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Sample records for butyrate dependent bacterial

  1. Enteric bacterial metabolites propionic and butyric acid modulate gene expression, including CREB-dependent catecholaminergic neurotransmission, in PC12 cells--possible relevance to autism spectrum disorders.

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    Bistra B Nankova

    Full Text Available Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA like propionic (PPA, and butyric acid (BA, which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals

  2. Genes and Gut Bacteria Involved in Luminal Butyrate Reduction Caused by Diet and Loperamide

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    Nakwon Hwang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Unbalanced dietary habits and gut dysmotility are causative factors in metabolic and functional gut disorders, including obesity, diabetes, and constipation. Reduction in luminal butyrate synthesis is known to be associated with gut dysbioses, and studies have suggested that restoring butyrate formation in the colon may improve gut health. In contrast, shifts in different types of gut microbiota may inhibit luminal butyrate synthesis, requiring different treatments to restore colonic bacterial butyrate synthesis. We investigated the influence of high-fat diets (HFD and low-fiber diets (LFD, and loperamide (LPM administration, on key bacteria and genes involved in reduction of butyrate synthesis in mice. MiSeq-based microbiota analysis and HiSeq-based differential gene analysis indicated that different types of bacteria and genes were involved in butyrate metabolism in each treatment. Dietary modulation depleted butyrate kinase and phosphate butyryl transferase by decreasing members of the Bacteroidales and Parabacteroides. The HFD also depleted genes involved in succinate synthesis by decreasing Lactobacillus. The LFD and LPM treatments depleted genes involved in crotonoyl-CoA synthesis by decreasing Roseburia and Oscilllibacter. Taken together, our results suggest that different types of bacteria and genes were involved in gut dysbiosis, and that selected treatments may be needed depending on the cause of gut dysfunction.

  3. Assessment of bacterial diversity in breast milk using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches.

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    Jost, Ted; Lacroix, Christophe; Braegger, Christian; Chassard, Christophe

    2013-10-01

    Initial neonatal gut colonisation is a crucial stage for developing a healthy physiology, beneficially influenced by breast-feeding. Breast milk has been shown not only to provide nutrients and bioactive/immunological compounds, but also commensal bacteria, including gut-associated anaerobic Bifidobacterium spp. The aim of the present study was to investigate bacterial diversity in breast milk, with emphasis on identifying gut-associated obligate anaerobes. Breast milk collected from seven mothers at three sampling points (days 3-6, 9-14 and 25-30 postpartum) was analysed by combined culture-dependent and state-of-the-art, culture-independent methods (Sanger sequencing and 454-pyrosequencing). In addition to the predominance of facultative anaerobes such as Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Propionibacterium (>90% of isolated strains and 23·7% relative abundance using pyrosequencing), significant populations of obligate anaerobes, including Bifidobacterium and Veillonella, were detected using pyrosequencing and confirmed by the isolation of viable strains (3·4% of isolates and 1·4% relative abundance). Pyrosequencing also revealed the presence of DNA of multiple major gut-associated obligate anaerobes (6·2% relative abundance) such as Bacteroides and, for the first time, several members of the Clostridia, including butyrate producers, such as Faecalibacterium and Roseburia, which are important for colonic health. The present study suggests that breast milk may be a major source of bacterial diversity to the neonatal gut, including gut-associated obligate anaerobes, and may thus significantly influence gut colonisation and maturation of the immune system.

  4. Wzy-dependent bacterial capsules as potential drug targets.

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    Ericsson, Daniel J; Standish, Alistair; Kobe, Bostjan; Morona, Renato

    2012-10-01

    The bacterial capsule is a recognized virulence factor in pathogenic bacteria. It likely works as an antiphagocytic barrier by minimizing complement deposition on the bacterial surface. With the continual rise of bacterial pathogens resistant to multiple antibiotics, there is an increasing need for novel drugs. In the Wzy-dependent pathway, the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is regulated by a phosphoregulatory system, whose main components consist of bacterial-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) and their cognate phosphatases. The ability to regulate capsule biosynthesis has been shown to be vital for pathogenicity, because different stages of infection require a shift in capsule thickness, making the phosphoregulatory proteins suitable as drug targets. Here, we review the role of regulatory proteins focusing on Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli and discuss their suitability as targets in structure-based drug design.

  5. Analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing

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    Neef, C.; van Gils, Stephanus A.; Ijzerman, W.L.

    2002-01-01

    In this article an analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing is described. The validation process of autoclaves uses parameters such as reduction rate constant k, decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z from an imaginary microorganism to

  6. Time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

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    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Kuśmierczyk, Piotr; Liu, Changqing; Yang, Guang; Sevostianov, Igor; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel. Due to its ideal biocompatibility, BC hydrogel could be employed in biomedical applications. Considering the complexity of loading conditions in human body environment, time-dependent behaviour under relevant conditions should be understood. BC specimens are produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 at static-culture conditions. Time-dependent behaviour of specimens at several stress levels is experimentally determined by uniaxial tensile creep tests. We use fraction-exponential operators to model the rheological behaviour. Such a representation allows combination of good accuracy in analytical description of viscoelastic behaviour of real materials and simplicity in solving boundary value problems. The obtained material parameters allow us to identify time-dependent behaviour of BC hydrogel at high stress level with sufficient accuracy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A dual switch controls bacterial enhancer-dependent transcription

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    Wiesler, Simone C.; Burrows, Patricia C.; Buck, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAPs) are targets for antibiotics. Myxopyronin binds to the RNAP switch regions to block structural rearrangements needed for formation of open promoter complexes. Bacterial RNAPs containing the major variant σ54 factor are activated by enhancer-binding proteins (bEBPs) and transcribe genes whose products are needed in pathogenicity and stress responses. We show that (i) enhancer-dependent RNAPs help Escherichia coli to survive in the presence of myxopyronin, (ii) enhancer-dependent RNAPs partially resist inhibition by myxopyronin and (iii) ATP hydrolysis catalysed by bEBPs is obligatory for functional interaction of the RNAP switch regions with the transcription start site. We demonstrate that enhancer-dependent promoters contain two barriers to full DNA opening, allowing tight regulation of transcription initiation. bEBPs engage in a dual switch to (i) allow propagation of nucleated DNA melting from an upstream DNA fork junction and (ii) complete the formation of the transcription bubble and downstream DNA fork junction at the RNA synthesis start site, resulting in switch region-dependent RNAP clamp closure and open promoter complex formation. PMID:22965125

  8. Discoloration of Polyvinyl Butyral

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    Kim, Q.; Shumka, A.

    1986-01-01

    Report presents results of study of discoloration in polyvinyl butyral (PVB). Clear PVB gradually turns yellowish brown in simulated-aging tests and outdoor environmental tests. Discoloration severely reduces solar-cell output. Using methods of modern analytical chemistry - transmission absorption, Fourier transform infrared absorption, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and scanning-electron microscopy - study uncovered major cause of yellowing.

  9. Temperature dependent bacteriophages of a tropical bacterial pathogen

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    Martha Rebecca Jane Clokie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness of the multiple ways that bacteriophages (phages influence bacterial evolution, population dynamics, physiology and pathogenicity. By studying a novel group of phages infecting a soil borne pathogen, we revealed a paradigm shifting observation that the phages switch their lifestyle according to temperature. We sampled soil from an endemic area of the serious tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, and established that podoviruses infecting the pathogen are frequently present in soil, and many of them are naturally occurring variants of a common virus type. Experiments on one phage in the related model Burkholderia thailandensis demonstrated that temperature defines the outcome of phage-bacteria interactions. At higher temperatures (37°C, the phage predominantly goes through a lytic cycle, but at lower temperatures (25°C, the phage remains temperate. This is the first report of a naturally occurring phage that follows a lytic or temperate lifestyle according to temperature. These observations fundamentally alter the accepted views on the abundance, population biology and virulence of B. pseudomallei. Furthermore, when taken together with previous studies, our findings suggest that the phenomenon of temperature dependency in phages is widespread. Such phages are likely to have a profound effect on bacterial life, and on our ability to culture and correctly enumerate viable bacteria.

  10. The Microbial Metabolite Butyrate Induces Expression of Th1-Associated Factors in CD4+ T Cells

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    Meike Kespohl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, which are generated by the bacterial fermentation of dietary fibers, promote expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs. Potential therapeutic value of SCFAs has been recently highlighted in the experimental models of T cell-mediated autoimmunity and allergic inflammation. These studies suggest that physiological intestinal concentrations of SCFAs within the millimolar range are crucial for dampening inflammation-mediated processes. Here, we describe opposing effects of SCFAs on T cell-mediated immune responses. In accordance with published data, lower butyrate concentrations facilitated differentiation of Tregs in vitro and in vivo under steady-state conditions. In contrast, higher concentrations of butyrate induced expression of the transcription factor T-bet in all investigated T cell subsets resulting in IFN-γ-producing Tregs or conventional T cells. This effect was mediated by the inhibition of histone deacetylase activity and was independent of SCFA-receptors FFA2 and FFA3 as well as of Na+-coupled SCFA transporter Slc5a8. Importantly, while butyrate was not able to induce the generation of Tregs in the absence of TGF-β1, the expression of T-bet and IFN-γ was triggered upon stimulation of CD4+ T cells with this SCFA alone. Moreover, the treatment of germ-free mice with butyrate enhanced the expression of T-bet and IFN-γ during acute colitis. Our data reveal that, depending on its concentration and immunological milieu, butyrate may exert either beneficial or detrimental effects on the mucosal immune system.

  11. Alternative splicing regulated by butyrate in bovine epithelial cells.

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    Sitao Wu

    Full Text Available As a signaling molecule and an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs, butyrate exerts its impact on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. This study examined the effect of butyrate on alternative splicing in bovine epithelial cells using RNA-seq technology. Junction reads account for 11.28 and 12.32% of total mapped reads between the butyrate-treated (BT and control (CT groups. 201,326 potential splicing junctions detected were supported by ≥ 3 junction reads. Approximately 94% of these junctions conformed to the consensus sequence (GT/AG while ~3% were GC/AG junctions. No AT/AC junctions were observed. A total of 2,834 exon skipping events, supported by a minimum of 3 junction reads, were detected. At least 7 genes, their mRNA expression significantly affected by butyrate, also had exon skipping events differentially regulated by butyrate. Furthermore, COL5A3, which was induced 310-fold by butyrate (FDR <0.001 at the gene level, had a significantly higher number of junction reads mapped to Exon#8 (Donor and Exon#11 (Acceptor in BT. This event had the potential to result in the formation of a COL5A3 mRNA isoform with 2 of the 69 exons missing. In addition, 216 differentially expressed transcript isoforms regulated by butyrate were detected. For example, Isoform 1 of ORC1 was strongly repressed by butyrate while Isoform 2 remained unchanged. Butyrate physically binds to and inhibits all zinc-dependent HDACs except HDAC6 and HDAC10. Our results provided evidence that butyrate also regulated deacetylase activities of classical HDACs via its transcriptional control. Moreover, thirteen gene fusion events differentially affected by butyrate were identified. Our results provided a snapshot into complex transcriptome dynamics regulated by butyrate, which will facilitate our understanding of the biological effects of butyrate and other HDAC

  12. Butyrate production under aerobic growth conditions by engineered Escherichia coli.

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    Kataoka, Naoya; Vangnai, Alisa S; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2017-05-01

    Butyrate is an important industrial platform chemical. Although several groups have reported butyrate production under oxygen-limited conditions by a native producer, Clostridium tyrobutylicum, and by a metabolically engineered Escherichia coli, efforts to produce butyrate under aerobic growth conditions have met limited success. Here, we constructed a novel butyrate synthetic pathway that functions under aerobic growth conditions in E. coli, by modifying the 1-butanol synthetic pathway reported previously. The pathway consists of phaA (acetyltransferase) and phaB (NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase) from Ralstonia eutropha, phaJ ((R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase) from Aeromonas caviae, ter (trans-enoyl-CoA reductase) from Treponema denticola, and endogenous thioesterase(s) of E. coli. To evaluate the potential of this pathway for butyrate production, culture conditions, including pH, oxygen supply, and concentration of inorganic nitrogen sources, were optimized in a mini-jar fermentor. Under the optimal conditions, butyrate was produced at a concentration of up to 140 mM (12.3 g/L in terms of butyric acid) after 54 h of fed-batch culture. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing.

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    Neef, C; van Gils, S A; IJzerman, W L

    2002-11-01

    In this article an analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing is described. The validation process of autoclaves uses parameters such as reduction rate constant k, decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z from an imaginary microorganism to describe the sterilization process. Total lethality of the process is calculated as the integral of the lethality (a function of the temperature) over time. In the case of concentration-dependent killing-i.e. using antibiotic drugs-the k-value is not necessarily a constant; it is the difference between growth and killing of the microorganism. Equations are derived for the decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z. Pharmacodynamic models of tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime are used to demonstrate that there is an optimal concentration for all three drugs: C(opt-tobra)=3.20 MICmg/l, C(opt-cipro)=3.45 MICmg/l and C(opt-cefta)=1.35 MICmg/l.

  14. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

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    Chiaro, Christopher, E-mail: cchiaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Lazarova, Darina L., E-mail: dlazarova@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Bordonaro, Michael, E-mail: mbordonaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that

  15. Modeling of scale-dependent bacterial growth by chemical kinetics approach.

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    Martínez, Haydee; Sánchez, Joaquín; Cruz, José-Manuel; Ayala, Guadalupe; Rivera, Marco; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We applied the so-called chemical kinetics approach to complex bacterial growth patterns that were dependent on the liquid-surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA/V) of the bacterial cultures. The kinetic modeling was based on current experimental knowledge in terms of autocatalytic bacterial growth, its inhibition by the metabolite CO2, and the relief of inhibition through the physical escape of the inhibitor. The model quantitatively reproduces kinetic data of SA/V-dependent bacterial growth and can discriminate between differences in the growth dynamics of enteropathogenic E. coli, E. coli JM83, and Salmonella typhimurium on one hand and Vibrio cholerae on the other hand. Furthermore, the data fitting procedures allowed predictions about the velocities of the involved key processes and the potential behavior in an open-flow bacterial chemostat, revealing an oscillatory approach to the stationary states.

  16. Colonic mucin synthesis is increased by sodium butyrate.

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    Finnie, I A; Dwarakanath, A D; Taylor, B A; Rhodes, J M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sodium butyrate and sodium bromo-octanoate (an inhibitor of beta oxidation) on colonic mucus glycoprotein (mucin) synthesis have been assessed using tissue from colonic resection samples. Epithelial biopsy specimens were incubated for 16 hours in RPMI 1640 with glutamine, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and N-acetyl-[3H]-glucosamine ([3H]-Glc NAc), and differing concentrations of sodium butyrate. Incorporation of [3H] Glc NAc into mucin by normal epithelium at least 10 cm distant from colonic cancer was increased in the presence of sodium butyrate in a dose dependent manner, with maximum effect (476%) at a concentration of 0.1 mM (number of specimens = 24 from six patients, p < 0.001). The increase in response to butyrate was not seen when specimens were incubated in the presence of the beta oxidation inhibitor sodium bromo-octanoate 0.05 M. The striking increase in mucin synthesis that results when butyrate is added to standard nutrient medium suggests that this may be an important mechanism affecting the rate of mucin synthesis in vivo and may also explain the therapeutic effect of butyrate in colitis.

  17. Magnesium-dependent processes are targets of bacterial manganese toxicity

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    Hohle, Thomas H.; O’Brian, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    A Bradyrhizobium japonicum mutant defective in the gene encoding the high affinity Mn2+ transporter MntH has a severe growth phenotype under manganese limitation. Here, we isolated suppressor mutants of an mntH strain that grew under manganese limitation, and activities of high affinity Mn2+ transport and Mn2+-dependent enzymes were partially rescued. The suppressor strains harbor gain-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the Mg2+ channel MgtE. The MgtE variants likely allow Mn2+ entry via loss of a gating mechanism that normally holds the transporter in the closed state when cellular Mg2+ levels are high. Both MgtE-dependent and -independent suppressor phenotypes were recapitulated by magnesium-limited growth of the mntH strain. Growth studies of wild type cells suggest that manganese is toxic to cells when environmental magnesium is low. Moreover, extracellular manganese and magnesium levels were manipulated to inhibit growth without substantially altering the intracellular content of either metal, implying that manganese toxicity depends on its cellular distribution rather than the absolute concentration. Mg2+-dependent enzyme activities were found to be inhibited or stimulated by Mn2+. We conclude that Mn2+ can occupy Mg2+-binding sites in cells, and suggest that Mg2+-dependent processes are targets of manganese toxicity. PMID:24975873

  18. Time Dependent Influence of Rotating Magnetic Field on Bacterial Cellulose

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    Karol Fijałkowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the influence of rotating magnetic field (RMF on the morphology, physicochemical properties, and the water holding capacity of bacterial cellulose (BC synthetized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus. The cultures of G. xylinus were exposed to RMF of frequency that equals 50 Hz and magnetic induction 34 mT for 3, 5, and 7 days during cultivation at 28°C in the customized RMF exposure system. It was revealed that BC exposed for 3 days to RMF exhibited the highest water retention capacity as compared to the samples exposed for 5 and 7 days. The observation was confirmed for both the control and RMF exposed BC. It was proved that the BC exposed samples showed up to 26% higher water retention capacity as compared to the control samples. These samples also required the highest temperature to release the water molecules. Such findings agreed with the observation via SEM examination which revealed that the structure of BC synthesized for 7 days was more compacted than the sample exposed to RMF for 3 days. Furthermore, the analysis of 2D correlation of Fourier transform infrared spectra demonstrated the impact of RMF exposure on the dynamics of BC microfibers crystallinity formation.

  19. Butyrate Regulates the Expression of Pathogen-Triggered IL-8 in Intestinal Epithelia

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    Weng, Meiqian; Walker, W. Allan; Sanderson, Ian R.

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by an exaggerated immune response that involves pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-8. Production of these pro-inflammatory cytokines is triggered by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP). Butyrate, a product of bacterial fermentation of carbohydrates, has been reported to modulate inflammation in IBD, possibly by regulating production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, this effect of butyrate is controversial. In this study, ...

  20. Enhanced translocation of bacteria across metabolically stressed epithelia is reduced by butyrate.

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    Lewis, Kimberley; Lutgendorff, Femke; Phan, Van; Söderholm, Johan D; Sherman, Philip M; McKay, Derek M

    2010-07-01

    The gut microflora in some patients with Crohn's disease can be reduced in numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria and this could result in metabolic stress in the colonocytes. Thus, we hypothesized that the short-chain fatty acid, butyrate, is important in the maintenance and regulation of the barrier function of the colonic epithelium. Confluent monolayers of the human colon-derived T84 or HT-29 epithelial cell lines were exposed to dinitrophenol (DNP (0.1 mM), uncouples oxidative phosphorylation) + Escherichia coli (strain HB101, 10(6) cfu) +/- butyrate (3-50 mM). Transepithelial resistance (TER), and bacterial internalization and translocation were assessed over a 24-hour period. Epithelial ultrastructure was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Epithelia under metabolic stress display decreased TER and increased numbers of pseudopodia that is consistent with increased internalization and translocation of the E. coli. Butyrate (but not acetate) significantly reduced the bacterial translocation across DNP-treated epithelia but did not ameliorate the drop in TER in the DNP+E. coli exposed monolayers. Inhibition of bacterial transcytosis across metabolically stressed epithelia was associated with reduced I-kappaB phosphorylation and hence NF-kappaB activation. Reduced butyrate-producing bacteria could result in increased epithelial permeability particularly in the context of concomitant exposure to another stimulus that reduces mitochondria function. We speculate that prebiotics, the substrate for butyrate synthesis, is a valuable prophylaxis in the regulation of epithelial permeability and could be of benefit in preventing relapses in IBD.

  1. A power-law dependence of bacterial invasion on mammalian host receptors.

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    Lee, Tae J; Wong, Jeffrey; Bae, Sena; Lee, Anna Jisu; Lopatkin, Allison; Yuan, Fan; You, Lingchong

    2015-04-01

    Pathogenic bacteria such as Listeria and Yersinia gain initial entry by binding to host target cells and stimulating their internalization. Bacterial uptake entails successive, increasingly strong associations between receptors on the surface of bacteria and hosts. Even with genetically identical cells grown in the same environment, there are vast differences in the number of bacteria entering any given cell. To gain insight into this variability, we examined uptake dynamics of Escherichia coli engineered to express the invasin surface receptor from Yersinia, which enables uptake via mammalian host β1-integrins. Surprisingly, we found that the uptake probability of a single bacterium follows a simple power-law dependence on the concentration of integrins. Furthermore, the value of a power-law parameter depends on the particular host-bacterium pair but not on bacterial concentration. This power-law captures the complex, variable processes underlying bacterial invasion while also enabling differentiation of cell lines.

  2. A power-law dependence of bacterial invasion on mammalian host receptors.

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    Tae J Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria such as Listeria and Yersinia gain initial entry by binding to host target cells and stimulating their internalization. Bacterial uptake entails successive, increasingly strong associations between receptors on the surface of bacteria and hosts. Even with genetically identical cells grown in the same environment, there are vast differences in the number of bacteria entering any given cell. To gain insight into this variability, we examined uptake dynamics of Escherichia coli engineered to express the invasin surface receptor from Yersinia, which enables uptake via mammalian host β1-integrins. Surprisingly, we found that the uptake probability of a single bacterium follows a simple power-law dependence on the concentration of integrins. Furthermore, the value of a power-law parameter depends on the particular host-bacterium pair but not on bacterial concentration. This power-law captures the complex, variable processes underlying bacterial invasion while also enabling differentiation of cell lines.

  3. Butyrate and the colonocyte. Implications for neoplasia.

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    Velázquez, O C; Lederer, H M; Rombeau, J L

    1996-04-01

    Butyrate is produced in the colon of mammals as a result of microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, undigested starch, and proteins. Butyrate may be an important protective agent in colonic carcinogenesis. Trophic effects on normal colonocytes in vitro and in vivo are induced by butyrate. In contrast, butyrate arrests the growth of neoplastic colonocytes and inhibits the preneoplastic hyperproliferation induced by some tumour promoters in vitro. We speculate that selective effects on G-protein activation may explain this paradox of butyrate's effects in normal versus neoplastic colonocytes. Butyrate induces differentiation of colon cancer cell lines. It also regulates the expression of molecules involved in colonocyte growth and adhesion and inhibits the expression of several protooncogenes relevant to colorectal carcinogenesis. Additional studies are needed to evaluate butyrate's antineoplastic effects in vivo and to understand its mechanism(s) of action.

  4. Comparative in silico analysis of butyrate production pathways in gut commensals and pathogens

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    Swadha Anand

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biosynthesis of butyrate by commensal bacteria plays a crucial role in maintenance of human gut health while dysbiosis in gut microbiome has been linked to several enteric disorders. Contrastingly, butyrate shows cytotoxic effects in patients with oral diseases like periodontal infections and oral cancer. In addition to these host associations, few syntrophic bacteria couple butyrate degradation with sulfate reduction and methane production. Thus, it becomes imperative to understand the distribution of butyrate metabolism pathways and delineate differences in substrate utilization between pathogens and commensals.The bacteria utilize four pathways for butyrate production with different initial substrates (Pyruvate, 4-aminobutyrate, Glutarate and Lysine which follow a polyphyletic distribution. A comprehensive mining of complete/draft bacterial genomes indicated conserved juxtaposed genomic arrangement in all these pathways. This gene context information was utilized for an accurate annotation of butyrate production pathways in bacterial genomes. Interestingly, our analysis showed that inspite of a beneficial impact of butyrate in gut, not only commensals, but a few gut pathogens also possess butyrogenic pathways. The results further illustrated that all the gut commensal bacteria (Faecalibacterium, Roseburia, Butyrivibrio, commensal species of Clostridia etc ferment pyruvate for butyrate production. On the contrary, the butyrogenic gut pathogen Fusobacterium utilizes different amino acid metabolism pathways like those for Glutamate (4-aminobutyrate and Glutarate and Lysine for butyrogenesis which leads to a concomitant release of harmful by-products like ammonia in the process. The findings in this study indicate that commensals and pathogens in gut have divergently evolved to produce butyrate using distinct pathways. No such evolutionary selection was observed in oral pathogens (Porphyromonas and Filifactor which showed presence of pyruvate as

  5. Depth-dependent influence of different land-use systems on bacterial biogeography.

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    Seuradge, Brent J; Oelbermann, Maren; Neufeld, Josh D

    2017-02-01

    Despite progress in understanding microbial biogeography of surface soils, few studies have investigated depth-dependent distributions of terrestrial microorganisms in subsoils. We leveraged high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes obtained from soils collected from the RARE: Charitable Research Reserve (Cambridge, ON, Canada) to assess the influence of depth on bacterial communities across various land-use types. Although bacterial communities were strongly influenced by depth across all sites, the magnitude of this influence was variable and demonstrated that land-use attributes also played a significant role in shaping soil bacterial communities. Soil pH exhibited a large gradient across samples and strongly influenced shifts in bacterial communities with depth and across different land-use systems, especially considering that physicochemical conditions showed generally consistent trends with depth. We observed significant (p ≤ 0.001) and strongly correlated taxa with depth and pH, with a strong predominance of positively depth-correlated OTUs without cultured representatives. These findings highlight the importance of depth in soil biogeographical surveys and that subsurface soils harbour understudied bacterial members with potentially unique and important functions in deeper soil horizons that remain to be characterized. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Differential Cellular and Molecular Effects of Butyrate and Trichostatin A on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

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    Kasturi Ranganna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, butyrate and trichostatin A (TSA, are epigenetic histone modifiers and proliferation inhibitors by downregulating cyclin D1, a positive cell cycle regulator, and upregulating p21Cip1 and INK family of proteins, negative cell cycle regulators. Our recent study indicated cyclin D1 upregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC that are proliferation-arrested by butyrate. Here we investigate whether cyclin D1 upregulation is a unique response of VSMC to butyrate or a general response to HDAC inhibitors (HDACi by evaluating the effects of butyrate and TSA on VSMC. While butyrate and TSA inhibit VSMC proliferation via cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, respectively, they downregulate cdk4, cdk6, and cdk2, and upregulate cyclin D3, p21Cip1 and p15INK4B, and cause similar effects on key histone H3 posttranslational modifications. Conversely, cyclin D1 is upregulated by butyrate and inhibited by TSA. Assessment of glycogen synthase 3-dependent phosphorylation, subcellular localization and transcription of cyclin D1 indicates that differential effects of butyrate and TSA on cyclin D1 levels are linked to disparity in cyclin D1 gene expression. Disparity in butyrate- and TSA-induced cyclin D1 may influence transcriptional regulation of genes that are associated with changes in cellular morphology/cellular effects that these HDACi confer on VSMC, as a transcriptional modulator.

  7. Microbial Metabolic Networks at the Mucus Layer Lead to Diet-Independent Butyrate and Vitamin B12 Production by Intestinal Symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzer, Clara; Chia, Loo Wee; Aalvink, Steven; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Piironen, Vieno; Knol, Jan; de Vos, Willem M

    2017-09-19

    Akkermansia muciniphila has evolved to specialize in the degradation and utilization of host mucus, which it may use as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Mucus degradation and fermentation by A. muciniphila are known to result in the liberation of oligosaccharides and subsequent production of acetate, which becomes directly available to microorganisms in the vicinity of the intestinal mucosa. Coculturing experiments of Amuciniphila with non-mucus-degrading butyrate-producing bacteria Anaerostipes caccae, Eubacterium hallii, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii resulted in syntrophic growth and production of butyrate. In addition, we demonstrate that the production of pseudovitamin B12 by E. hallii results in production of propionate by A. muciniphila, which suggests that this syntrophy is indeed bidirectional. These data are proof of concept for syntrophic and other symbiotic microbe-microbe interactions at the intestinal mucosal interface. The observed metabolic interactions between Amuciniphila and butyrogenic bacterial taxa support the existence of colonic vitamin and butyrate production pathways that are dependent on host glycan production and independent of dietary carbohydrates. We infer that the intestinal symbiont A. muciniphila can indirectly stimulate intestinal butyrate levels in the vicinity of the intestinal epithelial cells with potential health benefits to the host.IMPORTANCE The intestinal microbiota is said to be a stable ecosystem where many networks between microorganisms are formed. Here we present a proof of principle study of microbial interaction at the intestinal mucus layer. We show that indigestible oligosaccharide chains within mucus become available for a broad range of intestinal microbes after degradation and liberation of sugars by the species Akkermansia muciniphila This leads to the microbial synthesis of vitamin B12, 1,2-propanediol, propionate, and butyrate, which are beneficial to the microbial ecosystem and host epithelial

  8. Lactobacillus acidophilus counteracts enteropathogenic E. coli-induced inhibition of butyrate uptake in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop; Alrefai, Waddah A; Borthakur, Alip; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2015-10-01

    Butyrate, a key short-chain fatty acid metabolite of colonic luminal bacterial action on dietary fiber, serves as a primary fuel for the colonocytes, ameliorates mucosal inflammation, and stimulates NaCl absorption. Absorption of butyrate into the colonocytes is essential for these intracellular effects. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) plays a major role in colonic luminal butyrate absorption. Previous studies (Tan J, McKenzie C, Potamitis M, Thorburn AN, Mackay CR, Macia L. Adv Immunol 121: 91-119, 2014.) showed decreased MCT1 expression and function in intestinal inflammation. We have previously shown (Borthakur A, Gill RK, Hodges K, Ramaswamy K, Hecht G, Dudeja PK. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 290: G30-G35, 2006.) impaired butyrate absorption in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells due to decreased MCT1 level at the apical cell surface following enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) infection. Current studies, therefore, examined the potential role of probiotic Lactobacilli in stimulating MCT1-mediated butyrate uptake and counteracting EPEC inhibition of MCT1 function. Of the five species of Lactobacilli, short-term (3 h) treatment with L. acidophilus (LA) significantly increased MCT1-mediated butyrate uptake in Caco-2 cells. Heat-killed LA was ineffective, whereas the conditioned culture supernatant of LA (LA-CS) was equally effective in stimulating MCT1 function, indicating that the effects are mediated by LA-secreted soluble factor(s). Furthermore, LA-CS increased apical membrane levels of MCT1 protein via decreasing its basal endocytosis, suggesting that LA-CS stimulation of butyrate uptake could be secondary to increased levels of MCT1 on the apical cell surface. LA-CS also attenuated EPEC inhibition of butyrate uptake and EPEC-mediated endocytosis of MCT1. Our studies highlight distinct role of specific LA-secreted molecules in modulating colonic butyrate absorption.

  9. Culture dependent and independent analysis of bacterial communities associated with commercial salad leaf vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colin R; Randolph, Kevin C; Osborn, Shelly L; Tyler, Heather L

    2013-12-01

    Plants harbor a diverse bacterial community, both as epiphytes on the plant surface and as endophytes within plant tissue. While some plant-associated bacteria act as plant pathogens or promote plant growth, others may be human pathogens. The aim of the current study was to determine the bacterial community composition of organic and conventionally grown leafy salad vegetables at the point of consumption using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Total culturable bacteria on salad vegetables ranged from 8.0 × 10(3) to 5.5 × 10(8) CFU g(-1). The number of culturable endophytic bacteria from surface sterilized plants was significantly lower, ranging from 2.2 × 10(3) to 5.8 × 10(5) CFU g(-1). Cultured isolates belonged to six major bacterial phyla, and included representatives of Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Chryseobacterium, and Flavobacterium. Eleven different phyla and subphyla were identified by culture-independent pyrosequencing, with Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes being the most dominant lineages. Other bacterial lineages identified (e.g. Firmicutes, Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria) typically represented less than 1% of sequences obtained. At the genus level, sequences classified as Pseudomonas were identified in all samples and this was often the most prevalent genus. Ralstonia sequences made up a greater portion of the community in surface sterilized than non-surface sterilized samples, indicating that it was largely endophytic, while Acinetobacter sequences appeared to be primarily associated with the leaf surface. Analysis of molecular variance indicated there were no significant differences in bacterial community composition between organic versus conventionally grown, or surface-sterilized versus non-sterilized leaf vegetables. While culture-independent pyrosequencing identified significantly more bacterial taxa, the dominant taxa from pyrosequence data were also detected by traditional

  10. Butyrate-Loaded Chitosan/Hyaluronan Nanoparticles: A Suitable Tool for Sustained Inhibition of ROS Release by Activated Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sacco, Pasquale; Decleva, Eva; Tentor, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    of neutrophil ROS production by free butyrate declines over time, that of butyrate-loaded chitosan/hyaluronan nanoparticles (B-NPs) is sustained. Additional valuable features of these nanoparticles are inherent ROS scavenger activity, resistance to cell internalization, and mucoadhesiveness. B-NPs appear...... that butyrate inhibits neutrophil ROS release in a dose and time-dependent fashion. Given the short half-life of butyrate, chitosan/hyaluronan nanoparticles are next designed and developed as controlled release carriers able to provide cells with a long-lasting supply of this SCFA. Notably, while the inhibition...

  11. Comparative genomics and physiology of the butyrate-producing bacterium Intestinimonas butyriciproducens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, Thi Phuong Nam; Shetty, Sudarshan Anand; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Ritari, Jarmo; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Douillard, François P.; Paulin, Lars; Piironen, Vieno; Clavel, Thomas; Plugge, Caroline M.; Vos, de Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinimonas is a newly described bacterial genus with representative strains present in the intestinal tract of human and other animals. Despite unique metabolic features including the production of butyrate from both sugars and amino acids, there is to date no data on their diversity,

  12. Mechanism of Butyrate Stimulation of Triglyceride Storage and Adipokine Expression during Adipogenic Differentiation of Porcine Stromovascular Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui; Ajuwon, Kolapo M.

    2015-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA), products of microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, exert multiple metabolic effects in cells. Previously, we had demonstrated that soluble fiber influenced fat mass accumulation, gut microbial community structure and SCFA production in pigs. The current study was designed to identify effects of SCFA treatment during adipogenic differentiation of porcine stromovascular cells on lipid metabolism and adipokine expression. Differentiating cells were treated with varying concentrations of butyrate. Results show that butyrate treatment enhanced adipogenesis and lipid accumulation, perhaps through upregulation of glucose uptake and de novo lipogenesis and other mechanisms that include induction of SREBP-1c, C/EBPα/β, GLUT4, LPL, PPARγ, GPAT4, DGAT1 and DGAT2 expression. In addition, butyrate induced adiponectin expression, resulting in activation of downstream target genes, such as AMPK and AKT. Activation of AMPK by butyrate led to phosphorylation of ACC. Although increased ACO gene expression was seen with butyrate treatment, experiments with the peroxisomal fatty acid inhibitor, thioridazine, suggest that butyrate may have an inhibitory effect on peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Our studies also provide evidence that butyrate may inhibit lipolysis, perhaps in an FFAR3-dependent manner. Therefore, this study presents a novel paradigm for butyrate action in adipocytes and shows that adipocytes are capable of utilizing butyrate, leading to increased expression of adiponectin for enhanced glucose uptake and improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:26713737

  13. Mechanism of Butyrate Stimulation of Triglyceride Storage and Adipokine Expression during Adipogenic Differentiation of Porcine Stromovascular Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yan

    Full Text Available Short chain fatty acids (SCFA, products of microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, exert multiple metabolic effects in cells. Previously, we had demonstrated that soluble fiber influenced fat mass accumulation, gut microbial community structure and SCFA production in pigs. The current study was designed to identify effects of SCFA treatment during adipogenic differentiation of porcine stromovascular cells on lipid metabolism and adipokine expression. Differentiating cells were treated with varying concentrations of butyrate. Results show that butyrate treatment enhanced adipogenesis and lipid accumulation, perhaps through upregulation of glucose uptake and de novo lipogenesis and other mechanisms that include induction of SREBP-1c, C/EBPα/β, GLUT4, LPL, PPARγ, GPAT4, DGAT1 and DGAT2 expression. In addition, butyrate induced adiponectin expression, resulting in activation of downstream target genes, such as AMPK and AKT. Activation of AMPK by butyrate led to phosphorylation of ACC. Although increased ACO gene expression was seen with butyrate treatment, experiments with the peroxisomal fatty acid inhibitor, thioridazine, suggest that butyrate may have an inhibitory effect on peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Our studies also provide evidence that butyrate may inhibit lipolysis, perhaps in an FFAR3-dependent manner. Therefore, this study presents a novel paradigm for butyrate action in adipocytes and shows that adipocytes are capable of utilizing butyrate, leading to increased expression of adiponectin for enhanced glucose uptake and improved insulin sensitivity.

  14. Butyrate transcriptionally enhances peptide transporter PepT1 expression and activity.

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    Guillaume Dalmasso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PepT1, an intestinal epithelial apical di/tripeptide transporter, is normally expressed in the small intestine and induced in colon during chronic inflammation. This study aimed at investigating PepT1 regulation by butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced by commensal bacteria and accumulated inside inflamed colonocyte. RESULTS: We found that butyrate treatment of human intestinal epithelial Caco2-BBE cells increased human PepT1 (hPepT1 promoter activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with maximal activity observed in cells treated with 5 mM butyrate for 24 h. Under this condition, hPepT1 promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression levels were increased as assessed by luciferase assay, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. hPepT1 transport activity was accordingly increased by approximately 2.5-fold. Butyrate did not alter hPepT1 mRNA half-life indicating that butyrate acts at the transcriptional level. Molecular analyses revealed that Cdx2 is the most important transcription factor for butyrate-induced increase of hPepT1 expression and activity in Caco2-BBE cells. Butyrate-activated Cdx2 binding to hPepT1 promoter was confirmed by gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Moreover, Caco2-BBE cells overexpressing Cdx2 exhibited greater hPepT1 expression level than wild-type cells. Finally, treatment of mice with 5 mM butyrate added to drinking water for 24 h increased colonic PepT1 mRNA and protein expression levels, as well as enhanced PepT1 transport activity in colonic apical membranes vesicles. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our results demonstrate that butyrate increases PepT1 expression and activity in colonic epithelial cells, which provides a new understanding of PepT1 regulation during chronic inflammation.

  15. The neuropharmacology of butyrate: The bread and butter of the microbiota-gut-brain axis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilling, Roman M; van de Wouw, Marcel; Clarke, Gerard; Stanton, Catherine; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2016-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that brain function and behaviour are influenced by microbial metabolites. Key products of the microbiota are short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), including butyric acid. Butyrate is a functionally versatile molecule that is produced in the mammalian gut by fermentation of dietary fibre and is enriched in butter and other dairy products. Butyrate along with other fermentation-derived SCFAs (e.g. acetate, propionate) and the structurally related ketone bodies (e.g. acetoacetate and d-β-hydroxybutyrate) show promising effects in various diseases including obesity, diabetes, inflammatory (bowel) diseases, and colorectal cancer as well as neurological disorders. Indeed, it is clear that host energy metabolism and immune functions critically depend on butyrate as a potent regulator, highlighting butyrate as a key mediator of host-microbe crosstalk. In addition to specific receptors (GPR43/FFAR2; GPR41/FFAR3; GPR109a/HCAR2) and transporters (MCT1/SLC16A1; SMCT1/SLC5A8), its effects are mediated by utilisation as an energy source via the β-oxidation pathway and as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs), promoting histone acetylation and stimulation of gene expression in host cells. The latter has also led to the use of butyrate as an experimental drug in models for neurological disorders ranging from depression to neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive impairment. Here we provide a critical review of the literature on butyrate and its effects on multiple aspects of host physiology with a focus on brain function and behaviour. We find fundamental differences in natural butyrate at physiological concentrations and its use as a neuropharmacological agent at rather high, supraphysiological doses in brain research. Finally, we hypothesise that butyrate and other volatile SCFAs produced by microbes may be involved in regulating the impact of the microbiome on behaviour including social communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. Benzodiazepine augmented γ-amino-butyric acid signaling increases mortality from pneumonia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Robert D; Godlee, Alexandra; Fujimori, Toshifumi; Goulding, John; Xin, Gang; Salek-Ardakani, Samira; Snelgrove, Robert J; Ma, Daqing; Maze, Mervyn; Hussell, Tracy

    2013-07-01

    Benzodiazepines are used for treating anxiety, epilepsy, muscle spasm, alcohol withdrawal, palliation, insomnia, and sedation as they allosterically modulate γ-amino-butyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. Despite widespread use, the importance and mechanism of their immune side-effects are poorly understood. Herein we sought to elucidate the impact and mechanism of benzodiazepine-induced susceptibility to infection at anxiolytic doses in mice. Animal randomized controlled trial. Laboratory. Adult female C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. The effect of a subsedative, anxiolytic dose of diazepam (2 mg kg intraperitoneal) was investigated in a murine Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia model. Mortality, bacterial and cytokine load, cell recruitment, and intracellular pH were measured. Diazepam treatment did not affect immune homeostasis in the lung. However, diazepam increased mortality and bacterial load from S. pneumoniae pneumonia. The increases in mortality and bacterial load were reversed by a GABAA antagonist, bicuculline, indicating dependence on GABAA receptor signaling. While cell recruitment was unaltered by diazepam, the cytokine response to infection was affected, suggesting that local responses to the pathogen were perturbed. Macrophage and monocytes expressed benzodiazepine sensitive (α1-γ2) GABAA receptors. Interestingly macrophage GABAA receptor expression was regulated by bacterial toll-like receptor agonists and cytokines indicating an endogenous role in the immune response. Functionally diazepam appeared to counteract the endogenous down-regulation of GABAA signaling during infection. Consistent with augmented GABAA signaling, diazepam provoked intracellular acidosis in macrophage, leading to impaired cytokine production, bacterial phagocytosis and killing. In contrast, selective benzodiazepines that do not target the α1 GABAA subunit did not affect macrophage function ex vivo or increase susceptibility to pneumonia in vivo. Our data highlight the

  17. Conductivity-Dependent Strain Response of Carbon Nanotube Treated Bacterial Nanocellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Farjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the strain sensitivity of flexible, electrically conductive, and nanostructured cellulose which was prepared by modification of bacterial cellulose with double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The electrical conductivity depends on the modifying agent and its dispersion process. The conductivity of the samples obtained from bacterial cellulose (BNC pellicles modified with DWCNT was in the range from 0.034 S·cm−1 to 0.39 S·cm−1, and for BNC pellicles modified with MWCNTs it was from 0.12 S·cm−1 to 1.6 S·cm−1. The strain-induced electromechanical response, resistance versus strain, was monitored during the application of tensile force in order to study the sensitivity of the modified nanocellulose. A maximum gauge factor of 252 was found from the highest conductive sample treated by MWCNT. It has been observed that the sensitivity of the sample depends on the conductivity of the modified cellulose.

  18. Structure, biosynthesis, and function of bacterial capsular polysaccharides synthesized by ABC transporter-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lisa M; Whitfield, Chris

    2013-08-30

    Bacterial capsules are formed primarily from long-chain polysaccharides with repeat-unit structures. A given bacterial species can produce a range of capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) with different structures and these help distinguish isolates by serotyping, as is the case with Escherichia coli K antigens. Capsules are important virulence factors for many pathogens and this review focuses on CPSs synthesized via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent processes in Gram-negative bacteria. Bacteria utilizing this pathway are often associated with urinary tract infections, septicemia, and meningitis, and E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis provide well-studied examples. CPSs from ABC transporter-dependent pathways are synthesized at the cytoplasmic face of the inner membrane through the concerted action of glycosyltransferases before being exported across the inner membrane and translocated to the cell surface. A hallmark of these CPSs is a conserved reducing terminal glycolipid composed of phosphatidylglycerol and a poly-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) linker. Recent discovery of the structure of this conserved lipid terminus provides new insights into the early steps in CPS biosynthesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Padrig B.; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Elliott, Christopher T.; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Graham, William G.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30–60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27242335

  20. Signal-dependent turnover of the bacterial flagellar switch protein FliM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delalez, Nicolas J; Wadhams, George H; Rosser, Gabriel; Xue, Quan; Brown, Mostyn T; Dobbie, Ian M; Berry, Richard M; Leake, Mark C; Armitage, Judith P

    2010-06-22

    Most biological processes are performed by multiprotein complexes. Traditionally described as static entities, evidence is now emerging that their components can be highly dynamic, exchanging constantly with cellular pools. The bacterial flagellar motor contains approximately 13 different proteins and provides an ideal system to study functional molecular complexes. It is powered by transmembrane ion flux through a ring of stator complexes that push on a central rotor. The Escherichia coli motor switches direction stochastically in response to binding of the response regulator CheY to the rotor switch component FliM. Much is known of the static motor structure, but we are just beginning to understand the dynamics of its individual components. Here we measure the stoichiometry and turnover of FliM in functioning flagellar motors, by using high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of E. coli expressing genomically encoded YPet derivatives of FliM at physiological levels. We show that the approximately 30 FliM molecules per motor exist in two discrete populations, one tightly associated with the motor and the other undergoing stochastic turnover. This turnover of FliM molecules depends on the presence of active CheY, suggesting a potential role in the process of motor switching. In many ways the bacterial flagellar motor is as an archetype macromolecular assembly, and our results may have further implications for the functional relevance of protein turnover in other large molecular complexes.

  1. Signal-dependent turnover of the bacterial flagellar switch protein FliM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delalez, Nicolas J.; Wadhams, George H.; Rosser, Gabriel; Xue, Quan; Brown, Mostyn T.; Dobbie, Ian M.; Berry, Richard M.; Leake, Mark C.; Armitage, Judith P.

    2010-01-01

    Most biological processes are performed by multiprotein complexes. Traditionally described as static entities, evidence is now emerging that their components can be highly dynamic, exchanging constantly with cellular pools. The bacterial flagellar motor contains ∼13 different proteins and provides an ideal system to study functional molecular complexes. It is powered by transmembrane ion flux through a ring of stator complexes that push on a central rotor. The Escherichia coli motor switches direction stochastically in response to binding of the response regulator CheY to the rotor switch component FliM. Much is known of the static motor structure, but we are just beginning to understand the dynamics of its individual components. Here we measure the stoichiometry and turnover of FliM in functioning flagellar motors, by using high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of E. coli expressing genomically encoded YPet derivatives of FliM at physiological levels. We show that the ∼30 FliM molecules per motor exist in two discrete populations, one tightly associated with the motor and the other undergoing stochastic turnover. This turnover of FliM molecules depends on the presence of active CheY, suggesting a potential role in the process of motor switching. In many ways the bacterial flagellar motor is as an archetype macromolecular assembly, and our results may have further implications for the functional relevance of protein turnover in other large molecular complexes. PMID:20498085

  2. Novel Perspectives on the Characterization of Species-Dependent Optical Signatures of Bacterial Colonies by Digital Holography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Buzalewicz

    Full Text Available The use of light diffraction for the microbiological diagnosis of bacterial colonies was a significant breakthrough with widespread implications for the food industry and clinical practice. We previously confirmed that optical sensors for bacterial colony light diffraction can be used for bacterial identification. This paper is focused on the novel perspectives of this method based on digital in-line holography (DIH, which is able to reconstruct the amplitude and phase properties of examined objects, as well as the amplitude and phase patterns of the optical field scattered/diffracted by the bacterial colony in any chosen observation plane behind the object from single digital hologram. Analysis of the amplitude and phase patterns inside a colony revealed its unique optical properties, which are associated with the internal structure and geometry of the bacterial colony. Moreover, on a computational level, it is possible to select the desired scattered/diffracted pattern within the entire observation volume that exhibits the largest amount of unique, differentiating bacterial features. These properties distinguish this method from the already proposed sensing techniques based on light diffraction/scattering of bacterial colonies. The reconstructed diffraction patterns have a similar spatial distribution as the recorded Fresnel patterns, previously applied for bacterial identification with over 98% accuracy, but they are characterized by both intensity and phase distributions. Our results using digital holography provide new optical discriminators of bacterial species revealed in one single step in form of new optical signatures of bacterial colonies: digital holograms, reconstructed amplitude and phase patterns, as well as diffraction patterns from all observation space, which exhibit species-dependent features. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial colony analysis via digital holography and our study represents an

  3. Humidity-Dependent Bacterial Cells Functional Morphometry Investigations Using Atomic Force Microscope

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    Hike Nikiyan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a relative humidity (RH in a range of 93–65% on morphological and elastic properties of Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli cells was evaluated using atomic force microscopy. It is shown that gradual dehumidification of bacteria environment has no significant effect on cell dimensional features and considerably decreases them only at 65% RH. The increasing of the bacteria cell wall roughness and elasticity occurs at the same time. Observed changes indicate that morphological properties of B. cereus are rather stable in wide range of relative humidity, whereas E. coli are more sensitive to drying, significantly increasing roughness and stiffness parameters at RH ≤ 84% RH. It is discussed the dependence of the response features on differences in cell wall structure of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells.

  4. [Effect of dietary fiber in the quantitative expression of butyrate receptor GPR43 in rats colon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte Osorio, L Y; Martínez Flores, H E; Ortiz Alvarado, R

    2011-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, propionate and butyrate are the major anions produced by the bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber (DF) in colon. Recently, butyrate has been recently studied because is important to maintain colonic functions and because it has been related with a protective effect in colorectal cancer, which is mainly, explained by its potential to regulate gene expression by inhibiting enzyme histonedeacetylase (HDAC). Several investigationsshown that SCFAreceptor GPR43 is involved insignal transduction mechanisms once they bind to ligands such as butyrate to generate different physiological effects in colonocytes. Determine if dietary fiber consumption from nopal (Opuntia ficus I.) containing a ratio of soluble-insoluble fiber 40/60, has a direct influence on the quantitative expression of butyrate-specific receptor GPR43. Wistar rats were fed with four different diets formulated at different concentrations of dietary fiber of 0, 5, 15 and 25% of dietary fiber from opuntia, respectively. The results shown an increase in the expression of GPR43 (93.1%) when rats was fed with a 5% fiber diet, using β-actin as a reference gene. The results of this investigation will contribute to determinate the relation of diet with intestinal health for the purpose of expanding the knowledge of butyric acid on colonic functions.

  5. IL-1 Receptor Regulates S100A8/A9-Dependent Keratinocyte Resistance to Bacterial Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, BS; Khammanivong, A; Guenther, BD; Ross, KF; Herzberg, MC

    2012-01-01

    Previously we reported that epithelial cells respond to exogenous IL-1α by increasing expression of several genes involved in the host response to microbes, including the antimicrobial protein complex calprotectin (S100A8/A9). Given that S100A8/A9 protects epithelial cells against invading bacteria, we studied whether IL-1α augments S100A8/A9-dependent resistance to bacterial invasion of oral keratinocytes. When inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes, human buccal epithelial (TR146) cells expressed and released IL-1α. Subsequently, IL-1α-containing media from Listeria-infected cells increased S100A8/A9 gene expression in naïve TR146 cells an IL-1 receptor (IL-1R)-dependent manner. Incubation with exogenous IL-1α decreased Listeria invasion into TR146 cells, whereas invasion increased with IL-1R antagonist. Conversely, when S100A8/A9 genes were knocked down using shRNA, TR146 cells responded to exogenous IL-1α with increased intracellular bacteria. These data strongly suggest that infected epithelial cells release IL-1α to signal neighboring keratinocytes in a paracrine manner, promoting S100A8/A9-dependent resistance to invasive L. monocytogenes. PMID:22031183

  6. Antagonistic Effects of Sodium Butyrate and N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl-retinamide on Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Kuefer

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Butyrates and retinoids are promising antineoplastic agents. Here we analyzed effects of sodium butyrate and N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-retinamide (4-HPR on prostate cancer cells as monotherapy or in combination in vitro and in vivo. Sodium butyrate and 4-HPR induced concentration-dependent growth inhibition in prostate cancer cells in vitro. The isobologram analysis revealed that sodium butyrate and 4-HPR administered together antagonize effects of each other. For the in vivo studies, a water-soluble complex (4-HPR with a cyclodextrin was created. A single dose of sodium butyrate and 4-HPR showed a peak level in chicken plasma within 30 minutes. Both compounds induced inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis in xenografts of the chicken chorioallantoic membrane. Analysis of the cytotoxic effects of the drugs used in combination demonstrated an antagonistic effect on inhibition of proliferation and on induction of apoptosis. Prolonged jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation induced by sodium butyrate and 4-HPR was strongly attenuated when both compounds were used in combination. Both compounds induced inhibition of NF-κ,B. This effect was strongly antagonized in LNCaP cells when the compounds were used in combination. These results indicate that combinational therapies have to be carefully investigated due to potential antagonistic effects in the clinical setting despite promising results of a monotherapy.

  7. Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism in a thermophilic, anaerobic, butyrate-degrading triculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahring, B K; Westermann, P

    1987-02-01

    Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism were determined with butyrate-limited, chemostat-grown tricultures of a thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium together with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic rod. Kinetic parameters were determined from progress curves fitted to the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. The apparent half-saturation constants, K(m), for butyrate, acetate, and dissolved hydrogen were 76 muM, 0.4 mM, and 8.5 muM, respectively. Butyrate and hydrogen were metabolized to a concentration of less than 1 muM, whereas acetate uptake usually ceased at a concentration of 25 to 75 muM, indicating a threshold level for acetate uptake. No significant differences in K(m) values for butyrate degradation were found between chemostat- and batch-grown tricultures, although the maximum growth rate was somewhat higher in the batch cultures in which the medium was supplemented with yeast extract. Acetate utilization was found to be the rate-limiting reaction for complete degradation of butyrate to methane and carbon dioxide in continuous culture. Increasing the dilution rate resulted in a gradual accumulation of acetate. The results explain the low concentrations of butyrate and hydrogen normally found during anaerobic digestion and the observation that acetate is the first volatile fatty acid to accumulate upon a decrease in retention time or increase in organic loading of a digestor.

  8. Severe bacterial infections in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: prevalence and clinical risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattiya Teawtrakul

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients with NTDT was found to be moderate. Time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and iron overload may be clinical risk factors for severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. Bacterial infection should be recognized in splenectomized patients with NTDT, particularly those who have an iron overload.

  9. Bacterial diversity associated with the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis sp. complex determined by culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Ryota; Iehata, Shunpei; Nakano, Miyo; Tanaka, Reiji; Yoshimatsu, Takao; Maeda, Hiroto

    2012-03-01

    The bacterial communities associated with rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis sp. complex) and their culture water were determined using culture-dependent and -independent methods (16S rRNA gene clone library). The bacterial communities determined by the culture-independent method were more diverse than those determined by the culture-dependent method. Although the culture-dependent method indicated the bacterial community of rotifers was relatively similar to that of the culture water, 16S rRNA gene clone library analyses revealed a great difference between the two microbiotas. Our results suggest that most bacteria associated with rotifers are not easily cultured using conventional methods, and that the microbiota of rotifers do not correspond with that of the culture water completely.

  10. Poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid interaction with the transgenic flax fibers: FT-IR and Raman spectra of the composite extracted from a GM flax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Żuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan; Dymińska, Lucyna; Mączka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy

    2009-07-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman studies have been performed on commercial 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, commercial poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid as well as poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid (PHB) produced by bacteria. The data were compared to those obtained for poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid extracted from natural and genetically modified flax. Genetically modified flax was generated by expression of three bacterial genes coding for synthesis of poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid. Thus transgenic flaxes were enhanced with different amount of the PHB. The discussion of polymer structure and vibrational properties has been done in order to get insight into differences among these materials. The interaction between the cellulose of flax fibers and embedded poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid has been also discussed. The spectroscopic data provide evidences for structural changes in cellulose and in PHB when synthesized in fibers. Based on this data it is suggesting that cellulose and PHB interact by hydrogen and ester bonds.

  11. Effect of sodium butyrate on cell proliferation and cell cycle in porcine intestinal epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yueqin; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen; Wang, Li; Jiang, Zongyong

    2017-04-01

    Conflicting results have been reported that butyrate in normal piglets leads either to an increase or to a decrease of jejunal villus length, implying a possible effect on the proliferation of enterocytes. No definitive study was found for the biological effects of butyrate in porcine jejunal epithelial cells. The present study used IPEC-J2 cells, a non-transformed jejunal epithelial line to evaluate the direct effects of sodium butyrate on cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. Low concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM) of butyrate had no effect on cell proliferation. However, at 5 and 10 mM, sodium butyrate significantly decreased cell viability, accompanied by reduced levels of p-mTOR and PCNA protein. Sodium butyrate, in a dose-dependent manner, induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and reduced the numbers of cells in S phase. In addition, relative expression of p21, p27, and pro-apoptosis bak genes, and protein levels of p21Waf1/Cip1, p27Kip1, cyclinD3, CDK4, and Cleave-caspase3 were increased by higher concentrations of sodium butyrate (1, 5, 10 mM), and the levels of cyclinD1 and CDK6 were reduced by 5 and 10 mM butyrate. Butyrate increased the phosphorylated form of the signaling molecule p38 and phosphorylated JNK. In conclusion, the present in vitro study indicated that sodium butyrate inhibited the proliferation of IPEC-J2 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase of cell cycles and by increasing apoptosis at high concentrations.

  12. Interleukin-15 promotes intestinal dysbiosis with butyrate deficiency associated with increased susceptibility to colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Marlies; Mayassi, Toufic; Fehlner-Peach, Hannah; Koval, Jason C; O'Brien, Sarah L; Hinterleitner, Reinhard; Lesko, Kathryn; Kim, Sangman; Bouziat, Romain; Chen, Li; Weber, Christopher R; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Jabri, Bana; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A

    2017-01-01

    Dysbiosis resulting in gut-microbiome alterations with reduced butyrate production are thought to disrupt intestinal immune homeostasis and promote complex immune disorders. However, whether and how dysbiosis develops before the onset of overt pathology remains poorly defined. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is upregulated in distressed tissue and its overexpression is thought to predispose susceptible individuals to and have a role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although the immunological roles of IL-15 have been largely studied, its potential impact on the microbiota remains unexplored. Analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA-based inventories of bacterial communities in mice overexpressing IL-15 in the intestinal epithelium (villin-IL-15 transgenic (v-IL-15tg) mice) shows distinct changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria. Although some alterations are specific to individual intestinal compartments, others are found across the ileum, cecum and feces. In particular, IL-15 overexpression restructures the composition of the microbiota with a decrease in butyrate-producing bacteria that is associated with a reduction in luminal butyrate levels across all intestinal compartments. Fecal microbiota transplant experiments of wild-type and v-IL-15tg microbiota into germ-free mice further indicate that diminishing butyrate concentration observed in the intestinal lumen of v-IL-15tg mice is the result of intrinsic alterations in the microbiota induced by IL-15. This reconfiguration of the microbiota is associated with increased susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Altogether, this study reveals that IL-15 impacts butyrate-producing bacteria and lowers butyrate levels in the absence of overt pathology, which represent events that precede and promote intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  13. Bacterial Suppression of RNA Polymerase II-Dependent Host Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Ambite

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU is a bacterial carrier state in the urinary tract that resembles commensalism at other mucosal sites. ABU strains often lack the virulence factors that characterize uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli strains and therefore elicit weak innate immune responses in the urinary tract. In addition, ABU strains are active modifiers of the host environment, which they influence by suppressing RNA polymerase II (Pol II-dependent host gene expression. In patients inoculated with the ABU strain E. coli 83972, gene expression was markedly reduced after 24 h (>60% of all regulated genes. Specific repressors and activators of Pol II-dependent transcription were modified, and Pol II Serine 2 phosphorylation was significantly inhibited, indicating reduced activity of the polymerase. This active inhibition included disease–associated innate immune response pathways, defined by TLR4, IRF-3 and IRF-7, suggesting that ABU strains persist in human hosts by active suppression of the antibacterial defense. In a search for the mechanism of inhibition, we compared the whole genome sequences of E. coli 83972 and the uropathogenic strain E. coli CFT073. In addition to the known loss of virulence genes, we observed that the ABU strain has acquired several phages and identified the lytic Prophage 3 as a candidate Pol II inhibitor. Intact phage particles were released by ABU during in vitro growth in human urine. To address if Prophage 3 affects Pol II activity, we constructed a Prophage 3 negative deletion mutant in E. coli 83972 and compared the effect on Pol II phosphorylation between the mutant and the E. coli 83972 wild type (WT strains. No difference was detected, suggesting that the Pol II inhibitor is not encoded by the phage. The review summarizes the evidence that the ABU strain E. coli 83972 modifies host gene expression by inhibition of Pol II phosphorylation, and discusses the ability of ABU strains to actively create an

  14. Propolis augments apoptosis induced by butyrate via targeting cell survival pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Drago

    Full Text Available Diet is one of the major lifestyle factors affecting incidence of colorectal cancer (CC, and despite accumulating evidence that numerous diet-derived compounds modulate CC incidence, definitive dietary recommendations are not available. We propose a strategy that could facilitate the design of dietary supplements with CC-preventive properties. Thus, nutrient combinations that are a source of apoptosis-inducers and inhibitors of compensatory cell proliferation pathways (e.g., AKT signaling may produce high levels of programmed death in CC cells. Here we report the combined effect of butyrate, an apoptosis inducer that is produced through fermentation of fiber in the colon, and propolis, a honeybee product, on CC cells. We established that propolis increases the apoptosis of CC cells exposed to butyrate through suppression of cell survival pathways such as the AKT signaling. The programmed death of CC cells by combined exposure to butyrate and propolis is further augmented by inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway. Analyses on the contribution of the downstream targets of JNK signaling, c-JUN and JAK/STAT, to the apoptosis of butyrate/propolis-treated CC cells ascertained that JAK/STAT signaling has an anti-apoptotic role; whereas, the role of cJUN might be dependent upon regulatory cell factors. Thus, our studies ascertained that propolis augments apoptosis of butyrate-sensitive CC cells and re-sensitizes butyrate-resistant CC cells to apoptosis by suppressing AKT signaling and downregulating the JAK/STAT pathway. Future in vivo studies should evaluate the CC-preventive potential of a dietary supplement that produces high levels of colonic butyrate, propolis, and diet-derived JAK/STAT inhibitors.

  15. Propolis Augments Apoptosis Induced by Butyrate via Targeting Cell Survival Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Eric; Bordonaro, Michael; Lee, Seon; Atamna, Wafa; Lazarova, Darina L.

    2013-01-01

    Diet is one of the major lifestyle factors affecting incidence of colorectal cancer (CC), and despite accumulating evidence that numerous diet-derived compounds modulate CC incidence, definitive dietary recommendations are not available. We propose a strategy that could facilitate the design of dietary supplements with CC-preventive properties. Thus, nutrient combinations that are a source of apoptosis-inducers and inhibitors of compensatory cell proliferation pathways (e.g., AKT signaling) may produce high levels of programmed death in CC cells. Here we report the combined effect of butyrate, an apoptosis inducer that is produced through fermentation of fiber in the colon, and propolis, a honeybee product, on CC cells. We established that propolis increases the apoptosis of CC cells exposed to butyrate through suppression of cell survival pathways such as the AKT signaling. The programmed death of CC cells by combined exposure to butyrate and propolis is further augmented by inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway. Analyses on the contribution of the downstream targets of JNK signaling, c-JUN and JAK/STAT, to the apoptosis of butyrate/propolis-treated CC cells ascertained that JAK/STAT signaling has an anti-apoptotic role; whereas, the role of cJUN might be dependent upon regulatory cell factors. Thus, our studies ascertained that propolis augments apoptosis of butyrate-sensitive CC cells and re-sensitizes butyrate-resistant CC cells to apoptosis by suppressing AKT signaling and downregulating the JAK/STAT pathway. Future in vivo studies should evaluate the CC-preventive potential of a dietary supplement that produces high levels of colonic butyrate, propolis, and diet-derived JAK/STAT inhibitors. PMID:24023824

  16. Changes of Bacterial Diversity Depend on the Spoilage of Fresh Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hwan Lee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Almost 10~30% of vegetables were discarded by the spoilage from farms to tables. After harvest, vegetables are often spoiled by a wide variety of microorganisms including many bacterial and fungal species. This investigation was conducted to extent the knowledge of relationship the spoilage of vegetables and the diversity of microbes. The total aerobic bacterial numbers in fresh lettuce, perilla leaf, and chicory were 2.6~2.7×106, 4.6×105, 1.2×106 CFU/g of fresh weight, respectively. The most common bacterial species were Pseudomonas spp., Alysiella spp., and Burkholderia spp., and other 18 more genera were involved in. After one week of incubation of those vegetables at 28℃, the microbial diversity had been changed. The total aerobic bacterial numbers increased to 1.1~4.6×108, 4.9×107, and 7.6×108 CFU/g of fresh weight for lettuce, perilla leaf, and chicory that is about 102 times increased bacterial numbers than that before spoilage. However, the diversity of microbes isolated had been simplified and fewer bacterial species had been isolated. The most bacterial population (~48% was taken up by Pseudomonas spp., and followed by Arthrobacter spp. and Bacillus spp. The spoilage activity of individual bacterial isolates had been tested using axenic lettuce plants. Among tested isolates, Pseudomonas fluorescence and Pantoea agglomerans caused severe spoilage on lettuce.

