez, J.; Ballestrin, J.

    1996-01-01

    An analytical expression for the Decay Ratio is obtained: DR = exp(-bW / P 1/2 ). The physics behind is also explained. It applies to a commercial BWR Operation Map, on the vicinity of the power instability. This functional form seems fitting to the structure of the Operation map. The power P and the coolant flow are measured straightforward; the Decay Ratio is obtained by neutron noise analysis techniques. The parameter b, depending on the void reactivity coefficient, is then calculated on line during the Reactor Operation. New DR value is now predicted for each new displacement on the Map, so unexpected instability events are more likely avoided. (authors)

  20. Complete BWR--EM LOCA analysis using the WRAP--EM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmeyer, R.R.; Gregory, M.V.; Buckner, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Water Reactor Analysis Package, Evaluation Model (WRAP--EM), provides a complete analysis of postulated loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA's) in light--water nuclear power reactors. The system is being developed at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to interpret and evaluate reactor vendor, evaluation model (EM) analyses. The initial version of the WRAP--EM system for analysis of boiling water reactors (BWR's) is operational. To demonstrate the complete capability of the WRAP--BWR--EM system, a LOCA analysis has been performed for the Hope Creek Plant

  1. BWR condensate filtration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.A.; Pasricha, A.; Rekart, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Poor removal of particulate corrosion products (especially iron) from condensate is one of the major problems in BWR systems. The presence of activated corrosion products creates ''hot spots'' and increases piping dose rates. Also, fuel efficiency is reduced and the risk of fuel failure is increased by the deposit of corrosion products on the fuel. Because of these concerns, current EPRI guidelines call for a maximum of 2 ppb of iron in the reactor feedwater with a level of 0.5 ppb being especially desirable. It has become clear that conventional deep bed resins are incapable of meeting these levels. While installation of prefilter systems is an option, it would be more economical for plants with naked deep beds to find an improved bead resin for use in existing systems. BWR condensate filtration technologies are being tested on a condensate side stream at Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station. After two years of testing, hollow fiber filters (HFF) and fiber matrix filters (FMF), and low crosslink cation resin, all provide acceptable results. The results are presented for pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and water quality measurements. The costs are compared for backwashable non-precoat HFF and FMF. Results are also presented for full deep bed vessel tests of the low crosslink cation resin

  2. BWR type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toru.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain reactor core characteristics with less changes in the excess reactivity due to fuel burnup even when the operation period varies. Constitution: In a BWR type reactor where fuel assemblies containing fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons are arranged, the fuel assemblies are grouped into first fuel assemblies and second fuel assemblies. Then, the number of fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons within the first fuel assemblies is made greater than that of the second fuel rods, while the concentration of the burnable poisons in the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the first fuel assemblies is made lower than that of the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the second fuel assemblies. In the BWR type reactor constituted in this way, the reactor core characteristics can be improved by changing the ratio between the first fuel assemblies and the second fuel assemblies charged to the reactor core, thereby decreasing the changes in the burnup of the excess reactivity. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. BWR 90 and BWR 90+: Two advanced BWR design generations from ABB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced light water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and total power generation costs have been low. When developing the BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to a reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher than that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Hence, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The review work was completed in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with an 'evolutionary' design called BWR 90+, which aims at developing the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is performed by ABB Atom

  4. Speed control device for coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, Takao.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention intends to increase a margin relative of the oscillations of neutron fluxes when the temperature of feedwater is lowered in a compulsory recycling type BWR reactor. That is, when the operation point represented by a reactor thermal power and a reactor core inlet flow rate is in a state approximate to an oscillation limit of the reactor power, the device of the present invention controls the recycling pump speed in the increasing direction depending on the lowering range of the feedwater temperature from a stationary state. With such a constitution, even if the reactor power is in the operation region near the oscillation limit in the BWR type reactor and a feedwater heating loss is caused, the speed of the coolant recycling pump is increased by 10% at the maximum depending on the extent of the reduction of the feedwater temperature, so that the oscillation of the reactor power can be prevented from lasting for a long period of time even if a reactivity external disturbance should occur in the reactor. (I.S.)

  5. BWR fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baily, W.E.; Armijo, J.S.; Jacobson, J.; Proebstle, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The General Electric experience base on BWR fuel includes over 29,000 fuel assemblies which contain 1,600,000 fuel rods. Over the last five years, design, process and operating changes have been introduced which have had major effects in improving fuel performance. Monitoring this fuel performance in BWRs has been accomplished through cooperative programs between GE and utilities. Activities such as plant fission product monitoring, fuel sipping and fuel and channel surveillance programs have jointly contributed to the value of this extensive experience base. The systematic evaluation of this data has established well-defined fuel performance trends which provide the assurance and confidence in fuel reliability that only actual operating experience can provide

  6. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data

  7. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake [ISOGO Nuclear Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data.

  8. Large bundle BWR test CORA-18: Test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Sepold, L.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.

    1998-04-01

    The CORA out-of-pile experiments are part of the international Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Program. They were performed to provide information on the damage progression of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel elements in Loss-of-coolant Accidents in the temperature range 1200 C to 2400 C. CORA-18 was the large BWR bundle test corresponding to the PWR test CORA-7. It should investigate if there exists an influence of the BWR bundle size on the fuel damage behaviour. Therefore, the standard-type BWR CORA bundle with 18 fuel rod simulators was replaced by a large bundle with two additional surrounding rows of 30 rods (48 rods total). Power input and steam flow were increased proportionally to the number of fuel rod simulators to give the same initial heat-up rate of about 1 K/s as in the smaller bundles. Emphasis was put on the initial phase of the damage progression. More information on the chemical composition of initial and intermediate interaction products and their relocation behaviour should be obtained. Therefore, power and steam input were terminated after the onset of the temperature escalation. (orig.) [de

  9. The sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    2004-01-01

    The sodium is the best appropriate coolant for the fast neutrons reactors technology. Thus the fast neutrons reactors development is intimately bound to the sodium technology. This document presents the sodium as a coolant point of view: atomic structure and characteristics, sodium impacts on the fast neutron reactors technology, chemical properties of the sodium and the consequences, quality control in a nuclear reactor, sodium treatment. (A.L.B.)

  10. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  11. Extended Life Coolant Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 06-06-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Interim Report 3. DATES COVERED ... Corrosion Testing of Traditional and Extended Life Coolants 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Hansen, Gregory A. T...providing vehicle specific coolants. Several laboratory corrosion tests were performed according to ASTM D1384 and D2570, but with a 2.5x extended time

  12. BWR full integral simulation test (FIST) pretest predictions with TRACBO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.

    1984-01-01

    The Full Integral Simulation Test program is a three pronged approach to the development of best-estimate analysis capability for BWR systems. An analytical method development program is underway to extend the BWR-TRAC computer code to model reactor kinetics and major interfacing systems, including balance-of-plant, to improve application modeling flexibility, and to reduce computer running time. An experimental program is underway in a new single bundle system test facility to extend the large break loss-of-coolant accident LOCA data base to small breaks and operational transients. And a method qualification program is underway to test TRACBO2 against experiments in the FIST facility. The recently completed Phase 1 period included a series of LOCA and power transient tests, and successful pretest analysis of the large and small break LOCA tests with TRACBO2. These comparisons demonstrate BWR-TRAC capability for small and large break analysis, and provide detailed understanding of the phenomena

  13. BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1993 Revision, Normal and hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, G.; Goddard, C.; Fitzpatrick, S.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of water chemistry control is to extend the operating life of the reactor and rector coolant system, balance-of-plant components, and turbines while simultaneously controlling costs to safeguard the continued economic viability of the nuclear power generation investment. To further this goal an industry committee of chemistry personnel prepared guidelines to identify the benefits, risks, and costs associated with water chemistry in BWRs and to provide a template for an optimized water chemistry program. This document replaces the BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines - 1986 Revision and the BWR Hydrogen Water Chemistry Guidelines -- 1987 Revision. It expands on the previous guidelines documents by covering the economic implications of BWR water chemistry control

  14. Trend of field data on pipe wall thinning for BWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakii, Junichi; Hiranuma, Naoki; Hidaka, Akitaka

    2009-01-01

    Strongly motivated by every stakeholder not to repeat Mihama Nuclear Power Station pipe rupture accident in August 2004, JSME Main Committee on Codes and Standards on Power Generation Facilities immediately launched a special task force to develop Rules on Pipe Wall Thinning Management for BWR, PWR and fossil Power Plants respectively. The authors describes the process of the development of Rules for BWR Power Plans from the view point of collections and analysis of fields data of pipe wall thinning. Through its activities, the authors confirmed the existing findings, like the effect of Oxygen injection, turbulence and dependence on coolant temperature, derived from series of laboratory-scaled experiments in FAC and coolant velocities effects in LDI. Further based upon the said proven findings with field data, they explain the adequacy of major concept of the rule such as separate treatment of FAC (Flow Accelerated Corrosion) and LDI (Liquid Droplet Impingement). (author)

  15. BWR shutdown analyzer using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype alarm system for detecting abnormal reactor shutdowns based on artificial intelligence technology is described. The system incorporates knowledge about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant design and component behavior, as well as knowledge required to distinguish normal, abnormal, and ATWS accident conditions. The system was developed using a software tool environment for creating knowledge-based applications on a LISP machine. To facilitate prototype implementation and evaluation, a casual simulation of BWR shutdown sequences was developed and interfaced with the alarm system. An intelligent graphics interface for execution and control is described. System performance considerations and general observations relating to artificial intelligence application to nuclear power plant problems are provided

  16. Analysis of natural circulation BWR dynamics with stochastic and deterministic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanderHagen, T.H.; Van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Kleiss, E.B.J.; Nissen, W.H.M.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Reactor kinetic, thermal hydraulic and total plant stability of a natural convection cooled BWR was studied using noise analysis and by evaluation of process responses to control rod steps and to steamflow control valve steps. An estimate of the fuel thermal time constant and an impression of the recirculation flow response to power variations was obtained. A sophisticated noise analysis method resulted in more insight into the fluctuations of the coolant velocity

  17. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A.; Castlllo D, R.

    2006-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the Laguna Verde

  18. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to remove water not by way of mechanical operation in a reactor core and improve the fuel economy in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A hollow water removing rod of a cross-like profile made of material having a smaller neutron absorption cross section than the moderator is disposed to the water gap for each of unit structures composed of four fuel assemblies, and water is charged and discharged to and from the water removing rod. Water is removed from the water removing rod to decrease the moderators in the water gap to carry out neutron spectrum shift operation from the initial to the medium stage of reactor core cycles. At the final stage of the cycle, airs in the water removing rod are extracted and the moderator is introduced. The moderator is filled and the criticality is maintained with the accumulated nuclear fission materials. The neutron spectrum shift operation can be attained by eliminating hydrothermodynamic instability and using a water removing rod of a simple structure. (Horiuchi, T.)

  19. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  20. BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Shigeru.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, control rod drives are disposed in the upper portion of a reactor pressure vessel, and a control rod guide tube is disposed in adjacent with a gas/liquid separator at a same height, as well as a steam separator is disposed in the control rod guide tube. The length of a connection rod can be shortened by so much as the control rod guide tube and the gas/liquid separator overlapping with each other. Since the control rod guide tube and the gas/liquid separator are at the same height, the number of the gas/liquid separators to be disposed is decreased and, accordingly, even if the steam separation performance by the gas/liquid separator is lowered, it can be compensated by the steam separator of the control rod guide tube. In view of the above, since the direction of emergent insertion of the control rod is not against gravitational force but it is downward direction utilizing the gravitational force, reliability for the emergent insertion of the control rod can be further improved. Further, the length of the connection rod can be minimized, thereby enabling to lower the height of the reactor pressure vessel. The construction cost for the nuclear power plant can be reduced. (N.H.)

  1. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  2. Coolant leakage detecting device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Katsunori; Ishihara, Yoshinao.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention judges an amount of leakage of primary coolants of a PWR power plant at high speed. Namely, a mass of coolants contained in a pressurizer, a volume controlling tank and loop regions is obtained based on a preset relational formula and signals of each of process amount, summed up to determine the total mass of coolants for every period of time. The amount of leakage for every period of time is calculated by a formula of Karman's filter based on the total mass of the primary coolants for every predetermined period of time, and displays it on CRT. The Karman's filter is formed on every formula for several kinds of states formed based on the preset amount of the leakage, to calculate forecasting values for every mass of coolants. An adaptable probability for every preset leakage amount is determined based on the difference between the forecast value and the observed value and the scattering thereof. The adaptable probability is compared with a predetermined threshold value, which is displayed on the CRT. This device enables earlier detection of leakage and identification of minute leakage amount as compared with the prior device. (I.S.)

  3. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR; Estabilidad termohidraulica acoplada a la neutronica en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Mpio. Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico); Castlllo D, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gcm9acpp@cfe.gob.mx

    2006-07-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the

  4. Reactor coolant cleanup device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Noboru.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to introduce reactor water at high temperature and high pressure as it is, as well as effectively adsorb to eliminate cobalt in reactor water. Constitution: The coolant cleanup device comprises a vessel main body inserted to coolant pipeway circuits in a water cooled reactor power plant and filters contained within the vessel main body. The filters are prepared by coating and baking powder of metal oxides such as manganese ferrite having a function capable of adsorbing cobalt in the coolants onto the surface of supports made of metals or ceramics resistant to strong acids and alkalies in the form of three-dimensional network structure, for example, zircaloy-2, SUS 303 and the zirconia (baking) to form a basic filter elements. The basic filter elements are charged in plurality to the vessel main body. (Kawaiami, Y.)

  5. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 3—Calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Sterling; Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Blandford, Edward D, E-mail: edb@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Howe, Kerry [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Calcium leaching from NUKON fiberglass in borated TSP-buffered solution is independent of the level of fiberglass destruction. • The initial calcium release rate and the maximum calcium concentration increases with increased fiber concentration. • The calcium release in solution has a repeatable pattern of four distinct regions (prompt release, metastable, autocatalytic drop, and stable region) for all experiments. • Magnesium plays a significant role in initiating calcium precipitation in TSP-buffered environment. • Head loss through multi-constituents debris beds was found to increase progressively in all calcium concentration regions. - Abstract: Calcium that leaches from damaged or destroyed NUKON fiberglass in containment post a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) could lead to the formation of chemical precipitates. These precipitates could be filtered through the accumulated fibrous debris on the sump screen and compromising the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) sump pump performance. Reduced-scale leaching experiments were conducted on three solution inventory scales—bench (0.5 L), vertical column (31.5 L), and tank (1136 L) using three different flow conditions, and fiberglass concentrations (1.18–8 g/L) to investigate calcium release from NUKON fiber. All experiments were conducted in simulated post-LOCA water chemistry. (∼220 mM boric acid with ∼5.8 mM trisodium phosphate (TSP) buffer). Prior to the leaching tests, a preliminary experiment was carried out on the bench scale to determine the effect of the fiber preparation (unaltered and blended) method on calcium leaching. Results indicate that the extent of fiberglass destruction does not affect the amount of calcium released from fiberglass. Long-term calcium leach testing at constant temperature (80 °C) in borated TSP-buffered solution had repeatable behavior on all solution scales for different fiberglass concentrations. The calcium-leaching pattern can be divided into

  6. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoyama, Shigeaki; Tanabe, Akira.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a main steam pressure shock absorber for reflecting the effect of the pressure propagation to coolants surface in the reactor core. Constitution: An annular shock absorber having near the water level through holes for water level measurement is provided to the gap between the skirt of a steam separator and a pressure vessel. Pressure waves are made the rapid closure of a main steam check valve. If arrived from the dome to the shock absorber, are mostly reflected to the side of the dome and give no substantial effects on the water surface. If the through holes are made small enough, the effects of pressure waves passing through the holes are negligible if they reach the water surface. (Kawakami, Y.)

  7. BWR Services maintenance training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.H.; Chittenden, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    BWR Services has implemented a five-phase program to increase plant availability and capacity factor in operating BWR's. One phase of this program is establishing a maintenance training program on NSSS equipment; the scope encompasses maintenance on both mechanical equipment and electrical control and instrumentation equipment. The program utilizes actual product line equipment for practical Hands-on training. A total of 23 formal courses will be in place by the end of 1979. The General Electric Company is making a multimillion dollar investment in facilities to support this training. These facilities are described

  8. Description of steam-condensation phenomena during the loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Holman, G.S.; Aust, E.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, J.; Fuerst, H.

    1980-01-01

    The development and verification of advanced computer models which describe the boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure suppression process for a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) require a clear description of basic steam condensation phenomena. The GKSS Research Center, in coordination with interested institutions of West Germany and the United States, is currently conducting a test program for such basic research on a multivent BWR-related pressure suppression system. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) acts as the principal US NRC liaison for this test program, with particular emphasis on development of GKSS data for confirmatory use regarding US Mark II nuclear power plants as well as to advanced code development. The multivent test facility, placed in operation in February 1979, is a three-pipe full-scale vent system modelling main features of both the West German KWU and United States G.E. Mk II BWR pressure suppression systems. The test facility and testing programs are described

  9. Material operating behaviour of ABB BWR control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebensdorff, B.; Bart, G.

    2000-01-01

    The BWR control rods made by ABB use boron carbide (B 4 C and hafnium as absorber material within a cladding of stainless steel. The general behaviour under operation has proven to be very good. ABB and many of their control rod customers have performed extensive inspection programs of control rod behaviour. However, due to changes in the material properties under fast and thermal neutron irradiation defects may occur in the control rods at high neutron fluences. Examinations of irradiated control rod materials have been performed in hot cell laboratories. The examinations have revealed the defect mechanism Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) to appear in the stainless steel cladding. For IASCC to occur three factors have to act simultaneously. Stress, material sensitization and an oxidising environment. Stress may be obtained from boron carbide swelling due to irradiation. Stainless steel may be sensitized to intergranular stress corrosion cracking under irradiation. Normally the reactor environment in a BWR is oxidising. The presentation focuses on findings from hot cell laboratory work on irradiated ABB BWR control rods and studies of irradiated control rod materials in the hot cells at PSI. Apart from physical, mechanical and microstructural examinations, isotope analyses were performed to describe the local isotopic burnup of boron. Consequences (such as possible B 4 C washout) of a under operation in a ABB BWR, after the occurrence of a crack is discussed based on neutron radiographic examinations of control rods operated with cracks. (author)

  10. Coolant system decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution. (author)

  11. Research on Coolant Radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Yeong Keong; Kim, W. H.; Yeon, J. W.; Jung, Y. J.; Choi, K. C.; Choi, K. S.; Park, Y. J.; Cho, Y. H.

    2007-06-01

    The final objective of this study is to develop a method for reducing radioactive materials formed in the reactor coolant circuit. This second stage research was categorized into the following three subgroups: the development of the estimation technique of microscopic chemical variation at high temperatures and pressures, the fundamental study on the thermodynamics at high temperatures and pressures, and the study on the deposition of metal oxides and the determination of the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD. First, in the development of the estimation technique of microscopic chemical change at high temperatures and pressures, the technique for measuring coolant chemistry such as pH, conductivity and Eh was developed to be appropriate for the high temperature and pressure condition. The coolant chemistry measuring system including the self-devised high temperature pH sensor can be applied to the field of nuclear reactor and contribute on a large scale in the automation of the coolant chemistry control and the establishment of the real-time on-line measuring technique. Secondly, the dissociation constant of water and the solubility of metal oxides were measured in the fundamental study on the thermodynamics at high temperatures and pressures. Finally, in the study on the deposition of metal oxides and the determination of the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD, the careful investigation of the deposition phenomena of micro particles on the cladding surface showed that subcooled boiling and the dissolved hydrogen are the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD. In addition, the basis was provided for the construction of a new particle behavior model in the reactor coolant circuit

  12. BWR normal water chemistry guidelines: 1986 revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) have experienced stress corrosion cracking in the reactor cooling system piping resulting in adverse impacts on plant availability and personnel radiation exposure. The BWR Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major research and development program to provide remedies for this stress corrosion cracking problem. This work shows that the likelihood of cracking depends on the plant's water chemistry performance (environment) as well as on material condition and stress level. Plant experience and other research demonstrate that water quality also affects fuel performance and radiation field buildup in BWRs. This report,''BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1986 Revision,'' presents suggested generic water chemistry specifications, justifies the proposed water chemistry limits, suggests responses to out-of-specification water chemistry, discusses available chemical analysis methods as well as data management and surveillance schemes, and details the management philosophy required to successfully implement a water chemistry control program. An appendix contains recommendations for water quality of auxiliary systems. 73 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs

  13. BWR reactor management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Kakuji; Kawamura, Atsuo; Yoshioka, Ritsuo; Neda, Toshikatsu.

    1979-01-01

    It is necessary to grasp the delicate state of operation in reactor cores in view of the control of burn-up and power output at the time of the operation management of BWRs. Enormous labor has been required for the collection, processing and evaluation of the data. It is desirable to obtain the safer, more efficient and faster method of operation control by predicting the states in cores including the change of xenon and reflecting them to operation plans as well as by tracing with high accuracy the past burn-up history for a long period. At present, the on-line evaluation of the states in cores is carried out with the process computers attached to respective units, but the amount of data required for core operation management of high degree far exceeds their capacity. From such viewpoints, the research and development on the reactor management system were carried out. The data processing concerning core operation management is performed with newly installed computers utilizing the data from existing process computers, and the operation of reactor cores, the qualitative improvement of management works, labor saving, and fast, efficient operation control are feasible with it. This system was installed in an actual plant in October, 1977. The composition of the system, the prediction of the change in local output distribution accompanying control rod operation, the prediction of the change in the states in cores due to the flow rate of coolant, and the function of collecting plant data are explained. (Kako, I.)

  14. Development status of compact containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Mori, H.; Sekiguchi, K.; Kuroki, M.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2005-01-01

    In Japan, increase of nuclear plant unit capacity has been promoted to take advantage of economies of scale while further enhancing safety and reliability. As a result, more than 50 units of nuclear power plants are playing important role in electric power generation. However, the factors, such as stagnant growth in the recent electricity demand, limitation in electricity grid capacity and limited in initial investment avoiding risk, will not be in favor of large plant outputs. The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response

  15. ENVIRONMENTALLY REDUCING OF COOLANTS IN METAL CUTTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veijo KAUPPINEN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Strained environment is a global problem. In metal industries the use of coolant has become more problematic in terms of both employee health and environmental pollution. It is said that the use of coolant forms approximately 8 - 16 % of the total production costs.The traditional methods that use coolants are now obviously becoming obsolete. Hence, it is clear that using a dry cutting system has great implications for resource preservation and waste reduction. For this purpose, a new cooling system is designed for dry cutting. This paper presents the new eco-friendly cooling innovation and the benefits gained by using this method. The new cooling system relies on a unit for ionising ejected air. In order to compare the performance of using this system, cutting experiments were carried out. A series of tests were performed on a horizontal turning machine and on a horizontal machining centre.

  16. Compartmentalized safety coolant injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    A safety coolant injection system for nuclear reactors wherein a core reflood tank is provided to afford more reliable reflooding of the reactor core in the event of a break in one of the reactor coolant supply loops. Each reactor coolant supply loop is arranged in a separate compartment in the containment structure to contain and control the flow of spilled coolant so as to permit its use during emergency core cooling procedures. A spillway allows spilled coolant in the compartment to pass into the emergency water storage tank from where it can be pumped back to the reactor vessel. (author)

  17. Advanced Construction of Compact Containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Maruyama, T.; Mori, H.; Hoshino, K.; Hijioka, Y.; Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Hoshi, T.

    2006-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a mid/small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. Compact Containment BWR (CCR) is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified safety system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in case of design base accidents including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. CCR's specific self-standing steel high pressure resistible PCV is designed to contain minimum piping and valves inside with reactor pressure vessel (RPV), only 13 m in diameter and 24 m in height. This compact PCV makes it possible to

  18. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  19. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Toshio; Masuda, Hisao; Isono, Tomoyuki; Noji, Kunio; Togo, Toshiki

    1989-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) was established in April 1971 for the purpose of training the operators from all BWR utilities in Japan. Since April 1974, more than 2600 operators and 1000 shift teams have been trained with the full-scope simulators in BTC up to the end of March 1988. To get the satisfactory results of the training, BTC has been making every effort to improve the facilities, the training materials, the instruction methods and the curricula. In this paper, such a series of recent improvements in the instruction methods and the curricula are presented that are effective to expand the knowledge and to improve the skills of middle or senior class operators. (author)

  20. Development of long operating cycle simplified BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Maruya, T.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Narabayash, T.; Aritomi, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative plant concept for long operating cycle simplified BWR (LSBWR) In this plant concept, 1) Long operating cycle ( 3 to 15 years), 2) Simplified systems and building, 3) Factory fabrication in module are discussed. Designing long operating core is based on medium enriched U-235 with burnable poison. Simplified systems and building are realized by using natural circulation with bottom located core, internal CRD and PCV with passive system and an integrated reactor and turbine building. This LSBWR concept will have make high degree of safety by IVR (In Vessel Retention) capability, large water inventory above the core region and no PCV vent to the environment due to PCCS (Passive Containment Cooling System) and internal vent tank. Integrated building concept could realize highly modular arrangement in hull structure (ship frame structure), ease of seismic isolation capability and high applicability of standardization and factory fabrication. (authors)

  1. Advanced technology for BWR operator training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Akira; Fujita, Eimitsu; Nakao, Toshihiko; Nakabaru, Mitsugu; Asaoka, Kouchi.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plants which went into service recently. The simulator is a full scope replica type simulator which faithfully replicates the control room environment of the reference plant with six main control panels and twelve auxiliary ones. In comparison with earlier simulators, the scope of the simulation is significantly extended in both width and depth. The simulation model is also refined in order to include operator training according to sympton-based emergency procedure guidelines to mitigate the results in accident cases. In particular, the core model and the calculational model of the radiation intensity distribution, if radioactive materials were released, are improved. As for simulator control capabilities by which efficient and effective training can be achieved, various advanced designs are adopted allowing easy use of the simulators. (author)

  2. Synergistic failure of BWR internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A. G.; Chang, T.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components

  3. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennard, M W [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Pleasantville, NY (United States); Harbottle, J E [Stoller Nuclear Fuel, NAC International, Thornbury, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B{sub 4}C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  4. BWR control blade replacement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennard, M.W.; Harbottle, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control elements in a BWR, the control blades, perform three significant functions: provide shutdown margin during normal and accident operating conditions; provide overall core reactivity control; and provide axial power shaping control. As such, the blades are exposed to the core's neutron flux, resulting in irradiation of blade structural and absorber materials. Since the absorber depletes with time (if B 4 C is used, it also swells) and the structural components undergo various degradation mechanisms (e.g., embrittlement, corrosion), the blades have limits on their operational lifetimes. Consequently, BWR utilities have implemented strategies that aim to maximize blade lifetimes while balancing operational costs, such as extending a refuelling outage to shuffle high exposure blades. This paper examines the blade replacement strategies used by BWR utilities operating in US, Europe and Asia by assembling information related to: the utility's specific blade replacement strategy; the impact the newer blade designs and changes in core operating mode were having on those strategies; the mechanical and nuclear limits that determined those strategies; the methods employed to ensure that lifetime limits were not exceeded during operation; and blade designs used (current and replacement blades). (author)

  5. Development of next BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke

    1995-01-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.)

  6. Development of next BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Kumiaki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Utena, Shunsuke [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works

    1995-04-01

    It is expected that BWR power generation will be main nuclear power generation for long period hereafter, and in the ABWRs being constructed at present, the safety, reliability, operation performance, economical efficiency and so on are further heightend as compared with conventional BWRs. On the other hand, in order to cope with future social change, the move to develop the next reactor type following ABWRs was begun already by the cooperation of electirc power companies and plant manufacturers. Hitachi Ltd. has advanced eagerly the development of new light water reactors. Also the objective of BWR power generation hereafter is to heighten the safety, reliability, operation performance and economical efficiency, and the development has been advanced, aiming at bearing the main roles of nuclear power generation. At present, ABWRs are under construction as No. 6 and 7 plants in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. In order to let ABWRs take root, the further improvement of economy by the standardization, the rationalization by revising the specification and the improvement of machinery and equipment is necessary. As the needs of the development of next generation BWRs, the increase of power output, the heightening of safety and economical efficiency are discussed. The concept of the next generation BWR plant aiming at the start of operation around 2010 is shown. (K.I.).

  7. Evaluation of an optimized coolant circuit conception in a thermal whole vehicle environment with respect to the consumption of primary energy; Bewertung eines optimierten Kuehlmittelkreislaufkonzeptes in einer thermischen Gesamtfahrzeugumgebung hinsichtlich des Primaerenergieverbrauchs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Mirko; Neumann, Alexander; Tilch, Benjamin; Eilts, Peter [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen; Niedersaechsisches Forschungszentrum Fahrzeugtechnik (NFF), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with a co-simulation vehicle environment developed by the institute of internal combustion engines (ivb) of the Technical University Braunschweig as a tool to analyze the thermal effects in the power train during the warm-up phase, especially on the fuel consumption. This allows evaluating new drive train concepts in early stages of development by using power train thermal management techniques (TMM). Therefore you are able to give an objective statement for these techniques by analyzing the changes in fuel consumption. The used simulation models will be introduced and the mechanical and thermal behavior is verified using test bench data. An optimized coolant circuit concept in GT Suite {sup registered}, developed at the institute is identified and coupled to a thermal engine model. In this paper, the potentials for reducing primary energy consumption in the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) are presented. (orig.)

  8. Phenomena occuring in the reactor coolant system during severe core damage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) of a nuclear power plant consists of the reactor pressure vessel and the piping and associated components that are required for the continuous circulation of the coolant which is used to maintain thermal equilibrium throughout the system. This paper discusses, how in the event of an accident, the RCS also serves as one of several barriers to the escape of radiotoxic material into the biosphere. The physical and chemical processes occurring within the RCS during normal operation of the reactor are relatively uncomplicated and are reasonably well understood. When the flow of coolant is properly adjusted, the thermal energy resulting from nuclear fission (or, in the shutdown mode, from radioactive decay processes) and secondary inputs, such as pumps, are exactly balanced by thermal losses through the RCS boundaries and to the various heat sinks that are employed to effect the conversion of heat to electrical energy. Because all of the heat and mass fluxes remain sensibly constant with time, mathematical descriptions of the thermophysical processes are relatively straightforward, even for boiling water reactor (BWR) systems. Although the coolant in a BWR does undergo phase changes, the phase boundaries remain well-defined and time-invariant

  9. 14C Behaviour in PWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, Howard; Dickinson Shirley; Garbett, Keith

    2012-09-01

    Although 14 C is produced in relatively small amounts in PWR coolant, it is important to know its fate, for example whether it is released by gaseous discharge, removed by absorption on ion exchange (IX) resins or deposited on the fuel pin surfaces. 14 C can exist in a range of possible chemical forms: inorganic carbon compounds (probably mainly CO 2 ), elemental carbon, and organic compounds such as hydrocarbons. This paper presents results from a preliminary survey of the possible reactions of 14 C in PWR coolant. The main conclusions of the study are: - A combination of thermal and radiolytic reactions controls the chemistry of 14 C in reactor coolant. A simple chemical kinetic model predicts that CH 3 OH would be the initial product from radiolytic reactions of 14 C following its formation from 17 O. CH 3 OH is predicted to arise as a result of reactions of OH . with CH 4 and CH 3 , and it persists because there is no known radiation chemical reduction mechanism. - Thermodynamic considerations show that CH 3 OH can be thermally reduced to CH 4 in PWR conditions, although formation of CO 2 from small organics is the most thermodynamically favourable outcome. Such reactions could be catalysed on active nickel surfaces in the primary circuit. - Limited plant data would suggest that CH 4 is the dominant form in PWR and CO 2 in BWR. This implies that radiation chemistry may be important in determining the speciation. - Addition of acetate does not affect the amount of 14 C formed, but the addition of large amounts of stable carbon would lead to a large range of additional products, some of which would be expected to deposit on fuel pin surfaces as high molecular weight hydrocarbons. However, the subsequent thermal decomposition reactions of these products are not known. - Acetate addition may represent a small input of 12 C compared with organic material released from CVCS resins, although the importance of this may depend on whether that is predominantly soluble

  10. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Blandford, Edward, E-mail: edb@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Howe, Kerry [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  11. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel; Blandford, Edward; Howe, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  12. BWR Steam Dryer Alternating Stress Assessment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hambric, S. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ziada, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an overview of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) steam dryer design; the fatigue cracking failures that occurred at the Quad Cities (QC) plants and their root causes; a history of BWR Extended Power Uprates (EPUs) in the USA; and a discussion of steam dryer modifications/replacements, alternating stress mechanisms on steam dryers, and structural integrity evaluations (static and alternating stress).

  13. BWR alloy 182 stress Corrosion Cracking Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, R.M.; Hickling, J.

    2002-01-01

    Modern Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) have successfully operated for more than three decades. Over that time frame, different materials issues have continued to arise, leading to comprehensive efforts to understand the root cause while concurrently developing different mitigation strategies to address near-term, continued operation, as well as provide long-term paths to extended plant life. These activities have led to methods to inspect components to quantify the extent of degradation, appropriate methods of analysis to quantify structural margin, repair designs (or strategies to replace the component function) and improved materials for current and future application. The primary materials issue has been the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). While this phenomenon has been primarily associated with austenitic stainless steel, it has also been found in nickel-base weldments used to join piping and reactor internal components to the reactor pressure vessel consistent with fabrication practices throughout the nuclear industry. The objective of this paper is to focus on the history and learning gained regarding Alloy 182 weld metal. The paper will discuss the chronology of weld metal cracking in piping components as well as in reactor internal components. The BWR industry has pro-actively developed inspection processes and procedures that have been successfully used to interrogate different locations for the existence of cracking. The recognition of the potential for cracking has also led to extensive studies to understand cracking behavior. Among other things, work has been performed to characterize crack growth rates in both oxygenated and hydrogenated environments. The latter may also be relevant to PWR systems. These data, along with the understanding of stress corrosion cracking processes, have led to extensive implementation of appropriate mitigation measures. (authors)

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrey Ioilev; Maskhud Samigulin; Vasily Ustinenko; Simon Lo; Adrian Tentner

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The goal of this project is to develop an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle under various operating conditions. This code will include more fundamental physical models than the current generation of sub-channel codes and advanced numerical algorithms for improved computational accuracy, robustness, and speed. It is highly desirable to understand the detailed two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for the analysis of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is still too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Recent progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), coupled with the rapidly increasing computational power of massively parallel computers, shows promising potential for the fine-mesh, detailed simulation of fuel assembly two-phase flow phenomena. However, the phenomenological models available in the commercial CFD programs are not as advanced as those currently being used in the sub-channel codes used in the nuclear industry. In particular, there are no models currently available which are able to reliably predict the nature of the flow regimes, and use the appropriate sub-models for those flow regimes. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD Code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. The paper describes the model development strategy which has been adopted by the development team for the

  15. Coolant radiolysis studies in the high temperature, fuelled U-2 loop in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, A.J.; Stuart, C.R.

    2008-06-01

    An understanding of the radiolysis-induced chemistry in the coolant water of nuclear reactors is an important key to the understanding of materials integrity issues in reactor coolant systems. Significant materials and chemistry issues have emerged in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and CANDU reactors that have required a detailed understanding of the radiation chemistry of the coolant. For each reactor type, specific computer radiolysis models have been developed to gain insight into radiolysis processes and to make chemistry control adjustments to address the particular issue. In this respect, modelling the radiolysis chemistry has been successful enough to allow progress to be made. This report contains a description of the water radiolysis tests performed in the U-2 loop, NRU reactor in 1995, which measured the CHC under different physical conditions of the loop such as temperature, reactor power and steam quality. (author)

  16. Valuation of power oscillations in a BWR after control rod banks withdrawal events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A. L.; Pereira, C.; Da Silva, C. A. M.; Veloso, M. A. F.

    2009-01-01

    The out-of-phase mode of oscillation is a very challenging type of instability occurring in BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) and its study is relevant because of the safety implications related to the capability to promptly detect any such inadvertent occurrence by in-core neutron detectors, thus triggering the necessary countermeasures in terms of selected rod insertion or even reactor shutdown. In this work, control rod banks (CRB) withdrawal transient was considered to study the power instability occurring in a BWR. To simulate this transient, the control rod banks were continuously removed from the BWR core in different cases. The simulation resulted in a very large increase of power. To perform the instability simulations, the RELAP5/MOD3.3 thermal hydraulic system code was coupled with the PARCS/2.4 3D neutron kinetic code. Data from a real BWR, the Peach Bottom, have been used as reference conditions and reactor parameters. The trend of the mass flow rate, pressure, coolant temperature and the void fraction to four thermal hydraulic channels symmetrically located in the core with respect to the core centre, were taken. It appears that the velocity of the rod bank withdrawal is a very important aspect for reactor stability. The slowest CRB withdrawal (180 s) did not cause power perturbation while the fast removal (20 s) triggered a slow power oscillation that little by little amplified to reach levels of more 100% of the initial power after about 210 s. The investigation of the related thermo hydraulic parameters showed that the mass flow rate, the void fraction and also the coolant temperature began to oscillate at approximately the same time interval

  17. An advanced frequency-domain code for boiling water reactor (BWR) stability analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrooz, A.

