WorldWideScience

Sample records for butanols

  1. Butanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Montoya, José; Linder, Sonja; Dürre, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an overview on bacterial butanol production and recent developments concerning strain improvement, newly built butanol production plants, and the importance of alternative substrates, especially lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The butanol fermentation using solventogenic clostridial strains, particularly Clostridium acetobutylicum, is a very old industrial process (acetone-butanol-ethanol-ABE fermentation). The genome of this organism has been sequenced and analysed, leading to important improvements in rational strain construction. As the traditional ABE fermentation process is economically unfavourable, novel butanol production strains are being developed. In this review, some newly engineered solvent-producing Clostridium strains are described and strains of which sequences are available are compared with C. acetobutylicum. Furthermore, the past and present of commercial butanol fermentation are presented, including active plants and companies. Finally, the use of biomass as substrate for butanol production is discussed. Some advances concerning processing of biomass in a biorefinery are highlighted, which would allow lowering the price of the butanol fermentation process at industrial scale.

  2. Butanol tolerance in microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramucci, Michael G.; Nagarajan, Vasantha

    2016-03-01

    Provided herein are recombinant yeast host cells and methods for their use for production of fermentation products from a pyruvate utilizing pathway. Yeast host cells provided herein comprise reduced pyruvate decarboxylase activity and modified adenylate cyclase activity. In embodiments, yeast host cells provided herein comprise resistance to butanol and increased biomass production.

  3. Catalytic Oxidative Dehydration of Butanol Isomers: 1-Butanol, 2-Butanol, and Isobutanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    such as n-octane, into mixtures of olefins (10). A rhodium/cerium catalyst has been proposed in the past to convert biodiesel into olefins (11). The...butanol, 2-butanol, and isobutanol using a millisecond contact time reactor. Both alumina foam and rhodium-alumina foam catalysts convert these four...olefins (6–8). The production of olefins from hydrocarbons, as well as other sources, such as biodiesel and C1- C3 alcohols, is well documented in

  4. Assessment of in situ butanol recovery by vacuum during acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanol fermentation is product limiting due to butanol toxicity to microbial cells. Butanol (boiling point: 118 deg C) boils at a greater temperature than water (boiling point: 100 deg C) and application of vacuum technology to integrated acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation and recovery may ...

  5. Adaptation of lactic acid bacteria to butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanol can be produced biologically through fermentation of various substrates by Gram-positive Clostridium species. However, to profitably produce butanol at industrial scales, new microbial biocatalysts with increased tolerance to butanol are needed. In this study we report the isolation and se...

  6. Butanol production by fermentation: efficient bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy security, environmental concerns, and business opportunities in the emerging bio-economy have generated strong interest in the production of n-butanol by fermentation. Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE or solvent) batch fermentation process is product limiting because butanol even at low concentra...

  7. Identification of butanol tolerant genes in Lactobacillus mucosae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanol, though in low concentrations, is produced biologically through fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass-derived substrates by Gram-positive Clostridium species. However, naturally available butanol fermenting microbes are sensitive to stress caused by increased production of butanol and the...

  8. Solvent (acetone-butanol: ab) production

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article describes production of butanol [acetone-butanol-ethanol, (also called AB or ABE or solvent)] by fermentation using both traditional and current technologies. AB production from agricultural commodities, such as corn and molasses, was an important historical fermentation. Unfortunately,...

  9. Butanol production from renewable biomass by clostridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Malaviya, Alok; Cho, Changhee; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-11-01

    Global energy crisis and limited supply of petroleum fuels have rekindled the worldwide focus towards development of a sustainable technology for alternative fuel production. Utilization of abundant renewable biomass offers an excellent opportunity for the development of an economical biofuel production process at a scale sufficiently large to have an impact on sustainability and security objectives. Additionally, several environmental benefits have also been linked with the utilization of renewable biomass. Butanol is considered to be superior to ethanol due to its higher energy content and less hygroscopy. This has led to an increased research interest in butanol production from renewable biomass in recent years. In this paper, we review the various aspects of utilizing renewable biomass for clostridial butanol production. Focus is given on various alternative substrates that have been used for butanol production and on fermentation strategies recently reported to improve butanol production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium of {l_brace}water + phenol + (1-butanol, or 2-butanol, or tert-butanol){r_brace} systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadlich de Oliveira, Leonardo [School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aznar, Martin, E-mail: maznar@feq.unicamp.b [School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) and binodal curve data were determined for the systems (water + phenol + tert-butanol) at T = 298.15 K, (water + phenol + 2-butanol) and (water + phenol + 1-butanol) at T = 298.15 K and T = 313.15 K by the combined techniques of densimetry and refractometry. Type I curve (for tert-butanol) and Type II curves (for 1- and 2-butanol) were found. The data were correlated with the NRTL model and the parameters estimated present root mean square deviations below 2% for the system with tert-butanol and lower than 0.8% for the other systems.

  11. Enhanced butanol production obtained by reinforcing the direct butanol-forming route in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Joungmin; Park, Jin Hwan; Im, Jung Ae; Eom, Moon-Ho; Lee, Julia; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung-Hee; Seung, Do Young; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-10-23

    Butanol is an important industrial solvent and advanced biofuel that can be produced by biphasic fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. It has been known that acetate and butyrate first formed during the acidogenic phase are reassimilated to form acetone-butanol-ethanol (cold channel). Butanol can also be formed directly from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) through butyryl-CoA (hot channel). However, little is known about the relative contributions of the two butanol-forming pathways. Here we report that the direct butanol-forming pathway is a better channel to optimize for butanol production through metabolic flux and mass balance analyses. Butanol production through the hot channel was maximized by simultaneous disruption of the pta and buk genes, encoding phosphotransacetylase and butyrate kinase, while the adhE1(D485G) gene, encoding a mutated aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase, was overexpressed. The ratio of butanol produced through the hot channel to that produced through the cold channel increased from 2.0 in the wild type to 18.8 in the engineered BEKW(pPthlAAD(**)) strain. By reinforcing the direct butanol-forming flux in C. acetobutylicum, 18.9 g/liter of butanol was produced, with a yield of 0.71 mol butanol/mol glucose by batch fermentation, levels which are 160% and 245% higher than those obtained with the wild type. By fed-batch culture of this engineered strain with in situ recovery, 585.3 g of butanol was produced from 1,861.9 g of glucose, with the yield of 0.76 mol butanol/mol glucose and productivity of 1.32 g/liter/h. Studies of two butanol-forming routes and their effects on butanol production in C. acetobutylicum described here will serve as a basis for further metabolic engineering of clostridia aimed toward developing a superior butanol producer. IMPORTANCE Renewable biofuel is one of the answers to solving the energy crisis and climate change problems. Butanol produced naturally by clostridia has superior liquid fuel characteristics and thus has

  12. Metabolic pathways of clostridia for producing butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheshlaghi, R; Scharer, J M; Moo-Young, M; Chou, C P

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide demand for energy has been the impetus for research to produce alcohol biofuels from renewable resources. This review focuses on the biosynthesis of butanol, which is regarded to be superior to ethanol as a fuel. Although acetone/butanol fermentation is one of the oldest large-scale fermentation processes, butanol yield by anaerobic fermentation remains sub-optimal. Metabolic engineering provides a means for fermentation improvements. Consequently, a comprehensive assessment of the intermediary enzymes involved in butanol formation from carbohydrates by the saccharolytic bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum and other closely allied clostridia was performed to provide guidelines for potentially enhancing butanol productivity. The activity of the enzymes, their regulation and contribution to the metabolic pathways was reviewed. Published kinetic data for each important enzymatic reaction were assessed. For most enzymatic reactions, the systematic investigation of the kinetic data and the properties of the enzymes led to the development of rate equations that were able to describe activity as the function of the substrates, products, and allosteric effectors.

  13. Integrated bioprocessing and simultaneous product recovery for butanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter describes process integration for butanol fermentation and simultaneous recovery. In the control non-integrated butanol fermentation, the concentration of this biofuel in excess to 30 g/L is rarely achieved due to its toxic nature. Such a low butanol concentration results in low react...

  14. Enhanced Butanol Production Through Adding Organic Acids and Neutral Red by Newly Isolated Butanol-Tolerant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cheng; Cao, Guangli; Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Ying; Song, Jinzhu; Cong, Hua; Zhang, Junzheng; Yang, Qian

    2016-12-01

    As alternative microorganisms for butanol production with high butanol tolerant and productivity are in high demand, one excellent butanol-tolerant bacterium, S10, was isolated and identified as Clostridium acetobutylicum S10. In order to enhance the performance of butanol production, organic acids and neutral red were added during butanol fermentation. Synergistic effects were exhibited in the combinations of organic acids and neutral red to promote butanol production. Consequently, the optimal concentrations of combined acetate, butyrate, and neutral red were determined at sodium acetate 1.61 g/L, sodium butyrate 1.88 g/L, and neutral red 0.79 g/L, respectively, with the butanol yield of 6.09 g/L which was 20.89 % higher than that in control. These results indicated that combination of adding organic acid and neutral red is a potential effective measure to improve butanol production.

  15. Acetone-butanol Fermentation of Marine Macroalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Urquhart, Lindsay A.; Gill, Gary A.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-03-01

    Mannitol and laminarin, which are present at high concentrations in the brown macroalga Saccharina spp., a type of kelp, are potential biochemical feedstocks for butanol production. To test their bioconversion potential, aqueous extracts of the kelp Saccharina spp., mannitol, and glucose (a product of laminarin hydrolysis) were subjected to acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum (ATCC 824). Both mannitol and glucose were readily fermented. Mixed substrate fermentations with glucose and mannitol resulted in diauxic growth of C. acetobutylicum with glucose depletion preceding mannitol utilization. Fermentation of kelp extract exhibited triauxic growth, with an order of utilization of free glucose, mannitol, and bound glucose, presumably laminarin. The lag in laminarin utilization reflected the need for enzymatic hydrolysis of this polysaccharide into fermentable sugars. The butanol and total solvent yields were 0.12 g/g and 0.16 g/g, respectively, indicating that significant improvements are still needed to make industrial-scale acetone-butanol fermentations of seaweed economically feasible.

  16. Comparative Autoignition Trends in Butanol Isomers at Elevated Pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Weber, Bryan W.

    2013-03-21

    Autoignition experiments of stoichiometric mixtures of s-, t-, and i-butanol in air have been performed using a heated rapid compression machine (RCM). At compressed pressures of 15 and 30 bar and for compressed temperatures in the range 715-910 K, no evidence of a negative temperature coefficient region in terms of ignition delay response is found. The present experimental results are also compared with previously reported RCM data of n-butanol in air. The order of reactivity of the butanols is n-butanol > s-butanol ≈ i-butanol > t-butanol at the lower pressure but changes to n-butanol > t-butanol > s-butanol > i-butanol at higher pressure. In addition, t-butanol shows preignition heat release behavior, which is especially evident at higher pressures. To help identify the controlling chemistry leading to this preignition heat release, off-stoichiometric experiments are further performed at 30 bar compressed pressure, for t-butanol at φ = 0.5 and φ = 2.0 in air. For these experiments, higher fuel loading (i.e., φ = 2.0) causes greater preignition heat release (as indicated by greater pressure rise) than the stoichiometric or φ = 0.5 cases. Comparison of the experimental ignition delays with the simulated results using two literature kinetic mechanisms shows generally good agreement, and one mechanism is further used to explore and compare the fuel decomposition pathways of butanol isomers. Using this mechanism, the importance of peroxy chemistry in the autoignition of the butanol isomers is highlighted and discussed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Development of a High Temperature Microbial Fermentation Processfor Butanol Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeor, Jeffery D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reed, David W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Daubaras, Dayna L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Vicki S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Transforming renewable biomass into cost competitive high-performance biofuels and bioproducts is key to US energy security. Butanol production by microbial fermentation and chemical conversion to polyolefins, elastomers, drop-in jet or diesel fuel, and other chemicals is a promising solution. A high temperature fermentation process can facilitate butanol recovery up to 40%, by using gas stripping. Other benefits of fermentation at high temperatures are optimal hydrolysis rates in the saccharification of biomass which leads to maximized butanol production, decrease in energy costs associated with reactor cooling and capital cost associated with reactor design, and a decrease in contamination and cost for maintaining a sterile environment. Butanol stripping at elevated temperatures gives higher butanol production through constant removal and continuous fermentation. We describe methods used in an attempt to genetically prepare Geobacillus caldoxylosiliticus for insertion of a butanol pathway. Methods used were electroporation of electrocompetent cells, ternary conjugation with E. coli, and protoplast fusion.

  18. Butanol biorefineries: Use of novel technologies to produce biofuel butanol from sweet sorghum bagasse (SSB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to produce butanol biofuel at a competitive price, agricultural residues such as SSB should be used. This feedstock was studied as a substitute to corn to lower feedstock costs and broaden beyond a food crop. In addition, cutting edge science & technology was applied. In these studies we us...

  19. Interaction between amylose and 1-butanol during 1-butanol-hydrochloric acid hydrolysis of normal rice starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiuting; Wei, Benxi; Zhang, Bao; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the interaction between amylose and 1-butanol during the 1-butanol-hydrochloric acid (1-butanol-HCl) hydrolysis of normal rice starch. The interaction model between amylose and 1-butanol was proposed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), (13)C cross polarization and magic angle spinning NMR analysis ((13)C CP/MAS NMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermalgravimetric analysis (TGA). GC-MS data showed that another form of 1-butanol existed in 1-butanol-HCl-hydrolyzed normal rice starch, except in the form of free molecules absorbed on the starch granules. The signal of 1-butanol-HCl-hydrolyzed starch at 100.1 ppm appeared in the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectrum, indicating that the amylose-1-butanol complex was formed. DSC and TGA data also demonstrated the formation of the complex, which significantly affected the thermal properties of normal rice starch. These findings revealed that less dextrin with low molecular weight formed might be attributed to resistance of this complex to acid during 1-butanol-HCl hydrolysis. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. pH-induced change in cell susceptibility to butanol in a high butanol-tolerant bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis strain CM4A

    OpenAIRE

    Kanno, Manabu; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Mitani, Yasuo; Kimura, Nobutada; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Though butanol is considered as a potential biofuel, its toxicity toward microorganisms is the main bottleneck for the biological butanol production. Recently, butanol-tolerant bacteria have been proposed as alternative butanol production hosts overcoming the end product inhibition. One remaining key issue to be addressed is how physicochemical properties such as pH and temperature affect microbial butanol tolerance during cultivation and fermentation. Results We investigated the p...

  1. Eco-efficient butanol separation in the ABE fermentation process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patraşcu, Iulian; Bîldea, Costin Sorin; Kiss, Anton A.

    2017-01-01

    Butanol is considered a superior biofuel, as it is more energy dense and less hygroscopic than the more popular ethanol, resulting in higher possible blending ratios with gasoline. However, the production cost of the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process is still high, mainly due to the

  2. Fermentative production of butanol: Perspectives on synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sonil; Golemi-Kotra, Dasantila; McDermott, John C; Dalai, Ajay K; Gökalp, Iskender; Kozinski, Janusz A

    2017-07-25

    Apprehensions relating to global warming, climate change, pollution, rising energy demands as well as fluctuating crude oil prices and supply are leading to a shift in global interest to find suitable alternatives to fossil fuels. This review aims to highlight the many different facets of butanol as an advanced next-generation transportation biofuel. Butanol has fuel properties almost on a par with gasoline, such as high energy content, low vapor pressure, non-hygroscopic nature, less volatility, flexible fuel blends and high octane number. The paper reviews some recent advances in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation with special emphasis on the primary challenges encountered in butanol fermentation, including butanol toxicity, solvent intolerance and bacteriophage contamination. The mechanisms for butanol recovery techniques have been covered along with their benefits and limitations. A comprehensive discussion of genetic and metabolic engineering of butanol-producing microorganisms is made for the prospective development of industrially-relevant strains that can overcome the technical challenges involved in efficient butanol production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Recovery of butanol from fermentation broth by pervaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanol can be produced by fermentation from corn, molasses or lignocellulosic biomass for use as a chemical or superior biofuel. However, butanol’s production is hampered by its toxicity to the microbial culture that produces it. In fermentation broths, final butanol concentrations typically range ...

  4. Butanol Production from Leftover Beverages and Sport Drinks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raganati, Francesca; Procentese, Alessandra; Montagnaro, Fabio; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: (1) to identify an alternative disposal process for the industry of high-sugar-content beverages (HSCBs) and (2) to contribute to the study of butanol production from non-edible feedstocks. HSCBs were used as a renewable feedstock to produce butanol by

  5. Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, David E. [Environmental Energy Inc., Blacklick, OH (United States); Yang, Shang-Tian [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2005-08-25

    Butanol replaced gasoline gallon for gallon in a 10,000 miles trip across the United States without the need to highly modify a ’92 Buick (your existing car today). Butanol can now be made for less than ethanol and yields more Btu’s from the same corn, making the plow to tire equation positive – more energy out than it takes to make it and Butanol is much safer. Butanol when substituted for gasoline gives better gas mileage and does not pollute as tested in 10 states. Butanol should now receive the same recognition as ethanol in U.S. legislation “ethanol/butanol”. There is abundant plant biomass present as low-value agricultural commodities or processing wastes requiring proper disposal to avoid pollution problems. One example is in the corn refinery industry, which processes more than 13% of the ~9.5 billion bushels (~240 million metric tons) of corn annually produced in the U.S. to produce high-fructose-corn-syrup, dextrose, starch, and fuel alcohol, and generates more than 10 million metric tons of corn byproducts that are currently of limited use and pose significant environmental problems. The abundant inexpensive renewable resources as feedstock for fermentation, and recent advances in the fields of biotechnology and bioprocessing have resulted in a renewed interest in the fermentation production of chemicals and fuels, including n-butanol. The historic acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum is one of the oldest known industrial fermentations. It was ranked second only to ethanol fermentation by yeast in its scale of production, and is one of the largest biotechnological processes ever known. However, since the 1950's industrial ABE fermentation has declined continuously, and almost all butanol is now produced via petrochemical routes (Chemical Marketing Reporter, 1993). Butanol is an important industrial solvent and is a better fuel for replacing gasoline – gallon for gallon than ethanol. Current butanol

  6. Evaluation of substrates for butanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The production was evaluated of ethanol, acetone, and butanol from several different carbohydrate materials by five strains of Clostridia and two mixed cultures. The substrates, which were tested at concn ranging between 2.5 and 10% w/v, included pentoses, hexoses, disaccharides, and polysaccharides. The organisms used were Clostridium acetobutylicum strains NRRL B527 and NRRL B3179; Clostridium butylicum strains NRRL B592 and NRRL B593; and Clostridium pasteurianum strain NRRL B598. The mixed cultures contained all of these organisms. Mixed culture 1 contained in addition to the Clostridia, Klebsiella pneumoniae strain NRRL B427. Mixed culture 2 contained mixed culture 1 plus a yeast isolated from kefir culture. Where possible, maxima were found for the conversion of different substrates. 7 tables.

  7. Improving butanol fermentation to enter the advanced biofuel market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Bryan P

    2012-12-11

    1-Butanol is a large-volume, intermediate chemical with favorable physical and chemical properties for blending with or directly substituting for gasoline. The per-volume value of butanol, as a chemical, is sufficient for investing into the recommercialization of the classical acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) (E. M. Green, Curr. Opin. Biotechnol. 22:337-343, 2011) fermentation process. Furthermore, with modest improvements in three areas of the ABE process, operating costs can be sufficiently decreased to make butanol an economically viable advanced biofuel. The three areas of greatest interest are (i) maximizing yields of butanol on any particular substrate, (ii) expanding substrate utilization capabilities of the host microorganism, and (iii) reducing the energy consumption of the overall production process, in particular the separation and purification operations. In their study in the September/October 2012 issue of mBio, Jang et al. [mBio 3(5):e00314-12, 2012] describe a comprehensive study on driving glucose metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum to the production of butanol. Moreover, they execute a metabolic engineering strategy to achieve the highest yet reported yields of butanol on glucose.

  8. DOMESTIC BUTANOL-PRODUCING STRAINS OF THE Clostridium GENUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Tigunova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to summarize the results of own research concerning obtaining butanol producing strains of Clostridium genus, to identify them by physiological, morphological and genetic methods. Further study of characteristics and biological features of the strains, and various approaches in biotechnological process of butanol production are discussed. The work includes methods to increase butanol accumulation by producer strains. Perspectives of using chemical mutagenesis in Clostridia as a method of increasing butanol production are considered. The feasibility of using non-food raw material as a substrate for fermentation is discussed. Different methods of pretreatment and their impact on the accumulation of butanol in the liquid medium are compared. Butanol accumulation is shown to increase significantly if the synthesis precursors are added as components of enzymatic medium, and the “reverse bard” is used to reduce waste production without affecting the level of butanol synthesis. The problem of conservation of producing strains is given, and protective medium for microorganisms during the freeze-drying is defined.

  9. Metabolic responses to ethanol and butanol in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongguang; Xiao, Peng; Shao, Qing; Qin, Huan; Hu, Zhangli; Lei, Anping; Wang, Jiangxin

    2017-01-01

    Microalgae have been demonstrated to be among the most promising phototrophic species for producing renewable biofuels and chemicals. Ethanol and butanol are clean energy sources with good chemical and physical properties as alternatives to gasoline. However, biosynthesis of these two biofuels has not been achieved due to low tolerance of algal cells to ethanol or butanol. With an eye to circumventing these problems in the future and engineering the robust alcohol-producing microalgal hosts, we investigated the metabolic responses of the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ethanol and butanol. Using a quantitative proteomics approach with iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS technologies, we detected the levels of 3077 proteins; 827 and 730 of which were differentially regulated by ethanol and butanol, respectively, at three time points. In particular, 41 and 59 proteins were consistently regulated during at least two sampling times. Multiple metabolic processes were affected by ethanol or butanol, and various stress-related proteins, transporters, cytoskeletal proteins, and regulators were induced as the major protection mechanisms against toxicity of the organic solvents. The most highly upregulated butanol response protein was Cre.770 peroxidase. The study is the first comprehensive view of the metabolic mechanisms employed by C. reinhardtii to defend against ethanol or butanol toxicity. Moreover, the proteomic analysis provides a resource for investigating potential gene targets for engineering microalgae to achieve efficient biofuel production.

  10. Strategies to Introduce n-Butanol in Gasoline Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magín Lapuerta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of oxygenated fuels in spark ignition engines (SIEs has gained increasing attention in the last few years, especially when coming from renewable sources, due to the shortage of fossil fuels and global warming concern. Currently, the main substitute of gasoline is ethanol, which helps to reduce CO and HC emissions but presents a series of drawbacks such as a low heating value and a high hygroscopic tendency, which cause higher fuel consumption and corrosion problems, respectively. This paper shows the most relevant properties when replacing ethanol by renewable n-butanol, which presents a higher heating value and a lower hygroscopic tendency compared to the former. The test matrix carried out for this experimental study includes, on the one hand, ethanol substitution by n-butanol in commercial blends and, on the other hand, either ethanol or gasoline substitution by n-butanol in E85 blends (85% ethanol-15% gasoline by volume. The results show that the substitution of n-butanol by ethanol presents a series of benefits such as a higher heating value and a greater interchangeability with gasoline compared to ethanol, which makes n-butanol a promising fuel for SIEs in commercial blends. However, the use of n-butanol in E85 blends substituting either gasoline or ethanol may cause cold-start problems due to the lower vapor pressure of n-butanol. For this reason, a combined substitution of n-butanol by both gasoline and ethanol is proposed so that n-butanol can be used without start problems.

  11. Metabolic responses to ethanol and butanol in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yongguang; Xiao, Peng; Shao, Qing; Qin, Huan; Hu, Zhangli; Lei, Anping; Wang, Jiangxin

    2017-01-01

    Background Microalgae have been demonstrated to be among the most promising phototrophic species for producing renewable biofuels and chemicals. Ethanol and butanol are clean energy sources with good chemical and physical properties as alternatives to gasoline. However, biosynthesis of these two biofuels has not been achieved due to low tolerance of algal cells to ethanol or butanol. Results With an eye to circumventing these problems in the future and engineering the robust alcohol-producing...

  12. Compressed liquid densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galicia-Luna, Luis A. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: lgalicial@ipn.mx; Camacho-Camacho, Luis E. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-02-15

    (p, {rho}, T) properties were determined in liquid phase for 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainty is estimated to be lower than {+-}0.2 kg . m{sup -3} for the experimental densities. Nitrogen and water were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. Experimental densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol were correlated with a short empirical equation and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations were reported. Published densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol are compared with values calculated with the BWRS EoS using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with available correlations for 1-butanol and 2-butanol.

  13. Excess volumes of 1-butanol, 2-butanol, 2-methylpropan-1-ol, and 2-methylpropan-2-ol with xylenes at 308.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, U.; Maken, S.; Singh, K.C. [Maharshi Dayanand Univ., Rohtak (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-09-01

    The excess volumes V{sup E} for 1-butanol or 2-butanol or 2-methylpropan-1-ol or 2-methylpropan-2-ol + o-xylene or m-xylene or p-xylene at 308.15 K have been measured over the whole range of composition. The V{sup E} vs composition curves are skewed toward the low concentration of butanol. For systems containing 1-butanol curves are sigmoids and V{sup E} values change sign in the 1-butanol (1) rich region (x{sub 1} > 0.8). For butanol + xylene systems V{sup E} values vary in the order 2-methylpropan-2-ol > 2-butanol > 2-methylpropan-1-ol > 1-butanol.

  14. Relationship between hydrogen gas and butanol production by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosseau, J.D.; Yan, J.Y.; Lo, K.V.

    1986-03-01

    Two simultaneous fermentations were performed at 26 degrees C with simultaneous inocula using Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum. Fermentation 1 prevented the gas formed by the biomass from escaping the fermentor while 2 allowed the gas formed to escape. Fermentor 1 provided for the production of butanol, acetone, and ethanol, while when the H/sub 2/ formed was allowed to escape with fermentor 2, neither butanol nor acetone were produced. Ethanol was also formed in both fermentors and began along with the initial growth of biomass and continued until the fermentations were complete. Butanol and acetone production began after biomass growth had reached a maximum and began to subside. The butanol-acetone-ethanol millimolar yields and ratios were 38:1:14 respectively. The fermentor 2 results show that a yield of 2.1 l H/sub 2/, 93 or 370 mmol H/sub 2//mol glucose, was formed only during the growing stage of growth; neither butanol nor acetone were produced; ethanol was formed throughout the fermentation, reaching a yield of 15.2 mmolar. It appears that hydrogen gas is required for butanol production during the resting stage of growth. 16 references.

  15. Salt effect on (liquid + liquid) equilibrium of (water + tert-butanol + 1-butanol) system: Experimental data and correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Milton A.P. [School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6066, Campinas-SP 13081-970 (Brazil); Aznar, Martin [School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6066, Campinas-SP 13081-970 (Brazil)]. E-mail: maznar@feq.unicamp.br

    2006-01-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for the quaternary systems (water + tert-butanol + 1-butanol + KBr) and (water + tert-butanol + 1-butanol + MgCl{sub 2}) were experimentally determined at T = 293.15 K and T = 313.15 K. For mixtures with KBr, the overall salt concentrations were 5 and 10 mass percent; for mixtures with MgCl{sub 2}, the overall salt concentrations were 2 and 5 mass percent. The experimental results were used to estimate molecular interaction parameters for the NRTL activity coefficient model, using the Simplex minimization method and a concentration-based objective function. The correlation results are extremely satisfactory, with deviations in phase compositions below 1.7%.

  16. Energy-efficient recovery of butanol from model solutions and fermentation broth by adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, N; Hughes, S; Maddox, I S; Cotta, M A

    2005-07-01

    This article discusses the separation of butanol from aqueous solutions and/or fermentation broth by adsorption. Butanol fermentation is also known as acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) or solvent fermentation. Adsorbents such as silicalite, resins (XAD-2, XAD-4, XAD-7, XAD-8, XAD-16), bone charcoal, activated charcoal, bonopore, and polyvinylpyridine have been studied. Use of silicalite appears to be the more attractive as it can be used to concentrate butanol from dilute solutions (5 to 790-810 g L(-1)) and results in complete desorption of butanol (or ABE). In addition, silicalite can be regenerated by heat treatment. The energy requirement for butanol recovery by adsorption-desorption processes has been calculated to be 1,948 kcal kg(-1) butanol as compared to 5,789 kcal kg(-1) butanol by steam stripping distillation. Other techniques such as gas stripping and pervaporation require 5,220 and 3,295 kcal kg(-1) butanol, respectively.

  17. Henry's law constants and infinite dilution activity coefficients of cis-2-butene, dimethylether, chloroethane, and 1,1-difluoroethane in methanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, isobutanol, tert-butanol, 1-pentanol, 2-pentanol, 3-pentanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-2-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyano, Yoshimori [Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts, 2640 Nishinoura, Tsurajimacho, Kurashiki 712-8505 (Japan)]. E-mail: miyano@chem.kusa.ac.jp; Kobashi, Takahiro [Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts, 2640 Nishinoura, Tsurajimacho, Kurashiki 712-8505 (Japan); Shinjo, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts, 2640 Nishinoura, Tsurajimacho, Kurashiki 712-8505 (Japan); Kumada, Shinya [Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts, 2640 Nishinoura, Tsurajimacho, Kurashiki 712-8505 (Japan); Watanabe, Yusuke [Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts, 2640 Nishinoura, Tsurajimacho, Kurashiki 712-8505 (Japan); Niya, Wataru [Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts, 2640 Nishinoura, Tsurajimacho, Kurashiki 712-8505 (Japan); Tateishi, Yoko [Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts, 2640 Nishinoura, Tsurajimacho, Kurashiki 712-8505 (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    Henry's law constants and infinite dilution activity coefficients of cis-2-butene, dimethylether, chloroethane, and 1,1-difluoroethane in methanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, isobutanol, tert-butanol, 1-pentanol, 2-pentanol, 3-pentanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-2-butanol in the temperature range of 250 K to 330 K were measured by a gas stripping method and partial molar excess enthalpies were calculated from the activity coefficients. A rigorous formula for evaluating the Henry's law constants from the gas stripping measurements was used for the data reduction of these highly volatile mixtures. The uncertainty is about 2% for the Henry's law constants and 3% for the estimated infinite dilution activity coefficients. In the evaluation of the infinite dilution activity coefficients, the nonideality of the solute such as the fugacity coefficient and Poynting correction factor cannot be neglected, especially at higher temperatures. The estimated uncertainty of the infinite dilution activity coefficients includes 1% for nonideality.

  18. pH-induced change in cell susceptibility to butanol in a high butanol-tolerant bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis strain CM4A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Manabu; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Mitani, Yasuo; Kimura, Nobutada; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Though butanol is considered as a potential biofuel, its toxicity toward microorganisms is the main bottleneck for the biological butanol production. Recently, butanol-tolerant bacteria have been proposed as alternative butanol production hosts overcoming the end product inhibition. One remaining key issue to be addressed is how physicochemical properties such as pH and temperature affect microbial butanol tolerance during cultivation and fermentation. We investigated the pH effect on butanol tolerance of a high butanol-tolerant bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis strain CM4A. The strain grew over a broad pH range (pH 4.0 to 12.0) and preferred alkaline pH (pH 8.0 and 10.0) in the absence of butanol. However, in the presence of butanol, strain CM4A grew better under acidic and neutral pH conditions (pH 6.0 and 6.8). Membrane fatty acid analysis revealed that the cells exposed to butanol exhibited increased cyclopropane and saturated fatty acids, which contribute to butanol tolerance of the strain by decreasing membrane fluidity, more evidently at acidic and neutral pH than at alkaline pH. Meanwhile, the strain grown under alkaline pH without butanol increased short chain fatty acids, which is involved in increasing membrane fluidity for alkaline adaptation. Such a change was not observed in the cells grown under alkaline pH with butanol. These results suggested that strain CM4A simultaneously exposed to butanol and alkali stresses was not likely able to properly adjust membrane fluidity due to the opposite response to each stress and thereby showed low butanol tolerance under alkaline pH. Indeed, the cells exposed to butanol at alkaline pH showed an irregular shape with disrupted membrane structure under transmission electron microscopy observation, which also indicated the impact of butanol and alkali stresses on functioning of cellular membrane. The study clearly demonstrated the alkaline pH-induced increase of cell susceptibility to butanol in the tested strain

  19. Crystallization of Esomeprazole Magnesium Water/Butanol Solvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skieneh, Jenna; Khalili Najafabadi, Bahareh; Horne, Stephen; Rohani, Sohrab

    2016-04-23

    The molecular structure of esomeprazole magnesium derivative in the solid-state is reported for the first time, along with a simplified crystallization pathway. The structure was determined using the single crystal X-ray diffraction technique to reveal the bonding relationships between esomeprazole heteroatoms and magnesium. The esomeprazole crystallization process was carried out in 1-butanol and water was utilized as anti-solvent. The product proved to be esomeprazole magnesium tetrahydrate with two 1-butanol molecules that crystallized in P6₃ space group, in a hexagonal unit cell. Complete characterization of a sample after drying was conducted by the use of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), ¹H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS). Investigation by ¹H-NMR and TGA has shown that the solvent content in the dried sample consists of two water molecules and 0.3 butanol molecules per esomeprazole magnesium molecule. This is different from the single crystal X-ray diffraction results and can be attributed to the loss of some water and 1-butanol molecules stabilized by intermolecular interactions. The title compound, after drying, is a true solvate in terms of water; conversely, 1-butanol fills the voids of the crystal lattice in non-stoichiometric amounts.

  20. Crystallization of Esomeprazole Magnesium Water/Butanol Solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Skieneh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The molecular structure of esomeprazole magnesium derivative in the solid-state is reported for the first time, along with a simplified crystallization pathway. The structure was determined using the single crystal X-ray diffraction technique to reveal the bonding relationships between esomeprazole heteroatoms and magnesium. The esomeprazole crystallization process was carried out in 1-butanol and water was utilized as anti-solvent. The product proved to be esomeprazole magnesium tetrahydrate with two 1-butanol molecules that crystallized in P63 space group, in a hexagonal unit cell. Complete characterization of a sample after drying was conducted by the use of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, infrared spectroscopy (IR, and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS. Investigation by 1H-NMR and TGA has shown that the solvent content in the dried sample consists of two water molecules and 0.3 butanol molecules per esomeprazole magnesium molecule. This is different from the single crystal X-ray diffraction results and can be attributed to the loss of some water and 1-butanol molecules stabilized by intermolecular interactions. The title compound, after drying, is a true solvate in terms of water; conversely, 1-butanol fills the voids of the crystal lattice in non-stoichiometric amounts.

  1. Development of a high temperature microbial fermentation process for butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeor, Jeffery D. St. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reed, David W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Daubaras, Dayna L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Vicki S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Transforming renewable biomass into cost-competitive high-performance biofuels and bioproducts is key to the U.S. future energy and chemical needs. Butanol production by microbial fermentation for chemical conversion to polyolefins, elastomers, drop-in jet or diesel fuel, and other chemicals is a promising solution. A high temperature fermentation process could decrease energy costs, capital cost, give higher butanol production, and allow for continuous fermentation. In this paper, we describe our approach to genetically transform Geobacillus caldoxylosiliticus, using a pUCG18 plasmid, for potential insertion of a butanol production pathway. Transformation methods tested were electroporation of electrocompetent cells, ternary conjugation with E. coli donor and helper strains, and protoplast fusion. These methods have not been successful using the current plasmid. Growth controls show cells survive the various methods tested, suggesting the possibility of transformation inhibition from a DNA restriction modification system in G. caldoxylosiliticus, as reported in the literature.

  2. Characteristics of Butanol Isomers Oxidation in a Micro Flow Reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Hamzah, Muhamad Firdaus

    2017-05-01

    Ignition and combustion characteristics of n-butanol/air, 2-butanol.air and isobutanol/air mixtures at stoichiometric (ϕ = 1) and lean (ϕ = 0.5) conditions were investigated in a micro flow reactor with a controlled temperature profile from 323 K to 1313 K, under atmospheric pressure. Sole distinctive weak flame was observed for each mixture, with inlet fuel/air mixture velocity set low at 2 cm/s. One-dimensional computation with comprehensive chemistry and transport was conducted. At low mixture velocities, one-stage oxidation was confirmed from heat release rate profiles, which was broadly in agreement with the experimental results. The weak flame positions were congruent with literature describing reactivity of the butanol isomers. These weak flame responses were also found to mirror the trend in Anti-Knock Indexes of the butanol isomers. Flux and sensitivity analyses were performed to investigate the fuel oxidation pathways at low and high temperatures. Further computational investigations on oxidation of butanol isomers at higher pressure of 5 atm indicated two-stage oxidation through the heat release rate profiles. Low temperature chemistry is accentuated in the region near the first weak cool flame for oxidation under higher pressure, and its impact on key species – such as hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide and carbon monoxide – were considered. Both experimental and computational findings demonstrate the advantage of employing the micro flow reactor in investigating oxidation processes in the temperature region of interest along the reactor channel. By varying physical conditions such as pressure, the micro flow reactor system is proven to be highly beneficial in elucidating oxidation behavior of butanol isomers in conditions in engines such as those that mirror HCCI operations.

  3. Evaluation of hydrophobic micro-zeolite-mixed matrix membrane and integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation for enhanced butanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chuang; Yang, Decai; Du, Guangqing; Chen, Lijie; Ren, Jiangang; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-01-01

    Butanol is regarded as an advanced biofuel that can be derived from renewable biomass. However, the main challenge for microbial butanol production is low butanol titer, yield and productivity, leading to intensive energy consumption in product recovery. Various alternative separation technologies such as extraction, adsorption and gas stripping, etc., could be integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation with improving butanol productivity, but their butanol selectivities are not satisfactory. The membrane-based pervaporation technology is recently attracting increasing attention since it has potentially desirable butanol selectivity. The performance of the zeolite-mixed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes were evaluated to recover butanol from butanol/water binary solution as well as fermentation broth in the integrated ABE fermentation system. The separation factor and butanol titer in permeate of the zeolite-mixed PDMS membrane were up to 33.0 and 334.6 g/L at 80°C, respectively, which increased with increasing zeolite loading weight in the membrane as well as feed temperature. The enhanced butanol separation factor was attributed to the hydrophobic zeolites with large pore size providing selective routes preferable for butanol permeation. In fed-batch fermentation incorporated with pervaporation, 54.9 g/L ABE (34.5 g/L butanol, 17.0 g/L acetone and 3.4 g/L ethanol) were produced from 172.3 g/L glucose. The overall butanol productivity and yield increased by 16.0 and 11.1%, respectively, which was attributed to the alleviated butanol inhibition by pervaporation and reassimilation of acids for ABE production. The zeolite-mixed membrane produced a highly concentrated condensate containing 169.6 g/L butanol or 253.3 g/L ABE, which after phase separation easily gave the final product containing >600 g/L butanol. Zeolite loading in the PDMS matrix was attributed to improving the pervaporative performance of the membrane, showing great

  4. Esterification of maleic acid and butanol using cationic exchange ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dibutyl maleate is a perfumery ester used as an intermediate in the production of paints, adhesives, and copolymers. Esterification of maleic acid and butanol was studied in presence of acidic cation exchange resin as a catalyst. The objective of this work was to test the suitability and efficacy of heterogeneous catalystssuch ...

  5. Metabolic engineering toward 1-butanol derivatives in solvent producing clostridia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemerink, M.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Chapter 1 of this thesis gives an overview about the history of the acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The responsible solventogenic clostridia with their central metabolism are briefly discussed. Despite the fact that scientific research on the key organisms of the ABE process has

  6. Effects of n-butanol on barley microspore embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Ana Maria; Nielsen, Nanna; Jensen, Anni

    2014-01-01

    Doubled haploid (DH) production is an efficient tool in barley breeding, but efficiency of DH methods is not consistent. Hence, the aim of this study was to study the effect of n-butanol application on DH barley plant production efficiency. Five elite cultivars of barley and thirteen breeding...

  7. Esterification of maleic acid and butanol using cationic exchange ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AARTI MULAY

    2017-11-15

    Nov 15, 2017 ... Abstract. Dibutyl maleate is a perfumery ester used as an intermediate in the production of paints, adhesives, and copolymers. Esterification of maleic acid and butanol was studied in presence of acidic cation exchange resin as a catalyst. The objective of this work was to test the suitability and efficacy of ...

  8. LYOPHILIZATION EFFECT ON PRODUCTIVITY OF BUTANOL-PRODUCING STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Tigunova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of lyophilization effect on the productivity of butanol-producing strains was the aim of our research. For this purpose we used butanol-producing strains; technical glycerol; biomass of switchgrass Panicum virgatum L. Lyophilization was performed using a lyophilization-drying. The effect of the protective medium on residual moisture of freezedrying cultures suspensions depending on the concentration of glucose and sucrose was studed. It was shown that the lowest residual moisture was attained by using glucose and sucrose in amount of 10% and if the samples of freeze-drying bacteria had been saved for one month at 4 οC the productivity did not decrease. As temperature preservation was increased the productivity of the cultures was gradually decreased and it was greatly reduced at 30 οC. So the protective medium composition was optimized for lyophilization of butanol-producing strains as follows: sucrose 10.0%; gelatin 10.0%; agar 0.02%. It was shown that the preservation of samples of freeze-drying bacteria for six months at a temperature of 4 οC did not affect the productivity of strains. It was found that cultures could use glycerol as a carbon source for butanol accumulation before lyophilization.

  9. Intermediate species measurement during iso-butanol auto-ignition

    KAUST Repository

    Ji, Weiqi

    2015-10-01

    © 2015 The Combustion Institute.Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This work presents the time histories of intermediate species during the auto-ignition of iso-butanol at high pressure and intermediate temperature conditions obtained using a rapid compression machine and recently developed fast sampling system. Iso-butanol ignition delays were acquired for iso-butanol/O2 mixture with an inert/O2 ratio of 7.26, equivalence ratio of 0.4, in the temperature range of 840-950 K and at pressure of 25 bar. Fast sampling and gas chromatography were used to acquire and quantify the intermediate species during the ignition delay of the same mixture at P = 25.3 bar and T = 905 K. The ignition delay times and quantitative measurements of the mole fraction time histories of methane, ethene, propene, iso-butene, iso-butyraldehyde, iso-butanol, and carbon monoxide were compared with predictions from the detailed mechanisms developed by Sarathy et al., Merchant et al., and Cai et al. It is shown that while the Sarathy mechanism well predicts the overall ignition delay time, it overpredicts ethene by a factor of 6-10, underpredicts iso-butene by a factor of 2, and overpredicts iso-butyraldehyde by a factor of 2. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were carried out to identify the reactions responsible for the observed inadequacy. The rates of iso-butanol hydrogen atom abstraction by OH radical and the beta-scission reactions of hydroxybutyl radicals were updated based on recently published quantum calculation results. Significant improvements were achieved in predicting ignition delay at high pressures (25 and 30 bar) and the species concentrations of ethene and iso-butene. However, the updated mechanism still overpredicts iso-butyraldehyde concentrations. Also, the updated mechanism degrades the prediction in ignition delay at lower pressure (15 bar) compared to the original mechanism developed by Sarathy et al.

  10. Bioproduction of butanol in bioreactors: new insights from simultaneous in situ butanol recovery to eliminate product toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simultaneous acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii 260 and in situ product recovery was investigated using a vacuum process operated in two modes: continuous and intermittent. Integrated batch fermentations and ABE recovery were conducted at 37 deg C using a 14-L bio...

  11. Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-31

    Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

  12. A novel in situ gas stripping-pervaporation process integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation for hyper n-butanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chuang; Liu, Fangfang; Xu, Mengmeng; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Lijie; Ren, Jiangang; Bai, Fengwu; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Butanol is considered as an advanced biofuel, the development of which is restricted by the intensive energy consumption of product recovery. A novel two-stage gas stripping-pervaporation process integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was developed for butanol recovery, with gas stripping as the first-stage and pervaporation as the second-stage using the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixed matrix membrane (MMM). Compared to batch fermentation without butanol recovery, more ABE (27.5 g/L acetone, 75.5 g/L butanol, 7.0 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced in the fed-batch fermentation, with a higher butanol productivity (0.34 g/L · h vs. 0.30 g/L · h) due to reduced butanol inhibition by butanol recovery. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 155.6 g/L butanol (199.9 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 610.8 g/L butanol (656.1 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 85.6 g/L butanol (129.7 g/L ABE). Fed with the aqueous phase of the condensate from first-stage gas stripping, the second-stage pervaporation using the CNTs-PDMS MMM produced a condensate containing 441.7 g/L butanol (593.2 g/L ABE), which after mixing with the organic phase from gas stripping gave a highly concentrated product containing 521.3 g/L butanol (622.9 g/L ABE). The outstanding performance of CNTs-PDMS MMM can be attributed to the hydrophobic CNTs giving an alternative route for mass transport through the inner tubes or along the smooth surface of CNTs. This gas stripping-pervaporation process with less contaminated risk is thus effective in increasing butanol production and reducing energy consumption. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Acetone-butanol fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates for the butanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Tatyana; Semyonov, Sergey

    2017-11-01

    It is known that the use of lignocellulosic hydrolysates reduces the production cost of biofuel such as biobutanol and bioethanol. But for the most successful application of the hydrolysates for the biofuel production, it is necessary to apply an inexpensive and effective detoxification method and to use of cost-effective growth factors. In the present study, we evaluated the use of an acid hydrolysate of spruce and an enzymatic hydrolysate of miscanthus cellulose for the biobutanol production. To remove inhibitors from the hydrolysates, we applied the traditional physicochemical method with overliming and the biodetoxification method based on the use of the specially adapted activated sludge. Calcium hydroxide (150 g/L) was used for the neutralization. The biological method of detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates was carried out under non-sterile conditions at room temperature by the specially adapted activated sludge of the urban wastewater treatment plants. The acetone-butanol fermentation was carried out by a strain of bacteria Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The treatment by overliming removed 84-85 % and 83-86% of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and furfural from the hydrolysates respectively. Using the method of biodetoxification the content of furfural decreased by 98% and concentration of 5-HMF - by 97-99%. In the present study as an inexpensive source of growth substances for the fermentation of the hydrolysates it has been suggested to use decantate of the brewer's spent grain. The obtained results showed that the brewer's spent grain can be used in the biofuel production as efficiently as the synthetic growth substances.