  17. Comparative genomics and physiology of the butyrate-producing bacterium Intestinimonas butyriciproducens

    OpenAIRE

    Nam Bui, Thi Phuong; Shetty, Sudarshan; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Ritari, Jarmo; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Douillard, Francois; Paulin, Lars Göran; Piironen, Vieno; Clavel, Thomas; Plugge, Caroline M.; de Vos, Willem Meindert

    2016-01-01

    Intestinimonas is a newly described bacterial genus with representative strains present in the intestinal tract of human and other animals. Despite unique metabolic features including the production of butyrate from both sugars and amino acids, there is to date no data on their diversity, ecology, and physiology. Using a comprehensive phylogenetic approach, Intestinimomas was found to include at least three species that colonize primarily the human and mouse intestine. We focused on the most ...

  18. Detection and molecular characterization of butyrate-producing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Butyrate-producing gut microflora synthesizes and secretes butyrate which serves as source of energy and stimulates rumen development in young animals. ... screen butyrate-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) for probiotic use in animals in order to manipulate their gut flora for the benefit of host health and productivity.

  19. Effect of butyrate and Lactobacillus GG on a butyrate receptor and transporter during Campylobacter jejuni exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresci, Gail A M; Mayor, Paul C; Thompson, Stuart A

    2017-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni frequently infects humans causing many gastrointestinal symptoms, fever, fatigue and several long-term debilitating diseases. Current treatment for campylobacteriosis includes rehydration and in some cases, antibiotic therapy. Probiotics are used to treat several gastrointestinal diseases. Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid known to promote intestinal health. Interaction of butyrate with its respective receptor (HCAR2) and transporter (SLC5A8), both expressed in the intestine, is associated with water and electrolyte absorption as well as providing defense against colon cancer and inflammation. Alterations in gut microbiota influence the presence of HCAR2 and SLC5A8 in the intestine. We hypothesized that adherence and/or invasion of C. jejuni and alterations in HCAR2 and SLC5A8 expression would be minimized with butyrate or Lactobacillus GG (LGG) pretreatment of Caco-2 cells. We found that both C. jejuni adhesion but not invasion was reduced with butyrate pretreatment. While LGG pretreatment did not prevent C. jejuni adhesion, it did result in reduced invasion which was associated with altered cell supernate pH. Both butyrate and LGG protected HCAR2 and SLC5A8 protein expression following C. jejuni infection. These results suggest that the first stages of C. jejuni infection of Caco-2 cells may be minimized by LGG and butyrate pretreatment. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Dependence of Bacterial Magnetosome Morphology on Chemical Conditions in Deep-sea Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawamura, N.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) should play an important role for biogeochemical cycles of iron. MTB are considered to be microaerophilic and most commonly live near or below the oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ). However, common occurrence of magnetofossils in Pacific red clay (Yamazaki & Shimono, 2013), which contains abundant dissolved oxygen and does not have an OATZ, may conflict with the widespread interpretations of the ecology of MTB. For better understanding of the ecology in deep-sea sediments, we conducted rock-magnetic, biogeochemical, and microbiological analyses of Japan Sea surface sediments with an OATZ. Rock magnetic proxies and TEM images indicate that magnetofossils occur throughout the sediment columns regardless of the OATZ, even at the sediment-water interface. The proportion of magnetofossils with teardrop morphology increases near the OATZ. These suggest that some species producing teardrop magnetosomes prefer a chemical condition near the OATZ, whereas other species may live in microaerophilic microenvironments around organic particles near the sediment-water interface. The fact that morphology of magnetofossils in Pacific red clay is >90% octahedral suggests that even some species of MTB that yield octahedral magnetosomes might be aerotolerant and prefer oxic environments. To strengthen the notion above, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences was conducted for the corresponding sediments. Among diverse bacterial lineages known to produce magnetosomes, 16S rRNA gene sequences phylogenetically affiliated within the lineage of Nitrospirae known to produce teardrop magnetosomes were distributed only around the OATZ, whereas those affiliated within the family Rhodospirillaceae (α-Proteobacteria) and known to produce octahedral magnetosomes were distributed in all investigated Japan Sea sediments regardless of the OATZ. It is strongly suggested that the dependency on the OATZ is different among phylogenetically and morphologically diverse MTB.

  1. Hearing impairment after childhood bacterial meningitis dependent on etiology in Luanda, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Mariia; Pelkonen, Tuula; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Peltola, Heikki; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Childhood bacterial meningitis (BM) damages hearing, but the potential of different agents to cause impairment in developing countries is poorly understood. We compared the extent of hearing impairment in BM caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Streptococcus pneumoniae or Neisseria meningitidis among children aged 2 months to 13 years in Luanda, Angola. Hearing of 685 ears of 351 (78%) survivors among 723 enrolled patients was tested by brainstem-evoked response audiometry on day 7 of hospitalization. The causative agent was sought by cerebrospinal fluid culture, PCR or the latex-agglutination test. Altogether, 45 (12%) of the survivors were deaf (threshold >80 dB), and 20 (6%) had a threshold of 80 dB. The incidence of any kind of hearing loss, with ≥60 dB, was 34% with Hib, 30% with S. pneumoniae, 19% with N. meningitidis and 33% with other bacteria. Examining all ears combined and using the ≥60 dB threshold, the agents showed dissimilar harm (P=0.005), Hib being the most frequent and N. meningitidis the most infrequent cause. Compared to other agents, S. pneumoniae more often caused deafness (P=0.025) and hearing impairment at ≥60 dB (P=0.017) in infants, whereas this level of hearing loss in older survivors was most commonly caused by Hib (P=0.031). BM among children in Angola is often followed by hearing impairment, but the risk depends on the agent. S. pneumoniae is a major problem among infants, whereas Hib is mainly a risk beyond 12 months. N. meningitidis impairs hearing less frequently. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sodium butyrate down-regulates tristetraprolin-mediated cyclin B1 expression independent of the formation of processing bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiang-Tao; Xiao, Xiao-Qiang; Dai, Ju-Ji

    2015-12-01

    Butyrate regulates multiple host cellular events including the cell cycle; however, little is known about the molecular mechanism by which butyrate induces a global down-regulation of the expression of genes associated with the cell cycle. Here, we demonstrate that treating HEK293T cells and the non-small-cell lung cancer cell line A549 with a high concentration of sodium butyrate reduces cyclin B1 expression. The underlying mechanism is related to the destabilization of its mRNA by tristetraprolin, which is up-regulated in response to sodium butyrate. Specifically, the sodium butyrate stimulation reduces the mRNA and protein expression of cyclin B1 and, conversely, upregulates tristetraprolin expression. Importantly, the overexpression of tristetraprolin in HEK293T decreases the mRNA and protein expression of cyclin B1; in contrast, knockdown of tristetraprolin mediated by small interfering RNA increases its expression in response to sodium butyrate treatment for both HEK293T and A549 cells. Furthermore, results from luciferase reporter assays and RNA immunoprecipitation indicate that sodium butyrate accelerates 3' UTR-dependent cyclin B1 decay by enhancing the binding of tristetraprolin to the 3' untranslated region of cyclin B1. Surprisingly, the overexpression of tristetraprolin prevents the formation of processing bodies, and the siRNA-mediated silencing of EDC4 does not restore the sodium butyrate-induced reduction of cyclin B1 expression. Thus, we confirm that NaBu regulates ZFP36-mediated cyclin B1 expression in a manner that is independent of the formation of P-bodies. The above findings disclose a novel mechanism of sodium butyrate-mediated gene expression regulation and might benefit its application in tumor treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced butyrate formation by cross-feeding between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Covian, David; Gueimonde, Miguel; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; de los Reyes-Gavilan, Clara G

    2015-11-01

    Cross-feeding is an important metabolic interaction mechanism of bacterial groups inhabiting the human colon and includes features such as the utilization of acetate by butyrate-producing bacteria as may occur between Bifidobacterium and Faecalibacterium genera. In this study, we assessed the utilization of different carbon sources (glucose, starch, inulin and fructooligosaccharides) by strains of both genera and selected the best suited combinations for evidencing this cross-feeding phenomenon. Co-cultures of Bifidobacterium adolescentis L2-32 with Faecalibacterium prausnitzii S3/L3 with fructooligosaccharides as carbon source, as well as with F. prausnitzii A2-165 in starch, were carried out and the production of short-chain fatty acids was determined. In both co-cultures, acetate levels decreased between 8 and 24 h of incubation and were lower than in the corresponding B. adolescentis monocultures. In contrast, butyrate concentrations were higher in co-cultures as compared to the respective F. prausnitzii monocultures, indicating enhanced formation of butyrate by F. prausnitzii in the presence of the bifidobacteria. Variations in the levels of acetate and butyrate were more pronounced in the co-culture with fructooligosaccharides than with starch. Our results provide a clear demonstration of cross-feeding between B. adolescentis and F. prausnitzii. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Bacterial communities in fish sauce mash using culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Youhei; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Shozen, Kei-ichi; Funatsu, Yasuhiro; Takano, Takashi; Oikawa, Hiroshi; Yano, Yutaka; Satomi, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    In fish sauce production, microorganisms are associated with the fermentation process; however, the sequential changes in the bacterial communities have never been examined throughout the period of fermentation. In this study, we determined the bacterial floras in a fish sauce mash over 8 months, using three different culture media and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. During the first 4 weeks, viable counts of non-halophilic and halophilic bacteria decreased and were dominated by Staphylococcus species. Between 4 and 6 weeks, halophilic and highly halophilic bacterial counts markedly increased from 10(7) to 10(8) cfu/g, and the predominant species changed to Tetragenococcus halophilus. The occurrence of T. halophilus was associated with an increase of lactic acid and a reduction of pH values. In contrast, non-halophilic bacterial counts decreased to 10(6) cfu/g by 6 weeks with Bacillus subtilis as the dominant isolate. Clone library analysis revealed that the dominant bacterial group also changed from Staphylococcus spp. to T. halophilus, and the changes were consistent with those of the floras of halophilic and highly halophilic isolates. This is the first report describing a combination approach of culture and clone library methods for the analysis of bacterial communities in fish sauce mash.

  5. Comparative analysis of bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere of tomato by culture-dependent and -independent approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin Ae; Park, Jiyoung; Chu, Bora; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Joa, Jae-Ho; Sang, Mee Kyung; Song, Jaekyeong; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2016-12-01

    The microbiome in the rhizosphere-the region surrounding plant roots-plays a key role in plant growth and health, enhancing nutrient availability and protecting plants from biotic and abiotic stresses. To assess bacterial diversity in the tomato rhizosphere, we performed two contrasting approaches: culture-dependent and -independent. In the culture-dependent approach, two culture media (Reasoner's 2A agar and soil extract agar) were supplemented with 12 antibiotics for isolating diverse bacteria from the tomato rhizosphere by inhibiting predominant bacteria. A total of 689 bacterial isolates were clustered into 164 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 97% sequence similarity, and these were found to belong to five bacterial phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, and Firmicutes). Of these, 122 OTUs were retrieved from the antibiotic-containing media, and 80 OTUs were recovered by one specific antibiotic-containing medium. In the culture-independent approach, we conducted Illumina MiSeq amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and obtained 19,215 high-quality sequences, which clustered into 478 OTUs belonging to 16 phyla. Among the total OTUs from the MiSeq dataset, 22% were recovered in the culture collection, whereas 41% of OTUs in the culture collection were not captured by MiSeq sequencing. These results showed that antibiotics were effective in isolating various taxa that were not readily isolated on antibiotic-free media, and that both contrasting approaches provided complementary information to characterize bacterial diversity in the tomato rhizosphere.

  6. Developmental trajectories of amphibian microbiota: response to bacterial therapy depends on initial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Leyla R; Bigler, Laurent; Woodhams, Douglas C

    2017-04-01

    Improving host health through microbial manipulation requires untangling factors that shape the microbiome. There is currently little understanding of how initial community structure may drive the microbiota trajectory across host development or influence bacterial therapy outcomes. Probiotic baths of surface symbionts, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Flavobacterium johnsoniae were administered to 240 tadpoles of the midwife toad, Alytes obstetricans in semi-natural outdoor mesocosms originating from geographically and genetically distinct populations in Switzerland. Host bacterial and fungal assemblages were compared in tadpoles from the pond of origin, across metamorphosis, and in toadlets via microbial fingerprinting. Bacterial and fungal community structures differed significantly among populations and a microbial population signature persisted from the tadpole stage, through metamorphosis, and following probiotic treatment. A minimal core surface microbiota is described by persistence through development and by shared membership across populations. The impact of F. johnsoniae on the tadpole surface microbiome was assessed with shotgun metagenomics. Bacterial therapy reduced abundance, diversity, and functional repertoire compared to untreated controls. A correlation between host skin peptides and microbiota suggests a mechanism of host-directed symbiosis throughout development. Early developmental stages are ideal targets for amphibian bacterial therapy that can govern a microbiome trajectory at critical timepoints and may impact susceptibility to disease. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Loss of the DNA Damage Repair Kinase ATM Impairs Inflammasome-Dependent Anti-Bacterial Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erttmann, Saskia F; Härtlova, Anetta; Sloniecka, Marta; Raffi, Faizal A M; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Edgren, Tomas; Rofougaran, Reza; Resch, Ulrike; Fällman, Maria; Ek, Torben; Gekara, Nelson O

    2016-07-19

    The ATM kinase is a central component of the DNA damage repair machinery and redox balance. ATM dysfunction results in the multisystem disease ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). A major cause of mortality in AT is respiratory bacterial infections. Whether ATM deficiency causes innate immune defects that might contribute to bacterial infections is not known. Here we have shown that loss of ATM impairs inflammasome-dependent anti-bacterial innate immunity. Cells from AT patients or Atm(-/-) mice exhibited diminished interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in response to bacteria. In vivo, Atm(-/-) mice were more susceptible to pulmonary S. pneumoniae infection in a manner consistent with inflammasome defects. Our data indicate that such defects were due to oxidative inhibition of inflammasome complex assembly. This study reveals an unanticipated function of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in negative regulation of inflammasomes and proposes a theory for the notable susceptibility of AT patients to pulmonary bacterial infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of dietary supplementation with butyrate and probiotic on the survival of Pacific white shrimp after challenge with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norha Constanza Bolívar Ramírez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the performance, immunology, and survival of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei to experimental challenge to Vibrio alginolyticus based on the use of the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum and the combined use of probiotic and butyrate. Four different diets resulted from the addition of additives: butyrate, probiotic, butyrate + probiotic, and control (no additives. The attractiveness of the diets was assessed by the percentage of positive choices and rejections, using a dual-choice Y-maze format aquarium. The shrimps were fed during four weeks and performance parameters, intestinal microbiota, and immunological parameters were all evaluated. Subsequently, the shrimps were challenged with V. alginolyticus and after 48 h, survival and immunological parameters were evaluated. The results showed increased attractiveness and intake, but only with diets supplemented with sodium butyrate. However, other diets were not rejected. No difference in performance or immunological parameters was observed among the different diets. Also, among the treatments, no difference in Vibrio spp., or total heterotrophic bacteria counts, was found in the intestinal tract. However, the lactic acid bacteria count was higher in the intestinal tract of shrimps fed diets supplemented with probiotic. After bacterial challenge, shrimp fed all diets had a greater survival when compared with the control group. Lactobacillus plantarum and sodium butyrate increase the resistance of shrimp to infection with V. alginolyticus, but do so without affecting performance, immunological parameters, or Vibrio spp., and total heterotrophic bacteria counts in the intestinal tract.

  9. Thermophilic Anaerobic Degradation of Butyrate by a Butyrate-Utilizing Bacterium in Coculture and Triculture with Methanogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahring, Birgitte K.; Westermann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    We studied syntrophic butyrate degradation in thermophilic mixed cultures containing a butyrate-degrading bacterium isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum or in triculture with M. thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic bacterium. Butyrate was β-oxidized to acetate with protons as the electron acceptors. Acetate was used concurrently with its production in the triculture. We found a higher butyrate degradation rate in the triculture, in which both hydrogen and acetate were utilized, than in the coculture, in which acetate accumulated. Yeast extract, rumen fluid, and clarified digestor fluid stimulated butyrate degradation, while the effect of Trypticase was less pronounced. Penicillin G, d-cycloserine, and vancomycin caused complete inhibition of butyrate utilization by the cultures. No growth or degradation of butyrate occurred when 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid or chloroform, specific inhibitors of methanogenic bacteria, was added to the cultures and common electron acceptors such as sulfate, nitrate, and fumarate were not used with butyrate as the electron donor. Addition of hydrogen or oxygen to the gas phase immediately stopped growth and butyrate degradation by the cultures. Butyrate was, however, metabolized at approximately the same rate when hydrogen was removed from the cultures and was metabolized at a reduced rate in the cultures previously exposed to hydrogen. Images PMID:16347292

  10. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses of substrate-dependent bacterial temporal dynamics in microbial fuel cells.

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    Husen Zhang

    Full Text Available Understanding the microbial community structure and genetic potential of anode biofilms is key to improve extracellular electron transfers in microbial fuel cells. We investigated effect of substrate and temporal dynamics of anodic biofilm communities using phylogenetic and metagenomic approaches in parallel with electrochemical characterizations. The startup non-steady state anodic bacterial structures were compared for a simple substrate, acetate, and for a complex substrate, landfill leachate, using a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell. Principal coordinate analysis showed that distinct community structures were formed with each substrate type. The bacterial diversity measured as Shannon index decreased with time in acetate cycles, and was restored with the introduction of leachate. The change of diversity was accompanied by an opposite trend in the relative abundance of Geobacter-affiliated phylotypes, which were acclimated to over 40% of total Bacteria at the end of acetate-fed conditions then declined in the leachate cycles. The transition from acetate to leachate caused a decrease in output power density from 243±13 mW/m2 to 140±11 mW/m2, accompanied by a decrease in Coulombic electron recovery from 18±3% to 9±3%. The leachate cycles selected protein-degrading phylotypes within phylum Synergistetes. Metagenomic shotgun sequencing showed that leachate-fed communities had higher cell motility genes including bacterial chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, and increased gene abundance related to metal resistance, antibiotic resistance, and quorum sensing. These differentially represented genes suggested an altered anodic biofilm community in response to additional substrates and stress from the complex landfill leachate.

  11. Synthesis and Ionic Conductivity of Siloxane Based Polymer Electrolytes with Propyl Butyrate Pendant Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalagonia, Natia; Tatrishvili, Tamara; Markarashvili, Eliza; Aneli, Jimsher; Mukbaniani, Omar [Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia); Grazulevicius, Jouzas Vidas [Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2016-02-15

    Hydrosilylation reactions of 2.4.6.8-tetrahydro-2.4.6.8-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane with allyl butyrate catalyzed by Karstedt's, H2PtCl6 and Pt/C catalyst were studied and 2.4.6.8-tetra (propyl butyrate)-2.4.6.8-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane was obtained. The reaction order, activation energies and rate constants were determined. Ringopening polymerization of 2.4.6.8-tetra (propyl butyrate)-2.4.6.8-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane in the presence of CaF2, LiF, KF and anhydrous potassium hydroxide in 60-70 .deg. C temperature range was carried out and methylsiloxane oligomers with regular arrangement of propyl butyrate pendant groups were obtained. The synthesized products were studied by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. The polysiloxanes were characterized by wide-angle X-ray, gel-permeation chromatography and DSC analyses. Via sol-gel processes of oligomers doped with lithium trifluoromethylsulfonate or lithium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, solid polymer electrolyte membranes were obtained. The dependences of ionic conductivity of obtained polyelectrolytes on temperature and salt concentration were investigated, and it was shown that electric conductivity of the polymer electrolyte membranes at room temperature changed in the range 3.5x10{sup -4} - 6.4xa0{sup -7} S/cm.

  12. Equilibrium and thermodynamic parameters for heterogeneous esterification of butyric acid with methanol under microwave irradiation

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    P.N. Dange

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of methyl butyrate was investigated in a microwave irradiated batch reactor in presence of acid ion-exchange resin catalyst, amberlyst-15. Methyl ester was heterogeneously produced by the reaction between butyric acid and methanol. Effect of reaction parameters of temperature (323–343 K, catalyst loading (0–10.5% w/w, alcohol to acid ratio, M (1–5, and amount of molecular sieves added (0–13.5% w/w on conversion were studied. Equilibrium conversion of 92.6% was achieved in 60 minutes under microwave irradiation. Equilibrium constants at varied temperatures and dependency of equilibrium constant on temperature were studied. Equilibrium constant and equilibrium conversion showed increase with the increase in temperature as expected as per le-Chatelier principle. Van't Hoff plot for esterification of butyric acid was linear with negative slope indicating that reaction was endothermic. Comparative study showed that microwave irradiated method for methyl butyrate synthesis to be very efficient and fast compared with conventional and ultrasound assisted routes under optimized reaction conditions.

  13. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  14. Reductive Carboxylation of Propionate to Butyrate in Methanogenic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholozan, J. L.; Samain, E.; Grivet, J. P.; Moletta, R.; Dubourguier, H. C.; Albagnac, G.

    1988-01-01

    During the batch degradation of sodium propionate by the anaerobic sludge from an industrial digestor, we observed a significant amount of butyrate formation. Varying the initial propionate concentrations did not alter the ratio of maximal butyrate accumulation to initial propionate concentration within a large range. By measuring the decrease in the radioactivity of [1-14C]butyrate during propionate degradation, we estimated that about 20% of the propionate was converted to butyrate. Labeled butyrate was formed from [1-14C]propionate with the same specific radioactivity, suggesting a possible direct pathway from propionate to butyrate. We confirmed this hypothesis by nuclear magnetic resonance studies with [13C]propionate. The results showed that [1-13C]-, [2-13C]-, and [3-13C]propionate were converted to [2-13C]-, [3-13C]-, and [4-13C]butyrate, respectively, demonstrating the direct carboxylation on the carboxyl group of propionate without randomization of the other two carbons. In addition, we observed an exchange reaction between C-2 and C-3 of the propionate, indicating that acetogensis may proceed through a randomizing pathway. The physiological significance and importance of various metabolic pathways involved in propionate degradation are discussed, and an unusual pathway of butyrate synthesis is proposed. PMID:16347557

  15. Butyrate and the colonocyte. Production, absorption, metabolism, and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, O C; Lederer, H M; Rombeau, J L

    1997-01-01

    Butyrate, a SCFA generated by microbial fermentation of dietary substrates, is produced in the colon of humans and may influence colonic disease. It is possible to manipulate the diet in order to enhance levels of butyrate in various regions of the large intestine. Butyrate is absorbed by colonocytes in the proximal colon via passive diffusion and by active transport mechanisms which are linked to various ion exchange transporters. In the distal colon, the main mechanism of absorption is passive diffusion of the lipid-soluble form. Butyrate and other SCFA are important for the absorption of electrolytes by the large intestine and may play a role in preventing certain types of diarrhea. The mechanism by which butyrate and other SCFA exerts control over fluid and electrolyte fluxes in the colon is not well delineated though it may occur through an energy generated fuel effect, the up-regulation of various electrolyte transport systems, as well as possible effects on neuroendocrine factors. Butyrate has been shown to have beneficial effects on some colonic pathologies. This SCFA may be protective against colorectal neoplasia. Butyrate regulates colonic motility, increases colonic blood flow and may enhance colonic anastomosis healing. Butyrate may reduce the symptoms from ulcerative colitis and diversion colitis and it may prevent the progression of colitis in general. Further investigations are needed to confirm these findings in controlled, randomized, double blinded clinical studies.

  16. Discrete cyclic di-GMP-dependent control of bacterial predation versus axenic growth in Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

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    Laura Hobley

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a Delta-proteobacterium that oscillates between free-living growth and predation on Gram-negative bacteria including important pathogens of man, animals and plants. After entering the prey periplasm, killing the prey and replicating inside the prey bdelloplast, several motile B. bacteriovorus progeny cells emerge. The B. bacteriovorus HD100 genome encodes numerous proteins predicted to be involved in signalling via the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP, which is known to affect bacterial lifestyle choices. We investigated the role of c-di-GMP signalling in B. bacteriovorus, focussing on the five GGDEF domain proteins that are predicted to function as diguanylyl cyclases initiating c-di-GMP signalling cascades. Inactivation of individual GGDEF domain genes resulted in remarkably distinct phenotypes. Deletion of dgcB (Bd0742 resulted in a predation impaired, obligately axenic mutant, while deletion of dgcC (Bd1434 resulted in the opposite, obligately predatory mutant. Deletion of dgcA (Bd0367 abolished gliding motility, producing bacteria capable of predatory invasion but unable to leave the exhausted prey. Complementation was achieved with wild type dgc genes, but not with GGAAF versions. Deletion of cdgA (Bd3125 substantially slowed predation; this was restored by wild type complementation. Deletion of dgcD (Bd3766 had no observable phenotype. In vitro assays showed that DgcA, DgcB, and DgcC were diguanylyl cyclases. CdgA lacks enzymatic activity but functions as a c-di-GMP receptor apparently in the DgcB pathway. Activity of DgcD was not detected. Deletion of DgcA strongly decreased the extractable c-di-GMP content of axenic Bdellovibrio cells. We show that c-di-GMP signalling pathways are essential for both the free-living and predatory lifestyles of B. bacteriovorus and that obligately predatory dgcC- can be made lacking a propensity to survive without predation of bacterial pathogens and thus possibly

  17. Speed of the bacterial flagellar motor near zero load depends on the number of stator units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Ashley L; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Steel, Bradley C; Lo, Chien-Jung; Berry, Richard M

    2017-10-31

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) rotates hundreds of times per second to propel bacteria driven by an electrochemical ion gradient. The motor consists of a rotor 50 nm in diameter surrounded by up to 11 ion-conducting stator units, which exchange between motors and a membrane-bound pool. Measurements of the torque-speed relationship guide the development of models of the motor mechanism. In contrast to previous reports that speed near zero torque is independent of the number of stator units, we observe multiple speeds that we attribute to different numbers of units near zero torque in both Na+- and H+-driven motors. We measure the full torque-speed relationship of one and two H+ units in Escherichia coli by selecting the number of H+ units and controlling the number of Na+ units in hybrid motors. These experiments confirm that speed near zero torque in H+-driven motors increases with the stator number. We also measured 75 torque-speed curves for Na+-driven chimeric motors at different ion-motive force and stator number. Torque and speed were proportional to ion-motive force and number of stator units at all loads, allowing all 77 measured torque-speed curves to be collapsed onto a single curve by simple rescaling. Published under the PNAS license.

  18. Bacterial cell numbers and community structures of seawater biofilms depend on the attachment substratum

    KAUST Repository

    Yap, Scott A.

    2018-02-02

    Seawater is increasingly being used as a source for various industrial applications. For such applications, biofilm growth creates various problems including but not limited to pipe biocorrosion. In this study, it is hypothesized that the material type is preferred by certain bacterial populations in the seawater to attach and establish biofilms. By comparing differences in the total cell counts and microbial communities attached to high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polycarbonate, stainless steel (SS316) and titanium, the appropriate material can be used to minimize biofilm growth. All four materials have hydrophilic surfaces, but polycarbonate exhibits higher surface roughness. There were no significant differences in the cell numbers attached to polycarbonate, HDPE and titanium. Instead, there were significantly fewer cells attached to SS316. However, there was a higher relative abundance of genera associated with opportunistic pathogens on SS316. Copy numbers of genes representing Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae, both of which are sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), were approximately 10-fold higher in biofilms sampled from SS316. The enrichment of SRB in the biofilm associated with SS316 indicates that this material may be prone to biocorrosion. This study highlights the need for industries to consider the choice of material used in seawater applications to minimize microbial-associated problems.

  19. Dietary supplementation of butyrate in growing rabbits

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    G. Radaelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The UE restrictions imposed on the antibiotic utilization in animal husbandry have increased the interest on alternative additives capable of improving animal digestive health. Among the numerous tested products, short chain fatty acids stimulated intestinal mucus production at different level and intestinal cells proliferation in rats (Meslin et al., 2001; Moreau et al., 2003. Short and medium chain fatty acids could also modulate intestinal microflora: in rabbits, the antimicrobial activity of caprilic and capric acids was proved on various strains of Clostridium perfringens and Escherichia coli (Marounek et al., 2002. The present trial aimed to evaluate the effect of butyrate inclusion and level on growth performance, health status, digestive physiology and slaughter traits in growing rabbits.

  20. Allergic Airway Inflammation Decreases Lung Bacterial Burden following Acute Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection in a Neutrophil- and CCL8-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulek, Daniel E.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Moore, Martin L.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2014-01-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infection, we developed a combined model in which allergic airway inflammation and lung IL-4 and IL-13 expression were induced by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge prior to acute lung infection with K. pneumoniae. We hypothesized that preexisting allergic airway inflammation decreases lung IL-17A expression and airway neutrophil recruitment in response to acute K. pneumoniae infection and thereby increases the lung K. pneumoniae burden. As hypothesized, we found that allergic airway inflammation decreased the number of K. pneumoniae-induced airway neutrophils and lung IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 expression. Despite the marked reduction in postinfection airway neutrophilia and lung expression of Th17 cytokines, allergic airway inflammation significantly decreased the lung K. pneumoniae burden and postinfection mortality. We showed that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden was independent of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17A and partially dependent on IL-13 and STAT6. Additionally, we demonstrated that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden associated with allergic airway inflammation was both neutrophil and CCL8 dependent. These findings suggest a novel role for CCL8 in lung antibacterial immunity against K. pneumoniae and suggest new mechanisms of orchestrating lung antibacterial immunity. PMID:24958709

  1. Malaria-induced NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation mediates inflammation and hypersensitivity to bacterial superinfection.

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    Marco A Ataide

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14(+CD16(-Caspase-1(+ and CD14(dimCD16(+Caspase-1(+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria.

  2. Malaria-Induced NLRP12/NLRP3-Dependent Caspase-1 Activation Mediates Inflammation and Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Superinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataide, Marco A.; Andrade, Warrison A.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Wang, Donghai; Souza, Maria do Carmo; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Elian, Samir; Martins, Flaviano S.; Pereira, Dhelio; Reed, George; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14+CD16−Caspase-1+ and CD14dimCD16+Caspase-1+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria. PMID:24453977

  3. Relationships between bacterial community composition, functional trait composition and functioning are context dependent--but what is the context?

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    Ina Severin

    Full Text Available Bacterial communities are immensely diverse and drive many fundamental ecosystem processes. However, the role of bacterial community composition (BCC for functioning is still unclear. Here we evaluate the relative importance of BCC (from 454-sequencing, functional traits (from Biolog Ecoplates and environmental conditions for per cell biomass production (BPC; 3H-leucine incorporation in six data sets of natural freshwater bacterial communities. BCC explained significant variation of BPC in all six data sets and most variation in four. BCC measures based on 16S rRNA (active bacteria did not consistently explain more variation in BPC than measures based on the 16S rRNA-gene (total community, and adding phylogenetic information did not, in general, increase the explanatory power of BCC. In contrast to our hypothesis, the importance of BCC for BPC was not related to the anticipated dispersal rates in and out of communities. Functional traits, most notably the ability to use cyclic and aromatic compounds, as well as local environmental conditions, i.e. stoichiometric relationships of nutrients, explained some variation in all six data sets. In general there were weak associations between variation in BCC and variation in the functional traits contributing to productivity. This indicates that additional traits may be important for productivity as well. By comparing several data sets obtained in a similar way we conclude that no single measure of BCC was obviously better than another in explaining BPC. We identified some key functional traits for productivity, but although there was a coupling between BCC, functional traits and productivity, the strength of the coupling seems context dependent. However, the exact context is still unresolved.

  4. Monocyte-mediated inhibition of TLR9-dependent IFN-α induction in plasmacytoid dendritic cells questions bacterial DNA as the active ingredient of bacterial lysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poth, Jens M; Coch, Christoph; Busch, Nicolas; Boehm, Olaf; Schlee, Martin; Janke, Markus; Zillinger, Thomas; Schildgen, Oliver; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther

    2010-12-15

    Bacterial DNA contains unmethylated CpG dinucleotides and is a potent ligand for TLR9. Bacterial DNA has been claimed the active ingredient in bacterial lysates used for immunotherapy. Whereas the detection of viral DNA by TLR9 expressed in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) with subsequent IFN-α production is well defined, the role of bacterial DNA during microbial infection is less clear. In fact, IFN-α is not a hallmark of antibacterial immune responses. Unlike in mice, TLR9 expression in humans is restricted to PDCs and B cells; thus, conclusions from murine models of infection have limitations. In this study, we demonstrate that lysates of heat-killed Escherichia coli containing bacterial DNA induced IFN-α in isolated PDCs but not in the mixed cell populations of human PBMCs. Depletion of monocytes restored IFN-α secretion by PDCs within PBMCs. We found that monocyte-derived IL-10 and PGs contribute to monocyte-mediated inhibition of IFN-α release in PDCs. We conclude that human PDCs can be stimulated by bacterial DNA via TLR9; however, in the physiological context of mixed-cell populations, PDC activation is blocked by factors released from monocytes stimulated in parallel by other components of bacterial lysates such as LPS. This functional repression of PDCs by concomitantly stimulated monocytes avoids production of antiviral IFN-α during bacterial infection and thus explains how the innate immune system is enabled to distinguish bacterial from viral CpG DNA and thus to elicit the appropriate responses despite the presence of CpG DNA in both types of infection.

  5. The variability of bacterial aerosol in poultry houses depending on selected factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bródka, Karolina; Kozajda, Anna; Buczyńska, Alina; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, Irena

    2012-06-01

    This study is aimed at evaluation of bacterial air contamination in intensive poultry breeding. The evaluation was based on the determined levels of bacterial concentrations and qualitative identification of isolated microorganisms. The study covered 5 poultry houses: two hatcheries and three hen houses with the litter bed system. The air was sampled in three measurement series in the central part of the investigated workplace at the height of about 1.5 m over the ground, using portable measuring sets consisting of a GilAir 5 (Sensidyne, USA) pump and a measuring head filled with a glass microfibre filter (Whatman, UK). For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of microorganisms were used appropriate microbiological media. The total concentrations of airborne mesophilic bacteria inside the poultry breeding houses ranged from 4.74 × 10(4) cfu/m(3) to 1.89 × 10(8) cfu/m(3). For Gram-negative bacteria, the range comprised the values from 4.33 × 10(2) cfu/m(3) to 4.29 × 10(6) cfu/m(3). The concentrations of the cocci of Enterococcus genus ranged from 1.53 × 10(4) cfu/m(3) to 1.09 × 10(7) cfu/m(3), whereas those of other Gram-positive bacteria from 3.78 × 10(4) cfu/m(3) to 6.65 × 10(7) cfu/m(3). The lowest concentrations of each group of the examined microorganisms were noted in the second measurement series when the air exchange in the breeding houses was over twice higher than in first and third measurement series because the mechanical ventilation was supported by natural ventilation (opened gates in the buildings). The lowest concentrations of total bacteria were obtained in those buildings where one-day old chickens were kept. Gram-positive bacteria of the genera: Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Corynebacterium, Brevibacterium, Micrococcus, Cellulomonas, Bacillus, Aerococcus, and Gram-negative bacteria of the genera: Pseudomonas, Moraxella, Escherichia, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Pasteurella, Pantoea were isolated. It was shown that for most of the

  6. Bacterial diversity determination using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghiasian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mud volcanoes are taken into consideration by geologists and oil industry experts have given their association with oil and gas reserves and methane greenhouse gas production in hydrosphere and atmosphere. Gomishan mud volcano phenomenon in the southeastern edge of the Caspian Sea, given its oil and gas resources, has been studied by some geologists in terms of geology and tectonics but not in terms of microbiology. Accordingly, it seems necessary to study this phenomenon from the perspective of microbiology in order to identify prokaryotes living in this area. Prokaryotes diversity in Mud volcano has been studied by cultivation techniques, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified fragments of 16S rRNA genes. Total cell abundance in the mud volcano from 1×101-6×101per milliliter was determined by 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole direct count. The detectable proportion of Archaea to Bacteria in the community by FISH was one to five. High viable counts (1 – 3 × 106 were obtained in culture media. A total of 122 isolates were obtained, 46 colonies were selected based on primarily morphological and physiological traits, and their 16S rRNA sequences were determined. The isolated genera included Halomonas (20%, Arthrobacter (5%, Kocuria (5%, Thalassobacillus (5%, Marinobacter (20%, Paracoccus (5%, Roseovarius (5%, Jeotgalicoccus (5%, Bacillus (15%, and Staphylococcus (15%. Regarding DGGE analysis, selected bands were obtained from the gels, reamplified and sequenced. Overall, 75% of the bacterial sequences were related to Rahnella and 25% related to Serratia.

  7. Bacterial superantigens promote acute nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a human MHC Class II-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Katherine J; Zeppa, Joseph J; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T; Xu, Stacey X; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P Patrick; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2014-05-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as 'trademark' virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC -II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms.

  8. Synthesis of capsular polysaccharide at the division septum of Streptococcus pneumoniae is dependent on a bacterial tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Mafalda X; Rodrigues, Tatiana; Carido, Madalena; Ferreira, Luís; Filipe, Sérgio R

    2011-10-01

    One of the main virulence factors of the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is the capsule, present at the bacterial surface, surrounding the entire cell. Virtually all the 90 different capsular serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which vary in their chemical composition, express two conserved proteins, Wzd and Wze, which regulate the rate of the synthesis of capsule. In this work, we show that Wzd, a membrane protein, and Wze, a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, localize at the bacterial division septum, when expressed together in pneumococcal cells, without requiring the presence of additional proteins encoded in the capsule operon. The interaction between the two proteins and their consequent septal localization was dependent on a functional ATP binding domain of Wze. In the absence of either Wzd or Wze, capsule was still produced, linked to the cell surface, but it was absent from the division septum. We propose that Wzd and Wze are spatial regulators of capsular polysaccharide synthesis and, in the presence of ATP, localize at the division site, ensuring that capsule is produced in co-ordination with cell wall synthesis, resulting in full encapsulation of the pneumococcal cells. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Structure of a GTP-dependent Bacterial PEP-carboxykinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aich, Sanjukta; Prasad, Lata; Delbaere, Louis T.J. (Saskatchewan)

    2008-06-23

    GTP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) is the key enzyme that controls the blood glucose level during fasting in higher animals. Here we report the first substrate-free structure of a GTP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase from a bacterium, Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgPCK). The protein crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1} with four molecules per asymmetric unit. The 2.3 {angstrom} resolution structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human cytosolic PCK (hcPCK) structure (PDB ID: 1KHF) as the starting model. The four molecules in the asymmetric unit pack as two dimers, and is an artifact of crystal packing. However, the P-loop and the guanine binding loop of the substrate-free CgPCK structure have different conformations from the other published GTP-specific PCK structures, which all have bound substrates and/or metal ions. It appears that a change in the P-loop and guanine binding loop conformation is necessary for substrate binding in GTP-specific PCKs, as opposed to overall domain movement in ATP-specific PCKs.

  10. Infection-induced myelopoiesis during intracellular bacterial infection is critically dependent upon IFN-γ signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNamara, Katherine C; Oduro, Kwadwo; Martin, Olga; Jones, Derek D; McLaughlin, Maura; Choi, Kyunghee; Borjesson, Dori L; Winslow, Gary M

    2011-01-15

    Although microbial infections can alter steady-state hematopoiesis, the mechanisms that drive such changes are not well understood. We addressed a role for IFN-γ signaling in infection-induced bone marrow suppression and anemia in a murine model of human monocytic ehrlichiosis, an emerging tick-borne disease. Within the bone marrow of Ehrlichia muris-infected C57BL/6 mice, we observed a reduction in myeloid progenitor cells, as defined both phenotypically and functionally. Infected mice exhibited a concomitant increase in developing myeloid cells within the bone marrow, an increase in the frequency of circulating monocytes, and an increase in splenic myeloid cells. The infection-induced changes in progenitor cell phenotype were critically dependent on IFN-γ, but not IFN-α, signaling. In mice deficient in the IFN-γ signaling pathway, we observed an increase in myeloid progenitor cells and CDllb(lo)Gr1(lo) promyelocytic cells within the bone marrow, as well as reduced frequencies of mature granulocytes and monocytes. Furthermore, E. muris-infected IFN-γR-deficient mice did not exhibit anemia or an increase in circulating monocytes, and they succumbed to infection. Gene transcription studies revealed that IFN-γR-deficient CDllb(lo)Gr1(lo) promyelocytes from E. muris-infected mice exhibited significantly reduced expression of irf-1 and irf-8, both key transcription factors that regulate the differentiation of granulocytes and monocytes. Finally, using mixed bone marrow chimeric mice, we show that IFN-γ-dependent infection-induced myelopoiesis occurs via the direct effect of the cytokine on developing myeloid cells. We propose that, in addition to its many other known roles, IFN-γ acts to control infection by directly promoting the differentiation of myeloid cells that contribute to host defense.

  11. Bacterial ecology of artisanal Minas cheeses assessed by culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Luana Martins; Savo Sardaro, Maria Luisa; Nero, Luís Augusto; Neviani, Erasmo; Gatti, Monica

    2017-08-01

    Artisanal Minas cheese is produced in Minas Gerais state, Brazil and its varieties are named according to their geographical origin (Serro, Canastra, Serra do Salitre, Araxá and Campo das Vertentes). The cheese is produced with raw cow's milk and the whey from the previous cheese production ("pingo"). The high economic and cultural importance of artisanal cheese in Brazil justifies the efforts to ensure its safety, quality and provenance. This study aimed to characterize the microbial diversity composition, and geographical distribution of artisanal Minas cheese, focusing on the characterization of its autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) microbiota. Artisanal Minas cheese varieties from Serro, Canastra, Serra do Salitre, Araxá and Campo das Vertentes were analyzed by culture-dependent (culturing and LAB sequencing) and -independent (repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (rep-PCR) and length heterogeneity-PCR, LH-PCR) methods to characterize the microbiota. The microbial counts were variable between cheese samples, and some samples presented high number of coagulase positive bacteria and coliforms that may be associated with hygienic issues. In all samples was observed a prevalence of LAB. 16S rRNA sequencing and rep-PCR of the LAB strains identified four genus (Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Enterococcus and Weissella), ten species and more than one strain per species. Lactobacillus was the most prevalent genera in all the cheeses. LH-PCR revealed a further six genera and ten species that were not identified by culturing, highlighting the importance of combining both culture-dependent and -independent methods to fully characterize microbiota diversity. Principal component analysis of the LH-PCR data and cluster analysis of rep-PCR data revealed that the artisanal Minas cheese microbiota was influenced not only by their geographical origin but also by the cheese farm. The lack of standardization in the milking and cheese manufacturing procedures between

  12. Mg2+-dependent gating of bacterial MgtE channel underlies Mg2+ homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Iwase, Norihiko; Furuya, Noritaka; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Tsukazaki, Tomoya; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Maguire, Michael E; Ito, Koichi; Maturana, Andres; Nureki, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    The MgtE family of Mg2+ transporters is ubiquitously distributed in all phylogenetic domains. Recent crystal structures of the full-length MgtE and of its cytosolic domain in the presence and absence of Mg2+ suggested a Mg2+-homeostasis mechanism, in which the MgtE cytosolic domain acts as a ‘Mg2+ sensor' to regulate the gating of the ion-conducting pore in response to the intracellular Mg2+ concentration. However, complementary functional analyses to confirm the proposed model have been lacking. Moreover, the limited resolution of the full-length structure precluded an unambiguous characterization of these regulatory divalent-cation-binding sites. Here, we showed that MgtE is a highly Mg2+-selective channel gated by Mg2+ and elucidated the Mg2+-dependent gating mechanism of MgtE, using X-ray crystallographic, genetic, biochemical, and electrophysiological analyses. These structural and functional results have clarified the control of Mg2+ homeostasis through cooperative Mg2+ binding to the MgtE cytosolic domain. PMID:19798051

  13. Biochemical and structural characterization of a novel bacterial manganese-dependent hydroxynitrile lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnal, Ivan; Lyskowski, Andrzej; Hanefeld, Ulf; Gruber, Karl; Schwab, Helmut; Steiner, Kerstin

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxynitrile lyases (HNLs), which catalyse the decomposition of cyanohydrins, are found mainly in plants. In vitro, they are able to catalyse the synthesis of enantiopure cyanohydrins, which are versatile building blocks in the chemical industry. Recently, HNLs have also been discovered in bacteria. Here, we report on the detailed biochemical and structural characterization of a hydroxynitrile lyase from Granulicella tundricola (GtHNL), which was successfully heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The crystal structure was solved at a crystallographic resolution of 2.5 Å and exhibits a cupin fold. As GtHNL does not show any sequence or structural similarity to any other HNL and does not contain conserved motifs typical of HNLs, cupins represent a new class of HNLs. GtHNL is metal-dependent, as confirmed by inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectroscopy, and in the crystal structure, manganese is bound to three histidine and one glutamine residue. GtHNL displayed a specific activity of 1.74 U·mg(-1) at pH 6 with (R)-mandelonitrile, and synthesized (R)-mandelonitrile with 90% enantiomeric excess at 80% conversion using 0.5 m benzaldehyde in a biphasic reaction system with methyl tertiary butyl ether. © 2013 FEBS.

  14. Autoinducer 2: a concentration-dependent signal for mutualistic bacterial biofilm growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, A.H.; Palmer, R.J.; Blehert, D.S.; Campagna, S.R.; Semmelhack, M.F.; Egland, P.G.; Bassler, B.L.; Kolenbrander, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), a product of the LuxS enzyme in the catabolism of S-ribosylhomocysteine, spontaneously cyclizes to form autoinducer 2 (AI-2). AI-2 is proposed to be a universal signal molecule mediating interspecies communication among bacteria. We show that mutualistic and abundant biofilm growth in flowing saliva of two human oral commensal bacteria, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V and Streptococcus oralis 34, is dependent upon production of AI-2 by S. oralis 34. A luxS mutant of S. oralis 34 was constructed which did not produce AI-2. Unlike wild-type dual-species biofilms, A. naeslundii T14V and an S. oralis 34 luxS mutant did not exhibit mutualism and generated only sparse biofilms which contained a 10-fold lower biomass of each species. Restoration of AI-2 levels by genetic or chemical (synthetic AI-2 in the form of DPD) complementation re-established the mutualistic growth and high biomass characteristic for the wild-type dual-species biofilm. Furthermore, an optimal concentration of DPD was determined, above and below which biofilm formation was suppressed. The optimal concentration was 100-fold lower than the detection limit of the currently accepted AI-2 assay. Thus, AI-2 acts as an interspecies signal and its concentration is critical for mutualism between two species of oral bacteria grown under conditions that are representative of the human oral cavity. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Effects of acetic, propionic and butyric acids given intraruminally at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of acetic, propionic and butyric acids given intraruminally at different molar proportions or individually on rumen papillae growth and IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in plasma, liver and rumen tissue in growing sheep nourished by total intragastric infusions.

  16. Effects of dietary probiotic, prebiotic and butyric acid glycerides on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primalac), prebiotic (Fermacto) and butyric acid glycerides (Baby C4) on broiler performance and serum composition. Seven hundred and four day-old broilers were randomly distributed in a 222 factorial arrangement with two levels of probiotic ...

  17. Fermentative production of butyric acid from wheat straw: Economic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, G. N.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Westermann, P.

    2017-01-01

    . Two scenarios (S1 and S2) were examined assuming a plant with an annual capacity of 10,000 tonnes of product installed in India (due to significantly lower feedstock prices). S1 resulted in a product of 89% butyric acid mixed with acetic acid and S2 produced butyric acid of 99% purity. Unit production......The economic feasibility of biochemical conversion of wheat straw to butyric acid was studied in this work. Basic process steps included physicochemical pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and saccharification, fermentation with in-situ acids separation by electrodialysis and product purification...... cost was estimated at 2.75 and 3.31 $ per kg product for S1 and S2 respectively. The main part of production cost was attributed to steam for the purification step and electricity for the in-situ acids separation. This unit production cost combined with an estimated butyric acid selling price (year...

  18. TLR-mediated inflammatory responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae are highly dependent on surface expression of bacterial lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Gillian; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Pollard, Tracey; Lapp, Thabo; Cohen, Jonathan; Camberlein, Emilie; Stafford, Sian; Periselneris, Jimstan; Aldridge, Christine; Vollmer, Waldemar; Picard, Capucine; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Brown, Jeremy

    2014-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections induce inflammatory responses that contribute toward both disease pathogenesis and immunity, but the host-pathogen interactions that mediate these effects are poorly defined. We used the surface lipoprotein-deficient ∆lgt pneumococcal mutant strain to test the hypothesis that lipoproteins are key determinants of TLR-mediated immune responses to S. pneumoniae. We show using reporter assays that TLR2 signaling is dependent on pneumococcal lipoproteins, and that macrophage NF-κB activation and TNF-α release were reduced in response to the ∆lgt strain. Differences in TNF-α responses between Δlgt and wild-type bacteria were abrogated for macrophages from TLR2- but not TLR4-deficient mice. Transcriptional profiling of human macrophages revealed attenuated TLR2-associated responses to ∆lgt S. pneumoniae, comprising many NF-κB-regulated proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes. Importantly, non-TLR2-associated responses were preserved. Experiments using leukocytes from IL-1R-associated kinase-4-deficient patients and a mouse pneumonia model confirmed that proinflammatory responses were lipoprotein dependent. Our data suggest that leukocyte responses to bacterial lipoproteins are required for TLR2- and IL-1R-associated kinase-4-mediated inflammatory responses to S. pneumoniae. Copyright © 2014 The Authors.

  19. Novel and unexpected bacterial diversity in an arsenic-rich ecosystem revealed by culture-dependent approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavat, François; Lett, Marie-Claire; Lièvremont, Didier

    2012-09-10

    Acid Mine Drainages (AMDs) are extreme environments characterized by very acid conditions and heavy metal contaminations. In these ecosystems, the bacterial diversity is considered to be low. Previous culture-independent approaches performed in the AMD of Carnoulès (France) confirmed this low species richness. However, very little is known about the cultured bacteria in this ecosystem. The aims of the study were firstly to apply novel culture methods in order to access to the largest cultured bacterial diversity, and secondly to better define the robustness of the community for 3 important functions: As(III) oxidation, cellulose degradation and cobalamine biosynthesis. Despite the oligotrophic and acidic conditions found in AMDs, the newly designed media covered a large range of nutrient concentrations and a pH range from 3.5 to 9.8, in order to target also non-acidophilic bacteria. These approaches generated 49 isolates representing 19 genera belonging to 4 different phyla. Importantly, overall diversity gained 16 extra genera never detected in Carnoulès. Among the 19 genera, 3 were previously uncultured, one of them being novel in databases. This strategy increased the overall diversity in the Carnoulès sediment by 70% when compared with previous culture-independent approaches, as specific phylogenetic groups (e.g. the subclass Actinobacteridae or the order Rhizobiales) were only detected by culture. Cobalamin auxotrophy, cellulose degradation and As(III)-oxidation are 3 crucial functions in this ecosystem, and a previous meta- and proteo-genomic work attributed each function to only one taxon. Here, we demonstrate that other members of this community can also assume these functions, thus increasing the overall community robustness. This work highlights that bacterial diversity in AMDs is much higher than previously envisaged, thus pointing out that the AMD system is functionally more robust than expected. The isolated bacteria may be part of the rare

  20. Novel and unexpected bacterial diversity in an arsenic-rich ecosystem revealed by culture-dependent approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delavat François

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid Mine Drainages (AMDs are extreme environments characterized by very acid conditions and heavy metal contaminations. In these ecosystems, the bacterial diversity is considered to be low. Previous culture-independent approaches performed in the AMD of Carnoulès (France confirmed this low species richness. However, very little is known about the cultured bacteria in this ecosystem. The aims of the study were firstly to apply novel culture methods in order to access to the largest cultured bacterial diversity, and secondly to better define the robustness of the community for 3 important functions: As(III oxidation, cellulose degradation and cobalamine biosynthesis. Results Despite the oligotrophic and acidic conditions found in AMDs, the newly designed media covered a large range of nutrient concentrations and a pH range from 3.5 to 9.8, in order to target also non-acidophilic bacteria. These approaches generated 49 isolates representing 19 genera belonging to 4 different phyla. Importantly, overall diversity gained 16 extra genera never detected in Carnoulès. Among the 19 genera, 3 were previously uncultured, one of them being novel in databases. This strategy increased the overall diversity in the Carnoulès sediment by 70% when compared with previous culture-independent approaches, as specific phylogenetic groups (e.g. the subclass Actinobacteridae or the order Rhizobiales were only detected by culture. Cobalamin auxotrophy, cellulose degradation and As(III-oxidation are 3 crucial functions in this ecosystem, and a previous meta- and proteo-genomic work attributed each function to only one taxon. Here, we demonstrate that other members of this community can also assume these functions, thus increasing the overall community robustness. Conclusions This work highlights that bacterial diversity in AMDs is much higher than previously envisaged, thus pointing out that the AMD system is functionally more robust than expected

  1. Controlled Morphology of Porous Polyvinyl Butyral Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lubasova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and effective method for the fabrication of porous nanofibers based on the solvent evaporation methods in one-step electrospinning process from the commercial polyvinyl butyral (PVB is presented. The obtained nanofibers are prevalently amorphous with diameters ranging from 150 to 4350 nm and specific surface area of approximately 2–20 m2/g. Pore size with irregular shape of the porous PVB fibers ranged approximately from 50 to 200 nm. The effects of polymer solution concentration, composition of the solvents mixture, and applied voltage on fiber diameter and morphology were investigated. The theoretical approach for the choice of poor and good solvents for PVB was explained by the application Hansen solubility parameter (HSP and two-dimensional graph. Three basic conditions for the production of porous PVB nanofibers were defined: (i application of good/poor solvent mixture for spinning solution, (ii differences of the evaporation rate between good/poor solvent, and (iii correct ratios of good/poor solvent (v/v. The diameter of prepared porous PVB fibers decreased as the polymer concentration was lowered and with higher applied voltage. These nanofiber sheets with porous PVB fibers could be a good candidate for high-efficiency filter materials in comparison to smooth fibers without pores.

  2. Bacterial Superantigens Promote Acute Nasopharyngeal Infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a Human MHC Class II-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Katherine J.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T.; Xu, Stacey X.; Mazzuca, Delfina M.; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L.; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P. Patrick; Haeryfar, S. M. Mansour; McCormick, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as ‘trademark’ virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC –II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms. PMID:24875883

  3. Thermal decomposition of lanthanum(III) butyrate in argon atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Xiao, Tang

    2013-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of La(C3H7CO2)3·xH2O (x≈0.82) was studied in argon during heating at 5K/min. After the loss of bound H2O, the anhydrous butyrate presents at 135°C a phase transition to a mesophase, which turns to an isotropic liquid at 180°C. The decomposition of the anhydrous butyrate ...

  4. Wheat bran decreases aberrant crypt foci, preserves normal proliferation, and increases intraluminal butyrate levels in experimental colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compher, C W; Frankel, W L; Tazelaar, J; Lawson, J A; McKinney, S; Segall, S; Kinosian, B P; Williams, N N; Rombeau, J L

    1999-01-01

    Dietary wheat bran protects against colon cancer, but the mechanism(s) of this effect is not known. Butyrate, produced by colonic bacterial fermentation of dietary polysaccharides, such as wheat bran, induces apoptosis and decreases proliferation in colon cancer cell lines. Whether similar effects occur in vivo is not well defined. We hypothesized that wheat bran's antineoplastic effects in vivo may be mediated in part by butyrate's modulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Male F344 rats were fed wheat bran-supplemented or an isocaloric, isonitrogenous fiber-free diet. Rats were treated with one dose of the carcinogen azoxymethane or vehicle with sacrifice after 5 days (tumor initiation); or two doses (days O and 7) with sacrifice after 56 days (tumor promotion). Study variables included fecal butyrate levels and the intermediate biomarkers of colon carcinogenesis, aberrant crypt foci (ACF), and changes in crypt cell proliferation and apoptosis. During tumor initiation, wheat bran produced greater apoptosis (p = .01), a trend toward less proliferation, and preserved the normal zone of proliferation (p = .01). At tumor promotion, wheat bran decreased the number of ACF (proximal colon, p = .005; distal colon, p = .047) and maintained the normal proliferative zone. The fiber-free diet shifted the zone of proliferation into the premalignant pattern in both studies. Wheat bran produced significantly higher fecal butyrate (p = .01; .004, .00001) levels than the fiber-free diet throughout the tumor promotion study. Wheat bran increased apoptosis and controlled proliferation during tumor initiation and resulted in decreased ACF. Wheat bran's antineoplastic effects occurred early after carcinogen exposure, and were associated with increased fecal butyrate levels.

  5. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23–0.99 U mg−1 protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH3 and NH4+-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH3 and NH4+-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  6. Structural and Functional analysis of Staphylococcus aureus NADP-dependent IDH and its comparison with Bacterial and Human NADPdependent IDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Swarupa, Vimjam; Yeswanth, Sthanikam; Kumar, Pasupuleti Santhosh; Kumar, Easambadi Siva; Reddy, Kalikiri Mahesh Kumar; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Rani, Vangavaragu Jhansi; Chaudhary, Abhijit; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus a natural inhabitant of nasopharyngeal tract mainly survives as biofilms and possess complete Krebs cycle which plays major role in its pathogenesis. This TCA cycle is regulated by Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) we have earlier cloned, sequenced (HM067707), expressed and characterized this enzyme from S. aureus ATCC12600. We have observed only one type of IDH in all the strains of S. aureus which dictates the flow of carbon thereby controlling the virulence and biofilm formation, this phenomenon is variable among bacteria. Therefore in the present study comparative structural and functional analysis of IDH was undertaken. As the crystal structure of S. aureus IDH was not available therefore using the deduced amino sequence of complete gene the 3D structure of IDH was built in Modeller 9v8. The PROCHECK and ProSAweb analysis showed the built structure was close to the crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis. This structure when superimposed with other bacterial IDH structures exhibited extensive structural variations as evidenced from the RMSD values correlating with extensive sequential variations. Only 24% sequence identity was observed with both human NADP dependent IDHs (PDB: 1T09 and 1T0L) and the structural comparative studies indicated extensive structural variations with an RMSD values of 14.284Å and 10.073Å respectively. Docking of isocitrate to both human IDHs and S. aureus IDH structures showed docking scores of -11.6169 and -10.973 respectively clearly indicating higher binding affinity of isocitrate to human IDH.

  7. Polyphasic approach to bacterial dynamics during the ripening of Spanish farmhouse cheese, using culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Platero, Antonio M; Valdivia, Eva; Maqueda, Mercedes; Martín-Sánchez, Inés; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel

    2008-09-01

    We studied the dynamics of the microbial population during ripening of Cueva de la Magahá cheese using a combination of classical and molecular techniques. Samples taken during ripening of this Spanish goat's milk cheese in which Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus were used as starter cultures were analyzed. All bacterial isolates were clustered by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, species-specific PCR, and multiplex PCR. Our results indicate that the majority of the 225 strains isolated and enumerated on solid media during the ripening period were nonstarter lactic acid bacteria, and Lactobacillus paracasei was the most abundant species. Other Lactobacillus species, such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus parabuchneri, were also detected at the beginning and end of ripening, respectively. Non-lactic-acid bacteria, mainly Kocuria and Staphylococcus strains, were also detected at the end of the ripening period. Microbial community dynamics determined by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis provided a more precise estimate of the distribution of bacteria and enabled us to detect Lactobacillus curvatus and the starter bacteria S. thermophilus and L. lactis, which were not isolated. Surprisingly, the bacterium most frequently found using culture-dependent analysis, L. paracasei, was scarcely detected by this molecular approach. Finally, we studied the composition of the lactobacilli and their evolution by using length heterogeneity PCR.

  8. The pH dependence of polymerization and bundling by the essential bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Pacheco-Gómez

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence that bacterial cell division is an intricate coordinated process of comparable complexity to that seen in eukaryotic cells. The dynamic assembly of Escherichia coli FtsZ in the presence of GTP is fundamental to its activity. FtsZ polymerization is a very attractive target for novel antibiotics given its fundamental and universal function. In this study our aim was to understand further the GTP-dependent FtsZ polymerization mechanism and our main focus is on the pH dependence of its behaviour. A key feature of this work is the use of linear dichroism (LD to follow the polymerization of FtsZ monomers into polymeric structures. LD is the differential absorption of light polarized parallel and perpendicular to an orientation direction (in this case that provided by shear flow. It thus readily distinguishes between FtsZ polymers and monomers. It also distinguishes FtsZ polymers and less well-defined aggregates, which light scattering methodologies do not. The polymerization of FtsZ over a range of pHs was studied by right-angled light scattering to probe mass of FtsZ structures, LD to probe real-time formation of linear polymeric fibres, a specially developed phosphate release assay to relate guanosine triphosphate (GTP hydrolysis to polymer formation, and electron microscopy (EM imaging of reaction products as a function of time and pH. We have found that lowering the pH from neutral to 6.5 does not change the nature of the FtsZ polymers in solution--it simply facilitates the polymerization so the fibres present are longer and more abundant. Conversely, lowering the pH to 6.0 has much the same effect as introducing divalent cations or the FtsZ-associated protein YgfE (a putative ZapA orthologue in E. coli--it stabilizes associations of protofilaments.

  9. Butyrate increases colonocyte protein synthesis in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, W; Lew, J; Su, B; Bain, A; Klurfeld, D; Einhorn, E; MacDermott, R P; Rombeau, J

    1994-07-01

    Butyrate promotes epithelial cell healing and improves symptoms when administered rectally in patients with distal ulcerative colitis (UC). It was hypothesized that butyrate may enhance healing in patients with UC by stimulating colonocyte proliferation and/or protein production. Mucosa from the descending colon was obtained from patients with UC (n = 5), Crohn's disease (n = 8), diverticulitis (n = 6), and cancer (normal tissue 10 cm from tumor; n = 10). Epithelial cells were isolated using dispase/collagenase and differential sedimentation and incubated for 4 hr at 37 degrees C with either Na butyrate (10 mM) or NaCl (10 mM). Protein synthesis was assessed by [14C]leucine incorporation and proliferation was determined with [3H]thymidine. Mean viability and purity were >88%. Spontaneous proliferation was significantly increased in UC when compared to diverticulitis and normal controls. Butyrate significantly increased protein synthesis in UC epithelial cells when compared to saline control. The therapeutic effects of butyrate in patients with UC may be due to its use by epithelial cells as a metabolic fuel to increase protein production and promote healing.

  10. Gallium Nitrate Is Efficacious in Murine Models of Tuberculosis and Inhibits Key Bacterial Fe-Dependent Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanmi, Oyebode; Kesavalu, Banurekha; Pasula, Rajamouli; Abdalla, Maher Y.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2013-01-01

    Acquiring iron (Fe) is critical to the metabolism and growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Disruption of Fe metabolism is a potential approach for novel antituberculous therapy. Gallium (Ga) has many similarities to Fe. Biological systems are often unable to distinguish Ga3+ from Fe3+. Unlike Fe3+, Ga3+ cannot be physiologically reduced to Ga2+. Thus, substituting Ga for Fe in the active site of enzymes may render them nonfunctional. We previously showed that Ga inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis in broth and within cultured human macrophages. We now report that Ga(NO3)3 shows efficacy in murine tuberculosis models. BALB/c SCID mice were infected intratracheally with M. tuberculosis, following which they received daily intraperitoneal saline, Ga(NO3)3, or NaNO3. All mice receiving saline or NaNO3 died. All Ga(NO3)3-treated mice survived. M. tuberculosis CFU in the lungs, liver, and spleen of the NaNO3-treated or saline-treated mice were significantly higher than those in Ga-treated mice. When BALB/c mice were substituted for BALB/c SCID mice as a chronic (nonlethal) infection model, Ga(NO3)3 treatment significantly decreased lung CFU. To assess the mechanism(s) whereby Ga inhibits bacterial growth, the effect of Ga on M. tuberculosis ribonucleotide reductase (RR) (a key enzyme in DNA replication) and aconitase activities was assessed. Ga decreased M. tuberculosis RR activity by 50 to 60%, but no additional decrease in RR activity was seen at Ga concentrations that completely inhibited mycobacterial growth. Ga decreased aconitase activity by 90%. Ga(NO3)3 shows efficacy in murine M. tuberculosis infection and leads to a decrease in activity of Fe-dependent enzymes. Additional work is warranted to further define Ga's mechanism of action and to optimize delivery forms for possible therapeutic uses in humans. PMID:24060870

  11. Proteomic analysis of growth phase-dependent expression of Legionella pneumophila proteins which involves regulation of bacterial virulence traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Hayashi

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, which is a causative pathogen of Legionnaires' disease, expresses its virulent traits in response to growth conditions. In particular, it is known to become virulent at a post-exponential phase in vitro culture. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the exponential phase and post-exponential phase to identify candidates associated with L. pneumophila virulence using 2-Dimentional Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 68 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two growth phases, 64 were up-regulated at a post-exponential phase. The up-regulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis, ketone body biogenesis and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB biogenesis, suggesting that L. pneumophila may utilize sugars and lipids as energy sources, when amino acids become scarce. Proteins related to motility (flagella components and twitching motility-associated proteins were also up-regulated, predicting that they enhance infectivity of the bacteria in host cells under certain conditions. Furthermore, 9 up-regulated proteins of unknown function were found. Two of them were identified as novel bacterial factors associated with hemolysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBCs. Another 2 were found to be translocated into macrophages via the Icm/Dot type IV secretion apparatus as effector candidates in a reporter assay with Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase. The study will be helpful for virulent analysis of L. pneumophila from the viewpoint of physiological or metabolic modulation dependent on growth phase.