    2008-01-01

    for a large reactor could reach 20 gigabytes) that it is not possible to load into RAM memory of an operating system with 32 bit architecture. A special procedure has been developed within the MATLAB environment to remove this memory limitation, and to invert such large matrices and finally obtain the reactor transfer functions that enable the study of system stability. Various applications of the present frequency-domain code to a typical BWR fuel assembly, a BWR core, and to a chemical reactor showed a good agreement with reference results. (author)

  18. Power oscillations in BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa P, G.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main problems in the operation of BWR type reactors is the instability in power that these could present. One type of oscillations and that is the objective of this work is the named density wave, which is attributed to the thermohydraulic processes that take place in the reactor core. From the beginnings of the development of BWR reactors, the stability of these has been an important aspect in their design, due to its possible consequences on the fuel integrity. The reactor core operates in two phase flow conditions and it is observed that under certain power and flow conditions, power instabilities appear. Studying this type of phenomena is complex, due to that a reactor core is constituted approximately by 27,000 fuel bars with different distributions of power and flow. The phenomena that cause the instability in BWR reactors continue being matter of scientific study. In the literature mainly in nuclear subject, it can be observed that exist different methods and approximations for studying this type of phenomena, nevertheless, their results are focused to establish safety limits in the reactor operation, instead of studying in depth of the knowledge about. Also in this line sense of the reactor data analysis, the oscillations characteristic frequencies are obtained for trying to establish if the power is growing or decreasing. In addition to that before mentioned in this paper it is presented a rigorous study applying the volumetric average method, for obtaining the vacuum waves propagation velocities and its possible connection with the power oscillations. (Author)

  19. Dual coolant blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Schleisiek, K.

    1994-11-01

    A self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket with helium-cooled first wall ('Dual Coolant Blanket Concept') for a fusion DEMO reactor is described. This is one of the four blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European fusion technology program with the aim to select in 1995 the two most promising ones for further development. Described are the design of the blankets including the ancillary loop system and the results of the theoretical and experimental work in the fields of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, thermohydraulics, mechanical stresses, compatibility and purification of lead-lithium, tritium control, safety, reliability, and electrically insulating coatings. The remaining open questions and the required R and D programme are identified. (orig.) [de

  20. BWR steel containment corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  1. BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nei, Hiromichi; Hashiguchi, Isao; Inai, Nobuhiko.

    1996-01-01

    A heat exchanger is disposed between a reactor pressure vessel and a turbine, an inlet of a primary circuit of the heat exchanger is connected to a steam pipeline, an exit of the primary circuit of the heat exchanger is connected to a primary coolant pipeline, the primary coolant pipeline is connected to a feed water pipeline, a secondary circuit steam pipeline connected to the heat exchanger is connected to the turbine and a condensate circuit from the turbine is connected to the secondary coolant pipeline connected to the heat exchanger. Steams generated in the reactor are once flown into the heat exchanger to heat secondary coolants indirectly in the heat exchanger, and the generated steams are introduced to the steam turbine. Incondensible gases generated from the reactor and inflowing to the primary side of the heat exchanger are introduced, together with a portion of the steams, to a small-sized condensator passing through steam pipelines in the vicinity of a water surface in a hot well for storing condensed water and disposed at the lower portion of the heat exchanger, the steams and the incondensible gases are separated, and the incondensible gases are processed in an extraction system. Then, steam condition is improved to an over-heat state, and no large-sized shieldings are necessary. (N.H.)

  2. Application of noise analysis to stability determination of a natural circulation cooled BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Dam, H. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Nissen, W.H.M.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed on the Dodewaard natural circulation cooled BWR at different conditions. The absolute stability was determined by measuring system responses to control rod and steam flow valve steps. Changes in core stability were studied using the signal of an average power range monitor (APRM) in time domain (auto-correlation function and impulse response) and in frequency domain (power spectral density and peaking factor), the outlet void fraction and variations of the incore coolant velocity. It is shown that the reactor is very stable and that cooling by natural circulation improves load following. Stability monitoring can be performed by all mentioned methods but using APRM signals in frequency domain is preferred.

  3. Observations of crud deposits, corrosion and erosion of BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, H.

    1983-01-01

    The BWR experience is limited to one reactor but the PWR experience covers a wide range of successive generations of power plants (7 in total). The systems are described and their water chemistry briefly commented. Some R and D performed on the effects of the operating regimes (steady state and transients) are summarized. Observations made by pool-side inspections and postirradiation examinations of fuel are outlined concerning water chemistry effects (crud deposits and corrosion) and ''mechanical'' coolant-cladding interaction (chip deposits and baffle jetting). (author)

  4. Coolant channel module CCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeld, Alois

    2007-01-01

    A complete and detailed description of the theoretical background of an '(1D) thermal-hydraulic drift-flux based mixture-fluid' coolant channel model and its resulting module CCM will be presented. The objective of this module is to simulate as universally as possible the steady state and transient behaviour of the key characteristic parameters of a single- or two-phase fluid flowing within any type of heated or non-heated coolant channel. Due to the possibility that different flow regimes can appear along any channel, such a 'basic (BC)' 1D channel is assumed to be subdivided into a number of corresponding sub-channels (SC-s). Each SC can belong to only two types of flow regime, an SC with just a single-phase fluid, containing exclusively either sub-cooled water or superheated steam, or an SC with a two-phase mixture flow. After an appropriate nodalisation of such a BC (and therefore also its SC-s) a 'modified finite volume method' has been applied for the spatial discretisation of the partial differential equations (PDE-s) which represent the basic conservation equations of thermal-hydraulics. Special attention had to be given to the possibility of variable SC entrance or outlet positions (which describe boiling boundaries or mixture levels) and thus the fact that an SC can even disappear or be created anew. The procedure yields for each SC type (and thus the entire BC), a set of non-linear ordinary 1st order differential equations (ODE-s). To link the resulting mean nodal with the nodal boundary function values, both of which are present in the discretised differential equations, a special quadratic polygon approximation procedure (PAX) had to be constructed. Together with the very thoroughly tested packages for drift-flux, heat transfer and single- and two-phase friction factors this procedure represents the central part of the here presented 'Separate-Region' approach, a theoretical model which provides the basis to the very effective working code package CCM

  5. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, D.D.

    2002-01-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  6. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, D.D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  7. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  8. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.

    2009-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  9. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR system on a

  10. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR

  11. Secondary coolant purification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiteler, F.Z.; Donohue, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention combines the attributes of volatile chemical addition, continuous blowdown, and full flow condensate demineralization. During normal plant operation (defined as no primary to secondary leakage) condensate from the condenser is pumped through a full flow condensate demineralizer system by the condensate pumps. Volatile chemical additions are made. Dissolved and suspended solids are removed in the condensate polishers by ion exchange and/or filtration. At the same time a continuous blowdown of approximately 1 percent of the main steaming rate of the steam generators is maintained. Radiation detectors monitor the secondary coolant. If these monitors indicate no primary to secondary leakage, the blowdown is cooled and returned directly to the condensate pump discharge. If one of the radiation monitors should indicate a primary to secondary leak, when the temperature of the effluent exiting from the blowdown heat exchanger is compatible with the resin specifications of the ion exchangers, the bypass valve causes the blowdown flow to pass through the blowdown ion exchangers

  12. THALES, Thermohydraulic LOCA Analysis of BWR and PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABE, Kiyoharu

    1990-01-01

    reactor coolant system, combustible gas burning, atmosphere- structure heat transfer, ventilation, containment spray cooling, etc. After the molten core penetrates the reactor bottom head, steam generation, concrete disintegration and noncondensable gas generation are calculated in the reactor cavity or the pedestal. 2 - Method of solution: Each of the THALES member codes first establishes the steady state conditions after reading input data. Then iterative time-dependent calculation is continued, taking account of various phenomena and events and their interactions which will occur in the course of a postulated severe accident. The transient calculations are iterated by the physical times specified by input. Generally the RCS thermal hydraulic analysis with the THALES-PM or THALES-BM code is first carried out and its results are transferred to the following containment analysis with the THALES-CV code. Then both results are transferred to a code for analyzing fission product release and transport behavior. Automatic data transfer is possible in the case the JAERI's ART code is used for fission product behavior analysis. In overall thermal hydraulic analysis, a new method is adopted aiming at sufficiently accurate estimation of mixture levels in the reactor coolant system and the containment in a reasonable computer time. The heat transfer calculation in the core is carried out based on the backward method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Restrictions relating to storage allocation are: (1) Maximum number of radial regions in the core : 10; (2) Maximum number of axial increments in the fuel rods : 50; (3) Maximum number of loops in the PWR primary system : 4; (4) Maximum number of volumes in the PWR primary system : 11; (5) Number of BWR recirculation loops: 2 (fixed); (6) Number of volumes in the BWR reactor coolant system : 7 (fixed); (7) Maximum number of compartments in the containment : 10. There is another restriction, which relates to time step

  13. On-line prediction of BWR transients in support of plant operation and safety analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    A combination of advanced modeling techniques and modern, special-purpose peripheral minicomputer technology is presented which affords realistic predictions of plant transient and severe off-normal events in LWR power plants through on-line simulations at a speed ten times greater than actual process speeds. Results are shown for a BWR plant simulation. The mathematical models account for nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous two-phase flow effects in the coolant, for acoustical effects in the steam line and for the dynamics of the recirculation loop and feed-water train. Point kinetics incorporate reactivity feedback for void fraction, for fuel temperature, and for coolant temperature. Control systems and trip logic are simulated for the nuclear steam supply system

  14. Performance of iron–chromium–aluminum alloy surface coatings on Zircaloy 2 under high-temperature steam and normal BWR operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Weicheng; Mouche, Peter A.; Han, Xiaochun [University of Illinois, Department of Nuclear, Radiological, and Plasma Engineering, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Heuser, Brent J., E-mail: bheuser@illinois.edu [University of Illinois, Department of Nuclear, Radiological, and Plasma Engineering, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Was, Gary S. [University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) coatings deposited on Zircaloy 2 (Zy2) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by magnetron sputtering have been tested with respect to oxidation weight gain in high-temperature steam. In addition, autoclave testing of FeCrAl-coated Zy2 coupons under pressure-temperature-dissolved oxygen coolant conditions representative of a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment has been performed. Four different FeCrAl compositions have been tested in 700 °C steam; compositions that promote alumina formation inhibited oxidation of the underlying Zy2. Parabolic growth kinetics of alumina on FeCrAl-coated Zy2 is quantified via elemental depth profiling. Autoclave testing under normal BWR operating conditions (288 °C, 9.5 MPa with normal water chemistry) up to 20 days demonstrates observable weight gain over uncoated Zy2 simultaneously exposed to the same environment. However, no FeCrAl film degradation was observed. The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe–Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system. - Graphical abstract: Weight gain normalized to total sample surface area versus time during 700 °C steam exposure for FeCrAl samples with different composition (A) and Fe/Cr/Al:62/4/34 (B). In both cases, the responses of uncoated Zry2 (Zry2-13A and Zry2-19A) are shown for comparison. This uncoated Zry2 response shows the expected pre-transition quasi-cubic kinetic behavior and eventual breakaway (linear) kinetics. Highlights: • FeCrAl coatings deposited on Zy2 have been tested with respect to oxidation in high-temperature steam. • FeCrAl compositions promoting alumina formation inhibited oxidation of Zy2 and delay weight gain. • Autoclave testing to 20 days of coated Zy2 in a simulated BWR environment demonstrates minimal weight gain and no film degradation. • The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe-Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system.

  15. BWR series pump recirculation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillmann, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a recirculation system for driving reactor coolant water contained in an annular downcomer defined between a boiling water reactor vessel and a reactor core spaced radially inwardly therefrom. It comprises a plurality of circumferentially spaced second pumps disposed in the downcomer, each including an inlet for receiving from the downcomer a portion of the coolant water as pump inlet flow, and an outlet for discharging the pump inlet flow pressurized in the second pump as pump outlet flow; and means for increasing pressure of the pump inlet flow at the pump inlet including a first pump disposed in series flow with the second pump for first receiving the pump inlet flow from the downcomer and discharging to the second pump inlet flow pressurized in the first pump

  16. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  17. BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kosuke.

    1991-01-01

    In a BWR type nuclear power plant in which reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel can be drained to a waste processing system by way of reactor recycling pipeways and remaining heat removal system pipeways, a pressurized air supply device is disposed for supplying air for pressurizing reactor water to the inside of the reactor pressure vessel by way of an upper head. With such a constitution, since the pressurized air sent from the pressurized air supply device above the reactor pressure vessel for the reactor water discharging pressure upon draining, the water draining pressure is increased compared with a conventional case and, accordingly, the amount of drained water is not reduced even in the latter half of draining. Accordingly, the draining efficiency can be improved and only a relatively short period of time is required till the completion of the draining, which can improve safety and save labors. (T.M.)

  18. Decontamination of main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roofthooft, R.

    1988-01-01

    Last year a number of main coolant pumps in Belgian nuclear power plants were decontaminated. A new method has been developed to reduce the time taken for decontamination and the volume of waste to be treated. The method comprises two phases: Oxidation with permanganate in nitric acid and dissolution in oxalic acid. The decontamination of main coolant pumps can now be achieved in less than one day. The decontamination factors attained range between 15 and 150. (orig.) [de

  19. Genusa Bepu methodologies for the safety analysis of BWRs; Metodologias Bepu de Genusa para el analisis de seguridad de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, M.; Garcia, J.; Goodson, C.; Ibarra, L.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the BEPU methodologies developed by General Electric-Hitachi (GEH) for the evaluation of the BWR reactor safety analysis based on the TRACG best-estimate code. These methodologies are applicable to a wide range of events, operational transients (AOO), anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and instability events; to different BWR types operating commercially. General Electric (GE( designs and other vendors, including Generation III+ESBWR; to the new operation strategies, and to all types of BWR fuel. Their application achieves, among other benefits, a better understanding of the overall plant response and an improvement in margins to the operating limits; thus, the increase of flexibility in reactor operation and reduction in generation costs. (Author)

  20. ROSA-III/971, BWR Rig of Safety Assessment LOCA, Loss of Offsite Power Transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: ROSA-III is a 1/124 scaled down test facility with electrically heated core designed to study the response of engineered safety features to loss-of-coolant accidents in in commercial BWR. It consists of the following, fully instrumented subsystems: (a) the pressure vessel with a core simulating four half-length fuel assemblies and control rod; (b) steam line and feed water line, which are independent open loops; (c) coolant recirculation system, which consists of two loops provided with a recirculation pump and two jet pumps in each loop; (d) emergency cooling system, including HPCS, LPCS, LPCI, and ADS. 2 - Description of test: Run 971 simulated a BWR LOSS of off-site power transient. The core scram was assumed to occur at 6 seconds after the transient initiated by the turbine trip. HPCS failure was assumed. After ADS started, the upper half of the core was uncovered by steam. The core was re-flooded by LPCS alone

  1. Multi-state reliability for coolant pump based on dependent competitive failure model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Yanlong; Cai Qi; Zhao Xinwen; Chen Ling

    2013-01-01

    By taking into account the effect of degradation due to internal vibration and external shocks. and based on service environment and degradation mechanism of nuclear power plant coolant pump, a multi-state reliability model of coolant pump was proposed for the system that involves competitive failure process between shocks and degradation. Using this model, degradation state probability and system reliability were obtained under the consideration of internal vibration and external shocks for the degraded coolant pump. It provided an effective method to reliability analysis for coolant pump in nuclear power plant based on operating environment. The results can provide a decision making basis for design changing and maintenance optimization. (authors)

  2. AREVA solutions to licensing challenges in PWR and BWR reload and safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curca-Tivig, Florin [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Regulatory requirements for reload and safety analyses are evolving: new safety criteria, request for enlarged qualification databases, statistical applications, uncertainty propagation.. In order to address these challenges and access more predictable licensing processes, AVERA is implementing consistent code and methodology suites for PWR and BWR core design and safety analysis, based on first principles modeling and extremely broad verification and validation data base. Thanks to the high computational power increase in the last decades methods' development and application now include new capabilities. An overview of the main AREVA codes and methods developments is given covering PWR and BWR applications in different licensing environments.

  3. BWR chemistry control status: a summary of industry chemistry status relative to the BWR water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.E.; Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The EPRI Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Water Chemistry Guidelines were revised and issued in October 2008. The 2008 Revision of the Guidelines continues to focus on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), which can limit the service life of susceptible materials and components exposed to water chemistry environments. The 2008 Revision also places increased emphasis on fuel performance and meeting the industry goal of zero fuel failures by 2010. As an industry consensus document, the Guidelines were created to provide proactive water chemistry control strategies for mitigating IGSCC, maintaining fuel integrity and controlling radiation fields. The Guidelines provide a technically-based framework for an effective BWR water chemistry program. This paper provides an overview of industry experience relative to the Guidelines. Over the past few years, many BWR units have implemented noble metal chemical application technologies either during plant hot or cold shutdown or at normal power operating conditions. This paper explores plant experience with optimized water chemistry, implementation of various additive chemistries such as noble metal application and zinc addition, and compliance with the Guidelines recommendations. Depleted zinc oxide addition has been broadly applied across the BWR fleet since the 1980s. The guidance for zinc addition has been revised in the Guidelines to reflect concerns with fuel performance. While zinc addition is a successful method for shutdown dose rate control, concerns still exist for high zinc deposition on fuel surfaces, especially when feedwater iron is elevated and as fuel cores are being driven to provide maximum power output over longer fuel cycles. Recent plant experience has shown that the utilization of online noble metal application and continued zinc addition may provide additional benefits for radiation control. Dose rate experiences at plants utilizing the online noble metal application technology and zinc addition

  4. BWR chemistry control status: a summary of industry chemistry status relative to the BWR water chemistry guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.E., E-mail: sgarcia@epri.com [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, M.L., E-mail: jgiannelli@finetech.com [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, NJ (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The EPRI Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Water Chemistry Guidelines were revised and issued in October 2008. The 2008 Revision of the Guidelines continues to focus on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), which can limit the service life of susceptible materials and components exposed to water chemistry environments. The 2008 Revision also places increased emphasis on fuel performance and meeting the industry goal of zero fuel failures by 2010. As an industry consensus document, the Guidelines were created to provide proactive water chemistry control strategies for mitigating IGSCC, maintaining fuel integrity and controlling radiation fields. The Guidelines provide a technically-based framework for an effective BWR water chemistry program. This paper provides an overview of industry experience relative to the Guidelines. Over the past few years, many BWR units have implemented noble metal chemical application technologies either during plant hot or cold shutdown or at normal power operating conditions. This paper explores plant experience with optimized water chemistry, implementation of various additive chemistries such as noble metal application and zinc addition, and compliance with the Guidelines recommendations. Depleted zinc oxide addition has been broadly applied across the BWR fleet since the 1980s. The guidance for zinc addition has been revised in the Guidelines to reflect concerns with fuel performance. While zinc addition is a successful method for shutdown dose rate control, concerns still exist for high zinc deposition on fuel surfaces, especially when feedwater iron is elevated and as fuel cores are being driven to provide maximum power output over longer fuel cycles. Recent plant experience has shown that the utilization of online noble metal application and continued zinc addition may provide additional benefits for radiation control. Dose rate experiences at plants utilizing the online noble metal application technology and zinc addition

  5. BWR hydrogen addition for IGSCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in austenitic stainless steel piping and other components exposed to the primary coolant in boiling water reactors has become a major industry challenge. Hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) has become a very popular recommended method of slowing the propagation of IGSCC and is a desirable alternative to material replacement. Although HWC is a reasonable solution for controlling IGSCC, it is not without significant drawbacks for some plants. Carolina Power and Light's (CP and L's) Brunswick Unit 2 is one of these plants where the use of HWC for the mitigation of IGSCC could have a major impact on the current operating philosophy

  6. Modeling of the water gap in BWR fuel elements using SCALE/TRITON; Modellierung des Wasserspalts bei SWR-BE mit SCALE/TRITON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittelbach, S.; Chernykh, M. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The authors show that an adequate modeling of the water gap in BWR fuel element models using the code TRITON requires an explicit consideration of the Dancoff factors. The analysis of three modeling options reveals that considering the moderating effects of the water gap coolant for the peripheral fuel elements the resulting deviations of the U-235 and Pu-239 concentrations are significantly reduced. The increased temporal calculation efforts are justified with respect to the burnup credits for criticality safety analyses.

  7. Reactor coolant pump transportation incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noce, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an incident, which occurred on August 27, 1991, in which a Reactor Coolant Pump motor en route from Surry Power Station to Westinghouse repair facilities struck the overpass at the junction of Interstate 64 and Jefferson Avenue in Newport News, Virginia. The transport container that housed the reactor coolant pump motor failed to clear the overpass. The force of the impact dislodged the container and motor from the truck bed, and it landed on the acceleration land and road shoulder. Upon impact, the container broke open and exposed the reactor coolant pump motor. Incidental radioactively contaminated water that remained in the motor coolers drained onto the road, contaminating the aggregate as well as the underlying gravel

  8. Development of Coolant Radioactivity Interpretation Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Jung, Youngsuk; Kim, Kyounghyun; Kim, Jangwook

    2013-01-01

    In Korea, the coolant radioactivity analysis has been performed by using the computer codes of foreign companies such as CADE (Westinghouse), IODYNE and CESIUM (ABB-CE). However, these computer codes are too conservative and have involved considerable errors. Furthermore, since these codes are DOS-based program, their easy operability is not satisfactory. Therefore it is required development of an enhanced analysis algorithm applying an analytical method reflecting the change of operational environments of domestic nuclear power plants and a fuel failure evaluation software considering user' conveniences. We have developed a nuclear fuel failure evaluation code able to estimate the number of failed fuel rods and the burn-up of failed fuels during nuclear power plant operation cycle. A Coolant Radio-activity Interpretation Code (CRIC) for LWR has been developed as the output of the project 'Development of Fuel Reliability Enhanced Technique' organized by Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP). The CRIC is Windows based-software able to evaluate the number of failed fuel rods and the burn-up of failed fuel region by analyzing coolant radioactivity of LWR in operation. The CRIC is based on the model of fission products release commonly known as 'three region model' (pellet region, gap region, and coolant region), and we are verifying the CRIC results based on the cases of domestic fuel failures. CRIC users are able to estimate the number of failed fuel rods, burn-up and regions of failed fuel considered enrichment and power distribution of fuel region by using operational cycle data, coolant activity data, fuel loading pattern, Cs-134/Cs-137 ratio according to burn-up and U-235 enrichment provided in the code. Due to development of the CRIC, it is secured own unique fuel failure evaluation code. And, it is expected to have the following significant meaning. This is that the code reflecting a proprietary technique for quantitatively

  9. Improvement for BWR operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurisu, Takanori; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Harada, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Iwao.

    1988-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center was founded in April, 1971, and in April, 1974, training was begun, since then, 13 years elapsed. During this period, the curriculum and training facilities were strengthened to meet the training needs, and the new training techniques from different viewpoint were developed, thus the improvement of training has been done. In this report, a number of the training techniques which have been developed and adopted recently, and are effective for the improvement of the knowledge and skill of operators are described. Recently Japanese nuclear power stations have been operated at stable high capacity factor, accordingly the chance of experiencing the occurrence of abnormality and the usual start and stop of plants decreased, and the training of operators using simulators becomes more important. The basic concept on training is explained. In the standard training course and the short period fundamental course, the development of the guide for reviewing lessons, the utilization of VTRs and the development of the techniques for diagnosing individual degree of learning were carried out. The problems, the points of improvement and the results of these are reported. (Kako, I.)

  10. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  11. Core damage frequency prespectives for BWR 3/4 and Westinghouse 4-loop plants based on IPE results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Camp, S.; LaChance, J.; Mary Drouin

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the core damage frequency (CDF) insights gained by analyzing the results of the Individual Plant Examinations (IPES) for two groups of plants: boiling water reactor (BWR) 3/4 plants with Reactor Core Isolation Cooling systems, and Westinghouse 4-loop plants. Wide variability was observed for the plant CDFs and for the CDFs of the contributing accident classes. On average, transients-with loss of injection, station blackout sequences, and transients with loss of decay heat removal are important contributors for the BWR 3/4 plants, while transients, station blackout sequences, and loss-of-coolant accidents are important for the Westinghouse 4-loop plants. The key factors that contribute to the variability in the results are discussed. The results are often driven by plant-specific design and operational characteristics, but differences in modeling approaches are also important for some accident classes

  12. Reactor power control device in BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Tsuneo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for controlling reactor power based on a start-up/shut down program in a BWR type reactor, as well as for detecting deviation, if occurs, of the power from the start-up/shut down program, to control a recycling flow rate control system or control rod drive mechanisms. Namely, a power instruction section successively executes the start-up/shut down program and controls the coolant recycling system and the control rod driving mechanisms to control the power. A current state monitoring and calculation section receives a process amount, calculates parameters showing the plant state, compares/monitors them with predetermined values, detecting the deviation, if occurs, of the plant state from the start-up/shut down program, and prevents output of a power increase control signal which leads to power increase. A forecasting and monitoring/calculation section forecasts and calculates the plant state when not yet executed steps of the start-up/shut down program are performed, stops the execution of the start-up/shut down program in the next step in a case of forecasting that the results of the calculation will deviate from the start-up/shut down program. (I.S.)

  13. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez S, A.

    2004-01-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  14. Effect of zinc injection on BWR fuel cladding corrosion. Pt. 1. Study on an accelerated corrosion condition to evaluate corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Kanbe, Hiromu; Furuya, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Japanese BWR utilities have a plan to apply zinc injection to the primary coolant in order to reduce radioactivity accumulation on the structure. Prior to applying the zinc injection to BWR plants, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of zinc injection on corrosion resistance of fuel cladding. The objective of this report was to examine the accelerated corrosion condition for evaluation of BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance under non-irradiated conditions, as the first step of a zinc injection evaluation study. A heat transfer corrosion test facility, in which a two phase flow condition could be achieved, was designed and constructed. The effects of heat flux, void fraction and solution temperature on BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance were quantitatively investigated. The main findings were as follows. (1) In situ measurements using high speed camera and a void sensor together with one dimensional two phase flow analysis results showed that a two phase flow simulated BWR core condition can be obtained in the corrosion test facility. (2) The heat transfer corrosion test results showed that the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer increased with increasing solution temperature and was independent of heat flux and void fraction. The corrosion accelerating factor was about 2.5 times in the case of a temperature increase from 288degC to 350degC. (author)

  15. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research, and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are shown. After a short outline of historical developments the basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are dealt with. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies, which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurements on a BWR in The Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  16. ABB advanced BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Helmersson, S.; Andersson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel designed and fabricated by ABB is now operating in 40 PWRs and BWRs in Europe, the United States and Korea. An excellent fuel reliability track record has been established. High burnups are proven for both BWR and PWR. Thermal margin improving features and advanced burnable absorber concepts enable the utilities to adopt demanding duty cycles to meet new economic objectives. In particular we note the excellent reliability record of ABB PWR fuel equipped with Guardian TM debris filter, proven to meet the -6 rod-cycles fuel failure goal, and the out-standing operating record of the SVEA 10x10 BWR fuel, where ABB is the only vendor to date with multi batch experience to high burnup. ABB is dedicated to maintain high fuel reliability as well as continually improve and develop a broad line of BWR and PWR products. ABB's development and fuel follow-up activities are performed in close co-operation with its customers. (orig.)

  17. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor; Identificacion de modelos de orden reducido de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez S, A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: augusto@correo.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  18. Sodium as a reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, S.B.G.

    1989-01-01

    This work is related to the use of sodium as a reactor coolant, to the advantages and problems related to its use, its mechanical, thermophysics, eletronical, magnetic and nuclear properties. It is mainly a bibliographic review, with the aim of gathering the necessary information to persons initiating in the study of sodium and also as reference source. (author) [pt

  19. Vertical reactor coolant pump instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation conducted at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant to determine and correct increasing vibrations in the vertical reactor coolant pumps is described. Diagnostic procedures to determine the vibration causes and evaluate the corractive measures taken are also described

  20. BWR radiation exposure--experience and projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, C.F.; Wilkinson, C.D.; Hollander, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    The BWR/6 Mark III radiation exposures are projected to be about half of those of current average operating experience of 725 man-rem. These projections are said to be realistic and based on current achievements and not on promises of future development. The several BWRs operating with low primary system radiation levels are positive evidence that radiation sources can be reduced. Improvements have been made in reducing the maintenance times for the BWR/6, and further improvements can be made by further attention to cost-effective plant arrangement and layout during detail design to improve accessibility and maintainability of each system and component

  1. General Electric's training program for BWR chemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.N.; Lim, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the General Electric boiling water reactor chemistry training program from 1959 to the present. The original intention of this program was to provide practical hands on type training in radiochemistry to BWR chemistry supervisors with fossil station experience. This emphasis on radiochemistry has not changed through the years, but the training has expanded to include the high purity water chemistry of the BWR and has been modified to include new commission requirements, engineering developments and advanced instrumentation. Student and instructor qualifications are discussed and a description of the spin off courses for chemistry technicians and refresher training is presented

  2. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Wulff, W.; Mallen, A.N.; Lekach, S.V.; Stritar, A.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced technology for high-speed interactive nuclear power plant simulations is of great value for timely resolution of safety issues, for plant monitoring, and for computer-aided emergency responses to an accident. Presented is the methodology employed at BNL to develop a BWR plant analyzer capable of simulating severe plant transients at much faster than real-time process speeds. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is given for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computers to achieve the very high simulation speeds. Typical results are shown to demonstrate the modeling fidelity of the BWR plant analyzer

  3. The BWR Hybrid 4 control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, H.; Fuchs, H.P.; Lippert, H.J.; Dambietz, W.

    1988-01-01

    The service life of BWR control rods designed in the past has been unsatisfactory. The main reason was irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of B 4 C rods caused by external swelling of the B 4 C powder. By this reason KWU developed an improved BWR control rod (Hybrid 4 control rod) with extended service life and increased control rod worth. It also allows the procedure for replacing and rearranging fuel assemblies to be considerably simplified. A complete set of Hydbrid 4 control rods is expected to last throughout the service life of a plant (assumption: ca. 40 years) if an appropriate control rod reshuffling management program is used. (orig.)

  4. Improvement for BWR operator training, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noji, Kunio; Toeda, Susumu; Saito, Genhachi; Suzuki, Koichi

    1990-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) is conducting training for BWR plant operators using Full-scope Simulators. There are several courses for individual operators and one training course for shift crew (Family Training Course) in BTC. Family Training is carried out by all members of the operating shift-crew. BTC has made efforts to improve the Family Training in order to acquire more effective training results and contribute to up-grade team performance of all crews. This paper describes some items of our efforts towards Family Training improvement. (author)

  5. Panorama of the BWR reactors - Evolution of the concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, C.; Uhrig, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Safety Engineering Department - PEPS-G (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Nowadays, a fleet of more than 50 boiling water reactors (BWR) are in operation in the world. This article gives a short overview on the developments of nuclear power plants of the BWR type, with a focus on the European builds. It describes the technical bases from the early designs in the fifties, sketches the innovations of the sixties and seventies in the types BWR 69 and 72 (Baulinie 69 and 72) and gives an outlook of a possible next generation BWR. A promising approach in recent BWR developments is the the combination of passive safety systems with established design basis

  6. Kinetic analyses on startup and shutdown chemistry of BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domae, Masafumi; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Inagaki, Hiromitsu

    2012-09-01

    During startup and shutdown of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants, temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of reactor water change in a wide range. The changes result in variation of conductivity and pH of the reactor water. It has been speculated that the water chemistry change is due to dissolution of the oxides on fuel claddings and structural materials. However, detailed mechanism is not known. In the present paper, trend of recent water chemistry in several BWR plants during startup and shutdown is presented. Conductivity and pH are convenient indication of coolant purity. We tried to clarify the mechanism of the change in the conductivity and the pH value during startup and shutdown, based on the water chemistry data measured. In the water chemistry data, change in chromate concentration and Ni 2+ concentration is rather large. It is assumed that change in the chromate concentration and the Ni 2+ concentration results in the time variation of the conductivity and the pH value. It is reasonable to consider that the increase in the chromate concentration and the Ni 2+ concentration is ascribed to dissolution of Cr oxides and Ni oxides, respectively. A model of dissolution of the Cr oxides and the Ni oxides is proposed. A concept of finite inventory of the Cr oxides and the Ni oxides in the coolant system is introduced. The model is as follows. Chromate is generated by oxidation of the Cr oxides and the Cr dissolution rate depends on the DO concentration. The dissolution rate of chromate is in proportion to DO concentration, the inventory of Cr and difference between solubility limit and the chromate concentration. On the other hand, Ni 2+ is formed by dissolution of the Ni oxides, and DO is not necessary in this process. The dissolution rate of Ni 2+ is in proportion to the inventory of Ni and difference between solubility limit and the Ni 2+ concentration. Coolant is continuously purified, and the chromate concentration and the Ni 2+ concentration

  7. Nuclear reactor coolant and cover gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.A.; Redding, A.H.; Tower, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    A core cooling system is disclosed for a nuclear reactor of the type utilizing a liquid coolant with a cover gas above free surfaces of the coolant. The disclosed system provides for a large inventory of reactor coolant and a balanced low pressure cover gas arrangement. A flow restricting device disposed within a reactor vessel achieves a pressure of the cover gas in the reactor vessel lower than the pressure of the reactor coolant in the vessel. The low gas pressure is maintained over all free surfaces of the coolant in the cooling system including a coolant reservoir tank. Reactor coolant stored in the reservoir tank allows for the large reactor coolant inventory provided by the invention

  8. Experimental investigation of boiling-water nuclear-reactor parallel-channel effects during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, W.M.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    This report describes an experimental study of the influence of parallel channel effects (PCE) on the distribution of emergency core spray cooling water in a Boiling Water Nuclear Reactor (BWR) following a postulated design basis loss of coolant accident (LCA). The experiments were conducted in a scaled test section in which the reactor coolant was simulated by Freon-114 at conditions similar to those postulated to occur in the reactor vessel shortly after a LOCA. A BWR/4 was simulated by a (PCE) test section which contained three parallel heated channels to simulate fuel assemblies; a core bypass channel, and a jet pump channel. The test section also inlcuded scaled regions to simulate the lower and upper plena, downcomer, and steam separation regions of a BWR. A series of nine transient experiments were conducted, in which the lower plenum vaporization rate and heater rod power were varied while the core spray flow rate was held constant to simulate that of a BWR/4. During these experiments the flow distribution and heat transfer phenomena were observed and measured

  9. Component evaluation for intersystem loss-of-coolant accidents in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1994-07-01

    Using the methodology outlined in NUREG/CR-5603 this report evaluates (on a probabilistic basis) design rules for components in ALWRs that could be subjected to intersystem loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs). The methodology is intended for piping elements, flange connections, on-line pumps and valves, and heat exchangers. The NRC has directed that the design rules be evaluated for BWR pressures of 7.04 MPa (1025 psig), PWR pressures of 15.4 MPa (2235 psig), and 177 degrees C (350 degrees F), and has established a goal of 90% probability that system rupture will not occur during an ISLOCA event. The results of the calculations in this report show that components designed for a pressure of 0.4 of the reactor coolant system operating pressure will satisfy the NRC survival goal in most cases. Specific recommendations for component strengths for BWR and PWR applications are made in the report. A peer review panel of nationally recognized experts was selected to review and critique the initial results of this program

  10. Coolant monitoring systems for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzhnov, A.M.; Morozov, V.V.; Tsypin, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The ways of improving information capacity of existing monitoring systems and the necessity of designing new ones for coolant monitoring are reviewed. A wide research program on development of coolant monitoring systems in PWR reactors is analyzed. The possible applications of in-core and out-of-core detectors for coolant monitoring are demonstrated

  11. Moderator temperature coefficient in BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka

    1977-01-01

    Temperature dependences of infinite multiplication factor k sub(infinity) and neutron leakage from the core must be examined for estimation of moderator temperature coefficient. Temperature dependence on k sub(infinity) has been investigated by many researchers, however, the dependence on neutron leakage of a BWR with cruciformed control rods has hardly been done. Because there are difficulties and necessity on calculations of three space dimensional and multi-energy groups neutron distribution in a BWR core. In this study, moderator temperature coefficients of JPDR-II (BWR) core were obtained by calculation with DIFFUSION-ACE, which is newly developed three-dimensional multi-group computer code. The results were compared with experimental data measured from 20 to 275 0 C of the moderator temperature and the good agreement was obtained between calculation and measurement. In order to evaluate neutron leakage from the core, the other two calculations were carried out, adjusting criticality by uniform absorption rate and by material buckling. The former underestimated neutron leakage and the latter overestimated it. Discussion on the results shows that in order to estimate the temperature coefficient of BWR, neutron leakage must be evaluated precisely, therefore the calculation at actual pattern of control rods is necessary. (auth.)

  12. BWR vessel and internals project (BWRVIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilanin, W.J.; Dyle, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) inspections indicate that Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) is a significant technical issue for some BWR internals. IN response, the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) was formed by an associated of domestic and international utilities which own and operate BWRs. The project is identifying or developing generic, cost-effective strategies for managing degradation of reactor internals from which each utility can select the alternative most appropriate for their plant. The Electric Power Research Institute manages the technical program, implementing the utility defined programs. The BWRVIP is organized into four technical tasks: Assessment, Inspection, Repair and Mitigation. An Integration task coordinates the work. The goal of the Assessment task is to develop methodologies for evaluation of vessel and internal components in support of decisions for operation, inspection, mitigation or repair. The goal of the Inspection task is to develop and assess effective and predictable inspection techniques which can be used to determine the condition of BWR vessel and internals that are potentially susceptible to service-related SCC degradation. The goal of the Repair task is to assure the availability of cost-effective repair/replacement alternatives. The goal of the Mitigation task is to develop and demonstrate countermeasures for SCC degradation. This paper summarizes the BWRVIP approach for addressing BWR internals SCC degradation and illustrates how utilities are utilizing BWRVIP products to successfully manage the effect of SCC on core shrouds

  13. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  14. Secondary systems of PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, N.