  14. System-level modeling of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen; Seo, Seung-Oh; Lu, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is a metabolic process of clostridia that produces bio-based solvents including butanol. It is enabled by an underlying metabolic reaction network and modulated by cellular gene regulation and environmental cues. Mathematical modeling has served as a valuable strategy to facilitate the understanding, characterization and optimization of this process. In this review, we highlight recent advances in system-level, quantitative modeling of ABE fermentation. We begin with an overview of integrative processes underlying the fermentation. Next we survey modeling efforts including early simple models, models with a systematic metabolic description, and those incorporating metabolism through simple gene regulation. Particular focus is given to a recent system-level model that integrates the metabolic reactions, gene regulation and environmental cues. We conclude by discussing the remaining challenges and future directions towards predictive understanding of ABE fermentation. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Manganese-Catalyzed Upgrading of Ethanol into 1-Butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shaomin; Shao, Zhihui; Wang, Yujie; Liu, Qiang

    2017-08-30

    Biomass-derived ethanol is an important renewable feedstock. Its conversion into high-quality biofuels is a promising route to replace fossil resources. Herein, an efficient manganese-catalyzed Guerbet-type condensation reaction of ethanol to form 1-butanol was explored. This is the first example of upgrading ethanol into higher alcohols using a homogeneous non-noble-metal catalyst. This process proceeded selectively in the presence of a well-defined manganese pincer complex at the parts per million (ppm) level. The developed reaction represents a sustainable synthesis of 1-butanol with excellent turnover number (>110 000) and turnover frequency (>3000 h(-1)). Moreover, mechanistic studies including control experiments, NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography identified the essential role of the "N-H moiety" of the manganese catalysts and the major reaction intermediates related to the catalytic cycle.

  16. Engineering Escherichia coli for autoinducible production of n-butanol

    OpenAIRE

    Qinglong Wang; Yi ding; Li Liu; Jiping Shi; Junsong Sun; Yongchang Xue

    2015-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli does not produce n-butanol naturally, but can be butanologenic when related enzymes were expressed using inducible elements on plasmids. In this study we attempted to confer E. coli strain capability of automatic excretion of the chemical by employing a native anaerobic promoter. Also, a novel DNA kit was designed for PCR preparation of linear DNA fragments to perform strain modification. The kit is primarily composed of two mother vectors, co-transformation of li...

  17. Promoting the Synthesis of Ethanol and Butanol by Salicylic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Jinxin Zou; Lei Wang; Peijun Ji

    2017-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were functionalized with salicylic acid (SA). The copper-cobalt catalyst was impregnated on the SA functionalized MWCNTs (SA-MWCNTs). The catalyst copper-cobalt/SA-MWCNTs was used to catalyze the synthesis of alcohols from synthesis gas. Salicylic acid can promote the synthesis of ethanol and butanol from synthesis gas, thus reducing the synthesis of methanol. This work demonstrated that salicylic acid not only can be used to functionalize carbon nanotube...

  18. Integrated butanol recovery for an advanced biofuel: current state and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chuang; Zhao, Jing-Bo; Chen, Li-Jie; Bai, Feng-Wu; Yang, Shang-Tian; Sun, Jian-Xin

    2014-04-01

    Butanol has recently gained increasing interest due to escalating prices in petroleum fuels and concerns on the energy crisis. However, the butanol production cost with conventional acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium spp. was higher than that of petrochemical processes due to the low butanol titer, yield, and productivity in bioprocesses. In particular, a low butanol titer usually leads to an extremely high recovery cost. Conventional biobutanol recovery by distillation is an energy-intensive process, which has largely restricted the economic production of biobutanol. This article thus reviews the latest studies on butanol recovery techniques including gas stripping, liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption, and membrane-based techniques, which can be used for in situ recovery of inhibitory products to enhance butanol production. The productivity of the fermentation system is improved efficiently using the in situ recovery technology; however, the recovered butanol titer remains low due to the limitations from each one of these recovery technologies, especially when the feed butanol concentration is lower than 1 % (w/v). Therefore, several innovative multi-stage hybrid processes have been proposed and are discussed in this review. These hybrid processes including two-stage gas stripping and multi-stage pervaporation have high butanol selectivity, considerably higher energy and production efficiency, and should outperform the conventional processes using single separation step or method. The development of these new integrated processes will give a momentum for the sustainable production of industrial biobutanol.

  19. Recent advances to improve fermentative butanol production: genetic engineering and fermentation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jin; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Wang, Qunhui; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Butanol has recently attracted attention as an alternative biofuel because of its various advantages over other biofuels. Many researchers have focused on butanol fermentation with renewable and sustainable resources, especially lignocellulosic materials, which has provided significant progress in butanol fermentation. However, there are still some drawbacks in butanol fermentation in terms of low butanol concentration and productivity, high cost of feedstock and product inhibition, which makes butanol fermentation less competitive than the production of other biofuels. These hurdles are being resolved in several ways. Genetic engineering is now available for improving butanol yield and butanol ratio through overexpression, knock out/down, and insertion of genes encoding key enzymes in the metabolic pathway of butanol fermentation. In addition, there are also many strategies to improve fermentation technology, such as multi-stage continuous fermentation, continuous fermentation integrated with immobilization and cell recycling, and the inclusion of additional organic acids or electron carriers to change metabolic flux. This review focuses on the most recent advances in butanol fermentation especially from the perspectives of genetic engineering and fermentation technology. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS AFTER EXPLOSIVE AUTOHYDROLYSIS AS SUBSTRATE TO BUTANOL OBTAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigunova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was investigation of the effect of the explosive autohydrolysis on lignocellulosic biomass (saving, switchgrass biomass for consequent use as a substrate to produce biofuels such as butanol. Butanol-producing strains, switchgrass Panicum virgatum L. biomass and its components after autohydrolysis were used in study. The thermobaric pressure pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass was carried out using specially designed equipment. The effect of explosive autohydrolysis on lignocellulosic biomass for further use in producing biofuels using microbial conversion was studied. Components of lignocellulosic biomass were fractionated after undergoing thermobaric treatment. The possibility of using different raw material components after using explosive autohydrolysis processing to produce biobutanol was found. Products of switchgrass biomass autohydrolysis were shown to need further purification before fermentation from furfural formed by thermobaric pretreatment and inhibiting the growth of microorganisms. The ability of strains of the genus Clostridium to use cellulose as a substrate for fermentation was proved. It was found that using explosive autohydrolysis pretreatment to savings allowed boosting the butanol accumulation by 2 times.

  1. Bioproduction of butanol in bioreactors: new insights from simultaneous in situ butanol recovery to eliminate product toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Adriano Pinto; Qureshi, Nasib; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2011-08-01

    Simultaneous acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii P260 and in situ product recovery was investigated using a vacuum process operated in two modes: continuous and intermittent. Integrated batch fermentations and ABE recovery were conducted at 37 °C using a 14-L bioreactor (7.0 L fermentation volume) containing initial substrate (glucose) concentration of 60 g/L. The bioreactor was connected in series with a condensation system and vacuum pump. Vacuum was applied continuously or intermittently with 1.5 h vacuum sessions separated by 4, 6, and 8 h intervals. A control ABE fermentation experiment was characterized by incomplete glucose utilization due to butanol toxicity to C. beijerinckii P260, while fermentation coupled with in situ recovery by both continuous and intermittent vacuum modes resulted in complete utilization of glucose, greater productivity, improved cell growth, and concentrated recovered ABE stream. These results demonstrate that vacuum technology can be applied to integrated ABE fermentation and recovery even though the boiling point of butanol is greater than that of water. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Acoustic and Volumetric Properties of Mixture of (N,N-Dimethylacetamide + Ethyl Acrylate) with 1-Butanol or iso-Butanol or t-Butanol at 308.15 K

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kondaiah; Sreekanth, K.; D. Sravana Kumar; Krishna Rao, D.

    2014-01-01

    Densities, ρ, and ultrasonic speeds, u of mixtures of 1-butanol or iso-butanol or t-butanol with equimolar mixture of (N,N-dimethylacetamide + Ethyl acrylate) over the entire composition range have been measured at T=308.15 K. Using the experimental results, deviation in ultrasonic speed, Δu, deviation in isentropic compressibility, Δks, excess molar volume, VmE, excess intermolecular free length, LfE, and excess acoustic impedance, ZE, have been calculated. The variation of these properties ...

  3. Butanol production by bioconversion of cheese whey in a continuous packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raganati, F; Olivieri, G; Procentese, A; Russo, M E; Salatino, P; Marzocchella, A

    2013-06-01

    Butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 fermentation was investigated. Unsupplemented cheese whey was adopted as renewable feedstock. The conversion was successfully carried out in a biofilm packed bed reactor (PBR) for more than 3 months. The PBR was a 4 cm ID, 16 cm high glass tube with a 8 cm bed of 3mm Tygon rings, as carriers. It was operated at the dilution rate between 0.4h(-1) and 0.94 h(-1). The cheese whey conversion process was characterized in terms of metabolites production (butanol included), lactose conversion and biofilm mass. Under optimized conditions, the performances were: butanol productivity 2.66 g/Lh, butanol concentration 4.93 g/L, butanol yield 0.26 g/g, butanol selectivity of the overall solvents production 82 wt%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced butanol production by eukaryotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered to contain an improved pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuragi, Hiroshi; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Compared with ethanol, butanol has more advantageous physical properties as a fuel, and biobutanol is thus considered a promising biofuel material. Biobutanol has often been produced by Clostridium species; however, because they are strictly anaerobic microorganisms, these species are challenging to work with. We attempted to introduce the butanol production pathway into yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is a well-known microorganism that is tolerant to organic solvents. 1-Butanol was found to be produced at very low levels when the butanol production pathway of Clostridium acetobutylicum was simply introduced into S. cerevisiae. The elimination of glycerol production pathway in the yeast contributed to the enhancement of 1-butanol production. In addition, by the use of trans-enoyl-CoA reductase in the engineered pathway, 1-butanol production was markedly enhanced to yield 14.1 mg/L after 48 h of cultivation.

  5. Effects of butanol on high value product production in Schizochytrium limacinum B4D1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Chen, Limei; Liu, Jianmin; Gao, Feng; He, Ronglin; Chen, Wuxi; Guo, Wei; Chen, Shulin; Li, Demao

    2017-07-01

    Schizochytrium is a microalgae-like fungus and is widely used for producing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). It is also a promising source of squalene and carotenoids. However, few fermentation strategies are available in enhancing squalene and carotenoid content in Schizochytrium. This study showed that butanol addition had multiple effects on Schizochytrium limacinum B4D1. First, butanol addition altered the lipid content of cells. Second, 6g/L of butanol decreased the proportion of DHA by nearly 40%. Third, the squalene content increased 31-fold in the presence of 6g/L butanol. Finally, cells accumulated more carotenoids upon butanol addition. Specifically, when cells were treated with 8g/L butanol, the astaxanthin content increased to 245 times than that of the untreated control. These results are helpful for the commercial exploitation of Schizochytrium in producing squalene and carotenoids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Conceptual design of heterogeneous azeotropic distillation process for ethanol dehydration using 1-butanol as entrainer

    OpenAIRE

    Paritta Prayoonyong

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation process for ethanol dehydration using 1-butanol as entrainer is presented. The residue curve map of the ethanol/water/1-butanol mixture is computationally generated using non-random twoliquid thermodynamic model. It is found that 1-butanol leads to a residue curve map topological structure different from that generated by typical entrainers used in ethanol dehydration. Synthesis...

  7. Mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates: Shock tube ignition delay time measurements and chemical kinetic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    AlRamadan, Abdullah S.

    2015-10-01

    The demand for fuels with high anti-knock quality has historically been rising, and will continue to increase with the development of downsized and turbocharged spark-ignition engines. Butanol isomers, such as 2-butanol and tert-butanol, have high octane ratings (RON of 105 and 107, respectively), and thus mixed butanols (68.8% by volume of 2-butanol and 31.2% by volume of tert-butanol) can be added to the conventional petroleum-derived gasoline fuels to improve octane performance. In the present work, the effect of mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates has been investigated in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The ignition delay times of mixed butanols stoichiometric mixtures were measured at 20 and 40bar over a temperature range of 800-1200K. Next, 10vol% and 20vol% of mixed butanols (MB) were blended with two different toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane (TPRF) fuel blends having octane ratings of RON 90/MON 81.7 and RON 84.6/MON 79.3. These MB/TPRF mixtures were investigated in the shock tube conditions similar to those mentioned above. A chemical kinetic model was developed to simulate the low- and high-temperature oxidation of mixed butanols and MB/TPRF blends. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data with some deviations at low temperatures. The effect of mixed butanols addition to TPRFs is marginal when examining the ignition delay times at high temperatures. However, when extended to lower temperatures (T < 850K), the model shows that the mixed butanols addition to TPRFs causes the ignition delay times to increase and hence behaves like an octane booster at engine-like conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  8. Engineering of an Escherichia coli strain for the production of 3-methyl-1-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michael R; Liao, James C

    2008-09-01

    3-Methyl-1-butanol is a potential fuel additive or substitute. Previously this compound was identified in small quantities in yeast fermentation as one of the fusel alcohols. In this work, we engineered an Escherichia coli strain to produce 3-methyl-1-butanol from glucose via the host's amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Strain improvement with the removal of feedback inhibition and competing pathways increased the selectivity and productivity of 3-methyl-1-butanol. This work demonstrates the feasibility of production of 3-methyl-1-butanol as a biofuel and shows promise in using E. coli as a host for production.

  9. Fermentation and genomic analysis of acetone-uncoupled butanol production by Clostridium tetanomorphum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fuyu; Bao, Guanhui; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin; Dong, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    In typical acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, acetone is the main by-product (50 % of butanol mass) of butanol production, resulting in a low yield of butanol. It is known that some Clostridium tetanomorphum strains are able to produce butanol without acetone in nature. Here, we described that C. tetanomorphum strain DSM665 can produce 4.16 g/L butanol and 4.98 g/L ethanol at pH 6.0, and 9.81 g/L butanol and 1.01 g/L ethanol when adding 1 mM methyl viologen. Butyrate and acetate could be reassimilated and no acetone was produced. Further analysis indicated that the activity of the acetate/butyrate:acetoacetyl-CoA transferase responsible for acetone production is lost in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. The genome of C. tetanomorphum DSM665 was sequenced and deposited in DDBJ, EMBL, and GenBank under the accession no. APJS00000000. Sequence analysis indicated that there are no typical genes (ctfA/B and adc) that are typically parts of an acetone synthesis pathway in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. This work provides new insights in the mechanism of clostridial butanol production and should prove useful for the design of a high-butanol-producing strain.

  10. Improved efficiency of butanol production by absorbent fermentation with a renewable carrier

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    He, Qin; Chen, Hongzhang

    2013-01-01

    Biobutanol production is still not economically competitive because of some principal drawbacks including high cost in feedstock consumption, low butanol concentration in the fermentation broth caused...

  11. O-15-butanol PET activation study on declarative memory; O-15-Butanol-PET-Aktivierungsstudie zur zerebralen Repraesentation deklarativer Gedaechtnisvorgaenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, B.J.; Schmidt, D.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin]|[Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin; Halsband, U. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Psychologie; Tellmann, L.; Herzog, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin

    1998-12-31

    Aim: In this study, neuroanatomical correlates of encoding and retrieval in paired associate learning were evaluated with positron emission tomography using auditorily presented highly imaginable words. Methods: Six right-handed normal male volunteers took part in the study. Each subject underwent six O-15-butanol PET scans. On each of the six trials the memory task began with the injection of a bolus of O-15-butanol. The subjects had to learn and retrieve twelve word pairs (highly imaginable words, not semantically related). The presentation of nonsense words served as reference condition. Results: Recall accuracy after 2-4 presentations was high during the PET measurement. In both encoding and retrieval we found anterior cingulate activation. We show bilateral dorsalateral prefrontal activation during the encoding of auditorily presented word pair associates, whereas retrieval led to left frontal activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of the precuneus in the retrieval of highly imaginable world-pair associates. Conclusion: Our results support the hypothesis of the presence of distributed widespread brain structures subserving episodic declarative memory. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Untersuchungen zur zerebralen Repraesentation deklarativer Gedaechtnisvorgaenge mit der Positronen-Emissions-Tomographie an gesunden rechtshaendigen Normalprobanden. Methoden: Bei sechs Probanden erfolgten sechs O-15-Butanol-PET-Untersuchungen (jeweils 1500 MBq) mit einer GE 4096+ PET-Kamera. Die Gedaechtnisaufgabe bestand darin, zwoelf Wortpaare hoch bildhaften Gehaltes zu lernen (auditorische Praesentation ueber Kopfhoerer). Bei der nachfolgenden Abfrage wurden randomisiert jeweils die ersten Worte praesentiert und die Probanden hatten dann die dazugehoerenden Worte zu assoziieren. Als Referenzbedingungen wurden Nichtworte dargeboten. Die Datenanalyse erfolgte mit `Statistischem Parametrischem Mapping` (SPM 96) unter MatLab (Version 4.2). Ergebnisse: Die

  12. Hybrid Vapor Stripping-Vapor Permeation Process for Recovery and Dehydration of 1-Butanol and Acetone/Butanol/Ethanol from Dilute Aqueous Solutions. Part 1. Process Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Fermentative production of butanol is limited to low concentrations, typically less than 2 wt% solvent, due to product inhibition. The result is high separation energy demand by conventional distillation approaches, despite favorable vapor-liquid equilibrium and parti...

  13. Biooxidation of n-butane to 1-butanol by engineered P450 monooxygenase under increased pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Bernd A; Scheps, Daniel; Honda Malca, Sumire; Nestl, Bettina M; Breuer, Michael; Wagner, Hans-Günter; Breitscheidel, Boris; Kratz, Detlef; Hauer, Bernhard

    2014-12-10

    In addition to the traditional 1-butanol production by hydroformylation of gaseous propene and by fermentation of biomass, the cytochrome P450-catalyzed direct terminal oxidation of n-butane into the primary alcohol 1-butanol constitutes an alternative route to provide the high demand of this basic chemical. Moreover the use of n-butane offers an unexploited ubiquitous feed stock available in large quantities. Based on protein engineering of CYP153A from Polaromonas sp. JS666 and the improvement of the native redox system, a highly ω-regioselective (>96%) fusion protein variant (CYP153AP.sp.(G254A)-CPRBM3) for the conversion of n-butane into 1-butanol was developed. Maximum yield of 3.12g/L butanol, of which 2.99g/L comprise for 1-butanol, has been obtained after 20h reaction time. Due to the poor solubility of n-butane in an aqueous system, a high pressure reaction assembly was applied to increase the conversion. After optimization a maximum product content of 4.35g/L 1-butanol from a total amount of 4.53g/L butanol catalyzed by the self-sufficient fusion monooxygenase has been obtained at 15bar pressure. In comparison to the CYP153A wild type the 1-butanol concentration was enhanced fivefold using the engineered monooxygenase whole cell system by using the high-pressure reaction assembly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Conceptual design of heterogeneous azeotropic distillation process for ethanol dehydration using 1-butanol as entrainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paritta Prayoonyong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation process for ethanol dehydration using 1-butanol as entrainer is presented. The residue curve map of the ethanol/water/1-butanol mixture is computationally generated using non-random twoliquid thermodynamic model. It is found that 1-butanol leads to a residue curve map topological structure different from that generated by typical entrainers used in ethanol dehydration. Synthesised by residue curve map analysis, the distillation flowsheet for ethanol dehydration by 1-butanol comprises a double-feed column integrated with an overhead decanter and a simple column. The double-feed column is used to recover water as the top product, whereas the simple column is used for recovering ethanol and 1-butanol. The separation feasibility and the economically near-optimal designs of distillation columns in the flowsheet are evaluated and identified by using the boundary value design method. The distillation flowsheet using 1-butanol is compared with the conventional process using benzene as entrainer. Based on their total annualised costs, the ethanol dehydration process using 1-butanol is less economically attractive than the process using benzene. However, 1-butanol is less toxic than benzene.

  15. Recovery of butanol from Clostridium beijerinckii P260 fermentation broth by supercritical CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanol is a superior biofuel to ethanol because of its blend properties and higher energy density. However, its recovery by distillation from the fermentation broth is energy intensive. For this reason, we studied butanol recovery by supercritical CO2 extraction from simulated and actual fermentati...

  16. Biological butanol production from microalgae-based biodiesel residues by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai-Hsuan; Whang, Liang-Ming; Chan, Kun-Chi; Chung, Man-Chien; Wu, Shu-Hsien; Liu, Cheng-Pin; Tien, Shih-Yuan; Chen, Shan-Yuan; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lee, Wen-Jhy

    2015-05-01

    This study conducted batch experiments to evaluate the potential of butanol production from microalgae biodiesel residues by Clostridium acetobutylicum. The results indicated that with 90 g/L of glucose as the sole substrate the highest butanol yield of 0.2 g/g-glucose was found, but the addition of butyrate significantly enhanced the butanol yield. The highest butanol yield of 0.4 g/g-glucose was found with 60 g/L of glucose and 18 g/L of butyrate. Using microalgae biodiesel residues as substrate, C. acetobutylicum produced 3.86 g/L of butanol and achieved butanol yield of 0.13 g/g-carbohydrate via ABE fermentation, but the results indicated that approximately one third of carbohydrate was not utilized by C. acetobutylicum. Biological butanol production from microalgae biodiesel residues can be possible, but further research on fermentation strategies are required to improve production yield. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Experimental investigation on CRDI engine using butanol-biodiesel-diesel blends as fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakar Shetty, A. S.; Dineshkumar, L.; Koundinya, Sandeep; Mane, Swetha K.

    2017-07-01

    In this research work an experimental investigation of butanol-biodisel-diesel blends on combustion, performance and emission characteristics of a direct injection (DI) diesel engine is carried out. The blends are prepared at different proportions and fuel properties such as calorific value, viscosity, flash point and fire point, cloud point, pour point of butanol (B), biodiesel (B), diesel (D), biodiesel-diesel (BD) blends and butanol-biodiesel-diesel (BBD) blends are determined. The engine test is conducted at different speed and load. From the results obtained for fuel properties we can observe that the flash, fire and pour point, viscosity and density are decreasing by increasing the percentage of butanol in BBD blends. It is also observed that the performance parameters such as brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and exhaust gas temperature increases with increase in the proportion of butanol in BBD blend. However, the brake specific fuel consumption (BFSC) decreases with increase in the proportion of butanol in BBD blend. The increase of butanol in BBD blends also influence to increase on emission characteristic such as carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx).

  18. A novel pathway to produce butanol and isobutanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi, Paola; Longo, Valeria; Berterame, Nadia Maria; Rossi, Giorgia; Porro, Danilo

    2013-05-04

    The sustainable production of biofuels remains one of the major issues of the upcoming years. Among the number of most desirable molecules to be produced, butanol and isobutanol deserve a prominent place. They have superior liquid-fuel features in respect to ethanol. Particularly, butanol has similar properties to gasoline and thus it has the potential to be used as a substitute for gasoline in currently running engines. Clostridia are recognized as natural and good butanol producers and are employed in the industrial-scale production of solvents. Due to their complex metabolic characteristics and to the difficulty of performing genetic manipulations, in recent years the Clostridia butanol pathway was expressed in other microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but in yeast the obtained results were not so promising. An alternative way for producing fusel alcohol is to exploit the degradation pathway of aminoacids released from protein hydrolysis, where proteins derive from exhausted microbial biomasses at the end of the fermentation processes. It is known that wine yeasts can, at the end of the fermentation process, accumulate fusel alcohols, and butanol is among them. Despite it was quite obvious to correlate said production with aminoacid degradation, a putative native pathway was never proposed. Starting from literature data and combining information about different organisms, here we demonstrate how glycine can be the substrate for butanol and isobutanol production, individuating at least one gene encoding for the necessary activities leading to butanol accumulation. During a kinetic of growth using glycine as substrate, butanol and isobutanol accumulate in the medium up to 92 and 58 mg/L, respectively. Here for the first time we demonstrate an alternative metabolic pathway for butanol and isobutanol production in the yeast S. cerevisiae, using glycine as a substrate. Doors are now opened for a number of optimizations, also

  19. Reaction Mechanisms and HCCI Combustion Processes of Mixtures of n-Heptane and the Butanols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A reduced primary reference fuel (PRF-Alcohol-Di-tert-butyl Peroxide (DTBP mechanism with 108 species and 435 reactions, including sub-mechanisms of PRF, methanol, ethanol, DTBP and the four butanol isomers, is proposed for homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine combustion simulations of butanol isomers/n-heptane mixtures. HCCI experiments fuelled with butanol isomer/n-heptane mixtures on two different engines are conducted for the validation of proposed mechanism. The mechanism has been validated against shock tube ignition delays, laminar flame speeds, species profiles in premixed flames and engine HCCI combustion data, and good agreements with experimental results are demonstrated under various validation conditions. It is found that although the reactivity of neat tert-butanol is the lowest, mixtures of tert-butanol/n-heptane exhibit the highest reactivity among the butanol isomer/n-heptane mixtures if the n-heptane blending ratio exceeds 20% (mole. Kinetic analysis shows that the highest C-H bond energy in the tert-butanol molecule is partially responsible for this phenomenon. It is also found that the reaction tC4H9OH+CH3O2 =tC4H9O+CH3O2H plays important role and eventually produces the OH radical to promote the ignition and combustion. The proposed mechanism is able to capture HCCI combustion processes of the butanol/n-heptane mixtures under different operating conditions. In addition, the trend that tert-butanol /n-heptane has the highest reactivity is also captured in HCCI combustion simulations. The results indicate that the current mechanism can be used for HCCI engine predictions of PRF and alcohol fuels.

  20. Two-stage in situ gas stripping for enhanced butanol fermentation and energy-saving product recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, C; Zhao, JB; Liu, FF; Lu, CC; Yang, ST; Bai, FW

    2013-05-01

    Two-stage gas stripping for butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation with Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 in a fibrous bed bioreactor was studied. Compared to fermentation without in situ gas stripping, more ABE (10.0 g/L acetone, 19.2 g/L butanol, 1.7 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced, with a higher butanol yield (0.25 g/g vs. 0.20 g/g) and productivity (0.40 g/L.h vs. 0.30 g/L-h) due to reduced butanol inhibition. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 175.6 g/L butanol (227.0 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 612.3 g/L butanol (660.7 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 101.3 g/L butanol (153.2 g/L ABE). After second-stage gas stripping, a highly concentrated product containing 420.3 g/L butanol (532.3 g/L ABE) was obtained. The process is thus effective in producing high-titer butanol that can be purified with much less energy. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Two-stage in situ gas stripping for enhanced butanol fermentation and energy-saving product recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chuang; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Fangfang; Lu, Congcong; Yang, Shang-Tian; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2013-05-01

    Two-stage gas stripping for butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation with Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 in a fibrous bed bioreactor was studied. Compared to fermentation without in situ gas stripping, more ABE (10.0 g/L acetone, 19.2 g/L butanol, 1.7 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced, with a higher butanol yield (0.25 g/g vs. 0.20 g/g) and productivity (0.40 g/L·h vs. 0.30 g/L·h) due to reduced butanol inhibition. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 175.6 g/L butanol (227.0 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 612.3g/L butanol (660.7 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 101.3 g/L butanol (153.2 g/L ABE). After second-stage gas stripping, a highly concentrated product containing 420.3 g/L butanol (532.3 g/L ABE) was obtained. The process is thus effective in producing high-titer butanol that can be purified with much less energy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Current status and prospects of industrial bio-production of n-butanol in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Liu, Jinle; Jiang, Weihong; Yang, Yunliu; Yang, Sheng

    2015-11-15

    n-Butanol is an important bulk chemical. Commercial fermentative production of n-butanol has been applied more than 100 years ago but is currently more costly than production from propylene and syngas. Renewed interest in biobutanol as a biofuel has spurred technological advances to the fermentation process. This article reviewed the recent status including the commercialization, pilot production and R&D activities of n-butanol fermentation in China. Long-term bio-production of n-butanol as a next generation biofuel and biochemical from biomass waste and steel mill off-gas needs technology breakthroughs and more environmental concerns from policymakers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of n-Butanol on Chromosomal Damage in Mice Bone Marrow Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Mansouri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: n-Butanol is a four-carbon alcohol used widely in foods, cosmetics industries, biology and chemistry research laboratories, and other fields. Long time-effects of inhalation or consumption of small amounts of Butanol on human health are still unknown. On the other hand, numerous reports about the development of n-Butanol toxicity are available. The main objective of the study was to investigate the effects of inhaled and oral administration of n-Butanol as a long-term in vivo investigation.Materials and Methods: Small white laboratory, male mice (20-30 g were used in 11 groups (n=4 including experimental 1 to 6, 1 to 4 control "A” and positive control groups. Experimental groups 1-3, for 10, 20, and 40 days; 5 hours a day were inside a box with ventilation facilities exposed to air saturated with n-Butanol vapor. Experimental groups 4 to 6, received water containing n-Butanol 0.2%, 1% and 5% for 10 days. Control groups B, 1 to 3 was placed for 10, 20, and 40 days inside a similar box exposed to normal air, respectively. Control group B 4 received water without any particular substance for 10 days. The positive control group received 30µl subcutaneous vinblastine. Bone marrow cells were extracted 24 hours after treatments and stained by May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining and the number of micronucleus was counted. Vinblastine, as a positive control, increased an average of micronucleus numbers significantly compared to control group (P<0.001.Results: n-Butanol inhalation caused no significant difference in 1-3 experimental groups in the average numbers of micronucleus compared to control group, even in the 40 days treatment group, average numbers of micronucleus was decreased comparing to control group (P<0.05. Also, oral administration of 0.2% and 1% n-Butanol had no effect on the average micronucleus numbers compared to the control group, while oral administration of 5% n-Butanol caused even decrease in average numbers of micronucleus

  4. Oxidation of butane to butanol coupled to electrochemical redox reaction of NAD+/NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye Sun; Na, Byung Kwan; Park, Doo Hyun

    2007-08-01

    A crude cell extract from a butane-utilizing bacterium, Alcaligenes sp., catalyzed the oxidation of butane to butanol coupled to NADH. A graphite electrode modified with Neutral Red (NR-electrode) catalyzed the reduction of NAD(+) to NADH. About 4.9 mM butanol was produced from 50% n-butane/O(2) mixture through the combined reactions of the crude enzyme and the NR-electrode in 250 ml reactor for 3 h.

  5. Industrial production of acetone and butanol by fermentation?100 years later

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Microbial production of acetone and butanol was one of the first large-scale industrial fermentation processes of global importance. During the first part of the 20th century, it was indeed the second largest fermentation process, superseded in importance only by the ethanol fermentation. After a rapid decline after the 1950s, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation has recently gained renewed interest in the context of biorefinery approaches for the production of fuels and chemicals from ...

  6. ARTP mutation and genome shuffling of ABE fermentation symbiotic system for improvement of butanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chunkai; Wang, Genyu; Mai, Shuai; Wu, Pengfei; Wu, Jianrong; Wang, Gehua; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan

    2017-03-01

    Butanol is an ideal renewable biofuel which possesses superior fuel properties. Previously, butanol-producing symbiotic system TSH06 was isolated in our lab, with microoxygen tolerance ability. To boost butanol yield for large-scale industrial production, TSH06 was used as parental strain and subjected to atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) and four rounds of genome shuffling (GS). ARTP mutant and GS strain were co-cultured with facultative anaerobic Bacillus cereus TSH2 to form a symbiotic system with microoxygen tolerance, which was then subjected to fermentation. Relative messenger RNA (mRNA) level of key enzyme gene was measured by real-time PCR. The highest butanol titer of TS4-30 reached 15.63 g/L, which was 34% higher than TSH06 (12.19 g/L). Compared with parental strain, mRNA of acid-forming gene in TS4-30 decreased in acidogenesis phase, while solvent-forming gene increased in solventogenesis phase. This gene expression pattern was consistent with high butanol yield and low acid level in TS4-30. In summary, symbiotic system TS4-30 was obtained with butanol titer improvement and microoxygen tolerance.

  7. N-butanol and isobutanol as alternatives to gasoline: Comparison of port fuel injector characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenkl Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on an experimental investigation of the relationship between the pulse width of a gasoline engine port fuel injector and the quantity of the fuel injected when butanol is used as a fuel. Two isomers of butanol, n-butanol and isobutanol, are considered as potential candidates for renewable, locally produced fuels capable of serving as a drop-in replacement fuel for gasoline, as an alternative to ethanol which poses material compatibility and other drawbacks. While the injected quantity of fuel is typically a linear function of the time the injector coil is energized, the flow through the port fuel injector is complex, non ideal, and not necessarily laminar, and considering that butanol has much higher viscosity than gasoline, an experimental investigation was conducted. A production injector, coupled to a production fueling system, and driven by a pulse width generator was operated at various pulse lengths and frequencies, covering the range of engine rpm and loads on a car engine. The results suggest that at least at room temperature, the fueling rate remains to be a linear function of the pulse width for both n-butanol and isobutanol, and the volumes of fuel injected are comparable for gasoline and both butanol isomers.

  8. Butanol fermentation of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaoru; From, Nikolaj; Angelidaki, Irini; Huijgen, Wouter J J; Bjerre, Anne-Belinda

    2017-08-01

    Seaweed represents an abundant, renewable, and fast-growing biomass resource for 3rd generation biofuel production. This study reports an efficient butanol fermentation process carried out by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422 using enzymatic hydrolysate of the sugar-rich brown seaweed Laminaria digitata harvested from the coast of the Danish North Sea as substrate. The highest butanol yield (0.42g/g-consumed-substrates) compared to literature was achieved, with a significantly higher butanol:acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) molar ratio (0.85) than typical (0.6). This demonstrates the possibility of using the seaweed L. digitata as a potential biomass for butanol production. For the first time, consumption of alginate components was observed by C. beijerinckii DSM-6422. The efficient utilization of sugars and lactic acid further highlighted the potential of using this strain for future development of large-scale cost-effective butanol production based on (ensiled) seaweed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxygen exchange in the selective oxidation of 2-butanol on oxygen precovered Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ting; Gong, Jinlong; Mullins, C Buddie

    2009-11-11

    Direct evidence for C-O bond cleavage in the partial oxidation of 2-butanol on oxygen precovered Au(111) is provided using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and molecular beam reactive scattering (MBRS) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The oxygen precovered Au(111) surface can promote the partial oxidation of 2-butanol into 2-butanone with near 100% selectivity at low oxygen coverages, while 2-butanol adsorbs and desorbs molecularly on the clean Au(111) surface. Both C(2)H(5)C(16)OCH(3) and C(2)H(5)C(18)OCH(3) are observed in TPD after 2-butanol (C(2)H(5)CH(16)OHCH(3)) was dosed onto Au(111) precovered with (18)O(a). This oxygen exchange phenomenon serves as strong evidence for the C-O bond cleavage in 2-butanol partial oxidation to 2-butanone. Two surface intermediates are proposed for the selective oxidation of 2-butanol: 2-butoxide and eta(2)-aldehyde. As oxygen coverage increases, full oxidation is activated in addition to selective partial oxidation.

  10. Enhanced butanol production in a microbial electrolysis cell by Clostridium beijerinckii IB4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ai-Yong; Yin, Chun-Yan; Xu, Hao; Kong, Xiang-Ping; Xue, Jia-Wei; Zhu, Jing; Jiang, Min; Wu, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Reducing power such as NADH is an essential factor for acetone/butanol/ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium spp. The objective of this study was to increase available NADH in Clostridium beijerinckii IB4 by a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with an electron carrier to enhance butanol production. First of all, a MEC was performed without electron carrier to study the function of cathodic potential applying. Then, various electron carriers were tested, and neutral red (NR)-amended cultures showed an increase of butanol concentration. Optimal NR concentration (0.1 mM) was used to add in a MEC. Electricity stimulated the cell growth obviously and dramatically diminished the fermentation time from 40 to 28 h. NR and electrically reduced NR improved the final butanol concentration and inhibited the acetone generation. In the MEC with NR, the butanol concentration, yield, proportion and productivity were increased by 12.2, 17.4, 7.2 and 60.3 %, respectively. To further understand the mechanisms of NR, cathodic potential applying and electrically reduced NR, NADH and NAD(+) levels, ATP levels and hydrogen production were determined. NR and electrically reduced NR also improved ATP levels and the ratio of NADH/NAD(+), whereas they decreased hydrogen production. Thus, the MEC is an efficient method for enhancing the butanol production.

  11. Mitochondrial signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae pseudohyphae formation induced by butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starovoytova, Anna N; Sorokin, Maxim I; Sokolov, Svyatoslav S; Severin, Fedor F; Knorre, Dmitry A

    2013-06-01

    Yeasts growing limited for nitrogen source or treated with fusel alcohols form elongated cells--pseudohyphae. Absence of mitochondrial DNA or anaerobic conditions inhibits this process, but the precise role of mitochondria is not clear. We found that a significant percentage of pseudohyphal cells contained mitochondria with different levels of membrane potential within one cell. An uncoupler carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP), but not the ATP-synthase inhibitor oligomycin D, prevented pseudohyphal growth. Interestingly, repression of the MIH1 gene encoding phosphatase activator of the G2/M transition partially restores the ability of yeast to form pseudohyphal cells in the presence of FCCP or in the absence of mitochondrial DNA. At the same time, retrograde signaling (the one triggered by dysfunctional mitochondria) appeared to be a positive regulator of butanol-induced pseudohyphae formation: the deletion of any of the retrograde signaling genes (RTG1, RTG2, or RTG3) partially suppressed pseudohyphal growth. Together, our data suggest that two subpopulations of mitochondria are required for filamentous growth: one with high and another with low transmembrane potential. These mitochondria-activated signaling pathways appear to converge at Mih1p level. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improvement of the butanol production selectivity and butanol to acetone ratio (B:A) by addition of electron carriers in the batch culture of a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Shukor, Hafiza; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Improvement in the butanol production selectivity or enhanced butanol:acetone ratio (B:A) is desirable in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium strains. In this study, artificial electron carriers were added to the fermentation medium of a new isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1 in order to improve the butanol yield and B:A ratio. The results revealed that medium supplementation with electron carriers changed the metabolism flux of electron and carbon in ABE fermentation by YM1. A decrease in acetone production, which subsequently improved the B:A ratio, was observed. Further improvement in the butanol production and B:A ratios were obtained when the fermentation medium was supplemented with butyric acid. The maximum butanol production (18.20 ± 1.38 g/L) was gained when a combination of methyl red and butyric acid was added. Although the addition of benzyl viologen (0.1 mM) and butyric acid resulted in high a B:A ratio of 16:1 (800% increment compared with the conventional 2:1 ratio), the addition of benzyl viologen to the culture after 4 h resulted in the production of 18.05 g/L butanol. Manipulating the metabolic flux to butanol through the addition of electron carriers could become an alternative strategy to achieve higher butanol productivity and improve the B:A ratio. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of industrial dairy waste (milk dust powder) for acetone-butanol-ethanol production by solventogenic Clostridium species

    OpenAIRE

    Ujor, Victor; Bharathidasan, Ashok Kumar; Cornish, Katrina; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2014-01-01

    Readily available inexpensive substrate with high product yield is the key to restoring acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation to economic competitiveness. Lactose-replete cheese whey tends to favor the production of butanol over acetone. In the current study, we investigated the fermentability of milk dust powder with high lactose content, for ABE production by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii. Both microorganisms produced 7.3 and 5.8 g/L of butanol respectively, w...

  14. Controlling Citrate Synthase Expression by CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing for n-Butanol Production in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heo, Min-Ji; Jung, Hwi-Min; Um, Jaeyong

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 was successfully demonstrated in Esherichia coli to effectively produce n-butanol in a defined medium under microaerobic condition. The butanol synthetic pathway genes including those encoding oxygen-tolerant alcohol dehydrogenase were overexpressed in metabolically...... prediction program, UTR designer, and modified using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing method to reduce its expression level. E. coli strains with decreased citrate synthase expression produced more butanol and the citrate synthase activity was correlated with butanol production. These results demonstrate...

  15. Utilization of pentoses from sugarcane biomass: techno-economics of biogas vs. butanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Adriano Pinto; Dias, Marina O S; Junqueira, Tassia L; Cunha, Marcelo P; Bonomi, Antonio; Filho, Rubens Maciel

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents the techno-economics of greenfield projects of an integrated first and second-generation sugarcane biorefinery in which pentose sugars obtained from sugarcane biomass are used either for biogas (consumed internally in the power boiler) or n-butanol production via the ABE batch fermentation process. The complete sugarcane biorefinery was simulated using Aspen Plus®. Although the pentoses stream available in the sugarcane biorefinery gives room for a relatively small biobutanol plant (7.1-12 thousand tonnes per year), the introduction of butanol and acetone to the product portfolio of the biorefinery increased and diversified its revenues. Whereas the IRR of the investment on a biorefinery with biogas production is 11.3%, IRR varied between 13.1% and 15.2% in the butanol production option, depending on technology (regular or engineered microorganism with improved butanol yield and pentoses conversion) and target market (chemicals or automotive fuels). Additional discussions include the effects of energy-efficient technologies for butanol processing on the profitability of the biorefinery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii from sugar beet pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Carolina; Infante, Celia; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; Lucas, Susana; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2015-08-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) has been investigated as a promising feedstock for ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii. Although lignin content in SBP is low, a pretreatment is needed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation yields. Autohydrolysis at pH 4 has been selected as the best pretreatment for SBP in terms of sugars release and acetone and butanol production. The best overall sugars release yields from raw SBP ranged from 66.2% to 70.6% for this pretreatment. The highest ABE yield achieved was 0.4g/g (5.1g/L of acetone and 6.6g/L butanol) and 143.2g ABE/kg SBP (62.3g acetone and 80.9g butanol) were obtained when pretreated SBP was enzymatically hydrolyzed at 7.5% (w/w) solid loading. Higher solid loadings (10%) offered higher acetone and butanol titers (5.8g/L of acetone and 7.8g/L butanol). All the experiments were carried out under not-controlling pH conditions reaching about 5.3 in the final samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, EricJ.; Chan, Rossana; Prasad, Nilu; Myers, Samuel; Petzold, Christopher; Redding, Alyssa; Ouellet, Mario; Keasling, JayD.

    2008-11-25

    BackgroundIncreasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of ?second generation? biofuels that have better properties than ethanol.Results& ConclusionsSaccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha) were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB) did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  18. Enhanced butanol production by immobilized Clostridium beijerinckii TISTR 1461 using zeolite 13X as a carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichuviwat, Rapeephat; Boonsombuti, Akarin; Luengnaruemitchai, Apanee; Wongkasemjit, Sujitra

    2014-11-01

    Butanol production by cell immobilization onto porous materials-brick and zeolite 13X-was investigated using Clostridium beijerinckii TISTR 1461. Characterization results of two materials were completed to evaluate their potential as an immobilization carrier. Although zeolite has greater porosity than brick, it cannot be used for cell aggregation without treating with chemical. After immobilization, both materials can enhance butanol titers from 5.29 to 5.80g/L and 8.58g/L using brick and zeolite, respectively. Butanol to glucose yield also improved from 0.14 to 0.16g/g after immobilization. It was found that butanol production significantly increased due to an increase in buffering capacity, strong bonding between the zeolite surface and cell, and butanol tolerance. In addition, repeated batch fermentation was performed, demonstrating that cells immobilized onto zeolite 13X have high stability and potential for long-term use in continuous fermentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Samuel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of "second generation" biofuels that have better properties than ethanol. Results and conclusion Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  20. Acoustic and Volumetric Properties of Mixture of (N,N-Dimethylacetamide + Ethyl Acrylate with 1-Butanol or iso-Butanol or t-Butanol at 308.15 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kondaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Densities, ρ, and ultrasonic speeds, u of mixtures of 1-butanol or iso-butanol or t-butanol with equimolar mixture of (N,N-dimethylacetamide + Ethyl acrylate over the entire composition range have been measured at T=308.15 K. Using the experimental results, deviation in ultrasonic speed, Δu, deviation in isentropic compressibility, Δks, excess molar volume, VmE, excess intermolecular free length, LfE, and excess acoustic impedance, ZE, have been calculated. The variation of these properties with composition of the mixtures has been discussed in terms of molecular interactions in these mixtures. The deviation/excess properties have been fitted to Redlich-Kister type polynomial and the corresponding standard deviations have been calculated. Negative values of VmE, Δks, and LfE and positive values of Δu, and ZE are observed over the entire composition range. The observed negative and positive values of deviation/excess properties are attributed to the strong interactions between the unlike molecules of the mixtures. Further theoretical values of sound velocity in the mixtures have been evaluated using various theories and compared with experimental sound velocities to verify the applicability of such theories to the systems studied. Theoretical ultrasonic velocity data has been used to study molecular interactions in the systems investigated.

  1. Catalytic Upgrading of Ethanol to n-Butanol: Progress in Catalyst Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianyuan; Fang, Geqian; Tong, Yuqin; Jiang, Dahao; Liang, Zhe; Leng, Wenhua; Liu, Liu; Tu, Pengxiang; Wang, Hongjing; Ni, Jun; Li, Xiaonian

    2018-01-10

    Because n-butanol as a fuel additive has more advantageous physicochemical properties than those of ethanol, ethanol valorization to n-butanol through homo- or heterogeneous catalysis has received much attention in recent decades in both scientific and industrial fields. Recent progress in catalyst development for upgrading ethanol to n-butanol, which involves homogeneous catalysts, such as iridium and ruthenium complexes, and heterogeneous catalysts, including metal oxides, hydroxyapatite (HAP), and, in particular, supported metal catalysts, is reviewed herein. The structure-activity relationships of catalysts and underlying reaction mechanisms are critically examined, and future research directions on the design and improvement of catalysts are also proposed. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Characterization of an Arxula adeninivorans alcohol dehydrogenase involved in the metabolism of ethanol and 1-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Jakub; Rauter, Marion; Riechen, Jan; Worch, Sebastian; Baronian, Kim; Bode, Rüdiger; Schauer, Frieder; Kunze, Gotthard

    2016-05-01

    In this study, alcohol dehydrogenase 1 from Arxula adeninivorans (Aadh1p) was identified and characterized. Aadh1p showed activity with short and medium chain length primary alcohols in the forward reaction and their aldehydes in the reverse reaction. Aadh1p has 64% identity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adh1p, is localized in the cytoplasm and uses NAD(+) as cofactor. Gene expression analysis showed a low level increase in AADH1 gene expression with ethanol, pyruvate or xylose as the carbon source. Deletion of the AADH1 gene affects growth of the cells with 1-butanol, ethanol and glucose as the carbon source, and a strain which overexpressed the AADH1 gene metabolized 1-butanol more rapidly. An ADH activity assay indicated that Aadh1p is a major enzyme for the synthesis of ethanol and the degradation of 1-butanol in A. adeninivorans. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A kinetic model of the Amberlyst-15 catalyzed transesterification of methyl stearate with n-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Venkata K S; Yanez, Abraham J; Peereboom, Lars; Muller, Evan; Lira, Carl T; Miller, Dennis J

    2011-03-01

    An attractive approach to improving cold flow properties of biodiesel is to transesterify fatty acid methyl esters with higher alcohols such as n-butanol or with branched alcohols such as isopropanol. In this study, the reaction kinetics of Amberlyst-15 catalyzed transesterification of methyl stearate, a model biodiesel compound, with n-butanol have been examined. After identifying conditions to minimize both internal and external mass transfer resistances, the effects of catalyst loading, temperature, and the mole ratio of n-butanol to methyl stearate in the transesterification reaction were investigated. Experimental data were fit to a pseudo-homogeneous, activity-based kinetic model with inclusion of etherification reactions to appropriately characterize the transesterification system. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrophobic Hyflon® AD/PVDF membranes for butanol dehydration via pervaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Jalal, Taghreed

    2015-10-21

    Novel hydrophobic Hyflon® AD /PVDF membranes were developed and investigated for n-butanol dehydration via pervaporation. The coating protocols for thin defect-free Hyflon® AD selective layer on the PVDF support was optimized. Water and n-butanol transport was measured, analyzing the effect of operating conditions. The water flux through the newly developed membranes was higher than 150 g/m2.h with selectivity for water higher than 99 wt %. The focus was on the use of Hyflon® AD as the selective layer for n-butanol dehydration. The membrane application can be extended to other solvents, supporting an effective and simple method for dehydration with hydrophobic membranes.