  12. Antibiofilm effects of topical corticosteroids and intranasal saline in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps depend on bacterial species and their biofilm-forming capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirkovic, Ivana; Pavlovic, Bojan; Bozic, Dragana D; Jotic, Ana; Bakic, Ljubica; Milovanovic, Jovica

    2017-04-01

    Microbial biofilms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP). Intranasal application of corticosteroids and saline is a reliable option for their management. The aim of our study was to evaluate in vitro antibiofilm effects of corticosteroids and isotonic and hypertonic nasal saline in CRSwNP patients. The sinus mucosal specimens were harvested from the ethmoid cavity of 48 patients with CRSwNP and further subjected to hematoxylin-eosin staining and microbiology analysis. The biofilm-forming capacity of isolated bacterial strains was detected by microtiter-plate method and the effects of therapeutic doses of mometasone, fluticasone, isotonic and hypertonic saline on biofilm production were investigated. Bacterial strains were isolated in 42 (87.5%) patients: one organism in 34 (80.9%) and two organisms in 8 (19.1%). Staphylococcus epidermidis (34%) and Staphylococcus aureus (28%) were the most prevalent bacteria in biofilms of CRSwNP patients. Corticosteroids and saline solutions significantly reduced biofilm formation (p corticosteroids and saline solutions also greatly depended on bacterial biomass (p < 0.05), with the most significant effect on high compared to small amount of formed biofilm. The topical steroids and nasal saline are shown to be potent antibiofilm agents in patients with CRSwNP. The effects of tested compounds depend on bacterial species and volume of formed biofilm.

  13. Sodium Butyrate Prevents Memory Impairment by Re-establishing BDNF and GDNF Expression in Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Simões, Lutiana R; Faller, Cristiano Julio; Ceretta, Renan A; Petronilho, Fabricia; Lopes-Borges, Jéssica; Valvassori, Samira S; Quevedo, João

    2015-08-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a serious infection of the central nervous system (CNS) with high fatality rates that causes reduced psychomotor performance, slight mental slowness, impairments in attention executive functions and learning and memory deficiencies. Previously, we demonstrated a correlation between memory impairment and decreased levels of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampi of rats subjected to pneumococcal meningitis. Emerging evidence demonstrates that histone acetylation regulates neurotrophins; therefore, a potential molecular intervention against cognitive impairment in bacterial meningitis may be the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, sodium butyrate, which stimulates the acetylation of histones and increases BDNF expression. In this study, animals received either artificial cerebrospinal fluid as a placebo or a Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension at a concentration of 5 × 10(9) colony-forming units (CFU/mL). The animals received antibiotic treatment as usual and received saline or sodium butyrate as an adjuvant treatment. Ten days after, meningitis was induced; the animals were subjected to open-field habituation and the step-down inhibitory avoidance task. Immediately after these behavioural tasks, the animals were killed, and their hippocampi were removed to evaluate the expression of BDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In the meningitis group that received saline, the animals presented memory impairment in both behavioural tasks, and hippocampal BDNF and GDNF expression was decreased. Sodium butyrate was able to prevent memory impairment and re-establish hippocampal neurotrophin expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

  14. Inulin-type fructan degradation capacity of Clostridium cluster IV and XIVa butyrate-producing colon bacteria and their associated metabolic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, F; De Vuyst, L

    2017-05-30

    Four selected butyrate-producing colon bacterial strains belonging to Clostridium cluster IV (Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum DSM 23266 T and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii DSM 17677 T ) and XIVa (Eubacterium hallii DSM 17630 and Eubacterium rectale CIP 105953 T ) were studied as to their capacity to degrade inulin-type fructans and concomitant metabolite production. Cultivation of these strains was performed in bottles and fermentors containing a modified medium for colon bacteria, including acetate, supplemented with either fructose, oligofructose, or inulin as the sole energy source. Inulin-type fructan degradation was not a general characteristic among these strains. B. pullicaecorum DSM 23266 T and E. hallii DSM 17630 could only ferment fructose and did not degrade oligofructose or inulin. E. rectale CIP 105953 T and F. prausnitzii DSM 17677 T fermented fructose and could degrade both oligofructose and inulin. All chain length fractions of oligofructose were degraded simultaneously (both strains) and both long and short chain length fractions of inulin were degraded either simultaneously (E. rectale CIP 105953 T ) or consecutively (F. prausnitzii DSM 17677 T ), indicating an extracellular polymer degradation mechanism. B. pullicaecorum DSM 23266 T and E. hallii DSM 17630 produced high concentrations of butyrate, CO 2 , and H 2 from fructose. E. rectale CIP 105953 T produced lactate, butyrate, CO 2 , and H 2 , from fructose, oligofructose, and inulin, whereas F. prausnitzii DSM 17677 T produced butyrate, formate, CO 2 , and traces of lactate from fructose, oligofructose, and inulin. Based on carbon recovery and theoretical metabolite production calculations, an adapted stoichiometrically balanced metabolic pathway for butyrate, formate, lactate, CO 2 , and H 2 production by members of both Clostridium cluster IV and XIVa butyrate-producing bacteria was constructed.

  15. Leptin counteracts sodium butyrate-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer HT-29 cells via NF-kappaB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet-Benzineb, Patricia; Aparicio, Thomas; Guilmeau, Sandra; Pouzet, Cécile; Descatoire, Véronique; Buyse, Marion; Bado, André

    2004-04-16

    This study shows that leptin induced a rapid phosphorylation of p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase, an enhancement of both NF-kappaB DNA binding and transcriptional activities, and a concentration-dependent increase of HT-29 cell proliferation. These effects are consistent with the presence of leptin receptors on cell membranes. The leptin induction of cell growth was associated with an increase of cell population in S and G2/M phase compared with control cells found in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, cyclin D1 immunoreactivity was enhanced in leptin-treated HT-29 cells and this increase was essentially associated with cell population in G0/G1 phase. On the other hand, we observed that sodium butyrate inhibited cell proliferation by blocking HT-29 cells in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Interestingly, at physiological concentration, leptin prevented sodium butyrate-induced morphological nucleus changes, DNA laddering and suppressed butyrate-induced cell cycle arrest. This anti-apoptotic effect of leptin was associated with HT-29 cell proliferation and activation NF-kappaB pathways. However, the phosphorylation of p42/44 MAP kinase in response to leptin was reduced in butyrate-treated cells. These data demonstrated that leptin is a potent mitogenic factor for intestinal epithelial cells through the MAP kinase and NF-kappaB pathways. They also showed, for the first time, that leptin promotes colon cancer HT-29 cell survival upon butyrate challenge by counteracting the apoptotic programs initiated by this short chain fatty acid probably through the NF-kappaB pathways. Although further studies are required to unravel the precise mechanism, these data may have significance in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and ulcerative colitis diseases.

  16. Time-dependent effect of graphene on the structure, abundance, and function of the soil bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenjie; Ren, Gaidi; Teng, Ying; Li, Zhengao; Li, Lina

    2015-10-30

    The increased application of graphene raises concerns about its environmental impact, but little information is available on the effect of graphene on the soil microbial community. This study evaluated the impact of graphene on the structure, abundance and function of the soil bacterial community based on quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), pyrosequencing and soil enzyme activities. The results show that the enzyme activities of dehydrogenase and fluorescein diacetate (FDA) esterase and the biomass of the bacterial populations were transiently promoted by the presence of graphene after 4 days of exposure, but these parameters recovered completely after 21 days. Pyrosequencing analysis suggested a significant shift in some bacterial populations after 4 days, and the shift became weaker or disappeared as the exposure time increased to 60 days. During the entire exposure process, the majority of bacterial phylotypes remained unaffected. Some bacterial populations involved in nitrogen biogeochemical cycles and the degradation of organic compounds can be affected by the presence of graphene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of indole butyric acid on micrografting of cactus | Moghadam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of indole butyric acid on micrografting of cactus. ARL Moghadam, ZO Ardebili, L Rezaie. Abstract. Grafting is a common technique to propagate cacti species. Gymnocalycium mihanovichii is an ornamental plant and they should be grafted to root stock containing chlorophyll. In this research, exogenous auxin ...

  18. Effect of butyric acid supplementation and whole wheat inclusion on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of butyric acid supplementation and whole wheat inclusion on the performance and carcass traits of broilers. ... South African Journal of Animal Science ... Dietary supplementation with BA had no effect on average weight gain (AWG) or feed conversion ratio (FCR) in the starter, grower/finisher and over whole (0 - 42 d) ...

  19. Butyrate Suppresses The Severity Of Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short chain fatty acids are increasingly used as food additives due to the health benefits they have. Recently, they have been implicated in protecting patients against intestinal disorders but without a well-known mechanism. We explored the benefits of a major short chain fatty acid, butyrate on experimental ulcerative colitis ...

  20. Drug-loaded Cellulose Acetate and Cellulose Acetate Butyrate Films ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this research work was to evaluate the contribution of formulation variables on release properties of matrix type ocular films containing chloramphenicol as a model drug. This study investigated the use of cellulose acetate and cellulose acetate butyrate as film-forming agents in development of ocular films.

  1. Effects of acetic, propionic and butyric acids given intraruminally at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... gluconeogenesis (Bergman, 1990). However, the contri- bution of propionate to blood glucose via gluconeogenesis could probably be covered by the glucose infused into the abomasum. Effects of acetic, propionic and butyric acids given individually on rumen papillae size, and IGF-I, IGFBP-. 3, GH and ...

  2. Alternate splicing regulated by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a signaling molecule and a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HADCs), butyrate exerts its impacts on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. In this study, we examined the effect of...

  3. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle and specific cell synchronization with butyrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. The possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells was explored and the properties of butyrate-induced cell ...

  4. Butyrate reduces appetite and activates brown adipose tissue via the gut-brain neural circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Zhuang; Yi, Chun-Xia; Katiraei, Saeed; Kooijman, Sander; Zhou, Enchen; Chung, Chih Kit; Gao, Yuanqing; van den Heuvel, José K.; Meijer, Onno C.; Berbée, Jimmy F. P.; Heijink, Marieke; Giera, Martin; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Groen, Albert K.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Wang, Yanan

    2017-01-01

    Butyrate exerts metabolic benefits in mice and humans, the underlying mechanisms being still unclear. We aimed to investigate the effect of butyrate on appetite and energy expenditure, and to what extent these two components contribute to the beneficial metabolic effects of butyrate. Acute effects

  5. Co-variation of bacterial and fungal communities in different sorghum cultivars and growth stages is soil dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlemper, T.R.; van Veen, J.A.; Kuramae, E.E.

    2017-01-01

    Rhizosphere microbial community composition can be influenced by different biotic and abiotic factors. We investigated the composition and co-variation of rhizosphere bacterial and fungal communities from two sorghum genotypes (BRS330 and SRN-39) in three different plant growth stages (emergence of

  6. Infusion of butyrate affects plasma glucose, butyrate, and ß-hydroxybutyrate but not plasma insulin in lactating dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects on plasma metabolites and rumen measures when butyrate was infused into the rumen or abomasum of lactating cows. Jugular catheters were inserted into 5 ruminally fistulated Holstein cows (94.2 ± 26.3 days in milk [DIM]; 717 ± 45 kg body w...

  7. Diversity of Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Vibrio cholerae in Natural Transformation and Contact-Dependent Bacterial Killing Indicative of Type VI Secretion System Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardy, Eryn E; Turnsek, Maryann A; Wilson, Sarah K; Tarr, Cheryl L; Hammer, Brian K

    2016-05-01

    The bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholerae can occupy both the human gut and aquatic reservoirs, where it may colonize chitinous surfaces that induce the expression of factors for three phenotypes: chitin utilization, DNA uptake by natural transformation, and contact-dependent bacterial killing via a type VI secretion system (T6SS). In this study, we surveyed a diverse set of 53 isolates from different geographic locales collected over the past century from human clinical and environmental specimens for each phenotype outlined above. The set included pandemic isolates of serogroup O1, as well as several serogroup O139 and non-O1/non-O139 strains. We found that while chitin utilization was common, only 22.6% of the isolates tested were proficient at chitin-induced natural transformation, suggesting that transformation is expendable. Constitutive contact-dependent killing of Escherichia coli prey, which is indicative of a functional T6SS, was rare among clinical isolates (only 4 of 29) but common among environmental isolates (22 of 24). These results bolster the pathoadaptive model in which tight regulation of T6SS-mediated bacterial killing is beneficial in a human host, whereas constitutive killing by environmental isolates may give a competitive advantage in natural settings. Future sequence analysis of this set of diverse isolates may identify previously unknown regulators and structural components for both natural transformation and T6SS. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Bacterial deposition in a parallel plate and a stagnation point flow chamber: microbial adhesion mechanisms depend on the mass transport conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Dewi P; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2002-02-01

    Deposition onto glass in a parallel plate (PP) and in a stagnation point (SP) flow chamber of Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Psychrobacter sp. and Halomonas pacifica, suspended in artificial seawater, was compared in order to determine the influence of methodology on bacterial adhesion mechanisms. The three strains had different cell surface hydrophobicities, with water contact angles on bacterial lawns ranging from 18 to 85 degrees. Bacterial zeta potentials in artificial seawater were essentially zero. The three strains showed different adhesion kinetics and the hydrophilic bacterium H. pacifica had the greatest affinity for hydrophilic glass. On average, initial deposition rates were two- to threefold higher in the SP than in the PP flow chamber, possibly due to the convective fluid flow toward the substratum surface in the SP flow chamber causing more intimate contact between a substratum and a bacterial cell surface than the gentle collisions in the PP flow chamber. The ratios between the experimental deposition rates and theoretically calculated deposition rates based on mass transport equations not only differed among the strains, but were also different for the two flow chambers, indicating different mechanisms under the two modes of mass transport. The efficiencies of deposition were higher in the SP flow chamber than in the PP flow chamber: 62+/-4 and 114+/-28% respectively. Experiments in the SP flow chamber were more reproducible than those in the PP flow chamber, with standard deviations over triplicate runs of 8% in the SP and 23% in the PP flow chamber. This is probably due to better-controlled convective mass transport in the SP flow chamber, as compared with the diffusion-controlled mass transport in the PP flow chamber. In conclusion, this study shows that bacterial adhesion mechanisms depend on the prevailing mass transport conditions in the experimental set-up used, which makes it essential in the design of experiments that a methodology is

  9. Comparative analysis of bacterial community composition in bulk tank raw milk by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods using the viability dye propidium monoazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Mareike; Geißert, Janina; Kruse, Myriam; Lipski, André

    2014-11-01

    Microbial diversity of 3 raw milk samples after 72 h of storage at 4 °C in a bulk tank was analyzed by culture-dependent and -independent methods. The culture-dependent approach was based on the isolation of bacteria on complex and selective media, chemotaxonomic differentiation of isolates, and subsequent identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The culture-independent approach included the treatment of raw milk with the dye propidium monoazide before direct DNA extraction by mechanic and enzymatic cell lysis approaches, and cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. The selective detection of viable bacteria improved the comparability between bacterial compositions of raw milk based on culture-dependent and -independent methods, which was the major objective of this study. Several bacterial species of the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were detected by the culture-dependent method, whereas mainly bacteria of the phylum Proteobacteria as well as low proportions of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were detected by the culture-independent method. This led to the conclusion that the phylum Firmicutes was strongly discriminated by the culture-independent approach. Generally, species richness detected by the culture-dependent method was higher than that detected by the culture-independent method for all samples. However, few taxa could be detected solely by the direct DNA-based method. In conclusion, the combination of culture-dependent and -independent methods led to the detection of the highest bacterial diversity for the raw milk samples analyzed. It was shown that DNA extraction from raw milk as the essential step in culture-independent methods causes the discrimination of taxa by incomplete cell lysis. Treatment of raw milk with the viability dye propidium monoazide was optimized for the application in raw milk without former removal of milk ingredients and proved to be a suitable tool to ensure comparability

  10. Butyrate inhibits seeding and growth of colorectal metastases to the liver in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, O C; Jabbar, A; DeMatteo, R P; Rombeau, J L

    1996-08-01

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate inhibits growth of colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro. Mevalonate, a short-chain fatty acid structurally and metabolically related to butyrate, is important in signal transduction and is essential for cell growth. We investigated butyrate's effects on seeding and growth of colorectal tumor cells metastatic to the liver in vivo and hypothesized that butyrate's antiproliferative effects are associated with inhibition of mevalonate-mediated cell growth. Hepatic metastases were induced by injecting 1 x 10(5) MC-26 (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced murine colorectal carcinoma) cells into the spleen of BALB/c mice. Mice were treated with a continuous intravenous infusion of butyrate (2 gm/kg/day) for 7 days starting 24 hours before tumor cells were injected. Study variables included liver weight and number of hepatic surface metastases. Proliferation studies on MC-26 cells were performed in vitro to examine the effects of butyrate alone or combined with mevalonate or mevastatin (an inhibitor of mevalonate synthesis). Butyrate reduced seeding and growth of colorectal tumor cells in vivo. Mevalonate diminished butyrate's antiproliferative action in vitro, whereas mevastatin potentiated this effect. These studies (1) show that butyrate inhibits seeding and growth of hepatic colorectal metastases in vivo, (2) associate butyrate's antiproliferative effects with inhibition of mevalonate-mediated cell growth, and (3) indicate that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors may have synergistic antiproliferative effects when combined with butyrate.

  11. Effects of altered groundwater chemistry upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial attachment during transport within an organically contaminated sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Metge, David W.; Barber, Larry B.; Aiken, George R.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a dilute (ionic strength = 5 ?? 10-3 M) plume of treated sewage, with elevated levels (3.9 mg/L) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial transport through an iron-laden, quartz sand aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) were evaluated using sets of replicate, static minicolumns. Compared with uncontaminated groundwater, the plume chemistry diminished bacterial attachment under mildly acidic (pH 5.0-6.5) in-situ conditions, in spite of the 5-fold increase in ionic strength and substantively enhanced attachment under more alkaline conditions. The effects of the hydrophobic neutral and total fractions of the plume DOC; modest concentrations of fulvic and humic acids (1.5 mg/L); linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) (25 mg/L); Imbentin (200 ??g/L), a model nonionic surfactant; sulfate (28 mg/L); and calcium (20 mg/L) varied sharply in response to relatively small changes in pH, although the plume constituents collectively decreased the pH-dependency of bacterial attachment. LAS and other hydrophobic neutrals (collectively representing only ???3% of the plume DOC) had a disproportionately large effect upon bacterial attachment, as did the elevated concentrations of sulfate within the plume. The findings further suggest that the roles of organic plume constituents in transport or bacteria through acidic aquifer sediments can be very different than would be predicted from column studies performed at circumneutral pH and that the inorganic constituents within the plume cannot be ignored.

  12. Characterization and heterologous expression of an age-dependent fungal/bacterial type chitinase of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Eva; Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Miskei, M; Barna, Teréz; Pócsi, I

    2008-09-01

    Under carbon starvation, Aspergillus nidulans produced a fungal/bacterial type chitinase, ChiB. The chiB gene was cloned and subcloned into pJC40 expression vector containing a 10XHis fusion tag, and the ChiB protein was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. Recombinant and native ChiB enzymes shared the same optimal pH ranges and showed similar substrate specificities with endo-acting cleavage patterns.

  13. Morphine induces bacterial translocation in mice by compromising intestinal barrier function in a TLR-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Meng

    Full Text Available Opiates are among the most prescribed drugs for pain management. However, morphine use or abuse results in significant gut bacterial translocation and predisposes patients to serious infections with gut origin. The mechanism underlying this defect is still unknown. In this report, we investigated the mechanisms underlying compromised gut immune function and bacterial translocation following morphine treatment. We demonstrate significant bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph node (MLN and liver following morphine treatment in wild-type (WT animals that was dramatically and significantly attenuated in Toll-like receptor (TLR2 and 4 knockout mice. We further observed significant disruption of tight junction protein organization only in the ileum but not in the colon of morphine treated WT animals. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK blocked the effects of both morphine and TLR ligands, suggesting the role of MLCK in tight junction modulation by TLR. This study conclusively demonstrates that morphine induced gut epithelial barrier dysfunction and subsequent bacteria translocation are mediated by TLR signaling and thus TLRs can be exploited as potential therapeutic targets for alleviating infections and even sepsis in morphine-using or abusing populations.

  14. Campylobacter jejuni mediated disruption of polarized epithelial monolayers is cell-type specific, time dependent, and correlates with bacterial invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wine, Eytan; Chan, Voon L; Sherman, Philip M

    2008-12-01

    The precise mechanism by which the most common cause of bacterial enterocolitis in humans, Campylobacter jejuni, perturbs the intestinal mucosa remains elusive. To define effects of C. jejuni infection on mucosal permeability, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK)-I and T84 cell monolayers were infected with C. jejuni for up to 48 h. All three tested C. jejuni strains caused a 73-78% reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in intestinal (T84) cell monolayers, whereas only one strain slightly reduced TER of MDCK-I cells by 25% after 48 h infection. Infection with C. jejuni strains also caused a 2.3-4.5-fold increase in dextran permeability, but only in T84 cells. C. jejuni infection of monolayers also caused morphologic changes in desmosomes, observed by transmission electron microscopy. The cell-type specificity, demonstrated by increased T84 monolayer permeability, correlated with higher bacterial invasion into these cells, relative to MDCK-I cells. In T84 cells, invasion and bacterial translocation preceded barrier disruption and inhibition of C. jejuni invasion using a pharmacological inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, reduced the drop in TER. These findings suggest that C. jejuni disruption of monolayers is mediated by invasion, provide new insights into C. jejuni-host epithelial barrier interactions, and offer potential mechanisms of intestinal injury and chronic immune stimulation.

  15. Importance of release location on the mode of action of butyrate derivatives in the avian gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moquet, P.C.A.; Onrust, L.; Immerseel, Van F.; Ducatelle, R.; Hendriks, W.H.; Kwakkel, R.P.

    2016-01-01

    In the field of animal nutrition, butyrate is used as a zootechnical ingredient and can be used as an unprotected salt or in the form of protected derivatives such as butyrate glycerides or butyrate-loaded matrices. Dietary butyrate supplementation has been shown to improve growth performance and

  16. Bacterial cyclomodulin Cif blocks the host cell cycle by stabilizing the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Watrin, Claude; Jubelin, Grégory; Oswald, Eric; Taieb, Frédéric

    2008-12-01

    The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is a cyclomodulin produced by enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Upon injection into the host cell by the bacterial type III secretion system, Cif inhibits the G2/M transition via sustained inhibition of the mitosis inducer CDK1 independently of the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that Cif induces not only G2, but also G1 cell cycle arrest depending on the stage of cells in the cell cycle during the infection. In various cell lines including differentiated and untransformed enterocytes, the cell cycle arrests are correlated with the accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1). Cif-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor accumulation is independent of the p53 pathway but occurs through inhibition of their proteasome-mediated degradation. Our results provide a direct link between the mode of action of Cif and the host cell cycle control.

  17. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lip Nam Loh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl amiloride (EIPA and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling.

  18. Cholesterylbutyrate Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as a Butyric Acid Prodrug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Mauro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterylbutyrate (Chol-but was chosen as a prodrug of butyric acid.Butyrate is not often used in vivo because its half-life is very short and therefore too largeamounts of the drug would be necessary for its efficacy. In the last few years butyric acid'santi-inflammatory properties and its inhibitory activity towards histone deacetylases havebeen widely studied, mainly in vitro. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs, whose lipid matrixis Chol-but, were prepared to evaluate the delivery system of Chol-but as a prodrug and totest its efficacy in vitro and in vivo. Chol-but SLNs were prepared using the microemulsionmethod; their average diameter is on the order of 100-150 nm and their shape is spherical.The antineoplastic effects of Chol-but SLNs were assessed in vitro on different cancer celllines and in vivo on a rat intracerebral glioma model. The anti-inflammatory activity wasevaluated on adhesion of polymorphonuclear cells to vascular endothelial cells. In thereview we will present data on Chol-but SLNs in vitro and in vivo experiments, discussingthe possible utilisation of nanoparticles for the delivery of prodrugs for neoplastic andchronic inflammatory diseases.

  19. Bacterial radiosensitivity to gamma and ultraviolet. Compositional dependence and repair mechanisms; Radiosensibilidad bacteriana frente a gamma y ultravioleta. Dependencia composicional y mecanismos de reparacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez Angulo, R. M.; Davila, C. A.

    1974-07-01

    The gamma and ultraviolet radiosensitivity of several species of bacteria has been determined its dependence on DNAs composition and repair processes has been studied. Base composition are evaluated by chromatography, DNA melting temperature and isopycnic sedimentation on CsCl gradient. Repair capacity of gamma -and UV- lesions has been studied in two bacterial strains with same DMA base composition. It is concluded that the postulated correlation between radiosensitivity and base composition can not be generalized, the enzymatic repair mechanisms being of determining on radiosensitivity. (Author) 248 refs.

  20. Radiation-Dependent Limit for the Viability of Bacterial Spores in Halite Fluid Inclusions and on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kminek, Gerhard; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Pogliano, Kit; Ward, John F.

    2003-01-01

    When claims for the long-term survival of viable organisms are made, either within terrestrial minerals or on Mars, considerations should be made of the limitations imposed by the naturally occurring radiation dose to which they have been exposed. We investigated the effect of ionizing radiation on different bacterial spores by measuring the inactivation constants for B. subtilis and s. marismortui spores in solution as well as for dry spores of B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis. S. marismortui is a halophilic spore that is genetically similar to the recently discovered 2-9-3 bacterium from a halite fluid inclusion, claimed to be 250 million years old, B. thuringiensis is a soil bacterium that is genetically similar to the human pathogens B. anthracis and B. cereus. To relate the inactivation constant to some realistic environments, we calculated the radiation regimen in a halite fluid inclusion and in the Martian subsurface over time. Our conclusion is that the ionizing dose of radiation in those environments limits the survival of viable bacterial spores over long periods. In the absence of an active repair mechanism in the dormant state, the long-term survival of spores is limited to less than 109 million years in halite fluid inclusions, to 100 to 160 million years in the Martian subsurface below 3 m, and to less than 600,000 years in the upper-most meter of Mars.

  1. Hypoxia determines survival outcomes of bacterial infection through HIF-1alpha dependent re-programming of leukocyte metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A A R; Dickinson, R S; Murphy, F; Thomson, J P; Marriott, H M; Tavares, A; Willson, J; Williams, L; Lewis, A; Mirchandani, A; Dos Santos Coelho, P; Doherty, C; Ryan, E; Watts, E; Morton, N M; Forbes, S; Stimson, R H; Hameed, A G; Arnold, N; Preston, J A; Lawrie, A; Finisguerra, V; Mazzone, M; Sadiku, P; Goveia, J; Taverna, F; Carmeliet, P; Foster, S J; Chilvers, E R; Cowburn, A S; Dockrell, D H; Johnson, R S; Meehan, R R; Whyte, M K B; Walmsley, S R

    2017-02-10

    Hypoxia and bacterial infection frequently co-exist, in both acute and chronic clinical settings, and typically result in adverse clinical outcomes. To ameliorate this morbidity, we investigated the interaction between hypoxia and the host response. In the context of acute hypoxia, both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae infections rapidly induced progressive neutrophil mediated morbidity and mortality, with associated hypothermia and cardiovascular compromise. Preconditioning animals through longer exposures to hypoxia, prior to infection, prevented these pathophysiological responses and profoundly dampened the transcriptome of circulating leukocytes. Specifically, perturbation of HIF pathway and glycolysis genes by hypoxic preconditioning was associated with reduced leukocyte glucose utilisation, resulting in systemic rescue from a global negative energy state and myocardial protection. Thus we demonstrate that hypoxia preconditions the innate immune response and determines survival outcomes following bacterial infection through suppression of HIF-1α and neutrophil metabolism. The therapeutic implications of this work are that in the context of systemic or tissue hypoxia therapies that target the host response could improve infection associated morbidity and mortality.

  2. Hypoxia determines survival outcomes of bacterial infection through HIF-1alpha dependent re-programming of leukocyte metabolism *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A.A.R.; Dickinson, R.S.; Murphy, F.; Thomson, J. P.; Marriott, H.M.; Tavares, A.; Willson, J.; Williams, L.; Lewis, A.; Mirchandani, A.; Dos Santos Coelho, P.; Doherty, C.; Ryan, E.; Watts, E.; Morton, N. M.; Forbes, S.; Stimson, R. H.; Hameed, A. G.; Arnold, N.; Preston, J.A.; Lawrie, A.; Finisguerra, V.; Mazzone, M.; Sadiku, P.; Goveia, J.; Taverna, F.; Carmeliet, P.; Foster, S.J.; Chilvers, E.R.; Cowburn, A.S.; Dockrell, D.H.; Johnson, R.S.; Meehan, R. R.; Whyte, M.K.B.; Walmsley, S.R.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia and bacterial infection frequently co-exist, in both acute and chronic clinical settings, and typically result in adverse clinical outcomes. To ameliorate this morbidity, we investigated the interaction between hypoxia and the host response. In the context of acute hypoxia, both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae infections rapidly induced progressive neutrophil mediated morbidity and mortality, with associated hypothermia and cardiovascular compromise. Preconditioning animals through longer exposures to hypoxia, prior to infection, prevented these pathophysiological responses and profoundly dampened the transcriptome of circulating leukocytes. Specifically, perturbation of HIF pathway and glycolysis genes by hypoxic preconditioning was associated with reduced leukocyte glucose utilisation, resulting in systemic rescue from a global negative energy state and myocardial protection. Thus we demonstrate that hypoxia preconditions the innate immune response and determines survival outcomes following bacterial infection through suppression of HIF-1α and neutrophil metabolism. The therapeutic implications of this work are that in the context of systemic or tissue hypoxia therapies that target the host response could improve infection associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:28386604

  3. SIGIRR, a negative regulator of TLR/IL-1R signalling promotes Microbiota dependent resistance to colonization by enteric bacterial pathogens.

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    Ho Pan Sham

    Full Text Available Enteric bacterial pathogens such as enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC and Salmonella Typhimurium target the intestinal epithelial cells (IEC lining the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. Despite expressing innate Toll-like receptors (TLRs, IEC are innately hypo-responsive to most bacterial products. This is thought to prevent maladaptive inflammatory responses against commensal bacteria, but it also limits antimicrobial responses by IEC to invading bacterial pathogens, potentially increasing host susceptibility to infection. One reason for the innate hypo-responsiveness of IEC is their expression of Single Ig IL-1 Related Receptor (SIGIRR, a negative regulator of interleukin (IL-1 and TLR signaling. To address whether SIGIRR expression and the innate hypo-responsiveness of IEC impacts on enteric host defense, Sigirr deficient (-/- mice were infected with the EHEC related pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Sigirr -/- mice responded with accelerated IEC proliferation and strong pro-inflammatory and antimicrobial responses but surprisingly, Sigirr -/- mice proved dramatically more susceptible to infection than wildtype mice. Through haematopoietic transplantation studies, it was determined that SIGIRR expression by non-haematopoietic cells (putative IEC regulated these responses. Moreover, the exaggerated responses were found to be primarily dependent on IL-1R signaling. Whilst exploring the basis for their susceptibility, Sigirr -/- mice were found to be unusually susceptible to intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium colonization, developing enterocolitis without the typical requirement for antibiotic based removal of competing commensal microbes. Strikingly, the exaggerated antimicrobial responses seen in Sigirr -/- mice were found to cause a rapid and dramatic loss of commensal microbes from the infected intestine. This depletion appears to reduce the ability of the microbiota to compete for space and nutrients (colonization resistance with the invading

  4. Rumen microbial and fermentation characteristics are affected differently by bacterial probiotic supplementation during induced lactic and subacute acidosis in sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Ruminal disbiosis induced by feeding is the cause of ruminal acidosis, a digestive disorder prevalent in high-producing ruminants. Because probiotic microorganisms can modulate the gastrointestinal microbiota, propionibacteria- and lactobacilli-based probiotics were tested for their effectiveness in preventing different forms of acidosis. Results Lactic acidosis, butyric and propionic subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) were induced by feed chalenges in three groups of four wethers intraruminally dosed with wheat, corn or beet pulp. In each group, wethers were either not supplemented (C) or supplemented with Propionibacterium P63 alone (P) or combined with L. plantarum (Lp + P) or L. rhamnosus (Lr + P). Compared with C, all the probiotics stimulated lactobacilli proliferation, which reached up to 25% of total bacteria during wheat-induced lactic acidosis. This induced a large increase in lactate concentration, which decreased ruminal pH. During the corn-induced butyric SARA, Lp + P decreased Prevotella spp. proportion with a concomitant decrease in microbial amylase activity and total volatile fatty acids concentration, and an increase in xylanase activity and pH. Relative to the beet pulp-induced propionic SARA, P and Lr + P improved ruminal pH without affecting the microbial or fermentation characteristics. Regardless of acidosis type, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that probiotic supplementations modified the bacterial community structure. Conclusion This work showed that the effectiveness of the bacterial probiotics tested depended on the acidosis type. Although these probiotics were ineffective in lactic acidosis because of a deeply disturbed rumen microbiota, some of the probiotics tested may be useful to minimize the occurrence of butyric and propionic SARA in sheep. However, their modes of action need to be further investigated. PMID:22812531

  5. Rumen microbial and fermentation characteristics are affected differently by bacterial probiotic supplementation during induced lactic and subacute acidosis in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettat, Abderzak; Nozière, Pierre; Silberberg, Mathieu; Morgavi, Diego P; Berger, Claudette; Martin, Cécile

    2012-07-19

    Ruminal disbiosis induced by feeding is the cause of ruminal acidosis, a digestive disorder prevalent in high-producing ruminants. Because probiotic microorganisms can modulate the gastrointestinal microbiota, propionibacteria- and lactobacilli-based probiotics were tested for their effectiveness in preventing different forms of acidosis. Lactic acidosis, butyric and propionic subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) were induced by feed chalenges in three groups of four wethers intraruminally dosed with wheat, corn or beet pulp. In each group, wethers were either not supplemented (C) or supplemented with Propionibacterium P63 alone (P) or combined with L. plantarum (Lp + P) or L. rhamnosus (Lr + P). Compared with C, all the probiotics stimulated lactobacilli proliferation, which reached up to 25% of total bacteria during wheat-induced lactic acidosis. This induced a large increase in lactate concentration, which decreased ruminal pH. During the corn-induced butyric SARA, Lp + P decreased Prevotella spp. proportion with a concomitant decrease in microbial amylase activity and total volatile fatty acids concentration, and an increase in xylanase activity and pH. Relative to the beet pulp-induced propionic SARA, P and Lr + P improved ruminal pH without affecting the microbial or fermentation characteristics. Regardless of acidosis type, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that probiotic supplementations modified the bacterial community structure. This work showed that the effectiveness of the bacterial probiotics tested depended on the acidosis type. Although these probiotics were ineffective in lactic acidosis because of a deeply disturbed rumen microbiota, some of the probiotics tested may be useful to minimize the occurrence of butyric and propionic SARA in sheep. However, their modes of action need to be further investigated.

  6. Rumen microbial and fermentation characteristics are affected differently by bacterial probiotic supplementation during induced lactic and subacute acidosis in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lettat Abderzak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ruminal disbiosis induced by feeding is the cause of ruminal acidosis, a digestive disorder prevalent in high-producing ruminants. Because probiotic microorganisms can modulate the gastrointestinal microbiota, propionibacteria- and lactobacilli-based probiotics were tested for their effectiveness in preventing different forms of acidosis. Results Lactic acidosis, butyric and propionic subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA were induced by feed chalenges in three groups of four wethers intraruminally dosed with wheat, corn or beet pulp. In each group, wethers were either not supplemented (C or supplemented with Propionibacterium P63 alone (P or combined with L. plantarum (Lp + P or L. rhamnosus (Lr + P. Compared with C, all the probiotics stimulated lactobacilli proliferation, which reached up to 25% of total bacteria during wheat-induced lactic acidosis. This induced a large increase in lactate concentration, which decreased ruminal pH. During the corn-induced butyric SARA, Lp + P decreased Prevotella spp. proportion with a concomitant decrease in microbial amylase activity and total volatile fatty acids concentration, and an increase in xylanase activity and pH. Relative to the beet pulp-induced propionic SARA, P and Lr + P improved ruminal pH without affecting the microbial or fermentation characteristics. Regardless of acidosis type, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that probiotic supplementations modified the bacterial community structure. Conclusion This work showed that the effectiveness of the bacterial probiotics tested depended on the acidosis type. Although these probiotics were ineffective in lactic acidosis because of a deeply disturbed rumen microbiota, some of the probiotics tested may be useful to minimize the occurrence of butyric and propionic SARA in sheep. However, their modes of action need to be further investigated.

  7. Surface modification of bacterial cellulose nanofibers for property enhancement of optically transparent composites: dependence on acetyl-group DS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifuku, Shinsuke; Nogi, Masaya; Abe, Kentaro; Handa, Keishin; Nakatsubo, Fumiaki; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2007-06-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers were acetylated to enhance the properties of optically transparent composites of acrylic resin reinforced with the nanofibers. A series of BC nanofibers acetylated from degree-of-substitution (DS) 0 to 1.76 were obtained. X-ray diffraction profiles indicated that acetylation proceeded from the surface to the core of BC nanofibers, and scanning electron microscopy images showed that the volume of nanofibers increases by the bulky acetyl group. Since acetylation decreased the refractive index of cellulose, regular transmittance of composites comprised of 63% BC nanofiber was improved, and deterioration at 580 nm because of fiber reinforcement was suppressed to only 3.4%. Acetylation of nanofibers changed their surface properties and reduced the moisture content of the composite to about one-third that of untreated composite, although excessive acetylation increased hygroscopicity. Furthermore, acetylation was found to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion of a BC sheet from 3 x 10(-6) to below 1 x 10(-6) 1/K.

  8. Absence of phosphatidylcholine in bacterial membranes facilitates translocation of Sec-dependent β-lactamase AmpC from cytoplasm to periplasm in two Pseudomonas strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Sun, Yufang; Cao, Fang; Xiong, Min; Yang, Sheng; Li, Yang; Yu, Xuejing; Li, Yadong; Wang, Xingguo

    2017-05-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a rare membrane lipid in bacteria but crucial for virulence of various plant and animal pathogens. The pcs- mutant lacking PC in bacterial membranes of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall 1336 displayed more ampicillin resistance. Ampicillin susceptibility tests gave an IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) of 52 mg/ml for Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall 1336, 53 mg/ml for the complemented strain 1336 RM (pcs-/+) and 90 mg/ml for the 1336 pcs- mutant. Activity assay of β-lactamase in periplasmic extracts gave 0.050 U/mg for the 1336 wild type, 0.052 U/mg for the 1336RM (pcs-/+), 0.086 U/mg for the 1336 pcs- mutant. Analysis by western blotting showed that the content of AmpC enzyme was markedly different in periplasmic extracts between the wild-type and pcs- mutant strains. Reverse transcriptase PCR also showed that the presence or absence of PC in bacterial membranes did not affect the transcription of ampC gene. The phenotype of the pcs- mutant was able to be recovered to the wild type by introducing a wild-type pcs gene into the pcs- mutant. Similar results were also obtained from the soil-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 593. Our results demonstrate that the absence of PC in bacterial membranes facilitates the translocation of Sec-dependent β-lactamase AmpC from cytoplasm to periplasm, and the enhanced ampicillin-resistance in the pcs- strains mainly comes from effective translocation of AmpC via Sec-pathway. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of potentially functional biphenyl-degrading bacterial community in response to extracellular organic matter from Micrococcus luteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Yin-Dong; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Ding, Lin-Xian; Shen, Chao-Feng

    2015-05-01

    Biphenyl (BP)-degrading bacteria were identified to degrade various polychlorinated BP (PCB) congers in long-term PCB-contaminated sites. Exploring BP-degrading capability of potentially useful bacteria was performed for enhancing PCB bioremediation. In the present study, the bacterial composition of the PCB-contaminated sediment sample was first investigated. Then extracellular organic matter (EOM) from Micrococcus luteus was used to enhance BP biodegradation. The effect of the EOM on the composition of bacterial community was investigated by combining with culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The obtained results indicate that Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were predominant community in the PCB-contaminated sediment. EOM from M. luteus could stimulate the activity of some potentially difficult-to-culture BP degraders, which contribute to significant enhancement of BP biodegradation. The potentially difficult-to-culture bacteria in response to EOM addition were mainly Rhodococcus and Pseudomonas belonging to Gammaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria respectively. This study provides new insights into exploration of functional difficult-to-culture bacteria with EOM addition and points out broader BP/PCB degrading, which could be employed for enhancing PCB-bioremediation processes. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Nutrient balance of layers fed diets with different calcium levels and the inclusion of phytase and/or sodium butyrate

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    MM Vieira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Hisex Brown layers in lay were evaluated between 40 and 44 weeks of age to evaluate the inclusion of bacterial phytase (Ph and sodium butyrate (SB to diets containing different calcium levels (CaL. Performance, average egg weight and eggshell percentage, in addition to nutrient metabolizability and Ca and P balance were evaluated for 28 days. Birds were distributed according to a completely randomized experimental design with a 3x2x2 factorial arrangement, with three calcium levels (2.8, 3.3, 3.8%; the addition or not of phytase (500PhU/kg and the addition or not of sodium butyrate (20mEq/kg, composing 12 treatments with eight replicates of one bird each. There was no additive effect of phytase or SB on the evaluated responses. Feed intake and feed conversion ratio were influenced by CaL, with the best performance obtained with 3.3% dietary Ca. Ca balance was positively affected by dietary Ca, and P balance by the addition of phytase. Ca dietary concentration, estimated to obtain Ca body balance, was 3.41%, corresponding to an apparent retention of 59.9% of Ca intake.

  11. Use of Acetate, Propionate, and Butyrate for Reduction of Nitrate and Sulfate and Methanogenesis in Microcosms and Bioreactors Simulating an Oil Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Shen, Yin; An, Dongshan; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2017-04-01

    Acetate, propionate, and butyrate (volatile fatty acids [VFA]) occur in oil field waters and are frequently used for microbial growth of oil field consortia. We determined the kinetics of use of these VFA components (3 mM each) by an anaerobic oil field consortium in microcosms containing 2 mM sulfate and 0, 4, 6, 8, or 13 mM nitrate. Nitrate was reduced first, with a preference for acetate and propionate. Sulfate reduction then proceeded with propionate (but not butyrate) as the electron donor, whereas the fermentation of butyrate (but not propionate) was associated with methanogenesis. Microbial community analyses indicated that Paracoccus and Thauera (Paracoccus-Thauera), Desulfobulbus, and Syntrophomonas-Methanobacterium were the dominant taxa whose members catalyzed these three processes. Most-probable-number assays showed the presence of up to 107/ml of propionate-oxidizing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in waters from the Medicine Hat Glauconitic C field. Bioreactors with the same concentrations of sulfate and VFA responded similarly to increasing concentrations of injected nitrate as observed in the microcosms: sulfide formation was prevented by adding approximately 80% of the nitrate dose needed to completely oxidize VFA to CO2 in both. Thus, this work has demonstrated that simple time-dependent observations of the use of acetate, propionate, and butyrate for nitrate reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis in microcosms are a good proxy for these processes in bioreactors, monitoring of which is more complex.IMPORTANCE Oil field volatile fatty acids acetate, propionate, and butyrate were specifically used for nitrate reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenic fermentation. Time-dependent analyses of microcosms served as a good proxy for these processes in a bioreactor, mimicking a sulfide-producing (souring) oil reservoir: 80% of the nitrate dose required to oxidize volatile fatty acids to CO2 was needed to prevent souring in both. Our data

  12. Effect of feeding sodium butyrate in the late finishing period on Salmonella carriage, seroprevalence, and growth of finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Kavita; Argüello, Hector; Lynch, Helen; Leonard, Finola C; Grant, Jim; Yearsley, Dermot; Kelly, Sinead; Duffy, Geraldine; Gardiner, Gillian E; Lawlor, Peadar G

    2016-09-01

    Pork is an important source of human salmonellosis and low-cost on-farm control measures may provide a useful element in reducing the prevalence of this pathogen in food. This study investigated the effectiveness of dietary supplementation with sodium butyrate administered to finisher pigs for ∼4-weeks prior to slaughter to control Salmonella shedding on highly contaminated farms. Two trials (A and B) were conducted on two commercial pig farms, which had a history of high Salmonella seroprevalence. In both trials, pens (14 pens of 12 pigs/pen in Trial A and 12 pens of 12-17 pigs/pen in Trial B) were randomly assigned to a control (finisher feed without additive) or a treatment group (the same feed with 3kg sodium butyrate/t) for 24-28days, depending on the trial. Faeces were collected from each pig on days 0, 12 and 24/28, and blood, caecal digesta and ileocaecal/mesenteric lymph nodes were collected from the slaughterhouse. Pigs were weighed at the start and end of the trials, feed intake was recorded, and carcass quality parameters were recorded at slaughter. In Trial A, Salmonella shedding was reduced in the treatment compared to the control group at the end of the trial (30% versus 57% probability of detecting Salmonella in faeces, respectively; pSalmonella recovery rates were observed in the caecal digesta or lymph nodes in either trial. Furthermore, feed intake, weight gain, and feed conversion efficiency (FCE) did not differ between groups (p>0.05) in either trial. Numerical improvements in weight gain and FCE were found with sodium butyrate treatment, which gave a cost benefit of €0.04/kg of live-weight gain. Overall, results suggest that strategic feeding of sodium butyrate, at 3kg/t of feed, to finishing pigs for 24-28days prior to slaughter was effective in reducing Salmonella shedding and seroprevalance but perhaps only in the absence of co-infection with other pathogens. However, sodium butyrate supplementation at this rate did not influence

  13. Effects of dietary sodium butyrate on hepatic biotransformation and pharmacokinetics of erythromycin in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csikó, G; Nagy, G; Mátis, G; Neogrády, Z; Kulcsár, Á; Jerzsele, A; Szekér, K; Gálfi, P

    2014-08-01

    Butyrate, a commonly applied feed additive in poultry nutrition, can modify the expression of certain genes, including those encoding cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. In comparative in vitro and in vivo experiments, the effect of butyrate on hepatic CYP genes was examined in primary cultures of chicken hepatocytes and in liver samples of chickens collected from animals that had been given butyrate as a feed additive. Moreover, the effect of butyrate on the biotransformation of erythromycin, a marker substance for the activity of enzymes of the CYP3A family, was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Butyrate increased the expression of the avian-specific CYP2H1 both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, the avian CYP3A37 expression was decreased in hepatocytes following butyrate exposure, but not in the in vivo model. CYP1A was suppressed by butyrate in the in vitro experiments, and overexpressed in vivo in butyrate-fed animals. The concomitant incubation of hepatocytes with butyrate and erythromycin led to an increased CYP2H1 expression and a less pronounced inhibition of CYP3A37. In in vivo pharmacokinetic experiments, butyrate-fed animals given a single i.m. injection of erythromycin, a slower absorption phase (longer T(half-abs) and delayed T(max)) but a rapid elimination phase of this marker substrate was observed. Although these measurable differences were detected in the pharmacokinetics of erythromycin, it is unlikely that a concomitant application of sodium butyrate with erythromycin or other CYP substrates will cause clinically significant feed-drug interaction in chickens. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Optimization of Enzymatically Prepared Hexyl Butyrate by Lipozyme IM-77

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wei Chang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hexyl butyrate, a green note flavour compound, is widely used in the food industry. The ability of immobilised lipase (Lipozyme IM-77 from Rhizomucor miehei to catalyse the transesterification of hexanol and tributyrin was investigated in this study. Response surface methodology (RSM and five-level-five-factor central composite rotatable design (CCRD were employed to evaluate the effects of synthesis parameters, such as reaction time (2 to 10 h, temperature (25 to 65 °C, enzyme amount (10 to 50 %, substrate amount (in mol ratio of tributyrin to hexanol (1:1 to 3:1, and added water content (0 to 20 %, on percentage amount (in mol conversion of hexyl butyrate by transesterification. Reaction time and enzyme amount were the most important variables and substrate amount (in mol ratio had less effect on the percentage of amount (in mol conversion. Based on canonical analysis, the optimum synthesis conditions were: reaction time 8.3 h, temperature 50 °C, enzyme amount 42.7 %, substrate amount (in mol ratio 1.8:1, and added water 12.6 %. The predicted value was 96.2 % and actual experimental value 95.3 % of the amount (in mol conversion.

  15. Monitoring bacterial communities in raw milk and cheese by culture-dependent and -independent 16S rRNA gene-based analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbès, Céline; Ali-Mandjee, Leila; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2007-03-01

    The diversity and dynamics of bacterial populations in Saint-Nectaire, a raw-milk, semihard cheese, were investigated using a dual culture-dependent and direct molecular approach combining single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprinting and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The dominant clones, among 125 16S rRNA genes isolated from milk, belonged to members of the Firmicutes (58% of the total clones) affiliated mainly with the orders Clostridiales and the Lactobacillales, followed by the phyla Proteobacteria (21.6%), Actinobacteria (16.8%), and Bacteroidetes (4%). Sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of 126 milk isolates collected from four culture media revealed the presence of 36 different species showing a wider diversity in the Gammaproteobacteria phylum and Staphylococcus genus than that found among clones. In cheese, a total of 21 species were obtained from 170 isolates, with dominant species belonging to the Lactobacillales and subdominant species affiliated with the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes (Chryseobacterium sp.), or Gammaproteobacteria (Stenotrophomonas sp.). Fingerprinting DNA isolated from milk by SSCP analysis yielded complex patterns, whereas analyzing DNA isolated from cheese resulted in patterns composed of a single peak which corresponded to that of lactic acid bacteria. SSCP fingerprinting of mixtures of all colonies harvested from plate count agar supplemented with crystal violet and vancomycin showed good potential for monitoring the subdominant Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteria) organisms in milk and cheese. Likewise, analyzing culturable subcommunities from cheese-ripening bacterial medium permitted assessment of the diversity of halotolerant Actinobacteria and Staphylococcus organisms. Direct and culture-dependent approaches produced complementary information, thus generating a more accurate view of milk and cheese microbial ecology.

  16. Composition and diversity analysis of the gut bacterial community of the Oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata, determined by culture-independent and culture-dependent techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cai; Nan, Xiaoning; Zhang, Zhengqing; Li, Menglou

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal bacteria community structure and diversity of the Oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), was studied by analysis of a 16S rDNA clone library, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis,and culture-dependent techniques. The 16S rDNA clone library revealed a bacterial community diversity comprising Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Gracilicutes and Proteobacteria, among which Escherichia coli (Migula) (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae) was the dominant bacteria. The intestinal bacteria isolated by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were classified to Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Gracilicutes, and E. coli was again the dominant bacteria. The culture-dependent technique showed that the intestinal bacteria belonged to Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, and Staphylococcus was the dominant bacteria. The intestinal bacteria of M. separata were widely distributed among the groups Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Gracilicutes, Proteobacteria, and Gracilicutes. 16S rDNA clone library, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and culture-dependent techniques should be integrated to obtain precise results in terms of the microbial community and its diversity.

  17. Detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity identifies neuronal integrity in damaged rat central nervous system after application of bacterial melanin

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    Tigran R Petrosyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to confirm the neuroregenerative effects of bacterial melanin (BM on central nervous system injury using a special staining method based on the detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity. Twenty-four rats were randomly assigned to undergo either unilateral destruction of sensorimotor cortex (group I; n = 12 or unilateral rubrospinal tract transection at the cervical level (C3–4 (group II; n = 12. In each group, six rats were randomly selected after surgery to undergo intramuscular injection of BM solution (BM subgroup and the remaining six rats were intramuscularly injected with saline (saline subgroup. Neurological testing confirmed that BM accelerated the recovery of motor function in rats from both BM and saline subgroups. Two months after surgery, Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity detection in combination with Chilingarian's calcium adenoside triphosphate method revealed that BM stimulated the sprouting of fibers and dilated the capillaries in the brain and spinal cord. These results suggest that BM can promote the recovery of motor function of rats with central nervous system injury; and detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity is a fast and easy method used to study the regeneration-promoting effects of BM on the injured central nervous system.

  18. Electronic properties of electron-doped [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester and silylmethylfullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Sho; Okada, Susumu

    2017-06-01

    Electronic properties of electron-doped chemically decorated C60 fullerenes, [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and silylmethylfullerene (SIMEF), by a planar electrode were studied using density functional theory combined with the effective screening medium method to simulate the heterointerface between the chemically decorated C60 and cationic counter materials. We find that the distribution of accumulated electrons and induced electric field depend on the molecular arrangement with respect to the external electric field of the electrode. We also show that the quantum capacitance of the molecule is sensitive to molecular arrangement owing to the asymmetric distribution of the accumulated electrons.

  19. Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bacterial Keratitis Sections What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ... Lens Care Bacterial Keratitis Treatment What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es la Queratitis Bacteriana? ...

  20. Phylogenetic diversity of cultivalble butyrate-producing bacteria from pig gut content and feces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoqiong; Højberg, Ole; Canibe, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a preferred energy source for colonocytes and is considered crucial for maintaining colonic health in humans and animals. To investigate the diversity of cultivable butyrate-producing bacteria in pig gut, bacteria were isolated from intestinal digesta (Exp. 1) and feces (Exp. 2) of fi...... fermentans, Clostridium perfringens, and Clostridium rectum but higher abundance of the commensal Megasphaera elsdenii....

  1. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  2. Hypoxia and Inactivity Related Physiological Changes (Constipation, Inflammation Are Not Reflected at the Level of Gut Metabolites and Butyrate Producing Microbial Community: The PlanHab Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Šket

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We explored the assembly of intestinal microbiota in healthy male participants during the run-in (5 day and experimental phases [21-day normoxic bed rest (NBR, hypoxic bedrest (HBR], and hypoxic ambulation (HAmb in a strictly controlled laboratory environment, balanced fluid, and dietary intakes, controlled circadian rhythm, microbial ambiental burden, and 24/7 medical surveillance. The fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2 and partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2 were 0.209 and 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg for NBR and 0.141 ± 0.004 and 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg for both hypoxic variants (HBR and HAmb; ~4,000 m simulated altitude, respectively. A number of parameters linked to intestinal transit spanning Bristol Stool Scale, defecation rates, zonulin, α1-antitrypsin, eosinophil derived neurotoxin, bile acids, reducing sugars, short chain fatty acids, total soluble organic carbon, water content, diet composition, and food intake were measured (167 variables. The abundance, structure, and diversity of butyrate producing microbial community were assessed using the two primary bacterial butyrate synthesis pathways, butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase (but and butyrate kinase (buk genes. Inactivity negatively affected fecal consistency and in combination with hypoxia aggravated the state of gut inflammation (p < 0.05. In contrast, gut permeability, various metabolic markers, the structure, diversity, and abundance of butyrate producing microbial community were not significantly affected. Rearrangements in the butyrate producing microbial community structure were explained by experimental setup (13.4%, experimentally structured metabolites (12.8%, and gut metabolite-immunological markers (11.9%, with 61.9% remaining unexplained. Many of the measured parameters were found to be correlated and were hence omitted from further analyses. The observed progressive increase in two immunological intestinal markers suggested that the transition from healthy physiological state toward

  3. Recent advances and strategies in process and strain engineering for the production of butyric acid by microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongzhen; Yang, Rongling; Zhao, Yuping; Wang, Zhaoyu; Liu, Zheng; Huang, Mengyu; Zeng, Qingwei

    2018-01-03

    Butyric acid is an important platform chemical, which is widely used in the fields of food, pharmaceutical, energy, etc. Microbial fermentation as an alternative approach for butyric acid production is attracting great attention as it is an environmentally friendly bioprocessing. However, traditional fermentative butyric acid production is still not economically competitive compared to chemical synthesis route, due to the low titer, low productivity, and high production cost. Therefore, reduction of butyric acid production cost by utilization of alternative inexpensive feedstock, and improvement of butyric acid production and productivity has become an important target. Recently, several advanced strategies have been developed for enhanced butyric acid production, including bioprocess techniques and metabolic engineering methods. This review provides an overview of advances and strategies in process and strain engineering for butyric acid production by microbial fermentation. Additionally, future perspectives on improvement of butyric acid production are also proposed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Continuous butyric acid fermentation coupled with REED technology for enhanced productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; Skiadas, Ioannis; Westermann, Peter

    , today’s organic residues and wastes may become tomorrow’s platform for a variety of products for industrial use. Butyric acid fermentation has long been discussed in the last decade due to the wide application of butyric acid in chemical, pharmaceutical and food industries. Compared to other microbial......A major step towards the development of a sustainable industrial society is a shift from petroleum-based resources to renewable resources. An ongoing effort is focused on developing bio-refineries as an alternative way of producing fuels and chemical building-blocks from renewable resources. Thus...... strains, C.tyrobutyricum seems the most promising for biological production of butyric acid as it is characterised by higher selectivity and higher tolerance to butyric acid. However, studies on fermentative butyric production from lignocellulosic biomasses are scarce in the international literature...

  5. Is butyrate the link between diet, intestinal microbiota and obesity-related metabolic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahe, L K; Astrup, A; Larsen, L H

    2013-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that there is a connection between diet, intestinal microbiota, intestinal barrier function and the low-grade inflammation that characterizes the progression from obesity to metabolic disturbances, making dietary strategies to modulate the intestinal environment relevant. In this context, the ability of some Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria to produce the short-chain fatty acid butyrate is interesting. A lower abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria has been associated with metabolic risk in humans, and recent studies suggest that butyrate might have an anti-inflammatory potential that can alleviate obesity-related metabolic complications, possibly due to its ability to enhance the intestinal barrier function. Here, we review and discuss the potential of butyrate as an anti-inflammatory mediator in metabolic diseases, and the potential for dietary interventions increasing the intestinal availability of butyrate. © 2013 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  6. Hypoxia and Inactivity Related Physiological Changes (Constipation, Inflammation) Are Not Reflected at the Level of Gut Metabolites and Butyrate Producing Microbial Community: The PlanHab Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šket, Robert; Treichel, Nicole; Debevec, Tadej; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor; Schloter, Michael; Vital, Marius; Chandler, Jenna; Tiedje, James M; Murovec, Boštjan; Prevoršek, Zala; Stres, Blaž

    2017-01-01

    We explored the assembly of intestinal microbiota in healthy male participants during the run-in (5 day) and experimental phases [21-day normoxic bed rest (NBR), hypoxic bedrest (HBR)], and hypoxic ambulation (HAmb) in a strictly controlled laboratory environment, balanced fluid, and dietary intakes, controlled circadian rhythm, microbial ambiental burden, and 24/7 medical surveillance. The fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2) and partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2) were 0.209 and 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg for NBR and 0.141 ± 0.004 and 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg for both hypoxic variants (HBR and HAmb; ~4,000 m simulated altitude), respectively. A number of parameters linked to intestinal transit spanning Bristol Stool Scale, defecation rates, zonulin, α1-antitrypsin, eosinophil derived neurotoxin, bile acids, reducing sugars, short chain fatty acids, total soluble organic carbon, water content, diet composition, and food intake were measured (167 variables). The abundance, structure, and diversity of butyrate producing microbial community were assessed using the two primary bacterial butyrate synthesis pathways, butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk) genes. Inactivity negatively affected fecal consistency and in combination with hypoxia aggravated the state of gut inflammation (p exercise in NBR) that were exacerbated by systemic hypoxia (HBR) and significantly alleviated by exercise, despite hypoxia (HAmb). Butyrate producing community in colon exhibited apparent resilience toward short-term modifications in host exercise or hypoxia. Progressive constipation (decreased intestinal motility) and increased local inflammation marker suggest that changes in microbial colonization and metabolism were taking place at the location of small intestine.

  7. How T-cell-dependent and -independent challenges access the brain: vascular and neural responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and staphylococcal enterotoxin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrats, Jordi; Sawchenko, Paul E

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is widely used to study immune influences on the CNS, and cerebrovascular prostaglandin (PG) synthesis is implicated in mediating LPS influences on some acute phase responses. Other bacterial products, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), impact target tissues differently in that their effects are T-lymphocyte-dependent, yet both LPS and SEB recruit a partially overlapping set of subcortical central autonomic cell groups. We sought to compare neurovascular responses to the two pathogens, and the mechanisms by which they may access the brain. Rats received iv injections of LPS (2 microg/kg), SEB (1mg/kg) or vehicle and were sacrificed 0.5-3h later. Both challenges engaged vascular cells as early 0.5h, as evidenced by induced expression of the vascular early response gene (Verge), and the immediate-early gene, NGFI-B. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression was detected in both endothelial and perivascular cells (PVCs) in response to LPS, but only in PVCs of SEB-challenged animals. The non-selective COX inhibitor, indomethacin (1mg/kg, iv), blocked LPS-induced activation in a subset of central autonomic structures, but failed to alter SEB-driven responses. Liposome mediated ablation of PVCs modulated the CNS response to LPS, did not affect the SEB-induced activational profile. By contrast, disruptions of interoceptive signaling by area postrema lesions or vagotomy (complete or hepatic) markedly attenuated SEB-, but not LPS-, stimulated central activational responses. Despite partial overlap in their neuronal and vascular response profiles, LPS and SEB appear to use distinct mechanisms to access the brain.

  8. Butyric acid tolerance of rice mutant M4 families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Marini Kopp

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydromorphic soils have a low drainage capacity and are used mainly for the cultivation of irrigated rice.This condition favors the development of anaerobic microorganisms that produce phytotoxic substances. The objective of thisstudy was to evaluate the response of rice mutants to the phytotoxicity caused by butyric acid under anaerobic conditions. Theexperiment consisted of four treatments arranged in a randomized block design. Plants of 40 families were grown in ahydroponic system and the measured variables were root length and length of aerial part (LAP, number of roots (NR androot dry matter (RDM and aerial part dry matter (DMAP. The analysis of variance was performed, the relative performancecalculated and linear regressions were fitted. Only the treatment effect for NR and effect of interaction for LAP were notsignificant. Root length was most affected by the acid and the regressions expressed positive as well as negative effects for acidtolerance in the mutant families.

  9. In vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of calcium [1-14C]butyrate in free or protected forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate is a by-product of microbial carbohydrate fermentation that occurs primarily in the large intestine. When added to feed, butyrate quickly disappears in the upper digestive tract. Because butyrate is important for the epithelial cell development and for mucosal integrity, and for animal grow...

  10. In vitro and in vivo study of transcriptome alternation induced by butyrate in cattle using deep RNA-seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs,), especially butyrate, affect cell differentiation, proliferation, and motility. Furthermore, butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through its inhibition on histone deacetylases (HDACs). Butyrate is a potent inducer of histone hyper-acetylation in cells a...

  11. Quantification of Transcriptome Responses of the Rumen Epithelium to Butyrate Infusion using RNA-seq Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ransom L; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong; Li, Congjun; Bequette, Brian J; Li, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, produced by gut microorganisms, play a critical role in energy metabolism and physiology of ruminants as well as in human health. In this study, the temporal effect of elevated butyrate concentrations on the transcriptome of the rumen epithelium was quantified via serial biopsy sampling using RNA-seq technology. The mean number of genes transcribed in the rumen epithelial transcriptome was 17,323.63 ± 277.20 (±SD; N = 24) while the core transcriptome consisted of 15,025 genes. Collectively, 80 genes were identified as being significantly impacted by butyrate infusion across all time points sampled. Maximal transcriptional effect of butyrate on the rumen epithelium was observed at the 72-h infusion when the abundance of 58 genes was altered. The initial reaction of the rumen epithelium to elevated exogenous butyrate may represent a stress response as Gene Ontology (GO) terms identified were predominantly related to responses to bacteria and biotic stimuli. An algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (ARACNE) inferred regulatory gene networks with 113,738 direct interactions in the butyrate-epithelium interactome using a combined cutoff of an error tolerance (ɛ = 0.10) and a stringent P-value threshold of mutual information (5.0 × 10(-11)). Several regulatory networks were controlled by transcription factors, such as CREBBP and TTF2, which were regulated by butyrate. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of butyrate transport and metabolism in the rumen epithelium, which will guide our future efforts in exploiting potential beneficial effect of butyrate in animal well-being and human health.

  12. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jintao; Yi, Man; Zha, Longying; Chen, Siqiang; Li, Zhijia; Li, Cheng; Gong, Mingxing; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Chen, Jiehua; Zhang, Zheqing; Mao, Limei; Sun, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells. Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining), and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot. Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II), beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg)3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin) and genetic (si

  13. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Zhang

    Full Text Available Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells.Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29 were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining, and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot.Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II, beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin and genetic

  14. The RpfB-Dependent Quorum Sensing Signal Turnover System Is Required for Adaptation and Virulence in Rice Bacterial Blight Pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-Yu; Zhou, Lian; Yang, Jun; Ji, Guang-Hai; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, produces diffusible signal factor (DSF) family quorum sensing signals to regulate virulence. The biosynthesis and perception of DSF family signals require components of the rpf (regulation of pathogenicity factors) cluster. In this study, we report that RpfB plays an essential role in DSF family signal turnover in X. oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99A. The production of DSF family signals was boosted by deletion of the rpfB gene and was abolished by its overexpression. The RpfC/RpfG-mediated DSF signaling system negatively regulates rpfB expression via the global transcription regulator Clp, whose activity is reversible in the presence of cyclic diguanylate monophosphate. These findings indicate that the DSF family signal turnover system in PXO99A is generally consistent with that in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Moreover, this study has revealed several specific roles of RpfB in PXO99A. First, the rpfB deletion mutant produced high levels of DSF family signals but reduced extracellular polysaccharide production, extracellular amylase activity, and attenuated pathogenicity. Second, the rpfB/rpfC double-deletion mutant was partially deficient in xanthomonadin production. Taken together, the RpfB-dependent DSF family signal turnover system is a conserved and naturally presenting signal turnover system in Xanthomonas spp., which plays unique roles in X. oryzae pv. oryzae adaptation and pathogenesis.