    1981-01-01

    The secondary systems of a nuclear power plant comprises the steam, condensate and feedwater cycle, the steam plant auxiliary or ancillary systems and the cooling water systems. The presentation gives a general review about the main systems which show a high similarity of PWR and BWR plants. (orig./RW)

  15. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs

  16. BWR stability analysis at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1991-01-01

    Following the unexpected, but safely terminated, power and flow oscillations in the LaSalle-2 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) on March 9, 1988, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Offices of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) requested that the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) carry out BWR stability analyses, centered around fourteen specific questions. Ten of the fourteen questions address BWR stability issues in general and are dealt with in this paper. The other four questions address local, out-of-phase oscillations and matters of instrumentation; they fall outside the scope of the work reported here. It was the purpose of the work documented in this report to answer ten of the fourteen NRC-stipulated questions. Nine questions are answered by analyzing the LaSalle-2 instability and related BWR transients with the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA) and by performing an uncertainty assessment of the EPA predictions. The tenth question is answered on the basis of first principles. The ten answers are summarized

  17. Specificities of reactor coolant pumps units with lead and lead-bismuth coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Anotonenkov, M.A.; Bokov, P.A.; Baranova, V.S.; Kustov, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis results of impact of lead and lead-bismuth coolants specific properties on the coolants flow features in flow channels of the main and auxiliary circulating pumps are presented. Impossibility of cavitation initiation in flow channels of vane pumps pumping lead and lead-bismuth coolants was demonstrated. The experimental research results of discontinuity of heavy liquid metal coolant column were presented and conditions of gas cavitation initiation in coolant flow were discussed. Invalidity of traditional calculation methods of water and sodium coolants circulation pumps calculations for lead and lead-bismuth coolants circulation pumps was substantiated [ru

  18. Trace organics in AGR coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.; Green, L.O.; Johnson, P.A.V.

    1980-01-01

    Several analytical techniques have been employed in previous studies of the stable organic compounds arising from the radiolysis of methane/carbon monoxide/carbon dioxide coolants. The majority of this early information was collected from the Windscale AGR prototype. Analyses were also carried out on the liquors obtained from the WAGR humidryers. Three classes of compound were found in the liquors; aliphatic acids in the aqueous phase and methyl ketones and aromatic hydrocarbons in the oily phase. Acetic acid was found to be the predominant carboxylic acid. This paper outlines the major findings from a recent analytical survey of coolants taken over a wide range of dose rate, pressure, temperature and composition, from materials testing reactor facilities, WAGR and CAGR. (author)

  19. Primary coolant pipe rupture study AT(49-24)-0202

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, D.A.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate tests were conducted on 304 stainless steel and 516 carbon steel in a simulated BWR primary water environment. A study was carried out to determine the feasibility of measuring sensitization in type 304 SS by use of an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) technique, develop correlations between degree of sensitization (as measured electrochemically) and the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) resistance of type 304 SS, and provide technical data for evaluating the degree of sensitization and IGSCC susceptibility of welded components. 27 figures, 8 tables

  20. Optimum coolant chemistry in BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.C.; Cowan, R.L.; Kiss, E.

    2004-01-01

    LWR water chemistry parameters are directly or indirectly related to the plant's operational performance and for a significant amount of Operation and Maintenance (O and M) costs. Obvious impacts are the operational costs associated with water treatment, monitoring and associated radwaste generation. Less obvious is the important role water chemistry plays in the magnitude of drywell shutdown dose rates, fuel corrosion performance and, (probably most importantly) materials degradation such as from stress corrosion cracking of piping and Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) internal components. To improve the operational excellence of the BWR and to minimize the impact of water chemistry on O and M costs. General Electric has developed the concept of Optimum Water Chemistry (OWC). The 'best practices' and latest technology findings from the U.S., Asia and Europe are integrated into the suggested OWC Specification. This concept, together with cost effective ways to meet the requirement, are discussed. (author)

  1. Coolant clean-up and recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the service life of mechanical seals in a shaft sealing device, eliminate leakages and improve the safety by providing a recycle pump for feeding coolants to a coolant clean-up device upon reactor shut-down and adapting the pump treat only low temperature and low pressure coolants. Constitution: The system is adapted to partially take out coolants from the pipeways of a recycling pump upon normal operation and feed them to a clean-up device. Upon reactor shut-down, the recycle pump is stopped and coolants are extracted by the recycle pump for shut-down into the clean-up device. Since the coolants are not fed to the clean-up device by the recycle pump during normal operation as conducted so far, high temperature and high pressure coolants are not directly fed to the recycle pump, thereby enabling to avoid mechanical problems in the pump. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. GARLIC-B. A digital code for real-time calculation of the transient behaviour of nodal and global core and plant parameters of BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercan, Y.; Hoeld, A.; Lupas, O.

    1982-04-01

    A program description of the code GARLIC-B is given. The code is based on a nonlinear transient model for BWR nuclear power plants which consist of a 3D-core, a top plenum, steam removal and feed water systems and a downcomer with main coolant recirculation pumps. The core is subdivided into a number of superboxes and flow channels with different coolant mass flow rates. Subcooled boiling within these channels has an important reactivity feed back effect and has to be taken also into account. The code computes the local and global core and plant transient situation as dependent on both the inherent core dynamics and external control actions, i.e., disturbances such as motions of control rod banks, changes of mass flow rates of coolant, feed water and steam outlet. The case of a pressure-controlled reactor operation is also considered. (orig./GL) [de

  3. Zero waste machine coolant management strategy at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, B.; Algarra, F.; Wilburn, D.

    1998-01-01

    Machine coolants are used in machining equipment including lathes, grinders, saws and drills. The purpose of coolants is to wash away machinery debris in the form of metal fines, lubricate, and disperse heat between the part and the machine tool. An effective coolant prolongs tool life and protects against part rejection, commonly due to scoring or scorching. Traditionally, coolants have a very short effective life in the machine, often times being disposed of as frequently as once per week. The cause of coolant degradation is primarily due to the effects of bacteria, which thrive in the organic rich coolant environment. Bacteria in this environment reproduce at a logarithmic rate, destroying the coolant desirable aspects and causing potential worker health risks associated with the use of biocides to control the bacteria. The strategy described in this paper has effectively controlled bacterial activity without the use of biocides, avoided disposal of a hazardous waste, and has extended coolant life indefinitely. The Machine Coolant Management Strategy employed a combination of filtration, heavy lubricating oil removal, and aeration, which maintained the coolant peak performance without the use of biocides. In FY96, the Laboratory generated and disposed of 19,880 kg of coolants from 9 separate sites at a cost of $145K. The single largest generator was the main machine shop producing an average 14,000 kg annually. However, in FY97, the waste generation for the main machine shop dropped to 4,000 kg after the implementation of the zero waste strategy. It is expected that this value will be further reduced in FY98

  4. BWR NSSS design basis documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vij, R.S.; Bates, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    programs that GE has participated in and describes the different options and approaches that have been used by various utilities in their design basis programs. Some of these variations deal with the scope and depth of coverage of the information, while others are related to the process (how the work is done). Both of these topics can have a significant effect on the program cost. Some insight into these effects is provided. The final section of the paper presents a set of lessons learned and a recommendation for an optimum approach to a design basis information program. The lessons learned reflect the knowledge that GE has gained by participating in design basis programs with nineteen domestic and international BWR owner/operators. The optimum approach described in this paper is GE's attempt to define a set of information and a work process for a utility/GE NSSS Design Basis Information program that will maximize the cost effectiveness of the program for the utility. (author)

  5. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  6. Reactor coolant system and containment aqueous chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Fission products released from fuel during reactor accidents can be subject to a variety of environments that will affect their ultimate behavior. In the reactor coolant system (RCS), for example, neutral or reducing steam conditions, radiation, and surfaces could all have an effect on fission product retention and chemistry. Furthermore, if water is encountered in the RCS, the high temperature aqueous chemistry of fission products must be assessed to determine the quantity and chemical form of fission products released to the containment building. In the containment building, aqueous chemistry will determine the longer-term release of volatile fission products to the containment atmosphere. Over the past few years, the principles of physical chemistry have been rigorously applied to the various chemical conditions described above. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge and discusses the future directions of chemistry research relating to the behavior of fission products in the RCS and containment

  7. Computer code HYDRO-ACE for analyzing thermo-hydraulic phenomena in the BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Kiyoharu; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1979-10-01

    A computer code HYDRO-ACE has been developed for analyzing thermo-hydraulic phenomena in the BWR core under forced or natural circulation of cooling water. The code is composed of two main calculation routines for single channels such as riser, separator, and downcommer and multiple channels such as the reactor core with a heated zone. Functionally the code is divided into many subroutines to be connected straightforwardly, and so that the user can choose a given course freely by simply arranging the subroutines. In the program, void fraction is calculated by Maurer's method, two-phase frictional pressure drop by Maltinelli-Nelson's, and critical heat flux ratio by Hench-Levy's. The coolant flow distributions in the JPDR-II core calculated by the code are in good agreement with those measured. (author)

  8. Application of passive auto catalytic recombiner (PAR) for BWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Murano, K.; Yamanari, S.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The passive auto-catalytic recombiner (PAR), which can recombine flammable gases such as hydrogen and oxygen with each other to avoid an explosion in case of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), installed in the primary containment vessel does not require a power supply or dynamic equipment, while the existing flammability gas control system (FCS) of most BWRs as an outer loop of the primary containment vessel needs them to make flammable gases circulate through blowers and heaters in the system. PAR offers a number of advantages over existing FCS, such as high reliability, low cost due to much smaller amount of materials needed, good maintainability, good operability in case of a LOCA, and smaller space for installation. An experimental study has been carried out for the purpose of solving the problems of applying PAR to Japanese BWR plants instead of existing FCS, in which we grasped the basic characteristics of PAR. (author)

  9. Water chemistry experiences in a Japanese BWR during preoperational test period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, K.; Maeda, K.; Nakamura, M.

    1994-01-01

    The interest in organic impurities intrusion into the BWR's coolant has been increased in recent years. Organic impurities can be measured as total organic carbons (TOC) by using commercial TOC measuring instruments. The corrosive impurities such as sulfates and chlorides, produced by decomposition of the TOC, will enhance the crack growth rate of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the reactor cooling system. During the preoperational test period, the reactor water quality changed remarkably by TOC intrusion. The TOC intrusion was monitored by measuring main steam conductivity. It is appeared that the main steam conductivity measurement is one of the effective and reliable techniques to detect the TOC intrusion into the reactor. (authors). 4 figs., 5 refs

  10. An appraisal of subcooled boiling and slip ratio from measurements made in Lingen BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, G.

    1977-08-01

    Measurements of steam bubble velocities and voidage have been made in the relatively small Core B of Lingen BWR. The results of axial scanning in one radial position have produced experimental values of slip ratio, power (from a travelling incore probe), voidage and coolant mean density over the core height for this position. This one set of distributions has enabled us to test current UKAEA models of subcooled boiling and slip ratio against experiment. From the comparisons, it appears that we can predict the onset of voiding well, but the assumption that a constant fraction of the heat flux forms steam in the subcooled region needs modifying. Of four slip options tested, the current one used by HAMBO and JOSHUA III (Bankoff-Jones) predicts too high a slip ratio. A closer fit to experiment comes from the new Bryce flow-dependent slip option. Any changes in the modelling must be checked, however, with coupled thermal hydraulics-neutronics computations. (author)

  11. Impact analysis of modifying the composition of the nuclear fuel of a BWR with beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo V, J. M.; Morales S, J. B.

    2013-10-01

    The beryllium oxide (Be O) presents excellent physical properties, especially its high thermal conductivity that contrasts clearly with that of the uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) used at the present as fuel in a great number of nuclear plants. The present work models a nuclear reactor cooled by light water in boiling with two external recirculation loops (BWR/5) using the code for the transitory analysis and postulated accidents Trac-B F1, implementing a UO 2 mixture and different fractions of Be O, with the objective of improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel. The numeric results and the realized analyses indicate that when adding a fraction in volume of 10% the central temperature decreases in 30.4% in stationary state, while during the large break loss of coolant accident the peak cladding temperature diminishes in 7%. Although the real interaction of the mixture has not been determined experimentally, the obtained results are promising. (Author)

  12. Confinement barriers for loss of coolant accidents in the SEAFP reactor plant models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomquist, R.; Ebert, E.; Gay, J.M.; Mazille, F.; Natalizio, A.; Rolandsson, S.; Ross, W.E.; Shen, K.; Sjoeberg, A.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of coolant accidents may mobilise radioactivity and pressurise confinement barriers thereby making a release to the environment possible. The paper defines the radioactivity confinements and presents principal results from the underlying thermal-hydraulic analyses. (orig.)

  13. BWR 1 % main recirculation line break LOCA tests, RUNs 917 and 918, without HPCS at ROSA-III program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Okazaki, Motoaki; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideo; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1988-07-01

    In a case of small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) at a boiling water reactor (BWR) system, it is important to lower the system pressure to cool down the reactor system by using either the high pressure core spray (HPCS) or the automatic depressurization system (ADS). The report presents characteristic test results of RUNs 918 and 917, which were performed at the rig-of-safety assessment (ROSA)-III program simulating a 1 % break BWR LOCA with an assumption of HPCS failure, and clarifies effects of the ADS delay time on a small break LOCA. The ROSA-III test facility simulates principal components of a BWR/6 system with volumetric scaling factor of 1/424. It is experimentally concluded that the ADS delay time shorter than 4 minutes results in a similar PCT as that in a standard case, in which the PCT is observed after actuation of the low pressure core spray (LPCS). And the ADS delay time longer than 4 minutes results in higher PCT than in the standard case. In the latter, the PCT depends on the ADS time, a 220 K higher PCT, for example, in a case of 10 minutes ADS delay compared with the standard case. (author) 52 refs. 299 figs

  14. Enhancing BWR proliferation resistance fuel with minor actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Gray S.

    2009-03-01

    To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced light water reactor- LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides ( 237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 238Pu/Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In the study, a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO 2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance in the intermediate-term goal for future nuclear energy systems. To account for the water coolant density variation from the bottom (0.76 g/cm 3) to the top (0.35 g/cm 3) of the core, the axial coolant channel and fuel pin were divided to 24 nodes. The MA transmutation characteristics at different elevations were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality discussed. The concept of MARA, which involves the use of transuranic nuclides ( 237Np and/or 241Am), significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in

  15. Core heat transfer analysis during a BWR LOCA simulation experiment at ROSA-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonomoto, T.; Koizumi, Y.; Tasaka, K.

    1987-01-01

    The ROSA-III test facility is a 1/424-th volumetrically scaled BWR/6 simulator with an electrically heated core to study the thermal-hydraulic response during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Heat transfer analyses for 5, 15, 50 and 200% break tests were conducted to understand the basic heat transfer behavior in the core under BWR LOCA conditions and to obtain a data base of post-critical heat flux (CHF) heat transfer coefficients and quench temperature. The results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient of dried-out rods at the core midplane during a steam cooling period is less than approximately 120 W/m 2 K. It is larger than existing data measured at lower pressures during a spray cooling period. Bottom-up quench temperatures are given by a simple equations: The sum of the saturation temperature and a constant of 262 K. Then the heat transfer model in the RELAP4/MOD6/U4/J3 code was revised using the present results. The rod surface temperature behavior in the 200% break test was calculated better by using the revised model although the model is very simple. (orig.)

  16. BWR stability: analysis of cladding temperature for high amplitude oscillations - 146

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.; Wehle, F.

    2010-01-01

    Power oscillations associated with density waves in boiling water reactors (BWRs) have been studied widely. Industrial research in this area is active since the invention of the first BWR. Stability measurements have been performed in various plants during commissioning phase but especially the magnitude and divergent nature of the oscillations during the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant event on March 9, 1988, renewed concern about the state of knowledge on BWR instabilities and possible consequences to fuel rod integrity. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified stability tool, applicable for stability analysis in the non-linear regime, which extends to high amplitude oscillations where inlet reverse flow occurs. In case of high amplitude oscillations a cyclical dryout and rewetting process at the fuel rod may take place, which leads in turn to rapid changes of the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. The application of this stability tool allows for a conservative determination of the fuel rod cladding temperature in case of high amplitude oscillations during the dryout / re-wet phase. Moreover, it reveals in good agreement to experimental findings the stabilizing effect of the reverse bundle inlet flow, which might be obtained for large oscillation amplitudes. (authors)

  17. A neutronic assessment of the new Spherical Cermets Fuel concept for the BWR-PB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchrif, A.; Chetaine, A.; Amsil, H.; Bounakhla, M.

    2010-01-01

    The tri-structural-isotopic (TRISO) fuel directly cooled by boiling light water is used in the boiling water reactor with pebble-bed coated particles (BWR-PB). At the lower coolant temperature, the TRISO fuel particles demonstrate an unacceptable irradiation swelling in the silicon carbide coating layer during a fuel cycle. So, the objectives of this paper, on the one hand is to evaluate some neutronic parameters of a new fuel concept, Spherical Cermets Fuel (SCF), for a BWR-PB reactor. On the other hand, to assess the fact of SCF fuel concept on the fuel assembly lifetime and the burn-up characteristic. All the parameters as well as Infinite Multiplication Factor, Spectrum Index, Instantaneous Conversion Ratio and Neutron Energy Spectrum was calculated then compared for the TRISO and the SCF fuel concept. It can be seen from the assessment of fuel assembly burn-up characteristics that the normalised neutron spectra of all the assembly's parts pointed out a thermal spectrum for the SCF fuel assembly's parts than the TRISO one. The SCF fuel element increase the assembly life time about 6.1 EFPY corresponding 8000 MWd/t. So, the fuel assembly can be operated for a reasonably long period without outside refuelling. The difference in the assembly lifetime might leads to SCF fuel concept adopted, because the geometry and concept of TRISO fuel particles are wholly different to SCF ones. (author)

  18. A novel technology for fouling mitigation and dose reduction in BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Varela, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In a boiling water reactor (BWR), a jet pump provides an internal circulation path for the core coolant flow and consists of four main sections: the nozzle section, inlet mixer section (throat barrel), flare and diffuser. A high velocity coolant flow moves through the nozzles and discharges into the inlet mixer, and over time, oxide particulates (cruds) build up on the inside 304 stainless steel (SS) surfaces of the nozzles and the inlet mixer forming a layer of crud fouling. Cruds are typically removed from the surfaces of BWR components during regularly scheduled shutdowns of the reactor that is highly costly. Thus, a cost-effective is being developed to mitigate the crud fouling and the accumulation of radioactive species by using a colloid-based process. A colloid-based process can be applied to components in service, and does not require extensive equipment and extreme processing parameters as compared to other deposition processes and is not limited by geometric constraints as is the CVD process. Several parameters, such as concentration of TiO 2 nanoparticle, deposition/post-annealing temperature, and hydrodynamic flow condition, etc., for developing the optimum TiO 2 coating process have been examined to identify the most critical condition that can be applicable at plants. Preliminary results showed that the post-annealing treatment of coating is essential for improving the adherence and coherence of colloidal TiO 2 nanoparticles to the substrate. In addition, the presence of oxide on the coating surface is detrimental to the coating durability and thus pre-existing oxide surfaces require to be cleaned before coating. (author)

  19. Crud deposition modeling on BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucuk, Aylin; Cheng, Bo; Potts, Gerald A.; Shiralkar, Bharat; Morgan, Dave; Epperson, Kenny; Gose, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of boiling water reactor (BWR) system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance-limiting conditions in a number of plants. The operational impact of performance-limiting conditions involving crud deposition can be detrimental to a BWR operator, resulting in unplanned or increased frequency of fuel inspections, fuel failure and associated radiological consequences, operational restrictions including core power derate and/or forced shutdowns to remove failed fuel, premature discharge of individual bundles or entire reloads, and/or undesirable core design restrictions. To facilitate improved management of crud-related fuel performance risks, EPRI has developed the CORAL (Crud DepOsition Risk Assessment ModeL) tool. This paper presents a summary of the CORAL elements and benchmarking results. Applications of CORAL as a tool for fuel performance risk assessment are also discussed. (author)

  20. BWR radiation buildup control with ionic zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marble, W.J.; Wood, C.J.; Leighty, C.E.; Green, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    In 1983 a hypothesis was disclosed which suggested that the presence of ionic zinc in the reactor water of the BWR could reduce radiation buildup. This hypothesis was developed from correlations of plant data, and subsequently, from laboratory experiments which demonstrated clearly that ionic zinc inhibits the corrosion of stainless steel. The benefits of zinc addition have been measured at the Vallecitos Nuclear Center under and EPRI/GE project. Experimentation and analyses have been performed to evaluate the impact of intentional zinc addition on the IGSCC characteristics of primary system materials and on the performance of the nuclear fuel. It has been concluded that no negative effects are expected. The author conclude that the intentional addition of ionic zinc to the BWR reactor water at a concentration of approximately 10 ppb will provide major benefits in controlling the Co-60 buildup on primary system stainless steel surfaces. The intentional addition of zinc is now a qualified technique for use in BWRs

  1. BWR mechanics and materials technology update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses technical results obtained from a variety of important programs underway at General Electric's Nuclear Engineering Division. The principal objective of these programs is to qualify and improve BWR product related technologies that fall broadly under the disciplines of Applied Mechanics and Materials Engineering. The paper identifies and deals with current technical issues that are of general importance to the LWR industry albeit the specific focus is directed to the development and qualification of analytical predictive methods and criteria, and improved materials for use in the design of the BWR. In this paper, specific results and accomplishments are summarized to provide a braod perspective of technology advances. Results are presented in sections which discuss: dynamic analysis and modeling; fatigue and fracture evaluation; materials engineering advances; and flow induced vibration. (orig.)

  2. Parallel channel effects under BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Hatamiya, S.; Murase, M.

    1988-01-01

    Due to parallel channel effects, different flow patterns such as liquid down-flow and gas up-flow appear simultaneously in fuel bundles of a BWR core during postulated LOCAs. Applying the parallel channel effects to the fuel bundle, water drain tubes with a restricted bottom end have been developed in order to mitigate counter-current flow limiting and to increase the falling water flow rate at the upper tie plate. The upper tie plate with water drain tubes is an especially effective means of increasing the safety margin of a reactor with narrow gaps between fuel rods and high steam velocity at the upper tie plate. The characteristics of the water drain tubes have been experimentally investigated using a small-scaled steam-water system simulating a BWR core. Then, their effect on the fuel cladding temperature was evaluated using the LOCA analysis program SAFER. (orig.)

  3. Eulerian fluid-structure analysis of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, W.H.

    1979-05-01

    A fluid-structure-interaction algorithm is developed for the analysis of the dynamic response of a BWR pressure-suppression pool and containment structure. The method is incorporated into a two-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics code, PELE-IC, for the solution of incompressible flow coupled to flexible structures. The fluid, structure, and coupling algorithms have been verified by calculation of solved problems from the literature and by comparison with air and steam blowdown experiments

  4. Methyl Iodide Decomposition at BWR Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Mike; Bell, Merl

    2012-09-01

    Based on favourable results from short-term testing of methanol addition to an operating BWR plant, AREVA has performed numerous studies in support of necessary Engineering and Plant Safety Evaluations prior to extended injection of methanol. The current paper presents data from a study intended to provide further understanding of the decomposition of methyl iodide as it affects the assessment of methyl iodide formation with the application of methanol at BWR Plants. This paper describes the results of the decomposition testing under UV-C light at laboratory conditions and its effect on the subject methyl iodide production evaluation. The study as to the formation and decomposition of methyl iodide as it is effected by methanol addition is one phase of a larger AREVA effort to provide a generic plant Safety Evaluation prior to long-term methanol injection to an operating BWR. Other testing phases have investigated the compatibility of methanol with fuel construction materials, plant structural materials, plant consumable materials (i.e. elastomers and coatings), and ion exchange resins. Methyl iodide is known to be very unstable, typically preserved with copper metal or other stabilizing materials when produced and stored. It is even more unstable when exposed to light, heat, radiation, and water. Additionally, it is known that methyl iodide will decompose radiolytically, and that this effect may be simulated using ultra-violet radiation (UV-C) [2]. In the tests described in this paper, the use of a UV-C light source provides activation energy for the formation of methyl iodide. Thus is similar to the effect expected from Cherenkov radiation present in a reactor core after shutdown. Based on the testing described in this paper, it is concluded that injection of methanol at concentrations below 2.5 ppm in BWR applications to mitigate IGSCC of internals is inconsequential to the accident conditions postulated in the FSAR as they are related to methyl iodide formation

  5. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schardt, J.F. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  6. The HAMBO BWR simulator of HAMMLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Tommy; Jokstad, Haakon; Meyer, Brita D.; Nihlwing, Christer; Norrman, Sixten; Puska, Eija Karita; Raussi, Pekka; Tiihonen, Olli

    2001-02-01

    Modernisation of control rooms of the nuclear power plants has been a major issue in Sweden and Finland the last few years, and this will continue in the years to come. As an aid in the process of introducing new technology into the control rooms, the benefit of having an experimental simulator where proto typing of solutions can be performed, has been emphasised by many plants. With this as a basis, the BWR plants in Sweden and Finland decided to fund, in co-operation with the Halden Project, an experimental BWR simulator based on the Forsmark 3 plant in Sweden. The BWR simulator development project was initiated in January 1998. VTT Energy in Finland developed the simulator models with the aid of their APROS tool, while the operator interface was developed by the Halden Project. The simulator was thoroughly tested by experienced HRP personnel and professional Forsmark 3 operators, and accepted by the BWR utilities in June 2000. The acceptance tests consisted of 19 well-defined transients, as well as the running of the simulator from full power down to cold shutdown and back up again with the use of plant procedures. This report describes the HAMBO simulator, with its simulator models, the operator interface, and the underlying hardware and software infrastructure. The tools used for developing the simulator, APROS, Picasso-3 and the Integration Platform, are also briefly described. The acceptance tests are described, and examples of the results are presented, to illustrate the level of validation of the simulator. The report concludes with an indication of the short-term usage of the simulator. (Author)

  7. PREDICTIVE METHODS FOR STABILITY MARGIN IN BWR

    OpenAIRE

    MELARA SAN ROMÁN, JOSÉ

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Power and flow oscillations in a BWR are very undesirable. One of the major concerns is to ensure, during power oscillations, compliance with GDC 10 and 12. GDC 10 requires that the reactor core be designed with appropriate margin to assure that specified acceptable fuel design limits will not be exceeded during any condition of normal operation, including the effects of anticipated operational occurrences. GDC 12 requires assurance that power oscillations which can result in conditions ...

  8. Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation methods development for BWR/PWR reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruitt, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation addresses the Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP) perspective on the primary forces driving methods development in the nuclear industry. These forces are fuel design, computational environment and industry requirement evolution. The first segment of the discussion presents the SNP experience base. SNP develops, manufactures and licenses both BWR and PWR reload fuel. A review of this experience base highlights the accelerating rate at which new fuel designs are being introduced into the nuclear industry. The application of advanced BWR lattice geometries provides an example of fuel design trends. The second aspect of the presentation is the rapid evolution of the computing environment. The final subject in the presentation is the impact of industry requirements on code or methods development

  9. Coolant inlet device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroshi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Iwabuchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji.

    1969-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a coolant inlet device for liquid-metal cooled reactors which employs a coolant distributor serving also as a supporting means for the reactor core. The distributor is mounted within the reactor vessel so as to slide horizontally on supporting lugs, and is further slidably connected via a junction pipe to a coolant inlet conduit protruding through the floor of the vessel. The distributor is adapted to uniformly disperse the highly pressured coolant over the reactor core so as to reduce the stresses sustained by the reactor vessel as well as the supporting lugs. Moreover, the slidable nature of the distributor allows thermal shock and excessive coolant pressures to be prevented or alleviated, factors which posed major difficulties in conventional coolant inlet devices. (Owens, K. J.)

  10. BWR level estimation using Kalman Filtering approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, G.; Divakaruni, S.M.; Meyer, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Work is in progress on development of a system for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) vessel level validation and failure detection. The levels validated include the liquid level both inside and outside the core shroud. This work is a major part of a larger effort to develop a complete system for BWR signal validation. The demonstration plant is the Oyster Creek BWR. Liquid level inside the core shroud is not directly measured during full power operation. This level must be validated using measurements of other quantities and analytic models. Given the available sensors, analytic models for level that are based on mass and energy balances can contain open integrators. When such a model is driven by noisy measurements, the model predicted level will deviate from the true level over time. To validate the level properly and to avoid false alarms, the open integrator must be stabilized. In addition, plant parameters will change slowly with time. The respective model must either account for these plant changes or be insensitive to them to avoid false alarms and maintain sensitivity to true failures of level instrumentation. Problems are addressed here by combining the extended Kalman Filter and Parity Space Decision/Estimator. The open integrator is stabilized by integrating from the validated estimate at the beginning of each sampling interval, rather than from the model predicted value. The model is adapted to slow plant/sensor changes by updating model parameters on-line

  11. Utility experience with BWR-PSMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The BWR Power Shape Monitoring System (BWR-PSMS) has proven to be an effective and versatile tool for core monitoring. GPU Nuclear Corporation's (GPUN) Oyster Creek plant has been involved in the PSMS development since its inception, having been selected by EPRI as the initial demonstration site. Beginning with Cycle 10, Oyster Creek has been applying the BWR-PSMS as the primary core monitoring tool. Although the system has been in operation at Oyster Creek for the past several cycles, this is the first time the PSMS was used to monitor compliance to the plant technical specifications, to guide adherence to vendore fuel maneuvering recommendations and to develop data for certain performance records such as fuel burnup, isotopic accounting, etc. This paper will discuss the bases for the decision to apply PSMS as the fundamental core monitoring system, the experience in implementing the PSMS in this mode, activities currently underway or planned related to PSMS, and potential future extensions and applications of PSMS at Oyster Creek

  12. Economic analysis of hydride fueled BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganda, F.; Shuffler, C.; Greenspan, E.; Todreas, N.

    2009-01-01

    The economic implications of designing BWR cores with hydride fuels instead of conventional oxide fuels are analyzed. The economic analysis methodology adopted is based on the lifetime levelized cost of electricity (COE). Bracketing values (1970 and 3010 $/kWe) are used for the overnight construction costs and for the power scaling factors (0.4 and 0.8) that correlate between a change in the capital cost to a change in the power level. It is concluded that a newly constructed BWR reactor could substantially benefit from the use of 10 x 10 hydride fuel bundles instead of 10 x 10 oxide fuel bundles design presently in use. The cost saving would depend on the core pressure drop constraint that can be implemented in newly constructed BWRs - it is between 2% and 3% for a core pressure drop constraint as of the reference BWR, between 9% and 15% for a 50% higher core pressure drop, and between 12% and 21% higher for close to 100% core pressure. The attainable cost reduction was found insensitive to the specific construction cost but strongly dependent on the power scaling factor. The cost advantage of hydride fuelled cores as compared to that of the oxide reference core depends only weakly on the uranium and SWU prices, on the 'per volume base' fabrication cost of hydride fuels, and on the discount rate used. To be economically competitive, the uranium enrichment required for the hydride fuelled core needs to be around 10%.

  13. Investigation of BWR stability in Forsmark 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, R.; Reisch, F.; Bergdahl, B.G.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.; Kellner, S.

    1988-01-01

    A series of noise measurements have been conducted at the Forsmark-2 reactor during its start-up operation after the revision in 1987. The main purpose was to investigate the BWR stability problem based on noise analysis, i.e. the problem of resonant power oscillation with frequency of about 0.5 Hz, which tends to arise at high power and low core flow condition. The noise analysis was performed to estimate the noise source which gives rise to the power oscillation, to evaluate the stability condition of the Forsmark-2 reactor in terms of the decay ratio (DR), as well as to investigate a safety related problem in connection with the BWR stability. The results indicate that the power oscillation is due to dynamic coupling between the neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics via void reactivity feedback. The DR reached as high as ≅ 0.7 at 63% of the rated power and 4100 kg/s of the total core flow. An investigation was made for the noise recording which represents a strong pressure oscillation with a peak frequency at 0.33 Hz. The result suggests that such pressure oscillation, if the peak frequency coincided with that of the resonant power oscillation, might become a cause of scram. The present noise analysis indicates the importance of a BWR on-line surveillance system with functions like stability condition monitoring and control system diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for the management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after-core degradation has occurred) of postulated boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities, and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for further assessment. The first was a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertained to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose was to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies were performed during 1991 and this paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies, and the potential for their success. ((orig.))

  15. Scaling and uncertainty in BWR instability problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Auria, F.; Pellicoro, V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with a critical review of activities, performed at the DCMN of Pisa University, in relation to the thermo-hydraulic oscillations in two-phase systems. Stability analyses, including model development and achievement of experimental data, are generally performed for BWRs in order to achieve the following objectives: to reach a common understanding in relation to the predictive capabilities of system codes and to the influence of various parameters on the instability; to establish a data base for the qualification of the analytical tools already or becoming available; to set-up qualified tools (code/models + nodalization + user assumption) suitable for predicting the unstable behaviour of the nuclear plants of interest (current BWR, SBWR, ABWR and RBMK). These considerations have been the basis for the following researches: 1) proposal of the Boiling Instability Program (BIP) (1) 2) evaluation of stability tests in PIPER-ONE apparatus (2) 3) coupled thermal-hydraulic and neutronic instabilities in the LaSalle-2 BWR plant (3) 4) participation to the NEA-OECD BWR Benchmark (4) The RELAP/MOD2 and RELAP5/MOD3 codes have been used. (author)

  16. BWR recirculation pump diagnostic expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, S.C.; Morimoto, C.N.; Torres, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    At General Electric (GE), an on-line expert system to support maintenance decisions for BWR recirculation pumps for nuclear power plants has been developed. This diagnostic expert system is an interactive on-line system that furnishes diagnostic information concerning BWR recirculation pump operational problems. It effectively provides the recirculation pump diagnostic expertise in the plant control room continuously 24 hours a day. The expert system is interfaced to an on-line monitoring system, which uses existing plant sensors to acquire non-safety related data in real time. The expert system correlates and evaluates process data and vibration data by applying expert rules to determine the condition of a BWR recirculation pump system by applying knowledge based rules. Any diagnosis will be automatically displayed, indicating which pump may have a problem, the category of the problem, and the degree of concern expressed by the validity index and color hierarchy. The rules incorporate the expert knowledge from various technical sources such as plant experience, engineering principles, and published reports. These rules are installed in IF-THEN formats and the resulting truth values are also expressed in fuzzy terms and a certainty factor called a validity index. This GE Recirculation Pump Expert System uses industry-standard software, hardware, and network access to provide flexible interfaces with other possible data acquisition systems. Gensym G2 Real-Time Expert System is used for the expert shell and provides the graphical user interface, knowledge base, and inference engine capabilities. (author)

  17. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1982-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are touched on. The basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are treated. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurement of the reactor transfer function, which is demonstrated by results from measurements on a BWR in the Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  18. Organic coolant for ARIES-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Sviatoslavsky, I.; Sawan, M.; Gierszewski, P.; Hollies, R.; Sharafat, S.; Herring, S.

    1991-04-01

    ARIES-III is a D-He 3 reactor design study. It is found that the organic coolant is well suited for the D-He 3 reactor. This paper discusses the unique features of the D-He 3 reactor, and the reason that the organic coolant is compatible with those features. The problems associated with the organic coolant are also discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Physical properties of organic coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debbage, A.G.; Garton, D.A.; Kinneir, J.H.

    1963-03-01

    Density, viscosity, specific heat, vapour pressure and calorific value were measured within the temperature range 100 - 400 deg C for mixtures of Santowax R with pyrolytic high boiler and Santowax R with O.M.R.E. radiolytic high boiler; in addition measurements were made on Santowax OM, X-7 standard, X-7 loop coolant and O.M.R.E. coolant supplied by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. The accuracy of the measurements made were density (± 1/4%), viscosity (± 2%), specific heat (± 2%), vapour pressure (± 2%) and calorific value (± 1/2%). Thermal conductivity was calculated from an improved form of the Smiths equation with an accuracy within ± 6%. Equations fitted to the vapour pressure results were used to provide data outside the experimental range for burnout correlation purposes. The general effect of high boiler content on the specific heat and calorific values was small. The differences in physical property values for corresponding values of either pyrolytic or radiolytic high boiler were small for density (0.3%) and specific heat (2%), but quite large for viscosity (70%) with the pyrolytic high boiler mixture giving the higher value. The chemical analysis of all materials was based on gas chromatography and the relationship between this and an earlier distillation method established. (author)

  20. Sensitiaztion of austenitic stainless steels and its significance as regards stress-corrosion cracking of BWR pipe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.; Otterberg, R.

    1984-05-01

    A critical literature evaluation dealing with sensitization of austenitic stainless steels and its importance in the context of intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in high-temperature, oxygenated water is presented. The factors influencing the degree of sensitization are discussed, principally for type-304 stainless steels, both as regards sensitization arising as a result of isothermal holding within the critical temperature range and weld sensitization. The phenomenon of low-temperature sensitization is described and its potential significance under BWR operating conditions speculated upon. The principal features of and mechanisms controlling IGSCC of sensitized 304 steels in BWR-type environments are reviewed and some thoughts are given to the relevance of laboratory SCC testing in predicting the occurrence of cracking in actual BWR systems. Finally various countermeasures against IGSCC in existing and projected reactors are presented and discussed. (Author)

  1. BWR Refill-Reflood Program, Task 4.7 - model development: TRAC-BWR component models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Y.K.; Parameswaran, V.; Shaug, J.C.

    1983-09-01

    TRAC (Transient Reactor Analysis Code) is a computer code for best-estimate analysis for the thermal hydraulic conditions in a reactor system. The development and assessment of the BWR component models developed under the Refill/Reflood Program that are necessary to structure a BWR-version of TRAC are described in this report. These component models are the jet pump, steam separator, steam dryer, two-phase level tracking model, and upper-plenum mixing model. These models have been implemented into TRAC-B02. Also a single-channel option has been developed for individual fuel-channel analysis following a system-response calculation

  2. Water quality control device and water quality control method for reactor primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yoichi; Ibe, Eishi; Watanabe, Atsushi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is suitable for preventing defects due to corrosion of structural materials in a primary coolant system of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a concentration measuring means measures the concentration of oxidative ingredients contained in a reactor water. A reducing electrode is disposed along a reactor water flow channel in the primary coolant system and reduces the oxidative ingredients. A reducing counter electrode is disposed along the reactor water flow channel in the primary coolant system, and electrically connected to the reducing electrode. The reactor structural materials are used as a reference electrode providing a reference potential to the reducing electrode and the reducing counter electrode. A potential control means controls the potential of the reducing electrode relative to the reference potential based on the signals from the concentration measuring means. A stable reference potential in a region where an effective oxygen concentration is stable can be obtained irrespective of the change of operation conditions by using the reactor structural materials disposed to a boiling region in the reactor core as a reference electrode. As a result, the water quality can be controlled at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  3. Cleaning of aluminum after machining with coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roop, B.