  5. Butanol is cytotoxic to Lactococcus lactis while ethanol and hexanol are cytostatic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Anne-Mette Meisner; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    attention. In the present study the physiological alcohol stress response of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 towards the primary, even-chain alcohols; ethanol, butanol, and hexanol was characterized. The alcohol tolerance of L. lactis was found comparable to those reported for highly alcohol...... resistant lactic acid bacteria. Combined results from alcohol survival rate, live/dead staining, and a novel usage of the beta-galactosidase assay, revealed that while high concentrations of ethanol and hexanol were cytostatic to L. lactis, high concentrations of butanol were cytotoxic, causing irreparable...

  6. Isolasi Dan Identifikasi Terpenoid dari Fraksi n-Butanol Herba Lampasau (Diplazium esculentum Swartz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dewi Astuti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Telah dilakukan penelitian yang bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi senyawa kimia yang diisolasi dari fraksi n-butanol ekstrak metanol herba lampasau (Diplazium esculentum Swartz. Ekstrak metanol diperoleh secara maserasi dan difraksinasi berturut-turut denganpetroleum eter, etil asetat, dan n-butanol. Fraksi n­-butanol difraksinasidengan kromatografi kolom dengan fase diam silika gel dihasilkan fraksi A, B, C, dan D. Fraksi B dimurnikan dengan kromatografi lapis tipis preparatif pada silika geldihasilkan isolat B1. Isolat B1 berupa padatan tidak berwarna danberfluoresensi putih di bawah lampu UV 366 nm. Panjang gelombang maksimum pada spektra UV  isolat B1 adalah 225 nm dan 272.5 nm yang menunjukkan adanya ikatan rangkap tak terkonjugasi. Spektra IR isolat B1 menunjukkan adanya gugus C=C, –OH, C=O lakton, –CO, C–H ulur, dan C–H tekuk. Spektra 1H-NMR isolat B1 menunjukkan sinyal proton pada ikatan rangkap, proton –OH, proton pada –CH2 yang terikat atom oksigen, serta proton gugus metil –CH3. Berdasarkan data spektra UV, IR, dan 1H-NMR maka isolat B1 disarankan sebagai turunan senyawa triterpenoid hopan-lakton. Kata kunci : diplazium esculentum Swartz, fraksi n-butanol, triterpenoid hopan-lakton  Abstract The research  aims to identify chemical compounds isolated fromn-butanol fraction methanol extract of lampasau herbs (Diplazium esculentum Swartz. The methanol extract was obtained by maceration and fractioned by petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, andn-butanol. N-butanol fraction was fractionated using column chromatography on silica gel produced fractions A, B, C, and D. Fraction B was purified by preparative thin layer chromatography on silica gel produced isolate B1. Isolate B1was colorless solid and has white fluorescent under UV lamp 366 nm. The maximum wavelength on UV spectra of B1 are 225 nm and 272,5 nm indicates the unconjugated double bond. IR spectra of B1 showed the vibration of C=C, –OH, C=O lactone, –CO, C

  7. Process integration for simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR): Production of butanol from corn stover using Clostridium beijerinckii P260

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR) process was developed for production of acetone butanol ethanol (AB or ABE), of which butanol is the main product, from corn stover employing Clostridium beijerinckii P260. Of the 86 gL^-1^ corn stover, over 97% of the sugars were r...

  8. Kinetic studies on the Rhizomucor miehei lipase catalyzed esterification reaction of oleic acid with 1-butanol in a biphasic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraai, G.N.; Winkelman, J.G.M.; de Vries, Johannes; Heeres, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of the esterification of oleic acid with 1 -butanol catalyzed by free Rhizomucor miehei lipase in a biphasic system was studied in a batch reactor. The reaction appeared to proceed via a Ping Pong bi-bi mechanism with I -butanol inhibition. The kinetic constants of the model were

  9. Butanol production from concentrated lactose/whey permeate: Use of pervaporation membrane to recover and concentrate product

    Science.gov (United States)

    In these studies butanol (acetone butanol ethanol, or ABE) was produced from concentrated lactose/whey permeate containing 211 gL-1 lactose. Fermentation of such a highly concentrated lactose solution was possible due to simultaneous product removal using a pervaporation membrane. In this system a p...

  10. Aadh2p: an Arxula adeninivorans alcohol dehydrogenase involved in the first step of the 1-butanol degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauter, Marion; Kasprzak, Jakub; Becker, Karin; Riechen, Jan; Worch, Sebastian; Hartmann, Anja; Mascher, Martin; Scholz, Uwe; Baronian, Kim; Bode, Rüdiger; Schauer, Frieder; Matthias Vorbrodt, H; Kunze, Gotthard

    2016-10-12

    The non-conventional yeast Arxula adeninivorans uses 1-butanol as a carbon source and has recently attracted attention as a promising organism for 1-butanol production. Alcohol dehydrogenases (adhp) are important catalysts in 1-butanol metabolism, but only Aadh1p from Arxula has been characterized. This enzyme is involved in ethanol synthesis but has a low impact on 1-butanol degradation. In this study, we identified and characterized a second adhp from A. adeninivorans (Aadh2p). Compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADHs' (ScAdh) protein sequences it originates from the same ancestral node as ScAdh6p, 7p and 4p. It is also localized in the cytoplasm and uses NAD(H) as cofactor. The enzyme has its highest activity with medium chain-length alcohols and maximum activity with 1-butanol with the catalytic efficiency of the purified enzyme being 42 and 43,000 times higher than with ethanol and acetaldehyde, respectively. Arxula adeninivorans strain G1212/YRC102-AADH2, which expresses the AADH2 gene under the control of the strong constitutive TEF1 promoter was constructed. It achieved an ADH activity of up to 8000 U/L and 500 U/g dry cell weight (dcw) which is in contrast to the control strain G1212/YRC102 which had an ADH activity of up to 1400 U/L and 200 U/g dcw. Gene expression analysis showed that AADH2 derepression or induction using non-fermentable carbon-sources such as ethanol, pyruvate, glycerol or 1-butanol did occur. Compared to G1212/YRC102 AADH2 knock-out strain had a slower growth rate and lower 1-butanol consumption if 1-butanol was used as sole carbon source and AADH2-transformants did not grow at all in the same conditions. However, addition of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine allowed the transformants to use 1-butanol as carbon source. The addition of these amino acids to the control strain and Δaadh2 mutant cultures had the effect of accelerating 1-butanol consumption. Our results confirm that Aadh2p plays a major

  11. Butanol is cytotoxic to Lactococcus lactis while ethanol and hexanol are cytostatic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Anne-Mette Meisner; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    resistant lactic acid bacteria. Combined results from alcohol survival rate, live/dead staining, and a novel usage of the beta-galactosidase assay, revealed that while high concentrations of ethanol and hexanol were cytostatic to L. lactis, high concentrations of butanol were cytotoxic, causing irreparable...

  12. Butanol biorefineries: simultaneous product removal & process integration for conversion of biomass & food waste to biofuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanol, a superior biofuel, packs 30% more energy than ethanol on a per gallon basis. It can be produced from various carbohydrates and lignocellulosic (biomass) feedstocks. For cost effective production of this renewable and high energy biofuel, inexpensive feedstocks and economical process techno...

  13. Butanol production from food waste: a novel process for producing sustainable energy and reducing environmental pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficient utilization of food waste for fuel and chemical production can positively influence both the energy and environmental sustainability. In these studies we investigated use of food waste to produce butanol by Clostridium beijerinckii P260. In control fermentation, 40.5 g/L of glucose (initia...

  14. Techno-economics of carbon preserving butanol production using a combined fermentative and catalytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Robert; Bauer, Fredric; Mesfun, Sennai; Hulteberg, Christian; Lundgren, Joakim; Wännström, Sune; Rova, Ulrika; Berglund, Kris Arvid

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a novel process for n-butanol production which combines a fermentation consuming carbon dioxide (succinic acid fermentation) with subsequent catalytic reduction steps to add hydrogen to form butanol. Process simulations in Aspen Plus have been the basis for the techno-economic analyses performed. The overall economy for the novel process cannot be justified, as production of succinic acid by fermentation is too costly. Though, succinic acid price is expected to drop drastically in a near future. By fully integrating the succinic acid fermentation with the catalytic conversion the need for costly recovery operations could be reduced. The hybrid process would need 22% less raw material than the butanol fermentation at a succinic acid fermentation yield of 0.7g/g substrate. Additionally, a carbon dioxide fixation of up to 13ktonnes could be achieved at a plant with an annual butanol production of 10ktonnes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Utilizing an endogenous pathway for 1-butanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Tong; Luo, Yunzi; Xiao, Han; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-03-01

    Microbial production of higher alcohols from renewable feedstock has attracted intensive attention thanks to its potential as a source for next-generation gasoline substitutes. Here we report the discovery, characterization and engineering of an endogenous 1-butanol pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Upon introduction of a single gene deletion adh1Δ, S. cerevisiae was able to accumulate more than 120 mg/L 1-butanol from glucose in rich medium. Precursor feeding, ¹³C-isotope labeling and gene deletion experiments demonstrated that the endogenous 1-butanol production was dependent on catabolism of threonine in a manner similar to fusel alcohol production by the Ehrlich pathway. Specifically, the leucine biosynthesis pathway was engaged in the conversion of key 2-keto acid intermediates. Overexpression of the pathway enzymes and elimination of competing pathways achieved the highest reported 1-butanol titer in S. cerevisiae (242.8 mg/L). Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Butanol fermentation of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru; From, Nikolaj; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    Seaweed represents an abundant, renewable, and fast-growing biomass resource for 3rd generation biofuel production. This study reports an efficient butanol fermentation process carried out by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422 using enzymatic hydrolysate of the sugar-rich brown seaweed Laminaria...

  17. Chemical constituents in n-butanol fractions of Costus afer ker Gawl leaf and stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godswill Nduka Anyasor

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The bioactive compounds identified in the n-butanol fractions of C. afer leaves and stem may explain the folkloric use of C. afer plant in the treatment of chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress related diseases. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 78-84

  18. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-04

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated.

  19. Measurement of Ring Strain Using Butanols: A Physical Chemistry Lab Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William R.; Davidson, Ada S.; Ball, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a bomb calorimeter experiment and subsequent calculations aimed at determining the strain energy of the cyclobutane backbone are described. Students use several butanol isomers instead of the parent hydrocarbons, and they manipulate liquids instead of gases, which makes the experiment much easier to perform. Experiments show that…

  20. Use of liquid/supercritical CO2 extraction process for butanol recovery from fermentation broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order for butanol fermentation to be a viable option, it is essential to recover it from fermentation broth using economical alternate in-situ product recovery techniques such as liquid/supercritical CO2 extraction as compared to distillation. This technique (liquid CO2 extraction & supercritical...

  1. Acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of corn stover by Clostridium species: present status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianzheng; Baral, Nawa Raj; Jha, Ajay Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Sustainable vehicle fuel is indispensable in future due to worldwide depletion of fossil fuel reserve, oil price fluctuation and environmental degradation. Microbial production of butanol from renewable biomass could be one of the possible options. Renewable biomass such as corn stover has no food deficiency issues and is also cheaper in most of the agricultural based countries. Thus it can effectively solve the existing issue of substrate cost. In the last 30 years, a few of Clostridium strains have been successfully implemented for biobutanol fermentation. However, the commercial production is hindered due to their poor tolerance to butanol and inhibitors. Metabolic engineering of Clostridia strains is essential to solve above problems and ultimately enhance the solvent production. An effective and efficient pretreatment of raw material as well as optimization of fermentation condition could be another option. Furthermore, biological approaches may be useful to optimize both the host and pathways to maximize butanol production. In this context, this paper reviews the existing Clostridium strains and their ability to produce butanol particularly from corn stover. This study also highlights possible fermentation pathways and biological approaches that may be useful to optimize fermentation pathways. Moreover, challenges and future perspectives are also discussed.

  2. Laboratory evaluation of the molluscicidal potency of a butanol extract of Phytolacca dodecandra (endod) berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalawy, S S

    1972-01-01

    The effect of butanol extracts of endod against Biomphalaria choanomphala, B. pfeifferi, and Bulinus (Physopsis) nasutus was tested at different concentrations and for different exposure periods. Exposure to 19-25 ppm for 6 hours or to 6-7 ppm for 24 hours caused about 100% mortality.

  3. The Influence of Water on Butanol Isomers Pervaporation Transport through Polyethylene Membrane..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petričkovič, Roman; Setničková, Kateřina; Uchytil, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 107, APR 2 (2013), s. 85-90 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/1165 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : pervaporation * binary mixtures butanol isomers- water * polyethylene membranes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.065, year: 2013

  4. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the n-butanol fraction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The n-butanol leaf fraction of Vernonia glaberrima was evaluated for its toxicity, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. The leaves of V. glaberrima were collected, identified and extracted with methanol using maceration method and the resulting crude methanol extract was then partitioned using different solvents of ...

  5. Butanol production under microaerobic conditions with a symbiotic system of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pengfei; Wang, Genyu; Wang, Gehua; Børresen, Børre Tore; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan

    2016-01-14

    One major problem of ABE (acetone, butanol and ethanol) fermentation is high oxygen sensitivity of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Currently, no single strain has been isolated or genetically engineered to produce butanol effectively under aerobic conditions. In our previous work, a symbiotic system TSH06 has been developed successfully by our group, and two strains, C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and Bacillus cereus TSH2, were isolated from TSH06. Compared with single culture, TSH06 showed promotion on cell growth and solvent accumulation under microaerobic conditions. To simulate TSH06, a new symbiotic system was successfully re-constructed by adding living cells of B. cereus TSH2 into C. acetobutylicum TSH1 cultures. During the fermentation process, the function of B. cereus TSH2 was found to deplete oxygen and provide anaerobic environment for C. acetobutylicum TSH1. Furthermore, inoculation ratio of C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2 affected butanol production. In a batch fermentation with optimized inoculation ratio of 5 % C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and 0.5 % B. cereus TSH2, 11.0 g/L butanol and 18.1 g/L ABE were produced under microaerobic static condition. In contrast to the single culture of C. acetobutylicum TSH1, the symbiotic system became more aerotolerant and was able to produce 11.2 g/L butanol in a 5 L bioreactor even with continuous 0.15 L/min air sparging. In addition, qPCR assay demonstrated that the abundance of B. cereus TSH2 increased quickly at first and then decreased sharply to lower than 1 %, whereas C. acetobutylicum TSH1 accounted for more than 99 % of the whole population in solventogenic phase. The characterization of a novel symbiotic system on butanol fermentation was studied. The new symbiotic system re-constructed by co-culture of C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2 showed excellent performance on butanol production under microaerobic conditions. B. cereus TSH2 was a good partner for C. acetobutylicum TSH1 by providing an anaerobic

  6. Chemical constituents in n-butanol fractions of Castus afer ker Gawl leaf and stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyasor, Godswill Nduka; Funmilayo, Onajobi; Odutola, Osilesi; Olugbenga, Adebawo; Oboutor, Efere Martins

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the bioactive compounds in Costus afer Ker Gawl, an indigenous African medicinal plant whose leaf and stem extracts are used in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases, especially rheumatism and arthritis. The bioactive compounds present in the n-butanol fractions of C. afer leaf and stem were identified using qualitative phytochemical evaluation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analytical method, comparing the mass spectra of the identified compounds with those of the National Institute of Standards and Technology database library. Qualitative analysis detected alkaloids, saponins, diterpenes, triterpenes, phytosterol, phlobatannins, and tannins in both n-butanol fractions of C. afer leaf and stem. Phenols were detected in leaves alone while flavonoids were present in stem alone. GC/MS data showed that the bioactive compounds in n-butanol fraction of C. afer leaf were indolizine, 2-methoxy-4 vinylphenol, phytol, hexadecanoic acid-methyl ester, n-hexadecanoic acid, 9,12-octadecanoic acid-methyl ester, eicosane, cis-vaccenic acid and oleic acid while n-butanol fraction of C. afer stem contain benzofuran,2,3-dihydro,2-methoxy-4 vinylphenol, 9-octadecenoic acid (Z)-2-hydroxy-1-(hydroxymethyl) ethyl ester, campesterol, stigmasterol, hexadecanoic acid-methyl ester, n-hexadecanoic acid, and cis-vaccenic acid. The bioactive compounds identified in the n-butanol fractions of C. afer leaves and stem may explain the folkloric use of C. afer plant in the treatment of chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress related diseases.

  7. Inflammatory Mediator Profiling of n-butanol Exposed Upper Airways in Individuals with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Meinertz Dantoft

    Full Text Available Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS is a chronic condition characterized by reports of recurrent symptoms in response to low level exposure to various chemical substances. Recent findings suggests that dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in MCS pathophysiology.The aim of this study was to examine baseline and low dose n-butanol-induced upper airway inflammatory response profiles in MCS subjects versus healthy controls.Eighteen participants with MCS and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Epithelial lining fluid was collected from the nasal cavity at three time points: baseline, within 15 minutes after being exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol in an exposure chamber and four hours after exposure termination. A total of 19 cytokines and chemokines were quantified. Furthermore, at baseline and during the exposure session, participants rated the perceived intensity, valence and levels of symptoms and autonomic recordings were obtained.The physiological and psychophysical measurements during the n-butanol exposure session verified a specific response in MCS individuals only. However, MCS subjects and healthy controls displayed similar upper airway inflammatory mediator profiles (P>0.05 at baseline. Likewise, direct comparison of mediator levels in the MCS group and controls after n-butanol exposure revealed no significant group differences.We demonstrate no abnormal upper airway inflammatory mediator levels in MCS subjects before or after a symptom-eliciting exposure to low dose n-butanol, implying that upper airways of MCS subjects are functionally intact at the level of cytokine and chemokine production and secretory capacity. This suggests that previous findings of increased cytokine plasma levels in MCS are unlikely to be caused by systemic priming via excessive upper airway inflammatory processes.

  8. Butanol production in a first-generation Brazilian sugarcane biorefinery: technical aspects and economics of greenfield projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Adriano Pinto; Dias, Marina O S; Junqueira, Tassia L; Cunha, Marcelo P; Bonomi, Antonio; Filho, Rubens Maciel

    2013-05-01

    The techno-economics of greenfield projects of a first-generation sugarcane biorefinery aimed to produce ethanol, sugar, power, and n-butanol was conducted taking into account different butanol fermentation technologies (regular microorganism and mutant strain with improved butanol yield) and market scenarios (chemicals and automotive fuel). The complete sugarcane biorefinery with the batch acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process was simulated using Aspen Plus®. The biorefinery was designed to process 2 million tonne sugarcane per year and utilize 25%, 50%, and 25% of the available sugarcane juice to produce sugar, ethanol, and butanol, respectively. The investment on a biorefinery with butanol production showed to be more attractive [14.8% IRR, P(IRR>12%)=0.99] than the conventional 50:50 (ethanol:sugar) annexed plant [13.3% IRR, P(IRR>12%)=0.80] only in the case butanol is produced by an improved microorganism and traded as a chemical. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermodynamic properties of ternary mixtures containing water, 2-ethoxyethanol, and t-butanol at 298.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva Prasad, V.; Rajagopal, E.; Manohara Murthy, N.

    2010-12-01

    Ultrasonic speeds and isentropic compressibilities were measured at 298.15 K in the water-rich region of aqueous solutions of water + 2-ethoxyethanol (2EE) + t-butanol. The excess properties of ultrasonic speed and isentropic compressibility were also calculated and have been discussed in terms of molecular interactions. The concentrations of t-butanol at which ultrasonic speed becomes maximum and isentropic compressibility becomes minimum are found to decrease with increase in the concentration of 2EE in the cosolvent (aqueous 2EE). This behavior indicates that the aqueous ternary solutions are less structured than aqueous t-butanol. This behavior is explained as due to a decrease in the ability of t-butanol to form clathrate hydrates owing to the presence of 2EE. When the concentration of 2EE in the cosolvent ( x 2EE) > 0.14, ultrasonic speed decreases and isentropic compressibility increases with concentration of t-butanol indicating that the ternary solution behaves as normal solution wherein any further addition of 2EE or t-butanol leads to destabilization of the hydrogen bonded structure of water and t-butanol looses its ability to form clathrate hydrates in aqueous solutions.

  10. A Numerical Study of Spray Characteristics in Medium Speed Engine Fueled by Different HFO/n-Butanol Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Nowruzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, nonreacting and nonevaporating spray characteristics of heavy fuel oil (HFO/n-butanol blends are numerically investigated under two different high pressure injections in medium speed engines. An Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase scheme is used to simulate blend of C14H30 as HFO and 0%, 10%, 15%, and 20% by volume of n-butanol. OpenFOAM CFD toolbox is modified and implemented to study the effect of different blends of HFO/n-butanol on the spray characteristics at 600 and 1000 bar. To validate the presented simulations, current numerical results are compared against existing experimental data and good compliance is achieved. Based on the numerical findings, addition of n-butanol to HFO increases the particles volume in parcels at 600 bar. It was also found that blend fuels increase the number of spray particles and the average velocity of spray compared to pure HFO. Moreover, under injection pressure of 1000 bar, HFO/n-butanol blends compared to pure HFO fuel decrease particles volume in parcels of spray. Another influence of HFO/n-butanol blends is the decrease in average of particles diameter in parcels. Meanwhile, the effect of HFO/n-butanol on spray length is proved to be negligible. Finally, it can be concluded that higher injection pressure improves the spray efficiency.

  11. Ethyl acetate-n-butanol gradient solvent system for high-speed countercurrent chromatography to screen bioactive substances in okra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Hao; Jiang, Heyuan; Liu, Huan; Chen, Fangjuan; Du, Qizhen

    2014-09-12

    High-speed countercurrent chromatographic separation (HSCCC) possesses the property of zero-loss of sample, which is very useful for the screening of bioactive components. In the present study, the ethyl acetate-n-butanol gradient HSCCC solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-n-butanol-water was investigated for the screening of bioactive substances. To screen the antiproliferative compounds in okra extract, we used the stationary phase ethyl acetate-n-butanol-water (1:1:10) as the stationary phase, and eluted the antiproliferative components by 6-steps of gradient using mobile phases n-hexane-ethyl acetate (1:2), n-hexane-ethyl acetate (1:4), n-hexane-ethyl acetate (0:4), n-butanol-ethyl acetate (1:4) n-butanol-ethyl acetate (1:2), n-butanol-ethyl acetate (2:2), and n-butanol-ethyl acetate (2:1). The fractions collected from HSCCC separation with the gradient solvent system were assayed for antiproliferative activity against cancer cells. Bioactive components were identified: a major anti-cancer compound, 4'-hydroxy phenethyl trans-ferulate, with middle activity, and a minor anti-cancer compound, carolignan, with strong activity. The result shows that the gradient solvent system is potential for the screening of bioactive compounds from natural products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of n-butanol blending on the ignition delay times of gasoline and its surrogate at high pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Agbro, Edirin

    2016-09-24

    The influence of blending n-butanol at 20% by volume on the ignition delay times for a reference gasoline was studied in a rapid compression machine (RCM) for stoichiometric fuel/air mixtures at 20 bar and 678-858 K. Delay times for the blend lay between those of stoichiometric gasoline and stoichiometric n-butanol across the temperature range studied. At lower temperatures, delays for the blend were however, much closer to those of n-butanol than gasoline despite n-butanol being only 20% of the mixture. Under these conditions n-butanol acted as an octane enhancer over and above what might be expected from a simple linear blending law. The ability of a gasoline surrogate, based on a toluene reference fuel (TRF), to capture the main trends of the gasoline/n-butanol blending behaviour was also tested within the RCM. The 3-component TRF based on a mixture of toluene, n-heptane and iso-octane was able to capture the trends well across the temperature range studied. Simulations of ignition delay times were also performed using a detailed blended n-butanol/TRF mechanism based on the adiabatic core assumption and volume histories from the experimental data. Overall, the model captured the main features of the blending behaviour, although at the lowest temperatures, predicted ignition delays for stoichiometric n-butanol were longer than those observed. A brute-force local sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the main chemical processes driving the ignition behaviour of the TRF, n-butanol and blended fuels. The reactions of fuel + OH dominated the sensitivities at lower temperatures, with H abstraction from n-butanol from a and 7 sites being key for both the n-butanol and the blend. At higher temperatures the decomposition of H2O2 and reactions of HO2 and that of formaldehyde with OH became critical, in common with the ignition behaviour of other fiiels. Remaining uncertainties in the rates of these key reactions are discussed. Crown Copyright (C) 2016 Published

  13. Phase equilibria in water-(1-, 2-, iso-)butanol-18-crown-6 systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, N. A.; Golovina, N. B.; Bogachev, A. G.; Uspenskaya, I. A.

    2011-09-01

    We present the results from measuring the solubility of 18-crown-6 in isobutanol in the temperature interval of 280-308 K and information about liquid-liquid equilibria in water-(1-, 2-, iso-)butanol-18-crown-6 systems at 298 K. The parameter values of the extended UNIQUAC model were determined on the basis of information about the thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria in the binary systems. It is shown that we must use parameters of ternary interaction in addition to binary parameters to adequately describe the miscibility gap on the basis of the results of turbidimetric titration in ternary water-(1-,2-, iso)butanol-18-crown-6 systems.

  14. Thermophysical properties of N, N-dimethylacetamide mixtures with n-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharolkar, Aruna P.; Murugkar, A. G.; Khirade, P. W.; Mehrotra, S. C.

    2017-09-01

    The refraction, dielectric, viscosity, density, data of the binary mixtures of N, N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) with n-butanol at 308.15 and 313.15 K. The measured parameters used to obtain derived properties like Bruggeman factor, molar refraction and excess static dielectric constant, excess inverse relaxation time, excess molar volume and excess viscosity, excess molar refraction. The variation in magnitude with composition and temperature of these quantities has been used to discuss the type, strength and nature of binary interactions. Results confirm that there are strong hydrogen-bond interactions between unlike molecules of DMA+ n-butanol mixtures and that 1: 1 complexes are formed and strength of intermolecular interaction increases with temperature.

  15. Targeted mutagenesis of the Clostridium acetobutylicum acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksley, Clare M; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Hengzheng; Redl, Stephanie; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P

    2012-11-01

    The production of the chemical solvents acetone and butanol by the bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum was one of the first large-scale industrial processes to be developed, and in the first part of the last century ranked second in importance only to ethanol production. After a steep decline in its industrial use, there has been a recent resurgence of interest in the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process, with a particular emphasis on butanol production. In order to generate strains suitable for efficient use on an industrial scale, metabolic engineering is required to alter the AB ratio in favour of butanol, and eradicate the production of unwanted products of fermentation. Using ClosTron technology, a large-scale targeted mutagenesis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was carried out, generating a set of 10 mutants, defective in alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (adhE1, adhE2), butanol dehydrogenases A and B (bdhA, bdhB), phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb), acetate kinase (ack), acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc), CoA transferase (ctfA/ctfB), and a previously uncharacterised putative alcohol dehydrogenase (CAP0059). However, inactivation of the main hydrogenase (hydA) and thiolase (thl) could not be achieved. Constructing such a series of mutants is paramount for the acquisition of information on the mechanism of solvent production in this organism, and the subsequent development of industrial solvent producing strains. Unexpectedly, bdhA and bdhB mutants did not affect solvent production, whereas inactivation of the previously uncharacterised gene CAP0059 resulted in increased acetone, butanol, and ethanol formation. Other mutants showed predicted phenotypes, including a lack of acetone formation (adc, ctfA, and ctfB mutants), an inability to take up acids (ctfA and ctfB mutants), and a much reduced acetate formation (ack mutant). The adhE1 mutant in particular produced very little solvents, demonstrating that this gene was indeed the main contributor to

  16. Bioreactors and in situ product recovery techniques for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si-Yu; Chiang, Chung-Jen; Tseng, I-Ting; He, Chi-Ruei; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2016-07-01

    The microbial fermentation process is one of the sustainable and environment-friendly ways to produce 1-butanol and other bio-based chemicals. The success of the fermentation process greatly relies on the choice of bioreactors and the separation methods. In this review, the history and the performance of bioreactors for the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is discussed. The subject is then focused on in situ product recovery (ISPR) techniques, particularly for the integrated extraction-gas stripping. The usefulness of this promising hybrid ISPR device is acknowledged by its incorporation with batch, fed-batch and continuous processes to improve the performance of ABE fermentation. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. High acetone-butanol-ethanol production in pH-stat co-feeding of acetate and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Wang, Qunhui; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported the metabolic analysis of butanol and acetone production from exogenous acetate by (13)C tracer experiments (Gao et al., RSC Adv., 5, 8486-8495, 2015). To clarify the influence of acetate on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production, we first performed an enzyme assay in Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acetate addition was found to drastically increase the activities of key enzymes involved in the acetate uptake (phosphate acetyltransferase and CoA transferase), acetone formation (acetoacetate decarboxylase), and butanol formation (butanol dehydrogenase) pathways. Subsequently, supplementation of acetate during acidogenesis and early solventogenesis resulted in a significant increase in ABE production. To establish an efficient ABE production system using acetate as a co-substrate, several shot strategies were investigated in batch culture. Batch cultures with two substrate shots without pH control produced 14.20 g/L butanol and 23.27 g/L ABE with a maximum specific butanol production rate of 0.26 g/(g h). Furthermore, pH-controlled (at pH 5.5) batch cultures with two substrate shots resulted in not only improved acetate consumption but also a further increase in ABE production. Finally, we obtained 15.13 g/L butanol and 24.37 g/L ABE at the high specific butanol production rate of 0.34 g/(g h) using pH-stat co-feeding method. Thus, in this study, we established a high ABE production system using glucose and acetate as co-substrates in a pH-stat co-feeding system with C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Performance comparison of ethanol and butanol production in a continuous and closed-circulating fermentation system with membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunyan; Long, Sihua; Li, Airong; Xiao, Guoqing; Wang, Linyuan; Xiao, Zeyi

    2017-03-16

    Since both ethanol and butanol fermentations are urgently developed processes with the biofuel-demand increasing, performance comparison of aerobic ethanol fermentation and anerobic butanol fermentation in a continuous and closed-circulating fermentation (CCCF) system was necessary to achieve their fermentation characteristics and further optimize the fermentation process. Fermentation and pervaporation parameters including the average cell concentration, glucose consumption rate, cumulated production concentration, product flux, and separation factor of ethanol fermentation were 11.45 g/L, 3.70 g/L/h, 655.83 g/L, 378.5 g/m 2 /h, and 4.83, respectively, the corresponding parameters of butanol fermentation were 2.19 g/L, 0.61 g/L/h, 28.03 g/L, 58.56 g/m 2 /h, and 10.62, respectively. Profiles of fermentation and pervaporation parameters indicated that the intensity and efficiency of ethanol fermentation was higher than butanol fermentation, but the stability of butanol fermentation was superior to ethanol fermentation. Although the two fermentation processes had different features, the performance indicated the application prospect of both ethanol and butanol production by the CCCF system.

  19. Butanol production from wood pulping hydrolysate in an integrated fermentation-gas stripping process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, CC; Dong, J; Yang, ST

    2013-09-01

    Wood pulping hydrolysate (WPH) containing mainly xylose and glucose as a potential substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was studied. Due to the inhibitors present in the hydrolysate, several dilution levels and detoxification treatments, including overliming, activated charcoal adsorption, and resin adsorption, were evaluated for their effectiveness in relieving the inhibition on fermentation. Detoxification using resin and evaporation was found to be the most effective method in reducing the toxicity of WPH. ABE production in batch fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii increased 68%, from 6.73 g/L in the non-treated and non-diluted WPH to 11.35 g/L in the resin treated WPH. With gas stripping for in situ product removal, ABE production from WPH increased to 17.73 g/L, demonstrating that gas stripping was effective in alleviating butanol toxicity by selectively separating butanol from the fermentation broth, which greatly improved solvents production and sugar conversion in the fermentation. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Butanol production from wood pulping hydrolysate in an integrated fermentation-gas stripping process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Congcong; Dong, Jie; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2013-09-01

    Wood pulping hydrolysate (WPH) containing mainly xylose and glucose as a potential substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was studied. Due to the inhibitors present in the hydrolysate, several dilution levels and detoxification treatments, including overliming, activated charcoal adsorption, and resin adsorption, were evaluated for their effectiveness in relieving the inhibition on fermentation. Detoxification using resin and evaporation was found to be the most effective method in reducing the toxicity of WPH. ABE production in batch fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii increased 68%, from 6.73 g/L in the non-treated and non-diluted WPH to 11.35 g/L in the resin treated WPH. With gas stripping for in situ product removal, ABE production from WPH increased to 17.73 g/L, demonstrating that gas stripping was effective in alleviating butanol toxicity by selectively separating butanol from the fermentation broth, which greatly improved solvents production and sugar conversion in the fermentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimization of wastewater microalgae saccharification using dilute acid hydrolysis for acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Yessica; Ellis, Joshua T.; Miller, Charles D.; Sims, Ronald C.

    2015-02-01

    Exploring and developing sustainable and efficient technologies for biofuel production are crucial for averting global consequences associated with fuel shortages and climate change. Optimization of sugar liberation from wastewater algae through acid hydrolysis was determined for subsequent fermentation to acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acid concentration, retention time, and temperature were evaluated to determine optimal hydrolysis conditions by assessing the sugar and ABE yield as well as the associated costs. Sulfuric acid concentrations ranging from 0-1.5 M, retention times of 40-120 min, and temperatures from 23°C- 90°C were combined to form a full factorial experiment. Acid hydrolysis pretreatment of 10% dried wastewater microalgae using 1.0 M sulfuric acid for 120 min at 80-90°C was found to be the optimal parameters, with a sugar yield of 166.1 g for kg of dry algae, concentrations of 5.23 g/L of total ABE, and 3.74 g/L of butanol at a rate of USD $12.83 per kg of butanol.

  2. Lignocellulosic butanol production from Napier grass using semi-simultaneous saccharification fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chi-Ruei; Kuo, Yu-Yuan; Li, Si-Yu

    2017-05-01

    Napier grass is a potential feedstock for biofuel production because of its strong adaptability and wide availability. Compositional analysis has been done on Napier grass which was collected from a local area of Taiwan. By comparing acid- and alkali-pretreatment, it was found that the alkali-pretreatment process is favorable for Napier grass. An overall glucose yield of 0.82g/g-glucose total can be obtained with the combination of alkali-pretreatment (2.5wt% NaOH, 8wt% sample loading, 121°C, and a reaction time of 40min) and enzymatic hydrolysis (40FPU/g-substrate). Semi-simultaneous saccharification fermentation (sSSF) was carried out, where enzymatic hydrolysis and ABE fermentation were operated in the same batch. It was found that after 24-h hydrolysis, followed by 96-h fermentation, the butanol and acetone concentrations reached 9.45 and 4.85g/L, respectively. The butanol yield reached 0.22g/g-sugar glucose+xylose . Finally, the efficiency of butanol production from Napier grass was calculated at 31%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A microbial platform for renewable propane synthesis based on a fermentative butanol pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Navya; Pásztor, András; Menon, Binuraj Rk; Kallio, Pauli; Fisher, Karl; Akhtar, M Kalim; Leys, David; Jones, Patrik R; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2015-01-01

    Propane (C3H8) is a volatile hydrocarbon with highly favourable physicochemical properties as a fuel, in addition to existing global markets and infrastructure for storage, distribution and utilization in a wide range of applications. Consequently, propane is an attractive target product in research aimed at developing new renewable alternatives to complement currently used petroleum-derived fuels. This study focuses on the construction and evaluation of alternative microbial biosynthetic pathways for the production of renewable propane. The new pathways utilize CoA intermediates that are derived from clostridial-like fermentative butanol pathways and are therefore distinct from the first microbial propane pathways recently engineered in Escherichia coli. We report the assembly and evaluation of four different synthetic pathways for the production of propane and butanol, designated a) atoB-adhE2 route, b) atoB-TPC7 route, c) nphT7-adhE2 route and d) nphT7-TPC7 route. The highest butanol titres were achieved with the atoB-adhE2 (473 ± 3 mg/L) and atoB-TPC7 (163 ± 2 mg/L) routes. When aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) was co-expressed with these pathways, the engineered hosts also produced propane. The atoB-TPC7-ADO pathway was the most effective in producing propane (220 ± 3 μg/L). By (i) deleting competing pathways, (ii) including a previously designed ADOA134F variant with an enhanced specificity towards short-chain substrates and (iii) including a ferredoxin-based electron supply system, the propane titre was increased (3.40 ± 0.19 mg/L). This study expands the metabolic toolbox for renewable propane production and provides new insight and understanding for the development of next-generation biofuel platforms. In developing an alternative CoA-dependent fermentative butanol pathway, which includes an engineered ADO variant (ADOA134F), the study addresses known limitations, including the low bio-availability of butyraldehyde precursors

  4. Butanol production from food waste: a novel process for producing sustainable energy and reducing environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haibo; Singh, Vijay; Qureshi, Nasib

    2015-01-01

    Waste is currently a major problem in the world, both in the developing and the developed countries. Efficient utilization of food waste for fuel and chemical production can positively influence both the energy and environmental sustainability. This study investigated using food waste to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by Clostridium beijerinckii P260. In control fermentation, 40.5 g/L of glucose (initial glucose 56.7 g/L) was used to produce 14.2 g/L of ABE with a fermentation productivity and a yield of 0.22 g/L/h and 0.35 g/g, respectively. In a similar fermentation 81 g/L of food waste (containing equivalent glucose of 60.1 g/L) was used as substrate, and the culture produced 18.9 g/L ABE with a high ABE productivity of 0.46 g/L/h and a yield of 0.38 g/g. Fermentation of food waste at higher concentrations (129, 181 and 228 g/L) did not remarkably increase ABE production but resulted in high residual glucose due to the culture butanol inhibition. An integrated vacuum stripping system was designed and applied to recover butanol from the fermentation broth simultaneously to relieve the culture butanol inhibition, thereby allowing the fermentation of food waste at high concentrations. ABE fermentation integrated with vacuum stripping successfully recovered the ABE from the fermentation broth and controlled the ABE concentrations below 10 g/L during fermentation when 129 g/L food waste was used. The ABE productivity with vacuum fermentation was 0.49 g/L/h, which was 109 % higher than the control fermentation (glucose based). More importantly, ABE vacuum recovery and fermentation allowed near-complete utilization of the sugars (~98 %) in the broth. In these studies it was demonstrated that food waste is a superior feedstock for producing butanol using Clostridium beijerinckii. Compared to costly glucose, ABE fermentation of food waste has several advantages including lower feedstock cost, higher productivity, and less residual sugars.

  5. Selective extraction of alkaline phosphatase and 5'-nucleotidase from milk fat globule membranes by a single phase n-butanol procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Y S; Snow, L D

    1993-08-01

    A single phase extraction procedure employing 8% (v/v) n-butanol at room temperature extracted over 90% of alkaline phosphatase activity and over 60% of 5'-nucleotidase activity from bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM). For 5'-nucleotidase, higher n-butanol concentrations lead to loss of activity, while lower concentrations were ineffective in extracting the enzyme. When extractions were performed at 0 degrees C, similar yields were obtained for alkaline phosphatase extraction with 8% (v/v) n-butanol, but 5'-nucleotidase extraction required 10% (v/v) n-butanol for similar yields. However, 5'-nucleotidase was less susceptible to denaturation during extraction at 0 degrees C. The Km values and substrate specificities for both alkaline phosphatase and 5'-nucleotidase were unchanged by extraction with 8% (v/v) n-butanol. The 8% (v/v) n-butanol extraction procedure provides a 3-fold purification step, and an enzyme preparation suitable for further purification.

  6. Impact of nanoparticles and butanol on properties and spray characteristics of waste cooking oil biodiesel and pure rapeseed oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, K. H.; Hossain, A. K.

    2017-11-01

    Renewable biofuels can offset greenhouse gases by replacing fossil fuels destined for internal combustion engines. However, biofuels have their own setbacks and may lead to poor combustion inside the engine cylinder. In this study, nanoparticles and butanol were blended either separately or together with waste cooking oil biodiesel and neat rape seed oil to investigate the impact of these additives on the properties and spray characteristics. The investigation comprised of three stages, with each having an effect on how the next stage of the investigation was conducted. Initially, the physicochemical characteristics of 25ppm, 50ppm, 75ppm and 100ppm concentrations of aluminium oxide and copper oxide nanoparticle blends with fossil diesel, waste cooking oil biodiesel and rapeseed oil were investigated. The results from first stage investigation showed that, in general, blends containing aluminium oxide nanoparticles gave better results for almost all the concentrations when compared with copper oxide nanoparticle blends with the same nanoparticle concentrations. Overall, waste cooking oil biodiesel blended with 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticle showed most promising results like the flash point of 159.3°C, kinematic viscosity @40°C of 4.66 cSt, and gross calorific value of 44.43 MJ/kg. These values were 61.6% higher, 51.3% higher and 3.2% lower than that of corresponding fossil diesel values. Subsequently, in the second stage of the study, the addition of butanol was investigated to assess its ability to enhance the emulsion of biofuel-nanoparticles blends. Four blends containing 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol, and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol, with and without 100ppm Al2O3 were prepared. Results showed that the kinematic viscosity of the fuel blends containing 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticles were decreased by 0.4% and 3.3%, for 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol blends respectively, when compared to without the nanoparticles. The

  7. Impact of nanoparticles and butanol on properties and spray characteristics of waste cooking oil biodiesel and pure rapeseed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. H.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable biofuels can offset greenhouse gases by replacing fossil fuels destined for internal combustion engines. However, biofuels have their own setbacks and may lead to poor combustion inside the engine cylinder. In this study, nanoparticles and butanol were blended either separately or together with waste cooking oil biodiesel and neat rape seed oil to investigate the impact of these additives on the properties and spray characteristics. The investigation comprised of three stages, with each having an effect on how the next stage of the investigation was conducted. Initially, the physicochemical characteristics of 25ppm, 50ppm, 75ppm and 100ppm concentrations of aluminium oxide and copper oxide nanoparticle blends with fossil diesel, waste cooking oil biodiesel and rapeseed oil were investigated. The results from first stage investigation showed that, in general, blends containing aluminium oxide nanoparticles gave better results for almost all the concentrations when compared with copper oxide nanoparticle blends with the same nanoparticle concentrations. Overall, waste cooking oil biodiesel blended with 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticle showed most promising results like the flash point of 159.3°C, kinematic viscosity @40°C of 4.66 cSt, and gross calorific value of 44.43 MJ/kg. These values were 61.6% higher, 51.3% higher and 3.2% lower than that of corresponding fossil diesel values. Subsequently, in the second stage of the study, the addition of butanol was investigated to assess its ability to enhance the emulsion of biofuel-nanoparticles blends. Four blends containing 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol, and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol, with and without 100ppm Al2O3 were prepared. Results showed that the kinematic viscosity of the fuel blends containing 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticles were decreased by 0.4% and 3.3%, for 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol blends respectively, when compared to without

  8. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhen Luo

    Full Text Available In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1 extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2 enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3 direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology.

  9. Construction of CoA-dependent 1-butanol synthetic pathway functions under aerobic conditions in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Naoya; Vangnai, Alisa S; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Tajima, Takahisa; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Kato, Junichi

    2015-06-20

    1-Butanol is an important industrial platform chemical and an advanced biofuel. While various groups have attempted to construct synthetic pathways for 1-butanol production, efforts to construct a pathway that functions under aerobic conditions have met with limited success. Here, we constructed a CoA-dependent 1-butanol synthetic pathway that functions under aerobic conditions in Escherichia coli, by expanding the previously reported (R)-1,3-butanediol synthetic pathway. The pathway consists of phaA (acetyltransferase) and phaB (NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase) from Ralstonia eutropha, phaJ ((R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase) from Aeromonas caviae, ter (trans-enoyl-CoA reductase) from Treponema denticola, bld (butylraldehyde dehydrogenase) from Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum, and inherent alcohol dehydrogenase(s) from E. coli. To evaluate the potential of this pathway for 1-butanol production, culture conditions, including volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa) and pH were optimized in a mini-jar fermenter. Under optimal conditions, 1-butanol was produced at a concentration of up to 8.60gL(-1) after 46h of fed-batch cultivation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. On the high-temperature combustion of n-butanol: Shock tube data and an improved kinetic model

    KAUST Repository

    Vasu, Subith S.