  15. Actinomyces naeslundii GroEL-dependent initial attachment and biofilm formation in a flow cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Toshiaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2015-02-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii is an early colonizer with important roles in the development of the oral biofilm. The effects of butyric acid, one of short chain fatty acids in A. naeslundii biofilm formation was observed using a flow cell system with Tryptic soy broth without dextrose and with 0.25% sucrose (TSB sucrose). Significant biofilms were established involving live and dead cells in TSB sucrose with 60mM butyric acid but not in concentrations of 6, 30, 40, and 50mM. Biofilm formation failed in 60mM sodium butyrate but biofilm level in 60mM sodium butyrate (pH4.7) adjusted with hydrochloric acid as 60mM butyric media (pH4.7) was similar to biofilm levels in 60mM butyric acid. Therefore, butyric acid and low pH are required for significant biofilm formation in the flow cell. To determine the mechanism of biofilm formation, we investigated initial A. naeslundii colonization in various conditions and effects of anti-GroEL antibody. The initial colonization was observed in the 60mM butyric acid condition and anti-GroEL antibody inhibited the initial colonization. In conclusion, we established a new biofilm formation model in which butyric acid induces GroEL-dependent initial colonization of A. naeslundii resulting in significant biofilm formation in a flow system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. β-Amino-n-butyric Acid Regulates Seedling Growth and Disease Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong Chae; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Sang Woo; Chae, Yun-Soek; Kang, Hyun-Kyung; Yun, Byung-Wook; Hong, Jeum Kyu

    2013-09-01

    Non-protein amino acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA), has been involved in diverse physiological processes including seedling growth, stress tolerance and disease resistance of many plant species. In the current study, treatment of kimchi cabbage seedlings with BABA significantly reduced primary root elongation and cotyledon development in a dose-dependent manner, which adverse effects were similar to the plant response to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) application. BABA was synergistically contributing ABA-induced growth arrest during the early seedling development. Kimchi cabbage leaves were highly damaged and seedling growth was delayed by foliar spraying with high concentrations of BABA (10 to 20 mM). BABA played roles differentially in in vitro fungal conidial germination, mycelial growth and conidation of necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola causing black spot disease and hemibiotroph Colletotrichum higginsianum causing anthracnose. Pretreatment with BABA conferred induced resistance of the kimchi cabbage against challenges by the two different classes of fungal pathogens in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that BABA is involved in plant development, fungal development as well as induced fungal disease resistance of kimchi cabbage plant.

  17. β-Amino-n-butyric Acid Regulates Seedling Growth and Disease Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Chae Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-protein amino acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA, has been involved in diverse physiological processes including seedling growth, stress tolerance and disease resistance of many plant species. In the current study, treatment of kimchi cabbage seedlings with BABA significantly reduced primary root elongation and cotyledon development in a dose-dependent manner, which adverse effects were similar to the plant response to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA application. BABA was synergistically contributing ABA-induced growth arrest during the early seedling development. Kimchi cabbage leaves were highly damaged and seedling growth was delayed by foliar spraying with high concentrations of BABA (10 to 20 mM. BABA played roles differentially in in vitro fungal conidial germination, mycelial growth and conidation of necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola causing black spot disease and hemibiotroph Colletotrichum higginsianum causing anthracnose. Pretreatment with BABA conferred induced resistance of the kimchi cabbage against challenges by the two different classes of fungal pathogens in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that BABA is involved in plant development, fungal development as well as induced fungal disease resistance of kimchi cabbage plant.

  18. Hypoxia and Inactivity Related Physiological Changes (Constipation, Inflammation) Are Not Reflected at the Level of Gut Metabolites and Butyrate Producing Microbial Community: The PlanHab Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šket, Robert; Treichel, Nicole; Debevec, Tadej; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor; Schloter, Michael; Vital, Marius; Chandler, Jenna; Tiedje, James M.; Murovec, Boštjan; Prevoršek, Zala; Stres, Blaž

    2017-01-01

    We explored the assembly of intestinal microbiota in healthy male participants during the run-in (5 day) and experimental phases [21-day normoxic bed rest (NBR), hypoxic bedrest (HBR)], and hypoxic ambulation (HAmb) in a strictly controlled laboratory environment, balanced fluid, and dietary intakes, controlled circadian rhythm, microbial ambiental burden, and 24/7 medical surveillance. The fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2) and partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2) were 0.209 and 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg for NBR and 0.141 ± 0.004 and 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg for both hypoxic variants (HBR and HAmb; ~4,000 m simulated altitude), respectively. A number of parameters linked to intestinal transit spanning Bristol Stool Scale, defecation rates, zonulin, α1-antitrypsin, eosinophil derived neurotoxin, bile acids, reducing sugars, short chain fatty acids, total soluble organic carbon, water content, diet composition, and food intake were measured (167 variables). The abundance, structure, and diversity of butyrate producing microbial community were assessed using the two primary bacterial butyrate synthesis pathways, butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk) genes. Inactivity negatively affected fecal consistency and in combination with hypoxia aggravated the state of gut inflammation (p microbial community were not significantly affected. Rearrangements in the butyrate producing microbial community structure were explained by experimental setup (13.4%), experimentally structured metabolites (12.8%), and gut metabolite-immunological markers (11.9%), with 61.9% remaining unexplained. Many of the measured parameters were found to be correlated and were hence omitted from further analyses. The observed progressive increase in two immunological intestinal markers suggested that the transition from healthy physiological state toward the developed symptoms of low magnitude obesity-related syndromes was primarily driven by the onset of inactivity (lack of exercise in

  19. The effect of fiber diet on colonic cancer formation: the role of butyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari F. Syam

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The majority of colon cancers occur sporadically. They are thougth to be caused by non-inherited factors such as a combination of diet and environmental factors, which result in somatic mutations of specific genes. Among dietary factors butyrate which is derived from fermentable fibers may have important role as chemoprotector against colorectal cancer. The source of butyrate in daily diet mostly come from wheat products especially wheat bran. At molecular level, butyrate causes hystone acetylation, favours differentiation, induces apoptosis and regulates the expressions of various oncogens. These effects suggest that butyrate may be protective against colorectal cancers. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 127-31Keywords: colon cancer, dietary fiber, apoptosis

  20. ALA-Butyrate prodrugs for Photo-Dynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitch, G.; Nudelman, A.; Ehenberg, B.; Rephaeli, A.; Malik, Z.

    2010-05-01

    The use of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration has led to many applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in cancer. However, the hydrophilic nature of ALA limits its ability to penetrate the cells and tissues, and therefore the need for ALA derivatives became an urgent research target. In this study we investigated the activity of novel multifunctional acyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs of ALA that upon metabolic hydrolysis release active components such as, formaldehyde, and the histone deacetylase inhibitory moiety, butyric acid. Evaluation of these prodrugs under photo-irradiation conditions showed that butyryloxyethyl 5-amino-4-oxopentanoate (ALA-BAC) generated the most efficient photodynamic destruction compared to ALA. ALA-BAC stimulated a rapid biosynthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in human glioblastoma U-251 cells which resulted in generation of intracellular ROS, reduction of mitochondrial activity, leading to apoptotic and necrotic death of the cells. The apoptotic cell death induced by ALA / ALA-BAC followed by PDT equally activate intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals and both pathways may occur simultaneously. The main advantage of ALA-BAC over ALA stems from its ability to induce photo-damage at a significantly lower dose than ALA.

  1. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of methyl butyrate using heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dange, P N; Kulkarni, A V; Rathod, V K

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound assisted esterification of butyric acid with methanol was investigated in an ultrasound irradiated isothermal batch reactor using acid ion-exchange resin (amberlyst-15) as a catalyst. Effect of parameters such as temperature (323-353 K), catalyst loading (0-8.5%w/w), alcohol to acid ratio, M (2-6), ultrasound power (0-145 W), duty cycle (0-85%) and amount of molecular sieves added (0-11%w/w) on the rate of reaction was studied. At optimized parameters, a maximum conversion of 91.64% was obtained in 120 min in presence of ultrasound. Experimental kinetic data were correlated by using Eley-Rideal (ER) and Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson (LHH W) models taking into account reverse reaction. Studies showed that single site LHHW with reactants and products both adsorbing on catalyst surface was most suited for the obtained experimental data. Activation energy determined based on heterogeneous kinetics was in the range 49.31-57.54 kJ/mol while it was 18.29 kJ/mol using homogeneous model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cyclic AMP synergizes with butyrate in promoting β-defensin 9 expression in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Zeng, Xiangfang; Curtis, Amanda R; Zhang, Guolong

    2014-02-01

    Host defense peptides (HDP) have both microbicidal and immunomodulatory properties. Specific induction of endogenous HDP synthesis has emerged as a novel approach to antimicrobial therapy. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and butyrate have been implicated in HDP induction in humans. However, the role of cAMP signaling and the possible interactions between cAMP and butyrate in regulating HDP expression in other species remain unknown. Here we report that activation of cAMP signaling induces HDP gene expression in chickens as exemplified by β-defensin 9 (AvBD9). We further showed that, albeit being weak inducers, cAMP agonists synergize strongly with butyrate or butyrate analogs in AvBD9 induction in macrophages and primary jejunal explants. Additionally, oral supplementation of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase agonist in the form of a Coleus forskohlii extract, was found to induce AvBD9 expression in the crop of chickens. Furthermore, feeding with both forskolin and butyrate showed an obvious synergy in triggering AvBD9 expression in the crop and jejunum of chickens. Surprisingly, inhibition of the MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway augmented the butyrate-FSK synergy, whereas blocking JNK or p38 MAPK pathway significantly diminished AvBD9 induction in chicken macrophages and jejunal explants in response to butyrate and FSK individually or in combination. Collectively, these results suggest the potential for concomitant use of butyrate and cAMP signaling activators in enhancing HDP expression, innate immunity, and disease resistance in both animals and humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing Bacterial Diversity in the Rhizosphere of Thymus zygis Growing in the Sierra Nevada National Park (Spain through Culture-Dependent and Independent Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pascual

    Full Text Available Little is known of the bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of wild plant species found in natural settings. The rhizosphere bacterial community associated with wild thyme, Thymus zygis L., plants was analyzed using cultivation, the creation of a near-full length 16S rRNA gene clone library and 454 amplicon pyrosequencing. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (mostly Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes. Although each approach gave a different perspective of the bacterial community, all classes/subclasses detected in the clone library and the cultured bacteria could be found in the pyrosequencing datasets. However, an exception caused by inconclusive taxonomic identification as a consequence of the short read length of pyrotags together with the detection of singleton sequences which corresponded to bacterial strains cultivated from the same sample highlight limitations and considerations which should be taken into account when analysing and interpreting amplicon datasets. Amplicon pyrosequencing of replicate rhizosphere soil samples taken a year later permit the definition of the core microbiome associated with Thymus zygis plants. Abundant bacterial families and predicted functional profiles of the core microbiome suggest that the main drivers of the bacterial community in the Thymus zygis rhizosphere are related to the nutrients originating from the plant root and to their participation in biogeochemical cycles thereby creating an intricate relationship with this aromatic plant to allow for a feedback ecological benefit.

  4. Perturbation dynamics of the rumen microbiota in response to exogenous butyrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Li

    Full Text Available The capacity of the rumen microbiota to produce volatile fatty acids (VFAs has important implications in animal well-being and production. We investigated temporal changes of the rumen microbiota in response to butyrate infusion using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Twenty one phyla were identified in the rumen microbiota of dairy cows. The rumen microbiota harbored 54.5±6.1 genera (mean ± SD and 127.3±4.4 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, respectively. However, the core microbiome comprised of 26 genera and 82 OTUs. Butyrate infusion altered molar percentages of 3 major VFAs. Butyrate perturbation had a profound impact on the rumen microbial composition. A 72 h-infusion led to a significant change in the numbers of sequence reads derived from 4 phyla, including 2 most abundant phyla, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. As many as 19 genera and 43 OTUs were significantly impacted by butyrate infusion. Elevated butyrate levels in the rumen seemingly had a stimulating effect on butyrate-producing bacteria populations. The resilience of the rumen microbial ecosystem was evident as the abundance of the microorganisms returned to their pre-disturbed status after infusion withdrawal. Our findings provide insight into perturbation dynamics of the rumen microbial ecosystem and should guide efforts in formulating optimal uses of probiotic bacteria treating human diseases.

  5. Kinetic and thermodynamic control of butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junicke, H; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kleerebezem, R

    2016-01-01

    Many anaerobic conversions proceed close to thermodynamic equilibrium and the microbial groups involved need to share their low energy budget to survive at the thermodynamic boundary of life. This study aimed to investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic control mechanisms of the electron transfer during syntrophic butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities. Despite the rather low energy content of butyrate, results demonstrate unequal energy sharing between the butyrate-utilizing species (17 %), the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (9-10 %), and the acetoclastic methanogens (73-74 %). As a key finding, the energy disproportion resulted in different growth strategies of the syntrophic partners. Compared to the butyrate-utilizing partner, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens compensated their lower biomass yield per mole of electrons transferred with a 2-fold higher biomass-specific electron transfer rate. Apart from these thermodynamic control mechanisms, experiments revealed a ten times lower hydrogen inhibition constant on butyrate conversion than proposed by the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, suggesting a much stronger inhibitory effect of hydrogen on anaerobic butyrate conversion. At hydrogen partial pressures exceeding 40 Pa and at bicarbonate limited conditions, a shift from methanogenesis to reduced product formation was observed which indicates an important role of the hydrogen partial pressure in redirecting electron fluxes towards reduced products such as butanol. The findings of this study demonstrate that a careful consideration of thermodynamics and kinetics is required to advance our current understanding of flux regulation in energy-limited syntrophic ecosystems.

  6. Maternal butyrate supplementation induces insulin resistance associated with enhanced intramuscular fat deposition in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanping; Gao, Shixing; Chen, Jinglong; Albrecht, Elke; Zhao, Ruqian; Yang, Xiaojing

    2017-02-21

    Maternal nutrition is important for the risk of the offspring to develop insulin resistance and adiposity later in life. The study was undertaken to determine effects of maternal butyrate supplementation on lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in the offspring skeletal muscle. The offspring of rats, fed a control diet or a butyrate diet (1% sodium butyrate) throughout gestation and lactation, was studied at weaning and at 60 days of age. The offspring of dams fed a butyrate diet had higher HOMA-insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. This was associated with elevated mRNA and protein expressions of lipogenic genes and decreased amounts of lipolytic enzyme. Simultaneously, enhanced acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 and histone H3 lysine 27 modification on the lipogenic genes in skeletal muscle of adult offspring was observed. Higher concentration of serum insulin and intramuscular triglyceride in skeletal muscle of offspring from the butyrate group at weaning were accompanied by increasing levels of lipogenic genes and enrichment of acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27. Maternal butyrate supplementation leads to insulin resistance and ectopic lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle of offspring, indicating the importance of short chain fatty acids in the maternal diet on lipid metabolism.

  7. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  8. Preparation and characterization of nanoparticles of carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate containing acyclovir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Venkata Bharadwaz; Chopra, Maulick; Joseph, Emil; Mazumder, Sonal

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles of carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate complexed with the poorly soluble antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV) were produced by precipitation process and the formulation process and properties of nanoparticles were investigated. Two different particle synthesis methods were explored—a conventional precipitation method and a rapid precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer. The particles were processed by rotavap followed by freeze-drying. Particle diameters as measured by dynamic light scattering were dependent on the synthesis method used. The conventional precipitation method did not show desired particle size distribution, whereas particles prepared by the mixer showed well-defined particle size ~125-450 nm before and after freeze-drying, respectively, with narrow polydispersity indices. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed chemical stability and intactness of entrapped drug in the nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the drug was in amorphous state in the polymer matrix. ACV drug loading was around 10 wt%. The release studies showed increase in solution concentration of drug from the nanoparticles compared to the as-received crystalline drug.

  9. Electronic Structures and Optical Properties of Phenyl C71 Butyric Acid Methyl Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Rong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM has been adopted as electron acceptor materials in bulk heterojunction solar cells with relatively higher power conversion efficiency. The understanding of the mechanism and performance for the devices based upon PC71BM requires the information of conformations, electronic structures, optical properties, and so forth. Here, the geometries, IR and Raman, electronic structures, polarizabilities, and hyperpolarizabilities of PC71BM isomers are studied by using density functional theory (DFT; the absorption and excitation properties are investigated via time-dependent DFT with B3LYP, PBE0, and CAM-B3LYP functionals. The calculated results show that [6,6]PC71BM is more stable than [5,6]PC71BM due to the lower total energy. The vibrational modes of the isomers at IR and Raman peaks are quite similar. As to absorption properties, CAM-B3LYP functional is the suitable functional for describing the excitations of PC71BM because the calculated results with CAM-B3LYP functional agree well with that of the experiment. The analysis of transition configurations and molecular orbitals demonstrated that the transitions at the absorption maxima in UV/Vis region are localized π-π* transitions in fullerenes cages. Furthermore, the larger isotropic polarizability of PC71BM indicates that the response of PC71BM to applied external electric field is stronger than that of PC61BM, and therefore resulting into better nonlinear optical properties.

  10. Butyrate inhibits deoxycholate-induced increase in colonic mucosal DNA and protein synthesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, O C; Seto, R W; Choi, J; Zhou, D; Breen, F; Fisher, J D; Rombeau, J L

    1997-11-01

    Crypt surface hyperproliferation is an intermediate biomarker of colon cancer risk. In vitro studies indicate that the short-chain fatty acid and antineoplastic agent butyrate may reverse the crypt surface hyperproliferation induced by the secondary bile acid and tumor promoter, deoxycholate. We hypothesized that butyrate may reverse deoxycholate-induced crypt surface proliferation in vivo. Thirty-one Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) underwent surgical isolation of the colon and 24-hour luminal instillation of either sodium chloride, butyrate, deoxycholate, or butyrate plus deoxycholate (all solutions, 2 ml; pH 7; total sodium = 20 mM). Study variables included colon weight, mucosal DNA, mucosal protein, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry, labeling of which was determined in five crypt compartments from base to surface (12 crypts per rat). Labeling indexes were calculated as proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry-labeled cells divided by total counted cells in the whole colonic crypt and each of five crypt compartments. The phi(h) value (an index of premalignant risk) was calculated as the ratio of labeled cells in the two surface compartments divided by the total labeled cells. Deoxycholate significantly increased colon wet weight, mucosal protein, total crypt labeling indexes, crypt surface labeling indexes, and the phi(h) value and raised the mucosal DNA content. Butyrate alone slightly reduced total mucosal DNA and protein content. The combination of butyrate plus deoxycholate significantly decreased mucosal DNA and tended to reduce mucosal protein compared with deoxycholate alone. In contrast to prior in vitro findings, butyrate plus deoxycholate did not reverse the deoxycholate-induced surface hyperproliferative changes as measured by proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling. Because co-treatment with butyrate plus deoxycholate inhibits deoxycholate-induced increases in total mucosal DNA and protein content, we

  11. Gamma amino butyric acid accumulation in medicinal plants without stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anju, P; Moothedath, Ismail; Rema Shree, Azhimala Bhaskaranpillai

    2014-01-01

    Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is an important ubiquitous four carbon nonprotein amino acid with an amino group attached to gamma carbon instead of beta carbon. It exists in different organisms including bacteria, plants, and animals and plays a crucial role in humans by regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. It is directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone and also effective in lowering stress, blood pressure, and hypertension. The aim of the study was to develop the fingerprint profile of selected medicinally and economically important plants having central nervous system (CNS) activity and to determine the quantity of GABA in the selected plants grown under natural conditions without any added stress. The high-performance thin layer chromatography analysis was performed on precoated silica gel plate 60F-254 plate (20 cm × 10 cm) in the form of bands with width 8 mm using Hamilton syringe (100 μl) using n-butanol, acetic acid, and water in the proportion 5:2:2 as mobile phase in a CAMAG chamber which was previously saturated for 30 min. CAMAG TLC scanner 3 was used for the densitometric scanning at 550 nm. Specific marker compounds were used for the quantification. Among the screened medicinal plants, Zingiber officinale and Solanum torvum were found to have GABA. The percentage of GABA present in Z. officinale and S. torvum were found to be 0.0114% and 0.0119%, respectively. The present work confirmed that among the selected CNS active medicinal plants, only two plants contain GABA. We found a negative correlation with plant having CNS activity and accumulation of GABA. The GABA shunt is a conserved pathway in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, although the role of GABA as a neurotransmitter in mammals is clearly established, its role in plants is still vague.

  12. Gamma amino butyric acid accumulation in medicinal plants without stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anju, P.; Moothedath, Ismail; Rema Shree, Azhimala Bhaskaranpillai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is an important ubiquitous four carbon nonprotein amino acid with an amino group attached to gamma carbon instead of beta carbon. It exists in different organisms including bacteria, plants, and animals and plays a crucial role in humans by regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. It is directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone and also effective in lowering stress, blood pressure, and hypertension. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to develop the fingerprint profile of selected medicinally and economically important plants having central nervous system (CNS) activity and to determine the quantity of GABA in the selected plants grown under natural conditions without any added stress. Materials and Methods: The high-performance thin layer chromatography analysis was performed on precoated silica gel plate 60F–254 plate (20 cm × 10 cm) in the form of bands with width 8 mm using Hamilton syringe (100 μl) using n-butanol, acetic acid, and water in the proportion 5:2:2 as mobile phase in a CAMAG chamber which was previously saturated for 30 min. CAMAG TLC scanner 3 was used for the densitometric scanning at 550 nm. Specific marker compounds were used for the quantification. Results and Conclusion: Among the screened medicinal plants, Zingiber officinale and Solanum torvum were found to have GABA. The percentage of GABA present in Z. officinale and S. torvum were found to be 0.0114% and 0.0119%, respectively. The present work confirmed that among the selected CNS active medicinal plants, only two plants contain GABA. We found a negative correlation with plant having CNS activity and accumulation of GABA. The GABA shunt is a conserved pathway in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, although the role of GABA as a neurotransmitter in mammals is clearly established, its role in plants is still vague. PMID:25861139

  13. Models construction for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations with acetate/butyrate consecutively feeding by graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Several fermentations with consecutively feeding of acetate/butyrate were conducted in a 7 L fermentor and the results indicated that exogenous acetate/butyrate enhanced solvents productivities by 47.1% and 39.2% respectively, and changed butyrate/acetate ratios greatly. Then extracellular butyrate/acetate ratios were utilized for calculation of acids rates and the results revealed that acetate and butyrate formation pathways were almost blocked by corresponding acids feeding. In addition, models for acetate/butyrate feeding fermentations were constructed by graph theory based on calculation results and relevant reports. Solvents concentrations and butanol/acetone ratios of these fermentations were also calculated and the results of models calculation matched fermentation data accurately which demonstrated that models were constructed in a reasonable way. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sodium butyrate protects against severe burn-induced remote acute lung injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Liang

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, a ubiquitous nuclear protein, drives proinflammatory responses when released extracellularly. It plays a key role as a distal mediator in the development of acute lung injury (ALI. Sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has been demonstrated to inhibit HMGB1 expression. This study investigates the effect of sodium butyrate on burn-induced lung injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: 1 sham group, sham burn treatment; 2 burn group, third-degree burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA with lactated Ringer's solution for resuscitation; 3 burn plus sodium butyrate group, third-degree burns over 30% TBSA with lactated Ringer's solution containing sodium butyrate for resuscitation. The burned animals were sacrificed at 12, 24, and 48 h after burn injury. Lung injury was assessed in terms of histologic changes and wet weight to dry weight (W/D ratio. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-8 protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and HMGB1 expression in the lung was determined by Western blot analysis. Pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and malondialdehyde (MDA concentration were measured to reflect neutrophil infiltration and oxidative stress in the lung, respectively. As a result, sodium butyrate significantly inhibited the HMGB1 expressions in the lungs, reduced the lung W/D ratio, and improved the pulmonary histologic changes induced by burn trauma. Furthermore, sodium butyrate administration decreased the TNF-α and IL-8 concentrations in BALF and serum, suppressed MPO activity, and reduced the MDA content in the lungs after severe burn. These results suggest that sodium butyrate attenuates inflammatory responses, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative stress in the lungs, and protects against remote ALI induced by severe burn, which is associated with inhibiting HMGB1

  15. Simultaneous Intercalation of 1-Naphthylacetic Acid and Indole-3-butyric Acid into Layered Double Hydroxides and Controlled Release Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release formulations have been shown to have potential in overcoming the drawbacks of conventional plant growth regulators formulations. A controlled-release formulation of 1-naphthylacetic acid (NAA and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA simultaneous intercalated MgAl-layered double hydroxides (LDHs was prepared. The synthetic nanohybrid material was characterized by various techniques, and release kinetics was studied. NAA and IBA anions located in the gallery of MgAl-LDHs with bilayer arrangement, and the nanohybrids particles were of typical plate-like shape with the lateral size of 50–100 nm. The results revealed that NAA and IBA have been intercalated into the interlayer spaces of MgAl-LDHs. The release of NAA and IBA fits pseudo-second-order model and is dependent on temperature, pH value, and release medium. The nanohybrids of NAA and IBA simultaneously intercalated in LDHs possessed good controlled release properties.

  16. Bacterial conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Epling, John

    2012-01-01

    Conjunctivitis causes irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, and watering or discharge of the eye. Most cases in adults are probably due to viral infection, but children are more likely to develop bacterial conjunctivitis than viral forms. The main bacterial pathogens are Staphylococcus species in adults, and Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis in children.A bacterial cause is more likely if there is gluing of the eyelids and no itch.Contact le...

  17. Bacterial conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Epling, John

    2010-01-01

    Conjunctivitis causes irritation, itching, foreign body sensation, and watering or discharge of the eye. Most cases in adults are probably due to viral infection, but children are more likely to develop bacterial conjunctivitis than viral forms. The main bacterial pathogens are Staphylococcus species in adults, and Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis in children.A bacterial cause is more likely if there is glueing of the eyelids and no itch.Contact l...

  18. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase by Butyrate Protects Rat Liver from Ischemic Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Sun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We showed previously that pretreatment of butyrate, which is an endogenous histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor normally fermented from undigested fiber by intestinal microflora, seriously alleviated ischemia reperfusion (I/R-induced liver injury by inhibiting the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB pathway. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of butyrate administrated at the onset of ischemia for HDAC inhibition in hepatic I/R injury. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to warm ischemia for 60 min followed by 6 and 24 h of reperfusion. Butyrate was administrated at the onset of ischemia. Liver injury was evaluated by serum levels of aminotransferase, inflammatory factors, and histopathology. The levels of acetylated histone H3 and expression of heat shock protein (Hsp 70 were measured by Western blot. After reperfusion, the levels of acetylated histone H3 significantly decreased. Butyrate treatment markedly prevented the reduction of acetylated histone H3 and upregulated the expression of Hsp70, thereby reducing liver injury. Our study demonstrated that I/R resulted in marked reduction of histone acetylation; butyrate exerted a great hepatoprotective effect through HDAC inhibition and Hsp70 induction.

  19. Consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production from rice straw with undefined mixed culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binling Ai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable source with great potential for biofuels and bioproducts. However, the cost of cellulolytic enzymes limits the utilization of the low-cost bioresource. This study aimed to develop a consolidated bioprocessing without the need of supplementary cellulase for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass. A stirred-tank reactor with a working volume of 21 L was constructed and operated in batch and semi-continuous fermentation modes with a cellulolytic butyrate-producing microbial community. The semi-continuous fermentation with intermittent discharging of the culture broth and replenishment with fresh medium achieved the highest butyric acid productivity of 2.69 g/(L•d. In semi-continuous operation mode, the butyric acid and total carboxylic acid concentrations of 16.2 and 28.9 g/L, respectively, were achieved. Over the 21-day fermentation period, their cumulative yields reached 1189 and 2048 g, respectively, corresponding to 41% and 74% of the maximum theoretical yields based on the amount of NaOH pretreated rice straw fed in. This study demonstrated that an undefined mixed culture-based consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production can completely eliminate the cost of supplementary cellulolytic enzymes.

  20. [Sodium butyrate induces rat hepatic oval cells differentiating into mature hepatocytes in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Jia, Ji-Dong; Tang, Shu-Zhen; Yan, Zhong-Yu; You, Hong; Cong, Min; Wang, Bao-En; Chen, Li; An, Wei

    2004-12-01

    To elucidate the effects of sodium butyrate on rat hepatic oval cell differentiation in vitro. Hepatic oval cells were isolated from rats fed with a choline-deficient diet supplemented with 0.1% (w/w) ethonine for 4 to 6 weeks. The cultured hepatic oval cells were identified by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After hepatic oval cells were treated with sodium butyrate, the morphological changes were studied through Giemsa staining and the albumin expression level was tested by Western blot. Immunohistochemical results showed the isolated cells were positive for both mature hepatocyte marker albumin and bile duct cell marker cytokeratin-19. Furthermore, RT-PCR results showed that the cells expressed stem cell marker c-kit, but not hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34. In short, the isolated cells were rat hepatic oval cells. 0.75 mmol/L sodium butyrate induced obvious phenotype changes of hepatic oval cells, including enlargement of the oval cells, a decrease in nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, and a 50% increase in the number of binucleated cells. Western blot results showed that 0.75 mmol/L sodium butyrate markedly raised the expression of albumin. Sodium butyrate, a differentiation promoting agent, can induce rat hepatic oval cells (liver progenitor cells) to differentiate into mature hepatocytes in vitro.

  1. Characterization by culture-dependent and culture-1 independent methods of the 2 bacterial population of suckling-lamb packaged in different atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oses, S.M.; Diez, A.M.; Melero, B.; Luning, P.A.; Jaime, I.; Rovira, J.

    2013-01-01

    This study offers insight into the dynamics of bacterial populations in fresh cuts of suckling lamb under four different atmospheric conditions: air (A), and three Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) environments, 15%O2/30%CO2/55%N2 (C, commercial), 70%O2/30%CO2 (O), and 15%O2/85%CO2 (H) for 18

  2. Bacterial deposition in a parallel plate and a stagnation point flow chamber : microbial adhesion mechanisms depend on the mass transport conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, DP; Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    Deposition onto glass in a parallel plate (PP) and in a stagnation point (SP) flow chamber of Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Psychrobacter sp. and Halomonas pacifica, suspended in artificial seawater, was compared in order to determine the influence of methodology on bacterial adhesion

  3. Bacterial wall products induce downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors on endothelial cells via a CD14-dependent mechanism: implications for surgical wound healing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogenic cytokine which has been identified as the principal polypeptide growth factor influencing endothelial cell (EC) migration and proliferation. Ordered progression of these two processes is an absolute prerequisite for initiating and maintaining the proliferative phase of wound healing. The response of ECs to circulating VEGF is determined by, and directly proportional to, the functional expression of VEGF receptors (KDR\\/Flt-1) on the EC surface membrane. Systemic sepsis and wound contamination due to bacterial infection are associated with significant retardation of the proliferative phase of wound repair. The effects of the Gram-negative bacterial wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) on VEGF receptor function and expression are unknown and may represent an important biological mechanism predisposing to delayed wound healing in the presence of localized or systemic sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a series of in vitro experiments investigating this phenomenon and its potential implications for infective wound repair. VEGF receptor density on ECs in the presence of LPS and BLP was assessed using flow cytometry. These parameters were assessed in hypoxic conditions as well as in normoxia. The contribution of CD14 was evaluated using recombinant human (rh) CD14. EC proliferation in response to VEGF was quantified in the presence and absence of LPS and BLP. RESULTS: Flow cytometric analysis revealed that LPS and BLP have profoundly repressive effects on VEGF receptor density in normoxic and, more pertinently, hypoxic conditions. The observed downregulation of constitutive and inducible VEGF receptor expression on ECs was not due to any directly cytotoxic effect of LPS and BLP on ECs, as measured by cell viability and apoptosis assays. We identified a pivotal role for soluble\\/serum CD14, a highly specific bacterial wall product receptor, in

  4. A metabolic link between mitochondrial ATP synthesis and liver glycogen metabolism: NMR study in rats re-fed with butyrate and/or glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beauvieux Marie-Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Butyrate, end-product of intestinal fermentation, is known to impair oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver and could disturb glycogen synthesis depending on the ATP supplied by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cytosolic glycolysis. Methods In 48 hr-fasting rats, hepatic changes of glycogen and total ATP contents and unidirectional flux of mitochondrial ATP synthesis were evaluated by ex vivo 31P NMR immediately after perfusion and isolation of liver, from 0 to 10 hours after force-feeding with (butyrate 1.90 mg + glucose 14.0 mg.g-1 body weight or isocaloric glucose (18.2 mg.g-1 bw; measurements reflected in vivo situation at each time of liver excision. The contribution of energetic metabolism to glycogen metabolism was estimated. Results A net linear flux of glycogen synthesis (~11.10 ± 0.60 μmol glucosyl units.h-1.g-1 liver wet weight occurred until the 6th hr post-feeding in both groups, whereas butyrate delayed it until the 8th hr. A linear correlation between total ATP and glycogen contents was obtained (r2 = 0.99 only during net glycogen synthesis. Mitochondrial ATP turnover, calculated after specific inhibition of glycolysis, was stable (~0.70 ± 0.25 μmol.min-1.g-1 liver ww during the first two hr whatever the force-feeding, and increased transiently about two-fold at the 3rd hr in glucose. Butyrate delayed the transient increase (1.80 ± 0.33 μmol.min-1.g-1 liver ww to the 6th hr post-feeding. Net glycogenolysis always appeared after the 8th hr, whereas flux of mitochondrial ATP synthesis returned to near basal level (0.91 ± 0.19 μmol.min-1.g-1 liver ww. Conclusion In liver from 48 hr-starved rats, the energy need for net glycogen synthesis from exogenous glucose corresponds to ~50% of basal mitochondrial ATP turnover. The evidence of a late and transient increase in mitochondrial ATP turnover reflects an energetic need, probably linked to a glycogen cycling. Butyrate, known to reduce oxidative

  5. Butyric acid esterification kinetics over Amberlyst solid acid catalysts: the effect of alcohol carbon chain length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Venkata K S; Kanyi, Victor; Santhanakrishnan, Arati; Lira, Carl T; Miller, Dennis J

    2013-02-01

    The liquid phase esterification of butyric acid with a series of linear and branched alcohols is examined. Four strong cation exchange resins, Amberlyst™ 15, Amberlyst™ 36, Amberlyst™ BD 20, and Amberlyst™ 70, were used along with para-toluenesulfonic acid as a homogeneous catalyst. The effect of increasing alcohol carbon chain length and branching on esterification rate at 60°C is presented. For all catalysts, the decrease in turnover frequency (TOF) with increasing carbon chain length of the alcohol is described in terms of steric hindrance, alcohol polarity, and hydroxyl group concentration. The kinetics of butyric acid esterification with 2-ethylhexanol using Amberlyst™ 70 catalyst is described with an activity-based, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model that includes autocatalysis by butyric acid. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Butyric acid fermentation from pre-treated wheat straw by a mutant clostridium tyrobutyricum strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; Baumann, Ivan; Westermann, Peter

    ’s platform for a variety of products for industrial use. Butyric acid is considered as a potential chemical building-block for the production of chemicals for e.g. polymeric compounds and the aim of this work was to develop a suitable and robust strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum that produces less acetic......Only little research on butyric acid fermentation has been carried out in relationship to bio-refinery perspectives involving strain selection, development of adapted strains, physiological analyses for higher yield, productivity and selectivity. However, a major step towards the development...... acid (higher selectivity), has a higher yield and a higher productivity of butyric acid from pre-treated lignocellulosic biomass. Pre-treated wheat straw was used as the main carbon source. After one year of serial adaptation and selection a mutant strain of C. tyrobutyricum was developed. This new...

  7. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Reference Español: Meningitis bacteriana Bacterial meningitis is very serious and can be deadly. Death ...

  8. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  9. Membrane complexes of Syntrophomonas wolfei involved in syntrophic butyrate degradation and hydrogen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Regis Crable

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Syntrophic butyrate metabolism involves the thermodynamically unfavorable production of hydrogen and/or formate from the high potential electron donor, butyryl-CoA. Such redox reactions can occur only with energy input by a process called reverse electron transfer. Previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen production from butyrate requires the presence of a proton gradient, but the biochemical machinery involved has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the gene and enzyme systems involved in reverse electron transfer by Syntrophomonas wolfei were investigated using proteomic and gene expression approaches. S. wolfei was grown in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei or Dehalococcoides mccartyi under conditions requiring reverse electron transfer and compared to both axenic S. wolfei cultures and cocultures grown in conditions that do not require reverse electron transfer. Blue native gel analysis of membranes solubilized from syntrophically grown cells revealed the presence of a membrane-bound hydrogenase, Hyd2, which exhibited hydrogenase activity during in gel assays. Bands containing a putative iron-sulfur (FeS oxidoreductase were detected in membranes of crotonate-grown and butyrate grown S. wolfei cells. The genes for the corresponding hydrogenase subunits, hyd2ABC, were differentially expressed at higher levels during syntrophic butyrate growth when compared to growth on crotonate. The expression of the FeS oxidoreductase gene increased when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei. Additional membrane-associated proteins detected included FoF1 ATP synthase subunits and several membrane transporters that may aid syntrophic growth. Furthermore, syntrophic butyrate metabolism can proceed exclusively by interspecies hydrogen transfer, as demonstrated by growth with D. mccartyi, which is unable to use formate. These results argue for the importance of Hyd2 and FeS oxidoreductase in reverse electron transfer during syntrophic

  10. Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, David E. [Environmental Energy Inc., Blacklick, OH (United States); Yang, Shang-Tian [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2005-08-25

    prices as a chemical are at $3.00 per gallon – wholesaling in 55 gallon drums for $6.80, with a worldwide market of 1.4 billion gallon per year. The market demand is expected to increase dramatically since butanol can now be produced economically from low-cost biomass. Butanol’s application as a replacement for gasoline will outpace ethanol, biodiesel and hydrogen when its safety and simplicity of use are seen. Butanol’s application for the Department of Defense as a clean-safe replacement for batteries when used in conjunction with fuel cell technology is seen as an application for the future. Disposable canisters made of PLA that carry butanol to be reformed and used to generate electricity for computers, night vision and stealth equipment can be easily disposed of. In a typical ABE fermentation, butyric, propionic and acetic acids are produced first by C. acetobutylicum; the culture then undergoes a metabolic shift and solvents (butanol, acetone, and ethanol) are formed (Fond et al., 1985). In conventional ABE fermentations, the butanol yield from glucose is low, typically at ~15% (w/w) and rarely exceeds 25% (0.77–1.3 gallons per bushel corn respectfully). The production of butanol is also limited by severe product inhibition. Butanol at a concentration of 10 g/L can significantly inhibit cell growth and the fermentation. Consequently, butanol titers in conventional ABE fermentations are usually lower than 13 g/L. The low butanol yield and butanol concentration made butanol production from glucose by ABE fermentation uneconomical.

  11. Soil type dependent rhizosphere competence and biocontrol of two bacterial inoculant strains and their effects on the rhizosphere microbial community of field-grown lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Susanne; Sandmann, Martin; Smalla, Kornelia; Grosch, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Rhizosphere competence of bacterial inoculants is assumed to be important for successful biocontrol. Knowledge of factors influencing rhizosphere competence under field conditions is largely lacking. The present study is aimed to unravel the effects of soil types on the rhizosphere competence and biocontrol activity of the two inoculant strains Pseudomonas jessenii RU47 and Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18 in field-grown lettuce in soils inoculated with Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IB or not. Two independent experiments were carried out in 2011 on an experimental plot system with three soil types sharing the same cropping history and weather conditions for more than 10 years. Rifampicin resistant mutants of the inoculants were used to evaluate their colonization in the rhizosphere of lettuce. The rhizosphere bacterial community structure was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA to get insights into the effects of the inoculants and R. solani on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial communities. Both inoculants showed a good colonization ability of the rhizosphere of lettuce with more than 10(6) colony forming units per g root dry mass two weeks after planting. An effect of the soil type on rhizosphere competence was observed for 3Re4-18 but not for RU47. In both experiments a comparable rhizosphere competence was observed and in the presence of the inoculants disease symptoms were either significantly reduced, or at least a non-significant trend was shown. Disease severity was highest in diluvial sand followed by alluvial loam and loess loam suggesting that the soil types differed in their conduciveness for bottom rot disease. Compared to effect of the soil type of the rhizosphere bacterial communities, the effects of the pathogen and the inoculants were less pronounced. The soil types had a surprisingly low influence on rhizosphere competence and biocontrol activity while they significantly affected

  12. Context-dependent protein folding of a virulence peptide in the bacterial and host environments: structure of an SycH–YopH chaperone–effector complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vujanac, Milos; Stebbins, C. Erec, E-mail: stebbins@rockefeller.edu [The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The structure of a SycH–YopH chaperone–effector complex from Yersinia reveals the bacterial state of a protein that adopts different folds in the host and pathogen environments. Yersinia pestis injects numerous bacterial proteins into host cells through an organic nanomachine called the type 3 secretion system. One such substrate is the tyrosine phosphatase YopH, which requires an interaction with a cognate chaperone in order to be effectively injected. Here, the first crystal structure of a SycH–YopH complex is reported, determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals the presence of (i) a nonglobular polypeptide in YopH, (ii) a so-called β-motif in YopH and (iii) a conserved hydrophobic patch in SycH that recognizes the β-motif. Biochemical studies establish that the β-motif is critical to the stability of this complex. Finally, since previous work has shown that the N-terminal portion of YopH adopts a globular fold that is functional in the host cell, aspects of how this polypeptide adopts radically different folds in the host and in the bacterial environments are analysed.

  13. Hormone-dependent bacterial growth, persistence and biofilm formation--a pilot study investigating human follicular fluid collected during IVF cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise S Pelzer

    Full Text Available Human follicular fluid, considered sterile, is aspirated as part of an in vitro fertilization (IVF cycle. However, it is easily contaminated by the trans-vaginal collection route and little information exists in its potential to support the growth of microorganisms. The objectives of this study were to determine whether human follicular fluid can support bacterial growth over time, whether the steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone (present at high levels within follicular fluid contribute to the in vitro growth of bacterial species, and whether species isolated from follicular fluid form biofilms. We found that bacteria in follicular fluid could persist for at least 28 weeks in vitro and that the steroid hormones stimulated the growth of some bacterial species, specifically Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp. Streptococcus spp. and E. coli. Several species, Lactobacillus spp., Propionibacterium spp., and Streptococcus spp., formed biofilms when incubated in native follicular fluids in vitro (18/24, 75%. We conclude that bacteria aspirated along with follicular fluid during IVF cycles demonstrate a persistent pattern of growth. This discovery is important since it can offer a new avenue for investigation in infertile couples.

  14. Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Host Defense against Uropathogenic E. coli Is Counteracted by Bacterial HemolysinA-Dependent Killing of NK Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Chamutal; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Rosenberg, Shilo; Yamin, Rachel; Enk, Jonatan; Glasner, Ariella; Bar-On, Yotam; Fleissig, Omer; Naor, Ronit; Abed, Jawad; Mevorach, Dror; Granot, Zvi; Bachrach, Gilad; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are a common cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. While the importance of natural killer (NK) cells in innate immune protection against tumors and viral infections is well documented, their role in defense against bacterial infections is still emerging, and their involvement in UPEC-mediated UTI is practically unknown. Using a systematic mutagenesis approach, we found that UPEC adheres to NK cells primarily via its type I fimbriae and employs its hemolysinA toxin to kill NK cells. In the absence of hemolysinA, NK cells directly respond to the bacteria and secrete the cytokine TNF-α, which results in decreased bacterial numbers in vitro and reduction of bacterial burden in the infected bladders. Thus, NK cells control UPEC via TNF-α production, which UPEC counteracts by hemolysinA-mediated killing of NK cells, representing a previously unrecognized host defense and microbial counterattack mechanism in the context of UTI. PMID:24331464

  15. Combination of culture-independent and culture-dependent molecular methods for the determination of bacterial community of iru, a fermented Parkia biglobosa seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbenga Adedeji Adewumi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bacterial composition of iru produced by natural, uncontrolled fermentation of Parkia biglobosa seeds was assessed using culture-independent method in combination with culture-based genotypic typing techniques. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE revealed similarity in DNA fragments with the two DNA extraction methods used and confirmed bacterial diversity in the sixteen iru samples from different production regions. DNA sequencing of the highly variable V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes obtained from PCR-DGGE identified species related to Bacillus subtilis as consistent bacterial species in the fermented samples, while other major bands were identified as close relatives of Staphylococcus vitulinus, Morganella morganii, B. thuringiensis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Tetragenococcus halophilus, Ureibacillus thermosphaericus, Brevibacillus parabrevis, Salinicoccus jeotgali, Brevibacterium sp. and Uncultured bacteria clones. Bacillus species were cultured as potential starter cultures and clonal relationship of different isolates determined using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA combined with 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS PCR amplification, restriction analysis (ITS-PCR-RFLP and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR. This further discriminated Bacillus subtilis and its variants from food-borne pathogens such as Bacillus cereus and suggested the need for development of controlled fermentation processes and good manufacturing practices (GMP for iru production to achieve product consistency, safety quality and improved shelf life.

  16. Acetate and butyrate as substrates for hydrogen production through photo-fermentation: Process optimization and combined performance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srikanth, S.; Venkata Mohan, S.; Prathima Devi, M.; Peri, Dinakar; Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Tarnaka, Hyderabad, AP 500 007 (India)

    2009-09-15

    Organic acids viz., acetate and butyrate were evaluated as primary substrates for the production of biohydrogen (H{sub 2}) through photo-fermentation process using mixed culture at mesophilic temperature (34 C). Experiments were performed by varying parameters like operating pH, presence/absence of initiator substrate (glucose) and vitamin solution, type of nitrogen source (mono sodium salt of glutamic acid and amino glutamic acid) and gas (nitrogen/argon) used to create anaerobic microenvironment. Experimental data showed the feasibility of H{sub 2} production along with substrate degradation utilizing organic acids as metabolic substrate but was found to be dependent on the process parameters evaluated. Maximum specific H{sub 2} production and substrate degradation were observed with acetic acid [3.51 mol/Kg COD{sub R}-day; 1.22 Kg COD{sub R}/m{sup 3}-day (92.96%)] compared to butyric acid [3.33 mol/Kg COD{sub R}-day; 1.19 Kg COD{sub R}/m{sup 3}-day (88%)]. Higher H{sub 2} yield was observed under acidophilic microenvironment in the presence of glucose (co-substrate), mono sodium salt of glutamic acid (nitrogen source) and vitamins. Argon induced microenvironment was observed to be effective compared to nitrogen induced microenvironment. Combined process efficiency viz., H{sub 2} production and substrate degradation was evaluated employing data enveloping analysis (DEA) methodology based on the relative efficiency. Integration of dark fermentation with photo-fermentation appears to be an economically viable route for sustainable biohydrogen production if wastewater is used as substrate. (author)

  17. Short Chain Fatty Acids in the Colon and Peripheral Tissues: A Focus on Butyrate, Colon Cancer, Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M. McNabney

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased dietary fiber consumption has been associated with many beneficial effects, including amelioration of obesity and insulin resistance. These effects may be due to the increased production of short chain fatty acids, including propionate, acetate and butyrate, during fermentation of the dietary fiber in the colon. Indeed, oral and dietary supplementation of butyrate alone has been shown to prevent high fat-diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. This review focuses on sources of short chain fatty acids, with emphasis on sources of butyrate, mechanisms of fiber and butyrate metabolism in the gut and its protective effects on colon cancer and the peripheral effects of butyrate supplementation in peripheral tissues in the prevention and reversal of obesity and insulin resistance.

  18. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatrician Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental ... most common vaginal infection in sexually active teenaged girls . It appears to be caused by a bacterial ...

  19. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive STDs Home Page Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ( ... of getting other STDs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea . These bacteria can sometimes cause pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  20. Butyrate suppresses expression of neuropilin I in colorectal cell lines through inhibition of Sp1 transactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staton Carolyn A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropilin is a transmembrane receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and is expressed in normal endothelial cells and upregulated in cancer cells. Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1 has been shown to promote tumour cell migration and survival in colon cancer in response to VEGF binding. The expression profiles of neuropilins, associated co-receptors and known ligands have been mapped in three colorectal cell lines: Caco-2, HCT116 & HT29. We have previously shown that butyrate, a naturally occurring histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi produced by fermentation of fibre in the colon, causes apoptosis of colon cancer cell lines. Results Here we demonstrate that butyrate down-regulates NRP-1 and VEGF at the mRNA and protein level in colorectal cancer cell lines. NRP-1 is a known transcriptional target of Sp1, whose activity is regulated by acetylation. NRP-1 down-regulation by butyrate was associated with decreased binding affinity of Sp1 for canonical Sp-binding sites in the NRP-1 promoter. siRNA-mediated knock-down of Sp1 implied that Sp1 may have strong DNA binding activity but weak transactivation potential. Conclusion The downregulation of the key apoptotic and angiogenesis regulator NRP-1 by butyrate suggests a novel contributory mechanism to the chemopreventive effect of dietary fibre.

  1. Concentrations of butyric acid bacteria spores in silage and relationships with aerobic deterioration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Driehuis, F.; Giffel, M.C.T.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Germination and growth of spores of butyric acid bacteria ( BAB) may cause severe defects in semihard cheeses. Silage is the main source of BAB spores in cheese milk. The objectives of the study were to determine the significance of grass silages and corn silages as sources of BAB spores and to

  2. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving farm management by modeling the contamination of farm tank milk with butyric acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Driehuis, F.; Giffel, te M.C.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Control of contamination of farm tank milk (FTM) with the spore-forming butyric acid bacteria (BAB) is important to prevent the late-blowing defect in semi-hard cheeses. The risk of late blowing can be decreased via control of the contamination level of FTM with BAB. A modeling approach was applied

  4. Morphological development of polypropylene in immiscible blends with cellulose acetate butyrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) with different melt flow indexes were melt blended with cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and then prepared into microspheres or nanofibers following a novel process of producing well dispersed CAB/iPP immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The morp...

  5. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: electrospinning and calcination of hydroxyapatite/polyvinyl butyral nanofibers and growth kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakaria, S.M.; Zein, S.H. Sharif; Othman, M.R.; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospinning of hydroxyapatite (HA)/polyvinyl butyral solution resulted in the formation of fibers with average diameter of 937-1440 nm. These fibers were converted into HA nanoparticles with size <100 nm after undergoing calcination treatment at 600 degrees C. The diameter of the fiber was

  6. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) General. (1) A tolerance is established for the herbicide 4-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric... established for the combined residues, free and conjugated, of the herbicide MCPB, 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food...

  7. Epigenetic Regulation of Gene Expression Induced by Butyrate in Colorectal Cancer: Involvement of MicroRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S Bishop

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer mortality globally. Development of CRC is closely associated with lifestyle, and diet may modulate risk. A Western-style diet is characterised by a high intake of red meat but low consumption of fruit, vegetables, and whole cereals. Such a diet is associated with CRC risks. It has been demonstrated that butyrate, produced by the fermentation of dietary plant fibre, can alter both genetic and epigenetic expressions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that are commonly present in both normal and tumour cells. Aberrant miRNA expression is associated with CRC initiation, progression, and metastasis. In addition, butyrate can modulate cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and miRNA expression in CRC. In this review, the effects of butyrate on modulating miRNA expression in CRC will be discussed. Furthermore, evidence on the effect of butyrate on CRC risk through reducing oncogenic miRNA expression will be presented.

  8. Effect of method of delivery of sodium butyrate on rumen development in newborn calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Górka, P; Kowalski, Z M; Pietrzak, P

    2011-01-01

    The effect of sodium butyrate (SB) supplementation in milk replacer (MR) or in starter mixture (SM) or in both MR and SM on performance, selected blood parameters, and rumen development in newborn calves was determined. Twenty-eight male calves with a mean age of 5 (±1) d were randomly allocated...

  9. A cereal-based evening meal rich in indigestible carbohydrates increases plasma butyrate the next morning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Anne C.; Östman, Elin M.; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2010-01-01

    fermentation and improved glucose tolerance. This work can be seen as an extension of that study, focusing on the tentative role of specific colonic metabolites, i.e. SCFA. Plasma concentrations of acetate, propionate, and butyrate were determined in the morning in healthy participants (5 women and 10 men...

  10. Inhibition of lipolysis in bovine adipose tissue by butyrate and β-hydroxybutyrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.H.M.; Lopes-Cardozo, Matthijs; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1974-01-01

    In a previous paper it was shown that butyrate and DL-β-hydroxybutyrate, at a concentration of 10 mM, inhibit lipolysis in bovine adipose tissue in vitro. This inhibition was observed for basal lipolysis as well as for lipolysis stimulated by noradrenalin. Acetate, propionate and acetoacetate

  11. Evaluation of butyrate-induced production of a mannose-6-phosphorylated therapeutic enzyme using parallel bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavarao, Chikkathur N; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Wong, Lily; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Braulke, Thomas; Khan, Mansoor; Anderson, Howard; Johnson, Gibbes R

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactor process changes can have a profound effect on the yield and quality of biotechnology products. Mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) glycan content and the enzymatic catalytic kinetic parameters are critical quality attributes (CQAs) of many therapeutic enzymes used to treat lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Here, we have evaluated the effect of adding butyrate to bioreactor production cultures of human recombinant β-glucuronidase produced from CHO-K1 cells, with an emphasis on CQAs. The β-glucuronidase produced in parallel bioreactors was quantified by capillary electrophoresis, the catalytic kinetic parameters were measured using steady-state analysis, and mannose-6-phosphorylation status was assessed using an M6P-specific single-chain antibody fragment. Using this approach, we found that butyrate treatment increased β-glucuronidase production up to approximately threefold without significantly affecting the catalytic properties of the enzyme. However, M6P content in β-glucuronidase was inversely correlated with the increased enzyme production induced by butyrate treatment. This assessment demonstrated that although butyrate dramatically increased β-glucuronidase production in bioreactors, it adversely impacted the mannose-6-phosphorylation of this LSD therapeutic enzyme. This strategy may have utility in evaluating manufacturing process changes to improve therapeutic enzyme yields and CQAs. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Production of 4-hydroxybutyrate from succinate semialdehyde in butyrate biosynthesis in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasuo; Sato, Mitsunari; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Okamoto, Takashi; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2015-12-01

    Despite evidence demonstrating the importance of butyrate-producing bacteria in host health and disease, the characterization of enzymes responsible for butyrate production has not been fully elucidated in the periodontopathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis. LC-MS/MS and colorimetric analyses were employed to enzymatically characterize recombinant PGN_0724 in P. gingivalis as a succinate semialdehyde reductase. The concentration of short chain fatty acids in the culture supernatant of the wild-type bacteria and a mutant strain lacking the PGN_0724 gene were quantified using GC-MS. Incubation of recombinant PGN_0724 with succinate semialdehyde and NADH resulted in the production of 4-hydroxybutyrate as well as consumption of succinate semialdehyde. Double reciprocal plots showed that the reaction catalyzed by the PGN_0724 protein was associated with a ternary complex mechanism. The growth speed and final turbidity of the mutant strain were much lower than those of the wild-type cells. The capacity of the mutant strain to produce butyrate, isobutyrate, and isovalerate was 30%, 15%, and 45%, respectively, of that of the wild-type strain, while the mutant strain produced approximately 3.9-fold more propionate than the wild type. The pathway responsible for butyrate production is important for the growth of P. gingivalis and appears to be associated with production of the other short chain fatty acids. The aim of this study was to delineate the mechanisms involved in the production of 4-hydroxybutyrate, which is an intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway for production of butyrate, which is a virulence factor in P. gingivalis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyamine is a critical determinant of Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 for GacS-dependent bacterial cell growth and biocontrol capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju Yeon; Kang, Beom Ryong; Ryu, Choong-Min; Anderson, Anne J; Kim, Young Cheol

    2017-09-01

    The Gac/Rsm network regulates, at the transcriptional level, many beneficial traits in biocontrol-active pseudomonads. In this study, we used Phenotype MicroArrays, followed by specific growth studies and mutational analysis, to understand how catabolism is regulated by this sensor kinase system in the biocontrol isolate Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. The growth of a gacS mutant was decreased significantly relative to that of the wild-type on ornithine and arginine, and on the precursor of these amino acids, N-acetyl-l-glutamic acid. The gacS mutant also showed reduced production of polyamines. Expression of the genes encoding arginine decarboxylase (speA) and ornithine decarboxylases (speC) was controlled at the transcriptional level by the GacS sensor of P. chlororaphis O6. Polyamine production was reduced in the speC mutant, and was eliminated in the speAspeC mutant. The addition of exogenous polyamines to the speAspeC mutant restored the in vitro growth inhibition of two fungal pathogens, as well as the secretion of three biological control-related factors: pyrrolnitrin, protease and siderophore. These results extend our knowledge of the regulation by the Gac/Rsm network in a biocontrol pseudomonad to include polyamine synthesis. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that bacterial polyamines act as important regulators of bacterial cell growth and biocontrol potential. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  14. New lactic acid bacterial strains from traditional Mongolian fermented milk products have altered adhesion to porcine gastric mucin depending on the carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Seishi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Moriya, Naoko; Takenaka, Akio; Suzuki, Chise

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of lactic acid bacteria to the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is a major property of probiotics. Here, we examined the ability of 21 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented milk products in Mongolia to adhere to porcine gastric mucin in vitro. Higher attachment was observed with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains 6-8 and 8-1 than with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (positive control). Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain 7-1 adhered to mucin as effectively as did strain GG. Heat inactivation decreased the adhesive ability of strains 6-8 and 8-1 but did not affect strain 7-1. The adhesion of strains 6-8, 7-1 and 8-1 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with periodate and trypsin, indicating that proteinaceous and carbohydrate-like cell surface compounds are involved in the adhesion of these strains. The adhesion of strain 7-1 was affected by the type of carbohydrate present in the growth medium, being higher with fructose than with lactose, galactose or xylose as the carbon source. The sugar content of 7-1 cells grown on various carbohydrates was negatively correlated with its adhesive ability. We provide new probiotic candidate strains and new information regarding carbohydrate preference that influences lactic acid bacterial adhesion to mucin. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. Sodium Butyrate Reduces Colitogenic Immunoglobulin A-Coated Bacteria and Modifies the Composition of Microbiota in IL-10 Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tenghui; Ding, Chao; Zhao, Mingli; Dai, Xujie; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Yi; Gu, Lili; Wei, Yao; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-11-24

    High levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-coated bacteria may have a role in driving inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We therefore investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on microbiota in IBD prone interleukin (IL)-10 -/- mice. At 8 weeks of age, mice were allocated into three groups ( n = 4/group): normal (C57BL/6), IL-10 -/- , and IL-10 -/- treated with sodium butyrate (100 mM). Severity of colitis, inflammatory cytokine and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration in proximal colon contents, the percentage of IgA-coated bacteria and microbiota composition by 16S ribosomal RNA assessment of stool were measured after 4 weeks of treatment. Sodium butyrate ameliorated histological colitis and decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 in IL-10 -/- mice compared with those without treatment. At the phylum level, a reduction in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Firmicutes in IL-10 -/- mice treated with sodium butyrate were observed. Additionally, Prevotellaceae species were reduced in IL-10 -/- mice treated with sodium butyrate as compared with those without treatment. The level of biodiversity was slightly increased and the amount of IgA-coated bacteria decreased in IL-10 -/- mice treated with sodium butyrate compared with those without treatment. Our results indicate that sodium butyrate protects against colitis, possibly through modifying the gut microbiota, enriching biodiversity and reducing the amount of colitogenic IgA-coated bacteria in IL-10 -/- mice.

  16. Bacterial conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epling, John

    2012-02-20

    Most cases of conjunctivitis in adults are probably due to viral infection, but children are more likely to develop bacterial conjunctivitis than they are viral forms. The main bacterial pathogens are Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults and children, and Moraxella catarrhalis in children. Contact lens wearers may be more likely to develop gram-negative infections. Bacterial keratitis occurs in up to 30 per 100,000 contact lens wearers. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of empirical treatment in adults and children with suspected bacterial conjunctivitis? What are the effects of treatment in adults and children with bacteriologically confirmed bacterial conjunctivitis? What are the effects of treatment in adults and children with clinically confirmed gonococcal conjunctivitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 44 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: ocular decongestants, oral antibiotics, parenteral antibiotics, saline, topical antibiotics, and warm compresses.

  17. p21Waf1/Cip1 is a common target induced by short-chain fatty acid HDAC inhibitors (valproic acid, tributyrin and sodium butyrate) in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Paola; Tonelli, Roberto; Camerin, Consuelo; Purgato, Stefania; Fronza, Raffaele; Bianucci, Fabrizio; Guerra, Francesco; Pession, Andrea; Ferreri, Anna Maria

    2005-06-01

    Histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase (HDAC) determine the acetylation status of histones, and thereby control the regulation of gene expression. HDAC inhibitors have been found to inhibit the growth of a variety of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated previously that the short-chain fatty acid compound butyrate and its derivative tributyrin (both HDAC inhibitors) arrest cell growth and induce differentiation in human neuroblastoma (NB) cells. In the current study we investigated the effect of the HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on proliferation and differentiation in human NB cells (SJ-N-KP, AF8). Treatment with VPA resulted in a strong inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of cell differentiation, as revealed by neurite outgrowth and increase of acetylcholinesterase specific activity. Moreover, we addressed the question of whether the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) are involved in the mechanism of action of members of the short-chain fatty acids class (VPA, sodium butyrate and tributyrin) of HDAC inhibitors, in human NB cells. We demonstrated that p21(Cip1) is a common target of induction of transcription and protein expression for all the three compounds, while only VPA induced a concomitant increase of p27(Kip1) gene expression. These results suggest that p21(Cip1) could be involved in the inhibition of proliferation and induction of differentiation in human NB cells induced by treatment with VPA or tributyrin or sodium butyrate. Moreover, p21(Cip1) could be applied in the molecular monitoring of drug action in the possible therapeutic application of these short-chain fatty acid members of HDAC inhibitors for human NB treatment.

  18. Considerations on bacterial nucleoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijoo-Siota, Lucía; Rama, José Luis R; Sánchez-Pérez, Angeles; Villa, Tomás G

    2017-07-01

    The classic genome organization of the bacterial chromosome is normally envisaged with all its genetic markers linked, thus forming a closed genetic circle of duplex stranded DNA (dsDNA) and several proteins in what it is called as "the bacterial nucleoid." This structure may be more or less corrugated depending on the physiological state of the bacterium (i.e., resting state or active growth) and is not surrounded by a double membrane as in eukayotic cells. The universality of the closed circle model in bacteria is however slowly changing, as new data emerge in different bacterial groups such as in Planctomycetes and related microorganisms, species of Borrelia, Streptomyces, Agrobacterium, or Phytoplasma. In these and possibly other microorganisms, the existence of complex formations of intracellular membranes or linear chromosomes is typical; all of these situations contributing to weakening the current cellular organization paradigm, i.e., prokaryotic vs eukaryotic cells.

  19. Drug-loaded Cellulose Acetate and Cellulose Acetate Butyrate Films ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nx 6110

    amount of drug in the formulation, F is fraction of drug release at time t, Km is constant dependent on geometry of dosage form and n is diffusion exponent indicating the mechanism of drug release. For films, a value of n = 0.5 indicates Fickian diffusion, n = 0.5-1.0 indicates anomalous transport and n = 1.0 indicates case-.

  20. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  1. Bacterial stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Bacterial stress. Physicochemical and chemical parameters: temperature, pressure, pH, salt concentration, oxygen, irradiation. Nutritional depravation: nutrient starvation, water shortage. Toxic compounds: Antibiotics, heavy metals, toxins, mutagens. Interactions with other cells: ...

  2. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation,

  3. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained,

  4. Bacterial Cryoprotectants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    culture plate, whereas no growth was detected under similar conditions without betaine. They also observed that uptake of betaine into the bacterial cell was .... lar content of bound water, and (4) modifying the growth of ice crystals in the extracellular environment. Conclusion. At the present time, betaine serves as a model ...

  5. Bacterial mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...

  6. Bacterial Cryoprotectants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 11. Bacterial Cryoprotectants. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 7 Issue 11 November 2002 pp 59-63. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/11/0059-0063. Keywords.