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray photoemission spectroscopic study was undertaken to compare the cleaning of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) aluminum extrusion storage ring vacuum chambers after machining with and without water soluble coolants. While there was significant contamination left by the coolants, the cleaning process was capable of removing the residue. The variation of the surface and near surface composition of samples machined either dry or with coolants was negligible after cleaning. The use of such coolants in the machining process is therefore recommended

  4. Nanofluid as coolant for grinding process: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananathan, J.; Samykano, M.; Sudhakar, K.; Subramaniam, S. R.; Selavamani, S. K.; Manoj Kumar, Nallapaneni; Keng, Ngui Wai; Kadirgama, K.; Hamzah, W. A. W.; Harun, W. S. W.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress and applications of nanoparticles in lubricants as a coolant (cutting fluid) for grinding process. The role of grinding machining in manufacturing and the importance of lubrication fluids during material removal are discussed. In grinding process, coolants are used to improve the surface finish, wheel wear, flush the chips and to reduce the work-piece thermal deformation. The conventional cooling technique, i.e., flood cooling delivers a large amount of fluid and mist which hazardous to the environment and humans. Industries are actively looking for possible ways to reduce the volume of coolants used in metal removing operations due to the economical and ecological impacts. Thus as an alternative, an advanced cooling technique known as Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) has been introduced to the enhance the surface finish, minimize the cost, to reduce the environmental impacts and to reduce the metal cutting fluid consumptions. Nanofluid is a new-fangled class of fluids engineered by dispersing nanometre-size solid particles into base fluids such as water, lubrication oils to further improve the properties of the lubricant or coolant. In addition to advanced cooling technique review, this paper also reviews the application of various nanoparticles and their performance in grinding operations. The performance of nanoparticles related to the cutting forces, surface finish, tool wear, and temperature at the cutting zone are briefly reviewed. The study reveals that the excellent properties of the nanofluid can be beneficial in cooling and lubricating application in the manufacturing process.

  5. BWR water chemistry guidelines and PWR primary water chemistry guidelines in Japan – Purpose and technical background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka, E-mail: kawamuh@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Hirano, Hideo [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Katsumura, Yousuke [University of Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Shunsuke [Tohoku University (Japan); Mizuno, Takayuki [Mie University (Japan); Kitajima, Hideaki; Tsuzuki, Yasuo [Japan Nuclear Safety Institute (Japan); Terachi, Takumi [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (Japan); Nagase, Makoto; Usui, Naoshi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan); Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Shoda, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Takao [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Framework of BWR/PWR water chemistry Guidelines in Japan are presented. • Guideline necessity, definitions, philosophy and technical background are mentioned. • Some guideline settings for control parameters and recommendations are explaines. • Chemistry strategy is also mentioned. - Abstract: After 40 years of light water reactor (LWR) operations in Japan, the sustainable development of water chemistry technologies has aimed to ensure the highest coolant system component integrity and fuel reliability performance for maintaining LWRs in the world; additionally, it aimed to achieve an excellent dose rate reduction. Although reasonable control and diagnostic parameters are utilized by each boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) owner, it is recognized that specific values are not shared among everyone involved. To ensure the reliability of BWR and PWR operation and maintenance, relevant members of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish guidelines for water chemistry. The Japanese BWR and PWR water chemistry guidelines provide strategies to improve material and fuel reliability performance as well as to reduce dosing rates. The guidelines also provide reasonable “control values”, “diagnostic values” and “action levels” for multiple parameters, and they stipulate responses when these levels are exceeded. Specifically, “conditioning parameters” are adopted in the Japanese PWR primary water chemistry guidelines. Good practices for operational conditions are also discussed with reference to long-term experience. This paper presents the purpose, technical background and framework of the preliminary water chemistry guidelines for Japanese BWRs and PWRs. It is expected that the guidelines will be helpful as an introduction to achieve safety and reliability during operations.

  6. Reactor having coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Tadashi; Karatsuka, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Hajime.

    1991-01-01

    In a coolant recycling pump for an LMFBR type reactor, vertical grooves are formed to a static portion which surrounds a pump shaft as far as the lower end thereof. Sodium mists present in an annular gap of the pump shaft form a rotational flow, lose its centrifugal force at the grooved portion and are collected positively to the grooved portion. Further, since the rotational flow in the grooved channel is in a state of a cavity flow, the pressure is released in the grooved portion and a secondary eddy current is formed thereby providing a depressurized state. Accordingly, by a synergestic effect of the centrifugal force and the cavity flow, sodium mists can be recovered completely. (T.M.)

  7. Strategies of operation cycles in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, D.; Sendino, F.

    1996-01-01

    The article analyzes the operation cycles in BWR type reactors. The cycle size of operation is the consequence on the optimization process of the costs with the technical characteristics of nuclear fuel and the characteristics of demand and production. The authors analyze the cases of Garona NP and Cofrentes NP, both with BWR reactors. (Author)

  8. GPE-BWR and the containment venting and filtering issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, J.; Santiago, J. de

    1988-01-01

    The Spanish Boiling Water Reactor Owner's Group (GPE-BWR) is formed by three utilities, owning four units: Santa Maria de Garona (46 MWe, BWR3, Mark I containment), Cofrentes (975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) and Valdecaballeros (2x975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) - all of the reactors having been supplied by General Electric. One of the GPE-BWR's several committees is the Safety and Licensing Committee, which follows up the evolution of severe accident topics and particularly the containment venting and filtering issue. In September 1987, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), the Spanish Regulatory Body, asked the GPE-BWR to define its position on the installation of a containment venting system. The GPE-BWR created a Working Group which presented a Report on Containment Venting to the CSN in January 1987 gathered from: the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); some US utilities; and several European countries, especially France, Germany and Sweden. CSN's review of the containment venting Report and the Action Plan proposed by the GPE-BWR finished in April 1988. The conclusion of the Report and the proposed Action Plan take into account the US NRC's identified open items on severe accidents and the R and D programs scheduled to close these items

  9. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Findlay, J.A.; Hwang, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation

  10. Mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozuh, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mathematical model of reactor coolant pump is described in this paper. It is based on correlations for centrifugal reactor coolant pumps. This code is one of the elements needed for the simulation of the whole NPP primary system. In subroutine developed according to this model we tried in every possible detail to incorporate plant specific data for Krsko NPP. (author)

  11. A nonlinear 3D real-time model for simulation of BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercan, Y.

    1982-02-01

    A nonlinear transient model for BWR nuclear power plants which consists of a 3D-core (subdivided into a number of superboxes, and with parallel flow and subcooled boiling), a top plenum, steam removal and feed water systems and main coolant recirculation pumps is given. The model describes the local core and global plant transient situation as dependent on both the inherent core dynamics and external control actions, i.e., disturbances such as motions of control rod banks, changes of mass flow rates of coolant, feed water and steam outlet. The case of a pressure-controlled reactor operation is also considered. The model which forms the basis for the digital code GARLIC-B (Er et al. 82) is aimed to be used on an on-site process computer in parallel to the actual reactor process (or even in predictive mode). Thus, special measures had to be taken into account in order to increase the computational speed and reduce the necessary computer storage. This could be achieved by - separating the neutron and power kinetics from the xenon-iodine dynamics, - treating the neutron kinetics and most of the thermodynamics and hydrodynamics in a pseudostationary way, - developing a special coupling coefficient concept to describe the neutron diffusion, calculating the coupling coefficients from a basic neutron kinetics code, - combining coarse mesh elements into superboxes, taking advantage of the symmetry properties of the core and - applying a sparse matrix technique for solving the resulting algebraic power equation system. (orig.) [de

  12. Organic coolant in Winnipeg riverbed sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, J.E.; Acres, O.E.

    1979-03-01

    Between January and May 1977 a prolonged leak of organic coolant occurred from the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment's nuclear reactor, and a minimum of 1450 kg of coolant entered the Winnipeg River and was deposited on the riverbed. The level of radioactivity associated with this coolant was low, contributing less than 0.2 μGy (0.02 mrad) a year to the natural background gamma radiation field from the riverbed. The concentration of coolant in the water samples never exceeded 0.02 mg/L, the lower limit of detection. The mortality of crayfish, held in cages where the riverbed was covered with the largest deposits of coolant, was not significantly different from that in the control cages upstream of the outfall. No evidence of fish kill was found. (author)

  13. Primary coolant circuits in FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutani, Masushiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the requirement of a pump for the forcive circulation of primary coolants and avoid the manufacturing difficulty of equipments. Constitution: In primary coolant circuits of an LMFBR type reactor having a recycling path forming a closed loop between a reactor core and a heat exchanger, coolants recycled through the recycling path are made of a magnetic fluid comprising liquid sodium incorporated with fine magnetic powder, and an electromagnet is disposed to the downstream of the heat exchanger. In the above-mentioned structure, since the magnetic fluid as the primary coolants losses its magnetic property when heated in the reactor core but recovers the property at a lower temperature after the completion of the heat exchange, the magnetic fluid can forcively be flown through the recycling path under the effect of the electromagnet disposed to the down stream of the heat exchanger to thereby forcively recycle the primary coolants. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Electrical equipment performance under severe accident conditions (BWR/Mark 1 plant analysis): Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.R.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Medford, G.T.

    1986-09-01

    The purpose of the Performance Evaluation of Electrical Equipment during Severe Accident States Program is to determine the performance of electrical equipment, important to safety, under severe accident conditions. In FY85, a method was devised to identify important electrical equipment and the severe accident environments in which the equipment was likely to fail. This method was used to evaluate the equipment and severe accident environments for Browns Ferry Unit 1, a BWR/Mark I. Following this work, a test plan was written in FY86 to experimentally determine the performance of one selected component to two severe accident environments

  15. Analysis of radiological consequences in a typical BWR with a mark-II containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funayama, Kyoko; Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro

    2003-01-01

    INS/NUPEC in Japan has been carrying out the Level 3 PSA program. In the program, the MACCS2 code has been extensively applied to analyze radiological consequences for typical BWR and PWR plants in Japan. The present study deals with analysis of effects of the AMs, which were implemented by industries, on radiological consequence for a typical BWR with a Mark-II containment. In the present study, source terms and their frequencies of source terms were used based on results of Level 2 PSA taking into account AM countermeasures. Radiological consequences were presented with dose risks (Sv/ry), which were multiplied doses (Sv) by containment damage frequencies (/ry), and timing of radionuclides release to the environment. The results of the present study indicated that the dose risks became negligible in most cases taking AM countermeasures and evacuations. (author)

  16. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karjunen, T.; Laitinen, T.; Piippo, J.; Sirkiae, P.

    1996-01-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR's as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs

  17. Effects of a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident on a Mark I Boiling Water Reactor pressure-suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a boiling-water-reactor (BWR) power plant has never occurred. However, because this type of accident could be particularly severe, it is used as a principal theoretical basis for design. A series of consistent, versatile, and accurate air-water tests that simulate LOCA conditions has been completed on a 1 / 5 -scale Mark I BWR pressure-suppression system. Results from these tests are used to quantify the vertical-loading function and to study the associated fluid dynamics phenomena. Detailed histories of vertical loads on the wetwell are shown. In particular, variation of hydrodynamic-generated vertical loads with changes in drywell-pressurization rate, downcomer submergence, and the vent-line loss coefficient are established. Initial drywell overpressure, which partially preclears the downcomers of water, substantially reduces the peak vertical loads. Scaling relationships, developed from dimensional analysis and verified by bench-top experiments, allow the 1 / 5 -scale results to be applied to a full-scale BWR power plant. This analysis leads to dimensionless groupings that are invariant. These groupings show that, if water is used as the working fluid, the magnitude of the forces in a scaled facility is reduced by the cube of the scale factor and occurs in a time reduced by the square root of the scale factor

  18. BWR pipe crack remedies evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.; Kuzay, T.; Rybicki, E.F.; Stonesifer, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Piping in light-water-reactor power systems has been affected by several types of environmental degradation. This paper presents results from studies of (1) stress corrosion crack growth in fracture mechanics specimens of modified Type 347 SS and Type 304/308L SS weld overlay material, (2) heat-to-heat variations in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Types 316NG and 347 SS, (3) SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS in water with cupric ion or organic acid impurities, (4) electrochemical potential (ECP) measurements under gamma irradiation, (5) SCC of ferritic steels, (6) strain-controlled fatigue of Type 316NG SS in air at ambient temperature, and (7) through-wall residual stress measurements and finite-element calculation of residual stresses in weldments treated by a mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). Fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate tests on Type 316NG SS have shown that transgranular cracking can occur even in high purity environments, whereas no crack growth was observed in Type 347 SS even in impurity environments. In tests on weld overlay specimens, no cracks penetrated into the overlay even in impurity environments. Instead, the cracks branched when they approached the overlay, and then grew parallel to interface. In SCC tests on sensitized Type 304 SS, cupric ions at concentrations greater than ∼1 ppm were found to be deleterious, whereas organic acids at this concentration were not detrimental. Tests on several ferritic steels indicate a strong correlation between the sulfur content of the steels and susceptibility to SCC. External gamma radiation fields produced a large positive shift in the ECP of Type 304 SS at low dissolved-oxygen concentrations (<5 ppb), whereas in the absence of an external gamma field there was no difference in the ECP values of irradiated and nonirradiated material. Fatigue data for Type 316NG SS are consistent with the ASME code mean curve at high strains, but fall below the curve at low strains. Calculations of the

  19. A simplified spatial model for BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Y.; Lederer, Y.; Meron, E.

    2012-01-01

    A spatial reduced order model for the study of BWR stability, based on the phenomenological model of March-Leuba et al., is presented. As one dimensional spatial dependence of the neutron flux, fuel temperature and void fraction is introduced, it is possible to describe both global and regional oscillations of the reactor power. Both linear stability analysis and numerical analysis were applied in order to describe the parameters which govern the model stability. The results were found qualitatively similar to past results. Doppler reactivity feedback was found essential for the explanation of the different regions of the flow-power stability map. (authors)

  20. Level 2 PRA for a German BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassen, F.; Rapp, W.; Tietsch, W.; Roess, P.

    2007-01-01

    A concept for a Level 2 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (L2 PRA) for a German Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) has been developed taking into account the role of L2 PRA within the German regulatory landscape. According to this concept, a plant specific evaluation of the severe accident phenomenology as well as analyses of the accident progression for the severe accident scenarios has been performed. Furthermore a plant specific MELCOR 1.8.6 model has been developed and special MELCOR source term calculations have been performed for the different release paths. This paper will present examples from the different areas described above. (author)

  1. Maintenance of BWR control rod drive mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) replacement and rebuilding is one of the highest dose, most physically demanding, and complicated maintenance activities routinely accomplished by BWR utilities. A recent industry workshop sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which dealt with the effects of CRDM aging, revealed enhancements in maintenance techniques and tooling which have reduced ALARA, improved worker comfort and productivity, and have provided revised guidelines for CRDM changeout selection. Highlights of this workshop and ongoing research on CRDM aging are presented in this paper

  2. Loss-of-coolant accident for large pipe breaks in light water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keusenhoff, J.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and their control for nuclear reactor safety is explained. Showing the cooling circuits and emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) of both, PWR and BWR, the possible break spectrum and the general sequence of events is discussed. The governing physical phenomena for the different LOCA phases are pointed out in more detail. Special emphasis is taken on rules, regulations and failure criteria for licensing purposes. Analysis methods and codes for both, evaluation and best-estimate model are compared under deterministic and probabilistic approach, respectively. Some insight in present integral and separate effect tests demonstrates the interdependency of analysis and experiment. Results of LOCA analysis and experiments show the present state of the art. (orig.)

  3. Fuel assembly for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru.

    1993-01-01

    In the fuel assembly of the present invention, a means for mounting and securing short fuel rods is improved. Not only long fuel rods but also short fuel rods are disposed in channel of the fuel assembly to improve reactor safety. The short fuel rods are supported by a screw means only at the lower end plug. The present invention prevents the support for the short fuel rod from being unreliable due to the slack of the screw by the pressure of inflowing coolants. That is, coolant abutting portions such as protrusions or concave grooves are disposed at a portion in the channel box where coolants flowing from the lower tie plate, as an uprising stream, cause collision. With such a constitution, a component caused by the pressure of the flowing coolants is formed. The component acts as a rotational moment in the direction of screwing the male threads of the short fuel rod into the end plug screw hole. Accordingly, the screw is not slackened, and the short fuel rods are mounted and secured certainly. (I.S.)

  4. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C 4 F 10 and C 4 F 8 , were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C 4 F 10 mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C 4 F 10 weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd

  5. Coolant cleanup method in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Shigeoki; Takahashi, Sankichi; Izumi, Kenkichi; Motojima, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To effectively adsorb to remove low molecular weight organic substances from iron exchange resins for use in the removal of various radioactive nucleides contained in reactor coolants. Method : Reactor coolants are recycled by a main recyling pump in a nuclear reactor and a portion of the coolants is cooled and, thereafter, purified in a coolant desalter. While on the other hand, high pressure steams generated from the reactor are passed through a turbine, cooled in a condensator, eliminated with claddings or the likes by the passage through a filtration desalter using powderous ion exchange resins and then further passed through a desalter (filled with granular ion exchange resins). For instance, an adsorption and removing device for organic substances (resulted through the decomposition of ion exchange resins) precoated with activated carbon powder or filled with granular activated carbon is disposed at the downstream for each of the desalters. In this way, the organic substances in the coolants are eliminated to prevent the reduction in the desalting performance of the ion exchange resins caused by the formation of complexes between organic substances and cobalt in the coolants, etc. In this way, the coolant cleanup performance is increased and the amount of wasted ion exchange resins can be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. Phenomenology of BWR fuel assembly degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Masaki; Barrachin, Marc; Haste, Tim; Steinbrueck, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) which required an immediate re-examination of fuel degradation phenomenology. The present paper reviews the updated knowledge on the phenomenology of the fuel degradation, focusing mainly on the BWR fuel assembly degradation at the macroscopic scale and that of the individual interactions at the meso-scale. Oxidation of boron carbide (B4C) control rods potentially generates far larger amounts of heat and hydrogen under BWR accident conditions. All integral tests with B4C control rods or control blades have shown early failure, liquefaction, relocation and oxidation of B4C starting at temperatures around 1250 °C, well below the significant interaction temperatures of UO2-Zry. These interactions or reactions potentially influence the progress of fuel degradation in the early phase. The steam-starved conditions, which are being discussed as a likely scenario at the FDNPS accident, highly influence the individual interactions and potentially lead the fuel degradation in non-prototypical directions. The detailed phenomenology of individual interactions and their influence on the transient and on the late phase of the severe accidents are also discussed.

  7. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, G. Ivan; Christenson, John M.; Renier, J.P.; Marcille, T.F.; Casal, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs). A top-level objective of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis program element of the DOE NERI program is to investigate spent fuel treatment and recycling options for current light water reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, this project targets to expand the traditional scope of nuclear fuel management optimization into the following two complementary specific objectives: (1) To develop a direct coupling between the pin-by-pin within-bundle loading control variables and core-wide (bundle-by-bundle) optimization objectives, (2) to extend the methodology developed to explicitly encompass control variables, objectives, and constraints designed to maximize minor actinide incineration in BWR bundles and cycles. The first specific objective is projected to 'uncover' dormant thermal margin made available by employing additional degrees of freedom within the optimization process, while the addition of minor actinides is expected to 'consume' some of the uncovered thermal margin. Therefore, a key underlying goal of this project is to effectively invest some of the uncovered thermal margin into achieving the primary objective.

  8. Recent BWR fuel management reactor physics advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, R.L.; Congdon, S.P.; Crawford, B.W.; Kang, C.M.; Martin, C.L.; Reese, A.P.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Welchly, R.

    1982-01-01

    Improvements in BWR fuel management have been under development to reduce uranium and separative work (SWU) requirements and reduce fuel cycle costs, while also maintaining maximal capacity factors and high fuel reliability. Improved reactor physics methods are playing an increasingly important role in making such advances feasible. The improved design, process computer and analysis methods both increase knowledge of the thermal margins which are available to implement fuel management advance, and improve the capability to reliably and efficiently analyze and design for fuel management advances. Gamma scan measurements of the power distributions of advanced fuel assembly and advanced reactor core designs, and improved in-core instruments also are important contributors to improving 3-d predictive methods and to increasing thermal margins. This paper is an overview of the recent advances in BWR reactor physics fuel management methods, coupled with fuel management and core design advances. The reactor physics measurements which are required to confirm the predictions of performance fo fuel management advances also are summarized

  9. CECP, Decommissioning Costs for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Cost Estimating Computer Program CECP, designed for use on an IBM personal computer or equivalent, was developed for estimating the cost of decommissioning boiling water reactor (BWR) and light-water reactor (PWR) power stations to the point of license termination. 2 - Method of solution: Cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial volume and costs; and manpower staffing costs. Using equipment and consumables costs and inventory data supplied by the user, CECP calculates unit cost factors and then combines these factors with transportation and burial cost algorithms to produce a complete report of decommissioning costs. In addition to costs, CECP also calculates person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is designed for a specific waste charge structure. The waste cost data structure cannot handle intermediate waste handlers or changes in the charge rate structures. The decommissioning of a reactor can be divided into 5 periods. 200 different items for special equipment costs are possible. The maximum amount for each special equipment item is 99,999,999$. You can support data for 10 buildings, 100 components each; ESTS1071/01: There are 65 components for 28 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (BWR). ESTS1071/02: There are 75 components for 25 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (PWR)

  10. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C.; Arai, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  11. BWR-stability investigation at Forsmark 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergdahl, B.G.; Reisch, F.; Oguma, R.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1988-01-01

    A series of noise measurements have been conducted at Forsmark 1 during start-up operation after the revision summer '87. The main purpose was to investigate BWR-stability problems, i.e. resonant power oscillations of 0.5 Hz around 65% power and 4100 kg/s core flow, which tend to arise at high power and low core flow conditions. The analysis was performed to estimate the noise source which gives rise to the oscillation, to evaluate the measure of stability, i.e. the Decay Ratio (Dr) as well as to investigate other safety related problems. The result indicates that the oscillation is due to the dynamic coupling between the neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics via void reactivity feedback. The Dr ranged between values of 0.7 and > 0.9, instead of expected 0.6 (Dr=1 is defined as instability). These high values imply that the core cannot suppress oscillations fast enough and a small perturbation can cause scram. Further it was found that the entire core is oscillating in phase (LPRM's) with varying strength where any connection to the consequences of different fuel (8x8, 9x9) being present simultaneously cannot be excluded. This report elucidates the importance of an on-line BWR-stability surveillance system with functions like stability condition monitoring and control system diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P. [ABB Atom, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions.

  13. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Arai, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  14. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P.

    1997-01-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions

  15. BWR fuel experience with zinc injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.A.; Garcia, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    In 1982 a correlation between low primary recirculation system dose rates in BWR's and the presence of ionic zinc in reactor water was identified. The source of the zinc was primarily from Admiralty brass condensers. Plants with brass condensers are called ''natural zinc'' plants. Brass condensers were also a source of copper that was implicated in crude induced localized corrosion (CILC) fuel failures. In 1986 the first BWR intentionally injected zinc for the benefits of dose rate control. Although zinc alone was never implicated in fuel degradation of failures, a comprehensive fuel surveillance program was initiated to monitor fuel performance. Currently there are 14 plants that are injecting zinc. Six of these plants are also on hydrogen water chemistry. This paper describes the effect on both Zircaloy corrosion and the cruding characteristics as a result of these changes in water chemistry. Fuel rod corrosion was found to be independent of the specific water chemistry of the plants. The corrosion behavior was the same with the additions of zinc alone or zinc plus hydrogen and well within the operating experience for fuel without either of these additions. No change was observed in the amounts of crude deposited on the fuel rods, both for the adherent and loosely held deposits. One of the effects of the zinc addition was the trend to form more of the zinc rich iron spinel in the fuel deposits rather than the hematite deposits that are predominantly formed with non additive water chemistry

  16. Continuous surveillance of reactor coolant circuit integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Continuous surveillance is important to assuring the integrity of a reactor coolant circuit. It can give pre-warning of structural degradation and indicate where off-line inspection should be focussed. These proceedings describe the state of development of several techniques which may be used. These involve measuring structural vibration, core neutron noise, acoustic emission from cracks, coolant leakage, or operating parameters such as coolant temperature and pressure. Twenty three papers have been abstracted and indexed separately for inclusion in the data base

  17. Sound velocity in the coolant of boiling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Parshin, D.A.; Novikov, K.S.; Galivec, E.Yu.

    2009-01-01

    To prevent resonant interaction between acoustic resonance and natural frequencies of FE, FA and RI oscillations, it is necessary to determine the value of EACPO. Based on results of calculations of EACPO and natural frequencies of FR, FA and RI oscillations values, it would be possible to reveal the dynamical loadings on metal that are dangerous for the initiation of cracking process in the early stage of negative condition appearance. To calculate EACPO it is necessary to know the Speed Velocity in Coolant. Now we do not have any data about real values of such important parameter as pressure pulsations propagation velocity in two phase environments, especially in conditions with variations of steam content along the length of FR, with taking into account the type of local resistances, flow geometry etc. While areas of resonant interaction of the single-phase liquid coolant with equipment and internals vibrations are estimated well enough, similar estimations in the conditions of presence of a gas and steam phase in the liquid coolant are inconvenient till now. Paper presents results of calculation of velocity of pressure pulsations distribution in two-phase flow formed in core of RBMK-1000 reactors. Feature of the developed techniques is that not only thermodynamic factors and effect of a speed difference between water and steam in a two phase flow but also geometrical features of core, local resistance, non heterogeneity in the two phase environment and power level of a reactor are considered. Obtained results evidence noticeable decreasing of velocity propagation of pressure pulsations in the presence of steam actions in the liquids. Such estimations for real RC of boiling nuclear reactors with steam-liquid coolant are obtained for the first time. (author)

  18. Assessment of severe accident prevention and mitigation features: BWR, Mark II containment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.R.; Hsu, C.J.; Eltawila, F.; Perkins, K.R.; Luckas, W.J.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Pratt, W.T.

    1988-07-01

    Plant features and operator actions, which have been found to be important in either preventing or mitigating severe accidents in BWRs with Mark II containments (BWR Mark II's) have been identified. These features and actions were developed from insights derived from reviews of in-depth risk assessments performed specifically for the Limerick and Shoreham plants and from other relevant studies. Accident sequences that dominate the core-damage frequency and those accident sequences that are of potentially high consequence were identified. Vulnerabilities of the BWR Mark II to severe-accident containment loads were also noted. In addition, those features of a BWR Mark II, which are important for preventing core damage and are available for mitigating fission-product release to the environment were also identified. This report is issued to provide focus to an analyst examining an individual plant. This report calls attention to plant features and operator actions and provides a list of deterministic attributes for assessing those features and actions found to be helpful in reducing the overall risk for Mark II plants. Thus, the guidance is offered as a resource in examining the subject plant to determine if the same, or similar, plant features and operator actions will be of value in reducing overall plant risk. This report is intended to serve solely as guidance

  19. Characterisation of material behaviour in high temperature aqueous environments by means of electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojinov, M.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Sirkiae, P.; Beverskog, B.

    1998-01-01

    Electrochemical measurements in solutions simulating power plant coolants are complicated by the low conductivity of the water, especially in the case of boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. To be able to obtain useful information also in BWR conditions, electrochemical techniques based on a thin-layer electrode arrangement are introduced. This arrangement makes it possible to perform voltammetric and electrochemical impedance measurements in high-temperature water with a room temperature conductivity (κ) as low as 0.1 μScm -1 . A combination of these results with those obtained by means of measuring the resistance of the surface film using the contact electric resistance (CER) technique facilitates versatile characterisation of oxide film behaviour. Examples are given on impedance and CER measurements of the oxide films formed on AISI 316 stainless steel in high temperature high purity (κ -1 ) water and on OX18H10T stainless steel in VVER water. Correlations between temperature, hydrogen and oxygen content of the solution and the oxide behaviour are discussed. (author)

  20. Residual stress analysis in BWR pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Leung, C.P.; Pont, D.

    1992-06-01

    Residual stresses from welding processes can be the primary driving force for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR components. Thus, a better understanding of the causes and nature of these residual stresses can help assess and remedy SCC. Numerical welding simulation software, such as SYSWELD, and material property data have been used to quantify residual stresses for application to SCC assessments in BWR components. Furthermore, parametric studies using SYSWELD have revealed which variables significantly affect predicted residual stress. Overall, numerical modeling techniques can be used to evaluate residual stress for SCC assessments of BWR components and to identify and plan future SCC research

  1. ALARM, Thermohydraulics of BWR with Jet Pumps During LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, F.; Akimoto, M.

    1985-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: ALARM-B2 which is an improved version of ALARM-B1 is a computer program to analyze thermo-hydraulic phenomena of BWR during a blowdown period under a large-break loss-of-coolant accident condition with special emphasis on the heat transfer phenomena in the core region. 2 - Method of solution: A so called volume-junction method is used to present fluid conservations. The primary system is divided into a number of special elements called 'control-volumes'. The system of partial differential equations describing fluid conservations for a stream-tube are integrated over a number of control volumes. The resulting set of simultaneous differential equations that is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional, homogeneous and thermal- equilibrium flow is linearized and solved for a small time increment by a simple explicit numerical technique. The one-dimensional heat conduction equations describing temperature profiles within solid material are written in finite difference forms which are linearized and solved by the Crank-Nicholson implicit method. In order to simulate the blowdown heat transfer phenomena, the code has correlation packages for heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux. The heat generation in the core is given by a point reactor kinetics model with six groups of delayed neutrons and decay of eleven groups of fission products and actinides. The solution technique of the reactor kinetics is based on the Runge-Kutta method. ALARM-B2 has the models to simulate various components incorporated in BWRs such as jet pumps, recirculation pumps, steam separators, valves, and so on. The discharge and injection systems are modeled by leak and fill systems, respectively. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: As this has been developed to simulate a blowdown thermo-hydraulic transient during a large break LOCA, users must pay attention when applying the code to any medium or small break LOCAs or to later phases

  2. Condition monitoring of main coolant pumps, Dhruva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, V.; Satheesh, C.; Acharya, V.N.; Tikku, A.C.; Mishra, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Dhruva is a 100 MW research reactor with natural uranium fuel, heavy water as moderator and primary coolant. Three Centrifugal pumps circulate the primary coolant across the core and the heat exchangers. Each pump is coupled to a flywheel (FW) assembly in order to meet operational safety requirements. All the 3 main coolant pump (MCP) sets are required to operate during operation of the reactor. The pump-sets are in operation since the year 1984 and have logged more than 1,00,000 hrs. Frequent breakdowns of its FW bearings were experienced during initial years of operation. Condition monitoring of these pumps, largely on vibration based parameters, was initiated on regular basis. Break-downs of main coolant pumps reduced considerably due to the fair accurate predictions of incipient break-downs and timely maintenance efforts. An effort is made in this paper to share the experience

  3. Coolant processing device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Hideo; Funakoshi, Toshio; Izumoji, Yoshiaki

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce an entire facility cost by concentrating and isolating tritium accumulated in coolants, removing the tritium out of the system, and returning hydrogen gas generated at a reactor accident to a recombiner in a closed loop by the switching of a valve. Constitution: Coolant from a reactor cooling system processed by a chemical volume control system facility (CVCS) and coolant drain from various devices processed by a liquid waste disposing system facility (LWDS) are fed to a tritium isolating facility, in which they are isolated into concentrated tritium water and dilute tritium water. The concentrated tritium water is removed out of the system and stored. The dilute tritium water is reused as supply water for coolant. If an accident occurs to cause hydrogen to be generated, a closed loop is formed between the containment vessel and the recombiner, the hydrogen is recombined with oxygen in the air of the closed loop to be thus returned to water. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Selection of nuclear reactor coolant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lisheng; Wang Bairong

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear material is nuclear material or materials used in nuclear industry, the general term, it is the material basis for the construction of nuclear power, but also a leader in nuclear energy development, the two interdependent and mutually reinforcing. At the same time, nuclear materials research, development and application of the depth and breadth of science and technology reflects a nation and the level of the nuclear power industry. Coolant also known as heat-carrier agent, is an important part of the heart nuclear reactor, its role is to secure as much as possible to the economic output in the form fission energy to heat the reactor to be used: the same time cooling the core, is controlled by the various structural components allowable temperature. This paper described the definition of nuclear reactor coolant and characteristics, and then addressed the requirements of the coolant material, and finally were introduced several useful properties of the coolant and chemical control. (authors)

  5. Standardized sampling system for reactor coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Munson, L.F.; Nelson, J.L.; McDowell, R.L.; Jankowski, M.W.

    1982-09-01

    A three-pronged approach was developed to reach the objectives of acceptable coolant sampling, assessment of occupational exposure from corrosion products, and model development for the transport and buildup of corrosion products. Emphasis is on sampler design

  6. THYDE-B1/MOD1: a computer code for analysis of small-break loss-of-coolant accident of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Ken; Akimoto, Masayuki

    1982-08-01

    THYDE-B1/MOD1 is a computer code to analyze thermo-hydraulic transients of the reactor cooling system of a BWR, mainly during a small-break loss-of-coolant accidnet (SB-LOCA) with a special emphasis on the behavior of pressure and mixture level in the pressure vessel. The coolant behavior is simulated with a volume-and-junction method based on assumptions of thermal equilibrium and homogeneous conditions for two-phase flow. A characteristic feature of this code is a three-region representation of the state of the coolant in a control volume, in which three regions, i.e., subcooled liquid, saturated mixture and saturated steam regions are allowed to exist. The regions are separated by moving boundaries, tracked by mass and energy balances for each region. The interior of the pressure vessel is represented by two volumes with three regions: one for inside of the shroud and the other for outside, while other portions of the system are treated with homogeneous model. This method, although it seems to be very simple, has been verified to be adequate for cases of BWR SB-LOCAs in which the hydraulic transient is relatively slow and the cooling of the core strongly depends on the mixture level behavior in the vessel. In order to simulate the system behavior, THYDE-B1 is provided with analytical models for reactor kinetics, heat generation and conduction in fuel rods and structures, heat transfer between coolant and solid surfaces, coolant injection systems, breaks and discharge systems, jet pumps, recirculation pumps, and so on. The verification of the code has been conducted. A good predictability of the code has been indicated through the comparison of calculated results with experimental data provided by ROSA-III small-break tests. This report presents the analytical models, solution method, and input data requirements of the THYDE-B1/MOD1 code. (author)

  7. Assessment of effects of Fort St. Vrain HTGR primary coolant on Alloy 800. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trester, P.W.; Johnson, W.R.; Simnad, M.T.; Burnette, R.D.; Roberts, D.I.

    1982-08-01

    A comprehensive review was conducted of primary helium coolant chemistry data, based on current and past operating histories of helium-cooled, high-temperature reactors (HTGRs), including the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) HTGR. A reference observed FSV reactor coolant environment was identified. Further, a slightly drier expected FSV coolant chemistry was predicted for reactor operation at 100% of full power. The expected environment was compared with helium test environments used in the US, United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Japan. Based on a comprehensive review and analysis of mechanical property data reported for Alloy 800 tested in controlled-impurity helium environments (and in air when appropriate for comparison), an assessment was made of the effect of FSV expected helium chemistry on material properties of alloy 800, with emphasis on design properties of the Alloy 800 material utilized in the FSV steam generators

  8. GOTHIC MODEL OF BWR SECONDARY CONTAINMENT DRAWDOWN ANALYSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.N.

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces a GOTHIC version 7.1 model of the Secondary Containment Reactor Building Post LOCA drawdown analysis for a BWR. GOTHIC is an EPRI sponsored thermal hydraulic code. This analysis is required by the Utility to demonstrate an ability to restore and maintain the Secondary Containment Reactor Building negative pressure condition. The technical and regulatory issues associated with this modeling are presented. The analysis includes the affect of wind, elevation and thermal impacts on pressure conditions. The model includes a multiple volume representation which includes the spent fuel pool. In addition, heat sources and sinks are modeled as one dimensional heat conductors. The leakage into the building is modeled to include both laminar as well as turbulent behavior as established by actual plant test data. The GOTHIC code provides components to model heat exchangers used to provide fuel pool cooling as well as area cooling via air coolers. The results of the evaluation are used to demonstrate the time that the Reactor Building is at a pressure that exceeds external conditions. This time period is established with the GOTHIC model based on the worst case pressure conditions on the building. For this time period the Utility must assume the primary containment leakage goes directly to the environment. Once the building pressure is restored below outside conditions the release to the environment can be credited as a filtered release

  9. Reactor coolant pump seals: improving their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.; Metcalfe, R.

    1986-06-01

    Large CANDU plants are benefitting from transient-resistant four-year reliable reactor coolant pump seal lifetimes, a direct result of AECL's 20-year comprehensive seal improvement program involving R and D staff, manufacturers, and plant designers and operators. An overview of this program is presented, which covers seal modification design, testing, post-service examination, specialized maintenance and quality control. The relevancy of this technology to Light Water Reactor Coolant Pump Seals is also discussed

  10. Simulation of a scenario of total loss of external and internal power (Sbo) for different vent pressures of the containment of a BWR-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Godinez S, V.