    2013-11-21

    The combustion of n-butanol has received significant interest in recent years, because of its potential use in transportation applications. Researchers have extensively studied its combustion chemistry, using both experimental and theoretical methods; however, additional work is needed under specific conditions to improve our understanding of n-butanol combustion. In this study, we report new OH time-history data during the high-temperature oxidation of n-butanol behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 1300-1550 K and at pressures near 2 atm. These data were obtained at Stanford University, using narrow-line-width ring dye laser absorption of the R1(5) line of OH near 306.7 nm. Measured OH time histories were modeled using comprehensive n-butanol literature mechanisms. It was found that n-butanol unimolecular decomposition rate constants commonly used in chemical kinetic models, as well as those determined from theoretical studies, are unable to predict the data presented herein. Therefore, an improved high-temperature mechanism is presented here, which incorporates recently reported rate constants measured in a single pulse shock tube [C. M. Rosado-Reyes and W. Tsang, J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 9825-9831]. Discussions are presented on the validity of the proposed mechanism against other literature shock tube experiments. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. Enzymology of acetone-butanol-isopropanol formation. Final technical report, June 1, 1985--July 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiann-Shin

    1998-03-01

    Several species of anaerobic bacteria within the genus Clostridium produce acetone, n-butanol, and isopropanol (solvents), which are important industrial chemicals and fuel additives. Commercial production of solvents by the clostridia is a classical example of largescale chemical production by bacterial fermentation. Although the fermentation has been in use for decades, it still faces problems that include strain degeneration, a relatively low final product concentration due to butanol toxicity, and a need to fine-tune the growth conditions to achieve a high yield. The long-term goal of this project was to understand the fundamental properties of bacterial solvent production for the purpose of achieving a positive control on the metabolic switch leading to solvent production and on the proportion of useful products formed as well as of developing strategies for preventing the degeneration of producing strains. The objectives for the project included those approved in 1985 for the initial project period and those approved in 1988, 1991, and 1994 when the project was renewed. The objectives for the entire project period may be summarized as (1) To purify and characterize the enzymes that are specifically required for the formation of acetone, butanol, and isopropanol by the clostridia, (2) To clone and characterize the genes that encode enzymes or regulatory proteins for the production of solvents, and the emphasis was to determine the control mechanism for the transcription of the solvent-production genes, (3) To characterize the onset of solvent production and the intra- and extra-cellular parameters surrounding the metabolic switch to solvent production, and (4) To determine the genetic identity of the strains of solvent-producing clostridia that are currently in use by investigators around the world.

  12. Green chemistry: Efficient epoxides ring-opening with 1-butanol under microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Vidal, Jesus A. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Campus Universitario, Avda. de Elvas, s/n, E-06071-Badajoz (Spain); Duran-Valle, Carlos J. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Campus Universitario, Avda. de Elvas, s/n, E-06071-Badajoz (Spain)]. E-mail: carlosdv@unex.es; Ferrera-Escudero, Santiago [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C/Senda del Rey, 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-06-30

    Two activated carbons treated with mineral acids (HNO{sub 3} and sulfonitric mixture) have been tested as acid catalysts in the epoxides (1,2-epoxyhexane and styrene oxide) ring-opening reaction with 1-butanol under microwave (MW) irradiation. The mayor obtained product is that resulting of the alcohol addition to the most substituted carbon in the epoxide ring. The most active catalyst is that treated with sulfonitric mixture. The use of a MW oven allows achieving to the complete conversion of styrene oxide in only 2 min.

  13. Butanol production from food waste: a novel process for producing sustainable energy and reducing environmental pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Haibo; Singh, Vijay; Qureshi, Nasib

    2015-01-01

    Background Waste is currently a major problem in the world, both in the developing and the developed countries. Efficient utilization of food waste for fuel and chemical production can positively influence both the energy and environmental sustainability. This study investigated using food waste to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by Clostridium beijerinckii P260. Results In control fermentation, 40.5 g/L of glucose (initial glucose 56.7 g/L) was used to produce 14.2 g/L of ABE wit...

  14. CINÉTICA DE LA PRODUCCIÓN DE ACETONA-BUTANOL.

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Córdoba, Manuel Enrique; J. R. Hernández; Jiménez, U.F.

    2011-01-01

    Se estudió el cumplimiento cinético de la fermentación acetobutílica, utilizando el clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL-B594.Se empleó almidón de banano al 2% como sustrato, condiciones de pH inicial de 5,5 y temperatura constante de 36ºC. la relación de butanol, acetona y etanol obtenida fue de 9:3:2 al cabo de 96 horas de proceso.

  15. Inflammatory Mediator Profiling of n-butanol Exposed Upper Airways in Individuals with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by reports of recurrent symptoms in response to low level exposure to various chemical substances. Recent findings suggests that dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in MCS pathophysiology. The aim of this study......-eliciting exposure to low dose n-butanol, implying that upper airways of MCS subjects are functionally intact at the level of cytokine and chemokine production and secretory capacity. This suggests that previous findings of increased cytokine plasma levels in MCS are unlikely to be caused by systemic priming via...

  16. Investigation of uncertainties associated with the production of n-butanol through ethanol catalysis in sugarcane biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lucas G; Dias, Marina O S; MacLean, Heather L; Bonomi, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the viability of n-butanol production integrated within a first and second generation sugarcane biorefinery. The evaluation included a deterministic analysis as well as a stochastic approach, the latter using Monte Carlo simulation. Results were promising for n-butanol production in terms of revenues per tonne of processed sugarcane, but discouraging with respect to internal rate of return (IRR). The uncertainty analysis determined there was high risk involved in producing n-butanol and co-products from ethanol catalysis. It is unlikely that these products and associated production route will be financially attractive in the short term without lower investment costs, supportive public policies and tax incentives coupled with biofuels' production strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Studies on Dielectric Properties of Binary Polar Mixtures of n-Butanol-Mutual Correlation and Excess Thermodynamic Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, B. B.

    1984-07-01

    Dielectric constant of binary mixtures of six polar liquids with n-butanol has been measured at radio frequency. The data has been utilised for calculation of (i) mutual correlation factor, gab, between the unlike molecules and (ii) contribution of the unlike molecules to the excess free energy of mixing, \\varDelta Fab, and excess entropy \\varDelta Sab. The value of gab in mixture of the alcohols (n-butanol with methanol and n-propanol) remains above unity while for mixtures where the other component is a nonassociated liquid (n-butanol in chlorobenzene/aniline/ethyl benzoate/methyl benzoate) go below unity. These indicate predominance of microheterogeneous clustres with co-operative angular correlation (α-cluster) in the case of alcohol mixtures and of clusters with destructive angular correlation (β-cluster) in mixtures where one component is a non-associated liquid. The excess thermodynamic parameters calculated from this data also qualitatively support this view.

  18. Effect of Butanol Extract of Maturated Mahkota Dewa (Phaleria macrocarpa Fruit on Liver Tissue of Mice (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARIF SOEKSMANTO

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Mahkota dewa (Phaleria macrocarpa [Scheff.] Boerl. is a poisonous plant, but almost all parts of the plants can be used as a traditional medicine. Consuming the plant directly can cause swollen, sprue, numb at tongue, fever, even unconscious. Although the plant can conquere various diseases, from diabetes mellitus, hemorrhoid, impotency to cancer, but research on the plant is still limited. A research was conducted to find out effect of subchronic dosage of butanol extract of maturated mahkota dewa fruit. Observation was carried out on liver tissue which is main organ detoxifying poison in the body. Dosage of butanol extract of 0; 42,5; 85 and 170 mg/kg body weight was administered intra peritoneally to mice. The result showed that butanol extract of maturated mahkota dewa fruit did not affect liver tissue, although at dosage 170 mg/kg body weight, a vacuolization on liver's tissue, was occurred.

  19. A new process for the valorisation of a bio-alcohol. The oxidehydration of 1-butanol into maleic anhydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldarelli, A.; Cavani, F.; Garone, O.; Pavarelli, G. [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Industriale e dei Materiali; Bologna Univ. (Italy). CIRCC, Research Unit; Dubois, J.L. [ARKEMA, Colombes (France); Mitsova, I.; Simeonova, L. [JSC, Russe (Bulgaria). Orgachim

    2012-07-01

    This paper deals with a study on the gas-phase transformation of 1-butanol into maleic anhydride, using different types of catalysts. Indeed, catalytic acid properties are needed to dehydrate 1-butanol into 1-butene, whereas redox-type properties are required for the oxidation of the olefin into maleic anhydride. The two types of active sites can be combined in bifunctional systems, showing both acid and redox-type properties. We found that vanadyl pyrophosphate catalyzes the one-pot reaction, giving a maximum selectivity to maleic anhydride of 28%. In fact, various side reactions contributed to the formation of by-products, eg, 1-butanol (oxidative) dehydrogenation into butyraldehyde, formation of light carboxylic acids and carbon oxides, and condensation of unsaturated C{sub 4} intermediates (butenes and butadiene) with the formed maleic anhydride to yield heavier compounds. (orig.)

  20. NEW STRAIN PRODUCERS OF BIOBUTANOL. III. METHODS OF INCREASED BUTANOL ACCUMULATION FROM BIOMASS OF SWITCHGRASS Panicum virgatum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigunova O. O.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to enlarge accumulation of butanol from switchgrass Panicum virgatum L. biomass using strains-producers obtained from grounds and silts of Kyiv lakes. The objects of the study were strains of C. acetobutylicum ІМВ B-7407 (IFBG C6H, Clostridium acetobutylicum IFBG C6H 5М and Clostridium tyrobutyricum IFBG C4B from the "Collections of microbial strains and lines of plants for food and agricultural biotechnology" of the Public Institution "Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics" of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. Gas chromatography was used to determine the alcohol concentration at the stage of solvent synthesis. To determine the effect of butanol precursors during cultivation, butyric, lactic and acetic acids were used. Optimization of processing parameters, which was based on the needs of cultures, allowed us to increase the yield by 20 and 50% for the initial and mutant strain respectively. Using synthetic precursors (such as lactic, butyric and acetic acid during cultivation increased total concentration of butanol by 1.7 times. To optimize the process, a study was carried out using acetone- butyl grains. Using of acetone-butyl grains in concentrations up to 60% does not affect the synthesis of butanol by C. acetobutylicum IFBG C6H 5M. Increasing the concentration of grains led to decrease in accumulation of butanol. Almost double increase in accumulation of the target product (butanol was achieved using two-stage fermentation and/or precursors of synthesis. It was shown the possibility of using acetone-butyl grains in fermentation. As a result the mass fraction of the waste was reduced.

  1. Structure of deuterated liquid n-butanol by neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiglio, Viviana; Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Cuello, Gabriel Julio; Cabrillo, Carlos; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Silva-Santisteban, Alvaro

    Aliphatic alcohols are the simpler molecular liquids possessing a polar hydroxylic group and a nonpolar alkyl tail. While the structure of the smallest alcohols has been relatively well studied, no much attention has been paid to the temperature dependence of the pre-peak observed before the main diffraction peak. The role of H-bonding in causing this feature and the direct relation between the number of C atoms and their distance were discovered very early, suggesting a liquid picture constituted of straight chains joined by H-bonds with the formation of mesoscopic size clusters. X-rays and neutron diffraction measurements showed that the height of the pre-peak associated with the formation of H-bonds increases with temperature. To explain this counterintuitive effect, a complete diffraction study using two neutron diffractometers D4 and D16 (ILL, Grenoble, France) allowing to cover the range 0.01-23 Å t1 and exploring a temperature range from 100 K (glassy butanol) to 400 K (moderately supercritical conditions) has been conducted. Molecular Dynamics simulations using the OPLS-AA potential were also carried out as a function of temperature and compared to experiment. Experimental and numerical results of liquid n-butanol and its glassy transition will be presented.

  2. Evidence of mixotrophic carbon-capture by n-butanol-producer Clostridium beijerinckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Espinola, W J; Chinn, M S; Thon, M R; Bruno-Bárcena, J M

    2017-10-06

    Recent efforts to combat increasing greenhouse gas emissions include their capture into advanced biofuels, such as butanol. Traditionally, biobutanol research has been centered solely on its generation from sugars. Our results show partial re-assimilation of CO2 and H2 by n-butanol-producer C. beijerinckii. This was detected as synchronous CO2/H2 oscillations by direct (real-time) monitoring of their fermentation gasses. Additional functional analysis demonstrated increased total carbon recovery above heterotrophic values associated to mixotrophic assimilation of synthesis gas (H2, CO2 and CO). This was further confirmed using 13C-Tracer experiments feeding 13CO2 and measuring the resulting labeled products. Genome- and transcriptome-wide analysis revealed transcription of key C-1 capture and additional energy conservation genes, including partial Wood-Ljungdahl and complete reversed pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase / pyruvate-formate-lyase-dependent (rPFOR/Pfl) pathways. Therefore, this report provides direct genetic and physiological evidences of mixotrophic inorganic carbon-capture by C. beijerinckii.

  3. Continuous acetone-ethanol-butanol fermentation by immobilized cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badr, H.R.; Toledo, R.; Hamdy, M.K. [University of Georgia, Athens (Greece). Food Science and Technology Dept.

    2001-07-01

    Eight Clostridium acetobutylicum strains were examined for {alpha}-amylase and strains B-591, B-594 and P-262 had the highest activities. Defibered-sweet-potato-slurry (DSPS), containing 39.7 g starch l{sup -1}, supplemented with potassium phosphate (1.0 g l{sup -1}), cysteine-HCl (5.0 g l{sup -1}), the antifoam (polypropylene glycol, 0.1 mg ml{sup -1}), was used a continuous feedstock (FS) to a multistage bioreactor system for acetone-ethanol-butanol (AEB) fermentation. The system consisted on four columns (three vertical and one near horizontal) packed with beads containing immobilized cells of C. acetobutylicum P-262. When DSPS was pumped into the bioreactor system, at a flow rate of 2.36 ml min{sup -1}, the effluent has 7.73 g solvents l{sup -1} (1.56, acetone; 0.65, ethanol; 5.52 g, butanol) and no starch. Productivity of total solvents synthesized during continuous operation were 1.0 g 1{sup -1}h{sup -1} and 19.5 % yield compared to 0.12 g l{sup -1}h{sup -1} with 29% yield using the batch system. We proposed using DSPS for AEB fermentation in a continuous mode with immobilized P-262 cells that are active amylase producers which will lead to cost reduction compared to the batch system. (Author)

  4. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production from Kraft paper mill sludge by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wenjian; Shi, Suan; Tu, Maobing; Lee, Yoon Y

    2016-01-01

    Paper mill sludge (PS), a solid waste from pulp and paper industry, was investigated as a feedstock for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). ABE fermentation of paper sludge by Clostridium acetobutylicum required partial removal of ash in PS to enhance its enzymatic digestibility. Enzymatic hydrolysis was found to be a rate-limiting step in the SSF. A total of 16.4-18.0g/L of ABE solvents were produced in the SSF of de-ashed PS with solid loading of 6.3-7.4% and enzyme loading of 10-15FPU/g-glucan, and the final solvent yield reached 0.27g/g sugars. No pretreatment and pH control were needed in ABE fermentation of paper sludge, which makes it an attractive feedstock for butanol production. The results suggested utilization of paper sludge should not only consider the benefits of buffering effect of CaCO3 in fermentation, but also take into account its inhibitory effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Biodiesel production from crude palm oil and evaluation of butanol extraction and fuel properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabbe, E.; Nolasco-Hipolito, C.; Kobayashi, Genta; Sonomoto, Kenji; Ishizaki, Ayaaki [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Laboratory of Microbial Technology

    2001-09-01

    Three principal variables, molar ratio of methanol to oil, amount of catalyst, and reaction temperature, affecting the yield of acid-catalyzed production of methyl ester (biodiesel) from crude palm oil were investigated. The biodiesel was then used as an extractant in batch and continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation, and its fuel properties and that of the biodiesel-ABE product mix extracted from the batch culture analyzed. The optimized variables, 40:1 methanol/oil (mol/mol) with 5% H{sub 2}S0{sub 4} (vol/wt) reacted at 95{sup o}C for 9 h, gave a maximum ester yield of 97%. Biodiesel preferentially extracted butanol, and enhanced its production in the batch culture from 10 to 12 g 1{sup -1}. The fuel properties of biodiesel and the biodiesel-ABE mix were comparable to that of No.2 diesel, but their cetane numbers and the boiling points of the 90% fractions were higher. Therefore, they could serve as efficient No. 2 diesel substitutes. The biodiesel-ABE mixture had the highest cetane number. (author)

  6. Catalytic properties of highly ordered crystalline nanoporous tungsten oxide in butanol dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeonhee; Lee, Eunok; Jin, Mingshi; Park, Young-Kwon; Kim, Ji Man; Jeon, Jong-Ki

    2014-11-01

    Highly ordered mesoporous tungsten oxide (meso-WO3) was successfully synthesized using mesoporous silica KIT-6 as a hard template via the nanoreplication method. The physicochemical properties of meso-WO3 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia, and infra-red spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine. No oxidation state other than WO3 was observed in the meso-WO3 sample. Lewis acid sites were dominant in meso-WO3, which could be confirmed by infra-red spectroscopy of pyridine and temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia. Its catalytic behavior in 2-butanol dehydration was investigated in a fixed bed reactor and compared with that of the WO3/MCM-41 catalyst prepared by the atomic layer deposition method. The meso-WO3 catalyst exhibited higher 2-butanol dehydration activity than that of the WO3/MCM-41 catalyst, which is ascribed to the stronger acidity as well as higher amount of acid sites that are mainly composed of Lewis acid sites in the meso-WO3 catalyst.

  7. Consolidating biofuel platforms through the fermentative bioconversion of crude glycerol to butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erin; Sarchami, Tahereh; Kießlich, Sascha; Munch, Garret; Rehmann, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Economic realities for the rising industrial biofuel production have changed substantially during the low oil price period starting in the mid 2010's. Increased competition requires the sector to increase productivity through the reduction of low-value by-products and full utilization of all value and energy stored in their respective feedstock. Biodiesel is produced commercially from substrates such as animal fat and vegetable oil, generating approximately 10 wt% crude glycerol as its main, currently underutilized, by-product. This crude glycerol is contaminated with catalyst, soap, free fatty acids, glycerides and methyl esters; hence only a small fraction enters the existing glycerol markets, while the purification costs for the majority of crude glycerol are simply too high. However, this presents a unique opportunity to generate additional value. One technical possibility is to use crude glycerol as a carbon source for butanol production, a compound of higher value and energy, a potential additive for gasoline and diesel fuels and bulk chemical commodity. Conversion facilities could be co-located with biodiesel plants, utilizing established infrastructure and adding significant value and productivity to the existing biodiesel industry. This review focuses on the current activities geared towards the bioconversion of crude glycerol to butanol.

  8. [Performance optimization of property-improved biodiesel manufacturing process coupled with butanol extractive fermentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longyun; Yang, Ying; Shi, Zhongping

    2008-11-01

    The products concentrations in traditional acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation are too low that large amount of energy has to be consumed in the distillation and product recovery process. Aiming at direct utilization of the fermentation products, in this study, optimization of property-improved biodiesel manufacturing process coupled with AB extractive fermentation was conducted, under the condition of using the biodiesel originated from waste cooking oil as the extractant and high concentrated corn flour medium. The effect of biodiesel/broth volume ratio, waste supernatant recycle ratio, and electronic carrier addition on the major process performance index was carefully investigated. Under the optimized condition, the biodiesel quality was improved with the cetane value increased from 51.4 to 54.4; "actual butanol yield" reached to a level of 18%, and waste supernatant recycle ratio exceeded 50%. In this way, elimination of energy-consuming product recovery process and realization of "energy-saving & waste minimization" industrial production target advocated by the state government, could be potentially expected.

  9. Enhancing cellulose accessibility of corn stover by deep eutectic solvent pretreatment for butanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guo-Chao; Ding, Ji-Cai; Han, Rui-Zhi; Dong, Jin-Jun; Ni, Ye

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an effective corn stover (CS) pretreatment method was developed for biobutanol fermentation. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs), consisted of quaternary ammonium salts and hydrogen donors, display similar properties to room temperature ionic liquid. Seven DESs with different hydrogen donors were facilely synthesized. Choline chloride:formic acid (ChCl:formic acid), an acidic DES, displayed excellent performance in the pretreatment of corn stover by removal of hemicellulose and lignin as confirmed by SEM, FTIR and XRD analysis. After optimization, glucose released from pretreated CS reached 17.0 g L(-1) and yield of 99%. The CS hydrolysate was successfully utilized in butanol fermentation by Clostridium saccharobutylicum DSM 13864, achieving butanol titer of 5.63 g L(-1) with a yield of 0.17 g g(-1) total sugar and productivity of 0.12 g L(-1)h(-1). This study demonstrates DES could be used as a promising and biocompatible pretreatment method for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into biofuel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Recent progress on industrial fermentative production of acetone-butanol-ethanol by Clostridium acetobutylicum in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2009-06-01

    China is one of the few countries, which maintained the fermentative acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production for several decades. Until the end of the last century, the ABE fermentation from grain was operated in a few industrial scale plants. Due to the strong competition from the petrochemical industries, the fermentative ABE production lost its position in the 1990s, when all the solvent fermentation plants in China were closed. Under the current circumstances of concern about energy limitations and environmental pollution, new opportunities have emerged for the traditional ABE fermentation industry since it could again be potentially competitive with chemical synthesis. From 2006, several ABE fermentation plants in China have resumed production. The total solvent (acetone, butanol, and ethanol) production capacity from ten plants reached 210,000 tons, and the total solvent production is expected to be extended to 1,000,000 tons (based on the available data as of Sept. 2008). This article reviews current work in strain development, the continuous fermentation process, solvent recovery, and economic evaluation of ABE process in China. Challenges for an economically competitive ABE process in the future are also discussed.

  11. Industrial production of acetone and butanol by fermentation-100 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Microbial production of acetone and butanol was one of the first large-scale industrial fermentation processes of global importance. During the first part of the 20th century, it was indeed the second largest fermentation process, superseded in importance only by the ethanol fermentation. After a rapid decline after the 1950s, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation has recently gained renewed interest in the context of biorefinery approaches for the production of fuels and chemicals from renewable resources. The availability of new methods and knowledge opens many new doors for industrial microbiology, and a comprehensive view on this process is worthwhile due to the new interest. This thematic issue of FEMS Microbiology Letters, dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the first industrial exploitation of Chaim Weizmann's ABE fermentation process, covers the main aspects of old and new developments, thereby outlining a model development in biotechnology. All major aspects of industrial microbiology are exemplified by this single process. This includes new technologies, such as the latest developments in metabolic engineering, the exploitation of biodiversity and discoveries of new regulatory systems such as for microbial stress tolerance, as well as technological aspects, such as bio- and down-stream processing. © FEMS 2016.

  12. Selectivity of Ni-Cu and Pt-Au alloys in reactions of butanol and related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Burg, A.; Doornbos, J.; Kos, N.J.; Ultee, W.J.; Ponec, V.

    1978-09-01

    Experiments on the rates and product distributions of the reactions of cyclopentanone, 1-butanol, and 1-butanal with hydrogen on unsupported 0-100% nickel/copper alloys and silica-supported gold, platinum, 14% Pt/Au, and 98% Pt/Au showed that the addition of copper to nickel and gold to platinum had only a small effect on the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation activity of the catalyst but inhibited the intermolecular and intramolecular dehydration of 1-butanol to olefins and ethers. An analysis of these and available data suggested that the dehydration selectivity is controlled by the availability of ensembles of active sites. The surface mechanism is discussed.

  13. Prospects and challenges for the recovery of 2-butanol produced by vacuum fermentation - a techno-economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Joana P C; Lopez-Gomez, Gustavo; Reyes, Noelia G; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2017-07-01

    The conceptual design of a bio-based process for 2-butanol production is presented for the first time. Considering a hypothetical efficient producing strain, a vacuum fermentation is proposed to alleviate product toxicity, but the main challenge is the energy-efficient product recovery from the vapor. Three downstream scenarios were examined for this purpose: 1) multi-stage vapor recompression; 2) temperature swing adsorption; and 3) vapor absorption. The processes were simulated using Aspen Plus, considering a production capacity of 101 kton/yr. Process optimization was performed targeting the minimum selling price of 2-butanol. The feasibility of the different configurations was analyzed based on the global energy requirements and capital expenditure. The use of integrated adsorption and absorption minimized the energy duty required for azeotrope purification, which represents 11% of the total operational expenditure in Scenario 1. The minimum selling price of 2-butanol as commodity chemical was estimated as 1.05 $/kg, 1.21 $/kg, and 1.03 $/kg regarding the fermentation integrated with downstream scenarios 1), 2), and 3), respectively. Significant savings in 2-butanol production could be achieved in the suggested integrated configurations if more efficient microbial strains were engineered, and more selective adsorption and absorption materials were found for product recovery. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Binary, ternary and quaternary liquid-liquid equilibria in 1-butanol, oleic acid, water and n-heptane mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkelman, J. G. M.; Kraai, G. N.; Heeres, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on liquid-liquid equilibria in the system 1-butanol, oleic acid, water and n-heptane used for biphasic, lipase catalysed esterifications. The literature was studied on the mutual solubility in binary systems of water and each of the organic components. Experimental results were

  15. Implications of sterically constrained n-butane oxidation reactions on the reaction mechanism and selectivity to 1-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Sean T.; Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A.; Getman, Rachel B.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to analyze the reaction network in n-butane oxidation to 1-butanol over a Ag/Pd alloy catalyst under steric constraints, and the implications on the ability to produce 1-butanol selectively using MOF-encapsulated catalysts are discussed. MOFs are porous crystalline solids comprised of metal nodes linked by organic molecules. Recently, they have been successfully grown around metal nanoparticle catalysts. The resulting porous networks have been shown to promote regioselective chemistry, i.e., hydrogenation of trans-1,3-hexadiene to 3-hexene, presumably by forcing the linear alkene to stand "upright" on the catalyst surface and allowing only the terminal C-H bonds to be activated. In this work, we extend this concept to alkane oxidation. Our goal is to determine if a MOF-encapsulated catalyst could be used to selectively produce 1-butanol. Reaction energies and activation barriers are presented for more than 40 reactions in the pathway for n-butane oxidation. We find that C-H bond activation proceeds through an oxygen-assisted pathway and that butanal and 1-butanol are some of the possible products.

  16. Steam reforming of n-butanol over Rh/ZrO2 catalyst : Role of 1-butene and butyraldehyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harju, Heikki; Lehtonen, Juha; Lefferts, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Steam reforming (SR) of n-butanol and its main reaction intermediates, i.e., 1-butene, and butyraldehyde, was studied over 0,5wt.% Rh/ZrO2 catalyst at 500 and 700°C, atmospheric pressure and steam to carbon (S/C) molar ratio of 4. Coke deposits on the spent catalyst samples were characterized using

  17. Utilisation of saccharides in extruded domestic organic waste by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 for production of acetone, butanol and ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez-Contreras, A.M.; Claassen, P.A.; Mooibroek, H.; Vos, de W.M.

    2000-01-01

    Domestic organic waste (DOW) collected in The Netherlands was analysed and used as substrate for acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) production. Two different samples of DOW, referred to as fresh DOW and dried DOW, were treated by extrusion in order to expand the polymer fibres present and to obtain

  18. Efficient Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to 1-Butanol via the Guerbet Reaction over Copper- and Nickel-Doped Porous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Zhuohua; Vasconcelos, Anais Couto; Bottari, Giovanni; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Bonura, Giuseppe; Cannilla, Catia; Frusteri, Francesco; Barta, Katalin

    The direct conversion of ethanol to higher value 1-butanol is a catalytic transformation of great interest in light of the expected wide availability of bioethanol originating from the fermentation of renewable resources. In this contribution we describe several novel compositions of porous metal

  19. Acetone enhances the direct analysis of total condensed tannins in plant tissues by the butanol-HCl-iron assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The butanol-HCl spectrophotometric assay is widely used to quantify extractable and insoluble forms of condensed tannin (CT, syn. proanthocyanidin) in foods, feeds, and foliage of herbaceous and woody plants. However, this method underestimates total CT content when applied directly to plant materia...

  20. Microbial production of a biofuel (acetone-butanol-ethanol) in a continuous bioreactor: impact of bleed and simultaneous product removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) was produced in an integrated continuous fermentation and product recovery system using a microbial strain Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 for ABE production and fermentation gases (CO2 and H2) for product removal by gas stripping. This represents a continuation of our ...

  1. Two-stage pervaporation process for effective in situ removal acetone-butanol-ethanol from fermentation broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Di; Hu, Song; Miao, Qi; Chen, Changjing; Chen, Huidong; Zhang, Changwei; Li, Ping; Qin, Peiyong; Tan, Tianwei

    2017-01-01

    Two-stage pervaporation for ABE recovery from fermentation broth was studied to reduce the energy cost. The permeate after the first stage in situ pervaporation system was further used as the feedstock in the second stage of pervaporation unit using the same PDMS/PVDF membrane. A total 782.5g/L of ABE (304.56g/L of acetone, 451.98g/L of butanol and 25.97g/L of ethanol) was achieved in the second stage permeate, while the overall acetone, butanol and ethanol separation factors were: 70.7-89.73, 70.48-84.74 and 9.05-13.58, respectively. Furthermore, the theoretical evaporation energy requirement for ABE separation in the consolidate fermentation, which containing two-stage pervaporation and the following distillation process, was estimated less than ∼13.2MJ/kg-butanol. The required evaporation energy was only 36.7% of the energy content of butanol. The novel two-stage pervaporation process was effective in increasing ABE production and reducing energy consumption of the solvents separation system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic and nutrient modulation of acetyl-CoA levels in Synechocystis for n-butanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfelt, Josefine; Kaczmarzyk, Danuta; Shabestary, Kiyan

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong interest in using photosynthetic cyanobacteria as production hosts for biofuels and chemicals. Recent work has shown the benefit of pathway engineering, enzyme tolerance, and co-factor usage for improving yields of fermentation products. An n-butanol pathway was inserted...

  3. Evaluation of industrial dairy waste (milk dust powder) for acetone-butanol-ethanol production by solventogenic Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujor, Victor; Bharathidasan, Ashok Kumar; Cornish, Katrina; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2014-01-01

    Readily available inexpensive substrate with high product yield is the key to restoring acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation to economic competitiveness. Lactose-replete cheese whey tends to favor the production of butanol over acetone. In the current study, we investigated the fermentability of milk dust powder with high lactose content, for ABE production by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii. Both microorganisms produced 7.3 and 5.8 g/L of butanol respectively, with total ABE concentrations of 10.3 and 8.2 g/L, respectively. Compared to fermentation with glucose, fermentation of milk dust powder increased butanol to acetone ratio by 16% and 36% for C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii, respectively. While these results demonstrate the fermentability of milk dust powder, the physico-chemical properties of milk dust powder appeared to limit sugar utilization, growth and ABE production. Further work aimed at improving the texture of milk dust powder-based medium would likely improve lactose utilization and ABE production.

  4. Process economics of renewable biorefineries: butanol and ethanol production in integrated bioprocesses from lignocellulosics and other industrial by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter provides process economic details on production of butanol from lignocellulosic biomass and glycerol in integrated bioreactors where numerous unit operations are combined. In order to compare various processes, economic evaluations were performed using SuperPro Designer Software (versio...

  5. Biobutanol as Fuel for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells-Investigation of Sn-Modified Pt Catalyst for Butanol Electro-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthiyapura, Vinod Kumar; Brett, Dan J L; Russell, Andrea E; Lin, Wen-Feng; Hardacre, Christopher

    2016-05-25

    Direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) mostly use low molecular weight alcohols such as methanol and ethanol as fuels. However, short-chain alcohol molecules have a relative high membrane crossover rate in DAFCs and a low energy density. Long chain alcohols such as butanol have a higher energy density, as well as a lower membrane crossover rate compared to methanol and ethanol. Although a significant number of studies have been dedicated to low molecular weight alcohols in DAFCs, very few studies are available for longer chain alcohols such as butanol. A significant development in the production of biobutanol and its proposed application as an alternative fuel to gasoline in the past decade makes butanol an interesting candidate fuel for fuel cells. Different butanol isomers were compared in this study on various Pt and PtSn bimetallic catalysts for their electro-oxidation activities in acidic media. Clear distinctive behaviors were observed for each of the different butanol isomers using cyclic voltammetry (CV), indicating a difference in activity and the mechanism of oxidation. The voltammograms of both n-butanol and iso-butanol showed similar characteristic features, indicating a similar reaction mechanism, whereas 2-butanol showed completely different features; for example, it did not show any indication of poisoning. Ter-butanol was found to be inactive for oxidation on Pt. In situ FTIR and CV analysis showed that OHads was essential for the oxidation of primary butanol isomers which only forms at high potentials on Pt. In order to enhance the water oxidation and produce OHads at lower potentials, Pt was modified by the oxophilic metal Sn and the bimetallic PtSn was studied for the oxidation of butanol isomers. A significant enhancement in the oxidation of the 1° butanol isomers was observed on addition of Sn to the Pt, resulting in an oxidation peak at a potential ∼520 mV lower than that found on pure Pt. The higher activity of PtSn was attributed to the

  6. Industrial optimization of acetone-butanol fermentation: A study of the utilization of Jerusalem artichokes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchal, R.; Blanchet, D.; Vandecasteele, J.P.

    1985-12-01

    Acetone-butanol fermentation of the Jerusalem artichoke has been studied as a case for systematic investigation of the industrial optimization of both strain selection and fermentation operation. Hydrolysis of the inulinic oligofructans of the substrate was found necessary for optimal performance but could be achieved with a selected strain using a moderate amount of inulinase added at the beginning of the fermentation. Apart from ammonia, no nutritrional supplementation of the medium was found necessary. The marked influence of pH in the fermentation performance prompted a detailed search for a method of controlling pH during fermentation. With an optimized procedure, solvent production of 23-24 g/l were obtained in 36 h. Detailed fermentation balances are presented. An industrial process for ABE production from Jerusalem artichoke or sugar beet has been defined and tested in the pilot plant. (orig.).

  7. Chiral separation of hesperidin and naringin and its analysis in a butanol extract of Launeae arborescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belboukhari, Nasser; Cheriti, Abdelkrim; Roussel, Christian; Vanthuyne, Nicolas

    2010-04-01

    Two flavanone glycosides were isolated from the aerial part of Launeae arborescens (Asteraceae), which were identified as hesperidin and naringin. They are the most abundant flavonoids in the edible parts of many species of citrus fruits. In this study, we were interested in the chiral separation and determination of the diastereomerisation barriers of hesperidin and naringin by HPLC methods. The chiral separation HPLC screening of diastereomers of hesperidin and naringin by HPLC methods was accomplished in the normal-phase mode using 11 chiral stationary phases and various n-hexane/alcohol mobile phases. The rate constants and activation energy of diastereomerisation (DeltaG#) of flavanones, naringin and hesperidin were determined, respectively, on Chiralpak IC and Chiralpak IA. The analysis of flavanones isolated in butanol extracts of Launeae arborescens were confirmed by HPLC on Chiralpak IC.

  8. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Edward A; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that includes the effects of key metabolic intermediates and enzymes as well as culture pH, product inhibition, and glucose inhibition. The kinetic model is used for elucidating the behavior of the ABE fermentation under the conditions that are most relevant to continuous cultures. To this end, dynamic sensitivity analysis is performed to systematically investigate the effects of culture conditions, reaction kinetics, and enzymes on the dynamics of the ABE production pathway. The analysis provides guidance for future metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies.

  9. Low-energy biomass pretreatment with deep eutectic solvents for bio-butanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procentese, Alessandra; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Rehmann, Lars; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    Waste lettuce leaves - from the "fresh cut vegetable" industry - were pretreated with the deep eutectic solvent (DES) made of choline chloride - glycerol. Reaction time (3-16h) and the operation temperature (80-150°C) were investigated. Enzymatic glucose and xylose yields of 94.9% and 75.0%, respectively were obtained when the biomass was pretreated at 150°C for 16h. Sugars contained in the biomass hydrolysate were fermented in batch cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum DSMZ 792. The energy consumption and the energy efficiency related to the DES pretreatment were calculated and compared to the most common lignocellulosic pretreatment processes reported in the literature. The DES pretreatment process was characterized by lower energy required (about 28% decrease and 72% decrease) than the NAOH pretreatment and steam explosion process respectively. The Net Energy Ratio (NER) value related to butanol production via DES biomass pretreatment was assessed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental determination of the high-temperature rate constant for the reaction of OH with sec-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Genny A; Hanson, Ronald K; Golden, David M; Bowman, Craig T

    2012-10-04

    The overall rate constant for the reaction of OH with sec-butanol [CH(3)CH(OH)CH(2)CH(3)] was determined from measurements of the near-first-order OH decay in shock-heated mixtures of tert-butylhydroperoxide (as a fast source of OH) with sec-butanol in excess. Three kinetic mechanisms from the literature describing sec-butanol combustion were used to examine the sensitivity of the rate constant determination to secondary kinetics. The overall rate constant determined can be described by the Arrhenius expression 6.97 × 10(-11) exp(-1550/T[K]) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), valid over the temperature range of 888-1178 K. Uncertainty bounds of ±30% were found to adequately account for the uncertainty in secondary kinetics. To our knowledge, the current data represent the first efforts toward an experimentally determined rate constant for the overall reaction of OH with sec-butanol at combustion-relevant temperatures. A rate constant predicted using a structure-activity relationship from the literature was compared to the current data and previous rate constant measurements for the title reaction at atmospheric-relevant temperatures. The structure-activity relationship was found to be unable to correctly predict the measured rate constant at all temperatures where experimental data exist. We found that the three-parameter fit of 4.95 × 10(-20)T(2.66) exp(+1123/T[K]) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) better describes the overall rate constant for the reaction of OH with sec-butanol from 263 to 1178 K.

  11. In situ hydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from oleaginous fungal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Elhagag Ahmed; Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Bagy, Magdy Mohamed Khalil; Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    An in situ batch fermentation technique was employed for biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production from oleaginous fungal biomass using the anaerobic fermentative bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Oleaginous fungal Cunninghamella echinulata biomass which has ability to accumulate up to 71% cellular lipid was used as the substrate carbon source. The maximum cumulative hydrogen by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from crude C. echinulata biomass was 260 ml H2 l(-1), hydrogen production efficiency was 0.32 mol H2 mole(-1) glucose and the hydrogen production rate was 5.2 ml H2 h(-1). Subsequently, the produced acids (acetic and butyric acids) during acidogenesis phase are re-utilized by ABE-producing clostridia and converted into acetone, butanol, and ethanol. The total ABE produced by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 during batch fermentation was 3.6 g l(-1) from crude fungal biomass including acetone (1.05 g l(-1)), butanol (2.19 g l(-1)) and ethanol (0.36 g l(-1)). C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has ability to produce lipolytic enzymes with a specific activity 5.59 U/mg protein to hydrolyze ester containing substrates. The lipolytic potential of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was used as a biocatalyst for a lipase transesterification process using the produced ethanol from ABE fermentation for microdiesel production. The fatty acid ethyl esters (microdiesel) generated from the lipase transesterification of crude C. echinulata dry mass was analyzed by GC/MS as 15.4% of total FAEEs. The gross energy content of biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and biodiesel generated through C. acetobutylicum fermentation from crude C. echinulata dry mass was 3113.14 kJ mol(-1). These results suggest a possibility of integrating biohydrogen, acetone, butanol and ethanol production technology by C. acetobutylicum with microdiesel production from crude C. echinulata dry mass and therefore improve the feasibility and commercialization of bioenergy production

  12. Performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of twin-cylinder common rail diesel engine fuelled with butanol-diesel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamani, Venkatesh Tavareppa; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gottekere, Kumar Narayanappa

    2017-10-01

    Nitrogen oxides and smoke are the substantial emissions for the diesel engines. Fuels comprising high-level oxygen content can have low smoke emission due to better oxidation of soot. The objective of the paper is to assess the potential to employ oxygenated fuel, i.e., n-butanol and its blends with the neat diesel from 0 to 30% by volume. The experimental and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation is carried out to estimate the performance, combustion, and exhaust emission characteristics of n-butanol-diesel blends for various injection timings (9°, 12°, 15°, and 18°) using modern twin-cylinder, four-stroke, common rail direct injection (CRDI) engine. Experimental results reveal the increase in brake thermal efficiency (BTE) by ~ 4.5, 6, and 8% for butanol-diesel blends of 10% (Bu10), 20% (Bu20), and 30% (Bu30), respectively, compared to neat diesel (Bu0). Maximum BTE for Bu0 is 38.4%, which is obtained at 12° BTDC; however, for Bu10, Bu20 and Bu30 are 40.19, 40.9, and 41.7%, which are obtained at 15° BTDC, respectively. Higher flame speed of n-butanol-diesel blends burn a large amount of fuel in the premixed phase, which improves the combustion as well as emission characteristics. CFD and experimental results are compared and validated for all fuel blends for in-cylinder pressure and nitrogen oxides (NO x ), and found to be in good agreement. Both experimental and simulation results witnessed in reduction of smoke opacity, NO x , and carbon monoxide emissions with the increasing n-butanol percentage in diesel fuel.

  13. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production from substandard and surplus dates by Egyptian native Clostridium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Zohri, Abdel-Naser Ahmed; El-Enany, Abdel-Wahab Elsadek; Ali, Shimaa Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    One hundred and seven mesophilic isolates of Clostridium were isolated from agricultural soils cultivated with different plants in Assuit Governorate, Egypt. Eighty isolates (out of 107) showed the ability to produce ABE (Acetone, butanol and ethanol) on T6 medium ranging from 0.036 to 31.89 g/L. The highest numbers of ABE producing isolates were obtained from soil samples of potato contributing 27 isolates, followed by 18 isolates from wheat and 10 isolates from onion. On the other hand, there were three native isolates that produced ABE more than those produced by the reference isolate Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (11.543 g/L). The three isolates were identified based on phenotypic and gene encoding 16S rRNA as Clostridium beijerinckii ASU10 (KF372577), Clostridium chauvoei ASU55 (KF372580) and Clostridium roseum ASU58 (KF372581). The highest ABE level from substandard and surplus dates was produced by C. beijerinckii ASU10 (24.07 g/L) comprising butanol 67.15% (16.16 g/L), acetone 30.73% (7.4 g/L) and ethanol 2.12% (0.51 g/L), while C. roseum ASU58 and C. chauvoei ASU55 produced ABE contributing 20.20 and 13.79 g/L, respectively. ABE production by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was 15.01 g/L. This study proved that the native strains C. beijerinckii ASU10 and C. roseum ASU58 have high competitive efficacy on ABE production from economical substrate as substandard and surplus date fruits. Additionally, using this substrate without any nutritional components is considered to be a commercial substrate for desired ABE production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Liquid-Liquid Extraction in Systems Containing Butanol and Ionic Liquids – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubiczek Artur

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs are a moderately new class of liquid substances that are characterized by a great variety of possible anion-cation combinations giving each of them different properties. For this reason, they have been termed as designer solvents and, as such, they are particularly promising for liquid-liquid extraction, which has been quite intensely studied over the last decade. This paper concentrates on the recent liquid-liquid extraction studies involving ionic liquids, yet focusing strictly on the separation of n-butanol from model aqueous solutions. Such research is undertaken mainly with the intention of facilitating biological butanol production, which is usually carried out through the ABE fermentation process. So far, various sorts of RTILs have been tested for this purpose while mostly ternary liquid-liquid systems have been investigated. The industrial design of liquid-liquid extraction requires prior knowledge of the state of thermodynamic equilibrium and its relation to the process parameters. Such knowledge can be obtained by performing a series of extraction experiments and employing a certain mathematical model to approximate the equilibrium. There are at least a few models available but this paper concentrates primarily on the NRTL equation, which has proven to be one of the most accurate tools for correlating experimental equilibrium data. Thus, all the presented studies have been selected based on the accepted modeling method. The reader is also shown how the NRTL equation can be used to model liquid-liquid systems containing more than three components as it has been the authors’ recent area of expertise.

  15. Phase equilibrium properties of binary and ternary systems containing di-isopropyl ether + 1-butanol + benzene at 313.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villamanan, Rosa M. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion TERMOCAL, Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Cauce s/n, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: rvillama@dce.uva.es; Martin, M. Carmen [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion TERMOCAL, Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Cauce s/n, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: mcmg@eis.uva.es; Chamorro, Cesar R. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion TERMOCAL, Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Cauce s/n, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: cescha@eis.uva.es; Villamanan, Miguel A. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion TERMOCAL, Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Cauce s/n, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: miguel.villamanan@eis.uva.es; Segovia, Jose J. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion TERMOCAL, Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Cauce s/n, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: josseg@eis.uva.es

    2006-05-15

    (Vapour + liquid) equilibria data of (di-isopropyl ether + 1-butanol + benzene) (di-isopropyl ether + 1-butanol) and (1-butanol + benzene) have been measured at T = 313.15 K using an isothermal total pressure cell. Data reduction by Barker's method provides correlations for the excess molar Gibbs energy using the Margules equation for the binary systems and the Wohl expansion for the ternary. The Wilson, NRTL and UNIQUAC models have been applied successfully to both the binary and the ternary systems reported here.

  16. Leucine zipper-mediated targeting of multi-enzyme cascade reactions to inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli for enhanced production of 1-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gui Hwan; Seong, Wonjae; Fu, Yaoyao; Yoon, Paul K; Kim, Seong Keun; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Seung-Goo

    2017-03-01

    Metabolons in nature have evolved to facilitate more efficient catalysis of multistep reactions through the co-localization of functionally related enzymes to cellular organelles or membrane structures. To mimic the natural metabolon architecture, we present a novel artificial metabolon that was created by targeting multi-enzyme cascade reactions onto inclusion body (IB) in Escherichia coli. The utility of this system was examined by co-localizing four heterologous enzymes of the 1-butanol pathway onto an IB that was formed in E. coli through overexpression of the cellulose binding domain (CBD) of Cellulomonas fimi exoglucanase. To target the 1-butanol pathway enzymes to the CBD IB, we utilized a peptide-peptide interaction between leucine zipper (LZ) peptides. We genetically fused the LZ peptide to the N-termini of four heterologous genes involved in the synthetic 1-butanol pathway, whereas an antiparallel LZ peptide was fused to the CBD gene. The in vivo activity of the CBD IB-based metabolon was examined through the determination of 1-butanol synthesis using E. coli transformed with two plasmids containing the LZ-fused CBD and LZ-fused 1-butanol pathway genes, respectively. In vivo synthesis of 1-butanol using the engineered E. coli yielded 1.98g/L of 1-butanol from glucose, representing a 1.5-fold increase over that obtained from E. coli expressing the LZ-fused 1-butanol pathway genes alone. In an attempt to examine the in vitro 1-butanol productivity, we reconstituted CBD IB-based metabolon using CBD IB and individual enzymes of 1-butanol pathway. The 1-butanol productivity of in vitro reconstituted CBD IB-based metabolon using acetoacetyl-CoA as the starting material was 2.29mg/L/h, 7.9-fold higher than that obtained from metabolon-free enzymes of 1-butanol pathway. Therefore, this novel CBD-based artificial metabolon may prove useful in metabolic engineering both in vivo and in vitro for the efficient production of desired products. Copyright © 2017

  17. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria in {l_brace}water + acrylic acid + (1-butanol, or 2-butanol, or 1-pentanol){r_brace} systems at T = 293.2 K, T = 303.2 K, and T = 313.2 K and atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistell, Melissa C.; Alves, Thiago C.; Guadagnini, Talita R.; Hadlich de Oliveira, Leonardo [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Campinas, Av. Albert Einstein 500, 13083-852 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aznar, Martin, E-mail: maznar@feq.unicamp.br [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Campinas, Av. Albert Einstein 500, 13083-852 Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Acrylic acid solubilizes preferably in the studied solvents than in water. > Immiscibility region increases in the order: 2-butanol < 1-butanol < 1-pentanol. > Immiscibility region reduces little with an increase in temperature. > K and S values show that 1-pentanol is the best studied solvent. - Abstract: (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for {l_brace}water + acrylic acid + (1-butanol, or 2-butanol, or 1-pentanol){r_brace} at T = 293.2 K, T = 303.2 K, and T = 313.2 K and atmospheric pressure ({approx}95 kPa) were determined by Karl Fischer titration and densimetry. All systems present type I binodal curves. The size of immiscibility region changes little with an increase in temperature, but increases according to the solvent, following the order: 2-butanol < 1-butanol < 1-pentanol. Values of solute distribution and solvent selectivities show that 1-pentanol is a better solvent than 1-butanol or 2-butanol for acrylic acid removal from water solutions. Quality of data was ascertain by Hand and Othmer-Tobias equations, giving R{sup 2} > 0.916, mass balance and accordance between tie lines and cloud points. The NRTL model was used to correlate experimental data, by estimating new energy parameters, with root mean square deviations below 0.0053 for all systems.