  7. Gaseous 3-pentanol primes plant immunity against a bacterial speck pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato via salicylic acid and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geun Cheol eSong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available 3-Pentanol is an active organic compound produced by plants and is a component of emitted insect sex pheromones. A previous study reported that drench application of 3-pentanol elicited plant immunity against microbial pathogens and an insect pest in crop plants. Here, we evaluated whether 3-pentanol and the derivatives 1-pentanol and 2-pentanol induced plant systemic resistance using the in vitro I-plate system. Exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings to 10 M and 100 nM 3-pentanol evaporate elicited an immune response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. We performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the 3-pentanol-mediated Arabidopsis immune responses by determining Pathogenesis-Related (PR gene expression levels associated with defense signaling through SA, JA, and ethylene signaling pathways. The results show that exposure to 3-pentanol and subsequent pathogen challenge upregulated PDF1.2 and PR1 expression. Selected Arabidopsis mutants confirmed that the 3-pentanol-mediated immune response involved salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA signaling pathways and the NPR1 gene. Taken together, this study indicates that gaseous 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance in Arabidopsis by priming SA and JA signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a volatile compound of an insect sex pheromone triggers plant systemic resistance against a bacterial pathogen.

  8. Hydrocortisone 17-butyrate degradation in the presence of micro-organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabouan-Guyon, S M; Fauvaud, C M; Courtois, P Y; Barthes, D M

    1997-02-01

    This study compared the degradation of hydrocortisone 17-butyrate (H17B) in the presence of six different bacteria, commonly found on psoriatic skin. H17B and its degradation products (hydrocortisone and hydrocortisone 21-butyrate (H21B)) were assayed by HPLC. In the absence of micro-organisms, we observed 16.6 +/- 7.1% degradation. In the presence of micro-organisms and otherwise similar conditions, we noted that H17B degradation was not modified by cocci (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae). Three bacilli increased degradation, Escherichia coli 59.1 +/- 19.4%, Klebsiella oxytoca 62.1 +/- 6.7% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 56.0 +/- 17.9%. The degradation of H17B into hydrortisone and H21B may produce a loss of therapeutic activity.

  9. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, L; Nermes, M; Isolauri, E; Salminen, S; de Vos, W M; Satokari, R

    2015-02-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory, and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were characterized. Further, the changes in intestinal microbiota composition related to the improvement of this disease 3 months later were assessed. The severity of eczema correlated inversely with microbiota diversity (r = -0.54, P = 0.002) and with the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (r = -0.52, P = 0.005). During the 3-month follow-up, microbiota diversity increased (P microbiota and high abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria were associated with milder eczema, thus suggesting they have a role in alleviating symptoms of atopic eczema. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Butyric acid fermentation from pretreated and hydrolyzed wheat straw by C.tyrobutyricum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; Westermann, Peter; Gavala, Hariklia N.

    and xylose at a concentration of 71,6±0,2 g/l and 55,4±0,2 g/l respectively, with TS content 20,87% (g/g). From an economical point of view, the conversion of both sugars is very important. In fact C.tyrobutyricum has the capability to convert both hexose and pentose sugars. Results from batch experiments......Butyric acid fermentation has long been discussed in the last decade due to the wide application of butyric acid in chemical, pharmaceutical and food industries. Among other microbial strains, C.tyrobutyricum was found interesting due to its higher yield (more than 93% of the theoretical yield...

  11. Carboxymethyl Cellulose Acetate Butyrate: A Review of the Preparations, Properties, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El-Sakhawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB has gained increasing importance in several fields, particularly in coating technologies and pharmaceutical research. CMCAB is synthesized by esterification of CMC sodium salt with acetic and butyric anhydrides. CMCAB mixed esters are relatively high molecular weight (MW thermoplastic polymers with high glass transition temperatures (Tg. CMCAB ester is dispersible in water and soluble in a wide range of organic solvents, allowing varied opportunity to the solvent choice. It makes application of coatings more consistent and defect-free. Its ability to slow down the release rate of highly water-soluble compounds and to increase the dissolution of poorly soluble compounds makes CMCAB a unique and potentially valuable tool in pharmaceutical and amorphous solid dispersions (ASD formulations.

  12. Biopolymer blends based on polylactic acid and polyhydroxy butyrate-co-valerate: effect of clay on mechanical and thermal properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, MJ

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable polymer blends consisting of polylactic acid (PLA) and polyhydroxy butyrate-co-valerate (PHBV) have been prepared by melt mixing in a twin screw extruder and followed by injection molding technique. Cereplast PLA containing starch...

  13. Polyvinyl butyral films containing leuco-malachite green as low-dose dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Hoang Hoa; Solomon, H. M.; Taguchi, M.; Kojima, T.

    2008-04-01

    Thin films containing leuco-malachite green (LMG) dye in polyvinyl butyral (PVB) have been developed for dose measurements of a few hundreds Gy level. The film shows significant color change in the visible range, and the sensitivity of the film to absorbed dose was enhanced by addition of chloride-containing compounds, such as chloral hydrate or 2,2,2-trichloroethanol. The film is suitable as dosimeters for dose measurements, e.g. in food irradiation and environmental protection.

  14. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  15. Lipase catalyzed transesterification of ethyl butyrate synthesis inn-hexane- a kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, N Annapurna; Radhika, G B; Bhargavi, R J

    2017-08-01

    Kinetics of lipase catalyzed transesterification of ethyl caprate and butyric acid was investigated. The objective of this work was to propose a reaction mechanism and develop a rate equation for the synthesis of ethyl butyrate by transesterification using surfactant coated lipase from Candida rugosa . The reaction rate could be described in terms of Michaelis-Menten equation with a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism and competitive inhibition by both the substrates. The values of kinetic parameters computed were V max  = 2.861 μmol/min/mg; K m(acid)  = 0.0746 M; K m(ester)  = 0.125 M; K i acid = 0.450 M. This study indicated a competitive enzyme inhibition by butyric acid during lipase catalyzed transesterification reaction. Experimental observations had clearly indicated that the substrates as well as product act as dead-end inhibitors.

  16. Impact of butyrate on microbial selection in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2014-01-01

    Microbial selection in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal system was investigated in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor fed exclusively with butyrate as a carbon source. As reported in the few previous studies, butyrate uptake was slow and phosphorus (P) release occurred during the entire anaerobic period. Polyphosphate-accumulating organism (PAO), i.e. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (named as Accumulibacter), glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs), i.e. Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis (named as Competibacter) and Defluviicoccus-related, tetrad-forming alphaproteobacteria (named as Defluviicoccus) were identified using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The results show that Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus were selected in the butyrate-fed reactor, whereas Competibacter was not selected. P removal was efficient at the beginning of the experiment with an increasing percentage relative abundance (% RA) of PAOs. The % RA of Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus increased from 13% to 50% and 8% to 16%, respectively, and the % RA of Competibacter decreased from 8% to 2% during the experiment. After 6 weeks, P removal deteriorated with the poor correlation between the percentage of P removal and % RA of GAOs.

  17. Transfer of dietary fatty acids from butyric acid fortified canola oil into the meat of broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Rapaccini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature reported positive beneficial effects of butyric acid and canola oil on production performance traits of broiler chickens. Three hundred hybrid Ross 708 (150 males and 150 females were randomly allotted to 10 pens per treatment with 5 males and 5 females per pen. Ten pens were administered a diet supplemented with soybean oil (control, ten pens the same basal diet but supplemented with a blend of mono-, di-, tri-glyceride of butyric acid added to soybean oil (T1 and ten pens the same basal diet supplemented with a mix of soybean and canola oil containing butyrate (T2. No differences in final body weight, dressing percentage, liver and thigh weight were found be- tween groups. The T2 birds showed the highest feed/gain ratio (P<0.05. The control group showed the highest value for breast weight while the highest quantity of abdominal fat was in T2 carcasses. Fatty acid profile was significantly influenced by the presence of oil supplements, not only quantitatively but also qualitatively.

  18. Release of dissolved carbohydrates by Emiliania huxleyi and formation of transparent exopolymer particles depend on algal life cycle and bacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oostende, Nicolas; Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja C W; Boschker, Henricus T S; Vyverman, Wim; Sabbe, Koen

    2013-05-01

    The coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi plays a pivotal role in the marine carbon cycle. However, we have only limited understanding of how its life cycle and bacterial interactions affect the production and composition of dissolved extracellular organic carbon and its transfer to the particulate pool. We traced the fate of photosynthetically fixed carbon during phosphate-limited stationary growth of non-axenic, calcifying E. huxleyi batch cultures, and more specifically the transfer of this carbon to bacteria and to dissolved high molecular weight neutral aldoses (HMW NAld) and extracellular particulate carbon. We then compared the dynamics of dissolved carbohydrates and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) between cultures of non-axenic and axenic diploid E. huxleyi. In addition, we present the first data on extracellular organic carbon in (non-axenic) haploid E. huxleyi cultures. Bacteria enhanced the accumulation of dissolved polysaccharides and altered the composition of dissolved HMW NAld, while they also stimulated the formation of TEP containing high densities of charged polysaccharides in diploid E. huxleyi cultures. In haploid E. huxleyi cultures we found a more pronounced accumulation of dissolved carbohydrates, which had a different NAld composition than the diploid cultures. TEP formation was significantly lower than in the diploid cultures, despite the presence of bacteria. In diploid E. huxleyi cultures, we measured a high level of extracellular release of organic carbon (34-76%), retrieved mainly in the particulate pool instead of the dissolved pool. Enhanced formation of sticky TEP due to bacteria-alga interactions, in concert with the production of coccoliths, suggests that especially diploid E. huxleyi blooms increase the efficiency of export production in the ocean during dissolved phosphate-limited conditions. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. MUC2 Mucin and Butyrate Contribute to the Synthesis of the Antimicrobial Peptide Cathelicidin in Response to Entamoeba histolytica- and Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Eduardo R; Kissoon-Singh, Vanessa; Moreau, France; Holani, Ravi; Chadee, Kris

    2017-03-01

    Embedded in the colonic mucus are cathelicidins, small cationic peptides secreted by colonic epithelial cells. Humans and mice have one cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) each, LL-37/hCAP-18 and Cramp, respectively, with related structure and functions. Altered production of MUC2 mucin and antimicrobial peptides is characteristic of intestinal amebiasis. The interactions between MUC2 mucin and cathelicidins in conferring innate immunity against Entamoeba histolytica are not well characterized. In this study, we quantified whether MUC2 expression and release could regulate the expression and secretion of cathelicidin LL-37 in colonic epithelial cells and in the colon. The synthesis of LL-37 was enhanced with butyrate (a product of bacterial fermentation) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) (a proinflammatory cytokine in colitis) in the presence of exogenously added purified MUC2. The LL-37 responses to butyrate and IL-1β were higher in high-MUC2-producing cells than in lentivirus short hairpin RNA (shRNA) MUC2-silenced cells. Activation of cyclic adenylyl cyclase (AMP) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways was necessary for the simultaneous expression of MUC2 and cathelicidins. In Muc2 mucin-deficient (Muc2-/-) mice, murine cathelicidin (Cramp) was significantly reduced compared to that in Muc2+/- and Muc2+/+ littermates. E. histolytica-induced acute inflammation in colonic loops stimulated high levels of cathelicidin in Muc2+/+ but not in Muc2-/- littermates. In dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in Muc2+/+ mice, which depletes the mucus barrier and goblet cell mucin, Cramp expression was significantly enhanced during restitution. These studies demonstrate regulatory mechanisms between MUC2 and cathelicidins in the colonic mucosa where an intact mucus barrier is essential for expression and secretion of cathelicidins in response to E. histolytica- and DSS-induced colitis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  20. Assessment of microbial diversity in the rhizosphere of Pinus roxburghii (Sarg.) and bio-inoculant potential of selected pine bacterial isolates for wheat varieties based on culture independent and culture dependent techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, I; Bano, A; Mirza, M S

    2017-10-15

    Evidences are missing regarding compatibility of pine bacteria as bio-inoculants for crops. The diversity and abundance of rhizosphere bacteria of Pinus roxburghii had never been investigated by the simultaneous application of culture dependent and culture independent techniques. Present study was aimed to isolate, characterize, to check the bio-inoculant potential of pine bacteria and to assess rhizosphere bacterial diversity using culture independent advance approaches. Fourty bacteria were isolated from the rhizoplane of P. roxburghii growing in cold climate at high altitude in Murree, morphologically characterized; nine were identified by 16S-rRNA sequence analyses and used in experiment. The diversity and abundance of 16S-rRNA gene and nifH gene in the rhizosphere was assessed by cloning, RFLP analysis, 454 amplicon Pyrosequencing and qPCR. The bacterial isolates significantly improved dry weight of shoot, root, root area, IAA, GA3 contents, no. of grains/plant, weight of grains/plant in wheat var. Chakwal-50 and Fareed-06 under axenic and field conditions. The no. of 16S-rRNA sequences (2979) identified by Pyrosequencing shared similarity with 13 phyla of domains Bacteria and Archaea. The results confirmed the existence of diverse bacteria of agricultural and industrial importance in the rhizosphere and compatibility of rhizoplane bacteria as bio-inoculants for wheat varieties. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. [Determination of volatile fatty acids in the blood plasma of cattle before and after an infusion of propionate and butyrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eulitz-Meder, C; Hartung, J; Geldermann, H

    1989-05-01

    Before and after infusion of propionate and butyrate the concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the blood of heifers were determined by gas chromatography, in order to indicate activity and regulation of the carbohydrate metabolism. 14 heifers were loaded after food deprivation with intravenous infusions of propionate and butyrate. Concentrations of acetate, propionate, isobutyrate, butyrate, and valerate were measured in blood samples which were taken later on. The methods used for clearance and extraction as well as for gas chromatographic analysis are described. Retention times and blood concentrations are given for each VFA. Concentrations prior to infusion were for: acetate 10.14 +/- 2.51 microliters/ml; propionate 0.42 +/- 0.35 microliters/ml; iso-butyrate 3.72 +/- 1.37 microliters/ml; butyrate 3.44 +/- 0.68 microliters/ml blood plasma. The concentrations of the infused VFA showed a 100 (butyrate) to 1000 (propionate) fold increase followed by a subsequent decrease to the initial values. These investigations on the profile of VFA elucidated criteria of the energy metabolism.

  2. Proboscis conditioning experiments with honeybees, Apis mellifera caucasica, with butyric acid and DEET mixture as conditioned and unconditioned stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Charles I; Giray, Tugrul; Mixson, T Andrew; Nolf, Sondra L; Wells, Harrington; Kence, Aykut; Kence, Meral

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments are described investigating whether olfactory repellents DEET and butyric acid can support the classical conditioning of proboscis extension in the honeybee, Apis mellifera caucasica (Hymenoptera: Apidae). In the first experiment DEET and butyric acid readily led to standard acquisition and extinction effects, which are comparable to the use of cinnamon as a conditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that the odor of DEET or butyric acid is not intrinsically repellent to honey bees. In a second experiment, with DEET and butyric acid mixed with sucrose as an unconditioned stimulus, proboscis conditioning was not established. After several trials, few animals responded to the unconditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that these chemicals are gustatory repellents when in direct contact. In the last experiment a conditioned suppression paradigm was used. Exposing animals to butyric acid or DEET when the proboscis was extended by direct sucrose stimulation or by learning revealed that retraction of the proboscis was similar to another novel odor, lavender, and in all cases greatest when the animal was not permitted to feed. These results again demonstrate that DEET or butyric acid are not olfactory repellents, and in addition, conditioned suppression is influenced by feeding state of the bee.

  3. Bacterial lipases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, meaning a sharp increase in lipase activity observed when the substrate starts to form an emulsion, thereby presenting to the enzyme an interfacial area. As a consequence, the kinetics of a lipase rea...

  4. Longevity in mice is promoted by probiotic-induced suppression of colonic senescence dependent on upregulation of gut bacterial polyamine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuharu Matsumoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic low-grade inflammation is recognized as an important factor contributing to senescence and age-related diseases. In mammals, levels of polyamines (PAs decrease during the ageing process; PAs are known to decrease systemic inflammation by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine synthesis in macrophages. Reductions in intestinal luminal PAs levels have been associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction. The probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LKM512 is known to increase intestinal luminal PA concentrations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We supplemented the diet of 10-month-old Crj:CD-1 female mice with LKM512 for 11 months, while the controls received no supplementation. Survival rates were compared using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. LKM512-treated mice survived significantly longer than controls (P<0.001; moreover, skin ulcers and tumors were more common in the control mice. We then analyzed inflammatory and intestinal conditions by measuring several markers using HPLC, ELISA, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, and histological slices. LKM512 mice showed altered 16S rRNA gene expression of several predominant intestinal bacterial groups. The fecal concentrations of PAs, but not of short-chain fatty acids, were significantly higher in LKM512-treated mice (P<0.05. Colonic mucosal function was also better in LKM512 mice, with increased mucus secretion and better maintenance of tight junctions. Changes in gene expression levels were evaluated using the NimbleGen mouse DNA microarray. LKM512 administration also downregulated the expression of ageing-associated and inflammation-associated genes and gene expression levels in 21-month-old LKM512-treated mice resembled those in 10-month-old untreated (younger mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrated increased longevity in mice following probiotic treatment with LKM512, possibly due to the suppression of chronic low-grade inflammation in the colon

  5. A proteomic view at the biochemistry of syntrophic butyrate oxidation in Syntrophomonas wolfei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Schmidt

    Full Text Available In syntrophic conversion of butyrate to methane and CO2, butyrate is oxidized to acetate by secondary fermenting bacteria such as Syntrophomonas wolfei in close cooperation with methanogenic partner organisms, e.g., Methanospirillum hungatei. This process involves an energetically unfavourable shift of electrons from the level of butyryl-CoA oxidation to the substantially lower redox potential of proton and/or CO2 reduction, in order to transfer these electrons to the methanogenic partner via hydrogen and/or formate. In the present study, all prominent membrane-bound and soluble proteins expressed in S. wolfei specifically during syntrophic growth with butyrate, in comparison to pure-culture growth with crotonate, were examined by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and identified by peptide fingerprinting-mass spectrometry. A membrane-bound, externally oriented, quinone-linked formate dehydrogenase complex was expressed at high level specifically during syntrophic butyrate oxidation, comprising a selenocystein-linked catalytic subunit with a membrane-translocation pathway signal (TAT, a membrane-bound iron-sulfur subunit, and a membrane-bound cytochrome. Soluble hydrogenases were expressed at high levels specifically during growth with crotonate. The results were confirmed by native protein gel electrophoresis, by formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase-activity staining, and by analysis of formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities in intact cells and cell extracts. Furthermore, constitutive expression of a membrane-bound, internally oriented iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (DUF224 was confirmed, together with expression of soluble electron-transfer flavoproteins (EtfAB and two previously identified butyryl-CoA dehydrogenases. Our findings allow to depict an electron flow scheme for syntrophic butyrate oxidation in S. wolfei. Electrons derived from butyryl-CoA are transferred through a membrane-bound EtfAB:quinone oxidoreductase (DUF

  6. A proteomic view at the biochemistry of syntrophic butyrate oxidation in Syntrophomonas wolfei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alexander; Müller, Nicolai; Schink, Bernhard; Schleheck, David

    2013-01-01

    In syntrophic conversion of butyrate to methane and CO2, butyrate is oxidized to acetate by secondary fermenting bacteria such as Syntrophomonas wolfei in close cooperation with methanogenic partner organisms, e.g., Methanospirillum hungatei. This process involves an energetically unfavourable shift of electrons from the level of butyryl-CoA oxidation to the substantially lower redox potential of proton and/or CO2 reduction, in order to transfer these electrons to the methanogenic partner via hydrogen and/or formate. In the present study, all prominent membrane-bound and soluble proteins expressed in S. wolfei specifically during syntrophic growth with butyrate, in comparison to pure-culture growth with crotonate, were examined by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and identified by peptide fingerprinting-mass spectrometry. A membrane-bound, externally oriented, quinone-linked formate dehydrogenase complex was expressed at high level specifically during syntrophic butyrate oxidation, comprising a selenocystein-linked catalytic subunit with a membrane-translocation pathway signal (TAT), a membrane-bound iron-sulfur subunit, and a membrane-bound cytochrome. Soluble hydrogenases were expressed at high levels specifically during growth with crotonate. The results were confirmed by native protein gel electrophoresis, by formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase-activity staining, and by analysis of formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities in intact cells and cell extracts. Furthermore, constitutive expression of a membrane-bound, internally oriented iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (DUF224) was confirmed, together with expression of soluble electron-transfer flavoproteins (EtfAB) and two previously identified butyryl-CoA dehydrogenases. Our findings allow to depict an electron flow scheme for syntrophic butyrate oxidation in S. wolfei. Electrons derived from butyryl-CoA are transferred through a membrane-bound EtfAB:quinone oxidoreductase (DUF224) to a

  7. Inhibitory effects of neem seed oil and its extract on various direct acting and activation-dependant mutagens-induced bacterial mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vinod; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar; Meshram, Ghansham Pundilikji

    2013-12-01

    Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae), commonly called neem is a plant native to the Indian sub-continent. Neem oil extracted from the seeds of neem tree has shown promising medicinal properties. To investigate the possible anti-mutagenic activity of neem seed oil (NO) and its dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) extract (NDE) on the mutagenicity induced by various direct acting and activation-dependant mutagens. The possible anti-mutagenic activity of NO (100-10,000 µg/plate) and NDE (0.1-1000 µg/plate) as well as the mechanism of anti-mutagenic activity was studied in an in vitro Ames Salmonella/microsome assay. NSO and NDE inhibited the mutagenic activity of methyl glyoxal (MG), in which case the extent of inhibition ranged from 65 to 77% and against 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (NQNO); it showed a 48-87% inhibition in the non-toxic doses. Similar response of NSO and NDE was seen against the activation-dependant mutagens aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, 48-88%), benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P, 31-85%), cyclophosphamide (CP, 66-71%), 20-methylcholanthrane (20-MC, 37-83%) and acridine orange (AO, 39-72%) in the non-toxic doses. Mechanism-based studies indicated that NDE exhibits better anti-mutagenic activity in the pre- and simultaneous-treatment protocol against MG, suggesting that one or several active phytochemicals present in the extract covalently bind with the mutagen and prevent its interaction with the genome. These findings demonstrate that neem oil is capable of attenuating the mutagenic activity of various direct acting and activation-dependant mutagens.

  8. Bacterial transformation: ComFA is a DNA-dependent ATPase that forms complexes with ComFC and DprA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Amy; Foster, Hannah R; Gromek, Katarzyna A; Perry, Thomas N; Dujeancourt, Annick; Krasteva, Petya V; Gubellini, Francesca; Falbel, Tanya G; Burton, Briana M; Fronzes, Rémi

    2017-09-01

    Pneumococcal natural transformation contributes to genomic plasticity, antibiotic resistance development and vaccine escape. Streptococcus pneumoniae, like many other naturally transformable species, has evolved sophisticated protein machinery for the binding and uptake of DNA. Two proteins encoded by the comF operon, ComFA and ComFC, are involved in transformation but their exact molecular roles remain unknown. In this study, we provide experimental evidence that ComFA binds to single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and has ssDNA-dependent ATPase activity. We show that both ComFA and ComFC are essential for the transformation process in pneumococci. Moreover, we show that these proteins interact with each other and with other proteins involved in homologous recombination, such as DprA, thus placing the ComFA-ComFC duo at the interface between DNA uptake and DNA recombination during transformation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Bacterial endotoxin enhances colorectal cancer cell adhesion and invasion through TLR-4 and NF-kappaB-dependent activation of the urokinase plasminogen activator system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2009-05-19

    Perioperative exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with accelerated metastatic colorectal tumour growth. LPS directly affects cells through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and the transcription factor NF-kappaB. The urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) system is intimately implicated in tumour cell extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions fundamental to tumour progression. Thus we sought to determine if LPS directly induces accelerated tumour cell ECM adhesion and invasion through activation of the u-PA system and to elucidate the cellular pathways involved. Human colorectal tumour cell lines were stimulated with LPS. u-PA concentration, u-PA activity, active u-PA, surface urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) and TLR-4 expression were assessed by ELISA, colorimetric assay, western blot analysis and flow cytometry respectively. In vitro tumour cell vitronectin adhesion and ECM invasion were analysed by vitronectin adhesion assay and ECM invasion chambers. u-PA and u-PAR function was inhibited with anti u-PA antibodies or the selective u-PA inhibitors amiloride or WXC-340, TLR-4 by TLR-4-blocking antibodies and NF-kappaB by the selective NF-kappaB inhibitor SN-50. LPS upregulates u-PA and u-PAR in a dose-dependent manner, enhancing in vitro tumour cell vitronectin adhesion and ECM invasion by >40% (P<0.01). These effects were ameliorated by u-PA and u-PAR inhibition. LPS activates NF-kappaB through TLR-4. TLR-4 and NF-kappaB inhibition ameliorated LPS-enhanced u-PA and u-PAR expression, tumour cell vitronectin adhesion and ECM invasion. LPS promotes tumour cell ECM adhesion and invasion through activation of the u-PA system in a TLR-4- and NF-kappaB-dependent manner.

  10. Increased Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure Is Associated With Altered Gut Microbiota Composition and Butyrate Production in Early Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Arango, Luisa F; Barrett, Helen L; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K; Morrison, Mark; Dekker Nitert, Marloes

    2016-10-01

    The risk of developing pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia is higher in obese pregnant women. In obesity, the composition of the gut microbiota is altered. Obesity is also associated with low-grade inflammation. Metabolites from the gut microbiota may contribute to both hypertension and inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the composition of the gut microbiota in overweight and obese pregnant women is associated with blood pressure and levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. The composition of the gut microbiota was determined with 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing in 205 women at 16 weeks gestation from the SPRING study (the Study of Probiotics in Gestational Diabetes). Expression of butyrate-producing genes in the gut microbiota was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were measured in fasting serum of a subset of 70 women. Blood pressure was slightly but significantly higher in obese compared with overweight women. The abundance of the butyrate-producing genus Odoribacter was inversely correlated with systolic blood pressure. Butyrate production capacity was decreased, but plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentrations increased in obese pregnant women. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were inversely correlated with expression of butyrate kinase and Odoribacter abundance. This study shows that in overweight and obese pregnant women at 16 weeks gestation, the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and butyrate production in the gut microbiota is significantly negatively associated with blood pressure and with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels. Increasing butyrate-producing capacity may contribute to maintenance of normal blood pressure in obese pregnant women. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Sodium Butyrate Reduces Colitogenic Immunoglobulin A-Coated Bacteria and Modifies the Composition of Microbiota in IL-10 Deficient Mice

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    Tenghui Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA-coated bacteria may have a role in driving inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. We therefore investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on microbiota in IBD prone interleukin (IL-10−/− mice. At 8 weeks of age, mice were allocated into three groups (n = 4/group: normal (C57BL/6, IL-10−/−, and IL-10−/− treated with sodium butyrate (100 mM. Severity of colitis, inflammatory cytokine and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA concentration in proximal colon contents, the percentage of IgA-coated bacteria and microbiota composition by 16S ribosomal RNA assessment of stool were measured after 4 weeks of treatment. Sodium butyrate ameliorated histological colitis and decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and IL-6 in IL-10−/− mice compared with those without treatment. At the phylum level, a reduction in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Firmicutes in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate were observed. Additionally, Prevotellaceae species were reduced in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate as compared with those without treatment. The level of biodiversity was slightly increased and the amount of IgA-coated bacteria decreased in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate compared with those without treatment. Our results indicate that sodium butyrate protects against colitis, possibly through modifying the gut microbiota, enriching biodiversity and reducing the amount of colitogenic IgA-coated bacteria in IL-10−/− mice.

  12. Steering Endogenous Butyrate Production in the Intestinal Tract of Broilers as a Tool to Improve Gut Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onrust, Lonneke; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Driessche, Karolien; De Maesschalck, Celine; Vermeulen, Karen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The ban on antimicrobial growth promoters and efforts to reduce therapeutic antibiotic usage has led to major problems of gastrointestinal dysbiosis in livestock production in Europe. Control of dysbiosis without the use of antibiotics requires a thorough understanding of the interaction between the microbiota and the host mucosa. The gut microbiota of the healthy chicken is highly diverse, producing various metabolic end products, including gases and fermentation acids. The distal gut knows an abundance of bacteria from within the Firmicutes Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa that produce butyric acid, which is one of the metabolites that are sensed by the host as a signal. The host responds by strengthening the epithelial barrier, reducing inflammation, and increasing the production of mucins and antimicrobial peptides. Stimulating the colonization and growth of butyrate-producing bacteria thus may help optimizing gut health. Various strategies are available to stimulate butyrate production in the distal gut. These include delivery of prebiotic substrates that are broken down by bacteria into smaller molecules which are then used by butyrate producers, a concept called cross-feeding. Xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) are such compounds as they can be converted to lactate, which is further metabolized to butyrate. Probiotic lactic acid producers can be supplied to support the cross-feeding reactions. Direct feeding of butyrate-producing Clostridium cluster IV and XIVa strains are a future tool provided that large scale production of strictly anaerobic bacteria can be optimized. Current results of strategies that promote butyrate production in the gut are promising. Nevertheless, our current understanding of the intestinal ecosystem is still insufficient, and further research efforts are needed to fully exploit the capacity of these strategies.

  13. Steering endogenous butyrate production in the intestinal tract of broilers as a tool to improve gut health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke eOnrust

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ban on antimicrobial growth promoters and efforts to reduce therapeutic antibiotic usage has led to major problems of gastrointestinal dysbiosis in livestock production in Europe. Control of dysbiosis without the use of antibiotics requires a thorough understanding of the interaction between the microbiota and the host mucosa. The gut microbiota of the healthy chicken is highly diverse, producing various metabolic end products, including gases and fermentation acids. The distal gut knows an abundance of bacteria from within the Firmicutes Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa that produce butyric acid, which is one of the metabolites that is sensed by the host as a signal. The host responds by strengthening the epithelial barrier, reducing inflammation, and increasing the production of mucins and antimicrobial peptides. Stimulating the colonization and growth of butyrate producing bacteria thus may help optimizing gut health. Various strategies are available to stimulate butyrate production in the distal gut. These include delivery of prebiotic substrates that are broken down by bacteria into smaller molecules which are then used by butyrate producers, a concept called cross-feeding. Xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS are such compounds as they can be converted to lactate which is further metabolized to butyrate. Probiotic lactic acid producers can be supplied to support the cross-feeding reactions. Direct feeding of butyrate producing Clostridium cluster IV and XIVa strains are a future tool provided that large scale production of strictly anaerobic bacteria can be optimized. Current results of strategies that promote butyrate production in the gut are promising. Nevertheless, our current understanding of the intestinal ecosystem is still insufficient, and further research efforts are needed to fully exploit the capacity of these strategies.

  14. Butyrate promotes visceral hypersensitivity in an IBS-like model via enteric glial cell-derived nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, X; Li, M; Li, L-X; Sun, Y-Y; Zhang, W-X; Zhao, D-Y; Li, Y-Q

    2017-10-20

    Altered visceral sensation is common in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and nerve growth factor (NGF) participates in visceral pain development. Sodium butyrate (NaB) could induce colonic hypersensitivity via peripheral up-regulation of NGF in animals. Enteric glial cells (EGCs) appear to be an important source of NGF. Whether butyrate could induce visceral hypersensitivity via increased EGC-derived NGF is still unknown. CRL-2690 cells were used for transcriptome analyses after butyrate treatment. Rats received butyrate enemas to induce colonic hypersensitivity. Colorectal distention test was performed to assess visceral sensitivity. Immunofluorescence studies were used to evaluate the co-expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and NGF or growth associated protein 43 in animal model. NGF expression in rat colon was also investigated. In vitro, CRL-2690 cells were stimulated with NaB or trichostatin A (TSA). NGF or GFAP expression was also examined. Transcriptome analyses showed that butyrate induced marked changes of genes expression related to neurotrophic signaling pathways. NaB-treated rats showed increased visceral sensitivity. An improved NGF expression level was observed in NaB-treated rats. Meanwhile, a 2.1-fold increase in co-expression of GFAP and NGF was also determined in rats received NaB enemas. In cultured cells, both NaB and TSA treatment could cause obvious NGF expression. Thus, butyrate might regulate EGC function via histone deacetylase inhibition. Butyrate-EGC interplay may play a pivotal role in regulation of NGF expression and the development of colonic hypersensitivity in IBS-like animal model. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effects of butyrate on the insulin homeostasis of chickens kept on maize- or wheat-based diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulcsár, Anna; Mátis, Gábor; Molnár, Andor; Petrilla, Janka; Husvéth, Ferenc; Huber, Korinna; Dublecz, Károly; Neogrády, Zsuzsanna

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of butyrate as a feed supplement on the expression of insulin signalling proteins as potent regulators of metabolism and growth in Ross 308 broiler chickens fed maize- or wheat-based diets. Both diets were supplemented with non-protected butyrate (1.5 and 3.0 g/kg of diet, respectively) or with protected butyrate (0.2 g/kg of diet); the diet of the control groups was prepared without any additives (control). On day 42 of life, systemic blood samples were drawn for analyses of glucose and insulin concentrations, and tissue samples (liver, gastrocnemius muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue) were taken for Western blotting examinations. The expression of key insulin signalling proteins (IRβ, PKCζ and mTOR) was assessed by semiquantitative Western blotting from the tissues mentioned. The type of diet had a remarkable influence on the insulin homeostasis of chickens. The wheat-based diet significantly increased IRβ and mTOR expression in the liver as well as mTOR and PKCζ expression in the adipose tissue when compared to animals kept on a maize-based diet. IRβ expression in the liver was stimulated by the lower dose of non-protected butyrate as well, suggesting the potential of butyrate as a feed additive to affect insulin sensitivity. Based on the results obtained, the present study shows new aspects of nutritional factors by comparing the special effects of butyrate as a feed additive and those of the cereal type, presumably in association with dietary non-starch polysaccharide- (NSP-) driven enteric shortchain fatty acid release including butyrate, influencing insulin homeostasis in chickens. As the tissues of chickens have physiologically lower insulin sensitivity compared to mammals, diet-associated induction of the insulin signalling pathway can be of special importance in improving growth and metabolic health.

  16. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-03-17

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n = 38), Aves (n = 8) and Reptilia (n = 8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large 'unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild.

  17. Structure of thrombospondin type 3 repeats in bacterial outer membrane protein A reveals its intra-repeat disulfide bond-dependent calcium-binding capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shuyan; Sun, Cancan; Tan, Kemin; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2017-09-01

    Eukaryotic thrombospondin type 3 repeat (TT3R) is an efficient calcium ion (Ca2+) binding motif only found in mammalian thrombospondin family. TT3R has also been found in prokaryotic cellulase Cel5G, which was thought to forfeit the Ca2+-binding capability due to the formation of intra-repeat disulfide bonds, instead of the inter-repeat ones possessed by eukaryotic TT3Rs. In this study, we have identified an enormous number of prokaryotic TT3R-containing proteins belonging to several different protein families, including outer membrane protein A (OmpA), an important structural protein connecting the outer membrane and the periplasmic peptidoglycan layer in gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report the crystal structure of the periplasmic region of OmpA from Capnocytophaga gingivalis, which contains a linker region comprising five consecutive TT3Rs. The structure of OmpA-TT3R exhibits a well-ordered architecture organized around two tightly-coordinated Ca2+ and confirms the presence of abnormal intra-repeat disulfide bonds. Further mutagenesis studies showed that the Ca2+-binding capability of OmpA-TT3R is indeed dependent on the proper formation of intra-repeat disulfide bonds, which help to fix a conserved glycine residue at its proper position for Ca2+ coordination. Additionally, despite lacking inter repeat disulfide bonds, the interfaces between adjacent OmpA-TT3Rs are enhanced by both hydrophobic and conserved aromatic-proline interactions.

  18. The Shigella flexneri type 3 secretion system is required for tyrosine kinase-dependent protrusion resolution, and vacuole escape during bacterial dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Carole J; Dragoi, Ana-Maria; Agaisse, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is a human pathogen that triggers its own entry into intestinal cells and escapes primary vacuoles to gain access to the cytosolic compartment. As cytosolic and motile bacteria encounter the cell cortex, they spread from cell to cell through formation of membrane protrusions that resolve into secondary vacuoles in adjacent cells. Here, we examined the roles of the Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) in S. flexneri dissemination in HT-29 intestinal cells infected with the serotype 2a strain 2457T. We generated a 2457T strain defective in the expression of MxiG, a central component of the T3SS needle apparatus. As expected, the ΔmxiG strain was severely affected in its ability to invade HT-29 cells, and expression of mxiG under the control of an arabinose inducible expression system (ΔmxiG/pmxiG) restored full infectivity. In this experimental system, removal of the inducer after the invasion steps (ΔmxiG/pmxiG (Ara withdrawal)) led to normal actin-based motility in the cytosol of HT-29 cells. However, the time spent in protrusions until vacuole formation was significantly increased. Moreover, the number of formed protrusions that failed to resolve into vacuoles was also increased. Accordingly, the ΔmxiG/pmxiG (Ara withdrawal) strain failed to trigger tyrosine phosphorylation in membrane protrusions, a signaling event that is required for the resolution of protrusions into vacuoles. Finally, the ΔmxiG/pmxiG (Ara withdrawal) strain failed to escape from the formed secondary vacuoles, as previously reported in non-intestinal cells. Thus, the T3SS system displays multiple roles in S. flexneri dissemination in intestinal cells, including the tyrosine kinase signaling-dependent resolution of membrane protrusions into secondary vacuoles, and the escape from the formed secondary vacuoles.

  19. EspA acts as a critical mediator of ESX1-dependent virulence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by affecting bacterial cell wall integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Garces

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb requires the ESX1 specialized protein secretion system for virulence, for triggering cytosolic immune surveillance pathways, and for priming an optimal CD8+ T cell response. This suggests that ESX1 might act primarily by destabilizing the phagosomal membrane that surrounds the bacterium. However, identifying the primary function of the ESX1 system has been difficult because deletion of any substrate inhibits the secretion of all known substrates, thereby abolishing all ESX1 activity. Here we demonstrate that the ESX1 substrate EspA forms a disulfide bonded homodimer after secretion. By disrupting EspA disulfide bond formation, we have dissociated virulence from other known ESX1-mediated activities. Inhibition of EspA disulfide bond formation does not inhibit ESX1 secretion, ESX1-dependent stimulation of the cytosolic pattern receptors in the infected macrophage or the ability of Mtb to prime an adaptive immune response to ESX1 substrates. However, blocking EspA disulfide bond formation severely attenuates the ability of Mtb to survive and cause disease in mice. Strikingly, we show that inhibition of EspA disulfide bond formation also significantly compromises the stability of the mycobacterial cell wall, as does deletion of the ESX1 locus or individual components of the ESX1 system. Thus, we demonstrate that EspA is a major determinant of ESX1-mediated virulence independent of its function in ESX1 secretion. We propose that ESX1 and EspA play central roles in the virulence of Mtb in vivo because they alter the integrity of the mycobacterial cell wall.

  20. The Shigella flexneri type 3 secretion system is required for tyrosine kinase-dependent protrusion resolution, and vacuole escape during bacterial dissemination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole J Kuehl

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri is a human pathogen that triggers its own entry into intestinal cells and escapes primary vacuoles to gain access to the cytosolic compartment. As cytosolic and motile bacteria encounter the cell cortex, they spread from cell to cell through formation of membrane protrusions that resolve into secondary vacuoles in adjacent cells. Here, we examined the roles of the Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS in S. flexneri dissemination in HT-29 intestinal cells infected with the serotype 2a strain 2457T. We generated a 2457T strain defective in the expression of MxiG, a central component of the T3SS needle apparatus. As expected, the ΔmxiG strain was severely affected in its ability to invade HT-29 cells, and expression of mxiG under the control of an arabinose inducible expression system (ΔmxiG/pmxiG restored full infectivity. In this experimental system, removal of the inducer after the invasion steps (ΔmxiG/pmxiG (Ara withdrawal led to normal actin-based motility in the cytosol of HT-29 cells. However, the time spent in protrusions until vacuole formation was significantly increased. Moreover, the number of formed protrusions that failed to resolve into vacuoles was also increased. Accordingly, the ΔmxiG/pmxiG (Ara withdrawal strain failed to trigger tyrosine phosphorylation in membrane protrusions, a signaling event that is required for the resolution of protrusions into vacuoles. Finally, the ΔmxiG/pmxiG (Ara withdrawal strain failed to escape from the formed secondary vacuoles, as previously reported in non-intestinal cells. Thus, the T3SS system displays multiple roles in S. flexneri dissemination in intestinal cells, including the tyrosine kinase signaling-dependent resolution of membrane protrusions into secondary vacuoles, and the escape from the formed secondary vacuoles.

  1. Effect of Dietary Protein Levels on Composition of Odorous Compounds and Bacterial Ecology in Pig Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungback Cho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the effect of different levels of dietary crude protein (CP on composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities in pig manure. A total of 48 male pigs (average initial body weight 45 kg fed diets containing three levels of dietary CP (20%, 17.5%, and 15% and their slurry samples were collected from the pits under the floor every week for one month. Changes in composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities were analyzed by gas chromatography and 454 FLX titanium pyrosequencing systems, respectively. Levels of phenols, indoles, short chain fatty acid and branched chain fatty acid were lowest (p<0.05 in CP 15% group among three CP levels. Relative abundance of Bacteroidetes phylum and bacterial genera including Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Atopostipes, Peptonphilus, Ruminococcaceae_uc, Bacteroides, and Pseudomonas was lower (p<0.05 in CP 15% than in CP 20% group. There was a positive correlation (p<0.05 between odorous compounds and bacterial genera: phenol, indole, iso-butyric acid, and iso-valeric acid with Atopostipes, p-cresol and skatole with Bacteroides, acetic acid and butyric acid with AM982595_g of Porphyromonadaceae family, and propionic acid with Tissierella. Taken together, administration of 15% CP showed less production of odorous compounds than 20% CP group and this result might be associated with the changes in bacterial communities especially whose roles in protein metabolism.

  2. Use of Additives to Improve Performance of Methyl Butyrate-Based Lithium-Ion Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    This work addresses the need for robust rechargeable batteries that can operate well over a wide temperature range. To this end, a number of electrolyte formulations have been developed that incorporate the use of electrolyte additives to improve the high-temperature resilience, low-temperature power capability, and life characteristics of methyl butyrate-based electrolyte solutions. These electrolyte additives include mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), lithium oxalate, vinylene carbonate (VC), and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), which have been shown to result in improved high-temperature resilience of all carbonate-based electrolytes. Improved performance has been demonstrated of Li-ion cells with methyl butyrate-based electrolytes, including 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %); 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 2% FEC; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 4% FEC; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + lithium oxalate; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 2% VC; and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 0.10M LiBOB. These electrolytes have been shown to improve performance in MCMB-LiNiCoO2 and graphite-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 experimental Li-ion cells. A number of LiPF6-based mixed carbonate electrolyte formulations have been developed that contain ester co-solvents, which have been optimized for operation at low temperature, while still providing reasonable performance at high temperature. For example, a number of ester co-solvents were investigated, including methyl propionate (MP), ethyl propionate (EP), methyl butyrate (MB), ethyl butyrate (EB), propyl butyrate (PB), and butyl butyrate (BB) in multi-component electrolytes of the following composition: 1.0M LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC) + ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + X (20:60:20 v/v %) [where X = ester co-solvent]. ["Optimized Car bon ate and Ester-Based Li-Ion Electrolytes", NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 4 (April 2008), p. 56.] Focusing upon improved rate

  3. Effect of sodium butyrate and Yucca schidigera extract on bone characteristics in growing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puzio Iwona

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of diet supplementation with sodium butyrate and Yucca schidigera extract (0.2% and 0.3% on femur quality of growing pigs (n = 45. Material and Methods: At the age of 28, 35 and 56 d, five piglets from each group fed a different diet were euthanised and the femora were collected for further analyses. The bone characteristics were assessed based on weight, length, densitometric analysis of BMC and BMD, pQCT analysis (area, mineral content, volumetric density of trabecular and cortical part of metaphysis and diaphysis, respectively, ultimate strength, and geometrical parameters (cross-sectional area and second moment of inertia. Results: There were no significant differences in femur bone parameters among experimental groups on the 28th d of life. On the 35th d of life, piglets with 0.2% supplementation of sodium butyrate and Yucca schidigera extract had significantly lower values of weight and second moment of inertia, and significantly higher trabecular BMD and BMC compared to other experimental groups. In 56-day-old pigs, the higher values were observed in both experimental groups regarding BMC, ultimate strength, geometrical parameters, cortical BMC, diaphyseal total area, and endosteal circumference (P < 0.05. Significant differences between experimental groups were observed only in bone weight and cortical thickness. Conclusion: This study proved that simultaneous supplementation with sodium butyrate and Yucca schidigera extract positively influences bone quality in pigs in the post-weaning period. However, there were no differences in bone characteristics between the addition of 0.2% and 0.3% preparations.

  4. Deoxycholate inhibits in vivo butyrate-mediated BrDU labeling of the colonic crypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, O C; Seto, R W; Bain, A M; Fisher, J; Rombeau, J L

    1997-05-01

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate (NaBu) selectively increases colonic crypt base proliferation and inhibits "premalignant" crypt surface hyperproliferation while the secondary bile acid deoxycholate (DCA) induces surface hyperproliferation, in vitro. We hypothesized that NaBu and DCA have similar selective and antagonistic effects on the colonic crypt proliferative pattern, in vivo. Fifty-six adult SD rats underwent surgical isolation of the colon and 24-hr intraluminal instillation with physiological (10 mM) and pharmacological (25 mM) levels of butyrate alone or combined with a physiological DCA level (5 microM). Bromodeoxyuridine-labeling indices (LI) were determined as labeled cells divided by total cells, for the whole crypt and five crypt compartments from base to surface. Treatment with NaBu increased total LI when compared to NaCl. This effect was significant only at the crypt base. Both doses of NaBu resulted in similar LI with no further response at the higher concentration. In contrast to prior in vitro studies, DCA alone at this concentration did not affect LI, but when combined with NaBu, DCA inhibited the effects of NaBu at the crypt base and surface. The conclusions are: (1) the in vivo proliferative effects of NaBu are selective to the crypt base, (2) an in vivo low physiological DCA level does not promote crypt surface hyperproliferation but does inhibit butyrate's proliferative effect, and (3) NaBu and DCA interact in a complex and antagonistic manner to selectively modulate crypt base and surface proliferation, in the rat colon, in vivo. These findings may have clinical relevance since colonic levels of NaBu and DCA are affected by diet.

  5. 4,4,4-trifluoro-3-(indole-3-)butyric acid promotes root elongation in Lactuca sativa independent of ethylene synthesis and pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nenggang; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the mode of action of 4,4,4-trifluoro-3- (indole-3-) butyric acid (TFIBA), a recently described root growth stimulator, on primary root growth of Lactuca sativa L. seedlings. TFIBA (100 micromoles) promoted elongation of primary roots by 40% in 72 h but inhibited hypocotyl growth by 35%. TFIBA induced root growth was independent of pH. TFIBA did not affect ethylene production, but reduced the inhibitory effect of ethylene on root elongation. TFIBA promoted root growth even in the presence of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor L-alpha-(2-aminoethoxyvinyl)glycine. TFIBA and the ethylene-binding inhibitor silver thiosulphate (STS) had a similar effect on root elongation. The results indicate that TFIBA-stimulated root elongation was neither pH-dependent nor related to inhibition of ethylene synthesis, but was possibly related to ethylene action.

  6. Comparative effect of orally administered sodium butyrate before or after weaning on growth and several indices of gastrointestinal biology of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Maud; Gallois, Mélanie; Sève, Bernard; Louveau, Isabelle; Holst, Jens J; Oswald, Isabelle P; Lallès, Jean-Paul; Guilloteau, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Sodium butyrate (SB) provided orally favours body growth and maturation of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in milk-fed pigs. In weaned pigs, conflicting results have been obtained. Therefore, we hypothesised that the effects of SB (3 g/kg DM intake) depend on the period (before v. after weaning) of its oral administration. From the age of 5 d, thirty-two pigs, blocked in quadruplicates within litters, were assigned to one of four treatments: no SB (control), SB before (for 24 d), or after (for 11-12 d) weaning and SB before and after weaning (for 35-36 d). Growth performance, feed intake and various end-point indices of GIT anatomy and physiology were investigated at slaughter. The pigs supplemented with SB before weaning grew faster after weaning than the controls (P digestibility (P digestibilities (P digestibility.

  7. In Vitro Effects of Dietary Inulin on Human Fecal Microbiota and Butyrate Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Tae-Hwan; Jeon, Woo-Min; Han, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Administration of dietary fibers has various health benefits, mainly by increasing numbers of beneficial bacteria and enhancing production of short-chain fatty acids in the colon. There has been growing interest in the addition of dietary fiber to human diet, due to its prebiotic effects. This study aimed to evaluate the prebiotic activity of inulin using an in vitro batch fermentation system with human fecal microbiota. Fermentation of inulin resulted in a significantly greater ratio of Lactobacillus or Bifidobacteria to Enterobacteria strains as an index of healthy human intestine and elevated butyrate concentration, which are related to improvement of gut health.

  8. Converting Carbon Dioxide to Butyrate with an Engineered Strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Woodard, TL; Lovley, DR

    2014-08-26

    Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H-2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. IMPORTANCE The development of a microbial chassis for efficient conversion of carbon dioxide directly to desired organic products would greatly advance the environmentally sustainable production of biofuels and other commodities. Clostridium ljungdahlii is an effective catalyst for microbial electrosynthesis, a technology in which electricity generated with renewable technologies, such as solar or wind, powers the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to organic products. Other electron donors

  9. Effect of Indole-3-Butyric Acid on in vitro Root Development in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)

    OpenAIRE

    Khawar, Khalid Mahmood; ÖZCAN, Sebahattin

    2002-01-01

    Lentil is an important crop of the family Leguminosae and is notoriously recalcitrant to rooting in vitro. Shoots of cultivar \\"Ali Dayı\\" of lentil obtained after culturing seeds for 10 days on MS medium were isolated and rooted on MS medium containing indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) at concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/l. The primary response was obtained after 4 weeks; 0.25 mg/l IBA gave the best results, with a rooting percentage of 25%, mean number of 7.87 roots...

  10. Liquid - liquid equilibria of the water + butyric acid + decanol ternary system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Kirbaslar

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE data for the water + butyric acid + decanol ternary system were determined experimentally at temperatures of 298.15, 308.15 and 318.15 K. Complete phase diagrams were obtained by determining the solubility curve and the tie lines. The reliability of the experimental tie line data was confirmed with the Othmer-Tobias correlation. The UNIFAC method was used to predict the phase equilibrium of the system using the interaction parameters for groups CH3, CH2, COOH, OH and H2O determined experimentally. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region.

  11. Effect of different butyrate supplementations on growth and health of weaning pigs challenged or not with E. coli K88

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    Paolo Trevisi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In a full factorial design (4 diets X challenge, Yes/No, 72 weaning pigs were assigned to one of the diets: Control; experimental diets, obtained with the addition of 2 g/kg free sodium butyrate (fNaB, or 0.6 g/kg fat-protected sodium butyrate (pNaB, or 2 g/kg INVE-NutriAd commercial mixture (Mix, based on 75 g/kg protected butyrate. Oral challenge with Escherichia coli K88 was done on 2/3 of pigs on d 7. Pigs were slaughtered on d 13. The mortality in challenged pigs, tended to be higher in control group (50.0% than in the three supplemented groups (23.5%. Growth tended to be increased averagely by the supplements (p=0.100 after the challenge, that also significantly reduced growth. In general the diet did not affect the fecal shedding of Escherichia coli and Lactobacilli, the K88-specific IgA activity in blood, the morphology of oxyntic mucosa and the expression of H+/K+-ATPase gene. The supplementations tended to increase villous length of jejunum (p=0.101. On the whole, growth, villous height and surviving rate can be positively affected either when the supplementation is done by free butyrate, by protected butyrate or by the special Inve Nutri-Ad product and these effects are distributed both on pigs infected or not with Escherichia coli K88.

  12. Esterification for butyl butyrate formation using Candida cylindracea lipase produced from palm oil mill effluent supplemented medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu Salihu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Candida cylindracea lipase produced using palm oil mill effluent (POME as a basal medium to catalyze the esterification reaction for butyl butyrate formation was investigated. Butyric acid and n-butanol were used as substrates at different molar ratios. Different conversion yields were observed according to the affinity of the produced lipase toward the substrates. The n-butanol to butyric acid molar ratio of 8 and lipase concentration of 75 U/mg gave the highest butyl butyrate formation of 63.33% based on the statistical optimization using face centered central composite design (FCCCD after 12 h reaction. The esterification potential of the POME based lipase when compared with the commercial lipase from the same strain using the optimum levels was found to show a similar pattern. It can be concluded therefore that the produced lipase possesses appropriate characteristics to be used as a biocatalyst in the esterification reactions for butyl butyrate formation.

  13. Butyrate induces profound changes in gene expression related to multiple signal pathways in bovine kidney epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li CongJun

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global gene expression profiles of bovine kidney epithelial cells regulated by sodium butyrate were investigated with high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. The bovine microarray with 86,191 distinct 60mer oligonucleotides, each with 4 replicates, was designed and produced with Maskless Array Synthesizer technology. These oligonucleotides represent approximately 45,383 unique cattle sequences. Results 450 genes significantly regulated by butyrate with a median False Discovery Rate (FDR = 0 % were identified. The majority of these genes were repressed by butyrate and associated with cell cycle control. The expression levels of 30 selected genes identified by the microarray were confirmed using real-time PCR. The results from real-time PCR positively correlated (R = 0.867 with the results from the microarray. Conclusion This study presented the genes related to multiple signal pathways such as cell cycle control and apoptosis. The profound changes in gene expression elucidate the molecular basis for the pleiotropic effects of butyrate on biological processes. These findings enable better recognition of the full range of beneficial roles butyrate may play during cattle energy metabolism, cell growth and proliferation, and possibly in fighting gastrointestinal pathogens.

  14. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  15. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed M. Stubbendieck

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities.

  16. A bipartite butyrate-responsive element in the human calretinin (CALB2) promoter acts as a repressor in colon carcinoma cells but not in mesothelioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häner, Katrin; Henzi, Thomas; Pfefferli, Martine; Künzli, Esther; Salicio, Valerie; Schwaller, Beat

    2010-02-15

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate plays an essential role in colonic mucosa homeostasis through the capacity to block the cell cycle, regulate differentiation and to induce apoptosis. The beneficial effect of dietary fibers on preventing colon cancer is essentially mediated through butyrate, derived from luminal fermentation of fibers by intestinal bacteria. In epithelial cells of the colon, both in normal and colon cancer cells, the expression of several genes is positively or negatively regulated by butyrate likely through modulation of histone acetylation and thereby affecting the transcriptional activity of genes. Calretinin (CALB2) is a member of the EF-hand family of Ca(2+)-binding proteins and is expressed in a majority of poorly differentiated colon carcinoma and additionally in mesothelioma of the epithelioid and mixed type. Since CALB2 is one of the genes negatively regulated by butyrate in colon cancer cells and butyrate decreases calretinin protein expression levels in those cells, we investigated whether expression is regulated via putative butyrate-responsive elements (BRE) in the human CALB2 promoter. We identified two elements that act as butyrate-sensitive repressors in all colon cancer cell lines tested (CaCo-2, HT-29, Co-115/3). In contrast, in cells of mesothelial origin, MeT-5A and ZL34, the same two elements do not operate as butyrate-sensitive repressors and calretinin expression levels are insensitive to butyrate indicative of cell type-specific regulation of the CALB2 promoter. Calretinin expression in colon cancer cells is negatively regulated by butyrate via a bipartite BRE flanking the TATA box and this may be linked to butyrate's chemopreventive activity. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Neuroprotective Effects of Clostridium butyricum against Vascular Dementia in Mice via Metabolic Butyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics actively participate in neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the role of gut microbiota in brain disorders and vascular dementia (VaD remains unclear. We used a mouse model of VaD induced by a permanent right unilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (rUCCAO to investigate the neuroprotective effects and possible underlying mechanisms of Clostridium butyricum. Following rUCCAO, C. butyricum was intragastrically administered for 6 successive weeks. Cognitive function was estimated. Morphological examination was performed by electron microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin (H&E staining. The BDNF-PI3K/Akt pathway-related proteins were assessed by western blot and immunohistochemistry. The diversity of gut microbiota and the levels of butyrate in the feces and the brains were determined. The results showed that C. butyricum significantly attenuated the cognitive dysfunction and histopathological changes in VaD mice. C. butyricum not only increased the levels of BDNF and Bcl-2 and decreased level of Bax but also induced Akt phosphorylation (p-Akt and ultimately reduced neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, C. butyricum could regulate the gut microbiota and restore the butyrate content in the feces and the brains. These results suggest that C. butyricum might be effective in the treatment of VaD by regulating the gut-brain axis and that it can be considered a new therapeutic strategy against VaD.

  18. BACTERIAL PLASMIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dinic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids, extrachromosomal DNA, were identified in bacteria pertaining to family of Enterobacteriacae for the very first time. After that, they were discovered in almost every single observed strain. The structure of plasmids is made of circular double chain DNA molecules which are replicated autonomously in a host cell. Their length may vary from few up to several hundred kilobase (kb. Among the bacteria, plasmids are mostly transferred horizontally by conjugation process. Plasmid replication process can be divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The process involves DNA helicase I, DNA gyrase, DNA polymerase III, endonuclease, and ligase.Plasmids contain genes essential for plasmid function and their preservation in a host cell (the beginning and the control of replication. Some of them possess genes whichcontrol plasmid stability. There is a common opinion that plasmids are unnecessary fora growth of bacterial population and their vital functions; thus, in many cases they can be taken up or kicked out with no lethal effects to a plasmid host cell. However,there are numerous biological functions of bacteria related to plasmids. Plasmids identification and classification are based upon their genetic features which are presented permanently in all of them, and these are: abilities to preserve themselves in a host cell and to control a replication process. In this way, plasmids classification among incompatibility groups is performed. The method of replicon typing, which is based on genotype and not on phenotype characteristics, has the same results as in compatibility grouping.

  19. The proteins interacting with C-terminal of μ receptor are identified by bacterial two-hybrid system from brain cDNA library in morphine-dependent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peilan; Jiang, Jiebing; Dong, Zhaoqi; Yan, Hui; You, Zhendong; Su, Ruibin; Gong, Zehui

    2015-12-15

    Opioid addiction is associated with long-term adaptive changes in the brain that involve protein expression. The carboxyl-terminal of the μ opioid receptor (MOR-C) is important for receptor signal transduction under opioid treatment. However, the proteins that interact with MOR-C after chronic morphine exposure remain unknown. The brain cDNA library of chronic morphine treatment rats was screened using rat MOR-C to investigate the regulator of opioids dependence in the present study. The brain cDNA library from chronic morphine-dependent rats was constructed using the SMART (Switching Mechanism At 5' end of RNA Transcript) technique. Bacterial two-hybrid system was used to screening the rat MOR-C interacting proteins from the cDNA library. RT-qPCR and immunoblotting were used to determine the variation of MOR-C interacting proteins in rat brain after chronic morphine treatment. Column overlay assays, immunocytochemistry and coimmunoprecipitation were used to demonstrate the interaction of MOR-C and p75NTR-associated cell death executor (NADE). 21 positive proteins, including 19 known proteins were screened to interact with rat MOR-C. Expression of several of these proteins was altered in specific rat brain regions after chronic morphine treatment. Among these proteins, NADE was confirmed to interact with rat MOR-C by in vitro protein-protein binding and coimmunoprecipitation in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and rat brain with or without chronic morphine treatment. Understanding the rat MOR-C interacting proteins and the proteins variation under chronic morphine treatment may be critical for determining the pathophysiological basis of opioid tolerance and addiction. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Synthesis of Nm-PHB (nanomelanin-polyhydroxy butyrate) nanocomposite film and its protective effect against biofilm-forming multi drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, George Seghal; Jackson, Stephen A; Priyadharsini, Sethu; Dobson, Alan D W; Selvin, Joseph

    2017-08-22

    Melanin is a dark brown ubiquitous photosynthetic pigment which have many varied and ever expanding applications in fabrication of radio-protective materials, food packaging, cosmetics and in medicine. In this study, melanin production in a Pseudomonas sp. which was isolated from the marine sponge Tetyrina citirna was optimized employing one-factor at a time experiments and characterized for chemical nature and stability. Following sonication nucleated nanomelanin (Nm) particles were formed and evaluated for antibacterial and antioxidant properties. Nanocomposite film was fabricated using combinations (% w/v) of polyhydroxy butyrate-nanomelanin (PHB:Nm) blended with 1% glycerol. The Nm was found to be spherical in shape with a diameter of 100-140 nm and showed strong antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The Nm-PHB nanocomposite film was homogeneous, smooth, without any cracks, and flexible. XRD and DSC data indicated that the film was crystalline in nature, and was thermostable up to 281.87 °C. This study represents the first report on the synthesis of Nm and fabrication of Nm-PHB nanocomposite film which show strong protective effect against multidrug resistant Staphyloccoccus aureus. Thus this Nm-PHB nanocomposite film may find utility as packaging material for food products by protecting the food products from oxidation and bacterial contamination.

  1. Effects of β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate on working memory and cognitive flexibility in an animal model of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankosky, Emily R; Sherrill, Luke K; Ruvola, Lauren A; Haake, Rachel M; Kim, Taehyeon; Hammerslag, Lindsey R; Kougias, Daniel G; Juraska, Janice M; Gulley, Joshua M

    2017-09-01

    Normal aging results in cognitive decline and nutritional interventions have been suggested as potential approaches for mitigating these deficits. Here, we used rats to investigate the effects of short- and long-term dietary supplementation with the leucine metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB) on working memory and cognitive flexibility. Beginning ∼12 months of age, male and female Long-Evans rats were given twice daily access to sipper tubes containing calcium HMB (450 mg/kg) or vehicle (285 mg/kg calcium lactate) in a sucrose solution (20% w/v). Supplementation continued for 1 or 7 months (middle- and old-age (OA) groups, respectively) before testing began. Working memory was assessed by requiring rats to respond on a previously sampled lever following various delays. Cognitive flexibility was assessed by training rats to earn food according to a visual strategy and then, once acquired, shifting to an egocentric response strategy. Treatment with HMB improved working memory performance in middle-age (MA) males and OA rats of both sexes. In the cognitive flexibility task, there was a significant age-dependent deficit in acquisition of the visual strategy that was not apparent in OA males treated with HMB. Furthermore, HMB ameliorated an apparent deficit in visual strategy acquisition in MA females. Together, these findings suggest that daily nutritional supplementation with HMB facilitates learning and improves working memory performance. As such, HMB supplementation may mitigate age-related cognitive deficits and may therefore be an effective tool to combat this undesirable feature of the aging process.

  2. Stimulation of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene expression by sodium butyrate and trichostatin A in human endothelial cells involves histone acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, J; Lansink, M; Grimbergen, J; Toet, K H; Kooistra, T

    1995-08-15

    We have previously shown that the pleiotropic agent sodium butyrate strongly stimulates tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Here we provide the following evidence that the butyrate-induced t-PA expression in HUVEC involves histone H4 acetylation. (1) t-PA induction by butyrate occurs at the transcriptional level and does not require new protein synthesis, indicating a direct effect. (2) t-PA induction by butyrate can be fully mimicked by a specific, structurally unrelated, histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A. (3) At optimally stimulatory conditions, a combination of butyrate and trichostatin A does not enhance t-PA production more than each of the compounds alone, indicating that both compounds act through a common regulatory mechanism. (4) Induction of t-PA transcription by butyrate and trichostatin A was found to be preceded by histone H4 acetylation; at suboptimal inducing concentrations of butyrate and trichostatin A, the degree of acetylation of histone H4 caused by each agent was similarly reduced. These results are consistent with a role for histone H4 acetylation in t-PA induction by butyrate in HUVEC.

  3. Continuous Fermentation of Clostridium tyrobutyricum with Partial Cell Recycle as a Long-Term Strategy for Butyric Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar C. Clausen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In making alternative fuels from biomass feedstocks, the production of butyric acid is a key intermediate in the two-step production of butanol. The fermentation of glucose via Clostridium tyrobutyricum to butyric acid produces undesirable byproducts, including lactic acid and acetic acid, which significantly affect the butyric acid yield and productivity. This paper focuses on the production of butyric acid using Clostridium tyrobutyricum in a partial cell recycle mode to improve fermenter yield and productivity. Experiments with fermentation in batch, continuous culture and continuous culture with partial cell recycle by ultrafiltration were conducted. The results show that a continuous fermentation can be sustained for more than 120 days, which is the first reported long-term production of butyric acid in a continuous operation. Further, the results also show that partial cell recycle via membrane ultrafiltration has a great influence on the selectivity and productivity of butyric acid, with an increase in selectivity from ≈9% to 95% butyric acid with productivities as high as 1.13 g/Lh. Continuous fermentation with low dilution rate and high cell recycle ratio has been found to be desirable for optimum productivity and selectivity toward butyric acid and a comprehensive model explaining this phenomenon is given.