    2014-10-01

    The simulation of a Station Black Out (Sbo) was realized with intervention of the vent containment by means of a rigid vent coming from the dry-well and that discharges directly to the atmosphere, with the MELCOR code version 2.1. This scenario was carried out for a BWR-5 and containment type Mark II, with a thermal power of 2317 MWt similar to the reactor of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. For this scenario was considered as only available system for coolant injection to the reactor to the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (Rcic), which remained operating 4 hours with batteries bank. The Security and Relief Valves (SR V) were considered functional (by simplicity) and that they mechanically do not exceed their capacity to liberate pressure due to the performances in their safety way. The operator maneuver to perform the SR V and to de pressurize the vessel until the pressure (13 kg/cm 2 ) to operate the low pressure systems was modeled. The results cover approximately 48 hours (172000 seconds), time in which was observed the behavior of the level and pressure in the vessel. Also the scenario evolution was analyzed to different vent pressures of the primary containment (2.0, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, and 10.0 kg/cm 2 ), the temperature profiles of the dry-well, the hydrogen accumulation in the containment, the radio-nuclides liberation through rigid vent to the atmosphere and the inventory of these. In this work an analysis of the pressure behavior in the primary containment is presented, with the purpose of minimizing liberated fission products to the environment. (Author)

  11. Coolant clean up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Iwami, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of main steams and improve the plant heat efficiency by the use of condensated water as coolants for not-regenerative heat exchangers in a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor, a portion of condensates is transferred to the shell of a non-regenerative heat exchanger by way of a condensate pump for non-regenerative heat exchanger through a branched pipeway provided to the outlet of a condensate desalter for using the condensates as the coolants for the shell of the heat exchanger and the condensates are then returned to the inlet of a feedwater heater after the heat exchange. The branched flow rate of the condensates is controlled by the flow rate control valve mounted in the pipeway. Condensates passed through the heat exchanger and the condensates not passed through the heat exchanger are mixed and heated in a heater and then fed to the nuclear reactor. In a case where no feedwater is necessary to the nuclear reactor such as upon shutdown of the reactor, the condensates are returned by way of feedwater bypass pipeway to the condensator. By the use of the condensates as the coolants for the heat exchanger, the main steam loss can be decreased and the thermal load for the auxiliary coolant facility can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  12. Labelling Of Coolant Flow Anomaly Using Fractal Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djainal, Djen Djen

    1996-01-01

    This research deals with the instrumentation of the detection and characterization of vertical two-phase flow coolant. This type of work is particularly intended to find alternative method for the detection and identification of noise in vertical two-phase flow in a nuclear reactor environment. Various new methods have been introduced in the past few years, an attempt to developed an objective indicator off low patterns. One of new method is Fractal analysis which can complement conventional methods in the description of highly irregular fluctuations. In the present work, Fractal analysis was applied to analyze simulated boiling coolant signal. This simulated signals were built by sum random elements in small subchannels of the coolant channel. Two modes are defined and both are characterized by their void fractions. In the case of uni modal -PDF signals, the difference between these modes is relatively small. On other hand, bimodal -PDF signals have relative large range. In this research, Fractal dimension can indicate the characters of that signals simulation

  13. Prediction of the stability of BWR reactors during the start-up process; Prediccion de la estabilidad de reactores BWR durante el proceso de arranque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz E, J.A.; Castillo D, R. [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Blazquez M, J.B. [Centro de Investigaciones Energetics, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are susceptible of uncertainties of power when they are operated to low flows of coolant (W) and high powers (P), being presented this situation mainly in the start-up process. The start-up process could be made but sure if the operator knew the value of the stability index Decay reason (Dr) before going up power and therefore to guarantee the stability. The power and the flow are constantly measures, the index Dr could also be considered its value in real time. The index Dr depends on the power, flow and many other values, such as, the distribution of the flow axial and radial neutronic, the temperature of the feeding water, the fraction of holes and other thermohydraulic and nuclear parameters. A simple relationship of Dr is derived leaving of the pattern reduced of March-Leuba, where three independent variables are had that are the power, the flow and a parameter that it contains the rest of the phenomenology, that is to say all the other quantities that affect the value of Dr. This relationship developed work presently and verified its prediction with data of start-up of commercial reactors could be used for the design of a practical procedure practice of start-up, what would support to the operator to prevent this type of events of uncertainty. (Author)

  14. Verification of computer code for calculation of coolant radiolysis in the VVER reactor core with regard for boiling in its upper part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, O.P.; Kabakchi, S.A. [OKB Gidropress, Podolsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    Code Bora for WWER coolant radiolysis calculation considering single jets boiling in the reactor core top part is developed on the basis of computer codes MOPABA-H2 (radiolysis of aqueous solutions) and SteamRad (radiolysis of vapor). Physico-chemical processes taking place in boiling core coolant are complex and diversified. Still, for the solution of certain problems their simulation can be simplified. The approach of reasonable simplification was used for development of code Bora: mathematical model assumed is purposed for simulation of phenomena only in the area of interest; the number of simulated chemical reactions and particles shall be reasonably minimum; complexity of interphase mass transfer calculation procedure shall be adequate to actually available accuracy of modeling. The analysis of new experimental initial yields of water radiolysis products data and kinetic parameters of elementary chemical reactions with their participation has been carried out. Some changes have been introduced in the mechanism of liquid water and aqueous solutions of ammonia radiolysis have been significantly revised on the basis of this analysis. Examples of the calculations provided for code Bora verification are presented. Despite of very simple simulation of interphase mass transfer, Bora allows to obtain average chemical composition of two-phase coolant at BWR core outlet with the accuracy sufficient for engineering calculations. The report also presents the results of two-phase coolant chemical composition test calculation for reactor core top part coolant boiling in pressurized water reactor. (author)

  15. Best-estimate analysis development for BWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Kalra, S.P.; Beckner, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Program is a three pronged approach to the development of best-estimate analysis capability for BWR systems. An experimental program in the FIST BWR system simulator facility extends the LOCA data base and adds operational transients data. An analytical method development program with the BWR-TRAC computer program extends the modeling of BWR specific components and major interfacing systems, and improves numerical techniques to reduce computer running time. A method qualification program tests TRAC-B against experiments run in the FIST facility and extends the results to reactor system applications. With the completion and integration of these three activities, the objective of a best-estimate analysis capability has been achieved. (author)

  16. Boiling water system of nuclear power plants (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martias Nurdin

    1975-01-01

    About 85% of the world electric generators are light water reactors. It shows that LWR is technologically and economically competitive with other generators. The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is one of the two systems in the LWR group. The techniques of BWR operation in several countries, especially low and moderate power BWR, are presented. The discussion is made in relation with the interconnection problems of electric installation in developing countries, including Indonesia, where the total electric energy installation is low. The high reliability and great flexibility of the operation of a boiling water reactor for a sufficiently long period are also presented. Component standardization for BWR system is discussed to get a better technological and economical performance for further development. (author)

  17. BWR stability: history and state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, George

    2014-01-01

    The paper briefly recalls the historical developments, reviews the important phenomena, the analytical and simulation tools that are used for the analysis of BWR stability focussing on the linear, frequency domain methods

  18. Level controlling system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joge, Toshio; Higashigawa, Yuichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reasonably attain fully automatic water level control in the core of BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: A feedwater flow regulation valve for reactor operation and a feedwater flow regulation valve for starting are provided at the outlet of a motor-driven feedwater pump in a feedwater system, and these valves are controlled by a feedwater flow rate controller. While on the other hand, a damp valve for reactor clean up system is controlled either in ''computer'' mode or in ''manual'' mode selected by a master switch, that is, controlled from a computer or the ON-OFF switch of the master switch by way of a valve control analog memory and a turn-over switch. In this way, the water level in the nuclear reactor can be controlled in a fully automatic manner reasonably at the starting up and shutdown of the plant to thereby provide man power saving. (Seki, T.)

  19. Pressure vessel for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the retention of low temperature water and also prevent the thermal fatigue of the pressure vessel by making large the curvature radius of a pressure vessel of a feed water sparger fitting portion and accelerating the mixing of low-temperature water at the feed water sparger base and in-pile hot water. Constitution: The curvature radius of the corner of the feed water sparger fitting portion in a pressure vessel is formed largely. In-pile circulating water infiltrates up to the base portion of the feed water sparger to carry outside low-temperature water at the base part, which is mixed with in-pile hot water. Accordingly, low temperature water does not stay at the base portion of the feed water sparger and generation of thermal fatigue in the pressure vessel can be prevented and the safety of the BWR type reactor can be improved. (Yoshino, Y.)

  20. BWR plant advanced central control panel PODIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Neda, T.; Suto, O.; Takamiya, S.

    1983-01-01

    BWR plant central control panels have become more and more enlarged and complicated recently due to the magnification of the scale of a plant and the requirement to reinforce safety. So, it is important to make communication between men and the complicated central control panel smooth. Toshiba has developed an advanced central control panel, named PODIA, which uses many computers and color CRTs, and PODIA is now in the stage of application to practical plants. In this article, the writers first touch upon control functions transition in the central control room, the PODIA position concerning the world-wide trend in this technology phase and the human engineering on the design. Then they present concrete design concepts for the control board and computer system which constitute PODIA

  1. Evaluation of internal flooding in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, K.; Papazoglou, I.A.; Sun, Y.H.; Anavim, E.; Ilberg, D.

    1985-01-01

    Flooding inside a nuclear power station is capable of concurrently disabling redundant safety systems. This paper presents the results of a recent review study performed on internally-generated floods inside a boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor building. The study evaluated the flood initiator frequency due to either maintenance or ruptures using Markovian models. A time phased event tree approach was adopted to quantify the core damage frequency based on the flood initiator frequency. It is found in the study that the contribution to the total core damage due to internal flooding events is not insignificant and is comparable to other transient contributors. The findings also indicate that the operator plays an important role in the prevention as well as the mitigation of a flooding event

  2. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.E.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Chen, J.C.; Lappa, D.A.; Chuang, T.Y.; Murray, R.C.; Johnson, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The simplified seismic risk methodology developed in the USNRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant (PWR). The simplified seismic risk methodology was developed to reduce the costs associated with a seismic risk analysis while providing adequate results. A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models, was developed and used in assessing the seismic risk of the Zion nuclear power plant (FSAR). The simplified seismic risk methodology was applied to the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant, a BWR; to further demonstrate its applicability, and if possible, to provide a basis for comparing the seismic risk from PWRs and BWRs. (orig./HP)

  3. A BWR Safety and Operability Improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, Craig D.

    1993-01-01

    The A BWR is the culmination of 30 years of design, development and operating experience of BWRs around the world. It represents across the board improvements is safety, operation and maintenance practices (O and M), economics, radiation exposure and rad waste generation. More than ten years and $20m5 went into the design and development of its new features, and it is now under construction in Japan. This paper concentrates on the safety and operability improvements. In the safety area, more than a decade improvement in core damage frequency (CDFR) has been assessed by formal PIRA techniques, with CDFR less than 10 -6 /year. Severe accident mitigation has also been formally addressed in the design. Plant operations were simplified by incorporation of better materials, optimum use of redundancy in mechanical and electrical equipment so that on-line maintenance can be performed, by better arrangements which account for required maintenance practices, and by an advanced control room

  4. BWR stability using a reducing dynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J. M.; Blazquez Martinez, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical structure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations is non-linear. Simple parametric calculation of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author)

  5. BWR stability using a reduced dynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J.M.; Blazquez, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical struct-ure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations in non-linear. Simple parametric calculat-ion of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author). 7 refs

  6. Manufacturing technology and process for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    Following recent advanced technologies, processes and requests of the design changes of BWR fuel, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) has upgraded the manufacturing technology and honed its own skills to complete its brand-new automated facility in Tokai in the latter half of 1980's. The plant uses various forms of automation throughout the manufacturing process: the acceptance of uranium dioxide powder, pelletizing, fuel rod assembling, fuel bundle assembling and shipment. All processes are well computerized and linked together to establish the integrated control system with three levels of Production and Quality Control, Process Control and Process Automation. This multi-level system plays an important role in the quality assurance system which generates the highest quality of fuels and other benefits. (author)

  7. Facility of BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Mitsuji

    1998-01-01

    A condensate filtering device for cleaning condensate flown from a low pressure turbine and a condensate desalting device are connected by way of a condensate pipeline. Control rod drives (CRD) are disposed to the lower portion of BWR. A CRD pump and one end of a CRD feedwater pipeline are connected in series to the upstream of CRD. The other end of the CRD feedwater pipeline is connected to a CRD water taking pipeline branched from the condensate pipeline. Water is taken to the CRD from downstream of the condensate filtering device and upstream of a connecting portion between a low pressure heater drain pipeline and the condensate pipeline. Flow of impurities leached out of the condensate desalting device to the reactor can be suppressed, and rising of temperature of CRD water by the low pressure heater drain water is prevented. In addition, flowing of dissolved oxygen to the CRD system can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  8. Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for

  9. BWR Mark III containment analyses using a GOTHIC 8.0 3D model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, Gonzalo; Serrano, César; Lopez-Alonso, Emma; Molina, M del Carmen; Calvo, Daniel; García, Javier; Queral, César; Zuriaga, J. Vicente; González, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The development of a 3D GOTHIC code model of BWR Mark-III containment is described. • Suppression pool modelling based on the POOLEX STB-20 and STB-16 experimental tests. • LOCA and SBO transient simulated to verify the behaviour of the 3D GOTHIC model. • Comparison between the 3D GOTHIC model and MAAP4.07 model is conducted. • Accurate reproduction of pre severe accident conditions with the 3D GOTHIC model. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to establish a detailed three-dimensional model of Cofrentes NPP BWR/6 Mark III containment building using the containment code GOTHIC 8.0. This paper presents the model construction, the phenomenology tests conducted and the selected transient for the model evaluation. In order to study the proper settings for the model in the suppression pool, two experiments conducted with the experimental installation POOLEX have been simulated, allowing to obtain a proper behaviour of the model under different suppression pool phenomenology. In the transient analyses, a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and a Station Blackout (SBO) transient have been performed. The main results of the simulations of those transients were qualitative compared with the results obtained from simulations with MAAP 4.07 Cofrentes NPP model, used by the plant for simulating severe accidents. From this comparison, a verification of the model in terms of pressurization, asymmetric discharges and high pressure release were obtained. The completeness of this model has proved to adequately simulate the thermal hydraulic phenomena which occur in the containment during accidental sequences

  10. Characteristics of debris in the lower head of a BWR in different severe accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phung, Viet-Anh; Galushin, Sergey; Raub, Sebastian; Goronovski, Andrei; Villanueva, Walter; Kööp, Kaspar; Grishchenko, Dmitry; Kudinov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Station blackout scenario with delayed recovery of safety systems in a Nordic BWR is considered. • Genetic algorithm and random sampling methods are used to explore accident scenario domain. • Main groups of scenarios are identified. • Ranges and distributions of characteristics of debris bed in the lower head are determined. - Abstract: Nordic boiling water reactors (BWRs) adopt ex-vessel debris cooling to terminate severe accident progression. Core melt released from the vessel into a deep pool of water is expected to fragment and form a coolable debris bed. Characteristics of corium melt ejection from the vessel determine conditions for molten fuel–coolant interactions (FCI) and debris bed formation. Non-coolable debris bed or steam explosion can threaten containment integrity. Vessel failure and melt ejection mode are determined by the in-vessel accident progression. Characteristics (such as mass, composition, thermal properties, timing of relocation, and decay heat) of the debris bed formed in the process of core relocation into the vessel lower plenum define conditions for the debris reheating, remelting, melt-vessel structure interactions, vessel failure and melt release. Thus core degradation and relocation are important sources of uncertainty for the success of the ex-vessel accident mitigation strategy. The goal of this work is improve understanding how accident scenario parameters, such as timing of failure and recovery of different safety systems can affect characteristics of the debris in the lower plenum. Station blackout scenario with delayed power recovery in a Nordic BWR is considered using MELCOR code. The recovery timing and capacity of safety systems were varied using genetic algorithm (GA) and random sampling methods to identify two main groups of scenarios: with relatively small ( 100 tons) amount of relocated debris. The domains are separated by the transition regions, in which relatively small variations of the input

  11. Rapid depressurization event analysis in BWR/6 using RELAP5 and contain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueftueoglu, A.K.; Feltus, M.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Noncondensable gases may become dissolved in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water level instrumentation during normal operations. Any dissolved noncondensable gases inside these water columns may come out of solution during rapid depressurization events, and displace water from the reference leg piping resulting in a false high level. These water level errors may cause a delay or failure in actuation, or premature shutdown of the Emergency Core Cooling System. (ECCS). If a rapid depressurization causes an erroneously high water level, preventing automatic ECCS actuation, it becomes important to determine if there would be other adequate indications for operator response and other signals for automatic actuation such as high drywell pressure. It is also important to determine the effect of the level signal on ECCS operation after it is being actuated. The objective of this study is to determine the detailed coupled containment/NSSS response during this rapid depressurization events in BWR/6. The selected scenarios involve: (a) inadvertent opening of all ADS valves, (b) design basis (DB) large break loss of coolant accident (LOCA), and (c) main steam line break (MSLB). The transient behaviors are evaluated in terms of: (a) vessel pressure and collapsed water level response, (b) specific transient boundary conditions, (e.g., scram, MSIV closure timing, feedwater flow, and break blowdown rates), (c) ECCS initiation timing, (d) impact of operator actions, (e) whether indications besides low-low water level were available. The results of the analysis had shown that there would be signals to actuate ECCS other than low reactor level, such as high drywell pressure, low vessel pressure, high suppression pool temperature, and that the plant operators would have significant indications to actuate ECCS.

  12. Characteristics of debris in the lower head of a BWR in different severe accident scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phung, Viet-Anh, E-mail: vaphung@kth.se; Galushin, Sergey, E-mail: galushin@kth.se; Raub, Sebastian, E-mail: raub@kth.se; Goronovski, Andrei, E-mail: andreig@kth.se; Villanueva, Walter, E-mail: walterv@kth.se; Kööp, Kaspar, E-mail: kaspar@safety.sci.kth.se; Grishchenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry@safety.sci.kth.se; Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Station blackout scenario with delayed recovery of safety systems in a Nordic BWR is considered. • Genetic algorithm and random sampling methods are used to explore accident scenario domain. • Main groups of scenarios are identified. • Ranges and distributions of characteristics of debris bed in the lower head are determined. - Abstract: Nordic boiling water reactors (BWRs) adopt ex-vessel debris cooling to terminate severe accident progression. Core melt released from the vessel into a deep pool of water is expected to fragment and form a coolable debris bed. Characteristics of corium melt ejection from the vessel determine conditions for molten fuel–coolant interactions (FCI) and debris bed formation. Non-coolable debris bed or steam explosion can threaten containment integrity. Vessel failure and melt ejection mode are determined by the in-vessel accident progression. Characteristics (such as mass, composition, thermal properties, timing of relocation, and decay heat) of the debris bed formed in the process of core relocation into the vessel lower plenum define conditions for the debris reheating, remelting, melt-vessel structure interactions, vessel failure and melt release. Thus core degradation and relocation are important sources of uncertainty for the success of the ex-vessel accident mitigation strategy. The goal of this work is improve understanding how accident scenario parameters, such as timing of failure and recovery of different safety systems can affect characteristics of the debris in the lower plenum. Station blackout scenario with delayed power recovery in a Nordic BWR is considered using MELCOR code. The recovery timing and capacity of safety systems were varied using genetic algorithm (GA) and random sampling methods to identify two main groups of scenarios: with relatively small (<20 tons) and large (>100 tons) amount of relocated debris. The domains are separated by the transition regions, in which relatively small

  13. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    A recently completed Oak Ridge effort proposes two management strategies for mitigation of the events that might occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage in a BWR severe accident. While the probability of such an accident is low, there may be effective yet inexpensive mitigation measures that could be implemented employing the existing plant equipment and requiring only additions to the plant emergency procedures. In this spirit, accident management strategies have been proposed for use of a borated solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and for containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if injection systems cannot be restored. The proposed strategy for poisoning of the water used for vessel reflood should injection systems be restored after control blade damage has occurred has great promise, using only the existing plant equipment but employing a different chemical form for the boron poison. The dominant BWR severe accident sequence is Station Blackout and without means for mechanical stirring or heating of the storage tank, the question of being able to form the poisoned solution under accident conditions becomes of supreme importance. On the other hand, the proposed strategy for drywell flooding to cool the reactor vessel bottom head and prevent the core and structure debris from escaping to the drywell holds less promise. This strategy does, however, have potential for future plant designs in which passive methods might be employed to completely submerge the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions without the need for containment venting

  14. Seismic PRA of a BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masahide; Fujimoto, Haruo

    2014-01-01

    Since the occurrence of nuclear power plant accidents in the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power station, the regulatory framework on severe accident (SA) has been discussed in Japan. The basic concept is to typify and identify the accident sequences leading to core/primary containment vessel (PCV) damage and to implement SA measures covering internal and external events extensively. As Japan is an earthquake-prone country and earthquakes and tsunami are important natural external events for nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, JNES performed the seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) on a typical nuclear power plant and evaluated the dominant accident sequences leading to core/PCV damage to discuss dominant scenarios of severe accident (SA). The analytical models and the results of level-1 seismic PRA on a 1,100 MWe BWR-5 plant are shown here. Seismic PRA was performed for a typical BWR5 plant. Initiating events with large contribution to core damage frequency are the loss of all AC powers (station blackout) and the large LOCA. The top of dominant accident sequences is the simultaneous occurrence of station blackout and large LOCA. Important components to core damage frequency are electric power supply equipment. It needs to keep in mind that the results are influenced on site geologic characteristic to a greater or lesser. In the process of analysis, issues such as conservative assumptions related to damages of building or structure and success criteria for excessive LOCA are left to be resolved. These issues will be further studied including thermal hydric analysis in the future. (authors)

  15. Impact analysis of modifying the composition of the nuclear fuel of a BWR with beryllium oxide; Analisis del impacto de modificar la composicion del combustible nuclear de un BWR con oxido de berilio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo V, J. M.; Morales S, J. B., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The beryllium oxide (Be O) presents excellent physical properties, especially its high thermal conductivity that contrasts clearly with that of the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) used at the present as fuel in a great number of nuclear plants. The present work models a nuclear reactor cooled by light water in boiling with two external recirculation loops (BWR/5) using the code for the transitory analysis and postulated accidents Trac-B F1, implementing a UO{sub 2} mixture and different fractions of Be O, with the objective of improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel. The numeric results and the realized analyses indicate that when adding a fraction in volume of 10% the central temperature decreases in 30.4% in stationary state, while during the large break loss of coolant accident the peak cladding temperature diminishes in 7%. Although the real interaction of the mixture has not been determined experimentally, the obtained results are promising. (Author)

  16. Fact and fiction in ECP measurement and control in boiling water reactor primary coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    A review is presented of various electrochemical potentials, including the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), that are used in the mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in the primary coolant circuits of boiling water reactors (BWRs). Attention is paid to carefully defining each potential in terms of fundamental electrochemical concepts, so as to counter the confusion that has arisen due to the misuse of previously accepted terminology. A brief discussion is also included of reference electrodes and it is shown on the basis of experimental data that the use of a platinum redox sensor as a reference electrode in the monitoring of ECP in BWR primary coolant circuits is inappropriate and should be discouraged. If platinum is used as a reference electrode, because of extenuating circumstances (e.g., potential measurements in high dose regions in a reactor core), the onus must be placed on the user to demonstrate quantitatively that the electrode behaves as an equilibrium electrode under the specified conditions and/or that its potential is invariant with changes in the independent variables of the system. Preferably, a means should also be demonstrated of transferring the measured potential to the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) scale. (orig.)

  17. Membrane technology for treating of waste nanofluids coolant: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohruni, Amrifan Saladin; Yuliwati, Erna; Sharif, Safian; Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi

    2017-09-01

    The treatment of cutting fluids wastes concerns a big number of industries, especially from the machining operations to foster environmental sustainability. Discharging cutting fluids, waste through separation technique could protect the environment and also human health in general. Several methods for the separation emulsified oils or oily wastewater have been proposed as three common methods, namely chemical, physicochemical and mechanical and membrane technology application. Membranes are used into separate and concentrate the pollutants in oily wastewater through its perm-selectivity. Meanwhile, the desire to compensate for the shortcomings of the cutting fluid media in a metal cutting operation led to introduce the using of nanofluids (NFs) in the minimum quantity lubricant (MQL) technique. NFs are prepared based on nanofluids technology by dispersing nanoparticles (NPs) in liquids. These fluids have potentially played to enhance the performance of traditional heat transfer fluids. Few researchers have studied investigation of the physical-chemical, thermo-physical and heat transfer characteristics of NFs for heat transfer applications. The use of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) technique by NFs application is developed in many metal cutting operations. MQL did not only serve as a better alternative to flood cooling during machining operation and also increases better-finished surface, reduces impact loads on the environment and fosters environmental sustainability. Waste coolant filtration from cutting tools using membrane was treated by the pretreated process, coagulation technique and membrane filtration. Nanomaterials are also applied to modify the membrane structure and morphology. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is the better choice in coolant wastewater treatment due to its hydrophobicity. Using of polyamide nanofiltration membranes BM-20D and UF-PS-100-100, 000, it resulted in the increase of permeability of waste coolant filtration. Titanium dioxide

  18. BWR Radiation Assessment and Control Program: assessment and control of BWR radiation fields. Volume 1. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.

    1983-05-01

    This report covers work on the BWR Radiation Assessment and Control (BRAC) Program from 1978 to 1982. The major activities during this report period were assessment of the radiation-level trends in BWRs, evaluation of the effects of forward-pumped heater drains on BWR water quality, installation and operation of a corrosion-product deposition loop in an operating BWR, and analyzation of fuel-deposit samples from two BWRs. Radiation fields were found to be controlled by cobalt-60 and to vary from as low as 50 mr/hr to as high as 800 mr/hr on the recirculation-system piping. Detailed information on BWR corrosion films and system deposits is presented in the report. Additionally, the results of an oxygen-injection experiment and recontamination monitoring studies are provided

  19. Application of reliability techniques to prioritize BWR [boiling water reactor] recirculation loop welds for in-service inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1989-12-01

    In January 1988 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Generic Letter 88-01 together with NUREG-0313, Revision 2, ''Technical Report on Material Selection and Processing Guidelines for BWR Coolant Pressure Boundary Piping,'' to implement NRC long-range plans for addressing the problem of stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor piping. NUREG-0313 presents guidelines for categorizing BWR pipe welds according to their SCC condition (e.g., presence of known cracks, implementation of measures for mitigating SCC) as well as recommended inspection schedules (e.g., percentage of welds inspected, inspection frequency) for each weld category. NUREG-0313 does not, however, specify individual welds to be inspected. To address this issue, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed two recommended inspection samples for welds in a typical BWR recirculation loop. Using a probabilistic fracture mechanics model, LLNL prioritized loop welds on the basis of estimated leak probabilities. The results of this evaluation indicate that riser welds and bypass welds should be given priority attention over other welds. Larger-diameter welds as a group can be considered of secondary importance compared to riser and bypass welds. A ''blind'' comparison between the probability-based inspection samples and data from actual field inspections indicated that the probabilistic analysis generally captured the welds which the field inspections identified as warranting repair or replacement. Discrepancies between the field data and the analytic results can likely be attributed to simplifying assumptions made in the analysis. The overall agreement between analysis and field experience suggests that reliability techniques -- when combined with historical experience -- represent a sound technical basis on which to define meaningful weld inspection programs. 13 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Development and Assessment of CFD Models Including a Supplemental Program Code for Analyzing Buoyancy-Driven Flows Through BWR Fuel Assemblies in SFP Complete LOCA Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artnak, Edward Joseph, III

    This work seeks to illustrate the potential benefits afforded by implementing aspects of fluid dynamics, especially the latest computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach, through numerical experimentation and the traditional discipline of physical experimentation to improve the calibration of the severe reactor accident analysis code, MELCOR, in one of several spent fuel pool (SFP) complete loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. While the scope of experimental work performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) extends well beyond that which is reasonably addressed by our allotted resources and computational time in accordance with initial project allocations to complete the report, these simulated case trials produced a significant array of supplementary high-fidelity solutions and hydraulic flow-field data in support of SNL research objectives. Results contained herein show FLUENT CFD model representations of a 9x9 BWR fuel assembly in conditions corresponding to a complete loss-of-coolant accident scenario. In addition to the CFD model developments, a MATLAB based controlvolume model was constructed to independently assess the 9x9 BWR fuel assembly under similar accident scenarios. The data produced from this work show that FLUENT CFD models are capable of resolving complex flow fields within a BWR fuel assembly in the realm of buoyancy-induced mass flow rates and that characteristic hydraulic parameters from such CFD simulations (or physical experiments) are reasonably employed in corresponding constitutive correlations for developing simplified numerical models of comparable solution accuracy.

  1. Behaviour of the reactivity for BWR fuel cells; Comportamiento de la reactividad para celdas de combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Delfin, A.; Vargas, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: galonso@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the behaviour of the reactivity of a fuel assembly type BWR was studied, the objective is to obtain some expressions that consider the average enrichment of U-235 and the gadolinium concentration like a function of the fuel cells burnt. Also, the applicability of the lineal reactivity model was analyzed for fuel cells type BWR. The analysis was carried out with the CASMO-4 code. (Author)

  2. Beta and gamma dose calculations for PWR and BWR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, D.B.

    1989-07-01

    Analyses of gamma and beta dose in selected regions in PWR and BWR containment buildings have been performed for a range of fission product releases from selected severe accidents. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that safety-related equipment could experience during the selected severe accident sequences. The resulting dose calculations demonstrate the extent to which design basis accident qualified equipment could also be qualified for the severe accident environments. Surry was chosen as the representative PWR plant while Peach Bottom was selected to represent BWRs. Battelle Columbus Laboratory performed the source term release analyses. The AB epsilon scenario (an intermediate to large LOCA with failure to recover onsite or offsite electrical power) was selected as the base case Surry accident, and the AE scenario (a large break LOCA with one initiating event and a combination of failures in two emergency cooling systems) was selected as the base case Peach Bottom accident. Radionuclide release was bounded for both scenarios by including spray operation and arrested sequences as variations of the base scenarios. Sandia National Laboratories used the source terms to calculate dose to selected containment regions. Scenarios with sprays operational resulted in a total dose comparable to that (2.20 x 10 8 rads) used in current equipment qualification testing. The base case scenarios resulted in some calculated doses roughly an order of magnitude above the current 2.20 x 10 8 rad equipment qualification test region. 8 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs

  3. Coolant material effect on the heat transfer rates of the molten metal pool with solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Y.; Chung, Chang Hyun; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik

    1998-01-01

    Experimental studies on heat transfer and solidification of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling were performed. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 degree C. Demineralized water and R113 are used as the working coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool immersed in the boiling coolant. The Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region of this study are compared between the water coolant case and the R113 coolant case. The experimental results for the water coolant are higher than those for R113. Also, the empirical relationship of the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number is compared with the literature correlations measured from mercury. The present experimental results are higher than the literature correlations. It is believed that this discrepancy is caused by the effect of the heat loss to the environment on the natural convection heat transfer in the molten pool

  4. The module CCM for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic situation within a coolant channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeld, A.

    2000-01-01

    A coolant channel module (Cc) will be presented which aim is to simulate, in a very general way, the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of single- and two-phase fluids flowing along a heated (or cooled) vertical, inclined or horizontal coolant channel. It is based on a theoretical drift-flux supported 3-equation mixture-fluid model describing the steady state and transient behaviour of characteristic thermal-hydraulic parameters of a single- and two-phase flow within such a channel. The module can be applied as an element within an overall theoretical model for large and complex plant assemblies (PWR and BWR core channels, parallel channels in 3D cores, primary and secondary sides of different steam generators types etc.). The model refers to a general (basic) coolant channel (BC) which can consists of different flow regimes. The BC has thus to be subdivided accordingly into a number of subchannels (SC-s). All of them can belong, however, to only two types of SC-s (single-phase fluid with subcooled water or superheated steam or a two-phase flow regime). For both of them the possibility of variable entrance or outlet positions has to be considered. For discretization purposes the BC (and thus also the SC-s) have to be subdivided into a number of (BC and SC) nodes, discretizing thus the conservation equations for mass, energy and momentum along these nodes by applying a very general spatial procedure, namely a 'modified finite volume method'. A special quadratic polygon approximation method (PAX procedure) helps then to establish a connection between nodal boundary and mean nodal parameters. Considering their constitutive equations (among them an adequate drift-flux correlation package) yields finally a set of non-linear algebraic and non-linear ordinary differential equations for the characteristic parameters of each of these SC nodes (mass flow, pressure drop, coolant temperature and/or void fraction). Based on this theory a code package (CCM) could be established

  5. Simulation of a scenario of total loss of external and internal power (Sbo) for different vent pressures of the containment of a BWR-5; Simulacion de un escenario de perdida total de potencia externa e interna (SBO) para distintas presiones de venteo de la contencion de un reactor BWR-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Godinez S, V., E-mail: Jaime.cardenas@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The simulation of a Station Black Out (Sbo) was realized with intervention of the vent containment by means of a rigid vent coming from the dry-well and that discharges directly to the atmosphere, with the MELCOR code version 2.1. This scenario was carried out for a BWR-5 and containment type Mark II, with a thermal power of 2317 MWt similar to the reactor of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. For this scenario was considered as only available system for coolant injection to the reactor to the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (Rcic), which remained operating 4 hours with batteries bank. The Security and Relief Valves (SR V) were considered functional (by simplicity) and that they mechanically do not exceed their capacity to liberate pressure due to the performances in their safety way. The operator maneuver to perform the SR V and to de pressurize the vessel until the pressure (13 kg/cm{sup 2}) to operate the low pressure systems was modeled. The results cover approximately 48 hours (172000 seconds), time in which was observed the behavior of the level and pressure in the vessel. Also the scenario evolution was analyzed to different vent pressures of the primary containment (2.0, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, and 10.0 kg/cm{sup 2}), the temperature profiles of the dry-well, the hydrogen accumulation in the containment, the radio-nuclides liberation through rigid vent to the atmosphere and the inventory of these. In this work an analysis of the pressure behavior in the primary containment is presented, with the purpose of minimizing liberated fission products to the environment. (Author)

  6. Nuclear reactor of pressurized liquid coolant type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor comprises a vertical concrete pressure vessel, a bell-housing having an open lower end and disposed coaxially with the interior of the pressure vessel so as to delimit therewith a space filled with gas under pressure for the thermal insulation of the internal vessel wall, a pressurizing device for putting the coolant under pressure within the bell-housing and comprising a volume of control gas in contact with a large free surface of coolant in order that an appreciable variation in volume of liquid displaced within the coolant circuit inside the bell-housing should correspond to a small variation in pressure of the control gas. 9 claims, 3 drawing figures

  7. Limits to fuel/coolant mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Moses, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor explosion process involves the mixing of fuel with coolant prior to the explosion. A number of analysts have identified limits to the amount of fuel/coolant mixing that could occur within the reactor vessel following a core melt accident. Past models are reviewed and a sim plified approach is suggested to estimate the upper limit on the amount of fuel/coolant mixing pos sible. The approach uses concepts first advanced by Fauske in a different way. The results indicat that water depth is an important parameter as well as the mixing length scale D /SUB mix/ , and for large values of D /SUB mix/ the fuel mass mixed is limited to <7% of the core mass

  8. Status update of the BWR cask simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Durbin, Samuel G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are typically evaluated through detailed numerical analysis of the system's thermal performance. These modeling efforts are performed by the vendor to demonstrate the performance and regulatory compliance and are independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Numerous studies have been previously conducted. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have moved the storage location from above ground to below ground and significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the canister helium pressure. Previous cask performance validation testing did not capture these parameters. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern dry casks. These modern cask designs utilize elevated helium pressure in the sealed canister or are intended for subsurface storage. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above ground and below ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the canister. The symmetric single assembly geometry with well-controlled boundary conditions simplifies interpretation of results. Various configurations of outer concentric ducting will be used to mimic conditions for above and below ground storage configurations

  9. Main coolant pump testing at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartlen, R.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes Ontario Hydro Research Division's experience with a computerized data acquisition and analysis system for monitoring mechanical vibration in reactor coolant pumps. The topics covered include bench-marking of the computer system and the coolant pumps, signatures of normal and malfunctioning pumps, analysis of data collected by the monitoring system, simulation of faults, and concerns that have been expressed about data interpretation, sensor types and locations, alarm/shutdown limits and confirmation of nondestructive examination testing. This presentation consists of overheads only

  10. Comparative design study of FR plants with various coolants. 1. Studies on Na coolant FR, Pb-Bi coolant FR, gas coolant FR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomura, Mamoru; Shimakawa, Yoshio; Hori, Toru; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Kida, Masanori; Kasai, Shigeo; Ichimiya, Masakazu

    2001-01-01

    In Phase I of the Feasibility Studies on the Commercialized Fast Reactor (FR) Cycle System, plant designs on FR were performed with various coolants. This report describes the plant designs on FR with sodium, lead-bismuth, CO 2 gas and He gas coolants. A construction cost of 0.2 million yen/kWe was set up as a design goal. The result is as follows: The sodium reactor has a capability to obtain the goal, and lead-bismuth and gas reactors may satisfy the goal with further improvements. (author)

  11. On-Line Coolant Chemistry Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LM Bachman

    2006-01-01

    Impurities in the gas coolant of the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) can provide valuable indications of problems in the reactor and an overall view of system health. By monitoring the types and amounts of these impurities, much can be implied regarding the status of the reactor plant. However, a preliminary understanding of the expected impurities is important before evaluating prospective detection and monitoring systems. Currently, a spectroscopy system is judged to hold the greatest promise for monitoring the impurities of interest in the coolant because it minimizes the number of entry and exit points to the plant and provides the ability to detect impurities down to the 1 ppm level

  12. Leak detection device for reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Koichiro.

    1990-01-01

    In a light water cooled reactor, if reactor coolants are leaked from pipelines in a pipeline chamber, activated products (N-16) are diffused together to an atmosphere in the pipeline chamber. N-16 is sucked from an extracting tube which is always sucking the atmosphere in the pipeline chamber to a sucking blower. Then, β-rays released from N-16 are monitored by a radiation monitor in a measuring chamber which is radiation-shielded from the pipeline chamber. Accordingly, since the radiation monitor can detect even slight leakage, the slight leakage of reactor coolants in the pipelines can be detected at an early stage. (I.N.)