  18. Increasing n-butanol production with Saccharomyces cerevisiae by optimizing acetyl-CoA synthesis, NADH levels and trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadeweg, Virginia; Boles, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    n-Butanol can serve as an excellent gasoline substitute. Naturally, it is produced by some Clostridia species which, however, exhibit only limited suitability for industrial n-butanol production. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae would be an ideal host due to its high robustness in fermentation processes. Nevertheless, n-butanol yields and titers obtained so far with genetically engineered yeast strains are only low. In our recent work, we showed that n-butanol production via a clostridial acetoacetyl-CoA-derived pathway in engineered yeast was limited by the availability of coenzyme A (CoA) and cytosolic acetyl-CoA. Increasing their levels resulted in a strain producing up to 130 mg/L n-butanol under anaerobic conditions. Here, we show that under aerobic conditions. this strain can even produce up to 235 mg/L n-butanol probably due to a more efficient NADH re-oxidation. Nevertheless, expression of a bacterial water-forming NADH oxidase (nox) significantly reduced n-butanol production although it showed a positive effect on growth and glucose consumption. Screening for an improved version of an acetyl-CoA forming NAD(+)-dependent acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, adhE(A267T/E568K/R577S), and its integration into n-butanol-producing strain further improved n-butanol production. Moreover, deletion of the competing NADP(+)-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase Ald6 had a superior effect on n-butanol formation. To increase the endogenous supply of CoA, amine oxidase Fms1 was overexpressed together with pantothenate kinase coaA from Escherichia coli, and could completely compensate the beneficial effect on n-butanol synthesis of addition of pantothenate to the medium. By overexpression of each of the enzymes of n-butanol pathway in the n-butanol-producing yeast strain, it turned out that trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase (ter) was limiting n-butanol production. Additional overexpression of ter finally resulted in a yeast strain producing n-butanol up to a titer of 0

  19. The n-Butanol Fraction and Rutin from Tartary Buckwheat Improve Cognition and Memory in an In Vivo Model of Amyloid-β-Induced Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Yeon; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Dong Gu; Cho, Sunghun; Yoon, Young-Ho; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Sanghyun

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the beneficial effects of the n-butanol fraction and rutin extracted from tartary buckwheat (TB) on learning and memory deficits in a mouse model of amyloid β (Aβ)-induced Alzheimer's disease (AD). Learning and memory were assessed using the T-maze, object recognition, and Morris water maze tests. Animals administered Aβ showed impaired cognition and memory, which were alleviated by oral administration of an n-butanol fraction and rutin extracted from TB. Similarly, Aβ-induced increases in nitric oxide formation and lipid peroxidation in the brain, liver, and kidneys were attenuated by treatment with n-butanol fraction and rutin from TB in addition to antioxidant effects observed in control (nonAβ-treated) animals. The results of the present study suggest that the n-butanol fraction and rutin extracted from TB are protective against and have possible therapeutic applications for the treatment of AD.

  20. Characterisation and Deposition Studies of Recrystallised Lactose from Binary Mixtures of Ethanol/Butanol for Improved Drug Delivery from Dry Powder Inhalers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaialy, Waseem; Martin, Gary P; Ticehurst, Martyn D; Royall, Paul; Mohammad, Mohammad A; Murphy, John; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    ...) which are suboptimal. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the crystallisation of lactose from different ethanol/butanol co-solvent mixtures could be employed as a method of altering the FPF...

  1. Tumor-specific immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer with butanol-extracted antigens and ethylchlorformate polymerized tumor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, M G; Sarosdy, M F; Pickett, S H; Stogdill, B J; Lamm, D L

    1988-09-01

    Successful treatment of superficial bladder cancer using nonspecific immunotherapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been well documented. Investigation of two potential tumor-specific immunotherapeutic agents using a murine transitional-cell carcinoma model (MBT-2) is reported. The survival of mice immunized with tumor proteins obtained by treating tumor cells with either 1-butanol or ethylchlorformate was compared to the survival of animals immunized with BCG. Long-term immunity conferred by each of these agents was also assessed. Significant protection by both agents was noted in all treatment groups compared to controls. Long-term immunity was also found to result from treatment with both investigational agents as well as with BCG. Butanol-extracted antigens and ethylchlorformate polymerized tumor protein may be useful as immunotherapeutic alternatives to BCG.

  2. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of dilute alkaline-pretreated corn stover for enhanced butanol production by Clostridium saccharobutylicum DSM 13864.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jin-Jun; Ding, Ji-Cai; Zhang, Yun; Ma, Li; Xu, Guo-Chao; Han, Rui-Zhi; Ni, Ye

    2016-02-01

    Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process was applied for biobutanol production by Clostridium saccharobutylicum DSM 13864 from corn stover (CS). The key influential factors in SSF process, including corn steep liquor concentration, dry biomass and enzyme loading, SSF temperature, inoculation size and pre-hydrolysis time were optimized. In 5-L bioreactor with SSF process, butanol titer and productivity of 12.3 g/L and 0.257 g/L/h were achieved at 48 h, which were 20.6% and 21.2% higher than those in separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF), respectively. The butanol yield reached 0.175 g/g pretreated CS in SSF, representing 50.9% increase than that in SHF (0.116 g/g pretreated CS). This study proves the feasibility of efficient and economic production of biobutanol from CS by SSF. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Catalytic Upgrading of bio-oil using 1-octene and 1-butanol over sulfonic acid resin catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Wang, Qingwen; Tripathi, Prabhat; Pittman, Charles U.

    2011-02-04

    Raw bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass must be refined before it can be used as a transporation fuel, a petroleum refinery feed or for many other fuel uses. Raw bio-oil was upgraded with the neat model olefin, 1-octene, and with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures over sulfonic acid resin catalysts frin 80 to 150 degrees celisus in order to simultaneously lower water content and acidity and to increase hydrophobicity and heating value. Phase separation and coke formation were key factors limiting the reaction rate during upgrading with neat 1-octene although octanols were formed by 1-octene hydration along with small amounts of octyl acetates and ethers. GC-MS analysis confirmed that olefin hydration, carboxylic acid esterification, acetal formation from aldehydes and ketones and O- and C-alkylations of phenolic compounds occurred simultaneously during upgrading with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures. Addition of 1-butanol increased olefin conversion dramatically be reducing mass transfer restraints and serving as a cosolvent or emulsifying agent. It also reacted with carboxylic acids and aldehydes/ketones to form esters, and acetals, respectively, while also serving to stabilize bio-oil during heating. 1-Butanol addition also protected the catalysts, increasing catalyst lifetime and reducing or eliminationg coking. Upgrading sharply increased ester content and decreased the amounts of levoglucosan, polyhydric alcohols and organic acids. Upgrading lowered acidity (pH value rise from 2.5 to >3.0), removed the uppleasant ordor and increased hydrocarbon solubility. Water content decreased from 37.2% to < 7.5% dramatically and calorific value increased from 12.6 MJ kg to about 30.0 MJ kg.

  4. Measurement of electron spin-lattice relaxation times in radical doped butanol samples at 1 K using the NEDOR method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, C., E-mail: hess@ep1.rub.de [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Experimentalphysik I, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Herick, J.; Berlin, A.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Experimentalphysik I, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1e}) of TEMPO- and trityl-doped butanol samples at 2.5 T and temperatures between 0.95 K and 2.17 K was studied by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using the nuclear-electron double resonance (NEDOR) method. This method is based on the idea to measure the NMR lineshift produced by the local field of paramagnetic impurities, whose polarization can be manipulated. This is of technical advantage as measurements can be performed under conditions typically used for the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process - in our case 2.5 T and temperatures around 1 K - where a direct measurement on the electronic spins would be far more complicated to perform. As T{sub 1e} is a crucial parameter determining the overall efficiency of DNP, the effect of the radical type, its spin concentration, the temperature and the oxygen content on T{sub 1e} has been investigated. For radical concentrations as used in DNP (several 10{sup 19} spins/cm{sup 3}) the relaxation rate (T{sub 1e}{sup -1}) has shown a linear dependence on the paramagnetic electron concentration for both radicals investigated. Experiments with perdeuterated and ordinary butanol have given no indication for any influence of the host materials isotopes. The measured temperature dependence has shown an exponential characteristic. It is further observed that the oxygen content in the butanol samples has a considerable effect on the electron relaxation time and thus influences the nuclear relaxation time and polarization rate during the DNP. The experiments also show a variation in the NMR linewidth, leading to comparable time constants as determined by the lineshift. NEDOR measurements were also performed on irradiated, crystal grains of {sup 6}LiD. These samples exhibited a linewidth behavior similar to that of the cylindrically shaped butanol samples.

  5. Comparison of the performance of butanol and pentanol as modifiers in the micellar chromatographic determination of some phenethylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Agustí, M; Torres-Lapasió, J R; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C; Esteve-Romero, J

    2000-01-07

    A procedure was developed for the determination of several phenethylamines (amphetamine, arterenol, ephedrine, phenylephrine, phenylpropanolamine, mephentermine, methoxyphenamine, pseudoephedrine and tyramine), using micellar mobile phases of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), a C18 column and UV detection. The drugs were eluted at short retention times with conventional acetonitrile-water or methanol-water mobile phases. In contrast, in the micellar system, they were strongly retained due to association with the surfactant adsorbed on the stationary phase, and needed the addition of butanol or pentanol to be eluted from the column. These modifiers allowed a simple way of controlling the retention. The chromatographic efficiencies obtained with the hybrid mobile phases of SDS-butanol and SDS-pentanol were also very high, mostly in the N=3000-7000 range, significantly greater than those achieved with a conventional acetonitrile-methanol-water mobile phase. Butanol and pentanol yielded similar selectivities, but the latter modifier permitted significantly shorter retention times than butanol, and was preferred to expedite the analysis of the pharmaceuticals. Most binary combinations of the nine phenethylamines can be resolved with these mobile phases. A mobile phase of 0.15 M SDS-5% pentanol was used to assay five of the phenethylamines (amphetamine, ephedrine, phenylephrine, phenylpropanolamine and pseudoephedrine) in 22 pharmaceutical preparations, which contained diverse accompanying compounds. The results agreed with the declared compositions and with those obtained with a mobile phase of methanol-acetonitrile-0.05 M phosphate buffer (pH 3) 10:5:85, with no interferences and relative errors usually below 2%. However, with the aqueous-organic mobile phase, the retention time for phenylephrine was too low and could not be usually evaluated.

  6. Introducing a single secondary alcohol dehydrogenase into butanol-tolerant Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8 switches ABE fermentation to high level IBE fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Zongjie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have developed a butanol tolerant mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8, from the wild type strain DSM 1731. Strain Rh8 can tolerate up to 19 g/L butanol, with solvent titer improved accordingly, thus exhibiting industrial application potential. To test if strain Rh8 can be used for production of high level mixed alcohols, a single secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593 was overexpressed in strain Rh8 under the control of thl promoter. Results The heterogenous gene sADH was functionally expressed in C. acetobutylicum Rh8. This simple, one-step engineering approach switched the traditional ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation to IBE (isopropanol-butanol-ethanol fermentation. The total alcohol titer reached 23.88 g/l (7.6 g/l isopropanol, 15 g/l butanol, and 1.28 g/l ethanol with a yield to glucose of 31.42%. The acid (butyrate and acetate assimilation rate in isopropanol producing strain Rh8(psADH was increased. Conclusions The improved butanol tolerance and the enhanced solvent biosynthesis machinery in strain Rh8 is beneficial for production of high concentration of mixed alcohols. Strain Rh8 can thus be considered as a good host for further engineering of solvent/alcohol production.

  7. Enhanced robustness in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation with engineered Clostridium beijerinckii overexpressing adhE2 and ctfAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Congcong; Yu, Le; Varghese, Saju; Yu, Mingrui; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2017-11-01

    Clostridium beijerinckii CC101 was engineered to overexpress aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE2) and CoA-transferase (ctfAB). Solvent production and acid assimilation were compared between the parental and engineered strains expressing only adhE2 (CC101-SV4) and expressing adhE2, ald and ctfAB (CC101-SV6). CC101-SV4 showed an early butanol production from glucose but stopped pre-maturely at a low butanol concentration of ∼6g/L. Compared to CC101, CC101-SV6 produced more butanol (∼12g/L) from glucose and was able to re-assimilate more acids, which prevented "acid crash" and increased butanol production, under all conditions studied. CC101-SV6 also showed better ability in using glucose and xylose present in sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate, and produced 9.4g/L solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) compared to only 2.6g/L by CC101, confirming its robustness and better tolerance to hydrolysate inhibitors. The engineered strain of C. beijerinckii overexpressing adhE2 and ctfAB should have good potential for producing butanol from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preparation of highly dispersed tungsten oxide on MCM-41 via atomic layer deposition and its application to butanol dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeonjoo; Jeong, Soyeon; Kim, Do Heui; Park, Young-Kwon; Jeon, Jong-Ki

    2012-07-01

    Highly dispersed tungsten oxide on MCM-41 was synthesized using a novel atomic layer deposition (ALD) method. BET, XRD, XPS, NH3-TPD, and pyridine-IR were used to study the physicochemical properties of the supported tungsten oxides. In this study, the maximum loading of tungsten oxide on MCM-41 that could be prepared using the modified ALD method was 27.0 wt%. It was confirmed that the textural properties of the mesoporous silica were maintained after tungsten oxide loading. The NH3-TPD and Py-IR results indicated that weak acid sites, mainly Lewis acid sites, were produced over the WO3/MCM-41 samples. Moreover, 2-butanol dehydration was performed to demonstrate the potential advantages of the WO3/MCM-41 catalysts. The WO3/MCM-41 catalyst with 27.0 wt% tungsten oxide loading showed the highest activity in the dehydration of 2-butanol, which was attributed to the highest overall number of acid sites among the WO3/MCM-41 catalysts. The highly dispersed tungsten oxide on MCM-41 prepared via ALD can be an effective catalyst for producing butenes through 2-butanol dehydration.

  9. Antinociceptive activities of crude methanolic extract and phases, n-butanolic, chloroformic and ethyl acetate from Caulerpa racemosa (Caulerpaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton T. Souza

    Full Text Available In this study, we attempted to identify the possible antinociceptive actions of n-butanolic phase, chloroformic phase, ethyl acetate phase and crude methanolic extract obtained from Caulerpa racemosa. This seaweed is cosmopolitan in world, mainly in tropical regions. The n-butanolic, chloroformic, ethyl acetate phases and crude methanolic extract, all administered orally in the concentration of 100 mg/kg, reduced the nociception produced by acetic acid by 47.39%, 70.51%, 76.11% and 72.24%, respectively. In the hotplate test the chloroformic and ethyl acetate phase were activite in this models. In the neurogenic phase on formalin test, were observed that crude methanolic extract (51.77%, n-butanolic phase (35.12%, chloroformic phase (32.70% and indomethacin (32.06% were effective in inhibit the nociceptive response. In the inflammatory phase, only the ethyl acetate phase (75.43% and indomethacin (47.83% inhibited significantly the nociceptive response. Based on these data, we can infer that the ethyl acetate phase shows a significant anti-inflammatory profile, whose power has not yet been determined. However, pharmacological and chemical studies are continuing in order to characterize the mechanism(s responsible for the antinociceptive action and also to identify other active principles present in Caulerpa racemosa.

  10. Simultaneous glucose and xylose uptake by an acetone/butanol/ethanol producing laboratory Clostridium beijerinckii strain SE-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Wen; Xu, Haipeng; Li, Yan; Hua, Dongliang; Jin, Fuqiang; Gao, Mintian; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    Most butanol-producing strains of Clostridium prefer glucose over xylose, leading to a slower butanol production from lignocellulose hydrolysates. It is therefore beneficial to find and use a strain that can simultaneously use both glucose and xylose. Clostridium beijerinckii SE-2 strain assimilated glucose and xylose simultaneously and produced ABE (acetone/butanol/ethanol). The classic diauxic growth behavior was not seen. Similar rates of sugar consumption (4.44 mM glucose h(-1) and 6.66 mM xylose h(-1)) were observed suggesting this strain could use either glucose or xylose as the substrate and it has a similar capability to degrade these two sugars. With different initial glucose:xylose ratios, glucose and xylose were consumed simultaneously at rates roughly proportional to their individual concentrations in the medium, leading to complete utilization of both sugars at the same time. ABE production profiles were similar on different substrates. Transcriptional studies on the effect of glucose and xylose supplementation, however, suggests a clear glucose inhibition on xylose metabolism-related genes is still present.

  11. Continuous two stage acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation with integrated solvent removal using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 5313.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankar, Sandip B; Survase, Shrikant A; Singhal, Rekha S; Granström, Tom

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using a two stage chemostat system integrated with liquid-liquid extraction of solvents produced in the first stage. This minimized end product inhibition by butanol and subsequently enhanced glucose utilization and solvent production in continuous cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum B 5313. During continuous two-stage ABE fermentation, sugarcane bagasse was used as the cell holding material for the both stages and liquid-liquid extraction was performed using an oleyl alcohol and decanol mixture. An overall solvent production of 25.32g/L (acetone 5.93g/L, butanol 16.90g/L and ethanol 2.48g/L) was observed as compared to 15.98g/L in the single stage chemostat with highest solvent productivity and solvent yield of 2.5g/Lh and of 0.35g/g, respectively. Maximum glucose utilization (83.21%) at a dilution rate of 0.051/h was observed as compared to 54.38% in the single stage chemostat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of butanolic fraction of yellow and black maca (Lepidium meyenii) on the sperm count of adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, N; Farfan, C; Gonzales, G F

    2016-10-01

    Lepidium meyenii, known as maca, is a popular nutraceutical food which is grown over 4,000 m above sea level in the Peruvian central highlands. Maca contains alkaloids, but there are no studies on their biological effects. The butanol fraction obtained from methanol extract of maca hypocotyls contains alkaloids. The effects of butanol/aqueous fractions partitioned from methanol extract of yellow and black maca were examined. Total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity by 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl were used to evaluate maca fractions in vitro. Daily sperm production and sperm count in epididymis and vas deferens in mice were determined as biological effect of maca extracts in vivo. Yellow maca (21.7%±0.69) had better antioxidant capacity than black maca (18.2% ± 0.12; p maca. TPC is higher in the aqueous fraction than in the methanolic extract of yellow or black maca. Black maca administration resulted in higher concentration of sperm count in epididymis and vas deferens compared to yellow maca. A higher biological effect was observed in methanolic extract and in aqueous extract than in the butanol fraction of maca. In conclusion, better biological effect was observed in the methanolic extract of maca than in its partitioned fractions. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Biocatalyzed processes for production of commodity chemicals: Assessment of future research advances for N-butanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    This report is a summary of assessments by Chem Systems Inc. and a further evaluation of the impacts of research advances on energy efficiency and the potential for future industrial production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) solvents and other products by biocatalyzed processes. Brief discussions of each of the assessments made by CSI, followed by estimates of minimum projected energy consumption and costs for production of solvents by ABE biocatalyzed processes are included. These assessments and further advances discussed in this report show that substantial decreases in energy consumption and costs are possible on the basis of specific research advances; therefore, it appears that a biocatalyzed process for ABE can be developed that will be competitive with conventional petrochemical processes for production of n-butanol and acetone. (In this work, the ABE process was selected and utilized only as an example for methodology development; other possible bioprocesses for production of commodity chemicals are not intended to be excluded.) It has been estimated that process energy consumption can be decreased by 50%, with a corresponding cost reduction of 15-30% (in comparison with a conventional petrochemical process) by increasing microorganism tolerance to n-butanol and efficient recovery of product solvents from the vapor phase.

  14. Antidiabetic activities of aqueous ethanol and n-butanol fraction of Moringa stenopetala leaves in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Alemayehu; Makonnen, Eyasu; Mekonnen, Yelamtsehay; Debella, Asfaw; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2015-07-18

    Moringa stenopetala has been used in traditional health systems to treat diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to investigate the antidiabetic activity of aqueous ethanol and n-butanol fraction of Moringa stenopetala leaves in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. The aqueous ethanol extract and n-butanol fraction of Moringa stenopetala leaves hydroalcoholic (500 mg/kg body weight) and metformin (150 mg/kg body weight) were administered to diabetic rats. Blood glucose, lipid profiles, liver and kidney function were examined after 14 days of experiment. Histopathological profile of the pancreas was also observed in diabetic rats at the end of study. An oral sucrose challenge test was also carried out to assess the post prandial effect of the extract. Oral administration of the aqueous ethanol and n-butanol extracts of Moringa stenopetala leaves (500 mg/kg body weight) and metformin (150 mg/kg) significantly reduced blood glucose level (PMoringa stenopetala leaves possess antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic properties, and alleviate STZ-induced pancreatic damage in diabetic rats. The beneficial effects of plant material in inhibition of diabetes-induced complications are being investigated.

  15. Phenolic and lignan glycosides from the butanol extract of Averrhoa carambola L. root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qingwei; Lin, Xing; Liu, Yeqi; Xu, Xiaohui; Liang, Tao; Zheng, Ni; Kintoko; Huang, Renbin

    2012-10-19

    Fifteen compounds, which included six chiral lignans and nine phenolic glycosides, were separated from the butanol fraction of Averrhoa carambola L. root and identified. All of the compounds, namely 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenol-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, benzyl-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, (+)-5'-methoxyisolariciresinol 3α-O-β-D-gluco-pyranoside, (+)-isolariciresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, koaburaside, (+)-lyoniresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, (-)-lyoniresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, (-)-5'-methoxyisolariciresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, (-)-isolariciresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl 1-O-β-apiofuranosyl (1''→6')-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl 1-O-β-apiofuranosyl (1''→6')-β-gluco-pyranoside, methoxyhydroquinone-4-β-D-glucopyranoside, (2S)-2-O-β-D-gluco-pyranosyl-2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenol 1-O-β-D-apio-furanosyl-(1''→6')-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenol 1-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1''→6')-O-β-D-glucopyranoside were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  16. Phenolic and Lignan Glycosides from the Butanol Extract of Averrhoa carambola L. Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renbin Huang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen compounds, which included six chiral lignans and nine phenolic glycosides, were separated from the butanol fraction of Averrhoa carambola L. root and identified. All of the compounds, namely 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenol-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1, benzyl-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2, (+-5'-methoxyisolariciresinol 3α-O-β-D-gluco-pyranoside (3, (+-isolariciresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4, koaburaside (5, (+-lyoniresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6, (−-lyoniresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7, (−-5'-methoxyisolariciresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (8, (−-isolariciresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (9, 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl 1-O-β-apiofuranosyl (1''→6'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (10, 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl 1-O-β-apiofuranosyl (1''→6'-β-gluco-pyranoside (11, methoxyhydroquinone-4-β-D-glucopyranoside (12, (2S-2-O-β-D-gluco-pyranosyl-2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (13, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenol 1-O-β-D-apio-furanosyl-(1''→6'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (14 and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenol 1-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1''→6'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (15 were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  17. Lipase-Catalyzed Transesterification of Rapeseed Oil for Biodiesel Production with tert-Butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Park, Don-Hee

    Biodiesel is a fatty acid alkyl ester that can be derived from any vegetable oil or animal fat via the process of transesterification. It is a renewable, biodegradable, and nontoxic fuel. In this paper, we have evaluated the efficacy of a transesterification process for rapeseed oil with methanol in the presence of an enzyme and tert-butanol, which is added to ameliorate the negative effects associated with excess methanol. The application of Novozym 435 was determined to catalyze the transesterification process, and a conversion of 76.1% was achieved under selected conditions (reaction temperature 40 °C, methanol/oil molar ratio 3:1, 5% (w/w) Novozym 435 based on the oil weight, water content 1% (w/w), and reaction time of 24h). It has also been determined that rapeseed oil can be converted to fatty acid methyl ester using this system, and the results of this study contribute to the body of basic data relevant to the development of continuous enzymatic processes.

  18. Energy efficiency of acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) recovery by heat-integrated distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisales Diaz, Victor Hugo; Olivar Tost, Gerard

    2018-03-01

    Acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) is an alternative biofuel. However, the energy requirement of ABE recovery by distillation is considered elevated (> 15.2 MJ fuel/Kg-ABE), due to the low concentration of ABE from fermentation broths (between 15 and 30 g/l). In this work, to reduce the energy requirements of ABE recovery, four processes of heat-integrated distillation were proposed. The energy requirements and economic evaluations were performed using the fermentation broths of several biocatalysts. Energy requirements of the processes with four distillation columns and three distillation columns were similar (between 7.7 and 11.7 MJ fuel/kg-ABE). Double-effect system (DED) with four columns was the most economical process (0.12-0.16 $/kg-ABE). ABE recovery from dilute solutions by DED achieved energy requirements between 6.1 and 8.7 MJ fuel/kg-ABE. Vapor compression distillation (VCD) reached the lowest energy consumptions (between 4.7 and 7.3 MJ fuel/kg-ABE). Energy requirements for ABE recovery DED and VCD were lower than that for integrated reactors. The energy requirements of ABE production were between 1.3- and 2.0-fold higher than that for alternative biofuels (ethanol or isobutanol). However, the energy efficiency of ABE production was equivalent than that for ethanol and isobutanol (between 0.71 and 0.76) because of hydrogen production in ABE fermentation.

  19. Candida albicans PROTEIN PROFILE CHANGES IN RESPONSE TO THE BUTANOLIC EXTRACT OF Sapindus saponariaL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Adriana; Rosado, Fabio Rogério; Bettega, Eliane Martins da Silva; Melo, Kátia Cristina Sibin; Kukolj, Caroline; Bonfim-Mendonça, Patrícia de Souza; Shinobu-Mesquita, Cristiane Suemi; Ghiraldi, Luciana Dias; Campanerut, Paula Aline Zanetti; Capoci, Isis Regina Grenier; Godoy, Janine Silva Ribeiro; Ferreira, Izabel Cristina Piloto; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen that is capable of causing superficial and systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. Extracts of Sapindus saponaria have been used as antimicrobial agents against various organisms. In the present study, we used a combination of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the changes in protein abundance of C. albicans after exposure to the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and sub-minimal inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) of the butanolic extract (BUTE) of S. saponaria and also to fluconazole. A total of six different proteins with greater than 1.5 fold induction or repression relative to the untreated control cells were identified among the three treatments. In general, proteins/enzymes involved with the glycolysis (GPM1, ENO1, FBA1), amino acid metabolism (ILV5, PDC11) and protein synthesis (ASC1) pathways were detected. In conclusion, our findings reveal antifungal-induced changes in protein abundance of C. albicans. By using the previously identified components of the BUTE of S. saponaria(e.g., saponins and sesquiterpene oligoglycosides), it will be possible to compare the behavior of compounds with unknown mechanisms of action, and this knowledge will help to focus the subsequent biochemical work aimed at defining the effects of these compounds.

  20. Integrated, systems metabolic picture of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen; Seo, Seung-Oh; Celik, Venhar; Liu, Huaiwei; Kong, Wentao; Wang, Yi; Blaschek, Hans; Jin, Yong-Su; Lu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Microbial metabolism involves complex, system-level processes implemented via the orchestration of metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues. One canonical example of such processes is acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum, during which cells convert carbon sources to organic acids that are later reassimilated to produce solvents as a strategy for cellular survival. The complexity and systems nature of the process have been largely underappreciated, rendering challenges in understanding and optimizing solvent production. Here, we present a system-level computational framework for ABE fermentation that combines metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues. We developed the framework by decomposing the entire system into three modules, building each module separately, and then assembling them back into an integrated system. During the model construction, a bottom-up approach was used to link molecular events at the single-cell level into the events at the population level. The integrated model was able to successfully reproduce ABE fermentations of the WT C. acetobutylicum (ATCC 824), as well as its mutants, using data obtained from our own experiments and from literature. Furthermore, the model confers successful predictions of the fermentations with various network perturbations across metabolic, genetic, and environmental aspects. From foundation to applications, the framework advances our understanding of complex clostridial metabolism and physiology and also facilitates the development of systems engineering strategies for the production of advanced biofuels. PMID:26100881

  1. Enhanced acetone-butanol-ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysates by using starchy slurry as supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Kuittinen, Suvi; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Zhang, Junhua; Pappinen, Ari

    2017-11-01

    This study aims to improve acetone-butanol-ethanol production from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic material by supplementing starchy slurry as nutrients. In the fermentations of glucose, xylose and the hydrolysates of Salix schwerinii, the normal supplements such as buffer, minerals, and vitamins solutions were replaced with the barley starchy slurry. The ABE production was increased from 0.86 to 14.7g/L by supplementation of starchy slurry in the fermentation of xylose and the utilization of xylose increased from 29% to 81%. In the fermentations of hemicellulosic and enzymatic hydrolysates from S. schwerinii, the ABE yields were increased from 0 and 0.26 to 0.35 and 0.33g/g sugars, respectively. The results suggested that the starchy slurry supplied the essential nutrients for ABE fermentation. The starchy slurry as supplement could improve the ABE production from both hemicellulosic and cellulosic hydrolysate of lignocelluloses, and it is particularly helpful for enhancing the utilization of xylose from hemicelluloses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects of butanol extract from Arctium Lappa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Eun-Hwa; Jang, Seon-A; Joo, Haemi; Park, Sulkyoung; Kang, Se-Chan; Lee, Chul-Hoon; Kim, Sun-Young

    2011-02-08

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, allergic inflammatory skin disease that is accompanied by markedly increased levels of inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, and T cells. Arctium lappa L. is a traditional medicine in Asia. This study examined whether a butanol extract of A. lappa (ALBE) had previously unreported anti-allergic or anti-inflammatory effects. This study examined the effect of ALBE on the release of β-hexosaminidase in antigen-stimulated-RBL-2H3 cells. We also evaluated the ConA-induced expression of IL-4, IL-5, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and nuclear factor (NF)-κB using RT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in mouse splenocytes after ALBE treatment. We observed significant inhibition of β-hexosaminidase release in RBL-2H3 cells and suppressed mRNA expression and protein secretion of IL-4 and IL-5 induced by ConA-treated primary murine splenocytes after ALBE treatment. Additionally, ALBE (100 μg/mL) suppressed not only the transcriptional activation of NF-κB, but also the phosphorylation of MAPKs in ConA-treated primary splenocytes. These results suggest that ALBE inhibits the expression of IL-4 and IL-5 by downregulating MAPKs and NF-κB activation in ConA-treated splenocytes and supports the hypothesis that ALBE may have beneficial effects in the treatment of allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis.

  3. Anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects of butanol extract from Arctium Lappa L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Se-Chan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, allergic inflammatory skin disease that is accompanied by markedly increased levels of inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, and T cells. Arctium lappa L. is a traditional medicine in Asia. This study examined whether a butanol extract of A. lappa (ALBE had previously unreported anti-allergic or anti-inflammatory effects. Methods This study examined the effect of ALBE on the release of β-hexosaminidase in antigen-stimulated-RBL-2H3 cells. We also evaluated the ConA-induced expression of IL-4, IL-5, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, and nuclear factor (NF-κB using RT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in mouse splenocytes after ALBE treatment. Results We observed significant inhibition of β-hexosaminidase release in RBL-2H3 cells and suppressed mRNA expression and protein secretion of IL-4 and IL-5 induced by ConA-treated primary murine splenocytes after ALBE treatment. Additionally, ALBE (100 μg/mL suppressed not only the transcriptional activation of NF-κB, but also the phosphorylation of MAPKs in ConA-treated primary splenocytes. Conclusions These results suggest that ALBE inhibits the expression of IL-4 and IL-5 by downregulating MAPKs and NF-κB activation in ConA-treated splenocytes and supports the hypothesis that ALBE may have beneficial effects in the treatment of allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis.

  4. Butanol production from lignocellulose by simultaneous fermentation, saccharification, and pervaporation or vacuum evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Víctor Hugo Grisales; Tost, Gerard Olivar

    2016-10-01

    Techno-economic study of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) fermentation from lignocellulose was performed. Simultaneous saccharification, fermentation and vacuum evaporation (SFS-V) or pervaporation (SFS-P) were proposed. A kinetic model of metabolic pathways for ABE fermentation with the effect of phenolics and furans in the growth was proposed based on published laboratory results. The processes were optimized in Matlab®. The end ABE purification was carried out by heat-integrated distillation. The objective function of the minimization was the total annualized cost (TAC). Fuel consumption of SFS-P using poly[1-(trimethylsilyl)-1-propyne] membrane was between 13.8 and 19.6% lower than SFS-V. Recovery of furans and phenolics for the hybrid reactors was difficult for its high boiling point. TAC of SFS-P was increased 1.9 times with supplementation of phenolics and furans to 3g/l each one for its high toxicity. Therefore, an additional detoxification method or an efficient pretreatment process will be necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Candida albicans PROTEIN PROFILE CHANGES IN RESPONSE TO THE BUTANOLIC EXTRACT OF Sapindus saponariaL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana FIORINI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen that is capable of causing superficial and systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. Extracts of Sapindus saponaria have been used as antimicrobial agents against various organisms. In the present study, we used a combination of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS to identify the changes in protein abundance of C. albicans after exposure to the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and sub-minimal inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC of the butanolic extract (BUTE of S. saponaria and also to fluconazole. A total of six different proteins with greater than 1.5 fold induction or repression relative to the untreated control cells were identified among the three treatments. In general, proteins/enzymes involved with the glycolysis (GPM1, ENO1, FBA1, amino acid metabolism (ILV5, PDC11 and protein synthesis (ASC1 pathways were detected. In conclusion, our findings reveal antifungal-induced changes in protein abundance of C. albicans. By using the previously identified components of the BUTE of S. saponaria(e.g., saponins and sesquiterpene oligoglycosides, it will be possible to compare the behavior of compounds with unknown mechanisms of action, and this knowledge will help to focus the subsequent biochemical work aimed at defining the effects of these compounds.

  6. Statistical thermodynamics of 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and butanal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Prasenjit; Papajak, Ewa; Yu, Tao; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation is to calculate partition functions and thermodynamic quantities, viz., entropy, enthalpy, heat capacity, and Gibbs free energies, for 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and butanal in the vapor phase. We employed the multi-structural (MS) anharmonicity method and electronic structure calculations including both explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory and density functional theory. The calculations are performed using all structures for each molecule and employing both the local harmonic approximation (MS-LH) and the inclusion of torsional anharmonicity (MS-T). The results obtained from the MS-T calculations are in excellent agreement with experimental data taken from the Thermodynamics Research Center data series and the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, where available. They are also compared with Benson's empirical group additivity values, where available; in most cases, the present results are more accurate than the group additivity values. In other cases, where experimental data (but not group additivity values) are available, we also obtain good agreement with experiment. This validates the accuracy of the electronic structure calculations when combined with the MS-T method for estimating the thermodynamic properties of systems with multiple torsions, and it increases our confidence in the predictions made with this method for molecules and temperatures where experimental or empirical data are not available.

  7. Advances in consolidated bioprocessing systems for bioethanol and butanol production from biomass: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Salehi Jouzani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, lignocellulosic biomass as the most abundant renewable resource has been widely considered for bioalcohols production. However, the complex structure of lignocelluloses requires a multi-step process which is costly and time consuming. Although, several bioprocessing approaches have been developed for pretreatment, saccharification and fermentation, bioalcohols production from lignocelluloses is still limited because of the economic infeasibility of these technologies. This cost constraint could be overcome by designing and constructing robust cellulolytic and bioalcohols producing microbes and by using them in a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP system. This paper comprehensively reviews potentials, recent advances and challenges faced in CBP systems for efficient bioalcohols (ethanol and butanol production from lignocellulosic and starchy biomass. The CBP strategies include using native single strains with cellulytic and alcohol production activities, microbial co-cultures containing both cellulytic and ethanologenic microorganisms, and genetic engineering of cellulytic microorganisms to be alcohol-producing or alcohol producing microorganisms to be cellulytic. Moreover, high-throughput techniques, such as metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, next generation sequencing and synthetic biology developed to explore novel microorganisms and powerful enzymes with high activity, thermostability and pH stability are also discussed. Currently, the CBP technology is in its infant stage, and ideal microorganisms and/or conditions at industrial scale are yet to be introduced. So, it is essential to bring into attention all barriers faced and take advantage of all the experiences gained to achieve a high-yield and low-cost CBP process.

  8. Comparative genomic and proteomic analyses of Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8 and its parent strain DSM 1731 revealed new understandings on butanol tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Guanhui [CAS Key Laboratory of Microbial Physiological and Metabolic Engineering, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Dong, Hongjun; Zhu, Yan; Mao, Shaoming [CAS Key Laboratory of Microbial Physiological and Metabolic Engineering, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhang, Tianrui [CAS Key Laboratory of Microbial Physiological and Metabolic Engineering, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Tianjin Institute of Industrial Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Yanping [CAS Key Laboratory of Microbial Physiological and Metabolic Engineering, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Chen, Zugen [Department of Human Genetics, School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Li, Yin, E-mail: yli@im.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Microbial Physiological and Metabolic Engineering, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Genomes of a butanol tolerant strain and its parent strain were deciphered. • Comparative genomic and proteomic was applied to understand butanol tolerance. • None differentially expressed proteins have mutations in its corresponding genes. • Mutations in ribosome might be responsible for the global difference of proteomics. - Abstract: Clostridium acetobutylicum strain Rh8 is a butanol-tolerant mutant which can tolerate up to 19 g/L butanol, 46% higher than that of its parent strain DSM 1731. We previously performed comparative cytoplasm- and membrane-proteomic analyses to understand the mechanism underlying the improved butanol tolerance of strain Rh8. In this work, we further extended this comparison to the genomic level. Compared with the genome of the parent strain DSM 1731, two insertion sites, four deletion sites, and 67 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) are distributed throughout the genome of strain Rh8. Among the 67 SNVs, 16 SNVs are located in the predicted promoters and intergenic regions; while 29 SNVs are located in the coding sequence, affecting a total of 21 proteins involved in transport, cell structure, DNA replication, and protein translation. The remaining 22 SNVs are located in the ribosomal genes, affecting a total of 12 rRNA genes in different operons. Analysis of previous comparative proteomic data indicated that none of the differentially expressed proteins have mutations in its corresponding genes. Rchange Algorithms analysis indicated that the mutations occurred in the ribosomal genes might change the ribosome RNA thermodynamic characteristics, thus affect the translation strength of these proteins. Take together, the improved butanol tolerance of C. acetobutylicum strain Rh8 might be acquired through regulating the translational process to achieve different expression strength of genes involved in butanol tolerance.

  9. The Study of Synergistic Effects of n.butanolic Cyclamen coum Extract and Ciprofloxacin on inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ahya abdi ali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm are the major causes of death in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. Some studies revealed that biofilms are resistant to several antibiotics because of their impermeable structures. In order to re-sensitize bacteria to different antibiotics, biofilm formation should be inhibited. In this research, evaluation of antibiofilm activity of n-butanolic Cyclamen coum extract as a medici­nal plant from Myrsinaceae family, in combination with ciprofloxacin was carried out.   Materials and method s: The biofilm formation ability by P. aeruginosa PAO1 and one clinically isolated P. aeruginosa (PA214 was confirmed by microtiter plate method. Extraction of the tubers of Cyclamen coum was done by fractionation method . The antibiofilm and antibacterial properties of n-butanolic C. coum extract (which includes saponin compounds alone and in combination with ciprofloxacin by using microdilution and crystal violet methods were examined. The cytotoxicity effect of the n-butanolic extract on HT-29 cells was assayed by MTT (3- (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl -2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide test.   Results : The biofilm formation ability by P. aeruginosa strains was quantitatively confirmed. Saponin content of the n-butanolic C.coum extract was 156 µg/mL. The extract revealed antibacterial activity against the growth of planktonic P. aeruginosa strains. The combination of n-butanolic C.coum extract and ciprofloxacin significantly inhibited P.aeruginosa biofilm formation (ΣFBIC = 0.5. The n-butanolic C.coum extract showed insignificant cytotoxic effect against HT-29 human cancer cell line after 48 hours and 72 hours incubation .   Discussion and conclusion : It can be concluded that n-butanolic C.coum extract in combination with ciprofloxacin significantly revealed antibiofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilm however, further clinical investigations are required.

  10. Comparison of simulation and experimental results for a model aqueous tert-butanol solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overduin, S. D.; Patey, G. N.

    2017-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the behavior of aqueous tert-butanol (TBA) solutions for a range of temperatures, using the CHARMM generalized force field (CGenFF) to model TBA and the TIP4P/2005 or TIP4P-Ew water model. Simulation results for the density, isothermal compressibility, constant pressure heat capacity, and self-diffusion coefficients are in good accord with experimental measurements. Agreement with the experiment is particularly good at low TBA concentration, where experiments have revealed anomalies in a number of thermodynamic properties. Importantly, the CGenFF model does not exhibit liquid-liquid demixing at temperatures between 290 and 320 K (for systems of 32 000 molecules), in contrast with the situation for several other common TBA models [R. Gupta and G. N. Patey, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 034509 (2012)]. However, whereas real water and TBA are miscible at all temperatures where the liquid is stable, we observe some evidence of demixing at 340 K and above. To evaluate the structural properties at low concentrations, we compare with both neutron scattering and recent spectroscopic measurements. This reveals that while the CGenFF model is a definite improvement over other models that have been considered, the TBA molecules still exhibit a tendency to associate at low concentrations that is somewhat stronger than that indicated by experiments. Finally, we discuss the range and decay times of the long-range correlations, providing an indication of the system size and simulation times that are necessary in order to obtain reliable results for certain properties.

  11. 2-Butanol and butanone production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through combination of a B12 dependent dehydratase and a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase using a TEV-based expression system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Ghiaci

    Full Text Available 2-Butanol and its chemical precursor butanone (methyl ethyl ketone--MEK are chemicals with potential uses as biofuels and biocommodity chemicals. In order to produce 2-butanol, we have demonstrated the utility of using a TEV-protease based expression system to achieve equimolar expression of the individual subunits of the two protein complexes involved in the B12-dependent dehydratase step (from the pdu-operon of Lactobacillus reuteri, which catalyze the conversion of meso-2,3-butanediol to butanone. We have furthermore identified a NADH dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (Sadh from Gordonia sp. able to catalyze the subsequent conversion of butanone to 2-butanol. A final concentration of 4±0.2 mg/L 2-butanol and 2±0.1 mg/L of butanone was found. A key factor for the production of 2-butanol was the availability of NADH, which was achieved by growing cells lacking the GPD1 and GPD2 isogenes under anaerobic conditions.

  12. Effects of different replicons in conjugative plasmids on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression and n-butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium tyrobutyricum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mingrui; Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yang, Shang-Tian [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). William G. Lowrie Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Tang, I-Ching [Bioprocessing Innovative Company, Dublin, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 can produce butyric acid, acetic acid, and hydrogen as the main products from various carbon sources. In this study, C. tyrobutyricum was used as a host to produce n-butanol by expressing adhE2 gene under the control of a native thiolase promoter using four different conjugative plasmids (pMTL82151, 83151, 84151, and 85151) each with a different replicon (pBP1 from C. botulinum NCTC2916, pCB102 from C. butyricum, pCD6 from Clostridium difficile, and pIM13 from Bacillus subtilis). The effects of different replicons on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, adhE2 expression and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase activities, and butanol production by different mutants of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated. Among the four plasmids and replicons studied, pMTL82151 with pBP1 gave the highest transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression, and butanol biosynthesis. Butanol production from various substrates, including glucose, xylose, mannose, and mannitol were then investigated with the best mutant strain harboring adhE2 in pMTL82151. A high butanol titer of 20.5 g/L with 0.33 g/g yield and 0.32 g/L h productivity was obtained with mannitol as the substrate in batch fermentation with pH controlled at {proportional_to}6.0. (orig.)