  4. Butyrate pretreatment attenuates heart depression in a mice model of endotoxin-induced sepsis via anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangyan; Jin, Zengyou; Shen, Kaiyi; Weng, Tingting; Chen, Zhisong; Feng, Jiahui; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Xiaolong; Chu, Maoping

    2017-03-01

    The depressed heart function is the main complication to cause death of septic patients in clinic. It is urgent to find effective interventions for this intractable disease. In this study, we investigated whether butyrate could be protective for heart against sepsis and the underlying mechanism. Mice were randomly divided into three groups. Model group challenged with LPS (30 mg/kg, i.p.) only. Butyrate group received butyrate (200 mg/kg·d) for 3days prior to LPS administration (30 mg/kg). Normal group received saline only. 6h and 12h after LPS administration were chosen for detection the parameters to estimate the effects or mechanism of butyrate pretreatment on heart of sepsis. The data showed that septic heart depression was attenuated by butyrate pretreatment through improvement of heart function depression (Psepsis was significantly alleviated by butyrate pretreatment (P<0.01). As oxidative stress indicators, SOD and CAT activity, and MDA content in heart were deteriorated by LPS challenge, which was noticeably ameliorated by butyrate pretreatment (P<0.01 or P<0.05). In conclusion, pretreatment with butyrate attenuated septic heart depression via anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stimulation of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene expression by sodium butyrate and trichostatin A in human endothelial cells involves histone acetylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.; Lansink, T.; Grimbergen, J.; Toet, K.H.; Kooistra, T.

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the pleiotropic agent sodium butyrate strongly stimulates tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Here we provide the following evidence that the butyrate-induced t-PA expression in HUVEC involves histone H4

  6. Single-dose infusion of sodium butyrate, but not lactose, increases plasma ß-hydroxybutyrate and insulin in lactating dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several previous studies have identified beneficial effects of butyrate on rumen development and intestinal health in pre-ruminants. These encouraging findings have led to further investigations related to butyrate supplementation in the mature ruminant. However, the maximum tolerable dosage rate of...

  7. Stimulation of the Megasphaera elsdenii’s butyrate production in continuous culture by a yeast additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Soto-Cruz

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuous culture study of the ruminal bacterium Megasphaera elsdenii using lactate as carbon source is reported. Butyrate, the minor product in batch culture, was the main product in continuous culture. Under steady state conditions the biomass concentration was increased from 0.46 to 0.72 g l-1. Addition of Yea Sacc did not result an increased availability of carbon. The produced amounts of valerate and CO2 were calculated by using a combined carbon and degree of reduction balances. According to these results, the lactate catabolism of M. elsdenii was changed by the presence of yeast additive, yielding more butyrate and diminishing the production of valerate, while acetate and propionate production was not affected. Results reported in this work suggested that soluble compounds present in the yeast additive filtrate enhanced the anabolism of M. elsdenii and modified the carbon fluxes through its pathways by increasing butyrate and decreasing valerate production in continuous culture.Estudo em cultura contínua da bactéria ruminal Megasphaera elsdenii que utiliza lactato como fonte de carbono foi realizada. Butirato, foi o produto produzido em menor concentração na cultura em batelada, porém em cultura contínua foi o produto de maior concentração. Sob condições definidas a concentração de biomassa aumentou de 0.46 a 0.72 g l-1. A adição do aditivo Yea Sacc não resultou num aumento da disponibilidade do carbono. As quantidades produzidas de valerato e CO2 foram calculadas pelo uso combinado do balanço e grau de redução do carbono. De acordo com esses resultados, o catabolismo de lactato de M. elsdenii foi mudado pela adição de aditivo a base de levedura. Maior rendimento em butirato e redução na produção de valerato foi observada, por outro lado a produção deacetato e propionato não foi afetada. Os resultados desse trabalho sugerem que os componentes solúveis presentes no aditivo a base de levedura aumentam o

  8. Dietary fibres modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mu, Chunlong; Zhang, Lingli; He, Xiangyu; Smidt, Hauke; Zhu, Weiyun

    2017-01-01

    Dietary fibres have been shown to affect early-life microbiota colonization in the large intestine of suckling piglets, however, much less is known as to whether they also modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of dietary fibres on the

  9. Sodium Butyrate Ameliorates High-Concentrate Diet-Induced Inflammation in the Rumen Epithelium of Dairy Goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongyu; Liu, Xinxin; Yan, Jinyu; Aabdin, Zain Ul; Bilal, Muhammad Shahid; Shen, Xiangzhen

    2017-01-25

    To investigate the effect of sodium butyrate on high-concentrate diet-induced local inflammation of the rumen epithelium, 18 midlactating dairy goats were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a low-concentrate diet group as the control (concentrate:forage = 4:6), a high-concentrate (HC) diet group (concentrate:forage = 6:4), and a sodium butyrate (SB) group (concentrate:forage = 6:4, with 1% SB by weight). The results showed that, with the addition of sodium butyrate, the concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rumen fluid (2.62 × 104 ± 2.90 × 103 EU/mL) was significantly lower than that in the HC group (4.03 × 104 ± 2.77 × 103 EU/mL). The protein abundance of pp65, gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2,9 in the rumen epithelium were significantly down-regulated by SB compared with those in the HC group. With sodium butyrate administration, the concentration of NH3-N (19.2 ± 0.890 mM) in the rumen fluid was significantly higher than that for the HC group (12.7 ± 1.38 mM). Severe disruption of the rumen epithelium induced by HC was also ameliorated by dietary SB. Therefore, local inflammation and disruption of the rumen epithelium induced by HC were alleviated with SB administration.

  10. ChIp-seq of bovine cells (MDBK) to study butyrate-induced histone modification with 10 datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next-generation sequencing was combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology to analyze histone modification (acetylation) induced by butyrate and to map the epigenomic landscape of normal histone H3, H4 in rumen cells of the cow. Ten variants of histone H3 and H4 modification were m...

  11. A high-resolution whole-genome map of the distinctive epigenomic landscape induced by butyrate in bovine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents a study utilizing next-generation sequencing technology, combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq) technology to analyze histone modification induced by butyrate and to construct a high-definition map of the epigenomic landscape with normal histone H3, H4, and their...

  12. Production of γ-Amino Butyric Acid in Tea Leaves wit Treatment of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Hiroshi

    Lactic acid bacteria was searched for producing termented tea that contained a lot of γ-amino butyric acid(GABA). Also examined were the growth condition, GABA production and changes in catechin contents in the tea leaves. Lactobacillus brevis L12 was found to be suitable for the production of fermented tea since it gave as much GABA as gabaron tea when tea leaves being suspended with water at 10% and incubated for 4 days at 25°C. The amount of GABA produced was more than calculated based upon the content of glutamic acid in tea leaves. It is probable to assume that glutamate derived from glutamine and theanine is converted into GABA.

  13. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: electrospinning and calcination of hydroxyapatite/polyvinyl butyral nanofibers and growth kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Siti Maisurah; Sharif Zein, Sharif Hussein; Othman, Mohd Roslee; Jansen, John A

    2013-07-01

    Electrospinning of hydroxyapatite (HA)/polyvinyl butyral solution resulted in the formation of fibers with average diameter of 937-1440 nm. These fibers were converted into HA nanoparticles with size <100 nm after undergoing calcination treatment at 600°C. The diameter of the fiber was found to be influenced by applied voltage and spinning distance. The injection flowrate did not affect the diameter significantly. The electrospinning method successfully reduced the commercial HA particle size in the range of 400-1100 nm into <100 nm. The dispersion of the finally calcined HA nanoparticles was improved significantly after anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate surfactant was introduced. The experimental data of HA growth kinetics were subjected to the integral method of analysis, and the rate law of the reaction was found to follow the first order reaction. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Photochromic properties of the N-Salicylideneaniline in Polyvinyl Butyral matrix: Experimental and theoretical investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, Siyamak; Filippovich, Liudmila; Aharodnikova, M.; Almodarresiyeh, Hora A.; Hajikolaee, Fatemeh Haji; Kumar, Rakesh; Mashayekhi, Mahsa

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, isomerization, photophysical properties, thermal conductivity (λ) and spectral study of the N-Salicylideneaniline: 2-[(E)-(phenylimino)methyl]phenol (SA) under the action of UV radiation in the Polyvinyl Butyral (PVB) matrix were studied using the Indicator method and Density Functional Theory (DFT). The electronic absorption spectra of SA and its isomers (SA1 and SA2) in dimethylformamide (DMF) solutions were also calculated. The nature of absorption bands of SA, SA1 and SA2 in the visible and near ultraviolet spectral regions was interpreted. The excitation energies, electronic transitions and oscillator strengths for SA, SA1 and SA2 have also been calculated. Thermal Conductivity of PVB-films containing SA before and after UV radiation was also measured. A Photochromic PVB - film on the basis of SA for application in optical devices and display technologies was made.

  15. Conformational preferences and internal rotation of methyl butyrate by microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Abeysekera, Chamara; Hays, Brian M.; Kleiner, Isabelle; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-07-01

    The broadband rotational spectrum of methyl butyrate from 8 to 18 GHz, recorded using a chirp-pulsed Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometer, was combined with high resolution FTMW measurements over the 2-26.5 GHz region to provide a comprehensive account of its microwave spectrum under jet-cooled conditions. Two low-energy conformers, one with a fully extended, heavy-atom planar anti/anti structure (a, a), and the other with a gauche propyl chain (g±, a), were assigned in the spectrum. Torsional A/E splittings due to the internal rotation of the methoxy methyl group were resolved for both lower energy conformers, and were fitted using the program XIAM and BELGI, providing an estimate of the barrier to methyl internal rotation of V3 ≈ 420 cm-1. The conformational landscape of methyl butyrate occurs on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, which was mapped out by quantum chemical calculations at the B2PLYP-D3BJ/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The low torsional barrier about the Csbnd C(dbnd O)O bond leads to collisional removal of population originally in the (a, g±) and (g±, g±) minima into the (a, a) and (g±, a) minima, respectively, during the cooling in the expansion. Analysis of experimental intensities in the spectrum provide percent populations downstream in the expansion of 41 ± 4% (a, a), and 59 ± 6% (g±, a).

  16. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation...

  17. Low fucose containing bacterial polysaccharide facilitate mitochondria-dependent ROS-induced apoptosis of human lung epithelial carcinoma via controlled regulation of MAPKs-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 homeostasis signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sougata Roy; Sengupta, Suman; Biswas, Subir; Sen, Ramkrishna; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), the key mediators of cellular oxidative stress and redox dysregulation involved in cancer initiation and progression, have recently emerged as promising targets for anticancer drug discovery. Continuous free radical assault upsets homeostasis in cellular redox system and regulates the associated signaling pathways to mediate stress-induced cell death. This study investigates the dose-specific pro-oxidative behavior of a bacterial fucose polysaccharide, which attenuated proliferation of different cancer cells. In the fermentation process, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 [GenBank Accession Number HM371417] was found to biosynthesize a polysaccharide with low-fucose content (4.9%), which conferred the maximum anti-proliferative activity (750 µg/mL) against human lung cancer epithelial cells (A549) during preliminary screening. Structural elucidation and morphological characterization of the duly purified polysaccharide was done using HPLC, GC-MS, (1)H/(13)C NMR, and microscopy. The polysaccharide exhibited concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effects against A549 cells by inducing intracellular ROS level and regulating the mitochondrial membrane-permeability following the apoptotic pathway. This process encompasses activation of caspase-8/9/3/7, increase in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2 ratio, translocation of Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) and cytochrome c, decrease in expression of anti-apoptotic members of Bcl2 family, and phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Apoptosis was attenuated upon pretreatment with specific caspase-inhibitors. Simultaneously, during apoptosis, the ROS-mediated stress as well as activated MAPKs triggered nuclear translocation of transcription factors like nuclear factor (erythroid-derived)-like 2 (Nrf2) and promoted further transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes, which somehow perturbed the chemotherapeutic efficacy of the polysaccharide, although using CuPP, a chemical

  18. Single-dose infusion of sodium butyrate, but not lactose, increases plasma β-hydroxybutyrate and insulin in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, K J; Hippen, A R; Kalscheur, K F; Schingoethe, D J; Casper, D P; Moreland, S C; van Eys, J E

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have identified beneficial effects of butyrate on rumen development and intestinal health in preruminants. These encouraging findings led to further investigations related to butyrate supplementation in the mature ruminant. However, the effects of elevated butyrate concentrations on rumen metabolism have not been investigated, and consequently the maximum tolerable dosage rate of butyrate has not been established. Therefore, the first objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of a short-term increase in rumen butyrate concentration on key metabolic indicators. The second objective was to evaluate the source of butyrate, either directly dosed in the rumen or indirectly supplied via lactose fermentation in the rumen. Jugular catheters were inserted into 4 ruminally fistulated Holstein cows in a 4×4 Latin square with 3-d periods. On d 1 of each period, 1h after feeding, cows were ruminally dosed with 1 of 4 treatments: (1) 2L of water (CON), (2) 3.5g/kg of body weight (BW) of lactose (LAC), (3) 1g/kg of BW of butyrate (1GB), or (4) 2g/kg of BW of butyrate (2GB). Sodium butyrate was the source of butyrate, and NaCl was added to CON (1.34g/kg of BW), LAC (1.34g/kg of BW), and 1GB (0.67g/kg of BW) to provide equal amounts of sodium as the 2GB treatment. Serial plasma and rumen fluid samples were collected during d 1 of each period. Rumen fluid pH was greater in cows given the 1GB and 2GB treatments compared with the cows given the LAC treatment. Cows administered the 1GB and 2GB treatments had greater rumen butyrate concentrations compared with LAC. Those cows also had greater plasma butyrate concentrations compared with cows given the LAC treatment. Plasma β-hydroxybutyrate was greater and insulin tended to be greater for butyrate treatments compared with LAC. No difference in insulin was found between the 1GB and 2GB treatments. Based on plasma and rumen metabolites, singly infusing 3.5g/kg of BW of lactose into the rumen is not as effective

  19. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) prevents the induction of nicotinic receptor-regulated signaling by chronic ethanol in pancreatic cancer cells and normal duct epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2013-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a high mortality rate and alcoholism is a risk factor independent of smoking. We have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) regulate pancreatic ductal epithelia and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells in an autocrine fashion by stimulating their production of the stress neurotransmitters noradrenaline and adrenaline that signal through β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR). Our current study has investigated the modulation of this autocrine regulatory loop by chronic ethanol and explored the potential prevention of these effects by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA). Using MTT assays, cell migration assays, Western blotting, immunoassays, and gene knockdown of individual nAChRs in two PDAC cell lines and in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial cells, our data show that treatment for seven days with ethanol induced the protein expression and sensitivity of nAChRs α3, α5, and α7 resulting in increased production of noradrenaline and adrenaline, which drive proliferation and migration via cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signaling downstream of β-ARs. Treatment with GABA prevented all of these responses to chronic ethanol, reducing cell proliferation and migration below base levels in untreated cells. Our findings suggest that alcoholism induces multiple cAMP-dependent PDAC stimulating signaling pathways by upregulating the protein expression and sensitivity of nAChRs that regulate stress neurotransmitter production. Moreover, our data identify GABA as a promising agent for the prevention of PDAC in individuals at risk due to chronic alcohol consumption.

  20. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) prevents the induction of nicotinic receptor-regulated signaling by chronic ethanol in pancreatic cancer cells and normal duct epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H.; Al-Wadei, Hussein A.N.; Schuller, Hildegard M.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a high mortality rate and alcoholism is a risk factor independent of smoking. We have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) regulate pancreatic ductal epithelia and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells in an autocrine fashion by stimulating their production of the stress neurotransmitters noradrenaline and adrenaline that signal through beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs). Our current study has investigated the modulation of this autocrine regulatory loop by chronic ethanol and explored the potential prevention of these effects by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA). Using MTT assays, cell migration assays, western blotting, immunoassays, and gene knockdown of individual nAChRs in two PDAC cell lines and in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial cells, our data show that treatment for seven days with ethanol induced the protein expression and sensitivity of nAChRs α3, α5 and α7 resulting in increased production of noradrenaline and adrenaline which drive proliferation and migration via cAMP-dependent signaling downstream of β-ARs. Treatment with GABA prevented all of these responses to chronic ethanol, reducing cell proliferation and migration below base levels in untreated cells. Our findings suggest that alcoholism induces multiple cAMP-dependent PDAC stimulating signaling pathways by up-regulating the protein expression and sensitivity of nAChRs that regulate stress neurotransmitter production. Moreover, our data identify GABA as a promising agent for the prevention of PDAC in individuals at risk due to chronic alcohol consumption. PMID:23213073

  1. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... baby Common illnesses Family health & safety Complications & Loss Pregnancy complications Preterm labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care ... Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy ...

  2. Molecular mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by combined epigenetic-modulating epigallocatechin gallate and sodium butyrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldanha, Sabita N., E-mail: sabivan@uab.edu [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104 (United States); Kala, Rishabh [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Tollefsbol, Trygve O., E-mail: trygve@uab.edu [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Center for Healthy Aging, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Nutrition Obesity Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Diabetes Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bioactive compounds are considered safe and have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles of tumor cells. However, many of these changes have been reported at molecular concentrations higher than physiologically achievable levels. We investigated the role of the combinatorial effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a predominant polyphenol in green tea, and sodium butyrate (NaB), a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber, in the regulation of survivin, which is an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells. For the first time, our study showed that the combination treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RKO, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. This was found to be regulated by the decrease in HDAC1, DNMT1, survivin and HDAC activity in all three cell lines. A G2/M arrest was observed for RKO and HCT-116 cells, and G1 arrest for HT-29 colorectal cancer cells for combinatorial treatment. Further experimentation of the molecular mechanisms in RKO colorectal cancer (CRC) cells revealed a p53-dependent induction of p21 and an increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p65. An increase in double strand breaks as determined by gamma-H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX) protein levels and induction of histone H3 hyperacetylation was also observed with the combination treatment. Further, we observed a decrease in global CpG methylation. Taken together, these findings suggest that at low and physiologically achievable concentrations, combinatorial EGCG and NaB are effective in promoting apoptosis, inducing cell cycle arrest and DNA-damage in CRC cells. - Highlights: • EGCG and NaB as a combination inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation. • The combination treatment induces DNA damage, G2/M and G1 arrest and apoptosis. • Survivin is effectively down-regulated by the combination treatment. • p21 and p53 expressions are induced by the combination treatment. • Epigenetic proteins DNMT1 and HDAC1 are

  3. Immobilization of Lipase using Alginate Hydrogel Beads and Enzymatic Evaluation in Hydrolysis of p-Nitrophenol Butyrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuang; Shang, Wenting; Yang, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Shujuan; Zhang, Xiaogang; Chen, Jiawei [Renmin Univ. of China, Beijing (China)

    2013-09-15

    The immobilization of enzyme is one of the key issues both in the field of enzymatic research and industrialization. In this work, we reported a facile method to immobilize Candida Antarctica lipase B (CALB) in alginate carrier. In the presence of calcium cation, the enzyme-alginate suspension could be cross-linked to form beads with porous structure at room temperature, and the enzyme CALB was dispersed in the beads. Activity of the enzyme-alginate composite was verified by enzymatic hydrolysis reaction of p-nitrophenol butyrate in aqueous phase. The effects of reaction parameters such as temperature, pH, embedding and lyophilized time on the reactive behavior were discussed. Reuse cycle experiments for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenol butyrate demonstrated that activity of the enzyme-alginate composite was maintained without marked deactivation up to 6 repeated cycles.

  4. Supplementation of total parenteral nutrition with butyrate acutely increases structural aspects of intestinal adaptation after an 80% jejunoileal resection in neonatal piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholome, Anne L; Albin, David M; Baker, David H

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Supplementation of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with a mixture of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) enhances intestinal adaptation in the adult rodent model. However, the ability and timing of SCFA to augment adaptation in the neonatal intestine is unknown. Furthermore, the specific...... SCFA inducing the intestinotrophic effects and underlying regulatory mechanism(s) are unclear. Therefore, we examined the effect of SCFA supplemented TPN on structural aspects of intestinal adaptation and hypothesized that butyrate is the SCFA responsible for these effects. METHODS: Piglets (n = 120......) were randomized to (1) control TPN or TPN supplemented with (2) 60 mmol/L SCFA (36 mmol/L acetate, 15 mmol/L propionate and 9 mmol/L butyrate), (3) 9 mmol/L butyrate, or (4) 60 mmol/L butyrate. Within each group, piglets were further randomized to examine acute (4, 12, or 24 hours) and chronic (3 or 7...

  5. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits.

  6. Butyrate and propionate inhibit antigen-specific CD8+ T cell activation by suppressing IL-12 production by antigen-presenting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastasi, Claudia; Fredholm, Simon; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as acetate, butyrate and propionate, are products of microbial macronutrients fermentation that distribute systemically and are believed to modulate host immune responses. Recent data have indicated that certain SCFAs, such as butyrate and propionate, directly...... modulate human dendritic cell (DC) function. Given the role of DCs in initiating and shaping the adaptive immune response, we now explore how SCFAs affect the activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells stimulated with autologous, MART1 peptide-pulsed DC. We show that butyrate reduces the frequency...... of peptide-specific CD8+ T cells and, together with propionate, inhibit the activity of those cells. On the contrary, acetate does not affect them. Importantly, butyrate and propionate inhibit the production of IL-12 and IL-23 in the DCs and exogenous IL-12 fully restores the activation of the MART-1...

  7. Differential effects of short chain fatty acids on endothelial Nlrp3 inflammasome activation and neointima formation: Antioxidant action of butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xinxu; Wang, Lei; Bhat, Owais M; Lohner, Hannah; Li, Pin-Lan

    2018-02-13

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), a family of gut microbial metabolites, have been reported to promote preservation of endothelial function and thereby exert anti-atherosclerotic action. However, the precise mechanism mediating this protective action of SCFAs remains unknown. The present study investigated the effects of SCFAs (acetate, propionate and butyrate) on the activation of Nod-like receptor pyrin domain 3 (Nlrp3) inflammasome in endothelial cells (ECs) and associated carotid neointima formation. Using a partial ligated carotid artery (PLCA) mouse model fed with the Western diet (WD), we found that butyrate significantly decreased Nlrp3 inflammasome formation and activation in the carotid arterial wall of wild type mice (Asc +/+ ), which was comparable to the effect of gene deletion of the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein gene (Asc -/- ). Nevertheless, both acetate and propionate markedly enhanced the formation and activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome as well as carotid neointima formation in the carotid arteries with PLCA in Asc +/+ , but not Asc -/- mice. In cultured ECs (EOMA cells), butyrate was found to significantly decrease the formation and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes induced by 7-ketocholesterol (7-Ket) or cholesterol crystals (CHC), while acetate did not inhibit Nlrp3 inflammasome activation induced by either 7-Ket or CHC, but itself even activated Nlrp3 inflammsomes. Mechanistically, the inhibitory action of butyrate on the Nlrp3 inflammasome was attributed to a blockade of lipid raft redox signaling platforms to produce O2 •- upon 7-Ket or CHC stimulations. These results indicate that SCFAs have differential effects on endothelial Nlrp3 inflammasome activation and associated carotid neointima formation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Performance and plasma metabolites of dairy calves fed starter containing sodium butyrate, calcium propionate or sodium monensin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L S; Bittar, C M M

    2011-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine the influence of supplementation of sodium butyrate, sodium monensin or calcium propionate in a starter diet on the performance and selected plasma metabolites (plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate) of Holstein calves during pre- and post-weaning periods. Twenty-four newborn Holstein calves were housed in individual hutches until 10 weeks of life, receiving water free choice, and fed four liters of milk daily. Calves were blocked according to weight and date of birth, and allocated to one of the following treatments, according to the additive in the starter: (i) sodium butyrate (150 g/kg); (ii) sodium monensin (30 mg/kg); and (iii) calcium propionate (150 g/kg). During 10 weeks, calves received starter ad libitum, while coast cross hay (Cynodon dactylon (L.) pers.) was offered after weaning, which occurred at the 8th week of age. Weekly, calves were weighted and evaluated for body measurements. Blood samples were taken weekly after the fourth week of age, 2 hours after the morning feeding, for determination of plasma metabolites. No differences were observed among treatments for starter or hay intake, BW and daily gain of the animals. Mean concentrations of selected plasma metabolites were similar in calves fed a starter supplemented with sodium butyrate, sodium monensin and calcium propionate. There was significant reduction in the concentrations of plasma glucose as calves aged. The inclusion of sodium butyrate, calcium propionate or sodium monensin as additives in starter feeds resulted in equal animal performance, before and after weaning, suggesting that sodium monensin may be replaced by organic acid salts.

  9. Sodium butyrate reverses the inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes induced by amphetamine in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvassori, Samira S; Calixto, Karen V; Budni, Josiane; Resende, Wilson R; Varela, Roger B; de Freitas, Karolina V; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the possibility that mitochondrial impairment may play an important role in bipolar disorder (BD). The Krebs cycle is the central point of oxidative metabolism, providing carbon for biosynthesis and reducing agents for generation of ATP. Recently, studies have suggested that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may have antimanic effects. The present study aims to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB), a HDAC inhibitor, on Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the brain of rats subjected to an animal model of mania induced by D-amphetamine (D-AMPH). Wistar rats were first given D-AMPH or saline (Sal) for 14 days, and then, between days 8 and 14, rats were treated with SB or Sal. The citrate synthase (CS), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were evaluated in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The D-AMPH administration inhibited Krebs cycle enzymes activity in all analyzed brain structures and SB reversed D-AMPH-induced dysfunction analyzed in all brain regions. These findings suggest that Krebs cycle enzymes' inhibition can be an important link for the mitochondrial dysfunction seen in BD and SB exerts protective effects against the D-AMPH-induced Krebs cycle enzymes' dysfunction.

  10. Butyric acid released during milk lipolysis triggers biofilm formation of Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasvolsky, Ronit; Zakin, Varda; Ostrova, Ievgeniia; Shemesh, Moshe

    2014-07-02

    Bacillus species form biofilms within milking pipelines and on surfaces of equipment in the dairy industry which represent a continuous hygiene problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Although much is known about the mechanism by which the model organism Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms in laboratory mediums in vitro, little is known of how these biofilms are formed in natural environments such as milk. Besides, little is known of the signaling pathways leading to biofilm formation in other Bacillus species, such as Bacillus cereus and Bacillus licheniformis, both of which are known to contaminate milk. In this study, we report that milk triggers the formation of biofilm-related structures, termed bundles. We show this to be a conserved phenomenon among all Bacillus members tested. Moreover, we demonstrate that the tasA gene, which encodes a major portion of the matrix which holds the biofilm together, is vital for this process. Furthermore, we show that the free fatty acid (FFA) - butyric acid (BA), which is released during lipolysis of milk fat and demonstrates antimicrobial activity, is the potent trigger for biofilm bundle formation. We finally show that BA-triggered biofilm bundle formation is mediated by the histidine kinase, KinD. Taken together, these observations indicate that BA, which is a major FFA within milk triggers biofilm formation in a conserved mechanism among members of the Bacillus genus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Improvement of CO2/N2 separation performance by polymer matrix cellulose acetate butyrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. J.; Jawad, Z. A.; Ahmad, A. L.; Ngo, J. Q.; Chua, H. B.

    2017-06-01

    With the rapid development of modern civilization, carbon dioxide (CO2) is produced in large quantities and mainly generated from industrial sectors. The gas emission is the major contributor to global warming. To address this issue, the membrane technology is implemented for the CO2 removal, due to the energy efficiency and economic advantages presented. Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) is selected as the polymeric material, due to the excellent film-forming properties and capable of developing a defect-free layer of neat membrane. This study described the fabrication development of CAB using a wet phase inversion method with different casting conditions. Where the composition of the casting solutions (3-5 wt %) and solvent evaporation time (4-6 min) were determined. The outcomes of these dominant parameters were then used to determine the best CAB membrane for CO2/Nitrogen (N2) separation and supported by the characterization i.e. scanning electron micrograph. Gas permeation measurements showed satisfactory performance for CAB membrane fabricated with 5 min evaporation time and 4 wt% polymer composition (M2). Where, its permeance and selectivity are 120.19 GPU and 3.17, respectively. In summary, this study showed a brief outlined of the future direction and perspective of CAB membrane for CO2/N2 separation.

  12. Rhizogenic behavior of black pepper cultivars to indole-3-butyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welington Secundino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Little information is available regarding vegetative propagation of the species Piper nigrum L. to generate technical recommendations for the production of seedlings on a commercial scale. The purpose of this study was to investigate the rhizogenic behavior of cultivars of this species regarding indol-3-butyric acid (IBA. The experiment was performed at a vegetation house equipped with an intermittent nebulization irrigation system. The experimental site was located in the University Center of Northern Espírito Santo (CEUNES of the Federal University of Espírito Santo (UFES, Brazil. The experimental design consisted of randomized blocks arranged in a 3 x 5 factorial scheme: three cultivars (Bragantina, Iaçará and Guajarina x five IBA concentrations (0; 1,500; 3,000; 4,500 and 6,000 mg kg-1, with four repetitions of 16 cuttings each. Total immersion of the cuttings in IBA is recommended for the Iaçará and Guajarina cultivars, and immersion of only the basal region is recommended for cv. Bragantina. The recommended IBA concentration for these cultivars is 4,000 mg kg-1.

  13. The effect of sugars on the retention of ethyl butyrate by gellan gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evageliou, Vasiliki; Patsiakou, Anna

    2014-08-15

    The effect of sucrose, glucose and fructose on the retention of ethyl butyrate by low acyl gellan gels was investigated by static headspace gas chromatography. The air/biopolymer partition coefficient (K) and percentage of retention (R%) were determined. When 5 g of sample were left to equilibrate at 37 °C for 24 h, the obtained results were explained in terms of gel rigidity, as increased rigidity resulted in increased aroma retention. Glucose showed the greatest aroma release among the sugars and resulted in either the same or increased aroma release with increasing concentration. Increasing concentrations of fructose and sucrose did not alter aroma release significantly. For 15 g of sample mass, sucrose exhibited the lowest partition coefficient values among the sugars. The two higher sucrose concentrations resulted in decreased coefficient values. For fructose and glucose, aroma retention decreased with increasing concentration. The percentage of retention values were positive for all sugars, throughout their concentration range and for both experiments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transparent Blend of Poly(Methylmethacrylate/Cellulose Acetate Butyrate for the Protection from Ultraviolet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf Mahmood Raouf

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of transparent polymers as an alternative to glass has become widespread. However, the direct exposure of these materials to climatic conditions of sunlight and heat decrease the lifetime cost of these products. The aim of this study was to minimize the harm caused by ultraviolet (UV radiation exposure to transparent poly(methylmethacrylate (PMMA, which usually leads to changes in the physical and chemical properties of these materials and reduced performance. This was achieved using environmentally friendly cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB. The optical, morphological, and thermal properties of CAB blended with transparent PMMA was studied using UV-VIS spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, dynamic mechanical analysis, and thermal gravimetric analysis. The results show that CAB was able to reduce the effects of UV radiation by making PMMA more transparent to UV light, thereby preventing the negative effects of trapped radiation within the compositional structure, while maintaining the amorphous structure of the blend. The results also show that CAB blended with PMMA led to some properties commensurate with the requirements of research in terms of a slight increase in the value of the modulus and the glass transition temperature for the PMMA/CAB blend.

  15. Recycling of waste automotive laminated glass and valorization of polyvinyl butyral through mechanochemical separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Ryang Park, Jae; Yoon Shin, Dong; Park, Kyung-Soo; Hwan Hong, Myung; Gi Lee, Chan

    2015-10-01

    Due to strong binding, optical clarity, adhesion to many surfaces, toughness and flexibility polyvinyl butyral (PVB) resin films are commonly used in the automotive and architectural application as a protective interlayer in the laminated glass. Worldwide million tons of PVB waste generated from end-of-life automotive associated with various environmental issues. Stringent environmental directive, higher land cost eliminates land filling option, needs a study, we have developed a mechanochemical separation process to separate PVB resins from glass and characterized the separated PVB through various techniques, i.e., scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Commercial nonionic surfactants D201 used for the mechanochemical separation purpose. Through parameter optimization following conditions are considered to be the optimum condition; 30v ol% D201, stirring speed of 400 rpm, 35 °C temperature, operation time 1h, and dilute D201 volume to waste automotive laminated glass weight ratio of ≈25. The technology developed in our laboratory is sustainable, environmentally friendly, techno-economical feasible process, capable of mass production (recycling). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancement of Human Prolactin Synthesis by Sodium Butyrate Addition to Serum-Free CHO Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Rodrigues Goulart

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium butyrate (NaBu has been used as a productivity enhancer for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. Thus, the influence of NaBu on the production of recombinant human prolactin (hPRL from CHO cells was investigated for the first time. CHO cell cultures were submitted to a treatment with different concentrations of NaBu (0.25 to 4 mM. Quantitative and qualitative analyses by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC and Western blot or SDS-PAGE, carried out directly on CHO-conditioned medium, showed that the highest hPRL expression was obtained with 1 mM NaBu. In vitro biological assays based on noble rat lymphoma (Nb2 and mouse pro-B lymphoma (Ba/F3-LLP cells were carried out on purified hPRL. Its bioactivity in the presence of NaBu was not apparently different from that of the First International Reference Reagent of recombinant hPRL (WHO 97/714. Our results show that NaBu increased the synthesis of recombinant hPRL in CHO cells, apparently without compromising either its structure or function.

  17. Indole butyric acid and substrates influence on multiplication of blackberry 'Xavante'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrar Hussain

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Blackberry is a shrubby plant specie which has a high economic importance among agriculture crops. Brazil is the major country of Latin America with the highest future scope for blackberries. For availability of good quality and maximum quantity of seedlings, the present study was carried out at the Universidade Estadual de Londrina,PR from January to March in 2013. The aim of the study was to evaluate the multiplication of blackberry 'Xavante' cuttings under different type of substrates treated with different levels of indole butyric acid (IBA. The experiment was laid out in randomized complete block design with 2 factors, i.e., substrate (rice husk, vermiculite and coconut fiber and IBA (0; 1,000; 2,000 and 3,000mg L-1, with 5 replications. Each replicate consisted of 10 cuttings. The variables studied were: cutting rooting, cutting survival, leaf retention, cuttings with new leaves, number of major roots, length of major roots and roots dry weight. Most of the variables were significantly affected by both substrate and IBA. Rice husk and vermiculite performed better than coconut fiber and provided the same results for most of the variables, while coconut fiber showed lower performance for all of the variables studied. IBA significantly affected the rooting and the number of major roots. It is concluded that for multiplication of blackberry 'Xavante', both rice husk and vermiculite can be used along 2,000mg L-1 of IBA

  18. The histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate protects against noise-induced hearing loss in Guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Hua; Xie, Jing; Liu, Ke; Peng, Zhe; Guo, Jing-Ying; Yu, Shu-Kui; Wang, Guo-Peng; Gong, Shu-Sheng

    2017-11-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) severely impacts the quality of life of affected individuals. Oxidative stress resulting from noise exposure is a significant cause of NIHL. Although histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors were shown to protect against NIHL, the underlying mechanism remains unclear, and it is not known how they act on noise-induced oxidative stress. In the current study, we investigated the expression levels of acetyl-histone H3 (Lys9) (H3-AcK9), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), an oxidative stress marker, in a guinea pig model of NIHL using immunohistology and Western blotting. We then assessed the effects of systemic administration of the HDAC inhibitor, sodium butyrate (SB), on noise-induced permanent threshold shifts (PTS), hair cell (HC) loss, and changes in the above mentioned markers. The results showed that SB attenuated noise-induced PTS and outer hair cell loss. SB treatment promoted H3-AcK9 expression and repressed HDAC1 expression in the nuclei of HCs and Hensen's cells after noise exposure. Furthermore, SB attenuated the noise-induced increase of 3-NT expression in HCs and Hensen's cells. These findings suggest that SB protects against NIHL by reversing the noise-induced histone acetylation imbalance and inhibiting oxidative stress in cochlear HCs and Hensen's cells. SB treatment may represent a potential strategy to prevent and treat NIHL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Flexible thermoplastic composite of Polyvinyl Butyral (PVB and waste of rigid Polyurethane foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Sônego

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the preparation and characterization of composites with recycled poly(vinyl butyral (PVB and residue of rigid polyurethane foam (PUr, with PUr contents of 20, 35 and 50 wt %, using an extruder equipped with a Maillefer single screw and injection molding. The components of the composites were thermally characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetry. The composites were evaluated by melt flow index (MFI, tensile and hardness mechanical tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Tg determined by DSC of PVB sample (53 °C indicated the presence of plasticizer (Tg of pure PVB is 70 °C. MFI of the composites indicated a viscosity increase with the PUr content and, as the shear rate was held constant during injection molding, higher viscosities promoted higher shear stresses in the composites, thereby causing breaking or tearing of the PUr particles. The SEM micrographs showed low adhesion between PVB and PUr and the presence of voids, both inherent in the rigid foam and in the interphase PVB-PUr. The SEM micrographs also showed that PVB/PUr (50/50 composite exhibited the smallest particle size and a more homogeneous and compact structure with fewer voids in the interface. The stiffness of the composites increases with addition of the PUr particles, as evidenced in the mechanical tests.

  20. Polyvinylpyrrolidone/polyvinyl butyral composite as a stable binder for castable supercapacitor electrodes in aqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, M.; Weingarth, D.; Herbeck-Engel, P.; Grobelsek, I.; Presser, V.

    2015-04-01

    Mixtures of polyvinylpyrrolidone/polyvinyl butyral (PVP/PVB) are attractive binders for the preparation of carbon electrodes for aqueous electrolyte supercapacitors. The use of PVP/PVB offers several key advantages: They are soluble in ethanol and can be used to spray coat or drain cast activated carbon (AC) electrodes directly on a current collector. Infrared spectroscopy and contact angle measurements show that the PVP-to-PVB ratio determines the degree of binder hydrophilicity. Within our study, the most favorable performance was obtained for AC electrodes with a composition of AC + 1.5 mass% PVP + 6.0 mass% PVB; such electrodes were mechanically stabile and water resistant with a PVP release of less than 5% of total PVP while PVB itself is water insoluble. Compared to when using PVDF, the specific surface area (SSA) of the assembled electrodes was 10% higher, indicating a reduced pore blocking tendency. A good electrochemical performance was observed in different aqueous electrolytes for composite electrodes with the optimized binder composition: 160 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 for 1 M H2SO4 and 6 M KOH and 120 F g-1 for 1 M NaCl. The capacitance was slightly reduced by 2.5% after cycling to 1.2 V with 1.28 A g-1 in 1 M NaCl for 10,000 times.

  1. A survey on anticancer effects of artemisinin, iron, miconazole, and butyric acid on 5637 (bladder cancer and 4T1 (Breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ali Shahbazfar

    2014-01-01

    The groups treated with miconazole showed identical changes, with less severity compared to combination therapy groups. In butyric acid-treated groups, the only detectable changes were, mild cell swelling, few apoptosis, and rare necrosis. Conclusions: A combination therapy with artemisinin can be more effective against cancer cells than monotherapy with that. Butyric acid was not effective on cancer cells. Miconazole deviated the nature of cell death from apoptosis to necrosis and it must be used under caution.

  2. Diastereoselective Three-Component Reactions of Chiral Nickel(II Glycinate for Convenient Synthesis of Novel α-Amino-β-Substituted-γ,γ-Disubstituted Butyric Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The convenient, high yielding and diastereoselective synthesis of α-amino-β-substituted-γ,γ-disubstituted butyric acid derivatives was carried out by a three-component tandem reaction of a chiral equivalent of nucleophilic glycine. The reaction was performed smoothly under mild conditions and enabled the construction of two or three adjacent chiral centers in one step, thus affording a novel and convenient route to α-amino-β-substituted-γ,γ-disubstituted butyric acid derivatives.

  3. Propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit lipolysis and de novo lipogenesis and increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in primary rat adipocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Degerman, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibers by colonic microbiota generates short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g., propionic acid and butyric acid, which have been described to have "anti-obesity properties" by ameliorating fasting glycaemia, body weight and insulin tolerance in animal models. In the present study, we therefore investigate if propionic acid and butyric acid have effects on lipolysis, de novo lipogenesis and glucose uptake in primary rat adipocytes. We show that both propionic ac...

  4. Functional and Molecular Effects of Arginine Butyrate and Prednisone on Muscle and Heart in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Guerron, Alfredo D.; Rashmi Rawat; Arpana Sali; Spurney, Christopher F.; Emidio Pistilli; Hee-Jae Cha; Pandey, Gouri S.; Ramkishore Gernapudi; Dwight Francia; Viken Farajian; ESCOLAR, DIANA M.; Laura Bossi; Magali Becker; Patricia Zerr; Sabine de la Porte

    2010-01-01

    Background The number of promising therapeutic interventions for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is increasing rapidly. One of the proposed strategies is to use drugs that are known to act by multiple different mechanisms including inducing of homologous fetal form of adult genes, for example utrophin in place of dystrophin. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have treated mdx mice with arginine butyrate, prednisone, or a combination of arginine butyrate and prednisone for 6 mo...

  5. Experimental and Pathalogical study of Pistacia atlantica, butyrate, Lactobacillus casei and their combination on rat ulcerative colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Mahdi; Ghasemi-Niri, Seyedeh Farnaz; Maqbool, Faheem; Baeeri, Maryam; Memariani, Zahra; Pousti, Iraj; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Pistacia atlantica (P. atlantica), butyrate, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) and especially their combination therapy on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat colitis model. Rats were divided into seven groups. Four groups received oral P. atlantica, butyrate, L. casei and the combination of three agents for 10 consecutive days. The remaining groups were negative and positive controls and a sham group. Macroscopic and histopathological examinations were carried out along with determination of the specific biomarker of colonic oxidative stress, the myeloperoxidase (MPO). Compared with controls, the combination therapy exhibited a significant alleviation of colitis in terms of pathological scores and reduction of MPO activity (55%, p=0.0009). Meanwhile, the macroscopic appearance such as stool consistency, tissue and histopathological scores (edema, necrosis and neutrophil infiltration) were improved. Although single therapy by each P. atlantica, butyrate, and L. casei was partially beneficial in reduction of colon oxidative stress markers, the combination therapy was much more effective. In conclusion, the combination therapy was able to reduce the severity of colitis that is clear from biochemical markers. Future studies have to focus on clinical effects of this combination in management of human ulcerative colitis. Further molecular and signaling pathway studies will help to understand the mechanisms involved in the treatment of colitis and inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Structure and properties of oil palm-based nanocellulose reinforced chitosan nanocomposite for efficient synthesis of butyl butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Nursyafiqah; Chandren, Sheela; Attan, Nursyafreena; Mahat, Naji Arafat; Razak, Fazira Ilyana Abdul; Jamalis, Joazaizulfazli; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2017-11-15

    In this study, nanocellulose (NC) was successfully extracted from oil palm frond leaves (OPFL) using a combination of bleaching, alkaline treatment and acid hydrolysis. X-ray diffractogram revealed the extracted NC was crystalline with a crystallinity index of 70.2%. This indicates its suitability as nano-fillers for preparing the chitosan/nanocellulose (CS-NC) supports to immobilize Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) to produce the CRL/CS-NC biocatalysts. FTIR, FESEM and TGA characterizations of the CRL/CS-NC confirm the CRLs were successfully conjugated to the CS-NC supports. The air-dried CS-NC supports gave satisfactory immobilization of the CRLs (5.2mg/g) with the resultant CRL/CS-NCs catalysed conversions of ≥80% of butyl butyrate within 6h. Time course reaction profile revealed that 76.3% butyl butyrate conversion was achieved at 4h immobilization time using 3mg/mL of CRL/CS-NCs. NMR analyses on the purified butyl butyrate confirmed that the ester was successfully synthesized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Subclinical ketosis on dairy cows in transition period in farms with contrasting butyric acid contents in silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Fernando; Rodríguez, María Luisa; Martínez-Fernández, Adela; Soldado, Ana; Argamentería, Alejandro; Peláez, Mario; de la Roza-Delgado, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between subclinical ketosis (SCK) in dairy cows and the butyric acid content of the silage used in their feeding. Twenty commercial farms were monitored over a period of 12 months. The feed at each farm and the silages used in its ration were sampled monthly for proximal analysis and for volatile fatty acid analysis. A total of 2857 urine samples were taken from 1112 cows to examine the ketonuria from about 30 days prepartum to 100 postpartum. Wide variation was recorded in the quality of silages used in the preparation of diets. Approximately 80% of the urine samples analyzed had no detectable ketone bodies, 16% returned values indicative of slight SCK, and the remainder, 4%, showed symptoms of ketosis. Most of the cases of hyperkenuria were associated with the butyric acid content of the silage used (r2=0.56; P<0.05). As the metabolizable energy content of the feed was similar, no relationship was observed between the proportion of cows with SCK and the energy content of the feed. In our study, the probability of dairy cows suffering SCK is higher when they are eating feed made from silage with a high butyric acid content (35.2 g/kg DM intake).

  8. Subclinical Ketosis on Dairy Cows in Transition Period in Farms with Contrasting Butyric Acid Contents in Silages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between subclinical ketosis (SCK in dairy cows and the butyric acid content of the silage used in their feeding. Twenty commercial farms were monitored over a period of 12 months. The feed at each farm and the silages used in its ration were sampled monthly for proximal analysis and for volatile fatty acid analysis. A total of 2857 urine samples were taken from 1112 cows to examine the ketonuria from about 30 days prepartum to 100 postpartum. Wide variation was recorded in the quality of silages used in the preparation of diets. Approximately 80% of the urine samples analyzed had no detectable ketone bodies, 16% returned values indicative of slight SCK, and the remainder, 4%, showed symptoms of ketosis. Most of the cases of hyperkenuria were associated with the butyric acid content of the silage used (r2=0.56; P<0.05. As the metabolizable energy content of the feed was similar, no relationship was observed between the proportion of cows with SCK and the energy content of the feed. In our study, the probability of dairy cows suffering SCK is higher when they are eating feed made from silage with a high butyric acid content (35.2 g/kg DM intake.

  9. Conductive Fe3O4 nanoparticles accelerate syntrophic methane production from butyrate oxidation in two different lake sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchao Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Syntrophic methanogenesis is an essential link in the global carbon cycle and a key bioprocess for the disposal of organic waste and production of biogas. Recent studies suggest direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET is involved in electron exchange in methanogenesis occurring in paddy soils, anaerobic digesters and specific co-cultures with Geobacter. In this study, we evaluate the possible involvement of DIET in the syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in the enrichments from two lake sediments (an urban lake and a natural lake. The results showed that the production of CH4 was significantly accelerated in the presence of conductive nanoscale Fe3O4 or carbon nanotubes (CNTs in the sediment enrichments. Observations made with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and scanning electron microscope (SEM indicated that microbial aggregates were formed in the enrichments. It appeared that the average cell-to-cell distance in aggregates in nanomaterial-amended enrichments was larger than that in aggregates in the non-amended control. These results suggested that DIET-mediated syntrophic methanogenesis could occur in the lake sediments in the presence of conductive materials. Microbial community analysis of the enrichments revealed that the genera of Syntrophomonas, Sulfurospirillum, Methanosarcina and Methanoregula were responsible for syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in lake sediment samples. The mechanism for the conductive-material-facilitated DIET in butyrate syntrophy deserves further investigation.

  10. Sodium butyrate regulates Th17/Treg cell balance to ameliorate uveitis via the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Su, Wenru; Wan, Taoshang; Yu, Jianfeng; Zhu, Wenjie; Tang, Fen; Liu, Guangming; Olsen, Nancy; Liang, Dan; Zheng, Song Guo

    2017-10-15

    Autoimmune uveitis, a group of potentially blinding intraocular inflammatory diseases, remains a therapeutic challenge for ophthalmologists. Butyrates, which belong to the short-chain fatty acid family, possess immunomodulatory properties and therapeutic potential in several inflammatory disorders. However, the roles of butyrates in uveitis and their underlying immunomodulatory mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report that treatment with sodium butyrate (NaB) significantly attenuated the ocular inflammatory response in mice with experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) at 14days after immunization, with significant decreases in inflammatory cell infiltration and inflammatory cytokine production in the retinas. Furthermore, NaB treatment decreased the frequency and number of Th17 cells and increased the frequency and number of T regulatory (Treg) cells in both draining lymph nodes and spleens of EAU mice. In vitro, NaB treatment directly converted the differentiation of naive T cells from Th17 cells toward Treg cells. Mechanistically, the NaB-mediated inhibition of Th17 cell differentiation may occur via inhibition of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1)/interleukin-6 receptor pathway. Moreover, the NaB-mediated inhibition on Th17 cell differentiation and uveitis were abrogated when an HO-1 inhibitor, SnPP, was used. These findings suggest that NaB inverts the differentiation of Th17 cells toward Treg cells and attenuates experimental autoimmune uveitis by modulating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  12. Efficacy of the dietary histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate alone or in combination with vitamin A against proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, F.O. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nagamine, M.K. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Conti, A. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chaible, L.M. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fontelles, C.C. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jordão Junior, A.A.; Vannucchi, H. [Divisão de Nutrição, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Dagli, M.L.Z. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bassoli, B.K.; Moreno, F.S.; Ong, T.P. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-22

    The combined treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and retinoids has been suggested as a potential epigenetic strategy for the control of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treatment with butyrate, a dietary HDACi, combined with vitamin A on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the crystal violet staining method. MCF-7 cells were plated at 5 x 10{sup 4} cells/mL and treated with butyrate (1 mM) alone or combined with vitamin A (10 µM) for 24 to 120 h. Cell proliferation inhibition was 34, 10 and 46% following treatment with butyrate, vitamin A and their combination, respectively, suggesting that vitamin A potentiated the inhibitory activities of butyrate. Furthermore, exposure to this short-chain fatty acid increased the level of histone H3K9 acetylation by 9.5-fold (Western blot), but not of H4K16, and increased the expression levels of p21{sup WAF1} by 2.7-fold (Western blot) and of RARβ by 2.0-fold (quantitative real-time PCR). Our data show that RARβ may represent a molecular target for butyrate in breast cancer cells. Due to its effectiveness as a dietary HDACi, butyrate should be considered for use in combinatorial strategies with more active retinoids, especially in breast cancers in which RARβ is epigenetically altered.

  13. Downregulation of the Expression of GLUT1 Plays a Role in Apoptosis Induced by Sodium Butyrate in HT-29 Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Jin Yuan

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of glucose and sodium butyrate transporters(glucose transporter1-5 and Monocarboxylate transporter 1 and their relationship with cell apoptosis induced bysodium butyrate in colonic caner cell line HT-29 were studied. Cell apoptosis was detectedby flow cytometric assay. The expression of MCT1 and GLUT1-5 mRNA were detected byRT-PCR and the uptake of glucose was detected using 2-deoxy-[3H]glucose. The expressionof bax and bcl-x/l were detected by westernblot assay. We found that sodium butyrateinduced apoptosis in HT-29 cell line. The expression of GLUT1 mRNA, bcl-x/l, as well theuptake of glucose was inhibited by sodium butyrate. The expression of MCT1 and GLUT2,GLUT3, GLUT5 was not regulated by sodium butyrate. However, the concentration ofglucose had positive correlation with the expression of bcl-x/l protein and negativecorrelation with the apoptosis induced by sodium butyrate. All the results suggested thatdownregulation of the expression of GLUT1 was associated with the apoptosis induced bysodium butyrate in HT-29 cell line.

  14. The Bacterial Microflora of Fish, Revised

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, B.

    2006-01-01

    The results of numerous studies indicate that fish possess bacterial populations on or in their skin, gills, digestive tract, and light-emitting organs. In addition, the internal organs (kidney, liver, and spleen) of healthy fish may contain bacteria, but there is debate about whether or not muscle is actually sterile. Using traditional culture-dependent techniques, the numbers and taxonomic composition of the bacterial populations generally reflect those of the surrounding water. More modern...

  15. Thickness dependence of the efficiency of polymer : fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenes, M; Koster, LJA; Mihailetchi, VD; Blom, PWM

    2006-01-01

    We study the thickness dependence of the performance of bulk heterojunction solar cells based on poly[2-methoxy-5-(3('),7(')-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] as electron donor and [6,6]-phenyl C-61 butyric acid methyl ester as electron acceptor. Typically, these devices have an active layer

  16. Effects of bacterial direct-fed microbials on ruminal characteristics, methane emission, and milk fatty acid composition in cows fed high- or low-starch diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippeau, C; Lettat, A; Martin, C; Silberberg, M; Morgavi, D P; Ferlay, A; Berger, C; Nozière, P

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of bacterial direct-fed microbials (DFM) on ruminal fermentation and microbial characteristics, methane (CH4) emission, diet digestibility, and milk fatty acid (FA) composition in dairy cows fed diets formulated to induce different ruminal volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles. Eight ruminally cannulated dairy cows were divided into 2 groups based on parity, days in milk, milk production, and body weight. Cows in each group were fed either a high-starch (38%, HS) or a low-starch (2%, LS) diet in a 55:45 forage-to-concentrate ratio on a dry matter (DM) basis. For each diet, cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments in a Latin square design of (1) control (CON); (2) Propionibacterium P63 (P63); (3) P63 plus Lactobacillus plantarum 115 (P63+Lp); (4) P63 plus Lactobacillus rhamnosus 32 (P63+Lr). Strains of DFM were administered at 10(10) cfu/d. Methane emission (using the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique), total-tract digestibility, dry matter intake, and milk production and composition were quantified in wk 3. Ruminal fermentation and microbial characteristics were measured in wk 4. Data were analyzed using the mixed procedure of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). The 2 diets induced different ruminal VFA profiles, with a greater proportion of propionate at the expense of acetate and butyrate for the HS diet. Greater concentrations of total bacteria and selected bacterial species of methanogenic Archaea were reported for the HS diet, whereas the protozoa concentration in HS decreased. For both diets, bacterial DFM supplementation raised ruminal pH (+0.18 pH units, on average) compared with CON. Irrespective of diet, P63+Lp and P63+Lr increased ruminal cellulase activity (3.8-fold, on average) compared with CON, but this effect was not associated with variations in ruminal microbial numbers. Irrespective of diet, no effect of bacterial DFM on ruminal VFA was observed. For the LS diet, supplementing cows with P63+Lr tended to

  17. An orally administered butyrate-releasing derivative reduces neutrophil recruitment and inflammation in dextran sulphate sodium-induced murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeoli, Raffaele; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Pirozzi, Claudio; Lama, Adriano; Santoro, Anna; Russo, Roberto; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Berni Canani, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Perretti, Mauro; Meli, Rosaria

    2017-06-01

    Butyrate has shown benefits in inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it is not often administered orally because of its rancid smell and unpleasant taste. The efficacy of a more palatable butyrate-releasing derivative, N-(1-carbamoyl-2-phenylethyl) butyramide (FBA), was evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS). Male 10 week-old BALB/c mice received DSS (2.5%) in drinking water (for 5 days) followed by DSS-free water for 7 days (DSS group). Oral FBA administration (42.5 mg·kg-1 ) was started 7 days before DSS as preventive (P-FBA), or 2 days after DSS as therapeutic (T-FBA); both treatments lasted 19 days. One DSS-untreated group received only tap water (CON). FBA treatments reduced colitis symptoms and colon damage. P-FBA and T-FBA significantly decreased polymorphonuclear cell infiltration score compared with the DSS group. FBA reversed the imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (reducing inducible NOS protein expression, CCL2 and IL-6 transcripts in colon and increasing TGFβ and IL-10). Morever, P-FBA and T-FBA limited neutrophil recruitment (by expression and localization of the neutrophil granule protease Ly-6G), restored deficiency of the butyrate transporter and improved intestinal epithelial integrity, preventing tight-junction impairment (zonulin-1 and occludin). FBA, similar to its parental compound sodium butyrate, inhibited histone deacetylase-9 and restored H3 histone acetylation, exerting an anti-inflammatory effect through NF-κB inhibition and the up-regulation of PPARγ. FBA reduces inflammatory intestinal damage in mice indicating its potential as a postbiotic derivative without the problems associated with the oral administration of sodium butyrate. This article is part of a themed section on Principles of Pharmacological Research of Nutraceuticals. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.11/issuetoc. © 2016 The British

  18. Comparative effect of orally administered sodium butyrate before or after weaning on growth and several indices of gastrointestinal biology of piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Gall, Maud; Gallois, Mélanie; Sève, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Sodium butyrate (SB) provided orally favours body growth and maturation of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in milk-fed pigs. In weaned pigs, conflicting results have been obtained. Therefore, we hypothesised that the effects of SB (3 g/kg DM intake) depend on the period (before v. after weaning)...... efficient to stimulate body growth and feed intake after weaning, by reducing gastric emptying and intestinal mucosa weight and by increasing feed digestibility.......) of its oral administration. From the age of 5 d, thirty-two pigs, blocked in quadruplicates within litters, were assigned to one of four treatments: no SB (control), SB before (for 24 d), or after (for 11-12 d) weaning and SB before and after weaning (for 35-36 d). Growth performance, feed intake...... and various end-point indices of GIT anatomy and physiology were investigated at slaughter. The pigs supplemented with SB before weaning grew faster after weaning than the controls (P feed intake was higher in pigs supplemented with SB before or after weaning (P

  19. Influence of indole-butyric acid and electro-pulse on in vitro rooting and development of olive (Olea europea L.) microshoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Isabel Maria Gonzalez; Vidoy, I; Encina, C L

    2009-09-01

    The effects of indole-butyric acid (IBA) and electro-pulses on rooting and shoot growth were studied in vitro, using olive shoot cultures. Tested shoots were obtained from seedlings belonging to three Spanish cultivars, 'Arbequina', 'Manzanilla de Sevilla' and 'Gordal Sevillana', which have easy-, medium- and difficult-to-root rooting abilities, respectively. The standard two-step rooting method (SRM), consisting of root induction in olive rooting medium supplemented with 0, 0.1 or 1 mg/l IBA followed by root elongation in the same rooting medium without IBA, was compared with a novel one-step method consisting of shoot electro-pulses of 250, 1,250 or 2,500 V in a solution of IBA (0, 0.1 or 1 mg/l) and direct transferral to root elongation medium. The rooting percentage of the seedling-derived shoots obtained with the SRM was 76% for 'Arbequina' and 'Gordal Sevillana' cultivars and 100% for 'Manzanilla de Sevilla' cultivar, whereas with the electro-pulse method, the rooting percentages were 68, 64 and 88%, respectively. IBA dipping without pulse produced 0% rooting in 'Arbequina' seedling-derived shoots. The electroporation in IBA not only had an effect on shoot rooting but also on shoot growth and development, with longer shoots and higher axillary shoot sprouting and growth after some of the treatments. These effects were cultivar-dependent. The electro-pulse per se could explain some of these effects on shoot development.

  20. Investigations of vibrational spectra and bioactivity of novel anticancer drug N-(6-ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl)-gamma-amino butyric acid ethyl ester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhi, Geethu; Rajina, S. R.; Praveen, S. G.; Xavier, T. S.; Kenny, Peter T. M.; Jaiswal-Nagar, D.; Binoy, J.

    2017-10-01

    The bioactivity of compounds is mainly dependent on molecular structure and the present work aims to explore the bonding features responsible for biological activity of novel anticancer drug N-(6-ferrocenyl-2-naphthoyl)-gamma-amino butyric acid ethyl ester (FNGABEE). In the present study, we investigate the molecular structural properties of newly synthesized title compound through experimental and quantum chemical studies. The detailed vibrational analysis has been performed using FT IR and FT Raman spectrum, aided by DFT computed geometry, vibrational spectrum, Eigen vector distribution and PED, at B3LYP/6-311 ++G(d,p) level. The resonance structure of naphthalene, different from that of benzene, revealed by molecular structure has been investigated using Csbnd C and Cdbnd C stretching modes. The proton transfer in amide has been analyzed to obtain spectral distinction between different carbonyl and Csbnd N groups which point to the reactive sites responsible for binding with DNA and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The spectral distinction between eclipsed and staggered form of ferrocene has been analyzed. The molecular docking of FNGABEE with BSA and DNA has been performed to find the strength of binding and the moieties responsible for the interactions. The experimental binding studies of FNGABEE with BSA and DNA has been performed using UV absorption spectroscopy and fluorometric assay, to find the nature and strength of binding.

  1. [Effects of different carbohydrates on the simulation of human intestinal bacterial flora with in vitro culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, B; Yin, Y S; Sun, G; Zhu, L Y; Liu, W; Pi, X E; Fei, D B; Peng, L H; Wang, X; Yang, Y S

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the optimal growth condition of human fecal bacterial flora in vitro by comparing the effect of different carbohydrates as cultural media. Three fecal samples (1, 2, 3) were collected and inoculated into a single-stage chemostat system, in which starch medium (VI) and starch polysaccharide medium(XP) were used. Samples were collected for bacterial genomic DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis. Bacterial composition and short chain fatty acid (SCFA) were then analyzed. The single stage chemostat system reached steady after operating 8 days, when evaluated by the PCR-DGGE. Bacterial 16s rRNA high-throughput sequencing showed that the intestinal bacteria of these three volunteers was mainly composed of four bacterial phyla, namely, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. When the influence of bacterial abundance was considered, the similarity of bacterial composition between the original fecal samples to the harvested flora after culture was 0.847, 0.825, 0.968 in VI medium and 0.927, 0.926, 0.836 in XP medium, respectively. The similarity was decreased to 0.553, 0.580, 0.623 with VI medium and 0.617, 0.520, 0.574 with XP medium, when the number of bacterial species was considered. The variation of host individual also influenced the simulation. VI medium favored fecal sample 3, while XP medium more benefited sample 1 and 2. Bacteroides and Lachnospiraceae_incertae_sedis grew in both VI and XP medium. However, some species were only detected in VI medium and some were specifically found in the XP medium. The SCFA concentration in fermenters was 15-35 mmol/L, mainly propionate and butyrate. The chemostat system works for stimulating human gut bacterial flora in vitro. The bacterial composition is affected by different carbohydrate in the culture medium yet with close simulation higher than 80%.

  2. STUDI BIODEGRADASI POLI HIDROKSI BUTIRAT DALAM MEDIA CAIR (Biodegradation of Poly Hydroxy Butyrate in Liquid Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Sari

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK  Poli hidroksi butirat (PHS termasuk dalam golongan bioplastik. Plastik jenis ini diharapkan dapat menjadi plastik altematif yang ramah lingkungan sebagai pengganti plastik sintetis yang bersifat sangat suI it terdegradasi. Penelitian ini bertujuan menguji potensi biodegradabilitas PHS komersial dalam media cair dengan menggunakan lumpur aktif dan unit pengolahan limbah pabrik plastik sintetik. Identifikasi proses degradasi dilakukan dengan cara mengamati perubahan karakteristik PHS yang meliputi perubahan visual, perubahan morfologi permukaan, penurunan berat, perubahan kristalinitas, dan perubahan berat molekul selama 15 pekan inkubasi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kerusakan PHS se1ama proses degradasi dapat dilihat secara visual. Disamping itu, morfologi permukaan mengalami perubahan signifikan. Adapun penurunan berat, kristalinitas, dan berat molekul berturut-turut mencapai 22,91 %,57.44 %, dan 29,52 %.   ABSTRACT  Poly hidroxy butyrate (PHB is a member of bioplastic group. This type of plastic is expected to be alternative plastic which is environmently friendly to replace synthetic plastic that is known to be very difficult to degrade. This research aims to test the biodegradability of commercial PHB in liquid mediums used activated sludge from waste water treatment plant in plastic synthetic factory. Identification of biodegradation process  was done by monitoring the changes of PHB characteristics including visual change, surface morphology change, reduction of weight, reduction of crystallinity, and reduction of molecular weight during 15 weeks incubation. The result shows that  the damage of PHB sample during biodegradation could be seen visually and liquid medium show the existence of change which can be seen visually and the surface morphology of PHB changed significantly. Weight reduction, crystallinity  reduction, and molecular  weight reduction  revealed of 22.91%, 57.44%, and 29.52% respectively.

  3. Neuroprotective Effect of Sodium Butyrate against Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium butyrate (NaB is a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber and serves as an important neuromodulator in the central nervous system. In this study, we further investigated that NaB attenuated cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury in vivo and its possible mechanisms. NaB (5, 10 mg/kg was administered intragastrically 3 h after the onset of reperfusion in bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO mice. After 24 h of reperfusion, neurological deficits scores were estimated. Morphological examination was performed by electron microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin (H&E staining. The levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were assessed. Apoptotic neurons were measured by TUNEL; apoptosis-related protein caspase-3, Bcl-2, Bax, the phosphorylation Akt (p-Akt, and BDNF were assayed by western blot and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that 10 mg/kg NaB treatment significantly ameliorated neurological deficit and histopathology changes in cerebral I/R injury. Moreover, 10 mg/kg NaB treatment markedly restored the levels of MDA, SOD, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-8. 10 mg/kg NaB treatment also remarkably inhibited the apoptosis, decreasing the levels of caspase-3 and Bax and increasing the levels of Bcl-2, p-Akt, and BDNF. This study suggested that NaB exerts neuroprotective effects on cerebral I/R injury by antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties and BDNF-PI3K/Akt pathway is involved in antiapoptotic effect.