  13. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  14. Investigation of power oscillation mechanisms based on noise analysis at Forsmark-1 BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Ritsuo

    1996-01-01

    Noise analysis has been performed for stability test data collected during reactor start-up in January 1989 at the boiling water reactor (BWR) Forsmark unit 1. A unique instrumentation to measure local coolant flow in this reactor allowed investigation of dynamic interactions between neutron flux and coolant flow noise signals at different radial positions in the core. The causal relationship for these signals was evaluated based on a method called signal transmission path (STP) analysis with the aim of identifying the principal mechanism of power oscillations in this reactor. The results of the present study indicated that large amplitude power oscillations were induced by two instability mechanisms concurrent in the core. The first is the global void reactivity feedback effect which played the most significant role to power oscillations at a resonant frequency of about 0.53 Hz. The second is the thermal-hydraulics coupling with neutron kinetics, inducing resonant oscillations at about 0.45 Hz. The latter was found to be active only in a certain core region. A peculiar phenomenon of amplitude modulations observed in some local power range monitor (LPRM) signals was also examined. It was interpreted to occur as the consequence of these two resonant power oscillations, the frequencies of which lie close to each other. The noise analysis technique applied in the present study is expected to be useful to get a deeper understanding of the power oscillation mechanism which is active in the reactor under evaluation. The technique may be applicable to BWRs with instruments to measure local channel flow together with in-core neutron detectors. (Author)

  15. Recriticality calculation with GENFLO code for the BWR core after steam explosion in the lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miettinen, J. [VTT Processes (Finland)

    2002-12-01

    Recriticality of the partially degraded BWR core has been studied by assuming a severe accident phase during which the fuel rods are still intact but the control rods have experienced extensive damage. Previous NKS and EU projects have studied the same case assuming reflooding by the ECCS system In the present study it was assumed that coolant enters the core due to melt-coolant interaction in the lower plenum. In the first case specified the relocation and fragmentation of the molten control rod metal causes the level swell in the core but no steam explosion. In the second case a steam explosion in the lower head was assumed. I n the first case a prompt recriticality peak can occur, but after the peak no semistable power generation remains. In the second case the consequence of the slug entrance into the core is so violent that the fuel disintegration and melting during the first power peak may occur. After the large power peak water is rapidly pushed back from the core and no semistable power generation maintains. The fuel disintegration studies have been based on a coarse assumption that the acceptable local energy addition into the fresh fuel may be 170 cal/g, but with increasing burn-up it can be as low as 60-70 cal/g. In the level swell variations the maximum energy addition was between these limits, but in most of the steam explosion variations much above these limits. Additional variation of the assumptions related to the neutronics demonstrated that for the converged analysis result some interactions would be useful with respect to the boundary conditions and neutronic options.

  16. Fuel assembly for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto

    1990-01-01

    Various considerations are applied to fuel rods for improving the fuel burnup degree. If a gap between the fuel rods is changed, this varies the easiness for the flow of coolants depending on places, to reduce the thermal margin. Then, it is noted for the distribution of stresses generated due to the difference of water pressure caused by the difference of water streams between the inside and the outside of a channel box, and composite value, of stresses upon occurrence of earthquakes, neutron irradiation and a channel creep phenomenon caused by the stresses of due to the water pressure difference described above, the thickness of the channel box is increased in the upstream and decreased toward the downstream. Further, fuel spacers at the position where the thickness of the channel box is changed are spaced apart from the channel box so as not to brought into contact with the channel box. This can contribute to the reduction of coolants pressure loss, improvement of critical power and improvement of reactivity, as well as remarkably moderate local stresses applied from the fuel spacers to the channel box due to horizontal vibrations upon occurrence of earthquakes to improve the integrity of fuel assembly. (N.H.)

  17. Water level measurement uncertainty during BWR instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, R.C.; Derbidge, T.C.; Healzer, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the performance of the water-level measurement system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) during severe instability oscillations which, under some circumstances, can occur during an anticipated transient without SCRAM (ATWS). Test data from a prototypical mock-up of the water-level measurement system was used to refine and calibrate a water-level measurement system model. The model was then used to predict level measurement system response, using as boundary conditions vessel pressures calculated by ppercase RETRAN for an ATWS/instability event.The results of the study indicate that rapid pressure changes in the reactor pressure vessel which cause oscillations in downcomer water level, coupled with differences in instrument line lengths, can produce errors in the sensed water level. Using nominal parameters for the measurement system components, a severe instability transient which produced a 0.2 m peak-to-minimum water-level oscillation in the vessel downcomer was predicted to produce pressure difference equivalent to a 0.7 m level oscillation at the input to the differential pressure transmitter, 0.5 m oscillation at the output of the transmitter, and an oscillation of 0.3 m on the water-level indicator in the control room. The level measurement system error, caused by downcomer water-level oscillations and instrument line length differential, is mitigated by damping both in the differential pressure transmitter used to infer level and in the control room display instrument. ((orig.))

  18. Recent technology for BWR operator training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Kato, Kanji; Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Asaoka, Koichi.

    1990-01-01

    As one of the important factors for maintaining the high capacity ratio in Japanese nuclear power stations, the contribution of excellent operators is pointed out. BWR Operation Training Center has trained many operators using two full scope simulators for operation training modeling BWRs. But in order to meet the demands of the recent increase of training needs and the upgrading of the contents, it was decided to install the third simulator, and Hitachi Ltd. received the order to construct the main part, and delivered it. This simulator obtained the good reputation as its range of simulation is wide, and the characteristics resemble very well those of the actual plants. Besides, various new designs were adopted in the control of the simulator, and its handling became very easy. Japanese nuclear power plants are operated at constant power output, and the unexpected stop is very rare, therefore the chance of operating the plants by operators is very few. Accordingly, the training using the simulators which can simulate the behavior of the plants with computers, and can freely generate abnormal phenomena has become increasingly important. The mode and positioning of the simulators for operation training, the full scope simulator BTC-3 and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Method of operating BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reactor control depending on any demanded loads by performing control by the insertion of control rods in addition to the control by the regulation of the flow rate of the reactor core water at high power operation of a BWR type reactor. Method: The power is reduced at high power operation by decreasing the flow rate of reactor core water from the starting time for the power reduction and the flow rate is maintained after the time at which it reaches the minimum allowable flow rate. Then, the control rod is started to insert from the above time point to reduce the power to an aimed level. Thus, the insufficiency in the reactivity due to the increase in the xenon concentration can be compensated by the withdrawal of the control rods and the excess reactivity due to the decrease in the xenon concentration can be compensated by the insertion of the control rods, whereby the reactor power can be controlled depending on any demanded loads without deviating from the upper or lower limit for the flow rate of the reactor core water. (Moriyama, K.)

  20. Method of operating BWR type power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the operation efficiency of BWR type reactors by reducing the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start-up of the turbine and electrical generator, as well as decrease the pressure difference in each of the sections of the pressure vessel to thereby extend its life span. Method: The operation comprises switching the nuclear reactor from the shutdown mode to the start-up mode, increasing the reactor power to a predetermined level lower than a rated power while maintaining the reactor pressure to a predetermined level lower than a rated pressure, starting up a turbine and an electrical generator in the state of the predetermined reactor pressure and the reactor power to connect the electrical generator to the power transmission system and, thereafter, increasing the reactor pressure and the reactor power to the predetermined rated pressure and rated power respectively. This can shorten the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start of the power transmission system, whereby the operation efficiency of the power plant can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Experience on a BWR plant diagnosis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, A.; Kawai, K.; Hashimoto, Y.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to watch plant dynamics and equipment condition for avoiding a big transient or avoiding damage to a system by equipment failure. After the TMI accident the necessity of a diagnosis system has been recognized and such development activities have become of primary importance in many organizations. A diagnosis system has two kinds of function. One is the early detection of an anomaly before detection by a conventional instrumentation system. The other is appropriate instruction after alarm or scram has occurred. The authors have been developing the former system by a noise analysis technique and a feasibility study has been undertaken in recent years as a joint research programme of several electric power companies and the Toshiba Corporation. A prototype diagnosis system has been installed on a BWR plant in Japan. This diagnosis system concerns reactor core, jet pumps and three main control systems. Many data from normal operation have been accumulated using this system and a variation pattern of normal noise data is clarified. On this basis, anomally detection criteria have been determined using statistical decision theory. It is confirmed that this system performance is satisfactory, and that the system will be of great use for surveillance of core and control systems without artificial disturbances. (author)

  2. Power control system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yasuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To control the reactor power so that the power distribution can satisfy the limiting conditions, by regulating the reactor core flow rate while monitoring the power distribution in the reactor core of a BWR type reactor. Constitution: A power distribution monitor determines the power distribution for the entire reactor core based on the data for neutron flux, reactor core thermal power, reactor core flow rate and control rod pattern from the reactor and calculates the linear power density distribution. A power up ratio computing device computes the current linear power density increase ratio. An aimed power up ratio is determined by converting the electrical power up ratio transferred from a load demand input device into the reactor core thermal power up ratio. The present reactor core thermal power up ratio is subtracted from the limiting power up ratio and the difference is sent to an operation amount indicator and the reactor core flow rate is changed in a reactor core flow rate regulator, by which the reactor power is controlled. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. Fuel assemblies for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Takao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable effective failed fuel detection by the provision of water rod formed with a connecting section connected to a warmed water feed pipe of a sipping device at the lower portion and with a warmed water jetting port in the lower portion in a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor to thereby carry out rapid sipping. Constitution: Fuel rods and water rods are contained in the channel box of a fuel assembly, and the water rod is provided at its upper portion with a connecting section connected to the warmed water feed pipe of the sipping device and formed at its lower portion with a warmed water jetting port for jetting warmed water fed from the warmed water feed pipe. Upon detection of failed fuels, the reactor operation is shut down and the reactor core is immersed in water. The cover for the reactor container is removed and the cap of the sipping device is inserted to connect the warmed water feed pipe to the connecting section of the water rod. Then, warmed water is fed to the water rod and jetted out from the warmed water jetting port to cause convection and unify the water of the channel box in a short time. Thereafter, specimen is sampled and analyzed for the detection of failed fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Power generator in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to perform stable and dynamic conditioning operation for nuclear fuels in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The conditioning operation for the nuclear fuels is performed by varying the reactor core thermal power in a predetermined pattern by changing the predetermined power changing pattern of generator power, the rising rate of the reactor core thermal power and the upper limit for the rising power of the reactor core thermal power are calculated and the power pattern for the generator is corrected by a power conditioning device such that the upper limit for the thermal power rising rate and the upper limit for the thermal power rising rate are at the predetermined levels. Thus, when the relation between the reactor core thermal power and the generator electrical power is fluctuated, the fluctuation is detected based on the variation in the thermal power rising rate and the limit value for the thermal power rising rate, and the correction is made to the generator power changing pattern so that these values take the predetermined values to thereby perform the stable conditioning operation for the nuclear fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Evaluation of stress corrosion crack growth in BWR piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassir, M.; Sharma, S.; Reich, M.; Chang, M.T.

    1985-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to evaluate the effects of stress intensity factor and environment on the growth behavior of intergranular stress corrosion cracks in type 304 stainless steel piping systems. Most of the detected cracks are known to be circumferential in shape, and initially started at the inside surface in the heat affected zone near girth welds. These cracks grow both radially in-depth and circumferentially in length and, in extreme cases, may cause leakage in the installation. The propagation of the crack is essentially due to the influence of the following simultaneous factors: (1) the action of applied and residual stress; (2) sensitization of the base metal in the heat affected zone adjacent to girth weld; and (3) the continuous exposure of the material to an aggressive environment of high temperature water containing dissolved oxygen and some levels of impurities. Each of these factors and their effects on the piping systems is discussed in detail in the report. The report also evaluates the time required for hypothetical cracks in BWR pipes to propagate to their critical size. The pertinent times are computed and displayed graphically. Finally, parametric study is performed in order to assess the relative influence and sensitivity of the various input parameters (residual stress, crack growth law, diameter of pipe, initial size of defect, etc.) which have bearing on the growth behavior of the intergranular stress corrosion cracks in type 304 stainless steel. Cracks in large-diameter as well as in small-diameter pipes are considered and analyzed. 27 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs

  6. Burnup credit feasibility for BWR spent fuel shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent of fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Analyses 1 have shown the feasibility estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This paper summarizes the extension of the previous PWR feasibility assessments to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. As with the PWR analysis, the purpose was not verification of burnup credit (see ref. 2 for ongoing work in this area) but a reasonable assessment of the feasibility and potential gains from its use in BWR applications. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. The method includes characterization of a typical pin-cell spectrum, using a one-dimensional (1-D) model of a BWR assembly. The calculated spectrum allows burnup-dependent few-group material constants to be generated. Point depletion methods were then used to obtain the time-varying characteristics of the fuel. These simple methods were validated, where practical, with multidimensional methods. 6 refs., 1 tab

  7. Fission product release into the primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apperson, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The analytic evaluation of steady state primary coolant activity is discussed. The reported calculations account for temperature dependent fuel failure in two particle types and arbitrary radioactive decay chains. A matrix operator technique implemented in the SUVIUS code is used to solve the simultaneous equations. Results are compared with General Atomic Company's published results

  8. Summary of the OECD/NRC Boiling Water Reactor Turbine Trip Benchmark - Fifth Workshop (BWR-TT5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The reference problem chosen for simulation in a BWR is a Turbine Trip transient, which begins with a sudden Turbine Stop Valve (TSV) closure. The pressure oscillation generated in the main steam piping propagates with relatively little attenuation into the reactor core. The induced core pressure oscillation results in dramatic changes of the core void distribution and fluid flow. The magnitude of the neutron flux transient taking place in the BWR core is strongly affected by the initial rate of pressure rise caused by pressure oscillation and has a strong spatial variation. The correct simulation of the power response to the pressure pulse and subsequent void collapse requires a 3-D core modeling supplemented by 1-D simulation of the remainder of the reactor coolant system. A BWR TT benchmark exercise, based on a well-defined problem with complete set of input specifications and reference experimental data, has been proposed for qualification of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulic system transient codes. Since this kind of transient is a dynamically complex event with reactor variables changing very rapidly, it constitutes a good benchmark problem to test the coupled codes on both levels: neutronics/thermal-hydraulic coupling and core/plant system coupling. Subsequently, the objectives of the proposed benchmark are: comprehensive feedback testing and examination of the capability of coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core/plant interactions by comparison with actual experimental data. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises: Exercise 1 - Power vs. Time Plant System Simulation with Fixed Axial Power Profile Table (Obtained from Experimental Data). Exercise 2 - Coupled 3-D Kinetics/Core Thermal-Hydraulic BC Model and/or 1-D Kinetics Plant System Simulation. Exercise 3 - Best-Estimate Coupled 3-D Core/Thermal-Hydraulic System Modeling. The purpose of this fifth workshop was to discuss the results from Phase III (best

  9. Application of gadolinia credit to cask transportation of BWR-STEP3 SFAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Tsukasa; Mitsuhashi, Ishi; Ito, Dai-ichiro; Nakamura, Yu

    2003-01-01

    Instead of the fresh-fuel assumption, the application of gadolinia credit to cask transportation of BWR SFAs is studied. Its efficacy for BWR-STEP2 SFAs had already been estimated. This paper reports on the application of gadolinia credit to cask transportation of BWR-STEP3 SFAs. (author)

  10. Kuosheng BWR/6 recirculation pump trip transient analysis with the RETRAN02/MOD5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.R.; Shih, C.

    1992-01-01

    A recirculation pump trip (RPT) event results in a reduction in recirculation flow, which reduces the core coolant flow rate. A reduction in core flow results in an increase in core void fraction and hence a decrease in core power due to negative void reactivity feedback. Although this category of events is less severe than others and generally considered as nonlimiting, core instability still may occur such as that at LaSalle on March 9, 1988. This paper focuses on the RPT transient analysis of Kuosheng Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP), which has two units of General Electric-designed boiling water reactor (BWR)/6 with rated core thermal power of 2894 MW and rated core flow of 10645 kg/s (23472 lb m /s). The approach to investigating the RPT transient of KNPP consists of two steps. The first step is to develop a plant-specific model using the RETRAN02/MOD5 code. In this step, various plant-specific information, including design documentation, drawings, safety analysis reports, and other information supplied by vendors were collected for model development. The RPT startup test at 68% power was used for system model benchmarking to ensure the adequacy of this model and identify several sensitive parameters. The second step is to assess whether similar power oscillation phenomena may occur at KNPP because of an RPT with isolated feedwater heater event. Two transient analyses (with or without reactor scram) of the KNPP RPT with isolated feedwater heater were investigated

  11. Prediction of the stability of BWR reactors during the start-up process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz E, J.A.; Castillo D, R.; Blazquez M, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are susceptible of uncertainties of power when they are operated to low flows of coolant (W) and high powers (P), being presented this situation mainly in the start-up process. The start-up process could be made but sure if the operator knew the value of the stability index Decay reason (Dr) before going up power and therefore to guarantee the stability. The power and the flow are constantly measures, the index Dr could also be considered its value in real time. The index Dr depends on the power, flow and many other values, such as, the distribution of the flow axial and radial neutronic, the temperature of the feeding water, the fraction of holes and other thermohydraulic and nuclear parameters. A simple relationship of Dr is derived leaving of the pattern reduced of March-Leuba, where three independent variables are had that are the power, the flow and a parameter that it contains the rest of the phenomenology, that is to say all the other quantities that affect the value of Dr. This relationship developed work presently and verified its prediction with data of start-up of commercial reactors could be used for the design of a practical procedure practice of start-up, what would support to the operator to prevent this type of events of uncertainty. (Author)

  12. The integrity of NSSS and containment during extended station blackout for Kuosheng BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Keng-Hsien; Yuann, Yng-Ruey; Lin, Ansheng [Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research

    2017-11-15

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident occurring on March 11, 2011, reveals that Station Blackout (SBO) may last longer than 8 h. However, the original design may not have sufficient capacity to cope with a SBO for more than 8 h. In view of this, Taiwan Power Company has initiated several enhancements to mitigate the severity of the extended SBO. Based on the improved plant configuration, a SBO coping analysis is performed in this study to assess whether the Kuosheng BWR plant has sufficient capability to cope with SBO for 24 h with respect to maintaining the integrity of the reactor core and containment. The analyses in the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) and the containment are based on the RETRAN-3D and GOTHIC models, respectively. The flow conditions calculated by RETRAN-3D during the event are retrieved and input to the GOTHIC containment model to determine the containment pressure and temperature response. These boundary conditions include SRV flow rate, SRV flow enthalpy, and total reactor coolant system leakage flow rate.

  13. Analyzing the BWR rod drop accident in high-burnup cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.; Neymotin, L.; Kohut, P.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the fuel enthalpy during a rod drop accident (RDA) for cores with high burnup fuel. The calculations were done with the RAMONA-4B code which models the core with 3-dimensional neutron kinetics and multiple parallel coolant channels. The calculations were done with a model for a BWR/4 with fuel bundles having burnups up to 30 GWd/t and also with a model with bundle burnups to 60 GWd/t. This paper also discusses potential sources of uncertainty in calculations with high burnup fuel. One source is the ''rim'' effect which is the extra large peaking of the power distribution at the surface of the pellet. This increases the uncertainty in reactor physics and heat conduction models that assume that the energy deposition has a less peaked spatial distribution. Two other sources of uncertainty are the result of the delayed neutron fraction decreasing with burnup and the positive moderator temperature feedback increasing with burnup. Since these effects tend to increase the severity of the event, an RDA calculation for high burnup fuel will underpredict the fuel enthalpy if the effects are not properly taken into account. Other sources of uncertainty that are important come from the initial conditions chosen for the RDA. This includes the initial control rod pattern as well as the initial thermal-hydraulic conditions

  14. OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Benchmark: Simulation by POLCA-T Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, Dobromir

    2004-01-01

    Westinghouse transient code POLCA-T brings together the system thermal-hydraulics plant models and three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics core models. Participation in the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip (TT) Benchmark is a part of our efforts toward the code's validation. The paper describes the objectives for TT analyses and gives a brief overview of the developed plant system input deck and 3-D core model.The results of exercise 1, system model without netronics, are presented. Sensitivity studies performed cover the maximal time step, turbine stop valve position and mass flow, feedwater temperature, and steam bypass mass flow. Results of exercise 2, 3-D core neutronic and thermal-hydraulic model with boundary conditions, are also presented. Sensitivity studies include the core inlet temperature, cladding properties, and direct heating to core coolant and bypass.The entire plant model was validated in the framework of the benchmark's phase 3. Sensitivity studies include the effect of SCRAM initialization and carry-under. The results obtained - transient fission power and its initial axial distribution and steam dome, core exit, lower and upper plenum, main steam line, and turbine inlet pressures - showed good agreement with measured data. Thus, the POLCA-T code capabilities for correct simulation of pressurizing transients with very fast power were proved

  15. Effect of torus wall flexibility on hydro-structural interaction in BWR containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.H.; McCauley, E.W.; Holman, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    The MARK I boiling water reactor (BWR) containment system is comprised of a light-bulb-shaped reactor compartment connected through vent pipes to a torus-shaped and partially water-filled pressure suppression chamber, or the wetwell. During either a normally occurring safety relief valve (SRV) discharge or a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), air or steam is forced into the wetwell water pool for condensation and results in hydrodynamically induced loads on the torus shell. An analytical program is described which employs the finite element method to investigate the influence of torus wall flexibility on hydrodynamically induced pressure and the resultant force on the torus shell surface. The shell flexibility is characterized by the diameter-to-thickness ratio which is varied from the perfectly rigid case to the nominal plant condition. The general conclusion reached is that torus wall flexibility decreases both the maximum pressure seen by the shell wall and the total vertical load resulted from the hydrodynamically induced pressure

  16. The integrity of NSSS and containment during extended station blackout for Kuosheng BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Keng-Hsien; Yuann, Yng-Ruey; Lin, Ansheng

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident occurring on March 11, 2011, reveals that Station Blackout (SBO) may last longer than 8 h. However, the original design may not have sufficient capacity to cope with a SBO for more than 8 h. In view of this, Taiwan Power Company has initiated several enhancements to mitigate the severity of the extended SBO. Based on the improved plant configuration, a SBO coping analysis is performed in this study to assess whether the Kuosheng BWR plant has sufficient capability to cope with SBO for 24 h with respect to maintaining the integrity of the reactor core and containment. The analyses in the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) and the containment are based on the RETRAN-3D and GOTHIC models, respectively. The flow conditions calculated by RETRAN-3D during the event are retrieved and input to the GOTHIC containment model to determine the containment pressure and temperature response. These boundary conditions include SRV flow rate, SRV flow enthalpy, and total reactor coolant system leakage flow rate.

  17. Generic BWR-4 degraded core in-vessel study. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Original intent of this project was to produce a phenomenological study of the in-vessel degradation which occurs during the TQUX and TQUV sequences for a generic BWR-4 from the initiation of the FSAR Chapter 15 operational transient through core debris bed formation to the failure of the primary pressure boundary. Bounding calculations were to be performed for the two high pressure and low pressure non-LOCA scenarios to assess the uncertainties in the current state of knowledge regarding the source terms for containment integrity studies. Source terms as such were defined in terms of hydrogen generation, unreacted metal, and coolant inventroy, and in terms of the form, sequencing and mode of dispersal through the primary vessel boundary. Fission product release was not to be considered as part of this study. Premature termination of the project, however, led to the dicontinuation of work on an as is basis. Work on the in-core phase from the point of scram to core debris bed formation was largely completed. A preliminary scoping calculation on the debris bed phase had been initiated. This report documents the status of the study at termination

  18. Pipe rupture test results; 6 in. pipe whip test under BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Ryoichi; Yano, Toshikazu; Ueda, Shuzo; Isozaki, Toshikuni; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Kato, Rokuro; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1983-02-01

    A series of pipe rupture tests has been performed in JAERI to demonstrate the safety of the primary coolant circuits in the event of pipe rupture, in nuclear power plants. The present report summarizes the results of 6 in. pipe whip tests (RUN 5605, 5606), under BWR LOCA conditions (285 0 C, 6.8 MPa), which were performed in August, 1981. The test pipe is made of Type 304 stainless steel and its outer diameter is 6 in. and its thickness is 11.1 mm. The restraints are made of Type 304 stainless steel and its diameter is 16.0 mm. Two restraints were set on the restraint support with clearance of 100 mm. Overhang length was varied as the parameter in these tests and was 300 mm or 700 mm. The following results are obtained. (1) The deformations of a pipe and restraints are limited effectively by shorter overhang length of 300. However, they become larger when the overhang length is 700 mm, and the pipe deforms especially at the setting point of restraints. (2) Velocity at the free end of pipe becomes about 30 m/sec just after the break. However, velocity at the setting point of restraint becomes about only 4 m/sec just after the break. (3) It seems from the comparison between the 4 in. tests and 6 in. tests that the maximum restraint force of 6 in. tests is about two times as large as that of 4 in. tests. (author)

  19. Method of estimating thermal power distribution of core of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately and rapidly predict the thermal power of the core of a BWR they reactor at load follow-up operating time. Method: A parameter value corrected from a correction coefficient deciding unit and a xenon density distribution value predicted and calculated from a xenon density distributor are inputted to a thermal power distribution predicting devise, the status amount such as coolant flow rate or the like predetermined at this and next high power operating times is substituted for physical model to predict and calculate the thermal power distribution. The status amount of a nuclear reactor at the time of operating in previous high power corresponding to the next high power operation to be predicted is read from the status amount of the reactor stored in time series manner is a reactor core status memory, and the physical model used in the prediction and calculation of the thermal power distribution at the time of next high power operation is corrected. (Sikiya, K.)

  20. Non-Fourier Vernotte-Cattaneo numerical model for heat conduction in a BWR fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Martinez, E.G.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A.; Varela-Ham, J.R.; Espinosa-Paredes, G., E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    A fuel rod mathematical model based on transient heat conduction as constitutive Non-Fourier law for Light Water Reactors (LWRs) transient analysis is presented. The structure of the fuel pellet is affected due to high temperatures and irradiation, which eventually produce fracture or cracks. In principle the fractures are saturated of gas. Then, the Fourier law of the heat conduction is not strictly applicable to describe these phenomena, where the physical properties such as thermal conductivity, heat capacity and density correspond to a heterogeneous material due to gas, and therefore the thermal diffusion process due to molecular transport in the fuel pellet is affected. From the point of view of nuclear reactor safety analysis, the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant is crucial and superheating of the wall can cause the cladding failure. In the classical theory of diffusion, the Fourier law of heat conduction is used to describe the relation between the heat flux vector and the temperature gradient assuming that the heat propagation speeds are infinite. The Non-Fourier approach presented in this work eliminates the assumption of an infinite thermal wave speed, therefore time-dependent heat sources were considered in the fuel rod heat transfer model. The numerical experiments in a BWR, show that the Non-Fourier approach is crucial in the pressurization transients such as turbine trip and reactor isolation. (author)

  1. Non-Fourier Vernotte-Cattaneo numerical model for heat conduction in a BWR fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Martinez, E.G.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A.; Varela-Ham, J.R.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.

    2014-01-01

    A fuel rod mathematical model based on transient heat conduction as constitutive Non-Fourier law for Light Water Reactors (LWRs) transient analysis is presented. The structure of the fuel pellet is affected due to high temperatures and irradiation, which eventually produce fracture or cracks. In principle the fractures are saturated of gas. Then, the Fourier law of the heat conduction is not strictly applicable to describe these phenomena, where the physical properties such as thermal conductivity, heat capacity and density correspond to a heterogeneous material due to gas, and therefore the thermal diffusion process due to molecular transport in the fuel pellet is affected. From the point of view of nuclear reactor safety analysis, the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant is crucial and superheating of the wall can cause the cladding failure. In the classical theory of diffusion, the Fourier law of heat conduction is used to describe the relation between the heat flux vector and the temperature gradient assuming that the heat propagation speeds are infinite. The Non-Fourier approach presented in this work eliminates the assumption of an infinite thermal wave speed, therefore time-dependent heat sources were considered in the fuel rod heat transfer model. The numerical experiments in a BWR, show that the Non-Fourier approach is crucial in the pressurization transients such as turbine trip and reactor isolation. (author)

  2. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Wells, J.E.; Johnson, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    The seismic risk methodology developed in the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant, a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models was developed and analyzed. The SSMRP methodology can equally be applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR). To demonstrate its applicability, to identify fundamental differences in seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR, and to provide a basis of comparison of seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR when analyzed with comparable methodology and assumptions, a seismic risk analysis is being performed on the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant

  3. The BWR owners' group planning guide for life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.K.; Lehnert, D.F.; Locke, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Extending the operating life of a commercial nuclear power plant has been shown to be economically beneficial to both the utility and the electric customer. As such, many utilities are planning and implementing plant life extension (PLEX) programs. A document has been developed which provides guidance to utilities in formulating a PLEX program plant for one or more boiling water reactor (BWR) plants. The guide has been developed by the BWR Owners' Group Plant Life Extension Committee. The principal bases for this guide were the BWR Pilot and Lead Plant Programs. These programs were used as models to develop the 'base plan' described in this guide. By formulating their program plant utilizing the base plan, utilities will be able to maximize the use of existing evaluations and results. The utility planner will build upon the base plan by adding any tasks or features that are unique to their programs. (author)

  4. An overview of the BWR ECCS strainer blockage issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, A.W.; Marshall, M.L. Jr.; Elliott, R.

    1996-01-01

    This Paper provides a brief overview of actions taken in the mid 1980s to resolve Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-43, open-quotes Containment Emergency Sump Performance,close quotes and their relationship to the BWR strainer blockage issue; the importance of insights gained from the Barseback-2 (a Swedish BWR) incident in 1992 and from ECCS strainer testing and inspections at the Perry nuclear power plant in 1992 and 1993; an analysis of an US BWR/4 with a Mark I containment; an international community sharing of knowledge relevant to ECCS strainer blockage, additional experimental programs; and identification of actions needed to resolve the strainer blockage issue and the status of such efforts

  5. Analysis of Coolant Options for Advanced Metal Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Can, Levent

    2006-01-01

    .... The overall focus of this study is the build up of induced radioactivity in the coolant of metal cooled reactors as well as the evaluation of other physical and chemical properties of such coolants...

  6. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 1. Cask handling experience and decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doman, J.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Guenther, R.J.; Creer, J.M.; King, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report documents a heat transfer and shielding performance test conducted on a Ridihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2023 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The testing effort consisted of three parts: pretest preparations, performance testing, and post-test activities. Pretest preparations included conducting cask handling dry runs and characterizing BWR spent fuel assemblies from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The performance test matrix included 14 runs consisting of two loadings, two cask orientations, and three backfill environments. Post-test activities included calorimetry and axial radiation scans of selected fuel assemblies, in-basin sipping of each assembly, crud collection, video and photographic scans, and decontamination of the cask interior and exterior

  7. Composition and Distribution of Tramp Uranium Contamination on BWR and PWR Fuel Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schienbein, Marcel; Zeh, Peter; Hurtado, Antonio; Rosskamp, Matthias; Mailand, Irene; Bolz, Michael

    2012-09-01

    In a joint research project of VGB and AREVA NP GmbH the behaviour of alpha nuclides in nuclear power plants with light water reactors has been investigated. Understanding the source and the behaviour of alpha nuclides is of big importance for planning radiation protection measures for outages and upcoming dismantling projects. Previous publications have shown the correlation between plant specific alpha contamination of the core and the so called 'tramp fuel' or 'tramp uranium' level which is linked to the defect history of fuel assemblies and accordingly the amount of previously washed out fuel from defective fuel rods. The methodology of tramp fuel estimation is based on fission product concentrations in reactor coolant but also needs a good knowledge of tramp fuel composition and in-core distribution on the outer surface of fuel rods itself. Sampling campaigns of CRUD deposits of irradiated fuel assemblies in different NPPs were performed. CRUD analyses including nuclide specific alpha analysis have shown systematic differences between BWR and PWR plants. Those data combined with literature results of fuel pellet investigations led to model improvements showing that a main part of fission products is caused by fission of Pu-239 an activation product of U-238. CRUD investigations also gave a better picture of the in-core composition and distribution of the tramp uranium contamination. It was shown that the tramp uranium distribution in PWR plants is time dependent. Even new fuel assemblies will be notably contaminated after only one cycle of operation. For PWR applies the following logic: the higher the local power the higher the contamination. With increasing burnup the local rod power usually decreases leading to decreasing tramp uranium contamination on the fuel rod surface. This is not applicable for tramp uranium contamination in BWR. CRUD contamination (including the tramp fuel deposits) is much more fixed and is constantly increasing

  8. The JAERI code system for evaluation of BWR ECCS performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohsaka, Atsuo; Akimoto, Masayuki; Asahi, Yoshiro; Abe, Kiyoharu; Muramatsu, Ken; Araya, Fumimasa; Sato, Kazuo

    1982-12-01

    Development of respective computer code system of BWR and PWR for evaluation of ECCS has been conducted since 1973 considering the differences of the reactor cooling system, core structure and ECCS. The first version of the BWR code system, of which developmental work started earlier than that of the PWR, has been completed. The BWR code system is designed to provide computational tools to analyze all phases of LOCAs and to evaluate the performance of the ECCS including an ''Evaluation Model (EM)'' feature in compliance with the requirements of the current Japanese Evaluation Guideline of ECCS. The BWR code system could be used for licensing purpose, i.e. for ECCS performance evaluation or audit calculations to cross-examine the methods and results of applicants or vendors. The BWR code system presented in this report comprises several computer codes, each of which analyzes a particular phase of a LOCA or a system blowdown depending on a range of LOCAs, i.e. large and small breaks in a variety of locations in the reactor system. The system includes ALARM-B1, HYDY-B1 and THYDE-B1 for analysis of the system blowdown for various break sizes, THYDE-B-REFLOOD for analysis of the reflood phase and SCORCH-B2 for the calculation of the fuel assembl hot plane temperature. When the multiple codes are used to analyze a broad range of LOCA as stated above, it is very important to evaluate the adequacy and consistency between the codes used to cover an entire break spectrum. The system consistency together with the system performance are discussed for a large commercial BWR. (author)

  9. The BWR VIP role in license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyle, R.

    2001-01-01

    The full text follows. The Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) was started in response to an increase in the occurrence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in BWR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internal components. The BWRVIP first evaluated the internals to determine which components were necessary to assure safe operation. An assessment of the relative significance of the internals was then performed to establish the priority in which components would be evaluated. Once this was determined, each safety-related component was evaluated to determine what, if any, inspections or tests were necessary to assure component integrity. Although IGSCC was the initial degradation mechanism of concern for RPV internals, the individual component evaluations considered all known modes of failure (fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, neutron embrittlement, etc). The component evaluations also considered all potential failure locations and the susceptibility to degradation. Once the potential failure locations and mechanisms were identified, the BWRVIP developed inspection criteria to assess component condition. The BWRVIP also developed flaw evaluation methodologies that could be used to determine the integrity and remaining life of each component. All of this information was consolidated into a document called an Inspection and Flaw Evaluation (IE) Guideline for each component. At the same time the BWRVIP was developing its program to assure internals integrity, utilities began to seriously consider measures necessary to extend the life of the plants. In the United States, the USNRC promulgated rules to allow the renewal of a license to allow plant operation for an additional 20 years. One aspect of the rule was that management of age-related degradation in the renewal period must be performed. The timing of this ''license renewal rule'' was advantageous in that it allowed the BWRVIP to address the requirements of the rule in the development

  10. Peach Bottom transient analysis with BWR TRACB02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M.; Sutherland, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    TRAC calculations have been performed for a Turbine Trip transient (TT1) in the Peach Bottom BWR power plant. This study is a part of the qualification of the BWR-TRAC code. The simulation is aimed at reproducing the observed thermal hydraulic behavior in a pressurization transient. Measured core power is an input to the calculation. Comparison with data show the code reasonably well predicts the generation and propagation of the pressure waves in the main steam line and associated pressurization of the reactor vessel following the closure of the turbine stop valve

  11. BWR plant dynamic analysis code BWRDYN user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokobayashi, Masao; Yoshida, Kazuo; Fujiki, Kazuo

    1989-06-01

    Computer code BWRDYN has been developed for thermal-hydraulic analysis of a BWR plant. It can analyze the various types of transient caused by not only small but also large disturbances such as operating mode changes and/or system malfunctions. The verification of main analytical models of the BWRDYN code has been performed with measured data of actual BWR plant. Furthermore, the installation of BOP (Balance of Plant) model has made it possible to analyze the effect of BOP on reactor system. This report describes on analytical models and instructions for user of the BWRDYN code. (author)

  12. Limerick BWR turbine control and protection system upgrade success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C.K.; Pietryka, T.S.; Federico, P.A.; Williams, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Westinghouse and Exelon have successfully implemented a digital electro-hydraulic control (DEHC) at Limerick BWR Unit 1 Station to perform the turbine control, protection and reactor pressure functions. The DEHC replaces analog controls and addressed system performance, obsolescence and reliability. This was a first-of-a-kind application for control and protection of the main turbine and BWR pressure control for the distributed control system utilized. The demolition of analog equipment, main control room and front standard modifications, and acceptance testing were completed on schedule during the normal 2014 outage. Key aspects of the project that facilitated this success will be discussed and presented. (author)

  13. Limerick BWR turbine control and protection system upgrade success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, C.K.; Pietryka, T.S.; Federico, P.A., E-mail: tangck@westinghouse.com, E-mail: pietryt@westinghouse, E-mail: federipa@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Williams, J.C., E-mail: Jonathan.Williams@exeloncorp.com [Exelon Nuclear, Warrenville, IL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Westinghouse and Exelon have successfully implemented a digital electro-hydraulic control (DEHC) at Limerick BWR Unit 1 Station to perform the turbine control, protection and reactor pressure functions. The DEHC replaces analog controls and addressed system performance, obsolescence and reliability. This was a first-of-a-kind application for control and protection of the main turbine and BWR pressure control for the distributed control system utilized. The demolition of analog equipment, main control room and front standard modifications, and acceptance testing were completed on schedule during the normal 2014 outage. Key aspects of the project that facilitated this success will be discussed and presented. (author)

  14. Modern technology applied in the advanced BWR (ABWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hucik, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) represents the next generation of light water reactors (LWR) to be introduced into commercial operation in the 1990's. The ABWR is the result of the continuing evolution of the BWR, incorporating state-of-the-art technology and improvements based on worldwide experience, and extensive design and test and development programs. This paper discusses how the ABWR development objective focused on an optimized selection of advanced technologies and proven BWR technologies. A technical evaluation of the ABWR shows its superiority in terms of performance characteristics and economics relative to current LWR designs

  15. 3D simulation of a core operation cycle of a BWR using Serpent; Simulacion 3D de un ciclo de operacion del nucleo de un BWR usando SERPENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera Ch, M. A.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: rionchez@icloud.com [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This work had the main goal to develop a methodology to obtain the length of an operating cycle of the core of a BWR under different operating states using the Serpent code. The reactor core modeled in Serpent is composed of 444 fuel assemblies (120 with fresh fuels and 324 fuels from previous cycles), 109 cruciform control rods and light water as moderator and coolant. Once the core of the reactor was modeled in Serpent (Three-dimensional) without considering the cruciform control rods, a simulation was carried out with different steps of burning in the operational state with the average values of the fuel temperature (900 K), moderator temperature (600 K) and voids fraction equal to 0.4. In addition, the thermal power considered was 2017 MWt. This operational state was chosen because a previous analysis (not shown in this work) was carried out in 4 types of control cells. The first and second control cell has all of its natural uranium fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod respectively. The third and fourth control cell types have various types of enrichment, both natural uranium and gadolinium in their fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod. The conclusion of this previous analysis was that the behavior of the effective multiplication factor along the fuel burnout within the four control cell types was almost unaffected by the fuel temperature but was affected by the voids fraction. Thus, for this operating cycle in the operating state defined above, its length was 14,63052 GW t/Tm. In addition, at the end of this cycle, the decay heat obtained was equal to 116.71 MWt and the inventory of the most important isotopes to be considered was obtained, such as some isotopes of uranium, neptune, plutonium, americium and curio. (Author)

  16. Identification of flow patterns by neutron noise analysis during actual coolant boiling in thin rectangular channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozma, R.; van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to introduce results of coolant boiling experiments in a simulated materials test reactor-type fuel assembly with plate fuel in an actual reactor environment. The experiments have been performed in the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) research reactor at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft, The Netherlands. In the analysis, noise signals of self-powered neutron detectors located in the neighborhood of the boiling region and thermocouple in the channel wall and in the coolant are used. Flow patterns in the boiling coolant have been identified by means of analysis of probability density functions and power spectral densities of neutron noise. It is shown that boiling has an oscillating character due to partial channel blockage caused by steam slugs generated periodically between the plates. The observed phenomenon can serve as a basis for a boiling detection method in reactors with plate-type fuels

  17. Management of large scale coolant channel replacement programme for Indian PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.K.; Chadda, S.K.; Arya, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Coolant channel assemblies form most important core components of pressurised heavy water reactors. Zirconium alloy pressure tube which form part of coolant channel assemblies are subjected to environment of high neutron flux, high pressure and temperature. Under those operating environmental conditions, the pressure tubes material undergoes degradation of metallurgical and mechanical properties in addition to dimensional changes. The coolant channels are subjected to an in-service inspection (ISI) programme for monitoring the health particularly of the pressure tubes. The en-mass replacement of pressure tubes is needed after most of the pressure tubes show unacceptable conditions for an assured safe and reliable operation. An overview of various issues pertaining to this aspect is presented. (author). 4 figs

  18. BWR stability using a reducing dynamical model; Estabilidad de un BWR con un modelo dinamico reducido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J M; Blazquez Martinez, J B

    1990-07-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical structure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations is non-linear. Simple parametric calculation of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author)

  19. Thermochemistry in BWR. An overview of applications of program codes and databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H-P.; Becker, R.