  13. Experimental investigation of performance and emissions of a VCR diesel engine fuelled with n-butanol diesel blends under varying engine parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyar, Ashish; Sharma, Dilip; Soni, Shyam Lal; Mathur, Alok

    2017-09-01

    The continuous rise in the cost of fossil fuels as well as in environmental pollution has attracted research in the area of clean alternative fuels for improving the performance and emissions of internal combustion (IC) engines. In the present work, n-butanol is treated as a bio-fuel and investigations have been made to evaluate the feasibility of replacing diesel with a suitable n-butanol-diesel blend. In the current research, an experimental investigation was carried out on a variable compression ratio CI engine with n-butanol-diesel blends (10-25% by volume) to determine the optimum blending ratio and optimum operating parameters of the engine for reduced emissions. The best results of performance and emissions were observed for 20% n-butanol-diesel blend (B20) at a higher compression ratio as compared to diesel while keeping the other parameters unchanged. The observed deterioration in engine performance was within tolerable limits. The reductions in smoke, nitrogen oxides (NO x ), and carbon monoxide (CO) were observed up to 56.52, 17.19, and 30.43%, respectively, for B20 in comparison to diesel at rated power. However, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and hydrocarbons (HC) were found to be higher by 17.58 and 15.78%, respectively, for B20. It is concluded that n-butanol-diesel blend would be a potential fuel to control emissions from diesel engines. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  14. A New Process for Maleic Anhydride Synthesis from a Renewable Building Block: The Gas-Phase Oxidehydration of Bio-1-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavarelli, Giulia; Velasquez Ochoa, Juliana; Caldarelli, Aurora; Puzzo, Francesco; Cavani, Fabrizio; Dubois, Jean-Luc

    2015-07-08

    We investigated the synthesis of maleic anhydride by oxidehydration of a bio-alcohol, 1-butanol, as a possible alternative to the classical process of n-butane oxidation. A vanadyl pyrophosphate catalyst was used to explore the one-pot reaction, which involved two sequential steps: 1) 1-butanol dehydration to 1-butene, catalysed by acid sites, and 2) the oxidation of butenes to maleic anhydride, catalysed by redox sites. A non-negligible amount of phthalic anhydride was also formed. The effect of different experimental parameters was investigated with chemically sourced 1-butanol, and the results were then confirmed by using genuinely bio-sourced 1-butanol. In the case of bio-1-butanol, however, the purity of the product remarkably affected the yield of maleic anhydride. It was found that the reaction mechanism includes the oxidation of butenes to crotonaldehyde and the oxidation of the latter to either furan or maleic acid, both of which are transformed to produce maleic anhydride. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Rate constant measurements for the overall reaction of OH + 1-butanol → products from 900 to 1200 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Genny A; Hanson, Ronald K; Golden, David M; Bowman, Craig T

    2012-03-15

    The rate constant for the overall reaction OH + 1-butanol → products was determined in the temperature range 900 to 1200 K from measurements of OH concentration time histories in reflected shock wave experiments of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as a fast source of OH radicals with 1-butanol in excess. Narrow-linewidth laser absorption was employed for the quantitative OH concentration measurement. A detailed kinetic mechanism was constructed that includes updated rate constants for 1-butanol and TBHP kinetics that influence the near-first-order OH concentration decay under the present experimental conditions, and this mechanism was used to facilitate the rate constant determination. The current work improves upon previous experimental studies of the title rate constant by utilizing a rigorously generated kinetic model to describe secondary reactions. Additionally, the current work extends the temperature range of experimental data in the literature for the title reaction under combustion-relevant conditions, presenting the first measurements from 900 to 1000 K. Over the entire temperature range studied, the overall rate constant can be expressed in Arrhenius form as 3.24 × 10(-10) exp(-2505/T [K]) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The influence of secondary reactions on the overall OH decay rate is discussed, and a detailed uncertainty analysis is performed yielding an overall uncertainty in the measured rate constant of ±20% at 1197 K and ±23% at 925 K. The results are compared with previous experimental and theoretical studies on the rate constant for the title reaction and reasonable agreement is found when the earlier experimental data were reinterpreted.

  16. An improved kinetic model for the acetone-butanol-ethanol pathway of Clostridium acetobutylicum and model-based perturbation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Comprehensive kinetic models of microbial metabolism can enhance the understanding of system dynamics and regulatory mechanisms, which is helpful in optimizing microbial production of industrial chemicals. Clostridium acetobutylicum produces solvents (acetone-butanol–ethanol, ABE) through the ABE pathway. To systematically assess the potential of increased production of solvents, kinetic modeling has been applied to analyze the dynamics of this pathway and make predictive simulations. Up to date, only one kinetic model for C. acetobutylicum supported by experiment has been reported as far as we know. But this model did not integrate the metabolic regulatory effects of transcriptional control and other complex factors. It also left out the information of some key intermediates (e.g. butyryl-phosphate). Results We have developed an improved kinetic model featured with the incorporation of butyryl-phosphate, inclusion of net effects of complex metabolic regulations, and quantification of endogenous enzyme activity variations caused by these regulations. The simulation results of our model are more consistent with published experimental data than the previous model, especially in terms of reflecting the kinetics of butyryl-phosphate and butyrate. Through parameter perturbation analysis, it was found that butyrate kinase has large and positive influence on butanol production while CoA transferase has negative effect on butanol production, suggesting that butyrate kinase has more efficiency in converting butyrate to butanol than CoA transferase. Conclusions Our improved kinetic model of the ABE process has more capacity in approaching real circumstances, providing much more insight in the regulatory mechanisms and potential key points for optimization of solvent productions. Moreover, the modeling strategy can be extended to other biological processes. PMID:21689471

  17. Evaluating the possibility of using acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation wastewater for bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C; Yang, X-Y; Xiong, L; Guo, H-J; Luo, J; Wang, B; Zhang, H-R; Lin, X-Q; Chen, X-D

    2015-05-01

    To reduce the cost of bacterial cellulose (BC) production, the possibility of using acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation wastewater with high COD value (18 050 mg l(-1) ) for BC production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was evaluated. After 7 days of fermentation, the highest BC yield (1·34 g l(-1) ) was obtained. The carbon sources including sugars (glucose and xylose), organic acids (acetic acid and butyric acid) and alcohol compounds (ethanol and butanol) were utilized by G. xylinus simultaneously during fermentation. Although the COD decrease ratio (about 14·7%) was low, the highest BC yield on COD consumption (56·2%, g g(-1) ) was relatively high and the remaining wastewater could be used for further BC fermentation. Besides, the environment of ABE fermentation wastewater showed small influence on the BC structure by comparison with the BC products obtained in traditional HS medium using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Overall, ABE fermentation wastewater is one promising substrate for BC production. The possibility of using acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation wastewater for bacterial cellulose (BC) production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was evaluated in this study. This is the first time that ABE fermentation wastewater was used as substrate for BC fermentation. The results provide detail information of metabolism of G. xylinus in ABE fermentation wastewater and the influence of wastewater environment on the structure of BC samples. Overall, this bioconversion could reduce the cost of BC production greatly. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Effect of butanol fraction from Cassia tora L. seeds on glycemic control and insulin secretion in diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Jeongsu; Choi, Hyunju

    2008-01-01

    Cassia tora L. seeds have previously been reported to reduce blood glucose level in human and animals with diabetes. In the present study, the effects of Cassia tora L. seed butanol fraction (CATO) were studied on postprandial glucose control and insulin secretion from the pancreas of the normal and diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by an i.p. injection of Streptozotocin (55 mg/kg BW) into the male Sprague-Dawley rats. The postprandial glucose control was monitored during a 240 min-period u...

  19. The effect of CTAB on synthesis in butanol of samaria and gadolinia doped ceria - nickel oxide ceramics; Efeito do CTAB na sintese solvotermica em butanol de ceramicas de ceria dopada com samaria e gadolinia - oxido de niquel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakaki, A.R.; Cunha, S.M.; Yoshito, W.K.; Ussui, V.; Lazar, D.R.R., E-mail: alexander@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CCTM/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais

    2011-07-01

    In this work it was synthesized doped ceria and Samaria gadolinia - nickel oxide ceramics, mainly applied as anodes Fuel Cells Solid Oxide. Powders of composition Ce{sub 0,8}(SmGd){sub 0,2}O{sub 1,9}/NiO and mass ratio of 40: 60% were initially synthesized by hydroxides coprecipitation and then treated solvo thermically in butanol. Cerium samarium, gadolinium and nickel chlorides and CTAB with molar ratio metal / CTAB ranging from 1 to 3, were used as raw materials Powders were treated in butanol at 150 deg C for 16h. The powders were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, specific surface area for adsorption of nitrogen and particle size distribution by laser beam scattering. The ceramics were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and density measurements by immersion technique in water. The results showed that the powders had the characteristic crystalline structures of ceria and nickel hydroxide, and high specific surface area (80 m{sup 2} / g). The characterizations of ceramics demonstrated high chemical homogeneity and porosity values of 30%. (author)

  20. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium of (water + 2-propanol + 1-butanol + salt) systems at T = 313.15 K and T = 353.15 K: Experimental data and correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Milton A.P. [School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6066, 13081-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aznar, Martin [School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6066, 13081-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: maznar@feq.unicamp.br

    2006-06-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for the quaternary systems (water + 2-propanol + 1-butanol + potassium bromide) and (water + 2-propanol + 1-butanol + magnesium chloride) were measured at T = 313.15 K and T = 353.15 K. The overall salt concentrations were 5 and 10 mass percent. Ternary (liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for the salt-free system (water + 2-propanol + 1-butanol) were also determined and found to be in good agreement with data from the literature. The NRTL model for the activity coefficient was used to correlate the data. New interaction parameters were estimated, using the Simplex minimization method and a concentration-based objective function. The results are very satisfactory, with root mean square deviations between experimental and calculated compositions of both phases being less than 0.5%.

  1. Acetone-butanol-ethanol competitive sorption simulation from single, binary, and ternary systems in a fixed-bed of KA-I resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinglan; Zhuang, Wei; Ying, Hanjie; Jiao, Pengfei; Li, Renjie; Wen, Qingshi; Wang, Lili; Zhou, Jingwei; Yang, Pengpeng

    2015-01-01

    Separation of butanol based on sorption methodology from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation broth has advantages in terms of biocompatibility and stability, as well as economy, and therefore gains much attention. In this work a chromatographic column model based on the solid film linear driving force approach and the competitive Langmuir isotherm equations was used to predict the competitive sorption behaviors of ABE single, binary, and ternary mixture. It was observed that the outlet concentration of weaker retained components exceeded the inlet concentration, which is an evidence of competitive adsorption. Butanol, the strongest retained component, could replace ethanol almost completely and also most of acetone. In the end of this work, the proposed model was validated by comparison of the experimental and predicted ABE ternary breakthrough curves using the real ABE fermentation broth as a feed solution. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  2. Complementary vapor pressure data for 2-methyl-1-propanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol at a pressure range of (15 to 177) kPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, Arturo; Quezada, Nathalie [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Ambiental, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Avda. Espana 1680, Valparaiso (Chile); Fuente, Juan C. de la [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Ambiental, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Avda. Espana 1680, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: juan.delafuente@usm.cl

    2009-09-15

    The vapor pressure of pure 2-methyl-1-propanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol, components called congeners that are present in aroma of wine, pisco, and other alcoholic beverages, were measured with a dynamic recirculation apparatus at a pressure range of (15 to 177) kPa with an estimated uncertainty <0.2%. The measurements were performed at temperature ranges of (337 to 392) K for 2-methyl-1-propanol and (358 to 422) K for 3-methyl-1-butanol. Data were correlated using a Wagner-type equation with standard deviations of 0.09 kPa for the vapor pressure of 2-methyl-1-propanol and 0.21 kPa for 3-methyl-1-butanol. The experimental data and correlation were compared with data selected from the literature.

  3. Tributyl phosphate biodegradation to butanol and phosphate and utilization by a novel bacterial isolate, Sphingobium sp. strain RSMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangu, Shyam Sunder; Muralidharan, Bindu; Tripathi, S C; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-03-01

    A Sphingobium sp. strain isolated from radioactive solid waste management site (RSMS) completely degraded 7.98 g/L of tributyl phosphate (TBP) from TBP containing suspensions in 3 days. It also completely degraded 20 mM dibutyl phosphate (DBP) within 2 days. The strain tolerated high levels of TBP and showed excellent stability with respect to TBP degradation over several repeated subcultures. On solid minimal media or Luria Bertani media supplemented with TBP, the RSMS strain showed a clear zone of TBP degradation around the colony. Gas chromatography and spectrophotometry analyses identified DBP as the intermediate and butanol and phosphate as the products of TBP biodegradation. The RSMS strain utilized both TBP and DBP as the sole source of carbon and phosphorous for its growth. The butanol released was completely utilized by the strain as a carbon source thereby leaving no toxic residue in the medium. Degradation of TBP or DBP was found to be suppressed by high concentration of glucose which also inhibited TBP or DBP dependent growth. The results highlight the potential of Sphingobium sp. strain RSMS for bioremediation of TBP and for further molecular investigation.

  4. Preparation and characterization of zirconia-loaded lignocellulosic butanol residue as a biosorbent for phosphate removal from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Enmin; Liu, Xiaohuan; Jiang, Jinhua; Fu, Shenyuan; Chu, Fuxiang

    2016-11-01

    Zirconium(IV) loaded lignocellulosic butanol residue (LBR-Zr) used for the adsorption of phosphate (P) ions from aqueous solution was synthesized and evaluated. The adsorption isotherms were fitted well with the Freundlich and Temkin modes. Thermodynamic analyses indicated that phosphate adsorption on the LBR-Zr increased with increasing temperature from 298 to 338 K. The kinetic datas were described better by the pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic rate model. Increasing pH suppressed phosphate adsorption. Coexisting anions study exhibited that the incorporation of CO32- anion had the largest influence on the phosphate adsorption capacity. The mechanism of adsorption process on LBR-Zr was analyzed by FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an EDX (energy dispersive X-ray) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technologies, respectively. The above results confirmed that surface hydroxyl groups on biosorbent LBR-Zr were replaced by phosphate. The LBR-Zr with good specific affinity towards phosphate was a promising biosorbent for phosphate removal from aqueous solution. The research would be beneficial for developing a promising, eco-friendly phosphate biosorbent from plentiful lignocellulosic butanol residue.

  5. Preparation and characterization of zirconia-loaded lignocellulosic butanol residue as a biosorbent for phosphate removal from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zong, Enmin [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Plant Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation, Taizhou University, Taizhou 318000 (China); Liu, Xiaohuan, E-mail: liuxiaohuancaf@163.com [School of Engineering, National Engineering and Technology Research Center of Wood-Based Resources Comprehensive Utilization, and Key Laboratory of Wood Science and Technology of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University, Hangzhou, Lin’an 311300 (China); Jiang, Jinhua [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Plant Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation, Taizhou University, Taizhou 318000 (China); Fu, Shenyuan [School of Engineering, National Engineering and Technology Research Center of Wood-Based Resources Comprehensive Utilization, and Key Laboratory of Wood Science and Technology of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University, Hangzhou, Lin’an 311300 (China); Chu, Fuxiang [Institute of Chemical Industry of Forestry Products, CAF, Nanjing 210037 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • LBR-Zr was evaluated as a novel biosorbent for phosphate removal. • Effects of process factors on phosphate adsorption were studied in detail. • LBR-Zr showed markedly enhanced phosphate adsorption compared to LBR. • The underlying mechanism for phosphate adsorption of LBR-Zr was fully investigated. - Abstract: Zirconium(IV) loaded lignocellulosic butanol residue (LBR-Zr) used for the adsorption of phosphate (P) ions from aqueous solution was synthesized and evaluated. The adsorption isotherms were fitted well with the Freundlich and Temkin modes. Thermodynamic analyses indicated that phosphate adsorption on the LBR-Zr increased with increasing temperature from 298 to 338 K. The kinetic datas were described better by the pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic rate model. Increasing pH suppressed phosphate adsorption. Coexisting anions study exhibited that the incorporation of CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} anion had the largest influence on the phosphate adsorption capacity. The mechanism of adsorption process on LBR-Zr was analyzed by FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an EDX (energy dispersive X-ray) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technologies, respectively. The above results confirmed that surface hydroxyl groups on biosorbent LBR-Zr were replaced by phosphate. The LBR-Zr with good specific affinity towards phosphate was a promising biosorbent for phosphate removal from aqueous solution. The research would be beneficial for developing a promising, eco-friendly phosphate biosorbent from plentiful lignocellulosic butanol residue.

  6. Evaluation of Biocompatibility of an Etch-and-Rinse Adhesive System Based in Tertiary Butanol Applied in Deep Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Gilvanely Cardoso; Sobral, Ana Paula Veras

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system based in tertiary butanol applied in deep cavity human teeth with approximately 1 mm of remaining dentin by observing histological changes of the pulp tissue of humans at intervals of 01, 07, 14 and 21 days. Twenty third molars with indication for xtraction from patients of both sexes, presenting no systemic alterations were used. Class I cavity was made deeper and then, XP BOND adhesive system and resin Filtek Z250 were applied. The sample was divided into four groups according to the time intervals between the application of adhesive system and extraction. Morphologic criteria analysed considered the presence of hyperemia, type of inflammatory cell response, organization of odontoblast cells layer, organization of pulp tissue and the presence or absence of bacteria. Data were submitted to Fisher Exact Test p> 0.05. We observed mild inflammatory infiltrate, preserved pulp tissue morphology, disorganization of the odontoblast layer in most specimens, as well as absence of bacteria at the intervals of 01, 07, 14 and 21 days. In some cases there was pulp hyperemia. The etchand- rinse adhesive system based in tertiary butanol showed satisfactory behavior in the conditions studied.

  7. Thermodynamic characteristics of the adsorption of sulfanilamide, phenol, and n-butanol on bio-gel beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janado, M; Shimada, K; Nishida, T

    1976-03-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the adsorption of sulfanilamide, phenol and n-butanol on Bio-Gel beads have been studied. Bio-Gel was chosen as the adsorbent as it possesses both hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites on its surface. Adsorption of the former two adsorbates was found to be exothermic, and the relevant thermodynamic parameters at 20 degrees are in the ranges: deltaH degrees = -2.7 to -5.4 kcal/mole; deltaF degrees = -6.0 to -7.6 kcal/mole; deltaS degrees = +7.7 to +11.6 e.u. In the presence of urea, adsorption of sulfanilamide and phenol was partially disrupted. This, together with the large entropy gain of the process, indicates that both hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic bonding contribute cooperatively to the adsorption. On the contrary, adsorption of n-butanol, which was not susceptible to urea, was an endothermic process with the parameters, deltaH degrees = +5.8kcal/mole, deltaF degrees = -1.8 kcal/mole, and deltaS = +26.1 E.U. at 20 degrees. These data conform to the thermodynamic properties of hydrophobic bond formation. Finally, possible implications of these data in the structural assembly of lipoprotein molecules are discussed.

  8. Technoeconomic evaluation of the extractive fermentation of butanol as a guide to research in this area of biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, R.M. (Bio En-Gene-Er Associates, Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States))

    1991-09-01

    This report represents the completion of a part of an overall project to evaluate the technical and economic status of several newly conceptualized processes for producing butanol, acetone, acetic acid, and aerobically produced specialty chemicals, which are candidates for research support. The objective of the project are to identify strengths and weaknesses in the proposed and to assist in developing an ongoing research strategy along economically relevant lines. The products to be studied presently comprise a collective US market for 10.7 billion lb valued at $2.8 billion. If their manufacturing processes were converted from petroleum feedstocks to corn, they could consume 556 million bushels. Furthermore, if ethanol could be produced at a low enough price to serve as the precursor to ethylene and butadiene, it an its derivatives could account for 159 billion lb, or 50% of the US production of 316 billion lb of synthetic organic chemicals, presently valued at $113 billion. This use would consume 3.4 billion bushels, or {approximately}45% of the corn crop. In addition, the use of butanol for diesel blends or in jet fuel blends to enhance the range of military aircraft could further increase its market.

  9. Process integration for simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR): production of butanol from corn stover using Clostridium beijerinckii P260.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, N; Singh, V; Liu, S; Ezeji, T C; Saha, B C; Cotta, M A

    2014-02-01

    A simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR) process was developed for the production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (AB or ABE), of which butanol is the main product, from corn stover employing Clostridium beijerinckii P260. Of the 86 g L(-1) corn stover provided, over 97% of the sugars were released during hydrolysis and these were fermented completely with an ABE productivity of 0.34 g L(-1)h(-1) and yield of 0.39. This productivity is higher than 0.31 g L(-1)h(-1) when using glucose as a substrate demonstrating that AB could be produced efficiently from lignocellulosic biomass. Acetic acid that was released from the biomass during pretreatment and hydrolysis was also used by the culture to produce AB. An average rate of generation of sugars during corn stover hydrolysis was 0.98 g L(-1)h(-1). In this system AB was recovered using vacuum, and as a result of this (simultaneous product recovery), 100% sugars were used by the culture. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Role of Calcination Temperature on the Hydrotalcite Derived MgO–Al2O3 in Converting Ethanol to Butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gray, Michel J.; Job, Heather M.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Devaraj, Arun; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-09

    In the base catalyzed ethanol condensation reactions, the calcined MgO-Al2O3 derived hydrotalcites used broadly as catalytic material and the calcination temperature plays a big role in determining the catalytic activity. The characteristic of the hydrotalcite material treated between catalytically relevant temperatures 450ºC and 800ºC have been studied with respect to the physical, chemical, and structural properties and compared with catalytic activity testing. With the increasing calcination temperature, the total measured catalytic basicity dropped linearly with the calcination temperature and the total measured acidity stayed the same for all the calcination temperatures except 800ºC. However, the catalyst activity testing does not show any direct correlation between the measured catalytic basicity and the catalyst activity to the ethanol condensation reaction to form 1-butanol. The highest ethanol conversion of 44 percent with 1-butanol selectivity of 50 percent was achieved for the 600ºC calcined hydrotalcite material.

  11. Nanostructured composite TiO{sub 2}/carbon catalysts of high activity for dehydration of n-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyganiuk, Aleksandra [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Klimkiewicz, Roman [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research PAN, 50-422 Wroclaw (Poland); Bumajdad, Ali [Faculty of Science, Kuwait University, PO Box 5969 Safat, Kuwait 13060 (Kuwait); Ilnicka, Anna [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Lukaszewicz, Jerzy P., E-mail: jerzy_lukaszewicz@o2.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • New biotechnological method for fabrication of composite catalysts. • In situ synthesis of nanosized TiO{sub 2} clusters in the carbon matrix. • High dispersion of TiO{sub 2} in carbon matrix. • High catalytic activity achieved for very low active phase content. • Efficient dehydration of n-butanol to butane-1. - Abstract: A novel method of wood impregnation with titanium ions is presented. Titanium(IV) ions were complexed to peroxo/hydroxo complexes which were obtained by treating a TiCl{sub 4} water solution with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The solution of chelated titanium ions was used for the impregnation of living stems of Salix viminalis wood. Saturated stems were carbonized at 600–800 °C, yielding a microporous carbon matrix, in which nanoparticles of TiO{sub 2} were uniformly distributed. A series of composite TiO{sub 2}–carbon catalysts was manufactured and tested in the process of n-butanol conversion to butane-1. The composite catalysts exhibited very high selectivity (ca. 80%) and yield (ca. 30%) despite a low content of titanium (ca. 0.5% atomic). The research proved that the proposed functionalization led to high dispersion of the catalytic phase (TiO{sub 2}), which played a crucial role in the catalyst performance. High dispersion of TiO{sub 2} was achieved due to a natural transport of complexed titanium ions in living plant stems.

  12. N-butanol extracts of Morinda citrifolia suppress advanced glycation end products (AGE)-induced inflammatory reactions in endothelial cells through its anti-oxidative properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Isami, Fumiyuki; Abe, Yumi; Sakaguchi, Tatsuya; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi

    2017-03-04

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), senescent macroprotein derivatives formed during a normal aging process and acceleratedly under diabetic conditions, play a role in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. AGEs cause endothelial cell (EC) damage, an initial trigger for atherosclerosis through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE). We have previously shown that n-butanol extracts of Morinda citrifolia (noni), a plant belonging to the family Rubiaceae, block the binding of AGEs to RAGE in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of n-butanol extracts of noni on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and inflammatory reactions on AGE-exposed human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). HUVECs were treated with 100 μg/ml AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) or non-glycated BSA in the presence or absence of 670 ng/ml n-butanol extracts of noni for 4 h. Then ROS generation and inflammatory and gene expression in HUVECs were evaluated by dihydroethidium staining and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses, respectively. THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVECs was measured after 2-day incubation of AGE-BSA or BSA in the presence or absence of 670 ng/ml n-butanol extracts of noni. N-butanol extracts of noni at 670 ng/ml significantly inhibited the AGE-induced ROS generation and RAGE, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene expressions in HUVECs. AGEs significantly increased monocytic THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVECs, which was also prevented by 670 ng/ml n-butanol extracts of noni. The present study demonstrated for the first time that N-butanol extracts of noni could suppress the AGE-induced inflammatory reactions in HUVECs through its anti-oxidative properties via blocking of the interaction of AGEs with RAGE. Inhibition of the AGE-RAGE axis by n-butanol extracts of noni may be a novel nutraceutical strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Ethanol Induced Toxicity and Lipid Peroxidation in Pregnant Mice: Protective Effects of Butanolic Extract from Leaves of Chrysanthemum fontanesii, Vitamin E and C

    OpenAIRE

    Amel Amrani; Nassima Boubekri; Ouahiba Benaissa; Djamila Zama; Fadila Benayache; Samir Benayache

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of the present study was to investigate the ability of butanolic extract from leaves of Chrysanthemum fontanesii, vitamin E and C to modulate ethanol-Induced toxicity and oxidation damage in maternal and fetal tissues of mice. Butanolic extract from leaves of Chrysanthemum fontanesii (200 mg/Kg per day), vitamin E (100mg/Kg per day) and C (8.3mg/Kg per day) were administered by gavage to groups of pregnant mice from the 6 th to 17 th day of gestation. A number of ani...

  14. Study of alcohol fuel of butanol and ethanol effect on the compression ignition (CI) engine performance, combustion and emission characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, M. A.; Yusop, A. F.; Mat Yasin, M. H.; Hamidi, M. A.; Alias, A.; Hussin, H.; Hamri, S.

    2017-10-01

    Diesel engine which is one of the larger contributors to total consumption for petroleum is an attractive power unit used widely in many fields. However, diesel engines are among the main contributors to air pollutions for the large amount of emissions, such as CO, CO2 and NOx lead to an adverse effect on human health. Many researches have been done to find alternative fuels that are clean and efficient. Biodiesel is preferred as an alternative source for diesel engine which produces lower emission of pollutants. This study has focused on the evaluation of diesel and alcohol-diesel fuel properties and also the performance, combustion and exhaust emission from diesel engine fuelled with diesel and alcohol. Butanol and ethanol is blend with diesel fuel at 1:9 ratio. There are three test fuel that is tested which Diesel (100% diesel), D90BU10 (10% Butanol and 90% diesel) and D90E10 (10% Ethanol and 90% diesel). The comparison between diesel and alcohol-diesel blend has been made in terms of fuel properties characterization, engine performance such as brake power (BP) and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) also the in cylinder maximum pressure characteristic. Thus, exhaust gas emission of CO, CO2, NOx and O2 emission also has been observed at constant load of 50% but in different operating engine speed (1100 rpm, 1400 rpm, 1700 rpm, 2000 rpm and 2300 rpm). The results show the addition of 10% of each butanol and ethanol to diesel fuel had decreased the fuel density about 0.3% to 0.5% compared to mineral diesel. In addition, viscosity and energy content are also decrease. The addition of 10% butanol had improved the fuel cetane number however the ethanol blends react differently. In term of engine performance, as the engine speed increased, BP output also increase respectively. Hence, the alcohol blends fuel generates lower BP compared to diesel, plus BSFC for all test fuel shows decreasing trend at low and medium speed, however increased gradually at higher engine

  15. Kinetic studies on the transesterification of sunflower oil with 1-butanol catalyzed by Rhizomucor miehei lipase in a biphasic aqueous-organic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilmi, Miftahul; Hommes, Arne; Winkelman, Jozef; Hidayat, C.; Heeres, Hero

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of sunflower oil transesterification with 1-butanol using a homogeneous lipase (Rhizomucor miehei) in an aqueous-organic biphasic system were studied in a stirred batch reactor set-up. An initial screening study was performed to optimize relevant process conditions (enzyme

  16. Effect of cellulosic sugar degradation products (furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural) on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium beijerinckii P260

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were performed to identify chemicals present in wheat straw hydrolysate (WSH) that enhance acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) productivity. These chemicals were identified as furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF). Control experiment resulted in the production of 21.09-21.66 gL**-1 ABE with a ...

  17. Enhancing acetone biosynthesis and acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation performance by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrated with exogenous acetate addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Ding, Jian; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is the major by-product in ABE fermentations, most researches focused on increasing butanol/acetone ratio by decreasing acetone biosynthesis. However, economics of ABE fermentation industry strongly relies on evaluating acetone as a valuable platform chemical. Therefore, a novel ABE fermentation strategy focusing on bio-acetone production by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae with exogenous acetate addition was proposed. Experimental and theoretical analysis revealed the strategy could, enhance C. acetobutylicum survival oriented amino acids assimilation in the cells; control NADH regeneration rate at moderately lower level to enhance acetone synthesis but without sacrificing butanol production; enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and direct most of extra consumed glucose into acetone/butanol synthesis routes. By implementing the strategy using synthetic or acetate fermentative supernatant, acetone concentrations increased to 8.27-8.55g/L from 5.86g/L of the control, while butanol concentrations also elevated to the higher levels of 13.91-14.23g/L from 11.63g/L simultaneously. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of acetone, butanol and carbon dioxide as new breath biomarkers for convenient and noninvasive diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakli, Ismail; Öztürk, Önder; Akman, Hatice

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether analysis of carbon dioxide, acetone and/or butanol present in human breath can be used as a simple and noninvasive diagnosis method for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). For this purpose, overnight changes in the concentrations of these breath molecules were measured before and after sleep in 10 patients who underwent polysomnography and were diagnosed with OSAS, and were compared with the levels of these biomarkers determined after sleep in 10 healthy subjects. The concentrations of exhaled carbon dioxide were measured using external cavity laser-based off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy, whereas the levels of exhaled acetone and butanol were determined using thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry. We observed no significant changes in the levels of exhaled acetone and carbon dioxide in OSAS patients after sleep compared with pre-sleep values and compared with those in healthy control subjects. However, for the first time, to our knowledge, analyses of expired air showed an increased concentration of butanol after sleep compared with that before sleep and compared with that in healthy subjects. These results suggest that butanol can be established as a potential biomarker to enable the convenient and noninvasive diagnosis of OSAS in the future. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Acetone enhances the direct analysis of Procyanidin- and Prodelphinidin-based condensed tannins in lotus species by the butanol-HCl-iron assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The butanol-HCl spectrophotometric assay is widely used for quantifying extractable and insoluble condensed tannins (CT, syn. proanthocyanidins) in foods, feeds, and foliage of herbaceous and woody plants, but the method underestimates total CT content when applied directly to plant material. To imp...

  20. Integrated distillation-membrane process for bio-ethanol and bio-butanol recovery from actual fermentation broths: Separation energy efficiency and fate of secondary fermentation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hybrid process integrating vapor stripping with vapor compression and vapor permeation membrane separation, termed Membrane Assisted Vapor Stripping (MAVS), was evaluated for recovery and dehydration of ethanol and/or 1-butanol from aqueous solution as an alternative to convent...

  1. Molecular dynamics insights into the structural and diffusive properties of ZIF-8/PDMS mixed matrix membranes in the n-butanol/water pervaporation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Fang, Manquan; Wu, Zhen; Yu, Lixin; Li, Jiding

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the structural and diffusive properties of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a novel alcohol-permselective mixed matrix membrane (MMM). Simulation models of one pure PDMS membrane and three ZIF-8/PDMS MMMs with increasing loadings were successfully constructed. Non-bond energy turned out to be a strong attractive interaction between the PDMS matrix and ZIF-8 cells. The morphology and mobility of PDMS chains were characterized by mean square displacement (MSD). The fraction of free volume (FFV) of the pure membrane and MMMs was calculated and showed declining trends with increasing ZIF-8 loadings. The diffusion coefficients of n-butanol and water molecules were calculated by the Einstein relation. {D}n-\\text{butanol} first increased then decreased, while {D}{{water}} decreased with the increasing loadings. The mechanism of selective diffusion behaviour was investigated and it was found that the inner channels of ZIF-8 provided selective pathways for n-butanol. Diffusion coefficients were correlated with FFV and the results showed that the logarithm of {D}{{water}} demonstrated a good linear relation with the inverse FFV and was in agreement with the free volume theory, while {D}n-\\text{butanol} showed a significant deviation in the case of MMM-1 due to the selective diffusion channels provided by ZIF-8.

  2. Effect of small proportion of butanol additive on the performance, emission, and combustion of Australian native first- and second-generation biodiesel in a diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mofijur; Rasul, Mohammad Golam; Hassan, Nur Md Sayeed; Azad, Abul Kalam; Uddin, Md Nasir

    2017-10-01

    This paper aims to investigate the effect of the addition of 5% alcohol (butanol) with biodiesel-diesel blends on the performance, emissions, and combustion of a naturally aspirated four stroke multi-cylinder diesel engine at different engine speeds (1200 to 2400 rpm) under full load conditions. Three types of local Australian biodiesel, namely macadamia biodiesel (MB), rice bran biodiesel (RB), and waste cooking oil biodiesel (WCB), were used for this study, and the data was compared with results for conventional diesel fuel (B0). Performance results showed that the addition of butanol with diesel-biodiesel blends slightly lowers the engine efficiency. The emission study revealed that the addition of butanol additive with diesel-biodiesel blends lowers the exhaust gas temperature (EGT), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and particulate matter (PM) emissions whereas it increases hydrocarbon (HC) emissions compared to B0. The combustion results indicated that in-cylinder pressure (CP) for additive added fuel is higher (0.45-1.49%), while heat release rate (HRR) was lower (2.60-9.10%) than for B0. Also, additive added fuel lowers the ignition delay (ID) by 23-30% than for B0. Finally, it can be recommended that the addition of 5% butanol with Australian biodiesel-diesel blends can significantly lower the NOx and PM emissions.

  3. A process integration approach for the production of biological iso-propanol, butanol and ethanol using gas stripping and adsorption as recovery methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pyrgakis, Konstantinos A.; Vrije, de G.J.; Siegers-Budde, M.A.W.; Kyriakou, Kyriakos; Lopez Contreras, A.M.; Kokossis, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Biomass fermentation to Iso-propanol, Butanol and Ethanol (IBE) is particularly important as IBE is a common building block in the development of biorefineries and IBE-producing bacteria are robust industrial organisms, capable to utilize the sugars of the lignocellulosic biomass. Research is

  4. Alcohol Induced Hepato Cardiotoxicity and Oxidative Damage in Rats: The Protective Effect of n-butanol Extract of Green Tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, Amel; Boubekri, Nassima; Lassad, Somia; Zama, Djamila; Benayache, Fadil; Benayache, Samir

    2017-07-04

    The principal aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative effects of acute alcohol consumption on the functions of the heart and the liver and the possible modification of this effect by phenolic compounds from n-butanol extract of Camellia sinensis supplementation. Three experimental groups of rats were used: control, ethanol-exposed (40% v/v, 5 g/kg per oral every 12 hours for 3 doses, binge model), and ethanol-exposed plus n-butanol extract of Camellia sinensis (100 mg/kg once a day for three days before and simultaneously with ethanol administration). Serum transaminases, cholesterol, triglycerides, lipid peroxidation (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were estimated to assess organs damage. n-butanol extract of Camellia sinensis at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight exhibited a significant reversal effect in all biochemical parameters measured such as extent of lipid peroxidation, GSH, lipid profile, and serum aminotransferase activities. These results suggest that n-butanol extract of Camellia sinensis protected the heart and the liver from binge ethanol induced injury through attenuating oxidative stress. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Modulation of the Acetone/Butanol Ratio during Fermentation of Corn Stover-Derived Hydrolysate by Clostridium beijerinckii Strain NCIMB 8052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zi-Yong; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Ze-Jie; Zhang, Yong-Yu; Li, Fu-Li

    2017-04-01

    Producing biobutanol from lignocellulosic biomass has shown promise to ultimately reduce greenhouse gases and alleviate the global energy crisis. However, because of the recalcitrance of a lignocellulosic biomass, a pretreatment of the substrate is needed which in many cases releases soluble lignin compounds (SLCs), which inhibit growth of butanol-producing clostridia. In this study, we found that SLCs changed the acetone/butanol ratio (A/B ratio) during butanol fermentation. The typical A/B molar ratio during Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 batch fermentation with glucose as the carbon source is about 0.5. In the present study, the A/B molar ratio during batch fermentation with a lignocellulosic hydrolysate as the carbon source was 0.95 at the end of fermentation. Structural and redox potential changes of the SLCs were characterized before and after fermentation by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and electrochemical analyses, which indicated that some exogenous SLCs were involved in distributing electron flow to C. beijerinckii , leading to modulation of the redox balance. This was further demonstrated by the NADH/NAD + ratio and trxB gene expression profile assays at the onset of solventogenic growth. As a result, the A/B ratio of end products changed significantly during C. beijerinckii fermentation using corn stover-derived hydrolysate as the carbon source compared to glucose as the carbon source. These results revealed that SLCs not only inhibited cell growth but also modulated the A/B ratio during C. beijerinckii butanol fermentation. IMPORTANCE Bioconversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to butanol involves pretreatment, during which hundreds of soluble lignin compounds (SLCs) form. Most of these SLCs inhibit growth of solvent-producing clostridia. However, the mechanism by which these compounds modulate electron flow in clostridia remains elusive. In this study, the results revealed that SLCs changed redox balance by producing oxidative

  6. Phase equilibria of microemulsion forming system n-decyl-(beta)-D-glucopyranoside/water/n-octane/1-butanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahl, Heike; Quitzsch, Konrad; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1997-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the phase behaviour involving microemulsions is presented with respect to experimental and calculated data for the four-component system n-decyl-(beta)-D-glucopyranoside/water/n-octane/1-butanol and its corresponding ternaries at 25°C. The main feature of this kind...... of the UNIQUAC-equation and the UNIFAC-method. The UNIFAC-method is able to describe the phase behaviour in the quaternary system qualitatively, without fitting parameters. However, by applying the UNIQUAC-method, with adjustable parameters, it was only possible to model the ternary subsystems. The modelling...... of multicomponent system is the coexistence of a highly structural liquid phase enriched with amphiphilic compounds and an excess water or an excess oil phase or both of them. The phase behaviour was studied experimentally by use of turbidity titration and HPLC measurements and theoretically by application...

  7. Glass Formation of n-Butanol: Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using Gay-Berne Potential Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Gui-long; Zhang, Yong-hong; Huang, Shi-ping

    2012-04-01

    Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations based on Gay-Berne potential model, we have simulated the cooling process of liquid n-butanol. A new set of GB parameters are obtained by fitting the results of density functional theory calculations. The simulations are carried out in the range of 290-50 K with temperature decrements of 10 K. The cooling characteristics are determined on the basis of the variations of the density, the potential energy and orientational order parameter with temperature, whose slopes all show discontinuity. Both the radial distribution function curves and the second-rank orientational correlation function curves exhibit splitting in the second peak. Using the discontinuous change of these thermodynamic and structure properties, we obtain the glass transition at an estimate of temperature Tg=120±10 K, which is in good agreement with experimental results 110±1 K.

  8. ELECTROCHEMICAL DETERMINATION OF ETHANOL, 2- PROPANOL AND 1-BUTANOL ON GLASSY CARBON ELECTRODE MODIFIED WITH NICKEL OXIDE FILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Benchettara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the modification of a glassy carbon electrode with nickel oxide film which is performed in two successive steps. In the first one, the electrochemical deposition of metallic nickel on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE is achieved in 0.1M boric acid; in the second step, the metallic deposit is anodically oxidized in 0.1M NaOH. These two operations were carried out in a three electrode cell with a filiform platinum auxiliary electrode, a SCE as potential reference and a working microelectrode of modified glassy carbon with nickel oxides. This electrode is characterized by several electrochemical techniques and is used for the catalytic determination of ethanol, 2-propanol and 1-butanol in 0.1 M NaOH. The proposed chemical mechanism shows that NiO2 acts as a mediator.

  9. Models construction for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations with acetate/butyrate consecutively feeding by graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Several fermentations with consecutively feeding of acetate/butyrate were conducted in a 7 L fermentor and the results indicated that exogenous acetate/butyrate enhanced solvents productivities by 47.1% and 39.2% respectively, and changed butyrate/acetate ratios greatly. Then extracellular butyrate/acetate ratios were utilized for calculation of acids rates and the results revealed that acetate and butyrate formation pathways were almost blocked by corresponding acids feeding. In addition, models for acetate/butyrate feeding fermentations were constructed by graph theory based on calculation results and relevant reports. Solvents concentrations and butanol/acetone ratios of these fermentations were also calculated and the results of models calculation matched fermentation data accurately which demonstrated that models were constructed in a reasonable way. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. ELECTROCHEMICAL DETERMINATION OF ETHANOL, 2- PROPANOL AND 1-BUTANOL ON GLASSY CARBON ELECTRODE MODIFIED WITH NICKEL OXIDE FILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Benchettara

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the modification of a glassy carbon electrode with nickel oxide film which is performed in two successive steps. In the first one, the electrochemical deposition of metallic nickel on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE is achieved in 0.1M boric acid; in the second step, the metallic deposit is anodically oxidized in 0.1M NaOH. These two operations were carried out in a three electrode cell with a filiform platinum auxiliary electrode, a SCE as potential reference and a working microelectrode of modified glassy carbon with nickel oxides. This electrode is characterized by several electrochemical techniques and is used for the catalytic determination of ethanol, 2-propanol and 1-butanol in 0.1 M NaOH. The proposed chemical mechanism shows that NiO2 acts as a mediator.

  11. Toxicological study of the butanol fractionated root extract of Asparagus africanus Lam., on some blood parameter and histopathology of liver and kidney in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Sintayehu; Afework, Mekbeb; Debella, Asfaw; Ergete, Wondwossen; Makonnen, Eyasu

    2016-01-27

    The butanol fractionated root extract of Asparagus africanus Lam., a traditional herb widely used to treat various ailments were analyzed for the presence of potential toxicity after single (acute) and repeated (subchronic) dose oral administration in adult swiss albino mice using gavages. For the acute study, butanol fractionated extract of the plant was administered in single doses of 1000, 3000 and 5000 mg/kg body weight. In the sub-chronic dose study, the extract was administered at doses of 300 and 600 mg/kg body weight/day for 42 days. Selected hematological and biochemical parameters of the blood followed by histopathological analysis were investigated after 42 days of daily administrations. The results were expressed as M ± SE, and differences at P parameters of the experimental groups. In the acute study, the extract did not caused dose-dependent general behavioral adverse effects, body weight change and mortality. The single dose toxicity studies therefore showed that the butanol fraction of the extract has high safety profile when given orally. After 42 days of daily dosing, in the sub-chronic study, no clinically significant changes were observed for hematological and biochemical parameters. Except an occasional small number of focal mononuclear lymphocytic cells infiltrations around the central and portal triad of the liver of a few mice, the histopathological parameters do not show significant change. It is concluded that, the butanol fractionated extract from A. africanus at the given dose does not show significant toxicity. The presence of focal inflammation on the liver of a few mice may be associated to the presence of flavonoid glycoside in the butanol fractionated extract.

  12. Total flavonoid and phenolic contents of n-butanol extract of Samanea saman leaf and the antibacterial activity towards Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita, Wiwik Susanah; Swantara, I. Made Dira; Asih, I. A. Raka Astiti; Sinarsih, Ni Ketut; Suteja, I. Kadek Pater

    2016-03-01

    Total flavonoid and phenolic contents in some natural products was suspected of having a positive correlation to its activity in inhibiting the growth of bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the total flavonoid and phenolic contents of n-butanol extract of Samanea saman leaf, and to evaluate the antibacterial activity towards Escherechia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Extraction of compounds was done by ethanol 96%, followed by fractionation into n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. Determination of total flavonoid and phenolic contents was done by UV-Vis Spectrophotometer using standard of quersetin and galic acid respectively. In addition, antibacterial activity was evaluated by agar disc diffusion method. Extraction of 1000 g of Samanea saman leaf was obtained 80 g of ethanol extracts, fractionation of the extract was obtained 8.02 g of n-hexane extracts, 7.11 g of ethyl acetate extracts, 13.5 g of n-butanol extracts, and 14.16 g of aqueous extracts. Phytochemical screening of the n-butanol extracts revealed the presence of flavonoid and phenolic compounds. Total flavonoid and phenolic contents were successively 43.5798 mg QE/100g and 34.0180 mg GAE/100g. The butanol extracts inhibited the growth of S.aureus higher than the growth of E.coli. At the concentration of 2, 4, 6, 8 % (b/v), and positive control (meropenem μg/disc), inhibition zone towards S. aureus was successively 5.67, 9.33, 10.33, 12.00, and 32.33 mm, while the inhibition zone towards E. coli was1.33, 3.33, 4.33, 5.43, and 34.00 mm.

  13. Effect of polyvinylpyrrolidone on mesoporous silica morphology and esterification of lauric acid with 1-butanol catalyzed by immobilized enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinyu; Zhou, Guowei, E-mail: guoweizhou@hotmail.com; Jiang, Bin; Zhao, Minnan; Zhang, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Mesoporous silica materials with a range of morphology evolution, i.e., from curved rod-shaped mesoporous silica to straight rod-shaped mesoporous silica, were successfully prepared using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and triblock copolymer as dual template. The effects of PVP molecular weight and concentration on mesoporous silica structure parameters were studied. Results showed that surface area and pore volume continuously decreased with increased PVP molecular weight. Mesoporous silica prepared with PVP K30 also possessed larger pore diameter, interplanar spacing (d{sub 100}), and cell parameter (a{sub 0}) than that prepared with PVP K15 and PVP K90. In addition, with increased PVP concentration, d{sub 100} and a{sub 0} continuously decreased. The mechanism of morphology evolution caused by the change in PVP concentration was investigated. The conversion rate of lauric acid with 1-butanol catalyzed by immobilized Porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was also evaluated. Results showed that PPL immobilized on amino-functionalized straight rod-shaped mesoporous silica maintained 50% of its esterification conversion rate even after five cycles of use with a maximum conversion rate was about 90.15%. - Graphical abstract: Curved rod-shaped mesoporous silica can be obtained at low and the highest PVP concentration, while straight rod-shaped mesoporous silica can be obtained at higher PVP concentration. - Highlights: • Mesoporous silica with morphology evolution from CRMS to SRMS were prepared. • Effects of PVP molecular weight and concentration on silica morphology were studied. • A possible mechanism for the formation of morphology evolution SiO{sub 2} was proposed. • Esterification of lauric acid with 1-butanol catalyzed by immobilized PPL.