  4. Vildagliptin increases butyrate-producing bacteria in the gut of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Xiao, Xinhua; Li, Ming; Yu, Miao; Ping, Fan; Zheng, Jia; Wang, Tong; Wang, Xiaojing

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports a key role for the gut microbiota in metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin is highly efficacious in treating T2D. However, whether vildagliptin can alter the gut microbiome is still unclear. This study aimed to identify whether vildagliptin modifies the gut microbiota structure during T2D treatment. Diabetic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were induced by a high-fat diet and streptozotocin injection (HFD/STZ). Diabetic rats were orally administered a low dose of vildagliptin (LV, 0.01 g/kg/d vildagliptin), high dose of vildagliptin (HV, 0.02 g/kg/d vildagliptin), or normal saline for 12 weeks. Fasting blood glucose, blood glucose after glucose loading, and serum insulin levels were significantly reduced in the LV and HV groups compared with those in the T2D group. The serum GLP-1 level increased more in the vildagliptin-treated group than in the T2D group. Pyrosequencing of the V3-V4 regions of 16S rRNA genes revealed that vildagliptin significantly altered the gut microbiota. The operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and community richness (Chao1) index were significantly reduced in the vildagliptin and diabetic groups compared with those in the control group. At the phylum level, a higher relative abundance of Bacteroidetes, lower abundance of Firmicutes, and reduced ratio of Fimicutes/Bacteroidetes were observed in the vildagliptin-treated group. Moreover, vildagliptin treatment increased butyrate-producing bacteria, including Baceroides and Erysipelotrichaeae, in the diabetic rats. Moreover, Lachnospira abundance was significantly negatively correlated with fasting blood glucose levels. In conclusion, vildagliptin treatment could benefit the communities of the gut microbiota.

  5. Vildagliptin increases butyrate-producing bacteria in the gut of diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence supports a key role for the gut microbiota in metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes (T2D and obesity. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin is highly efficacious in treating T2D. However, whether vildagliptin can alter the gut microbiome is still unclear. This study aimed to identify whether vildagliptin modifies the gut microbiota structure during T2D treatment. Diabetic Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were induced by a high-fat diet and streptozotocin injection (HFD/STZ. Diabetic rats were orally administered a low dose of vildagliptin (LV, 0.01 g/kg/d vildagliptin, high dose of vildagliptin (HV, 0.02 g/kg/d vildagliptin, or normal saline for 12 weeks. Fasting blood glucose, blood glucose after glucose loading, and serum insulin levels were significantly reduced in the LV and HV groups compared with those in the T2D group. The serum GLP-1 level increased more in the vildagliptin-treated group than in the T2D group. Pyrosequencing of the V3-V4 regions of 16S rRNA genes revealed that vildagliptin significantly altered the gut microbiota. The operational taxonomic units (OTUs and community richness (Chao1 index were significantly reduced in the vildagliptin and diabetic groups compared with those in the control group. At the phylum level, a higher relative abundance of Bacteroidetes, lower abundance of Firmicutes, and reduced ratio of Fimicutes/Bacteroidetes were observed in the vildagliptin-treated group. Moreover, vildagliptin treatment increased butyrate-producing bacteria, including Baceroides and Erysipelotrichaeae, in the diabetic rats. Moreover, Lachnospira abundance was significantly negatively correlated with fasting blood glucose levels. In conclusion, vildagliptin treatment could benefit the communities of the gut microbiota.

  6. A reference electrode based on polyvinyl butyral (PVB) polymer for decentralized chemical measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinovart, Tomàs [Departament de Química Orgànica i Química Analítica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Carrer Marcellí Domingo s/n 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Crespo, Gastón A. [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Geneva, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 30, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Rius, F. Xavier [Departament de Química Orgànica i Química Analítica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Carrer Marcellí Domingo s/n 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Andrade, Francisco J., E-mail: franciscojavier.andrade@urv.cat [Departament de Química Orgànica i Química Analítica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Carrer Marcellí Domingo s/n 43007 Tarragona (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A disposable solid-contact reference electrode for potentiometry is presented. • The device shows unsensitivity to most ions, redox potential and light. • Low-cost and good stability, ideal to build disposable potentiometric sensors. • Nanopores formed in the membrane control the flux of ions with the solution. Abstract: A new solid-state reference electrode using a polymeric membrane of polyvinyl butyral (PVB), Ag/AgCl and NaCl to be used in decentralized chemical measurements is presented. The electrode is made by drop-casting the membrane cocktail onto a glassy carbon (GC) substrate. A stable potential (less than 1 mV dec⁻¹ over a wide range of concentrations for the several chemical species tested is obtained. No significant influence to changes in redox potential, light and pH are observed. The response of this novel electrode shows good correlation when compared with a conventional double-junction reference electrode. Also good long-term stability (90 ± 33 μV/h) and a lifetime of approximately 4 months are obtained. Aspects related to the working mechanisms are discussed. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) studies reveal the presence of nanopores and channels on the surface, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of optimized electrodes show low bulk resistances, usually in the kΩ range, suggesting that a nanoporous polymeric structure is formed in the interface with the solution. Future applications of this electrode as a disposable device for decentralized measurements are discussed. Examples of the utilization on wearable substrates (tattoos, fabrics, etc) are provided.

  7. Epigenetically reprogramming of human embryonic stem cells by 3-Deazaneplanocin A and sodium butyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Azghadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Infertility affects about 6.1 million women aged 15-44 in the United States. The leading cause of infertility in women is quantitative and qualitative defects in human germ-cell development (these sentences are not mentioned in introduction so it is not correct to mention in abstract, you can omit. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM of developing blastocysts and have a broad clinical potential. hESCs have been classified into three classes based on their epigenetic state. The goal of this study was to epigenetically reprogram Class II and Class III cell lines to Class I (naïve state, and to in vitro differentiation of potent hESCs to primordial germ cells (PGCs. Methods: Recent evidence suggests that 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep is a global histone methylation inhibitor which selectively inhibits trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3K27, and it is an epigenetic therapeutic for cancer. The characteristics of DZNep lead us to hypothesize that it is a good candidate to epigenetically reprogram hESCs to the Class I. Additionally, we used sodium butyrate (NaBu shown in previous studies to up-regulate the expression of germ cell specific markers (these sentences should be come in introduction. Results: We used these two drugs to produce epigenetically stable hESC lines. hESC lines are an appropriate system for disease modeling and understanding developmental stages, therefore producing stable stem cell lines may have an outstanding impact in different research fields such as preventive medicine. Conclusions: X-Chromosome inactivation has been used as a tool to follow the reprogramming process. We have used immunostaining and western blot as methods to follow this reprogramming qualitatively and quantitatively.

  8. Effects of Feeding Methylthio Butyric Acid Isopropyl Ester on Postpartum Performance and Metabolism in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Xia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment aimed to evaluate the effect of HMBi on the production performance and metabolism in dairy cows. Thirty multiparous Holstein dairy cows under similar conditions were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments; i Control, a basal diet; ii T1, a basal diet plus HMBi (0 g prepartum and 18 g postpartum; and iii T2, a basal diet plus HMBi (10 g prepartum and 18 g postpartum. Treatments were initiated 21 d before expected calving and continued through 91 d postpartum. HMBi was top-dressed onto the total mixed ration of each cow. Treatments did not affect dry matter intake, plasma urea nitrogen, peak milk yield, days to peak milk yield, nonesterified fatty acid, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, glutamic oxalaetic transaminase, milk fat content, milk protein content, milk lactose content, and milk solid non-fat content. The milk composition yields were increased by the HMBi-supplemented treatment. The T1 and T2 treatments increased the yields of 4% fat-corrected milk yield, milk fat, milk protein, and milk lactose compared with the control. Although there was no difference in the milk composition of the control and T2-treated cows, the T2-treated cows exhibited higher milk fat yield (increased by 74 g/d, lower milk urea nitrogen (reduced by 3.41%, and plasma β-hydroxy butyrate than the control cows. The results indicate that HMBi supplementation to diet has beneficial effects, and that there is no difference between supplementation at prepartum and starting only at parturition.

  9. Inhibition of NLRP3 Inflammasome Pathway by Butyrate Improves Corneal Wound Healing in Corneal Alkali Burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Fang; Xiao, Yangyan; Zaheer, Mahira; Volpe, Eugene A; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Li, De-Quan; de Paiva, Cintia S

    2017-03-05

    Epithelial cells are involved in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity in response to different stresses. The purpose of this study was to investigate if alkali-injured corneal epithelia activate innate immunity through the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (NOD)-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway. A unilateral alkali burn (AB) was created in the central cornea of C57BL/6 mice. Mice received either no topical treatment or topical treatment with sodium butyrate (NaB), β-hydroxybutyric acid (HBA), dexamethasone (Dex), or vehicle (balanced salt solution, BSS) quater in die (QID) for two or five days (d). We evaluated the expression of inflammasome components including NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC), and caspase-1, as well as the downstream cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. We found elevation of NLRP3 and IL-1β messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, as well as levels of inflammasome component proteins in the alkali-injured corneas compared to naïve corneas. Treatment with NLRP3 inhibitors using NaB and HBA preserved corneal clarity and decreased NLRP3, caspase-1, and IL-1β mRNA transcripts, as well as NLRP3 protein expression on post-injury compared to BSS-treated corneas. These findings identified a novel innate immune signaling pathway activated by AB. Blocking the NLRP3 pathway in AB mouse model decreases inflammation, resulting in greater corneal clarity. These results provide a mechanistic basis for optimizing therapeutic intervention in alkali injured eyes.

  10. Peritonitis - spontaneous bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP); Ascites - peritonitis; Cirrhosis - peritonitis ... who are on peritoneal dialysis for kidney failure. Peritonitis may have other causes . These include infection from ...

  11. Acute bacterial exacerbations in bronchitis and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodosh, S

    1987-04-27

    Symptomatic exacerbations are frequent problems in the management of chronic bronchitis and bronchial asthma. Identification of a bacterial etiology as the cause of specific exacerbations should be based on changes in clinical symptoms and documentation of significant bronchial bacterial flora and a neutrophilic inflammatory response. Most acute bacterial exacerbations in patients with bronchitis or asthma are caused by Hemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Branhamella catarrhalis. Treatment with ampicillins, synthetic tetracyclines, or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is successful in 80 to 90 percent of bacterial exacerbations. Emergence of resistant Hemophilus species and pneumococci motivates development of new orally administered antimicrobial drugs. Appropriate treatment depends on the prompt recognition that bacterial infection is present. Once instituted, antimicrobial therapy should be continued for a minimum of 10 to 14 days, which should increase the duration of the infection-free period until the next bacterial exacerbation. Adequate response should be evaluated by the return of symptoms to pre-infectious levels and by decreased sputum bacterial flora and neutrophilic inflammation.

  12. Proteomics in the Study of Bacterial Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachida Bouhenni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial keratitis is a serious ocular infection that can cause severe visual loss if treatment is not initiated at an early stage. It is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Serratia species. Depending on the invading organism, bacterial keratitis can progress rapidly, leading to corneal destruction and potential blindness. Common risk factors for bacterial keratitis include contact lens wear, ocular trauma, ocular surface disease, ocular surgery, lid deformity, chronic use of topical steroids, contaminated ocular medications or solutions, and systemic immunosuppression. The pathogenesis of bacterial keratitis, which depends on the bacterium-host interaction and the virulence of the invading bacterium, is complicated and not completely understood. This review highlights some of the proteomic technologies that have been used to identify virulence factors and the host response to infections of bacterial keratitis in order to understand the disease process and develop improved methods of diagnosis and treatment. Although work in this field is not abundant, proteomic technologies have provided valuable information toward our current knowledge of bacterial keratitis. More studies using global proteomic approaches are warranted because it is an important tool to identify novel targets for intervention and prevention of corneal damage caused by these virulent microorganisms.

  13. Coenzyme A-transferase-independent butyrate re-assimilation in Clostridium acetobutylicum-evidence from a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millat, Thomas; Voigt, Christine; Janssen, Holger; Cooksley, Clare M; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2014-11-01

    The hetero-dimeric CoA-transferase CtfA/B is believed to be crucial for the metabolic transition from acidogenesis to solventogenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum as part of the industrial-relevant acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Here, the enzyme is assumed to mediate re-assimilation of acetate and butyrate during a pH-induced metabolic shift and to faciliate the first step of acetone formation from acetoacetyl-CoA. However, recent investigations using phosphate-limited continuous cultures have questioned this common dogma. To address the emerging experimental discrepancies, we investigated the mutant strain Cac-ctfA398s::CT using chemostat cultures. As a consequence of this mutation, the cells are unable to express functional ctfA and are thus lacking CoA-transferase activity. A mathematical model of the pH-induced metabolic shift, which was recently developed for the wild type, is used to analyse the observed behaviour of the mutant strain with a focus on re-assimilation activities for the two produced acids. Our theoretical analysis reveals that the ctfA mutant still re-assimilates butyrate, but not acetate. Based upon this finding, we conclude that C. acetobutylicum possesses a CoA-tranferase-independent butyrate uptake mechanism that is activated by decreasing pH levels. Furthermore, we observe that butanol formation is not inhibited under our experimental conditions, as suggested by previous batch culture experiments. In concordance with recent batch experiments, acetone formation is abolished in chemostat cultures using the ctfa mutant.

  14. Bacterie remt phytophthora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuivers, M.; Overbeek, van L.S.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriën kunnen aardappelplanten weerbaarder maken tegen phytophthora. Uit kas-experimenten van Plant Research International (PRI) blijkt dat de aanwezigheid van de bacteriePseudomonas putida(isolaat P9) in twee late aardappelrassen leidt tot een vertraging met 45 procent van het ziekteverloop na

  15. common bacterial pathogens seen.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bacterial infections are important causes of morbidity in the neonatal period. Therefore identification of infecting organisms and the risk factors for possible bacterial infection in the newborn is of great importance. Institution early appropriate therapy is an important step in combating morbidity and mortality in this ...

  16. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...... about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria...

  17. Continuous fermentation and in-situ reed separation of butyric acid for higher sugar consumption rate and productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; Skiadas, Ioannis; Westermann, Peter

    and development, and process improvement for higher yield, productivity and selectivity. Compared with other microbial strains Clostridium tyrobutyricum has been well characterised, exhibits higher yield and selectivity and can utilize glucose and xylose simultaneously. However, a prerequisite for cost effective...... that disconnection of the REED system resulted to much lower (48 and 83% for glucose and xylose, respectively) sugars consumption rates and consequently lower butyric acid production rates. It was also noticeable that continuous operation, even without the REED system, resulted to higher glucose consumption rates...

  18. Propionic and butyric acids, formed in the caecum of rats fed highly fermentable dietary fibre, are reflected in portal and aortic serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsdottir, Greta; Jädert, Cecilia; Holm, Lena; Nyman, Margareta E

    2013-11-14

    SCFA are important end products formed during colonic fermentation of dietary fibre (DF). It has been suggested that propionic and butyric acids affect metabolic parameters, low-grade systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and obesity. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the various SCFA profiles observed after fermentation in the caecum of rats fed pectin, guar gum and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) were also represented in hepatic portal and aortic serum. The SCFA in serum were extracted using hollow fibre-supported liquid membrane extraction before GLC analysis. The concentrations of acetic, propionic and butyric acids in caecal content correlated well with those in portal serum (Pacids between the caecal content and aortic serum (Pacid concentration in caecal content was also reflected in the aortic serum (P= 0·019) of rats fed FOS. FOS gave rather low amounts of the SCFA, especially butyric acid, but caecal tissue weight was higher with FOS than with the other two diets. This may be explained by rapid fermentation and quick utilisation/absorption of the SCFA. The present study also showed that propionic acid was metabolised/utilised to a higher extent than butyric acid by colonocytes before reaching the liver. We conclude that the formation of propionic and butyric acids in the caecum is reflected by increased concentrations in the aortic blood. This approach may therefore simplify the evaluation and study of SCFA from DF in human subjects.

  19. Propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit lipolysis and de novo lipogenesis and increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in primary rat adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Degerman, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibers by colonic microbiota generates short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g., propionic acid and butyric acid, which have been described to have "anti-obesity properties" by ameliorating fasting glycaemia, body weight and insulin tolerance in animal models. In the present study, we therefore investigate if propionic acid and butyric acid have effects on lipolysis, de novo lipogenesis and glucose uptake in primary rat adipocytes. We show that both propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit isoproterenol- and adenosine deaminase-stimulated lipolysis as well as isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis in the presence of a phosphodiesterase (PDE3) inhibitor. In addition, we show that propionic acid and butyric acid inhibit basal and insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis, which is associated with increased phosphorylation and thus inhibition of acetyl CoA carboxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid synthesis. Furthermore, we show that propionic acid and butyric acid increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. To conclude, our study shows that SCFAs have effects on fat storage and mobilization as well as glucose uptake in rat primary adipocytes. Thus, the SCFAs might contribute to healthier adipocytes and subsequently also to improved energy metabolism with for example less circulating free fatty acids, which is beneficial in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  20. Efficacy of protected sodium butyrate, a protected blend of essential oils, their combination, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spore suspension against artificially induced necrotic enteritis in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerzsele, A; Szeker, K; Csizinszky, R; Gere, E; Jakab, C; Mallo, J J; Galfi, P

    2012-04-01

    Necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens leads to serious economical losses to the poultry industry. There is a growing need to find effective, nontoxic, antibiotic alternatives to prevent and cure the disease. In our study, the efficacy of protected sodium butyrate at 1.5 g/kg (BP70), a Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spore suspension with 10(9) cfu/g (BAL; Ecobiol), a protected blend of essential oils (1%) at 1.5 g/kg (EO), and a combination of sodium butyrate with essential oils (1%) protected with vegetable fat at 1.5 g/kg (BP70+EO; Natesse) was investigated in an artifical C. perfringens-infection model. Body weight gain, gross pathological and histopathological lesion scores, villus lengths, and villus length:crypt depth ratio was determined and compared with the control group. Broilers infected with C. perfringens and treated with essential oils or the combination of sodium butyrate and essential oils showed significantly better BW gain (P crypt depth ratio (P < 0.001), and decreased gross pathological and histopathological lesion scores (P < 0.05) compared with the control. Sodium butyrate alone and B. amyloliquefaciens spore suspension had no beneficial effects on the course of the disease in this study. According to our results, the protected combination of sodium butyrate and essential oils, as well as the protected essential oils, can be potential candidates for the prevention and treatment of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

  1. Effects of sodium butyrate supplementation on reproductive performance and colostrum composition in gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, B; Wang, M; Guo, H; Jia, Y; Yang, X; Zhao, R

    2016-10-01

    Nutrients are essential for the health and survival of human beings and animals. Also, they play a major role in enhancing reproductive efficiency. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB) on reproductive performance and colostrum composition in gilts. A total of 40 Large White×Landrace replacement gilts (at the age of 160 to 175 days) were fed either a standard diet (control group, n=20) or standard diet top dressed with encapsulated SB at the level of 500 mg/kg (SB group, n=20) from 1 month before mating to 7 days after farrowing. The rate of gilts regular return to estrus after insemination was lower in SB group than the control group. The total number of piglets born (P=0.179) and the litter weight at birth (P=0.063) did not differ between the two treatment groups. However, the mean BW at day 7 tended to be greater in SB group (P=0.051) and average daily gain of piglets was greater (P=0.011) compared with control group. Colostrum samples were collected at parturition and the concentrations of total protein (P=0.197), cholesterol (P=0.161) and lactose (P=0.923) were not influenced by SB supplementation. However, compared with control gilts, colostrum from SB-treated gilts contained lower triglyceride (P=0.050). Moreover, colostrum concentrations of prolactin (P=0.005) and leptin (P=0.006) were significantly lower in SB group. No significant differences were noted for the colostral concentrations of cortisol (P=0.899), thyroxine (P=0.891) or triiodothyronine (P=0.194). The concentration of lipopolysaccharide in colostrum was not influenced by SB supplementation (P=0.972). However, colostrum from SB-treated gilts had significantly lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) (P=0.030) and higher immunoglobulin A (IgA) (P=0.042). Collectively, SB supplementation could reduce the rate of gilts return to estrus, alter the composition of colostrum and enhance the growth rate of piglets. Moreover, SB could alter the immune function

  2. Li-Ion Cells Employing Electrolytes With Methyl Propionate and Ethyl Butyrate Co-Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring Mars and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate at low temperatures to satisfy the requirements of such applications as landers, rovers, and penetrators. A number of terrestrial applications, such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) also require energy storage devices that can operate over a wide temperature range (i.e., -40 to +70 C), while still providing high power capability and long life. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-30 to +40 C); however, the rate capability at the lower temperatures is very poor. These limitations at very low temperatures are due to poor electrolyte conductivity, poor lithium intercalation kinetics over the electrode surface layers, and poor ionic diffusion in the electrode bulk. Two wide-operating-temperature-range electrolytes have been developed based on advances involving lithium hexafluorophosphate-based solutions in carbonate and carbonate + ester solvent blends, which have been further optimized in the context of the technology and targeted applications. The approaches employed include further optimization of electrolytes containing methyl propionate (MP) and ethyl butyrate (EB), which are effective co-solvents, to widen the operating temperature range beyond the baseline systems. Attention was focused on further optimizing ester-based electrolyte formulations that have exhibited the best performance at temperatures ranging from -60 to +60 C, with an emphasis upon improving the rate capability at -20 to -40 C. This was accomplished by increasing electrolyte salt concentration to 1.20M and increasing the ester content to 60 percent by volume to increase the ionic conductivity at low temperatures. Two JPL-developed electrolytes 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MP (20:20:60 v/v %) and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+EB (20:20:60 v/v %) operate effectively over a wide

  3. Bacterial hemorrhagic enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ina, Kenji; Kusugami, Kazuo; Ohta, Michio

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial diarrhea can be classified into two clinical entities, noninflammatory diarrhea and inflammatory diarrhea syndromes. The latter type of diarrhea is characterized by bloody and puruloid mucus stool, and is often accompanied by fever, tenesmus, and severe abdominal pain. Pathogenic bacteria causing the inflammatory diarrhea syndrome include Salmonella, Vibrio, Shigella, enteroinvasive and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, Yersinia, Chlamydia, and Clostridium difficile. The pathologic changes in the inflammatory diarrhea syndrome range from a superficial exudative enterocolitis to a transmural enterocolitis with overt ulceration. This syndrome is also designated as bacterial hemorrhagic enterocolitis because of its usual manifestation by bloody diarrhea. The diagnostic approach needs information on the patient's age, travel history, epidemiological associations, sexual practice, and medical history, including usage of antibiotics. Bacterial information can be obtained by microscopic study, culture, and the identification of specific bacterial toxins. Flexible colonoscopy with biopsy is useful for the differentiation of bacterial hemorrhagic enterocolitis from idiopathic ulcerative colitis and ischemic colitis. Physicians should be familiar with the diagnostic modalities used to detect the specific pathogens causing hemorrhagic bacterial enterocolitis; namely, bacterial culture, serology, histology, and nucleic acid technologies.

  4. Síntese enzimática de butirato de isoamila empregando lipases microbianas comerciais Enzymatic synthesis isoamyl butyrate employing commercial microbial lipases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Cardoso Aragão

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoamyl butyrate production was investigated using free and immobilized lipases by esterification of butyric acid with isoamyl alcohol in a solvent-free system and in an organic media. Among the enzymes studied, Lipozyme TL IM was found to be the most active catalyst in n-hexane as a solvent. The effects of different solvents and the amount of water added on conversion rates were studied. A maximum conversion yield of 80% in n-hexano at 48 h was obtained under the following conditions: 3 g L-1 of Lipozyme TL IM, 30 ºC, 180 rpm of agitation, isoamyl alcohol to butyric acid molar ratio of 1:1 and acid substrate concentration of 0.06 M.

  5. Interfering with bacterial gossip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defense. Antibiotics exhibit a rather limited effect on biofilms. Furthermore, antibiotics have an ‘inherent obsolescence’ because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections with origin in bacterial biofilms have become a serious threat in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that appropriately target bacteria in their relevant habitat with the aim of mitigating their destructive impact on patients. In this review we describe molecular mechanisms involved in “bacterial gossip” (more scientifically referred to as quorum sensing (QS) and c-di-GMP signaling), virulence, biofilm formation......, resistance and QS inhibition as future antimicrobial targets, in particular those that would work to minimize selection pressures for the development of resistant bacteria....

  6. Aortic bacterial endarteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma Maroto, M J; Gorodezky, M; Contreras, R; C'ardenas, M

    1975-01-01

    Micotic aneurisms are very rare. They are produced as a consequence of a bacterial infection of the endartery. They are divided into "primary", or those of an unknown septic focus, and "secondary" to bacterial endocarditis, to intravascular in infection or to infection located in a neighboring region. Two cases of the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico are presented, with "primary" micotic aneurysm, which is the least frequent. One of them was because of bacterial endarteritis located in the thoracic aorta, an extremely rate entity. Due to the frequent rupture of these aneurysm with a very high mortality, emphasis is placed on the convenience of rapid surgical treatment of patients diagnosed.

  7. Amelioration of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats by valproic acid and butyrate: Role of nuclear factor kappa-B, proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabel, Ahmed M; Omar, Mohamed S; Elmaaboud, Maaly A Abd

    2016-10-01

    Bleomycin is one of the anticancer agents used frequently in management of various types of tumors. Pulmonary fibrosis is the major limiting factor for the use of bleomycin. Mechanisms of fibrosis may include disordered wound healing, infiltration with inflammatory cells and fibroblasts and release of reactive oxygen species and growth factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of valproic acid and butyrate on lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin, and to clarify their mechanisms of action. Fifty male Wistar rats were divided into 5 equal groups as follows: control group; bleomycin group; bleomycin+valproic acid group; bleomycin+butyrate group and bleomycin+valproic acid+butyrate group. Weight of rats, lung tissue hydroxyproline, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and catalase were measured. Also, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total and differential leukocytic count, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1). Lung tissue was examined histopathologically and immunostained for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Valproic acid and/or butyrate resulted in significant improvement of the body weight gain, oxidative stress, TGF-β1, IL-6, TNF-α, hydroxyproline and BAL cellularity together with significant improvement of the histopathological and immunohistochemical picture. The use of valproic acid/butyrate combination was better than the use of each of these drugs alone in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In conclusion, valproic acid/butyrate combination may be used prophylactically for amelioration of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Síntese enzimática de butirato de isoamila empregando lipases microbianas comerciais Enzymatic synthesis isoamyl butyrate employing commercial microbial lipases

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor Cardoso Aragão; Andréia Anschau; Barbara Daniele Almeida Porciuncula; Cleidi Thiesen; Susana Juliano Kalil; Carlos André Veiga Burkert; Janaína Fernandes de Medeiros Burkert

    2009-01-01

    Isoamyl butyrate production was investigated using free and immobilized lipases by esterification of butyric acid with isoamyl alcohol in a solvent-free system and in an organic media. Among the enzymes studied, Lipozyme TL IM was found to be the most active catalyst in n-hexane as a solvent. The effects of different solvents and the amount of water added on conversion rates were studied. A maximum conversion yield of 80% in n-hexano at 48 h was obtained under the following conditions: 3 g L-...

  9. Phase diagrams for the system water/butyric acid/propylene carbonate at T = 293.2-313.2 K and p = 101.3 kPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarsaraee, Sina; Nahzomi, Hossein Taherpour; Nasiri-Touli, Elham

    2017-11-01

    Phase diagrams for the system water/butyric acid/propylene carbonate were plotted at T = 293.2, 303.2, 313.2 K and p = 101.3 kPa. Acidimetric titration and refractive index methods were used to determine tie-line data. Solubility data revealed that the studied system exhibits type-1 behavior of liquid-liquid equilibrium. The experimental data were regressed and acceptably correlated using the UNIQUAC and NRTL models. As a result, propylene carbonate is a suitable separating agent for aqueous mixture of butyric acid.

  10. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  11. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summer Camp Tips for Kids With Asthma, Allergies Antioxidants: The Good Health Helpers As Stroke 'Liquefies' Brain ... Cancer Additional Content Medical News Overview of Bacterial Skin Infections By A. Damian Dhar, MD, JD, Private ...

  12. When bacterial tracheitis complicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Viral croup is the most common cause of stridor in children seen at emergency room. In the absence of response to treatment with corticosteroids and nebulized adrenaline, bacterial tracheitis should be considered. Case Report: A six year-old child, was admitted in emergency room with stridor, respiratory distress and fever, with partial response to therapy with nebulized epinephrine. Ceftriaxone was prescribed for suspected bacterial laryngotracheobronchitis. Despite therapy, developed cervical cellulitis with progression to retropharyngeal abscess and mediastinitis. Good outcome after therapy with ceftriaxone, clindamycin and vancomycin. Discussion/Conclusion: The authors describe an original case of a bacterial tracheitis complicated with retropharyngeal abcess and mediastinitis, emphasizing that bacterial tracheitis is potentially life threatening, requiring a high index of suspicion for early diagnosis.

  13. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  14. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing....... These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  15. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  16. Osmotic stress- and indole-3-butyric acid-induced NO generation are partially distinct processes in root growth and development in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Bartha, Bernadett; Erdei, László

    2008-06-01

    In this work, the effects of osmotic stress and exogenous auxin (indole-3-butyric acid, IBA) on root morphology and nitric oxide (NO) generation in roots were compared in pea plants. Five-day-old plants were treated with 0, 10(-3), 10(-4), 10(-5), 10(-6), 10(-7), 10(-8) or 10(-9) M IBA or with PEG 6000 at concentrations that determined 0, 50, 100, 200 or 400 mOsm in the medium, during 5 days. NO generation was examined by in situ and in vivo fluorescence method. Increasing concentrations of PEG as well as IBA resulted in shortening of primary root (PR), enhancement of lateral root (LR) number and significant increase of NO generation. Time-dependent investigations revealed that in the case of IBA treatments, the LR number increased in parallel with an intensified NO generation, while elongation of PR was not followed by changes in NO levels. Under osmotic stress, the time curve of NO development was distinct compared with that of IBA-treated roots, because significantly, the appearance of lateral initials was preceded by a transient burst of NO. This early phase of NO generation under osmotic stress was clearly distinguishable from that which accompanied LR initiation. It is concluded that osmotic stress and the presence of exogenous auxin resulted in partly similar root architecture but different time courses of NO synthesis. We suppose that the early phase of NO generation may fulfill a role in the osmotic stress-induced signalization process leading to the modification of root morphology.

  17. Preparation of poly(3-hexylthiophene)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester Langmuir-Blodgett bulk hetero junctions on indium tin oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Teruyoshi; Satoh, Aki; Sanda, Atsushi; Hishinuma, Takaaki; Kitagawa, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    Mono-layers of aggregated Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) molecules were obtained by using solutions of P3HT, PCBM and P3HT-PCBM mixture without stabilizers such as stearates in chloroform at an air-water interface. 1 to 10 cycle-lifted LB films of P3HT and PCBM were successfully transferred to cleaned bare indium-tin-oxide coated glass substrate by vertical lifting method excluding the first 1 to 2 cycle layer. The dependence of P3HT and PCBM film thickness on the transfer cycles has been explained by the molecular sizes, where four edge-on P3HT molecular and six PCBM molecular stacking which result in thickness was taken into account. Work functions of deposited LB-layers were consistent with those of the ordinary casted films. P3HT and PCBM LB-layers showed optical activity in both infra-red (IR) and visible absorption regions of the spectrum. P-polarized IR absorption owing to C=C and C=O stretching vibrations observed in LB-layered films clearly indicate the enhancement of the orientation of these bonds perpendicular to the substrate surface in contrast to the spin-coated one. Visible optical absorption intensity was increased well in proportion with the lift cycle-numbers of both P3HT and PCBM LB films. The photovoltaic characteristics have been observed in the devices fabricated with P3HT (5 cycles-layer)/PCBM (5 cycles-layer) LB hetero structure as an active layer of the solar cells. The surface pressure of LB compression for the mixture of P3HT and PCBM, that is, bulk hetero mixtures, has also been well built up to 30 mN/m.

  18. Genome-wide ChIP-seq mapping and analysis of butyrate-induced H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and epigenomic landscapes alteration in bovine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile short-chain fatty acids (VFAs, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) are nutrients especially critical to ruminants. Beyond their nutritional impact, clear evidence is beginning to link modifications in chromatin structure induced by butyrate to cell cycle progression, DNA replication and over...

  19. Social behavior and decision making in bacterial conjugation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koraimann, Günther; Wagner, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria frequently acquire novel genes by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). HGT through the process of bacterial conjugation is highly efficient and depends on the presence of conjugative plasmids (CPs...

  20. Over-expression of bacterial gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) in plastids affects photosynthesis, growth and sulphur metabolism in poplar (Populus tremula x Populus alba) dependent on the resulting gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschbach, Cornelia; Rizzini, Luca; Mult, Susanne; Hartmann, Tanja; Busch, Florian; Peuke, Andreas D; Kopriva, Stanislav; Ensminger, Ingo

    2010-07-01

    We compared three transgenic poplar lines over-expressing the bacterial gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) targeted to plastids. Lines Lggs6 and Lggs12 have two copies, while line Lggs20 has three copies of the transgene. The three lines differ in their expression levels of the transgene and in the accumulation of gamma-glutamylcysteine (gamma-EC) and glutathione (GSH) in leaves, roots and phloem exudates. The lowest transgene expression level was observed in line Lggs6 which showed an increased growth, an enhanced rate of photosynthesis and a decreased excitation pressure (1-qP). The latter typically represents a lower reduction state of the plastoquinone pool, and thereby facilitates electron flow along the electron transport chain. Line Lggs12 showed the highest transgene expression level, highest gamma-EC accumulation in leaves and highest GSH enrichment in phloem exudates and roots. This line also exhibited a reduced growth, and after a prolonged growth of 4.5 months, symptoms of leaf injury. Decreased maximum quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)) indicated down-regulation of photosystem II reaction centre (PSII RC), which correlates with decreased PSII RC protein D1 (PsbA) and diminished light-harvesting complex (Lhcb1). Potential effects of changes in chloroplastic and cytosolic GSH contents on photosynthesis, growth and the whole-plant sulphur nutrition are discussed for each line.

  1. Evaluation of different protections of butyric acid aiming for release in the last part of the gastrointestinal tract of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallo, J J; Balfagón, A; Gracia, M I; Honrubia, P; Puyalto, M

    2012-12-01

    Three tests, 2 in vivo and 1 in vitro, were conducted to compare how 2 forms of protection of butyric acid (BA) affect its liberation along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of piglets. The 2 forms of BA were vegetable fat-encapsulated sodium butyrate (SBE) and monoglyceride of butyric acid (MB). In the first trial, 528 piglets were weaned at 21 d of age and assigned to 3 diets in 8 replicate pens of 22 piglets per pen for 39 d. The 3 diets were (i) prestarter and starters I and II (Con), (ii) C + SBE (6 kg/t in both prestarter and starter feeds), and (iii) C + MB (2.5 kg/t in the prestarter feed, 2 kg/t in the starter feed I, and 0 kg/t in the starter feed II). Piglets receiving C and SBE feeds tended to show higher BW (18.74, 18.66, and 17.82 kg; P piglets; no significant differences were observed in feed intake or FCR. In the second trial, 8 pens of 4 piglets each (4 pens per treatment), weaned at 21 d, were given either a standard postweaning program with SBE (2 kg/t) or with MB (2 kg/t) and received the same amount of BA. Body weight, feed intake, and FCR were evaluated at days 14 and 28 of trial. At the end of the trial, 1 animal per pen was euthanized and the concentration of BA and VFA in duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, and cecum were quantified with HPLC. There were no statistical differences in growth, feed intake, or FCR. However, SBE-fed animals had higher concentration of VFA in colon than MB-fed animals. There were relevant numerical differences in the rest of the GIT sections but they were not statistically significant. The in vitro digestion of the products confirmed that BA can be released more easily from SBE (157.2 g of BA/kg of product after 7 h) than from MB (56.4 g of BA/kg of product after 7 h). It is concluded that the addition of SBE allows more BA to reach the distal sections of the GIT than MB.

  2. Modeling bacterial transport in the subsurface using HP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Olson, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial infiltration through the subsurface has been studied experimentally under different conditions of interest and is dependent on a variety of physical, chemical and biological factors, such as solution chemistry, bacterial size and surface properties, and mineral surfaces etc. However, most bacterial transport studies are often not directly relevant to processes occurring in natural systems. Bacteria have been frequently detected and reported in stormwater runoff. Mixing of stormwater runoff with groundwater in the subsurface during infiltration causes changes in solution chemistry, which lead to changes in bacterial surface properties (such as zeta potential) and collector surface charge and properties. This study focuses on bacterial transport as stormwater runoff infiltrates into the subsurface. A microbial reactive transport model is developed using HP1(HYDRUS1D-PHREEQC), which accounts for changes in the physical and chemical factors that control bacterial attachment onto liquid-solid and liquid-air interfaces. Bacterial attachment efficiency to liquid-solid interfaces is considered both under unfavorable conditions, as predicted by DLVO theory and the Maxwell approach coupling both primary and secondary-minima deposition, and under favorable conditions. Bacterial attachment at the liquid-air interface is modeled using mass transfer equations, which vary with changes in the water content profile. Different scenarios are simulated to observe bacterial transport behavior in uniformly and variably unsaturated soil, under high and low surface ponding depths and with varied and constant rates of bacterial attachment. Column transport experiments have been developed to experimentally validate the microbial reactive transport model.

  3. Urticaria and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minciullo, Paola L; Cascio, Antonio; Barberi, Giuseppina; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2014-01-01

    The association between urticaria and infectious diseases has been discussed for >100 years. However, a causal relationship with underlying or precipitating infection is difficult to establish. The purpose of this work was to perform a systematic analysis of the published cases of urticaria associated with bacterial infections. We give an umbrella breakdown of up-to-date systematic reviews and other important publications on the complex association of urticaria and bacterial infections. We did a Medline search, for English language articles published until January 2014, using the key words "urticaria" and "bacteria/bacterial disease"; a second analysis was performed in groups of bacteria and using each germ name as a key word. Many bacterial infections have been associated with urticaria manifestation, such as Helicobacter pylori, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Mycoplasma pneumonia, Salmonella, Brucella, Mycobacterium leprae, Borrelia, Chlamydia pneumonia, and Yersinia enterocolitica. In some cases the skin manifestations, described as urticaria, could be caused by the presence of the microorganism in the skin, or for the action of their toxins, or to the complement activation mediated by circulating immune complexes. Although only a weak association with urticaria of unclear pathogenesis exists, clinicians should consider these bacterial agents in the workup of the patients with urticaria. The eradication of the infection could, in fact, lead to the resolution of urticaria. Prospective studies and well-structured research are obviously needed to better clarify the real role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of urticaria and their relative prevalence.

  4. Bacterial Cell Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, George K; Weibel, Douglas B

    2017-07-25

    Cellular mechanical properties play an integral role in bacterial survival and adaptation. Historically, the bacterial cell wall and, in particular, the layer of polymeric material called the peptidoglycan were the elements to which cell mechanics could be primarily attributed. Disrupting the biochemical machinery that assembles the peptidoglycan (e.g., using the β-lactam family of antibiotics) alters the structure of this material, leads to mechanical defects, and results in cell lysis. Decades after the discovery of peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes, the mechanisms that underlie their positioning and regulation are still not entirely understood. In addition, recent evidence suggests a diverse group of other biochemical elements influence bacterial cell mechanics, may be regulated by new cellular mechanisms, and may be triggered in different environmental contexts to enable cell adaptation and survival. This review summarizes the contributions that different biomolecular components of the cell wall (e.g., lipopolysaccharides, wall and lipoteichoic acids, lipid bilayers, peptidoglycan, and proteins) make to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cell mechanics. We discuss the contribution of individual proteins and macromolecular complexes in cell mechanics and the tools that make it possible to quantitatively decipher the biochemical machinery that contributes to bacterial cell mechanics. Advances in this area may provide insight into new biology and influence the development of antibacterial chemotherapies.

  5. Butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by engineered Clostridium tyrobutyricum overexpressing xylose catabolism genes for glucose and xylose co-utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongxin; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Minqi; Wang, Jufang; Tang, I-Ching

    2017-06-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum can utilize glucose and xylose as carbon source for butyric acid production. However, xylose catabolism is inhibited by glucose, hampering butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates containing both glucose and xylose. In this study, an engineered strain of C. tyrobutyricum Ct-pTBA overexpressing heterologous xylose catabolism genes (xylT, xylA, and xylB) was investigated for co-utilizing glucose and xylose present in hydrolysates of plant biomass, including soybean hull, corn fiber, wheat straw, rice straw, and sugarcane bagasse. Compared to the wild-type strain, Ct-pTBA showed higher xylose utilization without significant glucose catabolite repression, achieving near 100% utilization of glucose and xylose present in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates in bioreactor at pH 6. About 42.6g/L butyrate at a productivity of 0.56g/L·h and yield of 0.36g/g was obtained in batch fermentation, demonstrating the potential of C. tyrobutyricum Ct-pTBA for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Thalidomide is more efficient than sodium butyrate in enhancing GATA-1 and EKLF gene expression in erythroid progenitors derived from HSCs with β-globin gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali Far, Mohammad Ali; Dehghani Fard, Ali; Hajizamani, Saiedeh; Mossahebi-Mohammadi, Majid; Yaghooti, Hamid; Saki, Najmaldin

    2016-01-01

    Efficient induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is considered as an effective therapeutic approach in beta thalassemia. HbF inducer agents can induce the expression of γ-globin gene and produce high levels of HbF via different epigenetic and molecular mechanisms. Thalidomide and sodium butyrate are known as HbF inducer drugs. CD133(+) stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood of a newborn with minor β-thalassemia in order to evaluate the effects of these two drugs on the in vitro expression of GATA-1 and EKLF genes as erythroid transcription factors. CD133(+) stem cells were expanded and differentiated into erythroid lineage and then treated with thalidomide and sodium butyrate and finally analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Statistical analysis was performed using student's t-test by SPSS software. Thalidomide and sodium butyrate increased GATA-1 and EKLF gene expression, compared to the non-treated control (P<0.05). Thalidomide was more efficient than sodium butyrate in augmenting expression of GATA-1 and EKLF genes. It seems that GATA-1 and EKLF have crucial roles in the efficient induction of HbF by thalidomide.

  7. Bioprotective carnitinoids: lipoic acid, butyrate, and mitochondria-targeting to treat radiation injury: mitochondrial drugs come of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steliou, Kosta; Faller, Douglas V; Pinkert, Carl A; Irwin, Michael H; Moos, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Preclinical Research Given nuclear-power-plant incidents such as the 2011 Japanese Fukushima-Daiichi disaster, an urgent need for effective medicines to protect against and treat the harmful biological effects of radiation is evident. To address such a challenge, we describe potential strategies herein including mitochondrial and epigenetic-driven methods using lipoic and butyric acid ester conjugates of carnitine. The antioxidant and other therapeutically beneficial properties of this class of agents may protect against ionizing radiation and resultant mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent studies of the compounds described herein reveal the potential-although further research and development is required to prove the effectiveness of this approach-to provide field-ready radiation-protective drugs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Aramid Fabrics Impregnated with Carbon Nanotube/Poly (Vinyl Butyral/Ethanol Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Obradović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study six samples of polyurethane/p-aramid multiaxial fabric forms (Colon fabrics were coated with 10 wt.% poly (vinyl butyral (PVB/ethanol solution with the addition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT. The solution was impregnated on both sides of each of the fabrics. All composite samples consisted of four layers of the impregnated fabrics. The MWCNT/PVB content was 0, 0.1 and 1 wt.%. The three samples of the fabrics with different MWCNT/PVB content were coated with γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (AMEO silane/ethanol solution due to the surface modification. The mechanical properties of the prepared composite samples were studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. The 60% increase in storage modulus was achieved by addition of MWCNT and impregnation of aramid fabrics with AMEO silane. The pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT were introduced in order to enhance additionally the mechanical properties of the materials for ballistic protection.

  9. Novel potentiometry immunoassay with amplified sensitivity for diphtheria antigen based on Nafion, colloidal Ag and polyvinyl butyral as matrixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dianping; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Zhang, Linyan; Zhong, Xia; Dai, Jianyuan; Liu, Yan

    2004-11-30

    A novel potentiometry immunoassay with amplified sensitivity has been developed for the detection of diphtheria antigen (Diph) via immobilizing diphtheria antibody (anti-Diph) on a platinum electrode based on Nafion, colloidal Ag (Ag), and polyvinyl butyral (PVB) as matrixes in this study. The modified procedure was further characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The influence and factors influencing the performance of resulting immunosensor were studied in detail. The resulting immunosensor exhibited sigmoid curve with log Diph concentrations, high sensitivity (51.4 mV/decade), wide linear range from 8 to 800 ng ml(-1) with a detection limit of 1.5 ng ml(-1), rapid potentiometric response (6 months). Analytical results of clinical samples show that the developed immunoassay is comparable with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) method, implying a promising alternative approach for detecting diphtheria antigen in the clinical diagnosis.

  10. The efficacy of Na-butyrate encapsulated in palm fat on performance of broilers infected with necrotic enteritis with gene expression analysis

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    M. G. Eshak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the efficacy of Na-butyrate encapsulated in palm fat on performance of broiler chickens experimentally infected with necrotic enteritis (NE with the determination of its protective effect against the changes in the gene expression profiles and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA fragmentation. Materials and Methods: A total of 800 one-day-old male Arbor Acres Plus broiler chickens were randomly allocated into four groups for 5 weeks. Na-butyrate was supplemented at dosages of 1 kg/ton for starter diet, 0.5 kg/ton for grower diet, and 0.25 kg/ton for finisher diet (presence or absence. Birds of groups 1 and 2 were inoculated by crop gavages with 4×108 CFU/ml/bird of Clostridium perfringens in phosphate buffered saline for 4 successive days, from 14 to 17 days of age to produce NE. Results: Addition of Na-butyrate, encapsulated in palm fat, to ration of experimentally infected broilers with NE resulted in increased final body weight, at 35 days of age, reduced total feed consumption, improved feed conversion ratio, reduced cumulative mortality, and increased production number. There were increased intestinal diameter, intestinal length, and significantly increased the weight of bursa of Fabricius(BF with higher hemagglutination inhibition titers against Newcastle disease (ND vaccination versus untreated infected and untreated negative control birds. The results showed increased expression levels of alpha-toxin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the bursa tissues of broilers infected with C. perfringens. However, the expression levels of these genes in broilers treated with Na-butyrate were similar to the non-infected control group. Supplementation of broilers with Na-butyrate increased the expression level of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and decreased the DNA fragmentation induced by C. perfringens. Conclusion: Na-butyrate significantly improved chicken broiler body weights, increased relative weights of BF, increased

  11. Effects of orally applied butyrate bolus on histone acetylation and cytochrome P450 enzyme activity in the liver of chicken – a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mátis Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Butyrate is known as histone deacetylase inhibitor, inducing histone hyperacetylation in vitro and playing a predominant role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and cell function. We hypothesized that butyrate, endogenously produced by intestinal microbial fermentation or applied as a nutritional supplement, might cause similar in vivo modifications in the chromatin structure of the hepatocytes, influencing the expression of certain genes and therefore modifying the activity of hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes. Methods An animal study was carried out in chicken as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of butyrate’s epigenetic actions in the liver. Broiler chicks in the early post-hatch period were treated once daily with orally administered bolus of butyrate following overnight starvation with two different doses (0.25 or 1.25 g/kg body weight per day for five days. After slaughtering, cell nucleus and microsomal fractions were separated by differential centrifugation from the livers. Histones were isolated from cell nuclei and acetylation of hepatic core histones was screened by western blotting. The activity of CYP2H and CYP3A37, enzymes involved in biotransformation in chicken, was detected by aminopyrine N-demethylation and aniline-hydroxylation assays from the microsomal suspensions. Results Orally added butyrate, applied in bolus, had a remarkable impact on nucleosome structure of hepatocytes: independently of the dose, butyrate caused hyperacetylation of histone H2A, but no changes were monitored in the acetylation state of H2B. Intensive hyperacetylation of H3 was induced by the higher administered dose, while the lower dose tended to increase acetylation ratio of H4. In spite of the observed modification in histone acetylation, no significant changes were observed in the hepatic microsomal CYP2H and CYP3A37 activity. Conclusion Orally added butyrate in bolus

  12. A survey of fermentation products and bacterial communities in corn silage produced in a bunker silo in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Han, Hongyan; Gu, Xueying; Yu, Zhu; Nishino, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the current practice of corn silage management in China, samples of bunker-made silage were collected from 14 farms within a 500-km radius of Beijing for the analysis of fermentation products and bacterial communities. Mean values for dry matter (DM) content were as low as 250 g/kg in both corn stover (St) and whole crop corn (Wc) silages, and pH values averaged 4.48 and 3.73, respectively. Only three of the 14 silages exhibited a lactic-to-acetic acid ratio > 1.0, indicating that the presence of acetic acid was predominant in fermentation. Although 1,2-propanediol content was marginal in most cases ( 25 g/kg DM. In contrast, 3 St silages had large amounts (> 10 g/kg DM) of butyric acid, and two of the three butyrate silages also had high concentrations of 1-propanol. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that the bacterial community appeared similar in 10 out of the 14 silage samples. Bands indicating Lactobacillus buchneri, L. acetotolerans and Acetobacter pasteurianus were found in both the St and Wc silages, accounting for the high acetic acid content found across silage samples. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. Lipoproteins of Bacterial Pathogens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs-Simon, A.; Titball, R. W.; Michell, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality, these proteins have a considerable significance in many phenomena, from cellular physiology through cell division and virulence. Here we give a general overview of lipoprotein biogenesis and highlight examples of the roles of lipoproteins in bacterial disease caused by a selection of medically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Neisseria meningitidis. Lipoproteins have been shown to play key roles in adhesion to host cells, modulation of inflammatory processes, and translocation of virulence factors into host cells. As such, a number of lipoproteins have been shown to be potential vaccines. This review provides a summary of some of the reported roles of lipoproteins and of how this knowledge has been exploited in some cases for the generation of novel countermeasures to bacterial diseases. PMID:20974828

  14. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the benefits......, but the identity and significance of interspecies bacterial interactions is neglected in these analyses. There is therefore an urgent need for bridging the gap between metagenomic analysis and in vitro models suitable for studies of bacterial interactions.Bacterial interactions and coadaptation are important...... at the microscale of complex communities, including biofilms.Studies of multispecies biofilms and the interactions shaping these are conducted in traditional approaches used for single-species biofilms with some adjustments; but a crucial point for consideration is which strains to combine and where these should...

  15. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis

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    Đukić Slobodanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2­producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent’s scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up­to­date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short­term and long­term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  16. Bacterial blight of cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïda JALLOUL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial blight of cotton (Gossypium ssp., caused by Xanthomonas citri pathovar malvacearum, is a severe disease occurring in all cotton-growing areas. The interactions between host plants and the bacteria are based on the gene-for-gene concept, representing a complex resistance gene/avr gene system. In light of the recent data, this review focuses on the understanding of these interactions with emphasis on (1 the genetic basis for plant resistance and bacterial virulence, (2 physiological mechanisms involved in the hypersensitive response to the pathogen, including hormonal signaling, the oxylipin pathway, synthesis of antimicrobial molecules and alteration of host cell structures, and (3 control of the disease.

  17. Bacterial meningitis in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Lawrence C; Boggess, Kim A; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal bacterial meningitis is uncommon but devastating. Morbidity among survivors remains high. The types and distribution of pathogens are related to gestational age, postnatal age, and geographic region. Confirming the diagnosis is difficult. Clinical signs are often subtle, lumbar punctures are frequently deferred, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures can be compromised by prior antibiotic exposure. Infants with bacterial meningitis can have negative blood cultures and normal CSF parameters. Promising tests such as the polymerase chain reaction require further study. Prompt treatment with antibiotics is essential. Clinical trials investigating a vaccine for preventing neonatal Group B Streptococcus infections are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional and molecular effects of arginine butyrate and prednisone on muscle and heart in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerron, Alfredo D; Rawat, Rashmi; Sali, Arpana; Spurney, Christopher F; Pistilli, Emidio; Cha, Hee-Jae; Pandey, Gouri S; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Francia, Dwight; Farajian, Viken; Escolar, Diana M; Bossi, Laura; Becker, Magali; Zerr, Patricia; de la Porte, Sabine; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Partridge, Terence; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2010-06-21

    The number of promising therapeutic interventions for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is increasing rapidly. One of the proposed strategies is to use drugs that are known to act by multiple different mechanisms including inducing of homologous fetal form of adult genes, for example utrophin in place of dystrophin. In this study, we have treated mdx mice with arginine butyrate, prednisone, or a combination of arginine butyrate and prednisone for 6 months, beginning at 3 months of age, and have comprehensively evaluated the functional, biochemical, histological, and molecular effects of the treatments in this DMD model. Arginine butyrate treatment improved grip strength and decreased fibrosis in the gastrocnemius muscle, but did not produce significant improvement in muscle and cardiac histology, heart function, behavioral measurements, or serum creatine kinase levels. In contrast, 6 months of chronic continuous prednisone treatment resulted in deterioration in functional, histological, and biochemical measures. Arginine butyrate-treated mice gene expression profiling experiments revealed that several genes that control cell proliferation, growth and differentiation are differentially expressed consistent with its histone deacetylase inhibitory activity when compared to control (saline-treated) mdx mice. Prednisone and combination treated groups showed alterations in the expression of genes that control fibrosis, inflammation, myogenesis and atrophy. These data indicate that 6 months treatment with arginine butyrate can produce modest beneficial effects on dystrophic pathology in mdx mice by reducing fibrosis and promoting muscle function while chronic continuous treatment with prednisone showed deleterious effects to skeletal and cardiac muscle. Our results clearly indicate the usefulness of multiple assays systems to monitor both beneficial and toxic effects of drugs with broad range of in vivo activity.

  19. Functional and molecular effects of arginine butyrate and prednisone on muscle and heart in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo D Guerron

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The number of promising therapeutic interventions for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is increasing rapidly. One of the proposed strategies is to use drugs that are known to act by multiple different mechanisms including inducing of homologous fetal form of adult genes, for example utrophin in place of dystrophin.In this study, we have treated mdx mice with arginine butyrate, prednisone, or a combination of arginine butyrate and prednisone for 6 months, beginning at 3 months of age, and have comprehensively evaluated the functional, biochemical, histological, and molecular effects of the treatments in this DMD model. Arginine butyrate treatment improved grip strength and decreased fibrosis in the gastrocnemius muscle, but did not produce significant improvement in muscle and cardiac histology, heart function, behavioral measurements, or serum creatine kinase levels. In contrast, 6 months of chronic continuous prednisone treatment resulted in deterioration in functional, histological, and biochemical measures. Arginine butyrate-treated mice gene expression profiling experiments revealed that several genes that control cell proliferation, growth and differentiation are differentially expressed consistent with its histone deacetylase inhibitory activity when compared to control (saline-treated mdx mice. Prednisone and combination treated groups showed alterations in the expression of genes that control fibrosis, inflammation, myogenesis and atrophy.These data indicate that 6 months treatment with arginine butyrate can produce modest beneficial effects on dystrophic pathology in mdx mice by reducing fibrosis and promoting muscle function while chronic continuous treatment with prednisone showed deleterious effects to skeletal and cardiac muscle. Our results clearly indicate the usefulness of multiple assays systems to monitor both beneficial and toxic effects of drugs with broad range of in vivo activity.

  20. The role of a cytoplasmic loop of MotA in load-dependent assembly and disassembly dynamics of the MotA/B stator complex in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourjaberi, Seyedeh Noorolhoda Shajari; Terahara, Naoya; Namba, Keiichi; Minamino, Tohru

    2017-11-01

    The proton-driven flagellar motor of Salmonella enterica can accommodate a dozen MotA/B stators in a load-dependent manner. The C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotB acts as a structural switch to regulate the number of active stators in the motor in response to load change. The cytoplasmic loop termed MotA C is responsible for the interaction with a rotor protein, FliG. Here, to test if MotA C is responsible for stator assembly around the rotor in a load-dependent manner, we analyzed the effect of MotA C mutations, M76V, L78W, Y83C, Y83H, I126F, R131L, A145E and E155K, on motor performance over a wide range of external load. All these MotA C mutations reduced the maximum speed of the motor near zero load, suggesting that they reduce the rate of conformational dynamics of MotA C coupled with proton translocation through the MotA/B proton channel. Dissociation of the stators from the rotor by decrease in the load was facilitated by the M76V, Y83H and A145E mutations compared to the wild-type motor. The E155K mutation reduced the number of active stators in the motor from 10 to 6 under extremely high load. We propose that MotA C is responsible for load-dependent assembly and disassembly dynamics of the MotA/B stator units. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Phage Life Cycles Behind Bacterial Biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszak, Tomasz; Latka, Agnieszka; Roszniowski, Bartosz; Valvano, Miguel A; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-11-24

    Bacteriophages (phages or bacterial viruses) are the most abundant biological entities in our planet; their influence reaches far beyond the microorganisms they parasitize. Phages are present in every environment and shape up every bacterial population in both active and passive ways. They participate in the circulation of organic matter and drive the evolution of microorganisms by horizontal gene transfer at unprecedented scales. The mass flow of genetic information in the microbial world influences the biosphere and poses challenges for science and medicine. The genetic flow, however, depends on the fate of the viral DNA injected into the bacterial cell. The archetypal notion of phages only engaging in predatorprey relationships is slowly fading. Because of their varied development cycles, environmental conditions, and the diversity of microorganisms they parasitize, phages form a dense and highly complex web of dependencies, which has important consequences for life on Earth. The sophisticated phage-bacteria interplay includes both aggressive action (bacterial lysis) and "diplomatic negotiations" (prophage domestication). Here, we review the most important mechanisms of interactions between phages and bacteria and their evolutionary consequences influencing their biodiversity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  3. Bacterial Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Know - Af-Soomaali (Somali) PDF Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Spanish (español) Expand Section Bacterial Infections: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Infecciones bacterianas: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) ...

  4. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velkey, Bálint; Vitális, Eszter; Vitális, Zsuzsanna

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis occurs most commonly in cirrhotic patients with ascites. Pathogens get into the circulation by intestinal translocation and colonize in peritoneal fluid. Diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is based on elevated polymorphonuclear leukocyte count in the ascites (>0,25 G/L). Ascites culture is often negative but aids to get information about antibiotic sensitivity in positive cases. Treatment in stable patient can be intravenous then orally administrated ciprofloxacin or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, while in severe cases intravenous III. generation cephalosporin. Nosocomial spontaneous bacterial peritonitis often caused by Gram-positive bacteria and multi-resistant pathogens can also be expected thus carbapenem should be the choice of the empiric treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered. Norfloxacin is used most commonly, but changes are expected due to increase in quinolone resistance. As a primary prophylaxis, a short-term antibiotic treatment is recommended after gastrointestinal bleeding for 5 days, while long-term prophylaxis is for patients with low ascites protein, and advanced disease (400 mg/day). Secondary prophylaxis is recommended for all patients recovered from spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Due to increasing antibiotic use of antibiotics prophylaxis is debated to some degree. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(2), 50-57.

  5. Bacterial Siderophores and their Biotechnological applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohandass, C.

    Siderophores and their Biotechnological applications C. Mohandass Biological Oceanography Division National Institute of Oceanography Dona-paula, Goa.403 004.India. Introduction Siderophore is the Greek phrase for ?iron bearer? and is applied to molecules... groups that can provide a high affinity set of ligands for coordination of ferric ions. In the marine environment bacterial growth depends in part upon the availability of iron, which is an essential requirement for most microorganisms. Although...

  6. Bacterial diversity analysis of larvae and adult midgut microflora using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods in lab-reared and field-collected Anopheles stephensi-an Asian malarial vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adak Tridibesh

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes are intermediate hosts for numerous disease causing organisms. Vector control is one of the most investigated strategy for the suppression of mosquito-borne diseases. Anopheles stephensi is one of the vectors of malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax. The parasite undergoes major developmental and maturation steps within the mosquito midgut and little is known about Anopheles-associated midgut microbiota. Identification and characterization of the mosquito midgut flora is likely to contribute towards better understanding of mosquito biology including longevity, reproduction and mosquito-pathogen interactions that are important to evolve strategies for vector control mechanisms. Results Lab-reared and field-collected A. stephensi male, female and larvae were screened by "culture-dependent and culture-independent" methods. Five 16S rRNA gene library were constructed form lab and field-caught A. stephensi mosquitoes and a total of 115 culturable isolates from both samples were analyzed further. Altogether, 68 genera were identified from midgut of adult and larval A. stephensi, 53 from field-caught and 15 from lab-reared mosquitoes. A total of 171 and 44 distinct phylotypes having 85 to 99% similarity with the closest database matches were detected among field and lab-reared A. stephensi midgut, respectively. These OTUs had a Shannon diversity index value of 1.74–2.14 for lab-reared and in the range of 2.75–3.49 for field-caught A. stephensi mosquitoes. The high species evenness values of 0.93 to 0.99 in field-collected adult and larvae midgut flora indicated the vastness of microbial diversity retrieved by these approaches. The dominant bacteria in field-caught adult male A. stephensi were uncultured Paenibacillaceae while in female and in larvae it was Serratia marcescens, on the other hand in lab-reared mosquitoes, Serratia marcescens and Cryseobacterium meninqosepticum bacteria were found to be abundant. Conclusion

  7. Effects of ruminal ammonia and butyrate concentrations on reticuloruminal epithelial blood flow and volatile fatty acid absorption kinetics under washed reticulorumen conditions in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, A C; Hanigan, M D; Kristensen, N B

    2011-08-01

    The effect of reticuloruminal epithelial blood flow on the absorption of propionate as a volatile fatty acid (VFA) marker in 8 lactating Holstein cows was studied under washed rumen conditions. The cows were surgically prepared with ruminal cannulas and permanent catheters in an artery and mesenteric, right ruminal, and hepatic portal veins. The experiment was designed with 2 groups of cows: 4 cows adapted to high crude protein (CP) and 4 to low CP. All cows were subjected to 3 buffers: butyric, ammonia, and control in a randomized replicated 3 × 3 incomplete Latin square design. The buffers (30 kg) were maintained in a temporarily emptied and washed rumen for 40 min. The initial concentration of VFA was 84.2 mmol/L. Butyrate was increased from 4 to 36 mmol/L in butyric buffer by replacement of acetate, and ammonia (NH(3)) was increased from 2.5 to 22.5 mmol/L in ammonia buffer by replacement of NaCl. Increasing amounts of deuterium oxide (D(2)O) were added to the buffers as the order of buffer sequence increased (6, 12, and 18 g of D(2)O). Ruminal clearance of D(2)O was used to estimate epithelial blood flow. To increase accuracy of the epithelial blood flow estimates, data of ruminal liquid marker (Cr-EDTA), and initial and final buffer volumes were fitted to a dynamic simulation model. The model was used to estimate ruminal liquid passages, residual liquid, and water influx (saliva and epithelia water) for each combination of cow and buffer (n=24). Epithelial blood flow increased 49±11% for butyric buffer compared with control. The ruminal disappearance of propionate (marker VFA) was affected by buffer and followed the same pattern as for epithelial blood flow. The correlation between ruminal disappearance of propionate and epithelial blood flow (r=0.56) indicates that the removal of propionate can be limited by epithelial blood flow. The ruminal disappearance of propionate increased 30±12% for the butyric compared with ammonia buffer and 12.5±8% when

  8. Kynetic resazurin assay (KRA) for bacterial quantification of foodborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Yaxal; Mandel, Arkady; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-03-01

    Fast detection of bacterial concentrations is important for the food industry and for healthcare. Early detection of infections and appropriate treatment is essential since, the delay of treatments for bacterial infections tends to be associated with higher mortality rates. In the food industry and in healthcare, standard procedures require the count of colony-forming units in order to quantify bacterial concentrations, however, this method is time consuming and reports require three days to be completed. An alternative is metabolic-colorimetric assays which provide time efficient in vitro bacterial concentrations. A colorimetric assay based on Resazurin was developed as a time kinetic assay (KRA) suitable for bacterial concentration measurements. An optimization was performed by finding excitation and emission wavelengths for fluorescent acquisition. A comparison of two non-related bacteria, foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, was performed in 96 well plates. A metabolic and clonogenic dependence was established for fluorescent kinetic signals.