    2010-01-01

    The Swedish work on thermodynamics of metal-water systems relevant to BWR conditions has been ongoing since the 70ies, and at present time a compilation and adaptation of codes and thermodynamic databases are in progress. In the previous work, basic thermodynamic data were compiled for parts of the system Fe-Cr-Ni-Co-Zn-S-H 2 O at 25-300 °C. Since some thermodynamic information necessary for temperature extrapolations of data up to 300 °C was not published in the earlier works, these data have now been partially recalculated. This applies especially to the parameters of the HKF-model, which are used to extrapolate the thermodynamic data for ionic and neutral aqua species from 25 °C to BWR temperatures. Using the completed data, e.g. the change in standard Gibbs energy (ΔG 0 ) and the equilibrium constant (log K) can be calculated for further applications at BWR/LWR conditions. In addition a computer program is currently being developed at Studsvik for the calculation of equilibrium conductivity in high temperature water. The program is intended for PWR applications, but can also be applied to BWR environment. Data as described above will be added to the database of this program. It will be relatively easy to further develop the program e.g. to calculate Pourbaix diagrams, and these graphs could then be calculated at any temperature. This means that there will be no limitation to the temperatures and total concentrations (usually 10 -6 to 10 -8 mol/kg) as reported in earlier work. It is also easy to add a function generating ΔG 0 and log K values at selected temperatures. One of the fundamentals for this work was also to overview and collect publicly available thermodynamic program codes and databases of relevance for BWR conditions found in open sources. The focus has been on finding already done compilations and reviews, and some 40 codes and 15 databases were found. Codes and data-bases are often integrated and such a package is often developed for

  20. RELAP4/MOD5: a computer program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. User's manual. Volume I. RELAP4/MOD5 description. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    RELAP4 is a computer program written in FORTRAN IV for the digital computer analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. It is primarily applied in the study of system transient response to postulated perturbations such as coolant loop rupture, circulation pump failure, power excursions, etc. The program was written to be used for water-cooled (PWR and BWR) reactors and can be used for scale models such as LOFT and SEMISCALE. Additional versatility extends its usefulness to related applications, such as ice condenser and containment subcompartment analysis. Specific options are available for reflood (FLOOD) analysis and for the NRC Evaluation Model.

  1. AREVA 10x10 BWR fuel experience feedback and on going upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, Hans Joachim; Rentmeister, Thomas; Garner, Norman; Tandy, Jay; Mollard, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Established with engineering and manufacturing operations in the US and Europe, AREVA NP has been and is supplying nuclear fuel assemblies and associated core components to boiling water reactors worldwide, representing today more than 63 000 fuel assemblies. The evolution of BWR fuel rod arrays from early 6x6 designs to the 10x10 designs first introduced in the mid 1990's yielded significant improvements in thermal mechanical operating limits, critical power level, cold shutdown margin, discharge burnup, as well as other key operational capabilities. Since first delivered in 1992, ATRIUM T M 1 0 fuel assemblies have now been supplied to a total of 32 BWR plants in the US, Europe, and Asia resulting in an operating experience over 20 000 fuel assemblies. This article presents in detail the operational experience consolidated by these more than 20 000 ATRIUM T M 1 0 BWR assemblies already supplied to utilities. Within the different 10x10 fuel assemblies available, the Fuel Assembly design is chosen and tailored to the operating strategies of each reactor. Among them, the latest versions of ATRIUM T M a re ATRIUM T M 1 0XP and ATRIUM T M 1 0XM fuel assemblies which have been delivered to several utilities worldwide. The article details key aspects of ATRIUM T M 1 0 fuel assemblies in terms of reliability and performance. Special attention is paid to key proven features, ULTRAFLOW T M s pacer grids, the use of part length fuel rods (PLFRs) and their geometrical optimization, water channel and load chain, upgraded features available for inclusion with most advanced designs. Regular upgrading of the product has been made possible thanks to a continuous improvement process with the aim of further upgrading BWR fuel assembly performance and reliability. Regarding thermal mechanical behavior of fuel rods, chromia (Cr2O3) doped fuel pellets, described in Reference 1, well illustrate this improvement strategy to reduce fission gas release, increase power thresholds for PCI

  2. Revised Mark 22 coolant temperature coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Coolant temperature coefficients for the Mark 22 charge published previously are non-conservative because of the neglect of a significant mechanism which has a positive contribution to reactivity. Even after correcting for this effect, dynamic tests made on a Mark VIB charge in the early 60's suggest the results are still non-conservative. This memorandum takes both of these sources of information into account in making a best estimate of the prompt (coolant plus metal) temperature coefficient. Although no safety issues arise from this work (the overall temperature coefficient still strongly contributes to reactor stability), it is obviously desirable to use best estimates for prompt coefficients in limits and other calculations

  3. Freeform Deposition Method for Coolant Channel Closeout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Reynolds, David Christopher (Inventor); Walker, Bryant H. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating a coolant channel closeout jacket on a structure having coolant channels formed in an outer surface thereof. A line of tangency relative to the outer surface is defined for each point on the outer surface. Linear rows of a metal feedstock are directed towards and deposited on the outer surface of the structure as a beam of weld energy is directed to the metal feedstock so-deposited. A first angle between the metal feedstock so-directed and the line of tangency is maintained in a range of 20-90.degree.. The beam is directed towards a portion of the linear rows such that less than 30% of the cross-sectional area of the beam impinges on a currently-deposited one of the linear rows. A second angle between the beam and the line of tangency is maintained in a range of 5-65 degrees.

  4. CAREM-25: considerations about primary coolant chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Iglesias, Alberto M.; Raffo Calderon, Maria C.; Villegas, Marina

    2000-01-01

    World operating experience, in conjunction with basic studies has been modifying chemistry specifications for the primary coolant of water cooled nuclear reactors along with the reactor type and structural materials involved in the design. For the reactor CAREM-25, the following sources of information have been used: 1) Experience gained by the Chemistry Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA, Argentina); 2) Participation of the Chemistry Department (CNEA) in international cooperation projects; 3) Guidelines given by EPRI, Siemens-KWU, AECL, etc. Given the main objectives: materials integrity, low radiation levels and personnel safety, which are in turn a balance between the lowest corrosion and activity transport achievable and considering that the CAREM-25 is a pressurized vessel integrated reactor, a group of guidelines for the chemistry and additives for the primary coolant have been given in the present work. (author)

  5. Recovery studies for plutonium machining oil coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.; Baldwin, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    Lathe coolant oil, contaminated with plutonium and having a carbon tetrachloride diluent, is generated in plutonium machining areas at Rocky Flats. A research program was initiated to determine the nature of plutonium in this mixture of oil and carbon tetrachloride. Appropriate methods then could be developed to remove the plutonium and to recycle the oil and carbon tetrachloride. Studies showed that the mixtures of spent oil and carbon tetrachloride contained particulate plutonium and plutonium species that are soluble in water or in oil and carbon tetrachloride. The particulate plutonium was removed by filtration; the nonfilterable plutonium was removed by adsorption on various materials. Laboratory-scale tests indicated the lathe-coolant oil mixture could be separated by distilling the carbon tetrachloride to yield recyclable products

  6. Reactor coolant pump seal leakage monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.M.; Spencer, J.W.; Morris, D.J.; James, W.; Shugars, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Problems with reactor coolant pump seals have historically accounted for a large percentage of unscheduled outages. Studies performed for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have shown that the replacement of coolant pump seals has been one of the leading causes of nuclear plant unavailability over the last ten years. Failures of coolant pump seals can lead to primary coolant leakage rates of 200-500 gallons per minute into the reactor building. Airborne activity and high surface contamination levels following these failures require a major cleanup effort and increases the time and personnel exposure required to refurbish the pump seals. One of the problems in assessing seal integrity is the inability to accurately measure seal leakage. Because seal leakage flow is normally very small, it cannot be sensed directly with normal flow instrumentation, but must be inferred from several other temperature and flow measurements. In operating plants the leakage rate has been quantified with a tipping-bucket gauge, a device which indicates when one quart of water has been accumulated. The tipping-bucket gauge has been used for most rainfall-intensity monitoring. The need for a more accurate and less expensive gauge has been addressed. They have developed a drop-counter precipitation sensor has been developed and optimized. The applicability of the drop-counter device to the problem of measuring seal leakage is being investigated. If a review of system specification and known drop-counter performance indicates that this method is feasible for measuring seal leak rates, a drop-counter gauge will be fabricated and tested in the laboratory. If laboratory tests are successful the gauge will be demonstrated in a pump test loop at Ontario Hydro and evaluated under simulated plant conditions. 3 references, 2 figures

  7. Enhancing resistance to burnout via coolant chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, J. P.; Dinh, T. N.; Theofanous, T. G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Boiling Crisis (BC) on horizontal, upwards-facing copper and steel surfaces under the influence of various coolant chemistries relevant to reactor containment waters is considered. In addition to Boric Acid (BA) and TriSodium Phosphate (TSP), pure De-Ionized Water (DIW) and Tap Water (TW) are included in experiments carried out in the BETA facility. The results are related to a companion paper on the large scale ULPU facility.

  8. Fission Product Releases from a Core into a Coolant of a Prismatic 350-MWth HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Min; Jo, C. K. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    A prismatic 350-MW{sub th} high temperature reactor (HTR) is a means to generate electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. The HTR will be operated for an extended fuel burnup of more than 150 GWd/MTU. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is performing a point design for the HTR which is a pre-conceptual design for the analysis and assessment of engineering feasibility of the reactor. In a prismatic HTR, metallic and gaseous fission products (FPs) are produced in the fuel, moved through fuel materials, and released into a primary coolant. The FPs released into the coolant are deposited on the various helium-wetted surfaces in the primary circuit, or they are sorbed on particulate matters in the primary coolant. The deposited or sorbed FPs are released into the environment through the leakage or venting of the primary coolant. It is necessary to rigorously estimate such radioactivity releases into the environment for securing the health and safety of the occupational personnel and the public. This study treats the FP releases from a core into a coolant of a prismatic 350-MW{sub th} HTR. These results can be utilized as input data for the estimation of FP migration from a coolant into the environment. The analysis of fission product release within a prismatic 350-MW{sub th} HTR has been done. It was assumed that the HTR was operated at constant temperature and power for 1500 EFPDs. - The final burnup is 152 GWd/tHM at packing fraction of 25 %, and the final fast fluence is about 8 X 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2}, E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV. - The temperatures at the compact center and at the center of a kernel located at the compact center are 884 and 893 .deg. C, respectively, when the packing fraction is 25 % and the coolant temperature is 850 .deg. C. - Xenon is the most radioactive fission product in a coolant of a prismatic HTR when there are broken TRISOs and fuel component contaminated with heavy metals. For metallic fission products, the radioactivity

  9. Minimizing secondary coolant blowdown in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. C.; Woo, J. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Cho, Y. G.; Lim, N. Y.

    2000-01-01

    There is about 80m 3 /h loss of the secondary cooling water by evaporation, windage and blowdown during the operation of HANARO, 30MW research reactor. The evaporation and the windage is necessary loss to maintain the performance of cooling tower, but the blowdown is artificial lose to get rid of the foreign material and to maintain the quality of the secondary cooling water. Therefore, minimizing the blowdown loss was studied. It was confirmed, through the relation of the number of cycle and the loss rate of secondary coolant, that the number of cycle is saturated to 12 without blowdown because of the windage loss. When the secondary coolant is treated by high Ca-hardness treatment program (the number of cycle > 10) to maintain the number of cycle around 12 without blowdown, only the turbidity exceeds the limit. By adding filtering system it was confirmed, through the relation of turbidity and filtering rate of secondary cooling water, that the turbidity is reduced below the limit (5 deg.) by 2% of filtering rate without blowdown. And it was verified, through the performance test of back-flow filtering unit, that this unit gets rid of foreign material up to 95% of the back-flow and that the water can be reused as coolant. Therefore, the secondary cooling water can be treated by the high Ca-hardness program and filter system without blowdown

  10. Reactor coolant pumps for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harand, E.; Richter, G.; Tschoepel, G.

    1975-01-01

    A brake for the pump rotor of a main coolant pump or a shutoff member on the pump are provided in order to prevent excess speeds of the pump rotor. Such excess speeds may occur in PWR type reactors with water at a pressure below, e.g., 150 bars if there is leakage from a coolant line associated with the main coolant pump. As a brake, a centrifugal brake depending upon the pump speed or a brake ring arranged on the pump housing and acting on the pump rotor, which ring would be activated by pressure differentials in the pump, may be used. If the pressure differences between suction and pressure sockets are very small, a controlled hydraulic increase of the pressure force on the brake may also be provided. Furthermore, a turbine brake may be provided. A slide which is automatically movable in closing position along the pump rotor axis is used as a shutoff element. It is of cylindrical configuration and is arranged concentrically with the rotor axis. (DG) [de

  11. Design of automotive engine coolant hoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrishikesh D BACHCHHAV

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we are present the performance of engine coolant hoses (radiator hoses used in passenger cars by checking various physical behaviours such as hose leakage, hose burst, hose collapse or any mechanical damage as studied-thru design guidelines, CFD analysis and product validation testing and also check pressure drop of the hoses when engine will be running. The design term is more likely used for technical part modelling using CAD tool. Later on, we will focus on the transformation of the part design to process design. The process design term is more likely used for "tooling design" for manufacturing of the product using CAD Tool. Then inlet hose carries coolant from engine to radiator inlet tank, then coolant circulated in radiator and passed through radiator outlet tank to water pump of engine with the help of outlet hose. After that …nding any leakage, Burst, damage or collapse of hose and pressure drop of the hose with the help of design checklist, CFD Analysis and product validation testing.

  12. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de; Voet, J. van der; Verhagen, F.C.M.

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs., 30 tabs

  13. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Voet, J. van der (Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland NV, Dodewaard (Netherlands)); Verhagen, F.C.M. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs., 30 tabs.

  14. Requests on domestic nuclear data library from BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hiromi

    2003-01-01

    Requests on the domestic nuclear data library JENDL and activities of the Nuclear Data Center have been presented from the perspective of BWR design and design code development. The requests include a standard multi-group cross section library, technical supports, and clarification of advantage of JENDL as well as requests from physical aspects. (author)

  15. BWR ATWS mitigation by Fine Motion Control Rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.; Mallen, A.; Diamond, D.

    1994-01-01

    Two main methods of ATWS mitigation in a SBWR are: fine Motion control Rods (FMCRD) and Boron injection via the Standby Liquid control System (SLCS). This study has demonstrated that the use of FMCRD along with feedwater runback mitigated the conditions due to reactivity insertion and possible ATWS in a BWR which is similar to SBWR

  16. Detection of failed fuel rods in shrouded BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baero, G.; Boehm, W.; Goor, B.; Donnelly, T.

    1988-01-01

    A manipulator and an ultrasonic testing (UT) technique were developed to identify defective fuel rods in shrouded BWR fuel assemblies. The manipulator drives a UT probe axially through the bottom tie plate into the water channels between the fuel rods. The rotating UT probe locates defective fuel rods by ingressed water which attenuates the UT-signal. (author)

  17. Transmutation of minor actinide using thorium fueled BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susilo, Jati

    2002-01-01

    One of the methods to conduct transmutation of minor actinide is the use of BWR with thorium fuel. Thorium fuel has a specific behaviour of producing a little secondary minor actinides. Transmutation of minor actinide is done by loading it in the BWR with thorium fuel through two methods, namely close recycle and accumulation recycle. The calculation of minor actinide composition produced, weigh of minor actinide transmuted, and percentage of reminder transmutation was carried SRAC. The calculations were done to equivalent cell modeling from one fuel rod of BWR. The results show that minor actinide transmutation is more effective using thorium fuel than uranium fuel, through both close recycle and accumulation recycle. Minor actinide transmutation weight show that the same value for those recycle for 5th recycle. And most of all minor actinide produced from 5 unit BWR uranium fuel can transmuted in the 6 t h of close recycle. And, the minimal value of excess reactivity of the core is 12,15 % Δk/k, that is possible value for core operation

  18. Physical model of nonlinear noise with application to BWR stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Perez, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of the present model it is shown that the BWR reactor cannot be unstable in the linear sense, but rather it executes limited power oscillations of a magnitude that depends on the operating conditions. The onset of these oscillations can be diagnosed by the decrease in stochasticity in the power traces and by the appearance of harmonics in the PSD

  19. Power plant design: ESBWR - the latest passive BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, H.; Yadigaroglu, G.; Stoop, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    When General Electric said it would end development of its 670 MWe SBWR (Simplified Boiling Water Reactor), it was not quite the end of the story. Also on the drawing board at the time was the larger ESBWR (standing for either European or Economic Simplified BWR) whose goal was to provide the improved economic performance that the SBWR could not. (UK)

  20. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A; Wehle, F; Opel, S; Velten, R [AREVA, AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  1. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A.; Wehle, F.; Opel, S.; Velten, R.

    2008-01-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  2. Decay ratio studies in BWR and PWR using wavelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, Oe.

    1996-10-01

    The on-line stability of BWR and PWR is studied using the neutron noise signals as the fluctuations reflect the dynamic characteristics of the reactor. Using appropriate signal modeling for time domain analysis of noise signals, the stability parameters can be directly obtained from the system impulse response. Here in particular for BWR, an important stability parameter is the decay ratio (DR) of the impulse response. The time series analysis involves the autoregressive modeling of the neutron detector signal. The DR determination is strongly effected by the low frequency behaviour since the transfer function characteristic tends to be a third order system rather than a second order system for a BWR. In a PWR low frequency behaviour is modified by the Boron concentration. As a result of these phenomena there are difficulties in the consistent determination of the DR oscillations. The enhancement of the consistency of this DR estimation is obtained by wavelet transform using actual power plant data from BWR and PWR. A comparative study of the Restimation with and without wavelets are presented. (orig.)

  3. Operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadasu

    1988-01-01

    For the operation management of nuclear power stations with high reliability and safety, the role played by operators is very important. The effort of improving the man-machine interface in the central control rooms of nuclear power stations is energetically advanced, but the importance of the role of operators does not change. For the training of the operators of nuclear power stations, simulators have been used from the early stage. As the simulator facilities for operator training, there are the full scope simulator simulating faithfully the central control room of an actual plant and the small simulator mainly aiming at learning the plant functions. For BWR nuclear power stations, two full scope simulators are installed in the BWR Operator Training Center, and the training has been carried out since 1974. The plant function learning simulators have been installed in respective electric power companies as the education and training facilities in the companies. The role of simulators in operator training, the BTC No.1 simulator of a BWR-4 of 780 MWe and the BTC No.2 simulator of a BWR-5 of 1,100 MWe, plant function learning simulators, and the design of the BTC No.2 simulator and plant function learning simulators are reported. (K.I.)

  4. CANDU with supercritical water coolant: conceptual design features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, N.

    1997-01-01

    An advanced CANDU reactor, with supercritical water as coolant, has many attractive design features. The pressure exceeds 22 MPa but coolant temperatures in excess of 370 degrees C can be reached without encountering the two-phase region with its associated fuel-dry-out and flow-instability problems. Increased coolant temperature leads to increased plant thermodynamic efficiency reducing unit energy cost through reduced specific capital cost and reduced fueling cost. Increased coolant temperature leads to reduced void reactivity via reduced coolant in-core density. Light water becomes a coolant option. To preserve neutron economy, an advanced fuel channel is needed and is described below. A supercritical-water-cooled CANDU can evolve as fuel capabilities evolve to withstand increasing coolant temperatures. (author)

  5. Two types of a passive safety containment for a near future BWR with active and passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Akinaga, Makoto; Kojima, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents two types of a passive safety containment for a near future BWR. They are named Mark S and Mark X containment. One of their common merits is very low peak pressure at severe accidents without venting the containment atmosphere to the environment. The PCV pressure can be moderated within the design pressure. Another merit is the capability to submerge the PCV and the RPV above the core level. The third merit is robustness against external events such as a large commercial airplane crash. Both the containments have a passive cooling core catcher that has radial cooling channels. The Mark S containment is made of reinforced concrete and applicable to a large power BWR up to 1830 MWe. The Mark X containment has the steel secondary containment and can be cooled by natural circulation of outside air. It can accommodate a medium power BWR up to 1380 MWe. In both cases the plants have active and passive safety systems constituting in-depth hybrid safety (IDHS). The IDHS provides not only hardware diversity between active and passive safety systems but also more importantly diversity of the ultimate heat sinks between the atmosphere and the sea water. Although the plant concept discussed in the paper uses well-established technology, plant performance including economy is innovatively and evolutionally improved. Nothing is new in the hardware but everything is new in the performance.

  6. Two types of a passive safety containment for a near future BWR with active and passive safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Takashi [Toshiba Corporation, IEC, Gen-SS, 8, Shinsugita-ho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama (Japan)], E-mail: takashi44.sato@glb.toshiba.co.jp; Akinaga, Makoto; Kojima, Yoshihiro [Toshiba Corporation, IEC, Gen-SS, 8, Shinsugita-ho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    The paper presents two types of a passive safety containment for a near future BWR. They are named Mark S and Mark X containment. One of their common merits is very low peak pressure at severe accidents without venting the containment atmosphere to the environment. The PCV pressure can be moderated within the design pressure. Another merit is the capability to submerge the PCV and the RPV above the core level. The third merit is robustness against external events such as a large commercial airplane crash. Both the containments have a passive cooling core catcher that has radial cooling channels. The Mark S containment is made of reinforced concrete and applicable to a large power BWR up to 1830 MWe. The Mark X containment has the steel secondary containment and can be cooled by natural circulation of outside air. It can accommodate a medium power BWR up to 1380 MWe. In both cases the plants have active and passive safety systems constituting in-depth hybrid safety (IDHS). The IDHS provides not only hardware diversity between active and passive safety systems but also more importantly diversity of the ultimate heat sinks between the atmosphere and the sea water. Although the plant concept discussed in the paper uses well-established technology, plant performance including economy is innovatively and evolutionally improved. Nothing is new in the hardware but everything is new in the performance.

  7. TRACE Assessment for BWR ATWS Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.; Cuadra, Arantxa; Raitses, Gilad; Aronson, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    A TRACE/PARCS input model has been developed in order to be able to analyze anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor. The model is based on one developed previously for the Browns Ferry reactor for doing loss-of-coolant accident analysis. This model was updated by adding the control systems needed for ATWS and a core model using PARCS. The control systems were based on models previously developed for the TRAC-B code. The PARCS model is based on information (e.g., exposure and moderator density (void) history distributions) obtained from General Electric Hitachi and cross sections for GE14 fuel obtained from an independent source. The model is able to calculate an ATWS, initiated by the closure of main steam isolation valves, with recirculation pump trip, water level control, injection of borated water from the standby liquid control system and actuation of the automatic depressurization system. The model is not considered complete and recommendations are made on how it should be improved.

  8. Primary cooling system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Eishi; Takahashi, Masanori; Aoki, Yasuko

    1993-01-01

    The present invention effectively uses information from a plurality of sensors in order to suppress corrosion circumstance of a nuclear reactor. That is, a predetermined general water quality factor at a predetermined position is determined as a standard index. A concentration of a water quality improver is controlled such that the index is within an aimed range. For this purpose, the entire sensor groups disposed in a primary coolant system of a nuclear reactor are divided into a plural systems of sensor groups each disposed on every different positions. Then, a predetermined sensor group (standard sensor group) is connected to a computing device and a data base so that it is always monitored for calculating and estimating the standard index. Only oxidative ingredient in water at the measuring point is noted, and a concentration distribution which agrees with an actually measured value of oxidative ingredients is extracted from data base and used as a correct concentration distribution. With such procedures, reactor water quality can be estimated accurately while compensating erroneous factors of individual sensors. Even when a new sensor is used, it is not necessary to greatly change control logic. (I.S.)

  9. On the domestic fuel channel for BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukada, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Kobe Steel Ltd. started the domestic manufacture of fuel channel boxes for BWRs in 1967, and entered the actual production stage four years after that. Since 1976, the mass production system was adopted with the increase of the demand. The requirements about the surface contamination and the dimensional accuracy over whole length are very strict in the fuel channel boxes, moreover, special consideration must be given so as to prevent the deformation in use. The unique working methods such as electron beam welding, high temperature press forming and so on are employed in Kobe Steel Ltd. to satisfy such strict requirements, therefore the quality of the produced fuel channel boxes is superior to imported ones. At present, the fuel channel boxes domestically made by Kobe Steel Ltd. are used for almost all BWRs in Japan. The functions of fuel channel boxes are to flow boiling coolant uniformly upward, to guide control rods, and to increase the rigidity of fuel assembly. The fuel channel boxes are the square tubes of zircaloy 4 of 134.06 mm inside width, 2.03 mm thickness, and 4118 or 4239 mm length. The progress of the development and the features of the fuel channel boxes and the manufacturing processes are described. Zircaloy plates are formed into channels, and two channels are electron beam-welded after the edge preparation, to make a box. Ultrasonic examination and stress relief treatment are applied, and clips and spacers are welded. (Kako, I.)

  10. Characteristics of fluctuating pressure generated in BWR main steam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shiro; Okuyama, Keita; Tamura, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    The BWR-3 steam dryer in the Quad Cities Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant was damaged by high cycle fatigue due to acoustic-induced vibration. The dryer failure was as attributed to flow-induced acoustic resonance at the stub pipes of safety relief valves (SRVs) in the main steam lines (MSLs). The acoustic resonance was considered to be generated by interaction between the sound field and an unstable shear layer across the closed side branches with SRV stub pipes. We have started a research program on BWR dryers to develop their loading evaluation methods. Moreover, it has been necessary to evaluate the dryer integrity of BWR-5 plants which are the main type of BWR in Japan. In the present study, we used 1/10-scale BWR tests and analyses to investigate the flow-induced acoustic resonance and acoustic characteristics in MSLs. The test apparatus consisted of a steam dryer, a steam dome and 4 MSLs with 20 SRV stub pipes. A finite element method (FEM) was applied for the calculation of three-dimensional wave equations in acoustic analysis. We demonstrated that remarkable fluctuating pressures occurred in high and low frequency regions. High frequency fluctuating pressures was generated by the flow-induced acoustic resonance in the SRV stub pipes. Low frequency fluctuating pressure was generated in an MSL with the dead leg. The frequency of the latter almost coincided with the natural frequency of the MSL with the dead leg. The amplitude of the fluctuating pressures in the multiple stub pipes became more intense because of interaction between them compared with that in the single stub pipe. Acoustic analysis results showed that the multiple stub pipes caused several natural frequencies in the vicinity of the natural frequency of the single stub pipe and several modes of the standing wave in the MSLs. (author)

  11. THYDE-B1/MOD2: a computer code for analysis of small-break loss-of-coolant accidents of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideo; Muramatsu, Ken; Kukita, Yutaka; Tasaka, Kanji

    1988-04-01

    THYDE-B1/MOD2 is a fast-running best estimate (BE) computer code to analyze thermal-hydraulic behaviors of the reactor cooling system of a boiling water reactor (BWR), mainly, during a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) with a special emphasis on the behavior of pressure and mixture level in the pressure vessel. The coolant behavior is simulated with a volume-and-junction method based on assumptions of thermal equilibrium and homogeneous conditions for two-phase flow. A characteristic feature of this code is a three-region representation of the state of the coolant in a control volume, in which three regions consist of subcooled liquid, saturated mixture and saturated steam regions from the volume bottom. The regions are separated by two horizontal moving boundaries which are tracked by mass and energy balances for each region. With this three region node model, the interior of the pressure vessel can be represented by only two volumes: one for inside of the shroud and the other for outside, while other portions of the system are treated with homogeneous node model. This method, although it seems to be very simple, has been verified to be adequate for cases of BWR SBLOCAs in which the thermal-hydraulic behavior is relatively slow and gravity controlled. The code has been improved and modified from the last version of the code, THYDE-B1/MOD1, especially in the phase separation model which is used in the mixture level calculation in the three region node model. Then, a good predictability of the code has been indicated through the comparison of calculated results with various SBLOCA test data including ROSA-III of JAERI and FIST of the General Electric Co. This report presents the code modifications and input data requirements of the THYDE-B1/MOD2 code. (author)

  12. Fuel-coolant interactions: preliminary experiments on the effect of gases dissolved in the 'coolant'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, R.C.; Davies, D.; Jones, P.G.

    1976-12-01

    A simple apparatus has been used to study fuel-coolant interactions under reasonably well controlled conditions. Preliminary experiments have used water as the 'coolant' and molten tin at 800 0 C as the 'fuel' and have investigated how the violence of the interaction is affected by dissolving gases (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide) in the water. It was found that saturating the water with carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide completely suppresses the violent interaction. Experiments in which the concentrations of these gases were varied showed that a certain critical concentration was needed; below this concentration the dissolved gas has no significant effect but above it the suppression is

  13. Study on the VFD (Variable Frequency Drive) for RCP (Reactor Coolant Pump) Motors of APR1400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Ha; Robert, M. Field; Kim, Tae Ryong [Department of NPP Engineering, KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Most industrial facilities are continually searching for ways to reduce energy costs while increasing or maintaining current production. In terms of electric motors, Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) units represent a critical opportunity for energy savings. Currently, VFDs are used on about ten (10) percent of industrial process motors, and this percentage is increasing every year. Properly applied VFDs have been documented to save as much as fifty percent of the energy consumed by certain industrial processes. Nuclear Power - Power plants in general and Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in particular are slow to adopt new technology. The nuclear power industry requires a nearly absolute demonstration through operating experience in other industries in which the new approach will result in a net improvement in plant reliability without any surprises. Only recently has the nuclear industry begun to adapt VFD units for large motors. Specifically, there are several examples in the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fleet of replacing Motor-Generator (M-G) sets with VFD units for Reactor Recirculation (RR) pump motor service. At one station, VFD units were introduced upstream of the Circulating Water (CWP) pump motors to address environmental issues. They units are taking advantage of VFD technology whose benefits include increased reliability, reduction in electrical house load, improved flow control, and reduced maintenance. RCP Application - In the case of new generation, it has been reported that the Westinghouse AP1000 will make use of VFD units for the Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) motors.

  14. Analysis of loss of coolant accident and emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Kiyoharu; Kobayashi, Kenji; Hayata, Kunihisa; Tasaka, Kanji; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, the analysis for the performance evaluation of emergency core cooling system is described, which is the safety protection device to the loss of coolant accidents due to the break of primary cooling pipings of light water reactors. In the LOCA analysis for the performance evaluation of ECCS, it must be shown that a reactor core keeps the form which can be cooled with the ECCS in case of LOCA, and the overheat of the core can be prevented. Namely, the shattering of fuel cladding tubes is never to occur, and for the purpose, the maximum temperature of Zircaloy 2 or 4 cladding tubes must be limited to 1200 deg C, and the relative thickness of oxide film must be below 15%. The calculation for determining the temperature of cladding tubes in case of the LOCA in BWRs and PWRs is explained. First, the primary cooling system, the ECCS and the related installations of BWRs and PWRs are outlined. The code systems for LOCA/ECCS analysis are divid ed into several steps, such as blowdown process, reflooding process and heatup calculation. The examples of the sensitivity analysis of the codes are shown. The LOCA experiments carried out so far in Japan and foreign countries and the LOCA analysis of a BWR with RELAP-4J code are described. The guidance for the performance evaluation of ECCS was established in 1975 by the Reactor Safety Deliberation Committee in Japan, and the contents are quoted. (Kako, I.)

  15. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  16. Coolant Void Reactivity Analysis of CANDU Lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Su; Lee, Hyun Suk; Tak, Tae Woo; Lee, Deok Jung [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Models of CANDU-6 and ACR-700 fuel lattices were constructed for a single bundle and 2 by 2 checkerboard to understand the physics related to CVR. Also, a familiar four factor formula was used to predict the specific contributions to reactivity change in order to achieve an understanding of the physics issues related to the CVR. At the same time, because the situation of coolant voiding should bring about a change of neutron behavior, the spectral changes and neutron current were also analyzed. The models of the CANDU- 6 and ACR-700 fuel lattices were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP6 using the ENDF/B-VII.0 continuous energy cross section library based on the specification from AECL. The CANDU fuel lattice was searched through sensitivity studies of each design parameter such as fuel enrichment, fuel pitch, and types of burnable absorber for obtaining better behavior in terms of CVR. Unlike the single channel coolant voiding, the ACR-700 bundle has a positive reactivity change upon 2x2 checkerboard coolant voiding. Because of the new path for neutron moderation, the neutrons from the voided channel move to the no-void channel where they lose energy and come back to the voided channel as thermal neutrons. This phenomenon causes the positive CVR when checkerboard voiding occurs. The sensitivity study revealed the effects of the moderator to fuel volume ratio, fuel enrichment, and burnable absorber on the CVR. A fuel bundle with low moderator to fuel volume ratio and high fuel enrichment can help achieve negative CVR.