  14. Behavior of Minute Amount of Crotonaldehyde in Batch Rectification of 1-Butanol+Ethanol and Isoamyl alcohol+Ethanol; 1-butanoru + etanoru oyobi isoamiruarukoru + etanoru kei no kaibunseiryu ni okeru biryo no kurotonarudehido no kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.; Hatate, Y.; Aiko, R. [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-07-10

    Vapor-liquid equilibria of 1-butanol+ethanol and isoamyl alcohol+ethanol systems containing a minute amount of crotonaldehyde were measured at atmospheric pressure using an Othmer-type still. Equilibrium ratio curves of the trace component (crotonaldehyde) are shown to exhibit a characteristic shape. Batch rectification experiments of ethanol, 1-butanol, 1-butanol+ehanol and isoamyl alcohol+ethanol systems containing 0.1 wt% crotonaldehyde were carried out using a glass Oldershow-type column. The lowering of the concentration of the trace component in distillate becomes gentle with the progress of distillation. The distillation curves of the trace component are found to show a peak at the change of distillate of the major components. In the residue of batch rectification of 1-butanol and isoamyl alcohol solutions, crotonaldehyde was detected in much higher concentration than in the last distillate. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Copper-based nanocatalysts for 2-butanol dehydrogenation: Screening and optimization of preparation parameters by response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geravand, Elham; Shariatinia, Geravand; Yaripour, Fereydoon [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sahebdelfar, Saeed [National Iranian Petrochemical Company, P. O. Box 1493, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Two types of copper-based dehydrogenation nanocatalysts (Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cu/SiO{sub 2}) were prepared from various precursors by impregnation (IM), sol-gel (SG) and co precipitation (COPRE) methods. The structures of samples were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, XRF, TPR, N{sub 2}O-Titration, FT-IR, FE-SEM and TEM techniques. The catalytic performance tests in vapor-phase dehydrogenation of 2-butanol to methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) were carried out in a fixed-bed reactor at a temperature of 260 .deg. C under atmospheric pressure and LHSV of 4mL/(h·g cat). The experimental results indicated that (i) the copper oxide over the COPRE nanocatalyst was reduced at a lower temperature (222 .deg. C) in comparison with the CuO reduced on the SG and IM samples (243 and 327 .deg. C, respectively). Also, the percentage of reduction of CuO species on COPRE catalyst was the highest (98.8%) in comparison with the two other samples, (ii) the COPRE nanocatalyst exhibited the highest activity for the dehydrogenation of 2-butanol to MEK, and (iii) co-precipitation method was selected as an optimum method for preparation of nanocatalyst. The central composite experimental design method was applied for investigation of the effects of four critical preparation factors on the MEK selectivity of Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocatalyst. The results showed that Cu/Zn molar ratio and precipitation pH are the most effective factors on the response and the optimum conditions for synthesis of Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocatalyst with maximum selectivity of MEK were T(pre)=67.5 .deg. C, T(aging)=68.8 .deg. C, pH(pre)=7.27 and Cu/Zn molar ratio=1.38. The performance of the prepared nanocatalyst at the optimum conditions was comparable to the commercially available nanocatalyst.

  16. Gene expression profiling in persons with multiple chemical sensitivity before and after a controlled n-butanol exposure session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantoft, Thomas M; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Engkilde, Kaare; Lind, Nina; Nordin, Steven; Hellgren, Lars I

    2017-02-22

    To investigate the pathophysiological pathways leading to symptoms elicitation in multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) by comparing gene expression in MCS participants and healthy controls before and after a chemical exposure optimised to cause symptoms among MCS participants.The first hypothesis was that unexposed and symptom-free MCS participants have similar gene expression patterns to controls and a second hypothesis that MCS participants can be separated from controls based on differential gene expression upon a controlled n-butanol exposure. Participants were exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol while seated in a windowed exposure chamber for 60 min. A total of 26 genes involved in biochemical pathways found in the literature have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of MCS and other functional somatic syndromes were selected. Expression levels were compared between MCS and controls before, within 15 min after being exposed to and 4 hours after the exposure. Participants suffering from MCS and healthy controls were recruited through advertisement at public places and in a local newspaper. 36 participants who considered themselves sensitive were prescreened for eligibility. 18 sensitive persons fulfilling the criteria for MCS were enrolled together with 18 healthy controls. 17 genes showed sufficient transcriptional level for analysis. Group comparisons were conducted for each gene at the 3 times points and for the computed area under the curve (AUC) expression levels. MCS participants and controls displayed similar gene expression levels both at baseline and after the exposure and the computed AUC values were likewise comparable between the 2 groups. The intragroup variation in expression levels among MCS participants was noticeably greater than the controls. MCS participants and controls have similar gene expression levels at baseline and it was not possible to separate MCS participants from controls based on gene expression measured after the

  17. Inhibition of ascitic ehrlich tumor cell growth by intraperitoneal injection of Pfaffia paniculata (Brazilian ginseng butanolic residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Vieira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of the administration of butanolic residue (BR of Pfaffia paniculata by intraperitoneal route to Ehrlich ascitis tumor bearing mice. Initially, a toxicity study of P. paniculata BR was performed in which doses of 12.5; 25 and 50mg/Kg were administered by intraperitoneal injection for seven days to Swiss mice. The treatment did not show toxicity. Then, Swiss male mice received, by intraperitoneal injection, once a day, 12.5; 25 or 50mg/Kg of P. paniculata BR for seven days. This protocol started in the same day of tumor inoculation with 5X10(6 cells i.p. The treatment with butanolic residue of P.paniculata i.p caused a significant increase in the ascitic volume; however, a significant decrease in tumor cells number per ml (pNeste estudo, foi avaliado o efeito do tratamento intraperitoneal com Resíduo Butanólico de Pfaffia paniculata, sobre o crescimento do Tumor de Ehrlich, forma ascítica. Foram utilizados dois grupos de 15 camundongos cada, sendo um grupo controle e o outro grupo tratado com RB 50mg/Kg. Todos os animais foram inoculados intraperitonealmente, com 5X10(6 células tumorais O tratamento iniciou-se no mesmo dia da inoculação do tumor. Assim, os animais receberam diariamente, por via intraperitoneal, 0,1 ml de RB na concentrações 50 mg/Kg, ou PBS como controle. Após 7 dias da inoculação do tumor, os animais foram eutanasiados e foi colhido o fluído ascítico total, para a contagem do número de células tumorais presentes neste fluído e estudo da morfologia destas células . Neste experimento observou-se aumento significante da quantidade de fluido ascítico nos animais tratados com RB, e diminuição significativa em relação ao número de células tumorais/ml e células tumorais totais, presentes no fluído ascítico, comparativamente com os animais controle. Estes resultados sugerem efeito inibitório tópico do RB levando à morte as células neoplásicas.

  18. Differential extraction of tumor-specific antigens from two ultraviolet light-induced murine fibrosarcomas with the use of 1-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcik, W J; Kripke, M L; Sheu, T L; LeGrue, S J

    1988-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunobiological characteristics of the tumor-specific cell surface antigen expressed by the UV-induced murine fibrosarcoma, UV-2240. UV-2240 is classified as a regressor UV tumor because it is immunologically rejected by normal syngeneic mice but grows in immunocompromised or UV-irradiated hosts. The strong tumor-specific rejection antigen expressed by UV-2240 was found on the plasma membrane, and unlike the previously characterized antigen of UV-1591, the UV-2240 antigen was removed by using the noncytolytic butanol extraction technique. The tumor antigen activity in butanol extracts was resistant to digestion by endoglycosidase F and alpha-mannosidase, but was destroyed by pronase. In addition, the immunoprotective activity in extracts of UV-2240 was thermostable. These data demonstrate that the UV-2240-specific tumor antigen possesses physicochemical properties distinct from those of its well-characterized counterpart UV-1591.

  19. Ternary liquid-liquid equilibrium for eugenol + tert-butanol + water system at 303.15 and 323.15K and atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucipto, Retno Kumala Hesti; Kuswandi, Wibawa, Gede

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine ternary liquid-liquid equilibrium for eugenol + tert-butanol + water system at 303.15 and 323.15K and atmospheric pressure. Using 25 mL equilibrium cell equipped jacketted water connected to water bath to maintain equilibrium temperature constant. The procedure of this experiment was conducted by inserting mixture of eugenol + tert-butanol + water system at certain composition into equilibrium cell. The solution was stirred for 4 hours and then was allowed for 20 hours in order to separate aqueous and organic phases completely. The temperature equilibrium cell of and the atmosphere pressure were recorded as equilibrium temperature and pressure for each measurenment. The equilibrium compositions of each phase were analyzed using Gas Chromatography. The experimental data obtained in this work were correlated with NRTL and UNIQUAC models with root mean square deviation between esperimental and calculated equilibrium compositions of 0.03% and 0.04% respectively.

  20. Production of 1,3-PDO and butanol by a mutant strain of Clostridium pasteurianum with increased tolerance towards crude glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Torbjørn Olshøj; Kvist, Thomas; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Westermann, Peter

    2012-08-17

    The production of biodiesel results in a concomitant production of crude glycerol (10% w/w). Clostridium pasteurianum can utilize glycerol as sole carbon source and converts it into 1,3-propanediol, ethanol, butanol, and CO2. Reduced growth and productivities on crude glycerol as compared to technical grade glycerol have previously been observed. In this study, we applied random mutagenesis mediated by ethane methyl sulfonate (EMS) to develop a mutant strain of C. pasteurianum tolerating high concentrations of crude glycerol. At an initial crude glycerol concentration of 25 g/l the amount of dry cell mass produced by the mutant strain was six times higher than the amount produced by the wild type. Growth of the mutant strain was even detected at an initial crude glycerol concentration of 105 g/l. A pH controlled reactor with in situ removal of butanol by gas-stripping was used to evaluate the performance of the mutant strain. Utilizing stored crude glycerol, the mutant strain showed significantly increased rates compared to the wild type. A maximum glycerol utilization rate of 7.59 g/l/h was observed along with productivities of 1.80 g/l/h and 1.21 g/l/h of butanol and 1,3-PDO, respectively. These rates are higher than what previously has been published for C. pasteurianum growing on technical grade glycerol in fed batch reactors. In addition, high yields of the main products (butanol and 1,3-PDO) were detected and these two products were efficiently separated in two steams using gas-stripping.

  1. Ethanol Induced Toxicity and Lipid Peroxidation in Pregnant Mice: Protective Effects of Butanolic Extract from Leaves of Chrysanthemum fontanesii, Vitamin E and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Amrani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the present study was to investigate the ability of butanolic extract from leaves of Chrysanthemum fontanesii, vitamin E and C to modulate ethanol-Induced toxicity and oxidation damage in maternal and fetal tissues of mice. Butanolic extract from leaves of Chrysanthemum fontanesii (200 mg/Kg per day, vitamin E (100mg/Kg per day and C (8.3mg/Kg per day were administered by gavage to groups of pregnant mice from the 6 th to 17 th day of gestation. A number of animals received plant extract, vitamin E and C, also treated with an oral administration of ethanol (0.02ml/g of 25% v/v absolute ethanol in water per day in same conditions. On day 18 of gestation, pregnant mice were killed, fetus, placenta, fetal liver, liver, kidneys and brain were removed, homogenised and used for determination of lipid peroxidation (LPO using TBARS method. Embryotoxicity was assessed by counting the number of live and dead fetus and growth retardation. Results: Severe alterations in all biomarkers were observed after injury with ETOH. ETOH produced significant decreases in fetal weight and significant increases in embryolethality and lipid peroxidation relative to control values. Treatment with Chrysanthemum fontanesii extract, vitamin C and vitamin E resulted in markedly decreased embryolethality and fetal growth retardation, while increased fetal weight were observed. Conclusion: The butanolic extract from leaves of Chrysanthemum fontanesii, vitamin E and C protected against ethanol induce fetal and maternal toxicity as revealed by the decrease in the extent of lipid peroxidation. So that butanolic extract from leaves of Chrysanthemum fontanesii posses in vivo antioxidant properties.

  2. Model-driven rebalancing of the intracellular redox state for optimization of a heterologous n-butanol pathway in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae Hyung; Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Se Yeon; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2013-11-01

    The intracellular redox state plays an important role in the cellular physiology that determines the efficiency of chemical and biofuel production by microbial cell factories. However, it is difficult to achieve optimal redox rebalancing of synthetic pathways owing to the sensitive responses of cellular physiology according as the intracellular redox state changes. Here, we demonstrate optimal rebalancing of the intracellular redox state by model-driven control of expression using n-butanol production in Escherichia coli as a model system. The synthetic n-butanol production pathway was constructed by implementing synthetic constitutive promoters and designing synthetic 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTR) for each gene. Redox rebalancing was achieved by anaerobically activating the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex and additionally tuning the expression level of NAD(+)-dependent formate dehydrogenase (fdh1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae) through rational UTR engineering. Interestingly, efficient production of n-butanol required different amounts of reducing equivalents depending on whether the substrate was glucose or galactose. One intriguing implication of this work is that additional strain improvement can be achieved, even within given genetic components, through rebalancing intracellular redox state according to target products and substrates. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Technical and economic assessment of processes for the production of butanol and acetone. Phase two: analysis of research advances. Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-08-01

    The initial objective of this work was to develop a methodology for analyzing the impact of technological advances as a tool to help establish priorities for R and D options in the field of biocatalysis. As an example of a biocatalyzed process, butanol/acetone fermentation (ABE process) was selected as the specific topic of study. A base case model characterizing the technology and economics associated with the ABE process was developed in the previous first phase of study. The project objectives were broadened in this second phase of work to provide parametric estimates of the economic and energy impacts of a variety of research advances in the hydrolysis, fermentation and purification sections of the process. The research advances analyzed in this study were based on a comprehensive literature review. The six process options analyzed were: continuous ABE fermentaton; vacuum ABE fermentation; Baelene solvent extraction; HRI's Lignol process; improved prehydrolysis/dual enzyme hydrolysis; and improved microorganism tolerance to butanol toxicity. Of the six options analyzed, only improved microorganism tolerance to butanol toxicity had a significant positive effect on energy efficiency and economics. This particular process option reduced the base case production cost (including 10% DCF return) by 20% and energy consumption by 16%. Figures and tables.

  4. Autoignition characterization of primary reference fuels and n-heptane/n-butanol mixtures in a constant volume combustion device and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, Marc E.

    2013-12-19

    In this study, the autoignition behavior of primary reference fuels (PRF) and blends of n-heptane/n-butanol were examined in a Waukesha Fuel Ignition Tester (FIT) and a Homogeneous Charge Compression Engine (HCCI). Fourteen different blends of iso-octane, n-heptane, and n-butanol were tested in the FIT - 28 test runs with 25 ignition measurements for each test run, totaling 350 individual tests in all. These experimental results supported previous findings that fuel blends with high alcohol content can exhibit very different ignition delay periods than similarly blended reference fuels. The experiments further showed that n-butanol blends behaved unlike PRF blends when comparing the autoignition behavior as a function of the percentage of low reactivity component. The HCCI and FIT experimental results favorably compared against single and multizone models with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms - both an existing mechanism as well as one developed during this study were used. The experimental and modeling results suggest that that the FIT instrument is a valuable tool for analysis of high pressure, low temperature chemistry, and autoignition for future fuels in advanced combustion engines. Additionally, in both the FIT and engine experiments the fraction of low temperature heat release (fLTHR) was found to correlate very well with the crank angle of maximum heat release and shows promise as a useful metric for fuel reactivity in advanced combustion applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. Butanol Dehydration over V2O5-TiO2/MCM-41 Catalysts Prepared via Liquid Phase Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ki Jeon

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available MCM-41 was used as a support and, by using atomic layer deposition (ALD in the liquid phase, a catalyst was prepared by consecutively loading titanium oxide and vanadium oxide to the support. This research analyzes the effect of the loading amount of vanadium oxide on the acidic characteristics and catalytic performance in the dehydration of butanol. The physical and chemical characteristics of the TiO2-V2O5/MCM-41 catalysts were analyzed using XRF, BET, NH3-TPD, XRD, Py-IR, and XPS. The dehydration reaction of butanol was performed in a fixed bed reactor. For the samples with vanadium oxide loaded to TiO2/MCM-41 sample using the liquid phase ALD method, it was possible to increase the loading amount until the amount of vanadium oxide reached 12.1 wt %. It was confirmed that the structural properties of the mesoporous silica were retained well after titanium oxide and vanadium loading. The NH3-TPD and Py-IR results indicated that weak acid sites were produced over the TiO2/MCM-41 samples, which is attributed to the generation of Lewis acid sites. The highest activity of the V2O5(12.1-TiO2/MCM-41 catalyst in 2-butanol dehydration is ascribed to it having the highest number of Lewis acid sites, as well as the highest vanadium dispersion.

  6. A laboratory study of the toxicity of the butanol extract of endod (Phytolacca dodecandra) on two species of freshwater fish and two species of aquatic snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobaeus, J K; Heath, G E; Parkhurst, R M; Jones, W O; Webster, J E

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of the butanol extract of Endod (Phytolacca dodecandra) on 4 species of aquatic animals. Groups of 10 mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) and 8 bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) were exposed to the butanol extract of Endod in 300 ml of water at concentrations of 0.0, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0, 1.2 or 2.0 ppm. Groups of 10 tropical snails (Biomphalaria glabrata) and 10 pond snails (Physa spp) were also exposed to the crude extract in 50 ml of water at concentrations of 0.0, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.2, 2.5, 3.0, 4.0 or 5.0 ppm. Following a 24-h exposure period, the test subjects were transferred to extract-free water and observed for an additional 24 h. The number of dead animals was determined after the total 48-h concentration was plotted on logarithmic (probit) graph paper and the concentration of Endod which killed 50% of the test subjects (LC50) was determined. The butanol extract of Endod was lethal to 50% of the fish and snails at relatively low concentrations (less than 3.0 ppm). The results also indicated that fish were approximately 2 to 4 times more sensitive to Endod than snails.

  7. Experimental liver protection of n-butanolic extract of Astragalus monspessulanus L. on carbon tetrachloride model of toxicity in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Rumyana; Bratkov, Viktor M; Kondeva-Burdina, Magdalena; Vitcheva, Vessela; Manov, Vassil; Krasteva, Ilina

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the hepatoprotective potential of n-butanolic extract of Astragalus monspessulanus L. (EAM) against in-vitro/in-vivo carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver damage in rats. Silymarin was used as a positive control. The in-vitro experiments were carried out in primary isolated rat hepatocytes first incubated with CCl4 (86 µmol/l). Hepatic injury was discerned by a decrease in cell viability and cell glutathione (GSH) levels, an increase in lactate dehydrogenase leakage into the medium, and an elevation in malondialdehyde (MDA) quantity. Cell pre-incubation with EAM (1 µg/ml and 10 µg/ml) significantly ameliorated the CCl4-induced liver damage. In-vivo rats were challenged orally with CCl4 (10% solution in olive oil) alone and after 7 days pre-treatment with EAM (100 mg/kg body weight per day, oral gavage). CCl4 damage was judged by an increased production of MDA, depletion of cell GSH, and a decrease in cell antioxidant defense system. EAM pre-treatment normalizes the activities of the antioxidant enzymes and the levels of GSH and MDA. These data are supported by the histopathological examination. These results indicate that EAM has a similar significant protective effect, in vitro and in vivo, against CCl4 induced hepatotoxicity in rat as silymarin.This may be due to its antioxidant and membrane stabilizing properties.

  8. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production (ABE) by Clostridium acetobutylicum XY16 immobilized on chemically modified sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangping; He, Aiyong; Zhao, Jie; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Min

    2015-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was chemically modified by polyethylenimine (PEI) and glutaraldehyde (GA) and then used as a support to immobilize Clostridium acetobutylicum XY16 in the process of butanol production. Compared with batch fermentation using unmodified sugarcane bagasse, 22.3 g/L total solvents were produced by cells immobilized on 4 g/L PEI treated sugarcane bagasse with high solvent productivity of 0.62 g/(L h) and glucose consumption rate of 1.67 g/(L h). Improvement of 14, 43, and 37 % in total solvent titer, solvent productivity and glucose consumption rate was observed, respectively. Enhanced solvent production of 25.14 g/L was obtained when using a high concentration of glucose of 80 g/L. Continuous fermentation was studied using PEI/GA modified sugarcane bagasse as immobilization support with a range of dilution which rates from 0.2 to 2.5 to find an optimal condition. The maximum solvent productivity of 11.32 g/(L h) was obtained at a high dilution rate of 2.0 h(-1).

  9. Blockade of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa mediates the antithrombotic activity of butanol fraction of Actinostemma lobatum Maxim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwan-Hyun; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Jang, Yu-Sung; Kim, Dae-Keun; Shim, Bum-Sang; Cho, Ki-Ho; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Ahn, Kyoo-Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2008-03-28

    Actinostemma lobatum Maxim, a wildlife plant of Cucurbitaceae family, has been utilized for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases as a folk remedy in Korea. However, its scientific evidence remains unclear. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effects of butanol fraction of Actinostemma lobatum Maxim (BFALM) on the in vitro and in vivo antithrombotic activity and possible mechanisms were elucidated for the first time. To elucidate the antithrombotic mechanism of BFALM, platelet aggregation assay, coagulation assay, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa assay, thromboxane A(2) assay and in vivo pulmonary thromboembolism experiment were performed. BFALM significantly inhibited collagen, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation in a concentration dependent manner. Consistently, oral administration of BFALM resulted in a dose-dependent increase of survival rates of mice with pulmonary thromboembolism induced by intravenous injection of collagen and epinephrine. In mechanism assays for the antithrombotic activity of BFALM, BFALM significantly inhibited the fibrinogen binding to the platelet surface Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GP IIb/IIIa) receptor in a concentration dependent fashion, as well as reduced the level of thromboxane A(2) at 400microg/ml. Furthermore, BFALM significantly prolonged the prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) compared with untreated control. These results suggest that BFALM may exert antithrombotic activity through inhibition of platelet aggregation via GP IIb/IIIa and thromboxane A(2) pathways, along with anticoagulatory activity through intrinsic and extrinsic pathways.

  10. CaCO3 supplementation alleviates the inhibition of formic acid on acetone/butanol/ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Gaoxiang; Xiong, Lian; Lin, Xiaoqing; Huang, Chao; Li, Hailong; Chen, Xuefang; Chen, Xinde

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the inhibiting effect of formic acid on acetone/butanol/ethanol (ABE) fermentation and explain the mechanism of the alleviation in the inhibiting effect under CaCO3 supplementation condition. From the medium containing 50 g sugars l(-1) and 0.5 g formic acid l(-1), only 0.75 g ABE l(-1) was produced when pH was adjusted by KOH and fermentation ended prematurely before the transformation from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. In contrast, 11.4 g ABE l(-1) was produced when pH was adjusted by 4 g CaCO3 l(-1). The beneficial effect can be ascribed to the buffering capacity of CaCO3. Comparative analysis results showed that the undissociated formic acid concentration and acid production coupled with ATP and NADH was affected by the pH buffering capacity of CaCO3. Four millimole undissociated formic acid was the threshold at which the transformation to solventogenesis occurred. The inhibiting effect of formic acid on ABE fermentation can be alleviated by CaCO3 supplementation due to its buffering capacity.

  11. Chiral liquid-crystalline polyacrylates from (S-(--2-methyl-1-butanol. Synthesis, mesomorphic properties and light scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlo Aloir A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and mesomorphic behavior of two chiral side chain liquid crystalline polyacrylates from (S-(--2-methyl-1-butanol are described. These new polyacrylates show a dependence of the phase transition temperatures on both, molecular weight and spacer length. The polyacrylate with four methylene units in the spacer exhibits a chiral nematic phase whereas the polyacrylate with a spacer containing eleven methylene units presents a smectic phase. In addition, the chiral nematic phase appears for low molecular weight and smectic phase for high molecular weight polyacrylates. Light scattering experiments were performed in dilute solutions of the polyacrylate containing eleven methylene units in tetrahydrofuran and dichloromethane. Values for weight averaged molecular weight, radius of gyration and second virial coefficient were determined by static light scattering whereas the diffusion coefficient and the hydrodynamic radius of the chains were obtained by photon correlation spectroscopy. A comparison between both techniques indicates that the chain behavior can be taken as typical for a polydisperse linear chain in a good solvent.

  12. Acetone-butanol-ethanol from sweet sorghum juice by an immobilized fermentation-gas stripping integration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Di; Wang, Yong; Chen, Changjing; Qin, Peiyong; Miao, Qi; Zhang, Changwei; Li, Ping; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-01

    In this study, sweet sorghum juice (SSJ) was used as the substrate in a simplified ABE fermentation-gas stripping integration process without nutrients supplementation. The sweet sorghum bagasse (SSB) after squeezing the fermentable juice was used as the immobilized carrier. The results indicated that the productivity of ABE fermentation process was improved by gas stripping integration. A total 24g/L of ABE solvents was obtained from 59.6g/L of initial sugar after 80h of fermentation with gas stripping. Then, long-term of fed-batch fermentation with continuous gas stripping was further performed. 112.9g/L of butanol, 44.1g/L of acetone, 9.5g/L of ethanol (total 166.5g/L of ABE) was produced in overall 312h of fermentation. At the same time, concentrated ABE product was obtained in the condensate of gas stripping. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Shotgun proteomic monitoring of Clostridium acetobutylicum during stationary phase of butanol fermentation using xylose and comparison with the exponential phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Raghavan, Vijaya G. S. [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Lefsrud, Mark G [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec

    2012-01-01

    Economically viable production of solvents through acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation requires a detailed understanding of Clostridium acetobutylicum. This study focuses on the proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from the stationary phase of ABE fermentation using xylose and compares with the exponential growth by shotgun proteomics approach. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed 22.9% of the C. acetobutylicum genome and 18.6% was found to be common in both exponential and stationary phases. The proteomic profile of C. acetobutylicum changed during the ABE fermentation such that 17 proteins were significantly differentially expressed between the two phases. Specifically, the expression of five proteins namely, CAC2873, CAP0164, CAP0165, CAC3298, and CAC1742 involved in the solvent production pathway were found to be significantly lower in the stationary phase compared to the exponential growth. Similarly, the expression of fucose isomerase (CAC2610), xylulose kinase (CAC2612), and a putative uncharacterized protein (CAC2611) involved in the xylose utilization pathway were also significantly lower in the stationary phase. These findings provide an insight into the metabolic behavior of C. acetobutylicum between different phases of ABE fermentation using xylose.

  14. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis and acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of sugarcane bagasse by combined diluted acid with oxidate ammonolysis pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Xiong, Lian; Chen, Xuefang; Wang, Can; Qi, Gaoxiang; Huang, Chao; Luo, Mutan; Chen, Xinde

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to propose a biorefinery pretreatment technology for the bioconversion of sugarcane bagasse (SB) into biofuels and N-fertilizers. Performance of diluted acid (DA), aqueous ammonia (AA), oxidate ammonolysis (OA) and the combined DA with AA or OA were compared in SB pretreatment by enzymatic hydrolysis, structural characterization and acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Results indicated that DA-OA pretreatment improves the digestibility of SB by sufficiently hydrolyzing hemicellulose into fermentable monosaccharides and oxidating lignin into soluble N-fertilizer with high nitrogen content (11.25%) and low C/N ratio (3.39). The enzymatic hydrolysates from DA-OA pretreated SB mainly composed of glucose was more suitable for the production of ABE solvents than the enzymatic hydrolysates from OA pretreated SB containing high ratio of xylose. The fermentation of enzymatic hydrolysates from DA-OA pretreated SB produced 12.12g/L ABE in 120h. These results suggested that SB could be utilized efficient, economic, and environmental by DA-OA pretreatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Retinol fluorescence in lecithin/n-butanol/water aggregates: a new improvement for its analysis in cosmetics without pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Andrés, M P; Vera, S; Torre, M; Valiente, M

    2011-01-01

    The possibilities of different media formed by lecithin/n-butanol (n-BuOH)/water ternary mixtures for the analysis of all-trans-retinol by fluorescence have been studied. Fluorescence intensity of retinol increases in the presence of different types of aggregates formed in these media. Analytical features are good, the detection limit and quantification limit have micrograms per liter levels, and the linear range and sensitivity are appropriate to determine retinol in cosmetic samples. The analysis of retinol in anti-wrinkle creams can be achieved directly without any pretreatment of the sample. The vesicles built up from a biocompatible surfactant (lecithin) in aqueous solution with a low amount of n-BuOH permit an appropriated media for a simple, rapid, and sensitive analytical method. This method has a linear range between 64.1 and 800 μg L(-1), a sensitivity of 202.3 L mg(-1), and a low detection and quantification limit at 19.2 and 64.1 μg L(-1), respectively.

  16. The thermodynamic properties of solutions and phase equilibria in the water-2-butanol-sodium chloride system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veryaeva, E. S.; Bogachev, A. G.; Shishin, D. I.; Voskov, A. L.; Igumnov, S. N.; Mamontov, M. N.; Uspenskaya, I. A.

    2012-06-01

    Fragments of the phase diagram of the H2O-2-C4H9OH-NaCl system were studied experimentally at 298 and 313 K. The thermodynamic properties of sodium chloride in three-component solutions with ionic strengths up to 1.9 mol/kg and alcohol content in the solvent 4.97 and 10 wt % were measured at 298 and 323 K by the electromotive force method with ion-selective electrodes. The eNRTL (electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquids) model parameters correctly describing the results of electrochemical measurements of the partial properties of NaCl and phase equilibria in the water-2-butanol-sodium chloride ternary system and binary subsystems constituting it were determined. The isothermal sections of the phase diagram of the H2O-2-C4H9OH-NaCl system were calculated using the method of convex hulls implemented in the TernAPI package.

  17. Effective multiple stages continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by immobilized bioreactors: Making full use of fresh corn stalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhen; Cai, Di; Wang, Yong; Chen, Changjing; Fu, Chaohui; Wang, Guoqing; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-04-01

    In order to make full use of the fresh corn stalk, the sugar containing juice was used as the sole substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol production without any nutrients supplement, and the bagasse after squeezing the juice was used as the immobilized carrier. A total 21.34g/L of ABE was produced in batch cells immobilization system with ABE yield of 0.35g/g. A continuous fermentation containing three stages with immobilized cells was conducted and the effect of dilution rate on fermentation was investigated. As a result, the productivity and ABE solvents concentration reached 0.80g/Lh and 19.93g/L, respectively, when the dilution rate in each stage was 0.12/h (corresponding to a dilution rate of 0.04/h in the whole system). And the long-term operation indicated the continuous multiple stages ABE fermentation process had good stability and showed the great potential in future industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The n-Hexane, ethylacetate, and butanol fractions from Hydnocarpi Semen enhanced wound healing in a mice ulcer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geum Seon; Yim, Dongsool; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Kang, Tae Jin

    2012-12-01

    Our previous report showed that Hydnocarpi Semen (HS) extract has wound repair activity at ulcer lesion in diabetic mice. In this study, fractions of n-Hexane, ethylacetate (EtOAc), and butanol (BuOH) from HS crude extract were evaluated for their wound healing activity by using in vivo diabetic ulcer models and in vitro acute inflammation model. Although n-Hexane and EtOAc fractions promote wound healing in mice with ulcer, the BuOH fraction exhibited the most potent wound healing activity and the wound area score significantly decreased after treatment of BuOH fraction even at dose of 2 mg/kg. BuOH fraction stimulated macrophages to increase the production of nitric oxide (NO) and TNF-α. The BuOH fraction also enhanced the production of TGF-β and VEGF, which were involved in fibroblast activation and angiogenesis. The mRNA expression and activation of MMP-9 were increased by three fractions and the activity was higher in BuOH fraction-treated group compared to the other groups. The mechanism that the HS helps to promote healing of diabetic ulcer is possibly associated with the production of TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, as well as the secretion of VEGF, TGF-β, and MMP-9, which were involved in proliferation of capillaries and fibroblasts. These results suggest that HS can be a new candidate material for the treatment of wound in skin ulcer.

  19. Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxant Effect of Butanolic Fraction from Caryocar brasiliense Camb. Leaves in Rat Thoracic Aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Lais Moraes; Rodrigues, Aline Gabriela; da Silva, Elaine Fernanda; Cerqueira, Letícia Bonancio; Castro, Carlos Henrique; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; de Carvalho, Maria Helena Catelli; Pontarolo, Roberto; Costa, Elson Alves; Campos, Francinete Ramos; Filgueira, Fernando Paranaiba; Ghedini, Paulo César

    2012-01-01

    Caryocar brasiliense Camb. "pequi" is a native plant from the Cerrado region of Brazil that contains bioactive components reported to be antioxidant agents. Previous work has demonstrated that dietary supplementation with pequi decreased the arterial pressure of volunteer athletes. We found that the crude hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) of C. brasiliense leaves relaxed, in a concentration-dependent manner, rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine, and that the butanolic fraction (BF) produced an effect similar to that of the CHE. Aortic relaxation induced by BF was abolished by endothelium removal, by incubation of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, or the soluble guanylatecyclase inhibitor ODQ. However, incubation with atropine and pyrilamine had no effect on the BF-induced vasorelaxation. Moreover, this effect was not inhibited by indomethacin and tetraethylammonium. The concentration-response curve to calcium in denuded-endothelium rings was not modified after incubation with BF, and the vasorelaxation by BF in endothelium-intact rings precontracted with KCl was abolished after incubation with L-NAME. In addition, administration of BF in anesthetized rats resulted in a reversible hypotension. The results reveal that C. brasiliense possesses both in vivo and in vitro activities and that the vascular effect of BF involves stimulation of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP pathway.

  20. Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxant Effect of Butanolic Fraction from Caryocar brasiliense Camb. Leaves in Rat Thoracic Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lais Moraes de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Caryocar brasiliense Camb. “pequi” is a native plant from the Cerrado region of Brazil that contains bioactive components reported to be antioxidant agents. Previous work has demonstrated that dietary supplementation with pequi decreased the arterial pressure of volunteer athletes. We found that the crude hydroalcoholic extract (CHE of C. brasiliense leaves relaxed, in a concentration-dependent manner, rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine, and that the butanolic fraction (BF produced an effect similar to that of the CHE. Aortic relaxation induced by BF was abolished by endothelium removal, by incubation of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, or the soluble guanylatecyclase inhibitor ODQ. However, incubation with atropine and pyrilamine had no effect on the BF-induced vasorelaxation. Moreover, this effect was not inhibited by indomethacin and tetraethylammonium. The concentration-response curve to calcium in denuded-endothelium rings was not modified after incubation with BF, and the vasorelaxation by BF in endothelium-intact rings precontracted with KCl was abolished after incubation with L-NAME. In addition, administration of BF in anesthetized rats resulted in a reversible hypotension. The results reveal that C. brasiliense possesses both in vivo and in vitro activities and that the vascular effect of BF involves stimulation of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP pathway.

  1. Near infrared absorption spectrum of perfluoro- t-butanol/acetonitrile complexes at low temperatures: Fermi resonances and simultaneous transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burneau, André

    1989-01-01

    Interactions between perfluoro- t-butanol (PFTB) and acetonitrile- d3 (AN) in a mixture of freons are studied between 298 and 88 K in liquid or vitreous states. In the conditions of the experiment, a mean 1:2 stoichiometry [PFTB⋯(AN) 2] is inferred from previous matrix measurements. A ν OH shift of about 160 cm -1 is observed in this temperature range: it is mainly ascribed to solvent effects on the complex. In fact, the dν OH/d T coefficient increases at low temperature on account of specific solvation of the complex by the freon Br atoms. The ν OH + τ OH combination wavenumber is little dependent on the state of PFTB, near 3900 cm -1. A comparatively strong simultaneous transition involving the PFTB ν OH mode and a ν CN mode of neighbouring AN molecules is observed. Weaker bands could also be explained by such transitions involving a combination level of PFTB and a ν CN vibration. Strong Fermi resonances are displayed in the 2ν OH region when the ν OH band is located around 3100 cm -1, either in pure AN or in freons at low temperature. The levels interacting with 2ν OH are ternary combinations and quaternary overtones mainly involving the COH bend and the CO stretch. These resonances are favoured by a strong increase of the OH stretching vibration anharmonicity.

  2. Changes in membrane fatty acid composition through proton-induced fabF mutation enhancing 1-butanol tolerance in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Kim, Sun Hong; Han, Sang Soo; Kim, Myung Hee; Lee, Keun Chul

    2012-07-01

    While a rational approach based on genomic data has become the preferred method for microbial strain development, radiation-induced random mutagenesis is still a robust method for organisms such as plants whose genome or target gene information is unavailable. We previously reported on a combined approach that consists of proton irradiation and a long-term experimental evolution to enhance 1-butanol tolerance of the E. coli C strain so that it can be used as a basal strain for the production of 1-butanol, a potential biofuel along with ethanol. Genome sequencing of one randomly chosen clone (PKH5000) from the endpoint population revealed eleven mutations occurring in the coding regions, and we found that a mutation (F74C) in fabF gene encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP synthases II is associated with a twofold increase in the major unsaturated fatty acid, cis-vaccenic acid. The increase of cis-vaccenic acid by wild-type FabF, which is more active at low temperatures or in the presence of organic compounds, is considered to be a protective mechanism against cold stress. A structural analysis of the FabF protein suggests that the F74C mutation may affect the enzyme activity through a change in flexibility around the catalytic site. The expression of a plasmid that harbors mutant fabF gene in the fabF knockout strain enhanced growth in a medium containing butanol with a concomitant elevation of the cis-vaccenic acid level. Among the eight available Keio knockout strains for genes that have amino acid substitution in the PKH5000 strain, the fabF mutant showed the slowest growth in the presence of 0.7% butanol. We propose that fabF, as probably the gene most responsible for butanol tolerance in wild-type form, contributes further when converted into a F74C missense mutation, which is beneficial as it increases the level of cis-vaccenic acid.

  3. Development of a High-Efficiency Transformation Method and Implementation of Rational Metabolic Engineering for the Industrial Butanol Hyperproducer Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum Strain N1-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Nicolaus A; Li, Jeffrey; Bedi, Ripika; Turchi, Barbara; Liu, Xiaoji; Miller, Michael J; Zhang, Wenjun

    2017-01-15

    While a majority of academic studies concerning acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) production by Clostridium have focused on Clostridium acetobutylicum, other members of this genus have proven to be effective industrial workhorses despite the inability to perform genetic manipulations on many of these strains. To further improve the industrial performance of these strains in areas such as substrate usage, solvent production, and end product versatility, transformation methods and genetic tools are needed to overcome the genetic intractability displayed by these species. In this study, we present the development of a high-efficiency transformation method for the industrial butanol hyperproducer Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum strain N1-4 (HMT) ATCC 27021. Following initial failures, we found that the key to creating a successful transformation method was the identification of three distinct colony morphologies (types S, R, and I), which displayed significant differences in transformability. Working with the readily transformable type I cells (transformation efficiency, 1.1 × 10 6 CFU/μg DNA), we performed targeted gene deletions in C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 using a homologous recombination-mediated allelic exchange method. Using plasmid-based gene overexpression and targeted knockouts of key genes in the native acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) metabolic pathway, we successfully implemented rational metabolic engineering strategies, yielding in the best case an engineered strain (Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum strain N1-4/pWIS13) displaying an 18% increase in butanol titers and 30% increase in total ABE titer (0.35 g ABE/g sucrose) in batch fermentations. Additionally, two engineered strains overexpressing aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases (encoded by adh11 and adh5) displayed 8.5- and 11.8-fold increases (respectively) in batch ethanol production. This paper presents the first steps toward advanced genetic engineering of the industrial butanol

  4. Evaluation of Butanol–Gasoline Blends in a Port Fuel-injection, Spark-Ignition Engine Évaluation de mélange butanol-essence dans un moteur à allumage commandé à injection indirecte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dernotte J.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses different butanol–gasoline blends used in a port fuel-injection, spark-ignition engine to quantify the influence of butanol addition on the emission of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxide. Furthermore, in-cylinder pressure was measured to quantify combustion stability and to compare the ignition delay and fully developed turbulent combustion phases as given by 0%–10% and 10%–90% Mass Fraction Burned (MFB. The main findings are: 1 a 40% butanol/60% gasoline blend by volume (B40 minimizes HC emissions; 2 no significant change in NOx emissions were observed, with the exception of the 80% butanol/20% gasoline blend; 3 the addition of butanol improves combustion stability as measured by the COV of IMEP; 4 butanol added to gasoline reduces ignition delay (0%–10% MFB; and 5 the specific fuel consumption of B40 blend is within 10% of that of pure gasoline for stoichiometric mixture. Cet article évalue le potentiel de l’utilisation de différents mélanges butanolessence dans un moteur à allumage commandé à injection indirecte afin de quantifier l’influence de l’ajout de butanol sur les émissions des hydrocarbures imbrûlés (HC, le monoxyde de carbone (CO et les oxydes d’azote (NOx. De plus, l’influence sur la stabilité de combustion, le délai d’inflammation et sur la durée de la phase de combustion turbulente développée y sont également présentés. Les principaux résultats: 1 un mélange de 40% butanol et 60% essence (B40 par volume diminue les émissions de HC; 2 aucun effet significatif sur les émissions de NOx n’a été observé à l’exception du mélange 80% butanol/20% essence; 3 l’ajout de butanol améliore la stabilité de combustion ; 4 l’ajout de butanol réduit le délai d’inflammation, quantifié par la durée pour consommer 10% de masse de gaz frais; et 5 la consommation spécifique de carburant pour un mélange stoechiométrique de B40 est 10% sup

  5. Techno-economic analysis of extraction-based separation systems for acetone, butanol, and ethanol recovery and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisales Díaz, Víctor Hugo; Olivar Tost, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Dual extraction, high-temperature extraction, mixture extraction, and oleyl alcohol extraction have been proposed in the literature for acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) production. However, energy and economic evaluation under similar assumptions of extraction-based separation systems are necessary. Hence, the new process proposed in this work, direct steam distillation (DSD), for regeneration of high-boiling extractants was compared with several extraction-based separation systems. The evaluation was performed under similar assumptions through simulation in Aspen Plus V7.3 ® software. Two end distillation systems (number of non-ideal stages between 70 and 80) were studied. Heat integration and vacuum operation of some units were proposed reducing the energy requirements. Energy requirement of hybrid processes, substrate concentration of 200 g/l, was between 6.4 and 8.3 MJ-fuel/kg-ABE. The minimum energy requirements of extraction-based separation systems, feeding a water concentration in the substrate equivalent to extractant selectivity, and ideal assumptions were between 2.6 and 3.5 MJ-fuel/kg-ABE, respectively. The efficiencies of recovery systems for baseline case and ideal evaluation were 0.53-0.57 and 0.81-0.84, respectively. The main advantages of DSD were the operation of the regeneration column at atmospheric pressure, the utilization of low-pressure steam, and the low energy requirements of preheating. The in situ recovery processes, DSD, and mixture extraction with conventional regeneration were the approaches with the lowest energy requirements and total annualized costs.

  6. Periodic peristalsis increasing acetone-butanol-ethanol productivity during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of steam-exploded corn straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwen; Wang, Lan; Chen, Hongzhang

    2016-11-01

    The acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation of lignocellulose at high solids content has recently attracted extensive attention. However, the productivity of high solids ABE fermentation of lignocellulose is typically low in traditional processes due to the lack of efficient intensifying methods. In the present study, periodic peristalsis, a novel intensifying method, was applied to improve ABE production by the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of steam-exploded corn straw using Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824. The ABE concentration and the ABE productivity of SSF at a solids content of 17.5% (w/w) with periodic peristalsis were 17.1 g/L and 0.20 g/(L h), respectively, which were higher than those obtained under static conditions (15.2 g/L and 0.14 g/(L h)). The initial sugar conversion rate over the first 12 h with periodic peristalsis was 4.67 g/(L h) at 10 FPU/g cellulase dosage and 15% (w/w) solids content, an increase of 49.7% compared with the static conditions. With periodic peristalsis, the period of batch fermentation was shortened from 108 h to 84 h. The optimal operating regime was a low frequency (6 h -1 ) of periodic peristalsis in the acid-production phase (0-48 h) of SSF. Therefore, periodic peristalsis should be an effective intensifying method to increase the productivity of ABE fermentation at high solids content. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Spark discharge and flame inception analysis through spectroscopy in a DISI engine fuelled with gasoline and butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimescu, A.; Merola, S. S.

    2017-10-01

    Extensive application of downsizing, as well as the application of alternative combustion control with respect to well established stoichiometric operation, have determined a continuous increase in the energy that is delivered to the working fluid in order to achieve stable and repeatable ignition. Apart from the complexity of fluid-arc interactions, the extreme thermodynamic conditions of this initial combustion stage make its characterization difficult, both through experimental and numerical techniques. Within this context, the present investigation looks at the analysis of spark discharge and flame kernel formation, through the application of UV-visible spectroscopy. Characterization of the energy transfer from the spark plug’s electrodes to the air-fuel mixture was achieved by the evaluation of vibrational and rotational temperatures during ignition, for stoichiometric and lean fuelling of a direct injection spark ignition engine. Optical accessibility was ensured from below the combustion chamber through an elongated piston design, that allowed the central region of the cylinder to be investigated. Fuel effects were evaluated for gasoline and n-butanol; roughly the same load was investigated in throttled and wide-open throttle conditions for both fuels. A brief thermodynamic analysis confirmed that significant gains in efficiency can be obtained with lean fuelling, mainly due to the reduction of pumping losses. Minimal effect of fuel type was observed, while mixture strength was found to have a stronger influence on calculated temperature values, especially during the initial stage of ignition. In-cylinder pressure was found to directly determine emission intensity during ignition, but the vibrational and rotational temperatures featured reduced dependence on this parameter. As expected, at the end of kernel formation, temperature values converged towards those typically found for adiabatic flames. The results show that indeed only a relatively small part

  8. Elimination Kinetics of the Tobacco-Specific Biomarker and Lung Carcinogen 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniewicz, Maciej L.; Havel, Christopher M.; Peng, Margaret Wilson; Jacob, Peyton; Dempsey, Delia; Yu, Lisa; Zielinska-Danch, Wioleta; Koszowski, Bartosz; Czogala, Jan; Sobczak, Andrzej; Benowitz, Neal L.

    2009-01-01

    4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) is tobacco specific and has a longer half-life than other tobacco biomarkers studied thus far. An accurate measurement of the NNAL half-life is important for optimal use to assess exposure to tobacco smoke. We determined the half-life of NNAL in urine in eight daily smokers on a clinical research ward and in five occasional smokers in a real-life environment. Total NNAL in urine was monitored for 14 days in daily smokers after stopping smoking and for up to 60 days in occasional smokers. The average half-life for the terminal phase in the daily smoker group using a two-compartmental body model was 10.3 days (beta phase), and using a noncompartmental model, it was 9.1 days. In the occasional group, these values were 17.6 and 16.0 days, respectively. The alpha-phase half-lives were 14.3 and 27.8 hours for the two groups, respectively. The inter-subject coefficient of variation of the NNAL terminal half-life ranged from 14% to 30%, and the intra-subject coefficient of variation ranged from 3% to 18%. There was very good agreement between the plasma and urinary half-lives in two subjects with plasma analyses: 7.4 versus 7.9 days and 9.2 versus 10.7 days. Mean renal clearance of NNAL was 13 ± 2.3 mL/min. The terminal half-life of NNAL of 10 to 18 days indicates that this biomarker can be used to detect tobacco smoke exposure for 6 to 12 weeks after cessation of exposure and requires a similar time to assess the steady levels of NNAL after switching from one tobacco product to another. PMID:19959691

  9. Peripheral and central antinociceptive effects of the butanolic fraction of Byrsonima verbascifolia leaves on nociception-induced models in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, A A; Siqueira, J M; Castro, A H F; Matos, N A; Klein, A; Silva, D B; Carollo, C A; Soares, A C

    2017-02-01

    Byrsonima verbascifolia (Malpighiaceae), commonly known as 'murici', is used in folk medicine, for example, in the treatment of inflammation. The anti-inflammatory activity of the butanolic fraction of B. verbascifolia leaves (BvBF) was previously reported by our group, and the present study was designed to evaluate their antinociceptive effects. BvBF (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) inhibited acetic acid induced abdominal writhing. In the formalin test, BvBF (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a reduction in licking time in both the neurogenic and inflammatory phases. Moreover, we demonstrated that BvBF (30 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) caused an increase in the latency to response in the hot-plate test. These results demonstrate that BvBF possesses marked peripheral and central antinociceptive activities. Pre-treatment with the non-selective receptor antagonist naloxone (5 mg/kg, i.p.) abolished the antinociceptive effects of BvBF (100 mg/kg, i.p.) in the neurogenic phase of the formalin and hot-plate tests. The anti-inflammatory activity of BvBF (previously reported) as well as the participation of the opioidergic system seems to be responsible, at least in part, for these antinociceptive effects. Finally, BvBF at the doses investigated (25, 50 and 100 mg/Kg) did not cause any toxicity signals, showing that the antinociceptive activity is devoid of sedative and hypomotility effects.