  9. The Putative Role of the Non-Gastric H+/K+-ATPase ATP12A (ATP1AL1 as Anti-Apoptotic Ion Transporter: Effect of the H+/K+ ATPase Inhibitor SCH28080 on Butyrate-Stimulated Myelomonocytic HL-60 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jakab

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The ATP12A gene codes for a non-gastric H+/K+ ATPase, which is expressed in a wide variety of tissues. The aim of this study was to test for the molecular and functional expression of the non-gastric H+/K+ ATPase ATP12A/ATP1AL1 in unstimulated and butyrate-stimulated (1 and 10 mM human myelomonocytic HL-60 cells, to unravel its potential role as putative apoptosis-counteracting ion transporter as well as to test for the effect of the H+/K+ ATPase inhibitor SCH28080 in apoptosis. Methods: Real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR was used for amplification and cloning of ATP12A transcripts and to assess transcriptional regulation. BCECF microfluorimetry was used to assess changes of intracellular pH (pHi after acute intracellular acid load (NH4Cl prepulsing. Mean cell volumes (MCV and MCV-recovery after osmotic cell shrinkage (Regulatory Volume Increase, RVI were assessed by Coulter counting. Flow-cytometry was used to measure MCV (Coulter principle, to assess apoptosis (phosphatidylserine exposure to the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, caspase activity, 7AAD staining and differentiation (CD86 expression. Results: We found by RT-PCR, intracellular pH measurements, MCV measurements and flow cytometry that ATP12A is expressed in human myelomonocytic HL-60 cells. Treatment of HL-60 cells with 1 mM butyrate leads to monocyte-directed differentiation whereas higher concentrations (10 mM induce apoptosis as assessed by flow-cytometric determination of CD86 expression, caspase activity, phosphatidylserine exposure on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane and MCV measurements. Transcriptional up-regulation of ATP12A and CD86 is evident in 1 mM butyrate-treated HL-60 cells. The H+/K+ ATPase inhibitor SCH28080 (100 µM diminishes K+-dependent pHi recovery after intracellular acid load and blocks RVI after osmotic cell shrinkage. After seeding, HL-60 cells increase their MCV within the first 24 h in culture, and subsequently

  10. Bacterial Genome Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  11. Carbohydrate mediated bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Roland J

    2011-01-01

    In the process of adhesion, bacteria often carry proteins on their surface, adhesins, that bind to specific components of tissue cells or the extracellular matrix. In many cases these components are carbohydrate structures. The carbohydrate binding specificities of many bacteria have been uncovered over the years. The design and synthesis of inhibitors of bacterial adhesion has the potential to create new therapeutics for the prevention and possibly treatment of bacterial infections. Unfortunately, the carbohydrate structures often bind only weakly to the adhesion proteins, although drug design approaches can improve the situation. Furthermore, in some cases linking carbohydrates covalently together, to create so-called multivalent systems, can also significantly enhance the inhibitory potency. Besides adhesion inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy, the adhesion proteins can also be used for detection. Novel methods to do this are being developed. These include the use of microarrays and glyconanoparticles. New developments in these areas are discussed.

  12. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...... susceptibility occurred in 21 (23%) of 92 cases of known aetiology, compared to an estimated 6% in nationally notified cases (p treatment was appropriate in 97% of ABM cases in the study population, and in 99.6% of nationally notified cases. The notification rate...... treatment for ABM should not be based exclusively on clinical notification systems with possible unbalanced under-reporting....

  13. Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a novel optimization algorithm based on the social foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. This paper presents a variation on the original BFO algorithm, namely, the Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization (CBFO, which significantly improve the original BFO in solving complex optimization problems. This significant improvement is achieved by applying two cooperative approaches to the original BFO, namely, the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the implicit space decomposition level and the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the hybrid space decomposition level. The experiments compare the performance of two CBFO variants with the original BFO, the standard PSO and a real-coded GA on four widely used benchmark functions. The new method shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  14. Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Hanning Chen; Yunlong Zhu; Kunyuan Hu

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO) is a recently developed nature-inspired optimization algorithm, which is based on the foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. Up to now, BFO has been applied successfully to some engineering problems due to its simplicity and ease of implementation. However, BFO possesses a poor convergence behavior over complex optimization problems as compared to other nature-inspired optimization techniques. This paper first analyzes how ...

  15. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishko, V. V.; Nogovitsina, Y. M.; Ivshina, I. B.

    2014-04-01

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references.

  16. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references.

  17. The impact of a moderate chronic temperature increase on spleen immune-relevant gene transcription depends on whether Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are stimulated with bacterial versus viral antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tiago S; Gamperl, A Kurt; Nash, Gord; Booman, Marije; Barat, Ashoktaru; Rise, Matthew L

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to elevated temperature is an inherent feature of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) sea-cage culture in some regions (e.g., Newfoundland) and may also become an increasingly prevalent challenge for wild fish populations because of accelerated climate change. Therefore, understanding how elevated temperatures impacts the immune response of this commercially important species may help to reduce the potential negative impacts of such challenges. Previously, we investigated the impacts of moderately elevated temperature on the antiviral responses of Atlantic cod (Hori et al. 2012) and reported that elevated temperature modulated the spleen transcriptome response to polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC, a viral mimic). Herein, we report a complementary microarray study that investigated the impact of the same elevated temperature regime on the Atlantic cod spleen transcriptome response to intraperitoneal (IP) injection of formalin-killed Aeromonas salmonicida (ASAL). Fish were held at two different temperatures (10 °C and 16 °C) prior to immune stimulation and sampled 6 and 24 h post-injection (HPI). In this experiment, we identified 711 and 666 nonredundant ASAL-responsive genes at 6HPI and 24HPI, respectively. These included several known antibacterial genes, including hepcidin, cathelicidin, ferritin heavy subunit, and interleukin 8. However, we only identified 15 differentially expressed genes at 6HPI and 2 at 24HPI (FDR 1%) when comparing ASAL-injected fish held at 10 °C versus 16 °C. In contrast, the same comparisons with pIC-injected fish yielded 290 and 339 differentially expressed genes (FDR 1%) at 6HPI and 24HPI, respectively. These results suggest that moderately elevated temperature has a lesser effect on the Atlantic cod spleen transcriptome response to ASAL (i.e., the antibacterial response) than to pIC (i.e., antiviral response). Thus, the impacts of high temperatures on the cod's immune response may be pathogen dependent.

  18. The Pyridoxal 5′-Phosphate (PLP-Dependent Enzyme Serine Palmitoyltransferase (SPT: Effects of the Small Subunits and Insights from Bacterial Mimics of Human hLCB2a HSAN1 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley E. Beattie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP-dependent enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT catalyses the first step of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis. The core human enzyme is a membrane-bound heterodimer composed of two subunits (hLCB1 and hLCB2a/b, and mutations in both hLCB1 (e.g., C133W and C133Y and hLCB2a (e.g., V359M, G382V, and I504F have been identified in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I (HSAN1, an inherited disorder that affects sensory and autonomic neurons. These mutations result in substrate promiscuity, leading to formation of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids found in affected individuals. Here we measure the activities of the hLCB2a mutants in the presence of ssSPTa and ssSPTb and find that all decrease enzyme activity. High resolution structural data of the homodimeric SPT enzyme from the bacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis (Sp SPT provides a model to understand the impact of the hLCB2a mutations on the mechanism of SPT. The three human hLCB2a HSAN1 mutations map onto Sp SPT (V246M, G268V, and G385F, and these mutant mimics reveal that the amino acid changes have varying impacts; they perturb the PLP cofactor binding, reduce the affinity for both substrates, decrease the enzyme activity, and, in the most severe case, cause the protein to be expressed in an insoluble form.

  19. Combing bacterial turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Nishiguchi, Daiki; Aronson, Igor

    Living systems represented by ensembles of motile organisms demonstrate a transition from a chaotic motion to a highly ordered state. Examples of such living systems include suspensions of bacteria, schools of fish, flocks of birds and even crowds of people. In spite of significant differences in interacting mechanisms and motion scales, ordered living systems have many similarities: short-range alignment of organism, turbulent-like motion, emergence of large-scale flows and dynamic vortices. In this work, we rectify a turbulent dynamics in suspensions of swimming bacteria Bacillus subtilis by imposing periodical constraints on bacterial motion. Bacteria, swimming between periodically placed microscopic vertical pillars, may self-organize in a stable lattice of vortices. We demonstrate the emergence of a strong anti-ferromagnetic order of bacterial vortices in a rectangular lattice of pillars. Hydrodynamic interaction between vortices increases the stability of an emerged pattern. The highest stability of vortices in the anti-ferromagnetic lattice and the fastest vortices speed were observed in structures with the periods comparable with a correlation length of bacterial unconstrained motion. A.S and I.A were supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science And Engineering, under contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357 and D.N was supported by ALPS and JSPS Grant No. 26-9915.

  20. Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a recently developed nature-inspired optimization algorithm, which is based on the foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. Up to now, BFO has been applied successfully to some engineering problems due to its simplicity and ease of implementation. However, BFO possesses a poor convergence behavior over complex optimization problems as compared to other nature-inspired optimization techniques. This paper first analyzes how the run-length unit parameter of BFO controls the exploration of the whole search space and the exploitation of the promising areas. Then it presents a variation on the original BFO, called the adaptive bacterial foraging optimization (ABFO, employing the adaptive foraging strategies to improve the performance of the original BFO. This improvement is achieved by enabling the bacterial foraging algorithm to adjust the run-length unit parameter dynamically during algorithm execution in order to balance the exploration/exploitation tradeoff. The experiments compare the performance of two versions of ABFO with the original BFO, the standard particle swarm optimization (PSO and a real-coded genetic algorithm (GA on four widely-used benchmark functions. The proposed ABFO shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  1. Effects of low-molecular weight alcohols on bacterial viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Adrian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol based solutions are among the most convenient and wide spread aid in the prevention of nosocomial infections. The current study followed the efficacy of several types and isomers of alcohols on different bacterial species. Seven alcohols (ethyl, n-propyl, iso-propyl, n-butyl, iso-butyl, tert-butyl alcohol, and ethylene glycol were used to evaluate their minimal inhibitory and bactericidal effects by microdilution method on bacteria that express many phenotypical characteristics: different cell-wall structure (Gram positive/negative bacteria, capsule production (Klebsiella pneumoniae, antibiotic resistance (MRSA vs MSSA or high environmental adaptability (Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results: The best inhibitory effect was noticed for n-propyl, followed by iso-propyl, n-butyl, and iso-butyl alcohols with equal values. Ethylene glycol was the most inefficient alcohol on all bacteria. In K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa, the bactericidal concentrations were higher than the inhibitory one, and to a level similar to that encountered for most of the Gram-positive bacteria. Among Gram-positive cocci, E. faecalis presented the lowest susceptibility to alcohols. Conclusions: All alcohols presented good effect on bacteria, even in low concentrations. Compared to ethanol as standard, there are better alternatives that can be used as antimicrobials, namely longer-chain alcohols such as propyl or butyric alcohols and their iso- isomers. Ethylene glycol should be avoided, due to its toxicity hazard and low antimicrobial efficacy. Bacterial phenotype (highly adaptable bacteria, biofilm formation and structure (cell wall structure, presence of capsule may drastically affect the responsiveness to the antimicrobial activity of alcohols, leading to higher bactericidal than inhibitory concentrations.

  2. Continuous fermentation and kinetic experiments for the conversion of crude glycerol derived from second-generation biodiesel into 1,3 propanediol and butyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varrone, Cristiano; Floriotis, Georgis; Heggeset, Tonje M. B.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of different mixed microbial cultures (MMC) able to ferment crude glycerol generated from animal fat-based biodiesel to produce 1,3 propanediol (1,3 PDO) and butyric acid, under non-sterile conditions. Eight different continuous flow stirred-tank reactors...... (CSTR) were set up with different inoculum types and growth media. The distribution of metabolic products under variable operating conditions was determined. All MMC were characterized from a kinetic point of view and overall stoichiometric reactions were constructed. Changes in the microbial...... communities were monitored by means of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Maximum substrate degradation rate reached approximately 110 g/L/d of glycerol (with a productivity of 38 g/L/d and 11 g/L/d for 1,3 PDO and butyric acid, respectively), obtained with an hydraulic retention time of 12 h and 60 g/L feed...

  3. Dark fermentative biohydrogen production by mesophilic bacterial consortia isolated from riverbed sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sneha; Sudhakaran, Anu K.; Sarma, Priyangshu Manab; Subudhi, Sanjukta; Mandal, Ajoy Kumar; Lal, Banwari [Environmental and Industrial Biotechnology Division, The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), Habitat Place, Darbari Seth Block, Lodhi Road, New Delhi 110003 (India); Gandham, Ganesh [Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited, Mumbai Refinery, B. D. Patil Marg, Mahul, Mumbai 400074 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Dark fermentative bacterial strains were isolated from riverbed sediments and investigated for hydrogen production. A series of batch experiments were conducted to study the effect of pH, substrate concentration and temperature on hydrogen production from a selected bacterial consortium, TERI BH05. Batch experiments for fermentative conversion of sucrose, starch, glucose, fructose, and xylose indicated that TERI BH05 effectively utilized all the five sugars to produce fermentative hydrogen. Glucose was the most preferred carbon source indicating highest hydrogen yields of 22.3 mmol/L. Acetic and butyric acid were the major soluble metabolites detected. Investigation on optimization of pH, temperature, and substrate concentration revealed that TERI BH05 produced maximum hydrogen at 37 C, pH 6 with 8 g/L of glucose supplementation and maximum yield of hydrogen production observed was 2.0-2.3 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose. Characterization of TERI BH05 revealed the presence of two different bacterial strains showing maximum homology to Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium bifermentans. (author)

  4. Locomotion of bacteria in liquid flow and the boundary layer effect on bacterial attachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao, E-mail: zhangchao@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Liao, Qiang, E-mail: lqzx@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Chen, Rong, E-mail: rchen@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhu, Xun, E-mail: zhuxun@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2015-06-12

    The formation of biofilm greatly affects the performance of biological reactors, which highly depends on bacterial swimming and attachment that usually takes place in liquid flow. Therefore, bacterial swimming and attachment on flat and circular surfaces with the consideration of flow was studied experimentally. Besides, a mathematical model comprehensively combining bacterial swimming and motion with flow is proposed for the simulation of bacterial locomotion and attachment in flow. Both experimental and theoretical results revealed that attached bacteria density increases with decreasing boundary layer thickness on both flat and circular surfaces, the consequence of which is inherently related to the competition between bacterial swimming and the non-slip motion with flow evaluated by the Péclet number. In the boundary layer, where the Péclet number is relatively higher, bacterial locomotion mainly depends on bacterial swimming. Thinner boundary layer promotes bacterial swimming towards the surface, leading to higher attachment density. To enhance the performance of biofilm reactors, it is effective to reduce the boundary layer thickness on desired surfaces. - Highlights: • Study of bacterial locomotion in flow as an early stage in biofilm formation. • Mathematical model combining bacterial swimming and the motion with flow. • Boundary layer plays a key role in bacterial attachment under flow condition. • The competition between bacterial swimming and the motion with flow is evaluated.

  5. Survivial Strategies in Bacterial Range Expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Erwin

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial communities represent complex and dynamic ecological systems. Different environmental conditions as well as bacterial interactions determine the establishment and sustainability of bacterial diversity. In this talk we discuss the competition of three Escherichia coli strains during range expansions on agar plates. In this bacterial model system, a colicin E2 producing strain C competes with a colicin resistant strain R and with a colicin sensitive strain S for new territory. Genetic engineering allows us to tune the growth rates of the strains and to study distinct ecological scenarios. These scenarios may lead to either single-strain dominance, pairwise coexistence, or to the coexistence of all three strains. In order to elucidate the survival mechanisms of the individual strains, we also developed a stochastic agent-based model to capture the ecological scenarios in silico. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach we are able to show that the level of biodiversity depends crucially on the composition of the inoculum, on the relative growth rates of the three strains, and on the effective reach of colicin toxicity.

  6. Engineering nanoparticles to silence bacterial communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Publicover Miller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The alarming spread of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has warranted the study of alternative antimicrobial agents. Quorum sensing is a chemical cell-to-cell communication mechanism utilized by bacteria to coordinate group behaviors and establish infections. Quorum sensing is integral to bacterial survival, and therefore provides a unique target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, silicon dioxide nanoparticles (Si-NP were engineered to target the signaling molecules (i.e. acylhomoserine lactones (HSL used for quorum sensing in order to halt bacterial communication. Specifically, when Si-NP were surface functionalized with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD, then added to cultures of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, whose luminous output depends upon HSL-mediated quorum sensing, the cell-to-cell communication was dramatically reduced. Reductions in luminescence were further verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR analyses of luminescence genes. Binding of AHLs to Si-NPs was examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The results indicated that by delivering high concentrations of engineered NPs with associated quenching compounds, the chemical signals were removed from the immediate bacterial environment. In actively-metabolizing cultures, this treatment blocked the ability of bacteria to communicate and regulate quorum sensing, effectively silencing and isolating the cells. Si-NPs provide a scaffold and critical stepping-stone for more pointed developments in antimicrobial therapy, especially with regard to quorum sensing – a target that will reduce resistance pressures imposed by traditional antibiotics.

  7. Improvement of adherence and anticorrosion properties of an epoxy-polyamide coating on steel by incorporation of an indole-3 butyric acid-modified nanomagnetite

    OpenAIRE

    Trinh, Anh Truc; Nguyen, Thu Trang; Thai, Thu Thuy; To, Thi Xuan Hang; Nguyen, Xuan Hoan; Nguyen, Anh Son; Aufray, Maëlenn; Pébère, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In this study, synthesized magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles were treated with a corrosion inhibitor, indole-3 butyric acid (IBA) and incorporated in an epoxy-polyamide coating. The coating was applied on a carbon steel substrate. For comparison, coatings with- out particles or with nontreated Fe 3 O 4 particles were also prepared. The IBA-modified nanomagnetite (IBA–Fe 3 O 4 ) was characterized by infrared spec- troscopy and Zeta potential measurements. The inhibiti...

  8. Interplay between Dopamine and γ2- AminoButyric Acid type A receptors' surface dynamics during maturation of neurons and development of hippocampal networks.

    OpenAIRE

    Matias, Miguel Albino

    2015-01-01

    MATIAS, Miguel Albino - Interplay between Dopamine and γ2- AminoButyric Acid type A receptors' surface dynamics during maturation of neurons and development of hippocampal networks. Coimbra : [s.n.], 2015. Dissertação de Mestrado em Biologia Celular e Molecular. A dynamic synapse is crucial not only in the regulation of synaptic transmission but also for maturation and development of neurons and neuronal circuits. This is particularly important in the case of receptors, whic...

  9. Vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by cuttings: effects of leaf area and indole-3-butyric acid concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Solis

    Full Text Available Abstract The seeds of Plukenetia polyadenia have high levels of unsaturated fatty acids and are used as medicine and food for native people in the Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon. The objective of this study was to develop a method for vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by rooting of cuttings. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with 12 treatments and 3 replications of 8 cuttings, in a 3 × 4 factorial arrangement. The factors were: 3 levels of leaf area (25, 50 and 75% and 3 indole-3-butyric acid - IBA concentrations (9.84, 19.68 and 29.52mM and a control without IBA. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and means were compared by Tukey test at 5% probability. Our results show that the use of cuttings with 50% of leaf area and treatment with 29.52mM of IBA induced high percentages of rooting (93% and the best root formation. Vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by cuttings will be used as a tool to conserve and propagate germplasm in breeding programs.

  10. Vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by cuttings: effects of leaf area and indole-3-butyric acid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, R; Pezo, M; Diaz, G; Arévalo, L; Cachique, D

    2017-01-01

    The seeds of Plukenetia polyadenia have high levels of unsaturated fatty acids and are used as medicine and food for native people in the Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon. The objective of this study was to develop a method for vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by rooting of cuttings. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with 12 treatments and 3 replications of 8 cuttings, in a 3 × 4 factorial arrangement. The factors were: 3 levels of leaf area (25, 50 and 75%) and 3 indole-3-butyric acid - IBA concentrations (9.84, 19.68 and 29.52mM) and a control without IBA. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and means were compared by Tukey test at 5% probability. Our results show that the use of cuttings with 50% of leaf area and treatment with 29.52mM of IBA induced high percentages of rooting (93%) and the best root formation. Vegetative propagation of Plukenetia polyadenia by cuttings will be used as a tool to conserve and propagate germplasm in breeding programs.

  11. Optimization of conditions to achieve high content of gamma amino butyric acid in germinated black rice, and changes in bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiyavat CHAIYASUT

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study estimated the optimum germination conditions to achieve high content of Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA and other phytochemicals in Thai black rice cultivar Kum Payao (BR. The Box–Behnken design of response surface methodology was employed to optimize the germination conditions. The changes in the GABA, phytochemical content, impact of salt, and temperature stress variation on phytochemical content, and stability of GABA were studied. The results showed that 12 h of soaking at pH 7, followed by 36 h of germination was the optimum condition to achieve maximum GABA content (0.2029 mg/g of germinated BR (GBR. The temperature (8 and 30 °C, and salt (50-200 mM NaCl content affected the phytochemicals of GBR, especially GABA, and anthocyanins. Obviously, the antioxidant capability, and enzyme (α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibiting nature of BR was significantly (P < 0.001 increased after germination. The storage of GBR at 4 °C significantly, preserved the GABA content (∼80% for 45 days. Primarily, the current study revealed the changes in phytochemical content, and bioactivity of Thai black rice cr. Kum Payao during germination. More studies should be carried out on pharmacological benefits of GABA-rich GBR.

  12. Mechanical and thermal properties of eco-friendly poly(propylene carbonate)/cellulose acetate butyrate blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Chenyang; Wang, Hengti; Hu, Qiaoqiao; Xu, Fenfen; Cao, Xiaojun; You, Jichun; Li, Yongjin

    2013-02-15

    The eco-friendly poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC)/cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) blends were prepared by melt-blending in a batch mixer for the first time. PPC and CAB were partially miscible because of the drastically shifted glass transition temperatures of both PPC and CAB, which originated from the specific interactions between carbonyl groups and hydroxyl groups. The incorporation of CAB into PPC matrix enhanced not only tensile strength and modulus of PPC dramatically, but also improved heat resistance and thermal stability of PPC significantly. The tensile strength and the modulus of PPC/CAB=50/50 blend are 27.7 MPa and 1.24 GPa, which are 21 times and 28 times higher than those of the unmodified PPC, respectively. Moreover, the elongation at break of PPC/CAB=50/50 blend is as high as 117%. In addition, the obtained blends exhibited good transparency, which is very important for the package materials. The results in this work pave new possibility for the massive application of eco-friendly polymer materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Indole-3-butyric acid induces lateral root formation via peroxisome-derived indole-3-acetic acid and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicht, Markus; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Burbach, Christian; Volkmann, Dieter; Baluska, Frantisek

    2013-10-01

    Controlled plant growth requires regulation through a variety of signaling molecules, including steroids, peptides, radicals of oxygen and nitrogen, as well as the 'classical' phytohormone groups. Auxin is critical for the control of plant growth and also orchestrates many developmental processes, such as the formation of new roots. It modulates root architecture both slowly, through actions at the transcriptional level and, more rapidly, by mechanisms targeting primarily plasma membrane sensory systems and intracellular signaling pathways. The latter reactions use several second messengers, including Ca(2+) , nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we investigated the different roles of two auxins, the major auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and another endogenous auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in the lateral root formation process of Arabidopsis and maize. This was mainly analyzed by different types of fluorescence microscopy and inhibitors of NO production. This study revealed that peroxisomal IBA to IAA conversion is followed by peroxisomal NO, which is important for IBA-induced lateral root formation. We conclude that peroxisomal NO emerges as a new player in auxin-induced root organogenesis. In particular, the spatially and temporally coordinated release of NO and IAA from peroxisomes is behind the strong promotion of lateral root formation via IBA. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Multiple Facets of Arabidopsis Seedling Development Require 
Indole-3-Butyric Acid–Derived Auxin[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Lucia C.; Wheeler, Dorthea L.; Christensen, Sarah E.; Berens, John C.; Cohen, Jerry D.; Rampey, Rebekah A.; Bartel, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    Levels of auxin, which regulates both cell division and cell elongation in plant development, are controlled by synthesis, inactivation, transport, and the use of storage forms. However, the specific contributions of various inputs to the active auxin pool are not well understood. One auxin precursor is indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), which undergoes peroxisomal β-oxidation to release free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). We identified ENOYL-COA HYDRATASE2 (ECH2) as an enzyme required for IBA response. Combining the ech2 mutant with previously identified iba response mutants resulted in enhanced IBA resistance, diverse auxin-related developmental defects, decreased auxin-responsive reporter activity in both untreated and auxin-treated seedlings, and decreased free IAA levels. The decreased auxin levels and responsiveness, along with the associated developmental defects, uncover previously unappreciated roles for IBA-derived IAA during seedling development, establish IBA as an important auxin precursor, and suggest that IBA-to-IAA conversion contributes to the positive feedback that maintains root auxin levels. PMID:21406624

  15. [The evaluation of hormone and metabolite profiles after the infusion of glucose, propionate and butyrate in cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, H; Eulitz-Meder, C; Geldermann, H; Sallmann, H P

    1989-06-01

    Lactational performance in high-yielding dairy cows has its limits in metabolic processes. Energy metabolism is maintained by mobilization of body reserves via hormonal regulation, resulting in lipolysis and sometimes ketoacidosis. For characterization of such conditions the intraruminal and intravascular application of glucose and volatile fatty acids was used in ruminant physiology. On the other hand the results of such experiments were correlated to actual and potential milk yield. For this investigation pairs of monozygous Holstein Friesian twins were tested as heifers and as cows by intravenous infusion of glucose, propionate and butyrate after 18 hours of feed withdrawal. Insulin, growth hormone, glucose, free fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate were measured before, during and up to 4 hours after infusion of substrates. Each substrate caused a transient change in plasma concentrations of metabolites and hormones. Differences between heifers and cows are discussed with the time series of the mean concentrations. The reaction profile of each animal was characterized by different parameters. Analysis of these parameters revealed a close relation between hormones and metabolites even under the conditions of the load-test.

  16. Chemical chaperone 4-phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA) reduces hepatocellular lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity through induction of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissar, Ashraf U; Sharma, Love; Mudasir, Malik A; Nazir, Lone A; Umar, Sheikh A; Sharma, Parduman R; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Tasduq, Sheikh A

    2017-09-01

    Defective autophagy has been linked to lipotoxicity in several cellular models. We aimed to investigate autophagy in lipid-stimulated hepatoma (Huh7) cells and tested whether 4-phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA), a chemical chaperone, has a beneficial role in hepatic fat accumulation and lipotoxicity. We report that long-term (24 h) exposure of hepatocytes to palmitate block autophagic flux that leads to lipid accumulation and cell death. Western blotting analysis showed increased accumulation of SQSTM1/p62, and decreased expression of Beclin1 and Atg7 in palmitate-treated cells. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) in palmitate-treated cells neither increased SQSTMI/p62 accumulation nor cell death, thus suggesting complete blockade of autophagy by palmitate. 4-PBA reduced lipid accumulation and cell death that were associated with restoration of autophagy. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Atg7 and presence of autophagy inhibitors, 3-MA and chloroquine, resulted in the decrease in lipid-lowering effect of 4-PBA, suggesting that 4-PBA mediates its lipid-lowering effect via autophagy. Apoptotic parameters, including altered Bcl2:Bax ratio and PARP1 cleavage induced by palmitate, were improved by 4-PBA. Our results indicate that palmitate impairs autophagy and increases lipid accumulation in Huh7 cells, whereas 4-PBA plays a protective role in lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity through activation of autophagy. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Monitoring Lipase/Esterase Activity by Stopped Flow in a Sequential Injection Analysis System Using p-Nitrophenyl Butyrate

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    Jorge Pliego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipases and esterases are biocatalysts used at the laboratory and industrial level. To obtain the maximum yield in a bioprocess, it is important to measure key variables, such as enzymatic activity. The conventional method for monitoring hydrolytic activity is to take out a sample from the bioreactor to be analyzed off-line at the laboratory. The disadvantage of this approach is the long time required to recover the information from the process, hindering the possibility to develop control systems. New strategies to monitor lipase/esterase activity are necessary. In this context and in the first approach, we proposed a lab-made sequential injection analysis system to analyze off-line samples from shake flasks. Lipase/esterase activity was determined using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as the substrate. The sequential injection analysis allowed us to measure the hydrolytic activity from a sample without dilution in a linear range from 0.05–1.60 U/mL, with the capability to reach sample dilutions up to 1000 times, a sampling frequency of five samples/h, with a kinetic reaction of 5 min and a relative standard deviation of 8.75%. The results are promising to monitor lipase/esterase activity in real time, in which optimization and control strategies can be designed.

  18. Role of clevidipine butyrate in the treatment of acute hypertension in the critical care setting: a review

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    Ahmed S Awad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed S Awad, Michael E GoldbergDepartment of Anesthesiology, Cooper University Hospital, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Camden Campus, Camden, New Jersey, USAAbstract: Acutely elevated blood pressure in the critical care setting is associated with a higher risk of acute end-organ damage (eg, myocardial ischemia, stroke, and renal failure and perioperative bleeding. Urgent treatment and careful blood pressure control are crucial to prevent significant morbidity. Clevidipine butyrate (Cleviprex™ is an ultrashort-acting, third-generation intravenous calcium channel blocker. It is an arterial-selective vasodilator with no venodilatory or myocardial depressive effects. Clevidipine has an extremely short half-life of approximately 1 minute as it is rapidly metabolized by blood and tissue esterases. These metabolites are then primarily eliminated through urine and fecal pathways. The rapid onset and the short duration of action permit tighter and closer adjustment of the blood pressure than is possible with other intravenous agents.Keywords: calcium channel blocker, antihypertensive medications, end-organ damage, hypertensive crisis, hypertensive urgency

  19. Highly sensitive and ultrafast response surface acoustic wave humidity sensor based on electrospun polyaniline/poly(vinyl butyral) nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qianqian; Li, Yang; Yang, Mujie

    2012-10-20

    Polyaniline (PANi) composite nanofibers were deposited on surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator with a central frequency of 433 MHz to construct humidity sensors. Electrospun nanofibers of poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), poly(ethylene oxide), poly(vinylidene fluoride), poly(vinyl butyral) (PVB) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and humidity response of corresponding SAW humidity sensors were investigated. The results indicated that PVB was suitable as a matrix to form nanofibers with PANi by electrospinning (ES). Electrospun PANi/PVB nanofibers exhibited a core-sheath structure as revealed by transmittance electron microscopy. Effects of ES collection time on humidity response of SAW sensor based on PANi/PVB nanofibers were examined at room temperature. The composite nanofiber sensor exhibited very high sensitivity of ~75kHz/%RH from 20 to 90%RH, ultrafast response (1s and 2s for humidification and desiccation, respectively) and good sensing linearity. Furthermore, the sensor could detect humidity as low as 0.5%RH, suggesting its potentials for low humidity detection. Attempts were done to explain the attractive humidity sensing performance of the sensor by considering conductivity, hydrophilicity, viscoelasticity and morphology of the polymer composite nanofibers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of indole-butyric acid and kinetin on rooting of rose cuttings in winter and summer

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    Edward Borowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of indole-butyric acid, both alone and with a low concentration of kinetin, on the rooting of rose cuttings in winter and summer, is presented in this paper. The experiments were conducted using 500 and 1000 mg/l IBA with or without the addition of 5 mg/l kinetin. The growth regulators were applied by dipping the base of a cutting for 5 s in an aqueous solution of these substances. Cuttings 5-6 cm in length were made from the mid-part of a stem of a rose grown in a greenhouse. The experiments were carried out using 'Queen of Bermuda' and 'Baccara' cuttings. The investigations showed that treating rose cuttings rooted in winter with an IBA solution had a significant promotive effect on the quantity of rooted cuttings, number of formed roots on the cutting, as well as on the length of the longest root. A distinctive increase in the number of breaking buds was also seen on the cuttings treated with IBA. The IBA solution applied to cuttings rooted in the summer significantly decreased the number of rooted cuttings and breaking buds. However, no significant influence on the number and length of formed roots was found. Addition of kinetin to the IBA solutions did not have any effect on the rooting of rose cuttings either in winter or summer.

  1. Study of the levels of beta hydroxy butyrate, glucose, protein and albumin in Holstein cows with subclinical ketosis

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    B Amouoghli Tabrizi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to comparatively evaluate the levels of beta hydroxy butyrate (BHB, glucose, protein and albumin in serum of healthy Holstein cows and those with subclinical ketosis. In this survey, blood samples were collected at two stages from cows selected at 7 dairy farms in Shahriar province of Tehran. Five to 7 ml of blood were taken from the coccygeal vein of 100 cows during the last week of pregnancy when the animals were dry and once again 2 months after parturition from the same cows, their sera separated and the amounts of BHB, glucose, protein and albumin determined by enzymatic techniques and commercially available kits. With the cut point of BHB at 1.2, 1.4 and 1.7 mmol/lit, the percentage of cows affected with subclinical ketosis were 18, 14 and 4 percent, respectively. Mean levels of BHB in ketotic cows was significantly higher than healthy cows before and after parturition while mean levels of glucose, protein and albumin was significantly lower during the same periods (P

  2. Sodium butyrate into the insular cortex during conditioned taste-aversion acquisition delays aversive taste memory extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Jaramillo, Luis; Reyes-López, Julian; Miranda, María Isabel

    2014-04-16

    Histone acetylation is one mechanism that promotes gene expression, and it increases during learning of various tasks. Specifically, novel taste consumption produces an increased acetylation of histone lysine residues in the insular cortex (IC), where protein synthesis is crucial during memory consolidation of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). However, the role of this elevated histone acetylation during CTA learning has not been examined directly. Thus, the present study investigated the effects of sodium butyrate (NaBu), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, injected into the IC during CTA acquisition. Male Wistar rats, IC bilaterally implanted, were injected 60 min before saccharine presentation, with a total volume of 0.5 µl of NaBu solution (100, 500, and 10 µg/0.5 µl) or saline; 30 min later animals were injected intraperitoneally with lithium chloride, a malaise-inducing drug. The next day, CTA retrieval was tested. No effects of NaBu were observed during acquisition or retrieval, but during extinction trials, a significant delay in aversive memory extinction was observed in the group injected with the lowest NaBu dose. This result indicates that NaBu in the IC strengthens CTA and delays aversive memory extinction, and suggests that histone acetylation could increase long-term taste-aversive memory strength.

  3. Biodegradation improvement of poly(3-hydroxy-butyrate) films by entomopathogenic fungi and UV-assisted surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Felipe; Marconatto, Leticia; Rodrigues, Roberta da Silva Bussamara; Lando, Gabriela Albara; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Weibel, Daniel Eduardo

    2014-01-05

    Ultraviolet (UV)-assisted surface modification in the presence of oxygen was used as initial step to achieve controlled degradation of poly(3-hydroxy-butyrate), PHB, films by entomopathogenic fungi. Treated surfaces were investigated by surface analysis techniques (water contact angle, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy in Attenuated Total Reflectance mode, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, Gel Permeation Chromatography, Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and weight loss). After the UV-assisted treatments, new carbonyl groups in new chemical environments were detected by XPS and NEXAFS spectroscopy. The oxidizing atmosphere did not allow the formation of CC bonds, indicating that Norrish Type II mechanism is suppressed during or by the treatments. The higher hydrophilicity and concentration of oxygenated functional groups at the surface of the treated films possibly improved the biodegradation of the films. It was observed a clear increase in the growth of this fungus when oxygenated groups were grafted on the polymers surfaces. This simple methodology can be used to improve and control the degradation rate of PHB films in applications that require a controllable degradation rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Butyrate stimulates the growth of human intestinal smooth muscle cells by activation of yes-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Li-Na; Yan, Jun-Kai; Xiao, Yong-Tao; Wen, Jie; Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Ke-Jun; Wang, Yang; Cai, Wei

    2017-08-23

    Intestinal smooth muscle cells play a critical role in the remodeling of intestinal structure and functional adaptation after bowel resection. Recent studies have shown that supplementation of butyrate (Bu) contributes to the compensatory expansion of a muscular layer of the residual intestine in a rodent model of short-bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we found that the growth of human intestinal smooth muscle cells (HISMCs) was significantly stimulated by Bu via activation of Yes-Associated Protein (YAP). Incubation with 0.5 mM Bu induced a distinct proliferative effect on HISMCs, as indicated by the promotion of cell cycle progression and increased DNA replication. Notably, YAP silencing by RNA interference or its specific inhibitor significantly abolished the proliferative effect of Bu on HISMCs. Furthermore, Bu induced YAP expression and enhanced the translocation of YAP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, which led to changes in the expression of mitogenesis genes, including TEAD1, TEAD4, CTGF, and Cyr61. These results provide evidence that Bu stimulates the growth of human intestinal muscle cells by activation of YAP, which may be a potential treatment for improving intestinal adaptation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia by thin-section computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Isao [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kurashiki Central Hospital, 1-1-1 Miwa, Kurashiki 710-8602 (Japan); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: isaoito@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ishida, Tadashi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kurashiki Central Hospital, 1-1-1 Miwa, Kurashiki 710-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: ishidat@kchnet.or.jp; Togashi, Kaori [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: ktogashi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Niimi, Akio [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: niimi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Koyama, Hiroshi [General Internal Medicine, National Hospital Organization Kyoto Medical Center, 1-1 Fukakusa-Mukohatacho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto 612-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: hkoyama-kyt@umin.ac.jp; Ishimori, Takayoshi [Department of Radiology, Kurashiki Central Hospital, 1-1-1 Miwa, Kurashiki 710-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: ti10794@kchnet.or.jp; Kobayashi, Hisataka [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 1B40, MSC1088, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-1088 (United States)], E-mail: kobayash@mail.nih.gov; Mishima, Michiaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: mishima@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2009-12-15

    Background and objective: The management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depends, in part, on the identification of the causative agents. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of thin-section computed tomography (CT) in differentiating bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonia. Patients and methods: Thin-section CT studies were prospectively examined in hospitalized CAP patients within 2 days of admission, followed by retrospective assessment by two pulmonary radiologists. Thin-section CT findings on the pneumonias caused by each pathogen were examined, and two types of pneumonias were compared. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were produced. Results: Among 183 CAP episodes (181 patients, 125 men and 56 women, mean age {+-} S.D.: 61.1 {+-} 19.7) examined by thin-section CT, the etiologies of 125 were confirmed (94 bacterial pneumonia and 31 non-bacterial pneumonia). Centrilobular nodules were specific for non-bacterial pneumonia and airspace nodules were specific for bacterial pneumonia (specificities of 89% and 94%, respectively) when located in the outer lung areas. When centrilobular nodules were the principal finding, they were specific but lacked sensitivity for non-bacterial pneumonia (specificity 98% and sensitivity 23%). To distinguish the two types of pneumonias, centrilobular nodules, airspace nodules and lobular shadows were found to be important by multivariate analyses. ROC curve analysis discriminated bacterial pneumonia from non-bacterial pneumonia among patients without underlying lung diseases, yielding an optimal point with sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 79%, respectively, but was less effective when all patients were analyzed together (70% and 84%, respectively). Conclusion: Thin-section CT examination was applied for the differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonias. Though showing some potential, this examination at the present time would

  6. Simultaneous extraction and HPLC determination of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid in pea plant by using ionic liquid-modified silica as sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhian, Leila; Bina, Sedigheh

    2016-01-15

    In this study, ionic liquid-modified silica was used as sorbent for simultaneous extraction and preconcentration of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid in pea plants. The effect of some parameters such as pH and ionic strength of sample solution, amount of sorbent, flow rate of aqueous sample solution and eluent solution, concentration of eluent solution, and temperature were studied for each hormone solution. Percent extraction of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid was strongly affected by pH of aqueous sample solution. Ionic strength of aqueous phase and temperature showed no serious effects on extraction efficiency of studied plant hormones. Obtained breakthrough volume was 200mL for each of studied hormones. Preconcentration factor for spectroscopic and chromatographic determination of studied hormones was 100 and 4.0×10(3) respectively. Each solid sorbent phase was reusable for almost 10 times of extraction/stripping procedure. Relative standard deviations of extraction/stripping processes of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid were 2.79% and 3.66% respectively. The calculated limit of detections for IBA and IAA were 9.1×10(-2)mgL(-1) and 1.6×10(-1)mgL(-1) respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synergistic Effect of Sodium Butyrate and Thalidomide in the Induction of Fetal Hemoglobin Expression in Erythroid Progenitors Derived from Cord Blood CD133 + Cells

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    Ali Dehghanifard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of drugs with the ability to induce production of fetal hemoglobin as a novel therapeutic approach in treating β-Hemoglobinopathies is considered. γ-globin gene expression inducer drugs including sodium butyrate and thalidomide can reduce additional α-globin chains accumulation in erythroid precursors. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, MACS kit was used to isolate CD133+ cells of umbilical cord blood. Further, the effect of two drugs of thalidomide and sodium butyrate were separately and combined studied on the induction of quantitative expression of β-globin and γ-globin genes in erythroid precursor cells derived from CD133+ stem cells in-vitro. For this purpose, the technique SYBR green Real-time PCR was used.Results: Flow cytometry results showed that approximately 95% of purified cells were CD133+. Real-time PCR results also showed the increased levels of γ-globin mRNA in the cell groups treated with thalidomide, sodium butyrate and combination of drugs as 2.6 and 1.2 and 3.5 times respectively, and for β-globin gene, it is respectively 1.4 and 1.3 and 1.6 times compared with the control group (p<0.05.Conclusion: The study results showed that the mentioned drug combination can act as a pharmaceutical composition affecting the induction of fetal hemoglobin expression in erythroid precursor cells derived from CD133 + cells.

  8. Effects of ruminal ammonia and butyrate concentrations on reticuloruminal epithelial blood flow and volatile fatty acid absorption kinetics under washed reticulorumen conditions in lactating dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Adam Christian; Hanigan, M.D.; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2011-01-01

    and mesenteric, right ruminal, and hepatic portal veins. The experiment was designed with 2 groups of cows: 4 cows adapted to high crude protein (CP) and 4 to low CP. All cows were subjected to 3 buffers: butyric, ammonia, and control in a randomized replicated 3 × 3 incomplete Latin square design. The buffers...... (30 kg) were maintained in a temporarily emptied and washed rumen for 40 min. The initial concentration of VFA was 84.2 mmol/L. Butyrate was increased from 4 to 36 mmol/L in butyric buffer by replacement of acetate, and ammonia (NH3) was increased from 2.5 to 22.5 mmol/L in ammonia buffer...... liquid marker (Cr-EDTA), and initial and final buffer volumes were fitted to a dynamic simulation model. The model was used to estimate ruminal liquid passages, residual liquid, and water influx (saliva and epithelia water) for each combination of cow and buffer (n = 24). Epithelial blood flow increased...

  9. Structural characterization of N-linked oligosaccharides of laminin from rat kidney: changes during diabetes and modulation by dietary fiber and butyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Adishesha Puneeth; Nandini, Chilkunda D; Salimath, Paramahans V

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrates of laminin, a family of large multidomain glycoproteins, have been implicated in various cellular activities including maintaining the protein structure, its function and also basement membrane integrity. During the course of our investigation, we observed that purified laminin from kidneys of control, diabetic, and dietary fiber- and butyric acid-treated diabetic rats showed differences in binding to extracellular matrix components. This prompted us to determine whether there are structural changes in laminin oligosaccharides. In this study, we have characterized a few major N-linked oligosaccharides isolated from purified laminin in various experimental groups, viz. normal, diabetic and diabetic rats fed with dietary fiber and butyric acid. Sugar composition, as identified by GLC, revealed the presence of mannose, galactose and N-acetylglucosamine. In order to study fine structures of the oligosaccharides, N-linked oligosaccharides of laminin were released by Peptide-N-glycosidase F digestion, end-labeled with 2-anthranilic acid and fractionated by lectin affinity chromatography. Furthermore, structural elucidation carried out by MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis showed variations in the oligosaccharide sequence of laminin during diabetes which were altered by the feeding of dietary fiber and butyric acid. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  10. Effects of phenylbutazone, indomethacin, prostaglandin E2, butyrate, and glutamine on restitution of oxidant-injured right dorsal colon of horses in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rötting, Anna K; Freeman, David E; Constable, Peter D; Eurell, Jo Ann C; Wallig, Matthew A

    2004-11-01

    To study the effects of phenylbutazone, indomethacin, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), glutamine, and butyrate on restitution of oxidant-injured right dorsal colon of horses in vitro. Right dorsal colon from 9 adult horses euthanatized for reasons other than gastrointestinal tract disease. Mucosal segments from the right dorsal colon were injured via exposure to HOCl and incubated in Ussing chambers in solutions containing phenylbutazone, indomethacin, indomethacin and PGE2, glutamine, and butyrate. Transepithelial resistance and mucosal permeability to mannitol were measured, and all mucosal segments were examined histologically. The HOCl-injured mucosa had lower resistance and higher permeability to mannitol, compared with control tissue. Histologic changes were also evident. Resistance of HOCl-injured mucosa recovered partially during the incubation period, and glutamine improved recovery. Phenylbutazone and indomethacin increased resistance, but these increases were not significant. Butyrate and PGE2 had no effects, compared with nontreated HOCl-injured tissues. Mucosal permeability to mannitol was lower in glutamine-treated tissue, compared with nontreated tissue. Histologic changes reflected the resistance and permeability changes. According to our findings, phenylbutazone and indomethacin do not seem to interfere with restitution of oxidant-injured mucosa of equine colon in vitro, and glutamine could facilitate mucosal restitution.

  11. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

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    Vilar, Jose E-mail: vilar_jlu@gva.es; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings.

  12. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the Par......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  13. The Bacterial Microflora of Fish, Revised

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Austin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of numerous studies indicate that fish possess bacterial populations on or in their skin, gills, digestive tract, and light-emitting organs. In addition, the internal organs (kidney, liver, and spleen of healthy fish may contain bacteria, but there is debate about whether or not muscle is actually sterile. Using traditional culture-dependent techniques, the numbers and taxonomic composition of the bacterial populations generally reflect those of the surrounding water. More modern culture-independent approaches have permitted the recognition of previously uncultured bacteria. The role of the organisms includes the ability to degrade complex molecules (therefore exercising a potential benefit in nutrition, to produce vitamins and polymers, and to be responsible for the emission of light by the light-emitting organs of deep-sea fish. Taxa, including Pseudomonas, may contribute to spoilage by the production of histamines in fish tissue.

  14. Animal Models of Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is a disease of the cornea characterized by pain, redness, inflammation, and opacity. Common causes of this disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Animal models of keratitis have been used to elucidate both the bacterial factors and the host inflammatory response involved in the disease. Reviewed herein are animal models of bacterial keratitis and some of the key findings in the last several decades. PMID:21274270

  15. Animal Models of Bacterial Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Marquart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial keratitis is a disease of the cornea characterized by pain, redness, inflammation, and opacity. Common causes of this disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Animal models of keratitis have been used to elucidate both the bacterial factors and the host inflammatory response involved in the disease. Reviewed herein are animal models of bacterial keratitis and some of the key findings in the last several decades.

  16. Xylo-Oligosaccharides and Inulin Affect Genotoxicity and Bacterial Populations Differently in a Human Colonic Simulator Challenged with Soy Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, Claus T.; Petersen, Anne; Licht, Tine R.; Conlon, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    High dietary intakes of some protein sources, including soy protein, can increase colonic DNA damage in animals, whereas some carbohydrates attenuate this. We investigated whether inulin and xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) could be protective against DNA strand breaks by adding them to a human colonic simulator consisting of a proximal vessel (PV) (pH 5.5) and a distal vessel (DV) (pH 6.8) inoculated with human faeces and media containing soy protein. Genotoxicity of the liquid phase and microbial population changes in the vessels were measured. Soy protein (3%) was fermented with 1% low amylose cornstarch for 10 day followed by soy protein with 1% XOS or 1% inulin for 10 day. Inulin did not alter genotoxicity but XOS significantly reduced PV genotoxicity and increased DV genotoxicity. Inulin and XOS significantly increased butyrate concentration in the DV but not PV. Numbers of the key butyrate-producing bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly increased in the PV and DV by inulin but significantly decreased by XOS in both vessels. Other bacteria examined were also significantly impacted by the carbohydrate treatments or by the vessel (i.e., pH). There was a significant overall inverse correlation between levels of damage induced by the ferments and levels of sulphate-reducing bacteria, Bacteroides fragilis, and acetate. In conclusion, dietary XOS can potentially modulate the genotoxicity of the colonic environment and specific bacterial groups and short chain fatty acids may mediate this. PMID:24064573

  17. A Perspective on the Enhancer Dependent Bacterial RNA Polymerase

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    Nan Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we review recent findings and offer a perspective on how the major variant RNA polymerase of bacteria, which contains the sigma54 factor, functions for regulated gene expression. We consider what gaps exist in our understanding of its genetic, biochemical and biophysical functioning and how they might be addressed.

  18. Dependence of bacterial chemotaxis on gradient shape and adaptation rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Vladimirov

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of cellular behavior on multiple scales requires models that are sufficiently detailed to capture central intracellular processes but at the same time enable the simulation of entire cell populations in a computationally cheap way. In this paper we present RapidCell, a hybrid model of chemotactic Escherichia coli that combines the Monod-Wyman-Changeux signal processing by mixed chemoreceptor clusters, the adaptation dynamics described by ordinary differential equations, and a detailed model of cell tumbling. Our model dramatically reduces computational costs and allows the highly efficient simulation of E. coli chemotaxis. We use the model to investigate chemotaxis in different gradients, and suggest a new, constant-activity type of gradient to systematically study chemotactic behavior of virtual bacteria. Using the unique properties of this gradient, we show that optimal chemotaxis is observed in a narrow range of CheA kinase activity, where concentration of the response regulator CheY-P falls into the operating range of flagellar motors. Our simulations also confirm that the CheB phosphorylation feedback improves chemotactic efficiency by shifting the average CheY-P concentration to fit the motor operating range. Our results suggest that in liquid media the variability in adaptation times among cells may be evolutionary favorable to ensure coexistence of subpopulations that will be optimally tactic in different gradients. However, in a porous medium (agar such variability appears to be less important, because agar structure poses mainly negative selection against subpopulations with low levels of adaptation enzymes. RapidCell is available from the authors upon request.

  19. Effects of Aqueous Extract of Saffron on Gamma-Amino Butyric Acid Content in Rat Hypothalami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikpour Moghaddam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Preliminary studies revealed that 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a key and major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Evidence from many animal studies and even some clinical studies indicate that GABA is responsible for regulating behavior and also plays an important role in brain functions. Previous studies presented Glutamic acid decarboxylase as a catalyst for the conversion of glutamic acid to GABA. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of saffron on GABA content in the hypothalamus of rats. Materials and Methods Male rats weighing 190 - 210 g were used. They were maintained in a temperature-controlled room with a 12-hour light/dark illumination cycle. The rats were fed standard pellet feed and had access to water ad libitum. The animals were divided into three groups: The first group received a 250 µL intraperitoneal injection of 0.05 g/mL saffron (Group I. The second group received a 250 µL intraperitoneal injection of 0.1 g/mL saffron (Group II. The third group acted as the control and received only water (Group III. The time intervals chosen for this experiment were 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks following the administration of saffron. At least six animals were assigned to each experimental group. At each time interval, the animals were anaesthetized and brain tissue extracted, hypothalami separated and homogenized in PBS solution, rinsed with PBS, re-filtered, and centrifuged at 1200 g for 10 minutes. Results In this study, both doses of saffron (0.05 g/mL [Group I]; and 0.1 g/mL [Group II] caused significantly increased GABA content in each hypothalamus. GABA in Group I increased significantly compared to the control group (1.00 ± 0.05 [mean ± SD, n = 8] vs. 0.29 ± 0.05, mM. GABA in Group II also increased significantly compared to the control group (1.45 ± 0.07 [mean ± SD, n = 8] vs. 0.29 ± 0.05, mM. The effect of saffron on GABA was also dose dependent; the only exception occurring during the

  20. Effect of sodium butyrate on performance, immune status, microarchitecture of small intestinal mucosa and lymphoid organs in broiler chickens

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    Arbab Sikandar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aimed to examine the effect of sodium butyrate (SB on growth performance, immune status, organs weights, and microarchitecture of lymphoid organs and small intestine. Methods A total of 120, 1-d-old broiler chicks were distributed into the following four treatment groups: corn-soy based basal diet (BD without supplement (control, or the same BD supplemented with 0.1 g/kg zinc bacitracin (ZnB, 0.5 g/kg SB (SB-0.5, or 1.0 g/kg SB (SB-1, respectively. Six birds/group were killed on d-21 and d-35, and samples were collected. Results Cell-mediated immune response at 48 h post-Phytohemagglutinin-P injection, and antibody titer against Newcastle disease vaccine and sheep red blood cells on d-35 was noted higher (p<0.05 in SB-1 compared to ZnB and control. Lower (p<0.05 feed conversion ratio (FCR was attained by the supplemented groups. Thymus and spleen weighed more (p<0.05 in SB-1, and bursa registered more (p<0.05 weight in both SB groups compared to control. On d-21, areas of thymus medulla and spleen germinal centers were noted higher (p<0.05 in SB-1 group. The villus height and villus surface area increased (p<0.05 in duodenum and jejunum in both SB groups on d-21, and in SB-1 on d-35, respectively compared to ZnB and control. On d-21, number of goblet cells containing mucins of acidic nature increased (p<0.05 in all the segments of small intestines in SB-1 group compared to control, and on d-35 in ileum compared to other groups. Conclusion In conclusion, SB improved growth performance and immunity as well as modulated morphology of lymphoid organs and gut mucosa in broiler chickens.

  1. Biochemical changes in barberries during adventitious root formation: the role of indole-3-butyric acid and hydrogen peroxide

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    Ali Tehranifar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase (PPO, phenolic compounds and total sugars (TS were investigated during root formation in cuttings of Berberis vulgaris var. asperma (BVA and Berberis thunbergii var. atropurpurea (BTA treated with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA and IBA+H2O2. Rooting was observed on BTA cuttings but not on BVA cuttings. The BTA cuttings treated with IBA and IBA+H2O2 showed higher rooting percentages, number of roots, and root length over the control. Those treated with IBA+H2O2 recorded the lowest peroxidase activity after planting. BTA cuttings treated with IBA+H2O2 showed the highest peroxidase activity at 50 d after planting; BVA cuttings under different treatments showed no significant difference for peroxidase activity at planting time or up to 80 d after planting. PPO activity for the BTA cuttings in the control treatment was lower than for other treatments during root formation. The cuttings in the IBA and IBA+H2O2 treatments showed increased PPO activity from 0 to 50 d after planting and a slight decrease in PPO activity from 60 to 80 d after planting. PPO activity for the BVA cuttings was significantly lower than for BTA during root formation. The BTA cuttings treated with IBA and IBA+H2O2 showed the highest phenolic compound content during root formation. The BVA cuttings displayed higher TS than BTA during the initial stage of root formation. A comparison of the anatomical structure of easy-to-root and difficult-to-root cuttings indicated that physical inhibitors did not affect the rooting capacity of BVA.

  2. Effect of indole-3-butyric acid and Trichoderma harzianum Rifai on asexual cape gooseberry propagation (Physalis peruviana L.

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    Oscar Humberto Alvarado-Sanabria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth and development of cape gooseberry plants obtained from cuttings is affected by microorganisms in the substrate and by the concentration of plant growth regulators applied during planting. Using a factorial design, the effect of four concentrations of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA (0, 800, 1,200, and 1,600 mg L-1 and four suspensions of Trichoderma harzianum (0, 2·10(6, 3·10(6, and 4·10(6 cfu/mL on the growth of cape gooseberry cuttings was evaluated. Apical cuttings were used, 20 cm long, from 20-month-old plants of the Colombian ecotype, which were planted in pots (2 L using peat moss with burned rice husks as the substrate at a 3:1 ratio (v/v. The 800 mg L-1 of IBA application showed the highest accumulation of total dry mass (DM and root DM. Moreover, 800 mg L-1 of IBA resulted in the highest leaf chlorophyll content, showing significant differences from 1,600 mg L-1, which had the lowest value. The 3·10(6 cfu/mL suspension of T. harzianum caused a greater accumulation of root DM and total DM and a higher leaf area in the plants. The most favorable interaction between the factors, which favors the growth of cape gooseberry plants obtained from cuttings, was observed with the application of 800 mg L-1 of IBA and 3·10(6 cfu/mL of T. harzianum.

  3. Hyaluronan Mixed Esters of Butyric and Retinoic Acid Affording Myocardial Survival and Repair without Stem Cell Transplantation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Cantoni, Silvia; Cavallini, Claudia; Bianchi, Francesca; Valente, Sabrina; Frascari, Irene; Olivi, Elena; Aquaro, Giovanni D.; Bonavita, Francesca; Scarlata, Ignazio; Maioli, Margherita; Vaccari, Valentina; Tassinari, Riccardo; Bartoli, Antonietta; Recchia, Fabio A.; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Ventura, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Possible cardiac repair by adult stem cell transplantation is currently hampered by poor cell viability and delivery efficiency, uncertain differentiating fate in vivo, the needs of ex vivo cell expansion, and consequent delay in transplantation after the onset of heart attack. By the aid of magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and immunohistochemistry, we show that injection of a hyaluronan mixed ester of butyric and retinoic acid (HBR) into infarcted rat hearts afforded substantial cardiovascular repair and recovery of myocardial performance. HBR restored cardiac [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and increased capillary density and led to the recruitment of endogenous Stro-1-positive stem cells. A terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated that HBR-treated hearts exhibited a decrease in the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes. In isolated rat cardiomyocytes and Stro-1 stem cells, HBR enhanced the transcription of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, kdr, akt, and pim-1. HBR also increased the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor, suggesting that the mixed ester may have recruited both myocardial and Stro-1 cells also. An increase in capillarogenesis was induced in vitro with medium obtained from HBR-exposed cells. In the infarcted myocardium, HBR injection increased histone H4 acetylation significantly. Acetyl-H4 immunoreactivity increased in rat cardiomyocytes and Stro-1 cells exposed to HBR, compared with untreated cells. In conclusion, efficient cardiac regenerative therapy can be afforded by HBR without the need of stem cell transplantation or vector-mediated gene delivery. PMID:20097747

  4. Green tea phenolics inhibit butyrate-induced differentiation of colon cancer cells by interacting with monocarboxylate transporter 1

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    Sánchez-Tena, S.; Vizán, P.; Dudeja, P.K.; Centelles, J.J.; Cascante, M.

    2016-01-01

    Diet has a significant impact on colorectal cancer and both dietary fiber and plant-derived compounds have been independently shown to be inversely related to colon cancer risk. Butyrate (NaB), one of the principal products of dietary fiber fermentation, induces differentiation of colon cancer cell lines by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs). On the other hand, (−)-epicatechin (EC) and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), two abundant phenolic compounds of green tea, have been shown to exhibit antitumoral properties. In this study we used colon cancer cell lines to study the cellular and molecular events that take place during co-treatment with NaB, EC and EGCG. We found that (i) polyphenols EC and EGCG fail to induce differentiation of colon adenocarcinoma cell lines; (ii) polyphenols EC and EGCG reduce NaB-induced differentiation; (iii) the effect of the polyphenols is specific for NaB, since differentiation induced by other agents, such as trichostatin A (TSA), was unaltered upon EC and EGCG treatment, and (iv) is independent of the HDAC inhibitory activity of NaB. Also, (v) polyphenols partially reduce cellular NaB; and (vi) on a molecular level, reduction of cellular NaB uptake by polyphenols is achieved by impairing the capacity of NaB to relocalize its own transporter (monocarboxylate transporter 1, MCT1) in the plasma membrane. Our findings suggest that beneficial effects of NaB on colorectal cancer may be reduced by green tea phenolic supplementation. This valuable information should be of assistance in choosing a rational design for more effective diet-driven therapeutic interventions in the prevention or treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:23994611

  5. The standardized extract of Loeselia mexicana possesses anxiolytic activity through the γ-amino butyric acid mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; González-Carranza, Adolfo; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique; Huerta-Reyes, Maira; Navarro-García, Víctor M

    2011-11-18

    Loeselia mexicana (Lam.) Brand has been used in Mexican Traditional Medicine to treat "espanto" or "susto" (fear), which is a culturally affiliated syndrome whose symptomatology comprises loss of appetite, difficulty in sleeping, and also nausea and fatigue, with a sensation of fear or risk - real or imagined - to external stimuli. The anxiolytic effect of the standardized methanol extract of Loeselia mexicana, with regard to its content of coumarin daphnoretin, was researched utilizing the elevated plus maze (EPM) in order to demonstrate whether the biological effect produced by the plant is antagonized by drugs that block γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)ergic transmission. The methanolic extract of Loeselia mexicana (LmMeOH) was tested at different doses on the EPM and then the interaction of this extract was evaluated in the same model with different GABAergic drugs, such as flumazenil (FLU) 10mg/kg, bicuculline (BIC) 5mg/kg, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) 10mg/kg, and picrotoxin (PTX) 2mg/kg. The effect of all of these treatments was evaluated by means of the open field test (OFT). Coumarin content was measured by the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. The 200- and 400-mg/kg doses of methanolic extract containing 3.14 and 6.28 mg of daphnoretin, respectively, induced an anxiolytic effect in the EPM without modification of the spontaneous motor activity. The anxiolytic activity of 200mg/kg of methanolic extract in EPM-exposed mice was antagonized by PTX, BIC, and FLU, but not by PTZ. The data presented here indicate that the Loeselia mexicana Brand methanolic extract possesses a significant anxiolytic effect that appears to be mediated in part by activation of the GABAergic system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate on heroin seeking behavior in the nucleus accumbens in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Jin; Zhu, Hua-Qiang; Gao, Lei; Lai, Miao-Jun; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Liu, Hui-Fen

    2016-12-01

    Histone acetylation and other modifications of the chromatin are important regulators of gene expression and may contribute to drug-induced behaviors and neuroplasticity. Inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDAC) activity results in the change of some drug-induced behaviors,however, relatively little is known about the effects of HDAC inhibitors on heroin-seeking behavior. In the present study, male rats were trained to self-administer heroin under a FR1 schedule for consecutive 14 days, followed by 14 daily 2h extinction session in the operant chamber. After training, the heroin priming (250μg/kg) was introduced for the reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior. Pretreatment with sodium butyrate (NaB) (200 or 400mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of HDAC, failed to affect heroin self-administration. Additionally,systemic administration of NaB (400mg/kg, i.p.)increased significantly the reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by heroin priming when NaB administered 12h, but not 6h before the reinstatement test. The same effect was observed after the intracerebroventricular injection of NaB (5μL, 100μg/μL). Moreover, the levels of histone H3 acetylation at lysine 18(H3K18)and H4 acetylation at lysine 5 or lysine 8(H4K5 or H4K8)in the accumbens nucleus core and shell were remarkably increased during the reinstatement and were further strengthened after intracerebroventricular injection of NaB. These results demonstrated that activation of histone acetylation may be involved in the heroin-seeking behavior, and identifying these epigenetic changes will be critical in proposing a novel pharmacological strategy for treating heroin addiction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Hyaluronan mixed esters of butyric and retinoic acid affording myocardial survival and repair without stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Cantoni, Silvia; Cavallini, Claudia; Bianchi, Francesca; Valente, Sabrina; Frascari, Irene; Olivi, Elena; Aquaro, Giovanni D; Bonavita, Francesca; Scarlata, Ignazio; Maioli, Margherita; Vaccari, Valentina; Tassinari, Riccardo; Bartoli, Antonietta; Recchia, Fabio A; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Ventura, Carlo

    2010-03-26

    Possible cardiac repair by adult stem cell transplantation is currently hampered by poor cell viability and delivery efficiency, uncertain differentiating fate in vivo, the needs of ex vivo cell expansion, and consequent delay in transplantation after the onset of heart attack. By the aid of magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and immunohistochemistry, we show that injection of a hyaluronan mixed ester of butyric and retinoic acid (HBR) into infarcted rat hearts afforded substantial cardiovascular repair and recovery of myocardial performance. HBR restored cardiac [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and increased capillary density and led to the recruitment of endogenous Stro-1-positive stem cells. A terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated that HBR-treated hearts exhibited a decrease in the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes. In isolated rat cardiomyocytes and Stro-1 stem cells, HBR enhanced the transcription of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, kdr, akt, and pim-1. HBR also increased the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor, suggesting that the mixed ester may have recruited both myocardial and Stro-1 cells also. An increase in capillarogenesis was induced in vitro with medium obtained from HBR-exposed cells. In the infarcted myocardium, HBR injection increased histone H4 acetylation significantly. Acetyl-H4 immunoreactivity increased in rat cardiomyocytes and Stro-1 cells exposed to HBR, compared with untreated cells. In conclusion, efficient cardiac regenerative therapy can be afforded by HBR without the need of stem cell transplantation or vector-mediated gene delivery.

  8. Collective decisions among bacterial viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Richard; Mileyko, Yuriy; Voit, Eberhard; Weitz, Joshua

    2010-03-01

    For many temperate bacteriophages, the decision of whether to kill hosts or enter a latent state depends on the multiplicity of infection. In this talk, I present a quantitative model of gene regulatory dynamics to describe how phages make collective decisions within host cells. Unlike most previous studies, the copy number of viral genomes is treated as a variable. In the absence of feedback loops, viral mRNA transcription is expected to be proportional to the viral copy number. However, when there are nonlinear feedback loops in viral gene regulation, our model shows that gene expression patterns are sensitive to changes in viral copy number and there can be a domain of copy number where the system becomes bistable. Hence, the viral copy number is a key control parameter determining host cell fates. This suggests that bacterial viruses can respond adaptively to changes in population dynamics, and can make alternative decisions as a bet-hedging strategy. Finally, I present a stochastic version of viral gene regulation and discuss speed-accuracy trade-offs in the context of cell fate determination by viruses.

  9. Gut bacterial microbiota and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, M; Lagier, J-C; Yahav, D; Paul, M

    2013-04-01

    Although probiotics and antibiotics have been used for decades as growth promoters in animals, attention has only recently been drawn to the association between the gut microbiota composition, its manipulation, and obesity. Studies in mice have associated the phylum Firmicutes with obesity and the phylum Bacteroidetes with weight loss. Proposed mechanisms linking the microbiota to fat content and weight include differential effects of bacteria on the ef