  17. EDF PWRs primary coolant purification strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gressier, Frederic; Mascarenhas, Darren; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Bretelle, Jean-Luc; Ranchoux, Gilles

    2012-09-01

    In order to achieve a good physico-chemical quality of the primary coolant fluid, the primary water is continuously treated by the Chemical and Volume Control System (CVCS). This system is composed of a treatment chain containing filters and ion-exchange resins. In the EDF design, an upstream filter is placed before the resin so as to prevent it from being saturated with insoluble particles. Then, the fluid passes through several resin beds (up to 3 depending on the configuration) and again through a downstream filter that prevents resin fines dissemination into the reactor coolant. Much work has been conducted in the last 5 years on the homogenisation of products and usage on French EDF NPP primary coolant treatment, while taking into account the compromise between source term reduction, liquid and solid waste, and buying and disposal costs. Two national markets have been created, and two operational documents for chemists on site have been published: a filtration guideline and an ion-exchange resin guideline. Both documents give general information about the products used, how are they characterized and selected for national market (technical requirements, standards and tests), how they should be used and what are the change-out criteria. They are also periodically updated based on feedback from sites. The positive impact on resin and filter lifetime (extension of some, limitation of others), homogenisation of products and usage will be presented. Moreover, EDF is constantly in the process of improving the current purification methods, as well as researching the use of existing and novel technologies. In this field, recent experiments on short loading of resin during reactor shutdown has been tested on site with success. In addition, work is done on silica free filters, filter consumption and filter chemical release. An overview of these optimization methods will be given. (authors)

  18. Coolant degassing device for PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Minemoto, Masaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently decrease the rare gas concentration in primary coolants, as well as shorten the degassing time required for the periodical inspection in the waste gas processing system of a PWR type reactor. Constitution: Usual degassing method by supplying hydrogen or nitrogen to a volume control tank is replaced with a method of utilizing a degassing tower (method of flowing down processing liquid into the filled tower from above while uprising streams from the bottom of the tower thereby degassing the gases dissolved in the liquid into the steams). The degassing tower is combined with a hydrogen separator or hydrogen recombiner to constitute a waste gas processing system. (Ikeda, J.)

  19. Microstructural characterization of primary coolant pipe steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Bentley, J.

    1986-01-01

    Atom probe field-ion microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, and optical microscopy have been used to investigate the changes that occur in the microstructure of cast CF 8 primary coolant pipe stainless steel after long term thermal aging. The cast duplex microstructure consisted of austenite with 15% delta-ferrite. Investigation of the aged material revealed that the ferrite spinodally decomposed into a fine scaled network of α and α'. A fine G-phase precipitate was also observed in the ferrite. The observed degradation in mechanical properties is probably a consequence of the spinodal decomposition in the ferrite

  20. Calorimetric and reactor coolant system flow uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, L.; McLean, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the quantification of errors associated with the determination of a feedwater flow, secondary power, and Reactor Coolant System (RCS) flow used at the Trojan Nuclear Plant to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. The sources of error in Plant indications and process measurement are identified and tracked, using examples, through the mathematical processes necessary to calculate the uncertainty in the RCS flow measurement. An error of approximately 1.4 percent is calculated for secondary power. This error results, along with the consideration of other errors, in an uncertainty of approximately 3 percent in the RCS flow determination

  1. LAPUR5 BWR stability analysis in Kuosheng nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunlung Wu; Chunkuan Shih; Wang, J.R.; Kao, L.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Unstable oscillation of a nuclear power reactor core is one of the main reasons that causes minor core damage. Stability analysis needs to be performed to predict the potential problem as early as possible and to prevent core instability events from happening. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requests all BWR licensees to examine each core reload and to impose operating limitations, as appropriate, to ensure compliance with GDC 10 and 12. GDC 10 requires that the reactor core be designed with appropriate margin to assure that specified acceptable fuel design limits will not be exceeded during any condition of normal operation, including anticipated operational occurrences. GDC 12 requires assurance that power oscillations which can result in conditions exceeding specified acceptable fuel design limits are either not possible or can be reliably and readily detected and suppressed. Therefore, the core instability is directly related to the fuel design limits. The core and channel DR (decay ratio) calculation are commonly performed to determine system's stability when new fuel designs are introduced in the core. In order to establish the independent analysis technology for BWR licensees and verifications, the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) has obtained agreement from NRC and implemented the 'Methodology and Procedure for Calculation of Core and Channel Decay Ratios with LAPUR', which was developed by the IBERINCO in 2001. LAPUR5 uses a multi-nodal description of the neutron dynamics, together with a distributed parameter model of the core thermal hydrodynamics to produce a space-dependent representation of the dynamics of a BWR in the frequency domain for small perturbations around a steady state condition. From the output of LAPUR5, the following results are obtained: global core decay ratio, out-of phase core decay ratio, and channel decay ratio. They are key parameters in the determination of BWR core stability

  2. Impact of advanced BWR core physics method on BWR core monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, H; Wells, A [Siemens Power Corporation, Richland (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Siemens Power Corporation recently initiated development of POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III for delivery to the Grand Gulf Nuclear Power Station. The main change introduced in POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III as compared to its predecessor POWERPLEX{sup TM}-II is the incorporation of the advances BWR core simulator MICROBURN-B2. A number of issues were identified and evaluated relating to the implementation of MICROBURN-B2 and its impact on core monitoring. MICROBURN-B2 demands about three to five times more memory and two to three times more computing time than its predecessor MICROBURN-B in POWERPLEX {sup TM}-II. POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III will improve thermal margin prediction accuracy and provide more accurate plant operating conditions to operators than POWERPLEX{sup TM}-II due to its improved accuracy in predicted TIP values and critical k-effective. The most significant advantage of POWERPLEX{sup TM}-III is its capability to monitor a relaxed rod sequence exchange operation. (authors)

  3. Multirods burst tests under loss-of-coolant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, S.; Uetsuka, H.; Furuta, T.

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the upper limit of coolant flow area restriction in a fuel assembly under loss-of-coolant accidents in LWRs, burst tests of fuel bundles were performed. Each bundle consisted of 49 rods(7x7 rods), and bursts were conducted in flowing steam. In some cases, 4 rods were replaced by control rods with guide tubes in a bundle. After the burst, the ballooning behavior of each rod and the degree of coolant flow area restriction in the bundle were measured. Ballooning behavior of rods and degree of coolant flow channel restriction in bundles with control rods were not different from those without control rods. The upper limit of coolant flow channel restriction under loss-of-coolant conditions was estimated to be about 80%. (author)

  4. Reactor auxiliary cooling facility and coolant supplying method therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1996-06-07

    A reactor auxiliary cooling facility of the present invention comprises a coolant recycling line for recycling coolants by way of a reactor auxiliary coolant pump and a cooling load, a gravitational surge tank for supplying coolants to the coolant recycling line and a supplemental water supplying line for supplying a supply the supplemental water to the tank. Then, a pressurization-type supply water surge tank is disposed for operating the coolant recycling line upon performing an initial system performance test in parallel with the gravitational surge tank. With such a constitution, the period of time required from the start of the installation of reactor auxiliary cooling facilities to the completion of the system performance test can be shortened at a reduced cost without enlarging the scale of the facility. (T.M.)

  5. Reactor auxiliary cooling facility and coolant supplying method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro.

    1996-01-01

    A reactor auxiliary cooling facility of the present invention comprises a coolant recycling line for recycling coolants by way of a reactor auxiliary coolant pump and a cooling load, a gravitational surge tank for supplying coolants to the coolant recycling line and a supplemental water supplying line for supplying a supply the supplemental water to the tank. Then, a pressurization-type supply water surge tank is disposed for operating the coolant recycling line upon performing an initial system performance test in parallel with the gravitational surge tank. With such a constitution, the period of time required from the start of the installation of reactor auxiliary cooling facilities to the completion of the system performance test can be shortened at a reduced cost without enlarging the scale of the facility. (T.M.)

  6. Risk evaluation of the alternate-3A modification to the ATWS prevention/mitigation system in a BWR-4, MARK-II power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, I.A.; Bari, R.A.; Karol, R.; Shiu, K.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present a risk evaluation of the ATWS Alternate 3A modification proposed by NRC staff in NUREG-0460 to the ATWS prevention/mitigation system in a BWR nuclear power plant. The evaluation is done relative to three risk indices: the frequency of core damage, the expected early fatalities, and the expected latent fatalities. The ATWS prevention tree includes: the mechanical subsystem of the reactor protection system, the electrical subsystem of the reactor protection system, the recirculation pump trip and the Alternate Rod Insertion System. The mitigation tree includes: standby liquid control system, opening of the relief valves, reclosing the relief valves, failure of coolant injection, inadvertent actuation of the automatic depressurization system, inadvertent operation of high-pressure injection system and containment heat removal

  7. Effect of parameter variation of reactor coolant pump on loss of coolant accident consequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Gaojian; Huang Daishun; Gao Yingxian; He Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the analyses were carried out on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II to study the consequence of the loss of coolant accident when the homologous characteristic curves and free volumes of the reactor coolant pump changed. Two different pumps used in the analysis were 100D (employed on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II) and ANDRITZ. The thermal characteristics in the large break LOCA accident were analyzed using CATHRE GB and CONPATE4, and the reactor coolant system hydraulics load during blow-clown phase of LOCA accident was analyzed using ATHIS and FORCET. The calculated results show that the homologous characteristic curves have great effect on the thermal characteristics of reactor core during the reflood phase of the large break LOCA accident. The maximum cladding surface temperatures are quite different when the pump's homologous characteristic curves change. On the other hand, the pump's free volume changing results in the variation of the LOCA rarefaction wave propagation, and therefore, the reactor coolant system hydraulic load in LOCA accident would be different. (authors)

  8. Summary of the OECD/NRC Boiling Water Reactor Turbine Trip Benchmark - Fourth Workshop (BWR-TT4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The reference problem chosen for simulation in a BWR is a Turbine Trip transient, which begins with a sudden Turbine Stop Valve (TSV) closure. The pressure oscillation generated in the main steam piping propagates with relatively little attenuation into the reactor core. The induced core pressure oscillation results in dramatic changes of the core void distribution and fluid flow. The magnitude of the neutron flux transient taking place in the BWR core is strongly affected by the initial rate of pressure rise caused by pressure oscillation and has a strong spatial variation. The correct simulation of the power response to the pressure pulse and subsequent void collapse requires a 3-D core modeling supplemented by 1-D simulation of the remainder of the reactor coolant system. A BWR TT benchmark exercise, based on a well-defined problem with complete set of input specifications and reference experimental data, has been proposed for qualification of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulic system transient codes. Since this kind of transient is a dynamically complex event with reactor variables changing very rapidly, it constitutes a good benchmark problem to test the coupled codes on both levels: neutronics/thermal-hydraulic coupling and core/plant system coupling. Subsequently, the objectives of the proposed benchmark are: comprehensive feedback testing and examination of the capability of coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core/plant interactions by comparison with actual experimental data. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises: Exercise 1 - Power vs. Time Plant System Simulation with Fixed Axial Power Profile Table (Obtained from Experimental Data). Exercise 2 - Coupled 3-D Kinetics/Core Thermal-Hydraulic BC Model and/or 1-D Kinetics Plant System Simulation. Exercise 3 - Best-Estimate Coupled 3-D Core/Thermal-Hydraulic System Modeling. The purpose of this fourth workshop was to present and discuss final results of

  9. Reliability and improvement of RODOS results for a BWR plant; Erhoehung der Zuverlaessigkeit der RODOS-Ergebnisse fuer eine SWR-Anlage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, H.; Cester, F.; Sonnenkalb, M.; Klein-Hessling, W.; Voggenberger, T.

    2009-06-15

    Decision support systems such as RODOS aim to support the responsible authorities by providing estimates for the possible radiological consequences in case of an event in a nuclear plant. The prognosis of quantity, composition and time of occurrence of a release from the plant (''source term'') in the so-called pre-release phase is one of the foundations with high relevance for this purpose. Within previous projects source term prognosis tools have been developed and applied exemplarily for a PWR. At the end of 2005 GRS has finalized a PSA level 2 for a plant of the SWR-69 type. On this basis improved versions of the source term prognosis tools QPRO (probabilistic) and ASTRID (deterministic) have been created for a BWR and tested in an emergency exercise in a BWR. The further development of QPRO has been related in particular to the structure of the probabilistic network and the precalculated source terms. The activities for the adaptation of ASTRID focus on the creation of the dataset for the BWR coolant loop and the containment. In the emergency exercise the manageability of QPRO but also of ASTRID has been proven. Further, the first phases of the accident progression have been well identified. However, the exercise scenario developed into a very unlikely sequence with partial core melt, and the reactor building ventilation was shut off just at a critical moment. Therefore the source term prognoses deviate from the exercise scenario. Starting from these experiences with the development and application of QPRO and ASTRID recommendations are given for the further improvement of the reliability of the source term prognosis for RODOS. In general it can be stated that the development status of QPRO and ASTRID is definitely advanced compared to the presently still prevailing source term prognosis methods. Therefore it is recommended to develop plant specific versions of these codes and to apply them.

  10. Natural circulation in reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Reactor coolant system (RCS) natural circulation in a PWR is the buoyancy-driven coolant circulation between the core and the upper-plenum region (in-vessel circulation) with or without a countercurrent flow in the hot leg piping between the vessel and steam generators (ex-vessel circulation). This kind of multidimensional bouyancy-driven flow circulation serves as a means of transferring the heat from the core to the structures in the upper plenum, hot legs, and possibly steam generators. As a result, the RCS piping and other pressure boundaries may be heated to high temperatures at which the structural integrity is challenged. RCS natural circulation is likely to occur during the core uncovery period of the TMLB' accident in a PWR when the vessel upper plenum and hot leg are already drained and filled with steam and possibly other gaseous species. RCS natural circulation is being studied for the Surry plant during the TMLB' accident in which station blackout coincides with the loss of auxiliary feedwater and no operator actions. The effects of the multidimensional RCS natural circulation during the TMLB' accident are discussed

  11. CFD analyses of coolant channel flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagley, Jennifer A.; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield characteristics in rocket engine coolant channels are analyzed by means of a numerical model. The channels are characterized by large length to diameter ratios, high Reynolds numbers, and asymmetrical heating. At representative flow conditions, the channel length is approximately twice the hydraulic entrance length so that fully developed conditions would be reached for a constant property fluid. For the supercritical hydrogen that is used as the coolant, the strong property variations create significant secondary flows in the cross-plane which have a major influence on the flow and the resulting heat transfer. Comparison of constant and variable property solutions show substantial differences. In addition, the property variations prevent fully developed flow. The density variation accelerates the fluid in the channels increasing the pressure drop without an accompanying increase in heat flux. Analyses of the inlet configuration suggest that side entry from a manifold can affect the development of the velocity profile because of vortices generated as the flow enters the channel. Current work is focused on studying the effects of channel bifurcation on the flow field and the heat transfer characteristics.

  12. Efficiency of water coolant for DEMO divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetzer, Renate; Igitkhanov, Yuri; Bazylev, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, water-cooled divertor concepts have been developed for limited incident fluxes without taking into account transient power loadings. In this paper we analyzed the efficiency of water as a coolant for the particular PFC tungsten monoblock shield with a cooling tube made from Cu alloy (Cu OFHC) as a laminate adjacent to W and a low activation martensitic steel (Eurofer) as inner tube contacting the coolant. Thermal analysis is carried out by using the code MEMOS, which simulates W armour damage under the repetitive ELM heat loads. We consider cooling conditions which allow one to keep relatively high material temperatures (in the range 300–600 °C) thus minimizing Eurofer embrittlement under neutron irradiation. Expected DEMO I and DEMO II heat loads including type I ELMs are found to cause melting of the W surface during unmitigated ELMs. By mitigation of the ELMs melting of W is avoided. DEMO I operation under these conditions is save for cooling at water pressure 15.5 MPa and temperature 325 °C, while for DEMO II with mitigated ELMs the critical heat flux is exceeded and safe operation is not provided.

  13. Chemistry of liquid metal coolants and sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasekaran, T.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid sodium is the coolant of choice for the current generation fast breeder reactors. When sodium contains low levels of dissolved non-metallic impurities, it is highly compatible with structural steels. When the dissolved oxygen level is high, corrosion and mass transfer in sodium-steel circuits are enhanced and this involves formation of NaxMyOz type of species (M = alloying components in steels). Experience has shown that this enhancement of corrosion in a sodium circuit with all austenitic steel structural materials would not be encountered if oxygen level in sodium is below ~ 5ppm. For understanding this observation, a complete knowledge on the phase diagrams of Na-M-O systems and the thermochemical data of all relevant NaxMyOz compounds is essential. This presentation would highlight the work carried out at IGCAR on the chemistry of liquid sodium and heavy liquid metal coolants. Work carried out on various sensors for their use in these liquid metal circuits would be described and their current status would be discussed

  14. Efficiency of water coolant for DEMO divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetzer, Renate, E-mail: renate.fetzer@kit.edu; Igitkhanov, Yuri; Bazylev, Boris

    2015-10-15

    Up to now, water-cooled divertor concepts have been developed for limited incident fluxes without taking into account transient power loadings. In this paper we analyzed the efficiency of water as a coolant for the particular PFC tungsten monoblock shield with a cooling tube made from Cu alloy (Cu OFHC) as a laminate adjacent to W and a low activation martensitic steel (Eurofer) as inner tube contacting the coolant. Thermal analysis is carried out by using the code MEMOS, which simulates W armour damage under the repetitive ELM heat loads. We consider cooling conditions which allow one to keep relatively high material temperatures (in the range 300–600 °C) thus minimizing Eurofer embrittlement under neutron irradiation. Expected DEMO I and DEMO II heat loads including type I ELMs are found to cause melting of the W surface during unmitigated ELMs. By mitigation of the ELMs melting of W is avoided. DEMO I operation under these conditions is save for cooling at water pressure 15.5 MPa and temperature 325 °C, while for DEMO II with mitigated ELMs the critical heat flux is exceeded and safe operation is not provided.

  15. Analysis of core degradation and relocation phenomena and scenarios in a Nordic-type BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galushin, Sergey, E-mail: galushin@kth.se; Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pkudinov@kth.se

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A data base of the debris properties in lower plenum generated using MELCOR code. • The timing of safety systems has significant effect on the relocated debris properties. • Loose coupling between core relocation and vessel failure analyses was established. - Abstract: Severe Accident Management (SAM) in Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) employs ex-vessel cooling of core melt debris. The melt is released from the failed vessel and poured into a deep pool of water located under the reactor. The melt is expected to fragment, quench, and form a debris bed, coolable by a natural circulation and evaporation of water. Success of the strategy is contingent upon melt release conditions from the vessel and melt-coolant interaction that determine (i) properties of the debris bed and its coolability (ii) potential for energetic melt-coolant interactions (steam explosions). Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM+) framework is currently under development for quantification of the risks associated with formation of non-coolable debris bed and occurrence of steam explosions, both presenting a credible threats to containment integrity. The ROAAM+ framework consist of loosely coupled models that describe each stage of the accident progression. Core relocation analysis framework provides initial conditions for melt vessel interaction, vessel failure and melt release frameworks. The properties of relocated debris and melt release conditions, including in-vessel and ex-vessel pressure, lower drywell pool depth and temperature, are sensitive to the accident scenarios and timing of safety systems recovery and operator actions. This paper illustrates a methodological approach and relevant data for establishing a connection between core relocation and vessel failure analysis in ROAAM+ approach. MELCOR code is used for analysis of core degradation and relocation phenomena. Properties of relocated debris are obtained as functions of the accident scenario

  16. Comparative analysis of mechanical characteristics of solidified concentrates from BWR system using Yugoslav and Italian cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Peric, A.; Drljaca, J.; Kostadinovic, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, properties of Italian and Yugoslav cement mixture with BWR evaporation concentrates were compared, research was held upon fifteen samples, according to the adequate formulations. Samples were made in standard cube form, side 10 cm. Functional relationship between decreasing the compressive strength and amount of incorporated BWR concentrate cement mixture was developed. The results of research showed nearly the same mechanical properties of solidified BWR concentrate with Italian and Yugoslav cements. (author)

  17. Upper internals of PWR with coolant flow separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevereau, G.; Heuze, A.

    1989-01-01

    The upper internals for a PWR has a collecting volume for the coolant merging from the core and an apparatus for separating the flow of coolant. This apparatus has a guide for the control rods, a lower plate perforated to allow the coolant through from the core, an upper plate also perforated to allow the coolant through to the collecting volume and a peripheral binding ring joining the two plates. Each guide comprises an envelope without holes and joined perceptibly tight to the plates [fr

  18. Parametric studies on containment thermal hydraulic loads during high pressure melt ejection in a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silde, A.; Lindholm, I. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The containment thermal hydraulic loads during high pressure melt ejection in a Nordic BWR are studied parametrically with the CONTAIN and the MELCOR codes. The work is part of the Nordic RAK-2 project. The containment analyses were divided into two categories according to composition of the discharged debris: metallic and oxidic debris cases. In the base case with highly metallic debris, all sources from the reactor coolant system to the containment were based on the MELCOR/BH calculation. In the base case with the oxidic debris, the source data was specified assuming that {approx} 15% of the whole core material inventory and 34,000 kg of saturated water was discharged from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during 30 seconds. In this case, the debris consisted mostly of oxides. The highest predicted containment pressure peaks were about 8.5 bar. In the scenarios with highly metallic debris source, very high gas temperature of about 1900 K was predicted in the pedestal, and about 1400 K in the upper drywell. The calculations with metallic debris were sensititive to model parameters, like the particle size and the parameters, which control the chemical reaction kinetics. In the scenarios with oxidic debris source, the predicted pressure peaks were comparable to the cases with the metallic debris source. The maximum gas temperatures (about 450-500 K) in the containment were, however, significantly lower than in the respective metallic debris case. The temperatures were also insensitive to parametric variations. In addition, one analysis was performed with the MELCOR code for benchmarking of the MELCOR capabilities against the more detailed CONTAIN code. The calculations showed that leak tightness of the containment penetrations could be jeopardized due to high temperature loads, if a high pressure melt ejection occurred during a severe accident. Another consequence would be an early containment venting. (au). 28 refs.

  19. 3D simulation of a core operation cycle of a BWR using Serpent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera Ch, M. A.; Del Valle G, E.; Gomez T, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This work had the main goal to develop a methodology to obtain the length of an operating cycle of the core of a BWR under different operating states using the Serpent code. The reactor core modeled in Serpent is composed of 444 fuel assemblies (120 with fresh fuels and 324 fuels from previous cycles), 109 cruciform control rods and light water as moderator and coolant. Once the core of the reactor was modeled in Serpent (Three-dimensional) without considering the cruciform control rods, a simulation was carried out with different steps of burning in the operational state with the average values of the fuel temperature (900 K), moderator temperature (600 K) and voids fraction equal to 0.4. In addition, the thermal power considered was 2017 MWt. This operational state was chosen because a previous analysis (not shown in this work) was carried out in 4 types of control cells. The first and second control cell has all of its natural uranium fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod respectively. The third and fourth control cell types have various types of enrichment, both natural uranium and gadolinium in their fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod. The conclusion of this previous analysis was that the behavior of the effective multiplication factor along the fuel burnout within the four control cell types was almost unaffected by the fuel temperature but was affected by the voids fraction. Thus, for this operating cycle in the operating state defined above, its length was 14,63052 GW t/Tm. In addition, at the end of this cycle, the decay heat obtained was equal to 116.71 MWt and the inventory of the most important isotopes to be considered was obtained, such as some isotopes of uranium, neptune, plutonium, americium and curio. (Author)

  20. Construction techniques and management methods for BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yohji; Tateishi, Mizuo; Hayashi, Yoshishige

    1989-01-01

    Toshiba is constantly striving for safer and more efficient plant construction to realize high-quality BWR plants within a short construction period. To achieve these aims, Toshiba has developed and improved a large number of construction techniques and construction management methods. In the area of installation, various techniques have been applied such as the modularization of piping and equipment, shop installation of reactor internals, etc. Further, installation management has been upgraded by the use of pre-installation review programs, the development of installation control systems, etc. For commissioning, improvements in commissioning management have been achieved through the use of computer systems, and testing methods have also been upgraded by the development of computer systems for the recording and analysis of test data and the automatic adjustment of controllers in the main control system of the BWR. This paper outlines these construction techniques and management methods. (author)

  1. Specifications of the BWR simulator for HAMMLAB 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grini, Rolf-Einar; Miettinen, Jaakko; Nurmilaukas, Pekka; Raussi; Pekka; Saarni, Ray; Stokke; Egil; Soerensen, Aimar; Tiihonen, Olli

    1998-02-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) simulator for HAMMLAB 2000 will be a model of the Swedish plant Forsmark-3. This report gives the specifications of the BWR simulator. The bulk of the report is a copy of the relevant addendum to the contract with the developer, and to the contract with the group of utilities and with ABB Atom. After a general overview, each plant system is described one after the other (using the reference plant system coding), and the simulation of each system is specified. Even the systems that shall not be simulated are included; in those cases the specification is: It is not required that ... is simulated. A list of malfunctions is given, as well as a list of validation transients. Finally the operator interface is specified. (author)

  2. BWR Fuel Assemblies Physics Analysis Utilizing 3D MCNP Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Ren-Tai; Williams, John B.; Folk, Ken S.

    2008-01-01

    MCNP is used to model a partially controlled BWR fresh fuel four assemblies (2x2) system for better understanding BWR fuel behavior and for benchmarking production codes. The impact of the GE14 plenum regions on axial power distribution is observed by comparing against the GE13 axial power distribution, in which the GE14 relative power is lower than the GE13 relative power at the 15. node and at the 16. node due to presence of the plenum regions in GE14 fuel in these two nodes. The segmented rod power distribution study indicates that the azimuthally dependent power distribution is very significant for the fuel rods next to the water gap in the uncontrolled portion. (authors)

  3. BWR Fuel Assemblies Physics Analysis Utilizing 3D MCNP Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Ren-Tai [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Williams, John B.; Folk, Ken S. [Southern Nuclear Company, Birmingham, Alabama 35242 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    MCNP is used to model a partially controlled BWR fresh fuel four assemblies (2x2) system for better understanding BWR fuel behavior and for benchmarking production codes. The impact of the GE14 plenum regions on axial power distribution is observed by comparing against the GE13 axial power distribution, in which the GE14 relative power is lower than the GE13 relative power at the 15. node and at the 16. node due to presence of the plenum regions in GE14 fuel in these two nodes. The segmented rod power distribution study indicates that the azimuthally dependent power distribution is very significant for the fuel rods next to the water gap in the uncontrolled portion. (authors)

  4. Initiation model for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWR pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, Mamoru; Kawakubo, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yuji; Arii, Mitsuru.

    1981-01-01

    Discussions were made on the keys of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature water in laboratories and stress corrosion cracking incidents in operating plants. Based on these discussions, a model was set up of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation in BWR pipes. Regarding the model, it was presumed that the intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiates during start up periods whenever heat-affected zones in welded pipes are highly sensitized and suffer dynamic strain in transient water containing dissolved oxygen. A series of BWR start up simulation tests were made by using a flowing autoclave system with slow strain rate test equipment. Validity of the model was confirmed through the test results. (author)

  5. A BWR 24-month cycle analysis using multicycle techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel cycle design analyses have become increasingly challenging in the past several years. As utilities continue to seek improved capacity factors, reduced power generation costs, and reduced outage costs, longer cycle lengths and fuel design optimization become important considerations. Accurate multicycle analysis techniques are necessary to determine the viability of fuel designs and cycle operating strategies to meet reactor operating requirements, e.g., meet thermal and reactivity margin constraints, while minimizing overall fuel cycle costs. Siemens Power Corporation (SPC), Nuclear Division, has successfully employed multi-cycle analysis techniques with realistic rodded cycle depletions to demonstrate equilibrium fuel cycle performance in 24-month cycles. Analyses have been performed by a BWR/5 reactor, at both rated and uprated power conditions

  6. Standard Technical Specifications, General Electric plants, BWR/4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for General Electric Plants, BWR/4, and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the BWR Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power specifications. This report contains three volumes. This document, Volume 2, contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS

  7. Neutron noise analysis of BWR using time series analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunishi, Kohyu

    1976-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to give more quantitative understanding of noise source in neutron flux and to provide a useful tool for the detection and diagnosis of reactor. The space dependent effects of distributed neutron flux signals at the axial direction of two different strings are investigated by the power contribution ratio among neutron fluxes and the incoherent noise spectra of neutron fluxes derived from autoregressive spectra. The signals are measured on the medium sized commercial BWR of 460 MWe in Japan. From the obtained results, local and global noise sources in neutron flux are discussed. This method is indicated to be a useful tool for detection and diagnosis of anomalous phenomena in BWR. (orig./RW) [de

  8. Condensate polishing guidelines for PWR and BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, P.; Crinigan, P.; Graham, B.; Kohlmann, R.; Crosby, C.; Seager, J.; Bosold, R.; Gillen, J.; Kristensen, J.; McKeen, A.; Jones, V.; Sawochka, S.; Siegwarth, D.; Keeling, D.; Polidoroff, T.; Morgan, D.; Rickertsen, D.; Dyson, A.; Mills, W.; Coleman, L.

    1993-03-01

    Under EPRI sponsorship, an industry committee, similar in form and operation to other guideline committees, was created to develop Condensate Polishing Guidelines for both PWR and BWR systems. The committee reviewed the available utility and water treatment industry experience on system design and performance and incorporated operational and state-of-the-art information into document. These guidelines help utilities to optimize present condensate polisher designs as well as be a resource for retrofits or new construction. These guidelines present information that has not previously been presented in any consensus industry document. The committee generated guidelines that cover both deep bed and powdered resin systems as an integral part of the chemistry of PWR and BWR plants. The guidelines are separated into sections that deal with the basis for condensate polishing, system design, resin design and application, data management and performance and management responsibilities

  9. Vertical Drop of 44-BWR Waste Package With Lifting Collars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.K. Scheider

    2005-08-23

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a waste package (WP) dropped flat on its bottom from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 44-Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities. The Uncanistered Waste Disposal Container System is classified as Quality Level 1 (Ref. 4, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (Ref. 16). AP-3. 12Q, Design Calculations and Analyses (Ref. 11) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design of the type of 44-BWR WP considered in this calculation and provides the potential dimensions and materials for that design.

  10. Study on thermal performance and margins of BWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stosic, Zoran

    1999-01-01

    This paper contributes to developing a methodology of predicting and analyzing thermal performance and margins of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies under conditions of reaching high quality Boiling Crisis and subsequent post-dryout thermal hydraulics causing temperature excursion of fuel cladding. Operational margins against dryout and potential for increasing fuel performance with appropriate benefits are discussed. The philosophy of modeling with its special topics are demonstrated on the HECHAN (HEated CHannel ANalyzer) model as the state-of-art for thermal-hydraulics analysis of BWR fuel assemblies in pre- and post-dryout two-phase flow regimes. The scope of further work either being or has to be performed concerning implementation of new physical aspects, including domain extension of HECHAN model applications to the Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), is discussed. Finally, a comprehensive overview of the literature dealing with development of the model is given. (author)

  11. Paired replacement fuel assemblies for BWR-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Kazushige.

    1997-01-01

    There are disposed a large-diameter water rod constituting a non-boiling region at a central portion and paired replacement fuel assemblies for two streams having the same average enrichment degree and different amount of burnable poisons. The paired replacement fuel assemblies comprise a first fuel assembly having a less amount of burnable poisons and a second fuel assembly having a larger amount of burnable poisons. A number of burnable poison-containing fuel rods in adjacent with the large diameter water rod is increased in the second fuel assembly than the first fuel assembly. Then, the poison of the paired replacement fuel assemblies for the BWR type reactor can be annihilated simultaneously at the final stage of the cycle. Accordingly, fuels for a BWR type reactor excellent in economical property and safety and facilitating the design of the replacement reactor core can be obtained. (N.H.)

  12. Development of the advanced on-line BWR core monitoring system TiARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Development of an integrated computer environment to support plant operators and station nuclear engineers is a recent activity. In achieving this goal, an advanced on-line boiling water reactor (BWR) core monitoring system: TiARA has been developed by Toden Software. An integrated design approach was performed through the introduction of recent computer technologies, a sophisticated human/machine interface (HMI) and an advanced nodal method. The first prototype of TiARA was ready in early 1996. This prototype is now undergoing a field test at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa unit 6. After successful completion of this test, the authors will have achieved the following goals: (1) consistency between on-line core monitoring system and off-line core management system; (2) an enhanced HMI and database; (3) user-friendly operability and maintainability; (4) system development from the utilities' standpoint to fully satisfy operator needs

  13. General model for Pc-based simulation of PWR and BWR plant components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratemi, W M; Abomustafa, A M [Faculty of enginnering, alfateh univerity Tripoli, (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, we present a basic mathematical model derived from physical principles to suit the simulation of PWR-components such as pressurizer, intact steam generator, ruptured steam generator, and the reactor component of a BWR-plant. In our development, we produced an NMMS-package for nuclear modular modelling simulation. Such package is installed on a personal computer and it is designed to be user friendly through color graphics windows interfacing. The package works under three environments, namely, pre-processor, simulation, and post-processor. Our analysis of results using cross graphing technique for steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident, yielded a new proposal for on-line monitoring of control strategy of SGTR-accident for nuclear or conventional power plant. 4 figs.

  14. Review of international solutions to NEACRP benchmark BWR lattice cell problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.

    1977-12-01

    This paper summarises international solutions to a set of BWR benchmark problems. The problems, posed as an activity sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Reactor Physics, were as follows: 9-pin supercell with central burnable poison pin, mini-BWR with 4 pin-cells and water gaps and control rod cruciform, full 7 x 7 pin BWR lattice cell with differential U 235 enrichment, and full 8 x 8 pin BWR lattice cell with water-hole, Pu-loading, burnable poison, and homogenised cruciform control rod. Solutions have been contributed by Denmark, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK. (author)

  15. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Voet, J. van der (Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland NV, Dodewaard (Netherlands)); Verhagen, F.C.M. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on the PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs.; 9 figs.; 30 tabs.

  16. Latest experiences in inspecting the inside of BWR vessel shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, R.; Gonzalez, E.

    2001-07-01

    In the last few years, the owners of BWR nuclear power plants have been forced to address new fuel shield inspection requirements, TECNATOM has responded to this situation by launching the TEIDE projects, which include development of an inspection machine and the corresponding Non-Destructive Tests to examine the inside of this shield. With these projects, TECNATOM has performed more than 12 fuel shield inspections in different countries. This article describes the experience gained in the last three years. (Author)

  17. Results of modeling advanced BWR fuel designs using CASMO-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, D.; Edenius, M.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced BWR fuel designs from General Electric, Siemens and ABB-Atom have been analyzed using CASMO-4 and compared against fission rate distributions and control rod worths from MCNP. Included in the analysis were fuel storage rack configurations and proposed mixed oxide (MOX) designs. Results are also presented from several cycles of SIMULATE-3 core follow analysis, using nodal data generated by CASMO-4, for cycles in transition from 8x8 designs to advanced fuel designs. (author)

  18. TVA experience in BWR reload design and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    TVA has developed and implemented the capability to perform BWR reload core design and licensing analyses. The advantages accruing from this capability include the tangible cost-savings from performing reload analyses in-house. Also, ''intangible'' benefits such as increased operating flexibility and the ability to accommodate multivendor fuel designs have been demonstrated. The major disadvantage with performing in-house analyses is the cost associated with development and maintenance of the analytical methods and staff expertise

  19. Diesel engine coolant analysis, new application for established instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D P; Lukas, M; Lynch, B K [Spectro Incorporated, Littleton, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Rotating disk electrode (RDE) arc emission spectrometers are user` many commercial, industrial and military laboratories throughout the world to analyze millions of oil and fuel samples each year. In fact, RDE spectrometers have been used exclusively for oil and fuel analysis for so long that it has nearly been forgotten by most practitioners that when RDE spectrometers were first introduced more than 40 years ago, they were routinely used for aqueous samples as well. This presentation reviews early methods of aqueous sample analysis using RDE technology. This presentation also describes recent work to calibrate an RDE spectrometer for both water samples and for engine coolant samples which are a mixture of approximately 50 % water and 50 % ethylene or propylene glycol. Limits of detection determined for aqueous standards are comparable to limits of detection for oil standards. Repeatability of aqueous samples is comparable to the repeatability achieved for oil samples. A comparison of results for coolant samples measured by both inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) spectrometers is presented. Not surprisingly, RDE results are significantly higher for samples containing particles larger than a few micrometers. Although limits of detection for aqueous samples are not as low as can be achieved using the more modern ICP spectrometric method or the more cumbersome atomic absorption (AA) method, this presentation suggests that RDE spectrometers may be appropriate for certain types of aqueous samples in situations where the more sensitive ICP or AA spectrometers and the laboratory environment and skilled personnel needed for them to operate are not conveniently available. (orig.) 4 refs.

  20. Diesel engine coolant analysis, new application for established instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.P.; Lukas, M.; Lynch, B.K. [Spectro Incorporated, Littleton, MA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Rotating disk electrode (RDE) arc emission spectrometers are user` many commercial, industrial and military laboratories throughout the world to analyze millions of oil and fuel samples each year. In fact, RDE spectrometers have been used exclusively for oil and fuel analysis for so long that it has nearly been forgotten by most practitioners that when RDE spectrometers were first introduced more than 40 years ago, they were routinely used for aqueous samples as well. This presentation reviews early methods of aqueous sample analysis using RDE technology. This presentation also describes recent work to calibrate an RDE spectrometer for both water samples and for engine coolant samples which are a mixture of approximately 50 % water and 50 % ethylene or propylene glycol. Limits of detection determined for aqueous standards are comparable to limits of detection for oil standards. Repeatability of aqueous samples is comparable to the repeatability achieved for oil samples. A comparison of results for coolant samples measured by both inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) spectrometers is presented. Not surprisingly, RDE results are significantly higher for samples containing particles larger than a few micrometers. Although limits of detection for aqueous samples are not as low as can be achieved using the more modern ICP spectrometric method or the more cumbersome atomic absorption (AA) method, this presentation suggests that RDE spectrometers may be appropriate for certain types of aqueous samples in situations where the more sensitive ICP or AA spectrometers and the laboratory environment and skilled personnel needed for them to operate are not conveniently available. (orig.) 4 refs.