  10. IKK β -Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Activities of a Butanol Fraction of Artificially Cultivated Cordyceps pruinosa Fruit Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyung Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory activities of the Cordyceps pruinosa butanol fraction (Cp-BF were investigated by determining inflammatory responses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-treated RAW264.7 macrophage cells and by evaluating HCl/ethanol (EtOH-triggered gastric ulcers in mice. The molecular mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of Cp-BF were investigated by identifying target enzymes using biochemical and molecular biological approaches. Cp-BF strongly inhibited the production of NO and TNF-α, release of reactive oxygen species (ROS, phagocytic uptake of FITC-dextran, and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL-6, inducible NO synthase (iNOS, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α in activated RAW264.7 cells. Cp-BF also strongly downregulated the NF-κB pathway by suppressing IKKβ according to luciferase reporter assays and immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, Cp-BF blocked both increased levels of NF-κB-mediated luciferase activities and phosphorylation of p65/p50 observed by IKKβ overexpression. Finally, orally administered Cp-BF was found to attenuate gastric ulcer and block the phosphorylation of IκBα induced by HCl/EtOH. Therefore, these results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of Cp-BF may be mediated by suppression of IKKα and its downstream NF-κB activation. Since our group has established the mass cultivation conditions by developing culture conditions for Cordyceps pruinosa, the information presented in this study may be useful for developing new anti-inflammatory agents.

  11. Kinetics of the Hydrogen Atom Abstraction Reactions from 1-Butanol by Hydroxyl Radical: Theory Matches Experiment and More

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seal, Prasenjit; Oyedepo, Gbenga; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-01-17

    In the present work, we study the H atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyl radical at all five sites of 1-butanol. Multistructural variational transition state theory (MS-VTST) was employed to estimate the five thermal rate constants. MS-VTST utilizes a multifaceted dividing surface that accounts for the multiple conformational structures of the transition state, and we also include all the structures of the reactant molecule. The vibrational frequencies and minimum energy paths (MEPs) were computed using the M08-HX/MG3S electronic structure method. The required potential energy surfaces were obtained implicitly by direct dynamics employing interpolated variational transition state theory with mapping (IVTST-M) using a variational reaction path algorithm. The M08-HX/MG3S electronic model chemistry was then used to calculate multistructural torsional anharmonicity factors to complete the MS-VTST rate constant calculations. The results indicate that torsional anharmonicity is very important at higher temperatures, and neglecting it would lead to errors of 26 and 32 at 1000 and 1500 K, respectively. Our results for the sums of the site-specific rate constants agree very well with the experimental values of Hanson and co-workers at 896–1269 K and with the experimental results of Campbell et al. at 292 K, but slightly less well with the experiments of Wallington et al., Nelson et al., and Yujing and Mellouki at 253–372 K; nevertheless, the calculated rates are within a factor of 1.61 of all experimental values at all temperatures. Finally, this gives us confidence in the site-specific values, which are currently inaccessible to experiment.

  12. Kinetics of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from 1-butanol by hydroxyl radical: theory matches experiment and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Prasenjit; Oyedepo, Gbenga; Truhlar, Donald G

    2013-01-17

    In the present work, we study the H atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyl radical at all five sites of 1-butanol. Multistructural variational transition state theory (MS-VTST) was employed to estimate the five thermal rate constants. MS-VTST utilizes a multifaceted dividing surface that accounts for the multiple conformational structures of the transition state, and we also include all the structures of the reactant molecule. The vibrational frequencies and minimum energy paths (MEPs) were computed using the M08-HX/MG3S electronic structure method. The required potential energy surfaces were obtained implicitly by direct dynamics employing interpolated variational transition state theory with mapping (IVTST-M) using a variational reaction path algorithm. The M08-HX/MG3S electronic model chemistry was then used to calculate multistructural torsional anharmonicity factors to complete the MS-VTST rate constant calculations. The results indicate that torsional anharmonicity is very important at higher temperatures, and neglecting it would lead to errors of 26 and 32 at 1000 and 1500 K, respectively. Our results for the sums of the site-specific rate constants agree very well with the experimental values of Hanson and co-workers at 896-1269 K and with the experimental results of Campbell et al. at 292 K, but slightly less well with the experiments of Wallington et al., Nelson et al., and Yujing and Mellouki at 253-372 K; nevertheless, the calculated rates are within a factor of 1.61 of all experimental values at all temperatures. This gives us confidence in the site-specific values, which are currently inaccessible to experiment.

  13. Chemiluminescence analysis of the effect of butanol-diesel fuel blends on the spray-combustion process in an experimental common rail diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merola Simona Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion process was studied from the injection until the late combustion phase in an high swirl optically accessible combustion bowl connected to a single cylinder 2-stroke high pressure common rail compression ignition engine. Commercial diesel and blends of diesel and n-butanol (20%: BU20 and 40%: BU40 were used for the experiments. A pilot plus main injection strategy was investigated fixing the injection pressure and fuel mass injected per stroke. Two main injection timings and different pilot-main dwell times were explored achieving for any strategy a mixing controlled combustion. Advancing the main injection start, an increase in net engine working cycle (>40% together with a strong smoke number decrease (>80% and NOx concentration increase (@50% were measured for all pilot injection timings. Compared to diesel fuel, butanol induced a decrease in soot emission and an increase in net engine working area when butanol ratio increased in the blend. A noticeable increase in NOx was detected at the exhaust for BU40 with a slight effect of the dwell-time. Spectroscopic investigations confirmed the delayed auto-ignition (~60 ms of the pilot injection for BU40 compared to diesel. The spectral features for the different fuels were comparable at the start of combustion process, but they evolved in different ways. Broadband signal caused by soot emission, was lower for BU40 than diesel. Different balance of the bands at 309 and 282 nm, due to different OH transitions, were detected between the two fuels. The ratio of these intensities was used to follow flame temperature evolution.

  14. pH-dependent conversion of liver-membranous alkaline phosphatase to a serum-soluble form by n-butanol extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, A; Kominami, T; Ikehara, Y

    1985-01-16

    Alkaline phosphatase released from rat liver plasma membrane under usual conditions was electrophoretically not identical with a soluble form in serum which was derived from the liver. The liver-membranous alkaline phosphatase, however, was converted to the serum-soluble form when the liver plasma membrane was treated with n-butanol under the acidic conditions lower than pH 6.5. Such pH-dependent conversion of the enzyme was not observed in plasma membrane of rat ascites hepatoma AH-130 cells. The converting activity for alkaline phosphatase was detected not only in plasma membrane but also in lysosomal membrane of rat liver.

  15. Excess enthalpy, density, and speed of sound determination for the ternary mixture (methyl tert-butyl ether + 1-butanol + n-hexane)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascato, Eva [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Mariano, Alejandra [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Pineiro, Manuel M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain)], E-mail: mmpineiro@uvigo.es; Legido, Jose Luis [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Paz Andrade, M.I. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    Density, ({rho}), and speed of sound, (u), from T = 288.15 to T = 308.15 K, and excess molar enthalpies, (h{sup E}) at T = 298.15 K, have been measured over the entire composition range for (methyl tert-butyl ether + 1-butanol + n-hexane). In addition, excess molar volumes, V{sup E}, and excess isentropic compressibility, {kappa}{sub s}{sup E}, were calculated from experimental data. Finally, experimental excess enthalpies results are compared with the estimations obtained by applying the group-contribution models of UNIFAC (in the versions of Dang and Tassios, Larsen et al., Gmehling et al.), and DISQUAC.

  16. Artificial symbiosis for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation from alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs by co-culture of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium cellulovorans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Butanol is an industrial commodity and also considered to be a more promising gasoline substitute compared to ethanol. Renewed attention has been paid to solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) production from the renewable and inexpensive substrates, for example, lignocellulose, on account of the depletion of oil resources, increasing gasoline prices and deteriorating environment. Limited to current tools for genetic manipulation, it is difficult to develop a genetically engineered microorganism with combined ability of lignocellulose utilization and solvents production. Mixed culture of cellulolytic microorganisms and solventogenic bacteria provides a more convenient and feasible approach for ABE fermentation due to the potential for synergistic utilization of the metabolic pathways of two organisms. But few bacteria pairs succeeded in producing biobutanol of high titer or high productivity without adding butyrate. The aim of this work was to use Clostridium cellulovorans 743B to saccharify lignocellulose and produce butyric acid, instead of adding cellulase and butyric acid to the medium, so that the soluble sugars and butyric acid generated can be subsequently utilized by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to produce butanol in one pot reaction. Results A stable artificial symbiotic system was constructed by co-culturing a celluloytic, anaerobic, butyrate-producing mesophile (C. cellulovorans 743B) and a non-celluloytic, solventogenic bacterium (C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052) to produce solvents by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) with alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs (AECC), a low-cost renewable feedstock, as the sole carbon source. Under optimized conditions, the co-culture degraded 68.6 g/L AECC and produced 11.8 g/L solvents (2.64 g/L acetone, 8.30 g/L butanol and 0.87 g/L ethanol) in less than 80 h. Besides, a real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was performed to study the dynamics of the abundance of each strain

  17. Excess enthalpies of binary and ternary mixtures containing dibutyl ether (DBE), 1-butanol, and heptane at T = 298.15 K and 313.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, Fernando; Alaoui, Fatima E.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electromecanica, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de Burgos, E-09006 Burgos (Spain); Segovia, Jose J.; Villamanan, Miguel A. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion TERMOCAL, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain); Montero, Eduardo A., E-mail: emontero@ubu.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Electromecanica, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de Burgos, E-09006 Burgos (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Experimental excess molar enthalpies of the ternary systems left bracedibutyl ether (DBE) + 1-butanol + heptaneright brace and the corresponding binary systems at T = 298.15 K and T = 313.15 K at atmospheric pressure are reported. A quasi-isothermal flow calorimeter has been used to make the measurements. All the binary and the ternary systems show endothermic character. The experimental data for the binary and ternary systems have been fitted using the Redlich-Kister equation, the NRTL and UNIQUAC models. The values of the standard deviation indicate good agreement between the experimental results and those calculated from the equations.

  18. Artificial symbiosis for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation from alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs by co-culture of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium cellulovorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhiqiang; Wu, Mianbin; Lin, Yijun; Yang, Lirong; Lin, Jianping; Cen, Peilin

    2014-07-15

    Butanol is an industrial commodity and also considered to be a more promising gasoline substitute compared to ethanol. Renewed attention has been paid to solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) production from the renewable and inexpensive substrates, for example, lignocellulose, on account of the depletion of oil resources, increasing gasoline prices and deteriorating environment. Limited to current tools for genetic manipulation, it is difficult to develop a genetically engineered microorganism with combined ability of lignocellulose utilization and solvents production. Mixed culture of cellulolytic microorganisms and solventogenic bacteria provides a more convenient and feasible approach for ABE fermentation due to the potential for synergistic utilization of the metabolic pathways of two organisms. But few bacteria pairs succeeded in producing biobutanol of high titer or high productivity without adding butyrate. The aim of this work was to use Clostridium cellulovorans 743B to saccharify lignocellulose and produce butyric acid, instead of adding cellulase and butyric acid to the medium, so that the soluble sugars and butyric acid generated can be subsequently utilized by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to produce butanol in one pot reaction. A stable artificial symbiotic system was constructed by co-culturing a celluloytic, anaerobic, butyrate-producing mesophile (C. cellulovorans 743B) and a non-celluloytic, solventogenic bacterium (C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052) to produce solvents by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) with alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs (AECC), a low-cost renewable feedstock, as the sole carbon source. Under optimized conditions, the co-culture degraded 68.6 g/L AECC and produced 11.8 g/L solvents (2.64 g/L acetone, 8.30 g/L butanol and 0.87 g/L ethanol) in less than 80 h. Besides, a real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was performed to study the dynamics of the abundance of each strain during the co

  19. Study of the Effects of Temperature and Pressure on the Thermodynamic and Acoustic Properties of 2-Methyl-1-butanol at Temperatures from 293K to 318K and Pressures up to 100MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzida, Marzena

    2010-01-01

    The speeds of sound in 2-methyl-1-butanol were measured at temperatures from 293K to 318K and pressures up to 101MPa. The densities were measured in the same temperature range under atmospheric pressure. The isobaric specific heat capacities were measured at atmospheric pressure and temperatures from 284K to 355K. The densities, isobaric heat capacities, isobaric thermal expansions, isentropic compressibilities, isothermal compressibilities, and internal pressures as functions of temperature and pressure were calculated using the experimental speeds of sound under elevated pressures together with the densities and heat capacities at atmospheric pressure. The effects of temperature and pressure on the isobaric thermal expansion and internal pressure of 2-methyl-1-butanol are discussed and compared with those of pentan-1-ol, 2-methyl-2-butanol, and pentan-3-ol.

  20. Butanol / Honda CRADA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    fuels I - , I I -----· --.. --.1--------0 20 40 Content [vol%] Fig. 8: Relatio ns hip of Mixing Ratio of Butano I an d Startabilit\\( under RVP...build Crown up l.....ts Piston Thrust l oad Majorttvust Skill I Udt.J cnc::e~ l’lSton Piston side lnside diameter- Wrist Pin Connecting

  1. The Influence of 1-Butanol and Trisodium Citrate Ion on Morphology and Chemical Properties of Chitosan-Based Microcapsules during Rigidification by Alkali Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sudipta; Salaün, Fabien; Campagne, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Linseed oil which has various biomedical applications was encapsulated by chitosan (Chi)-based microcapsules in the development of a suitable carrier. Oil droplets formed in oil-in-water emulsion using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as emulsifier was stabilized by Chi, and microcapsules with multilayers were formed by alternate additions of SDS and Chi solutions in an emulsion through electrostatic interaction. No chemical cross-linker was used in the study and the multilayer shell membrane was formed by ionic gelation using Chi and SDS. The rigidification of the shell membrane of microcapsules was achieved by alkali treatment in the presence of a small amount of 1-butanol to reduce aggregation. A trisodium citrate solution was used to stabilize the charge of microcapsules by ionic cross-linking. Effects of butanol during alkali treatment and citrate in post alkali treatment were monitored in terms of morphology and the chemical properties of microcapsules. Various characterization techniques revealed that the aggregation was decreased and surface roughness was increased with layer formation. PMID:25474188

  2. The Influence of 1-Butanol and Trisodium Citrate Ion on Morphology and Chemical Properties of Chitosan-Based Microcapsules during Rigidification by Alkali Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Chatterjee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Linseed oil which has various biomedical applications was encapsulated by chitosan (Chi-based microcapsules in the development of a suitable carrier. Oil droplets formed in oil-in-water emulsion using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS as emulsifier was stabilized by Chi, and microcapsules with multilayers were formed by alternate additions of SDS and Chi solutions in an emulsion through electrostatic interaction. No chemical cross-linker was used in the study and the multilayer shell membrane was formed by ionic gelation using Chi and SDS. The rigidification of the shell membrane of microcapsules was achieved by alkali treatment in the presence of a small amount of 1-butanol to reduce aggregation. A trisodium citrate solution was used to stabilize the charge of microcapsules by ionic cross-linking. Effects of butanol during alkali treatment and citrate in post alkali treatment were monitored in terms of morphology and the chemical properties of microcapsules. Various characterization techniques revealed that the aggregation was decreased and surface roughness was increased with layer formation.

  3. Effects of alkyl alcohols and related chemicals on rat liver structure and function. III. Physiochemical properties of ethanol-, propanol- and butanol- treated rat liver mitochondrial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, K; Momota, M; Teranishi, Y; Ueki, R; Hagiwara, M; Wakabayashi, T; Popinigis, J

    1992-08-01

    The physicochemical properties of mitochondria in liver tissue obtained from rats given 32% ethanol, 32% propanol or 6.9% butanol in drinking water for up to 3 months were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence polarization measurements. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Phospholipids extracted from mitochondria showed increases in the relative amounts of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine, and a decrease in the relative amount of phosphatidylethanolamine. An increase in the unsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio of phospholipids was also observed. 2) Elevation of the thermotropic lipid phase transition temperature with a decrease in the enthalpy value (delta H) was revealed by differential scanning calorimetry. 3) The elevation of the lipid phase transition temperature was detected also by fluorescence polarization measurements using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) as a probe. Elevation of mitochondrial membrane fluidity was found in some of the experimental animals, but most showed no changes in comparison with the control. A possible role of membrane fusion in the mechanism of formation of ethanol-, propanol- and butanol-induced hepatic megamitochondria is discussed on the basis of these results.

  4. A dynamic metabolic flux analysis of ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, with riboflavin as a by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinhe; Kasbi, Mayssa; Chen, Jingkui; Peres, Sabine; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2017-12-01

    The present study reveals that supplementing sodium acetate (NaAc) strongly stimulates riboflavin production in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 with xylose as carbon source. Riboflavin production increased from undetectable concentrations to ∼0.2 g L -1 (0.53 mM) when supplementing 60 mM NaAc. Of interest, solvents production and biomass yield were also promoted with fivefold acetone, 2.6-fold butanol, and 2.4-fold biomass adding NaAc. A kinetic metabolic model, developed to simulate ABE biosystem, with riboflavin production, revealed from a dynamic metabolic flux analysis (dMFA) simultaneous increase of riboflavin (ribA) and GTP (precursor of riboflavin) (PurM) synthesis flux rates under NaAc supplementation. The model includes 23 fluxes, 24 metabolites, and 72 kinetic parameters. It also suggested that NaAc condition has first stimulated the accumulation of intracellular metabolite intermediates during the acidogenic phase, which have then fed the solventogenic phase leading to increased ABE production. In addition, NaAc resulted in higher intracellular levels of NADH during the whole culture. Moreover, lower GTP-to-adenosine phosphates (ATP, ADP, AMP) ratio under NaAc supplemented condition suggests that GTP may have a minor role in the cell energetic metabolism compared to its contribution to riboflavin synthesis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Preparation of H-mordenite/MCM-48 composite and its catalytic performance in the alkylation of toluene with tert-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Cheng, Fuling; Qin, Juan; Yu, Pengcheng; Xu, Lin; Gu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xiaoqin; Wu, Wenliang

    2017-09-01

    A series of HM/MCM-48 samples with different SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio were prepared by sol-gel method. The prepared catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, NH3-TPD, FT-IR, SEM, and TEM techniques, and their catalytic performance was investigated in alkylation of toluene with tert-butanol. The adsorption capacity and the acid sites amount of HM/MCM-48-4 sample prepared by growing MCM-48 on the surface of HM zeolite are much higher than that of their mechanical mixture (HM/MCM-48(4) sample) due to its biporous structure; it shows higher catalytic performance than other HM/MCM-48 samples. The influence of reaction conditions on the catalytic performance of HM/MCM-48-4 zeolite was discussed. Toluene conversion of 41.4% and p-tert-butyltoluene selectivity of 73.5% were obtained at the weight ratio of toluene to HM/MCM-48-4 of 5, reaction temperature of 453 K, reaction time of 5 h and the molar ratio of toluene to tert-butanol of 0.5.

  6. Effect of dilute alkaline pretreatment on the conversion of different parts of corn stalk to fermentable sugars and its application in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Di; Li, Ping; Luo, Zhangfeng; Qin, Peiyong; Chen, Changjing; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effect of dilute alkaline pretreatment on different parts of biomass, corn stalk was separated into flower, leaf, cob, husk and stem, which were treated by NaOH in range of temperature and chemical loading. The NaOH-pretreated solid was then enzymatic hydrolysis and used as the substrate for batch acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The results demonstrated the five parts of corn stalk could be used as potential feedstock separately, with vivid performances in solvents production. Under the optimized conditions towards high product titer, 7.5g/L, 7.6g/L, 9.4g/L, 7g/L and 7.6g/L of butanol was obtained in the fermentation broth of flower, leaf, cob, husk and stem hydrolysate, respectively. Under the optimized conditions towards high product yield, 143.7g/kg, 126.3g/kg, 169.1g/kg, 107.7g/kg and 116.4g/kg of ABE solvent were generated, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Separation of the potential G-quadruplex ligands from the butanol extract of Zanthoxylum ailanthoides Sieb. & Zucc. by countercurrent chromatography and preparative high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tian; Cao, Xueli; Xu, Jing; Pei, Hairun; Zhang, Hong; Tang, Yalin

    2017-07-21

    G-quadruplex DNA structure is considered to be a very attractive target for antitumor drug design due to its unique role in maintaining telomerase activities. Therefore, discovering ligands with high stability of G-quadruplex structure is of great interest. In this paper, pH-zone refining counter current chromatography (CCC) and preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were employed for the separation of potent G-quadruplex ligands from the n-butanol fraction of the crude extract of Zanthoxylum ailanthoides, which is a traditional Chinese medicine recently found to display high inhibitory activity against several human cancer cells. The 75% aqueous ethanol extract of the stem bark of Z. ailanthoides and its fractions with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol displayed almost the same G-quadruplex stabilization ability. Here, pH-zone refining CCC was used for the separation of the alkaloids from the n-butanol fraction by a seldom used solvent system composed of dichloromethane-methanol-water (4:1:2.5) with 10mM TEA in the organic stationary phase as retainer and 10mM HCl in the aqueous mobile phase as eluter. Compounds I, II and III were obtained, with purity greater than 95%, in the quantities of 31.2, 94.0, and 26.4mg respectively from 300mg of lipophilic fraction within 80min, which were identified as three tetrahydroprotoberberines isolated for the first time in this plant. In addition, a phenylpropanoid glycoside compound IV (Syringin), an isoquinoline (Magnoflorine, V), and two lignin isomers (+)-lyoniresiol-3α-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (VI) and (-)-lyoniresinol -3α-O-β-D -glucopyranoside (VII) were isolated by traditional CCC together with preparative HPLC. Compounds IV, V, VI and VII were obtained, with purity greater than 95%, in the quantities of 4.0, 13.2, 6.7, and 6.5mg respectively from 960mg of hydrophilic fraction. Among the seven isolated compounds, tetrahydroprotoberberine I, II and III were found to display remarkable

  8. Improvement of the liver pathology by the aqueous extract and the n-butanol fraction of Sida pilosa Retz in Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatsa, Hermine Boukeng; Russo, Remo Castro; Pereira, Cintia Aparecida de Jesus; Aguilar, Edenil Costa; Garcia, Cristiana Couto; Araújo, Emília Souza; Oliveira, Jailza Lima Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Vanessa Fernandes; de Oliveira, Vinícius Gustavo; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline Isaura; Braga, Fernão Castro; Louis-Albert Tchuem Tchuente; Kamtchouing, Pierre; Negrão-Corrêa, Deborah Aparecida; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-03-02

    Sida pilosa Retz (Malvaceae) is a plant used in Africa for the treatment of intestinal helminthiasis, lower abdominal pains and dysmenorrhea. In order to determine the potential use of S. pilosa in the treatment of schistosomiasis mansoni, we evaluated the schistosomicidal, antioxidant and anti-fibrotic properties of the aqueous extract and the n-butanol fraction of its aerial parts. S. pilosa aqueous extract (SpAE) at 100, 200 and 400mg/kg and n-butanol fraction (SpBF) at 50, 100 and 200mg/kg were administered per os to Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice for 4 weeks. Praziquantel (100mg/kg × 5 days) was used as reference drug. After sacrifice, worm burden and egg count, transaminases and proteins levels were evaluated. Malondialdehyde (MDA), lipid hydroperoxydes (LOOH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were also measured. The anti-fibrotic effect of the plant was evaluated by the determination of hydroxyproline and γ-interferon (IFN-γ). The treatment of S. mansoni-infected mice by SpAE or SpBF resulted in a moderate reduction of worm burden and egg load in the liver and intestine. Both SpAE and SpBF significantly reversed the increasing liver proteins, MDA, LOOH and CAT levels induced by the infection. Moreover, SOD activity was improved by SpAE and SpBF. Schistosomiasis mansoni considerably increased the EPO (p<0.001) and MPO activities (p<0.001). SpAE treatment significantly reduced EPO and MPO activities at all doses. SpBF failed to reduce the increasing MPO and decreased EPO only at the highest dose. S. mansoni-infection induced an increase in hydroxyproline content (p<0.001) and a decrease in IFN-γ level (p<0.001). Both SpAE and SpBF significantly reduced hepatic hydroxyproline content, while only SpAE (p<0.05) improved IFN-γ level. These results suggest that the liver pathology in schistosomiasis mansoni is improved by S. pilosa aqueous extract, which disclosed a moderate schistosomicidal

  9. Field evaluation of synthetic lure (3-methyl-1-butanol) when compared to non odor-baited control in capturing Anopheles mosquitoes in varying land-use sites in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohdy, Sarah; Derfus, Kristin; Andrianjafy, Mbolatiana Tovo; Wright, Patricia C; Gillespie, Thomas R

    2015-03-07

    Malaria is the 4(th) largest cause of mortality in Madagascar. To better understand malaria transmission dynamics, it is crucial to map the distribution of the malaria vectors, mosquitoes belonging to the genus Anopheles. To do so, it is important to have a strong Anopheles-specific lure to ensure the maximum number of captures. Previous studies have isolated volatiles from the human skin microbiota and found the compound 3-methyl-1-butanol to be the most attractive to the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, in a laboratory setting; and recommended 3-methyl-1-butanol as a compound to increase An. gambiae captures in the field. To date, this compound's ability to lure wild mosquitoes in differing land-use settings has not been tested. In this study, we evaluate the role of the synthetic compound, 3-methyl-1-butanol in combination with field produced CO(2) in attracting Anopheles mosquitoes in varying land-use sites in Madagascar. CDC miniature light traps in combination with field produced CO(2) were deployed in and around six villages near Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar. To test the role of 3-methyl-1-butanol in luring Anopheles mosquitoes, two traps were set in each land-use site (village, agricultural sites, and forested habitats affiliated with each village). One was baited with the synthetic odor and the other was kept as a non-baited control. While 3-methyl-1-butanol baited traps did capture An. gambiae s.l. in this study, we did not find traps baited with synthetic 3-methyl-1-butanol to be more successful in capturing Anopheles mosquitoes, (including Anopheles gambiae s.l.) than the non odor-baited control traps in any of the land-use sites examined; however, regardless of odor bait, trapping near livestock pens resulted in the capture of significantly more Anopheles specimens. A strong synthetic lure in combination with insecticide has great potential as a mosquito control. Our findings suggest that trapping mosquitoes near livestock in malaria

  10. Determinación de la acidez de sólidos por la prueba catalítica de la deshidratación del 1-butanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Olmedo Pérez Oliveros

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se examina la deshidratación catalítica de 1-butanol para determinar la naturaleza de los centros ácidos de muestras de circonia sulfatada con o sin el dopaje de Ce, Sb o W así como, muestras de ZSM-5, Al-MCM-41 y permutita (aluminosilicato de naturaleza amorfa. La acidez de los diferentes catalizadores se ordenó dependiendo de la medida de la actividad catalítica y de la magnitud de las relaciones de abundancia relativa de los isómeros cis-buteno/trans-buteno (CB/TB, 1-buteno/trans-buteno (1B/TB e isobuteno/trans-buteno (IB/TB. Se encontró que la actividad aumenta a mayor contenido de sulfato en la circonia. Además, el catalizador Al-MCM-41 muestra un comportamiento similar a la mejor muestra de circonia sulfatada.

  11. Activación de lipasa de candida rugosa para la esterificación de ácido oleico con N-Butanol en isooctano

    OpenAIRE

    Restrepo, Edgar Andrés

    2005-01-01

    El presente trabajo de grado se encaminó a ensayar dos productos que se encuentran en la literatura para la activación de enzimas, con el fin de verificar cual de ellos da lugar a una mayor actividad enzimática en la esterificación de ácido oleico con n-butanol como solvente siendo la enzima ensayada lipasa de Cándida rugosa. El primer protocolo de activación está basado en la adición de una sal a la enzima, en este caso sulfato de sodio con una previa disolución de ésta en una solución buffe...

  12. Effects of erythrocyte lipid and of glucose and galactose concentration on transport of the sugars across a water-butanol interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T J; Schlowsky, B

    1969-03-01

    A property of sugar transport into the human erythrocyte is that a sugar with a high affinity for the hypothetical "carrier" will enter the cell at low concentration more rapidly than a sugar with lower affinity for carrier. At high concentration the sequence will be reversed. This behavior is exemplified by glucose, which enters erythrocytes faster than galactose at 0.015 m and slower than galactose at 1.3 m. A physicochemical model with the same properties has been found: layers of butanol and water with erythrocyte lipid at the interface. With total lipid from the human erythrocyte incorporated into the model, glucose at low concentration enters the oil phase faster than galactose and at high concentration galactose enters more rapidly. In the absence of lipid, glucose flux exceeds galactose flux at all concentrations. The hypothetical carrier molecule has not been identified.

  13. [Butanol extraction combined with dilute hydrochloric acid dissolution-atomic fluorescence spectrometric method for indirect determination of molybdenum in Chinese herbal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping; Geng, Guo-Xing; Tang, Yan-Kui; Lu, Zhi-Yong

    2012-12-01

    A method for indirectly determining the molybdenum in Chinese herbal medicine by butanol extraction and dilute hydrochloric acid dissolution was established for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The molybdoarsenate heteropoly acid, formed in the presence of As(V) and ammonium molybdate in 0.3 mol x L(-1) sulphuric acid medium, was separated and enriched in the organic solvent, then the evaporation of organic reagent was implemented and the left residue was dissolved in dilute hydrochloric acid in which the arsenic content was determined on behalf of molybdenum. In the optimum experimental conditions, molybdenum content in 0-15 microg x L(-1) range depicts a good linear relationship, the detection limit and relative standard deviation of 0.44 microg x L(-1) and 1.1% were obtained, respectively. Spiked Chinese herbal medicine samples were determined with the proposed method, and recoveries of 95.6%-101.3% were achieved.

  14. Protective properties of butanolic extract of the Calendula officinalis L. (marigold) against lipid peroxidation of rat liver microsomes and action as free radical scavenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Clarissa A S; Siqueira, Ionara R; Netto, Carlos A; Yunes, Rosendo A; Volpato, Ana M; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Curi-Pedrosa, Rozangela; Creczynski-Pasa, Tânia B

    2002-01-01

    Calendula officinalis (marigold) has many pharmacological properties. It is used for the treatment of skin disorders, pain and also as a bactericide, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are known to participate in the pathogenesis of various human diseases and may be involved in the conditions which C. officinalis is used to treat. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the beneficial properties of this plant and its antioxidant action. The butanolic fraction (BF) was studied because it is non-cytotoxic and is rich in a variety of bioactive metabolites including flavonoids and terpenoids. Superoxide radicals (O(2)(*-)) and hydroxyl radicals (HO(*)) are observed in decreasing concentrations in the presence of increasing concentrations of BF with IC(50) values of 1.0 +/- 0.09 mg/ml and 0.5 +/- 0.02 mg/ml, respectively, suggesting a possible free radical scavenging effect. Lipid peroxidation in liver microsomes induced by Fe(2+)/ascorbate was 100% inhibited by 0.5 mg/ml of BF (IC(50) = 0.15 mg/ml). Its total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP) (in microM Trolox equivalents) was 368.14 +/- 23.03 and its total antioxidant reactivity (TAR) was calculated to be 249.19 +/- 14.5 microM. The results obtained suggest that the butanolic fraction of C. officinalis possesses a significant free radical scavenging and antioxidant activity and that the proposed therapeutic efficacy of this plant could be due, in part, to these properties.

  15. Characterisation and deposition studies of recrystallised lactose from binary mixtures of ethanol/butanol for improved drug delivery from dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaialy, Waseem; Martin, Gary P; Ticehurst, Martyn D; Royall, Paul; Mohammad, Mohammad A; Murphy, John; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2011-03-01

    Dry powder inhaler formulations comprising commercial lactose-drug blends can show restricted detachment of drug from lactose during aerosolisation, which can lead to poor fine particle fractions (FPFs) which are suboptimal. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the crystallisation of lactose from different ethanol/butanol co-solvent mixtures could be employed as a method of altering the FPF of salbutamol sulphate from powder blends. Lactose particles were prepared by an anti-solvent recrystallisation process using various ratios of the two solvents. Crystallised lactose or commercial lactose was mixed with salbutamol sulphate and in vitro deposition studies were performed using a multistage liquid impinger. Solid-state characterisation results showed that commercial lactose was primarily composed of the α-anomer whilst the crystallised lactose samples comprised a α/β mixture containing a lower number of moles of water per mole of lactose compared to the commercial lactose. The crystallised lactose particles were also less elongated and more irregular in shape with rougher surfaces. Formulation blends containing crystallised lactose showed better aerosolisation performance and dose uniformity when compared to commercial lactose. The highest FPF of salbutamol sulphate (38.0 ± 2.5%) was obtained for the lactose samples that were crystallised from a mixture of ethanol/butanol (20:60) compared to a FPF of 19.7 ± 1.9% obtained for commercial lactose. Engineered lactose carriers with modified anomer content and physicochemical properties, when compared to the commercial grade, produced formulations which generated a high FPF.

  16. Conversion of human placental alkaline phosphatase from a high Mr form to a low Mr form during butanol extraction. An investigation of the role of endogenous phosphoinositide-specific phospholipases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, A S; Low, M G

    1986-12-01

    Alkaline phosphatase in a wide range of tissues has been shown to be anchored in the membrane by a specific interaction with the polar head group of phosphatidylinositol. It has previously been suggested that the production of low Mr alkaline phosphatase during the commonly used butanol extraction procedure may result from the activation of an endogenous phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C which removes the 1,2-diacylglycerol responsible for membrane anchoring. This conversion process was investigated in greater detail with human placenta used as the source of alkaline phosphatase. Mr and hydrophobicity of the alkaline phosphatase were determined by gel filtration on TSK-250 and partitioning in Triton X-114, respectively. Alkaline phosphatase extracted from human placental particulate fraction with butanol at pH 5.4 or released by incubation with Staphylococcus aureus phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C produced a form of alkaline phosphatase of Mr approx. 170,000 and relatively low hydrophobicity. By contrast, the butanol extract prepared at pH 8.3 was an aggregated form of Mr approx. 600,000 and was relatively hydrophobic. The effect of a variety of inhibitors and activators on the amount of low Mr alkaline phosphatase produced during butanol extraction revealed that it was a Ca2+- and thiol-dependent process. Proteinase inhibitors had no effect. [3H]Phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis by the particulate fraction, unlike low Mr alkaline phosphatase production, was relatively sensitive to heat inactivation, indicating that the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipases C from cytosol and lysosomes were unlikely to be responsible for conversion. A butanol-stimulated activity which removed the [3H]myristic acid from the variant surface glycoprotein ( [3H]mfVSG) of Trypanosoma brucei was detectable in the human placental particulate fraction. Since this activity was acid active, Ca2+- and thiol-dependent and relatively heat stable, it may be the same as

  17. EFFECT OF ZEOLITE 4A ON WATER CONCENTRATION IN THE SYSTEM OF THE ESTERIFICATION REACTION OF ACETIC ACID WITH 1-BUTANOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Dewi Kusumaningtyas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The usual problem encountered on a reversible reaction is that the reaction cannot achieve a complete conversion of reactants since it is limited by the thermodynamic equilibrium. Due to this low conversion, it will face challenges with product purification and recycling of the reactants, which then cause an increase in the operation cost. To obtain higher conversion, it is necessary to shift the equilibrium towards the products by continuously removing the water formed. One popular example of reversible reaction is esterification process. In this research, water removal was conducted through an adsorption process using zeolite 4A. Effect of zeolite 4A on water concentration in the liquid phase esterification of acetic acid and 1-butanol catalyzed by sulfuric acid was investigated. It was performed in an isothermal batch reactor. The molar ratio of 1-butanol - acetic acid was 1.4 times theoretically, the catalyst concentration was 1 % wt and the mixing intensity was 1000 rpm. The influence of the temperature was studied at 40 to 80 °C and the zeolite 4A loading was varied at 1.6 to 5.52 % w/ v. The reaction was compared to the conventional esterification reaction carried out under identical conditions but without addition of zeolite 4A. Concentration of each component in the system was analyzed using on-line Gas Chromatography. Effect of removing the water produced during the reaction by using zeolite 4A was demonstrated. It was revealed that the amount of water removed was proportional to the amount of the zeolite 4A to be employed. On the other hand, the increase of the temperature led to the lower amount of water to be adsorbed. Among all the experiments, the best result was achieved on the addition of 5.52 % b/v zeolite 4A at 40 °C, where water concentration was 3.1356 g mole/L and the conversion was 76.11 % at the equilibrium condition. As comparison, water concentration on the conventional reaction performed at 40 °C was 6.9161 g mole

  18. Extended UNIQUAC Model for Correlation and Prediction of Vapor-Liquid-Liquid-Solid Equilibria in Aqueous Salt Systems Containing Non-Electrolytes. Part B. Alcohol (Ethanol, Propanols, Butanols) - Water-salt systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Iliuta, Maria Cornelia; Rasmussen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    -Redlich-Kwong equation of state. The model only requires binary, temperature-dependent interaction parameters. It has previously been used to describe the excess Gibbs energy for aqueous electrolyte mixtures and aqueous electrolyte systems containing methanol. It has been found to be an adequate model for representing......, and liquid-liquid equilibrium data for solvent mixtures and for mixed solvent-electrolyte systems. The application of this model to represent the vapor-liquid-liquid-solid equilibria in aqueous systems containing various non-electrolytes (ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2- butanol, 2-methyl I...... solid-liquid-vapor equilibrium and thermal property data for strongly non-ideal systems. In this work, the model is extended to aqueous salt systems containing higher alcohols. The calculations are based on an extensive database consisting of salt solubility data, vapor liquid equilibrium data...

  19. Conversion of human placental alkaline phosphatase from a high Mr form to a low Mr form during butanol extraction. An investigation of the role of endogenous phosphoinositide-specific phospholipases.

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, A. S.; Low, M G

    1986-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase in a wide range of tissues has been shown to be anchored in the membrane by a specific interaction with the polar head group of phosphatidylinositol. It has previously been suggested that the production of low Mr alkaline phosphatase during the commonly used butanol extraction procedure may result from the activation of an endogenous phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C which removes the 1,2-diacylglycerol responsible for membrane anchoring. This conversion process w...

  20. N-Butanol and Aqueous Fractions of Red Maca Methanolic Extract Exerts Opposite Effects on Androgen and Oestrogens Receptors (Alpha and Beta in Rats with Testosterone-Induced Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH affects, worldwide, 50% of 60-year-old men. The Peruvian plant red maca (Lepidium meyenii inhibits BPH in rodents. This study aimed to determine the effects of methanolic red maca extract and its n-butanol and aqueous fractions on expression of androgen and oestrogen receptors in rats with testosterone enanthate-induced BPH. Thirty-six rats in six groups were studied. Control group received 2 mL of vehicle orally and 0.1 mL of propylene glycol intramuscularly. The second group received vehicle orally and testosterone enanthate (TE (25 mg/0.1 mL intramuscularly in days 1 and 7. The other four groups were BPH-induced with TE and received, during 21 days, 3.78 mg/mL of finasteride, 18.3 mg/mL methanol extract of red maca, 2 mg/mL of n-butanol fraction, or 16.3 mg/mL of aqueous fraction from red maca. Treatments with red maca extract and its n-butanol but not aqueous fraction reduced prostate weight similar to finasteride. All maca treated groups restored the expression of ERβ, but only the aqueous fraction increased androgen receptors and ERα. In conclusion, butanol fraction of red maca reduced prostate size in BPH by restoring expression of ERβ without affecting androgen receptors and ERα. This effect was not observed with aqueous fraction of methanolic extract of red maca.

  1. Densities and volume properties of (water + tert-butanol) over the temperature range of (274.15 to 348.15) K at pressure of 0.1 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, Gennadiy I., E-mail: gie@isc-ras.r [Laboratory of Structure and Dynamics of Molecular and Ion-Molecular Solutions, Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Akademicheskaya Street, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Makarov, Dmitriy M. [Laboratory of Structure and Dynamics of Molecular and Ion-Molecular Solutions, Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Akademicheskaya Street, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    The densities of {l_brace}water (1) + tert-butanol (2){r_brace} binary mixture were measured over the temperature range (274.15 to 348.15) K at atmospheric pressure using 'Anton Paar' digital vibrating-tube densimeter. Density measurements were carried out over the whole concentration range at (308.15 to 348.15) K. The following volume parameters were calculated: excess molar volumes and thermal isobaric expansivities of the mixture, partial molar volumes and partial molar thermal isobaric expansivities of the components. Concentration dependences of excess molar volumes were fitted with Redlich-Kister equation. The results of partial molar volume calculations using four equations were compared. It was established that for low alcohol concentrations at T {<=} 208 K the inflection points at x{sub 2} {approx} 0.02 were observed at concentration dependences of specific volume. The concentration dependences of partial molar volumes of both water and tert-butanol had extremes at low alcohol content. The temperature dependence of partial molar volumes of water had some inversion at x{sub 2} {approx} 0.65. The temperature dependence of partial molar volumes of tert-butanol at infinite dilution had minimum at {approx}288 K. It was discovered that concentration dependences of thermal isobaric expansivities of the mixture at small alcohol content and low temperatures passed through minimum.

  2. Evaluation of Antiradical and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Ethyl Acetate and Butanolic Subfractions of Agelanthus dodoneifolius (DC.) Polhill & Wiens (Loranthaceae) Using Equine Myeloperoxidase and Both PMA-Activated Neutrophils and HL-60 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boly, Rainatou; Franck, Thierry; Kohnen, Stephan; Lompo, Marius; Guissou, Innocent Pierre; Dubois, Jacques; Serteyn, Didier; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange

    2015-01-01

    The ethyl acetate and n-butanolic subfractions of Agelanthus dodoneifolius were investigated for their antioxidant and antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) activities. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and dichlorofluorescein- (DCF-) induced fluorescence techniques from phorbol myristate acetate- (PMA-) stimulated equine neutrophils and human myeloid cell line HL-60, respectively. In parallel, the effects of the tested subfractions were evaluated on the total MPO release by stimulated neutrophils and on the specific MPO activity by means of immunological assays. The results showed the potent activity of the butanolic subfraction, at least in respect of the chemiluminescence test (IC50 = 0.3 ± 0.1 µg/mL) and the ELISA and SIEFED assays (IC50 = 2.8 ± 1.2 µg/mL and 1.3 ± 1.0 µg/mL), respectively. However, the ethyl acetate subfraction was found to be the most potent in the DCF assay as at the highest concentration, DCF fluorescence intensity decreases of about 50%. Moreover, we demonstrated that the ethyl acetate subfraction was rich in catechin (16.51%) while it was not easy to identify the main compounds in the butanolic subfraction using the UPLC-MS/MS technique. Nevertheless, taken together, our results provide evidence that Agelanthus dodoneifolius subfractions may represent potential sources of natural antioxidants and of antimyeloperoxidase compounds. PMID:25821497

  3. N-butanol extract of Capparis spinosa L. induces apoptosis primarily through a mitochondrial pathway involving mPTP open, cytochrome C release and caspase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yu-Bin; Yu, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Capparis spinosa L., a Uygur medicine, had been shown to have anti-tumor activity in our early experiments with an N-butanol extract (CSBE) as its active fraction. However, the mechanisms responsible for its effects are not clearly understood. Here, we report that treatment of SGC-7901 cells with CSBE resulted in dose-dependent reduction of cell viability and induction of apoptosis. To observe the inhibitory and killing effects of CSBE on SGC-7901, the SRB method was adopted, apoptosis being observed by electron microscopy. To clarify the mechanisms of apoptosis, Western blot and enzyme-labeled methods were used to examine the release of cytochrome c (Cyt c) and the activation of the caspase cascade. By electron microscopy, apoptotic morphologic changes were detectable after CSBE administration. In this study, it was also demonstrated that CSBE induced apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells by inhibiting mPTP open, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. The findings indicated that CSBE induces apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway.

  4. Secondhand smoke exposure within semi-open air cafes and tobacco specific 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanol (NNAL concentrations among nonsmoking employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantine I. Vardavas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Secondhand smoke (SHS is a defined occupational hazard. The association though between SHS exposure in semi-open air venues and tobacco specific carcinogen uptake is an area of debate. Material and Methods: A cross sectional survey of 49 semi-open air cafes in Athens, Greece was performed during the summer of 2008, prior to the adoption of the national smoke free legislation. All venues had at least 1 entire wall open to allow for free air exchange. Indoor concentrations of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns (PM2.5 attributable to SHS were assessed during a work shift, while 1 non-smoking employee responsible for indoor and outdoor table service from each venue provided a post work shift urine sample for analysis of 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanol (NNAL. Results: Post work shift NNAL concentrations were correlated with work shift PM2.5 concentrations attributable to SHS (r = 0.376, p = 0.0076. Urinary NNAL concentrations among employees increased by 9.5%, per 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 concentrations attributable to SHS after controlling for the time of day and day of week. Conclusions: These results indicate that the commonly proposed practice of maintaining open sliding walls as a means of free air exchange does not lead to the elimination of employee exposure to tobacco specific carcinogens attributable to workplace SHS.

  5. Inhibitory effect of n-butanol fraction of Moringa oleifera Lam. seeds on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a guinea pig model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Shailaja G; Banerjee, Aryamitra; Chauhan, Bhupendrasinh F; Padh, Harish; Nivsarkar, Manish; Mehta, Anita A

    2009-01-01

    Moringaceae, which belongs to the Moringa oleifera Lam. family, is a well-known herb used in Asian medicine as an antiallergic drug. In the present study, the efficacy of the n-butanol extract of the seeds of the plant (MONB) is examined against ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in guinea pigs. The test drugs (MONB or dexamethasone) are administered orally prior to challenge with aerosolized 0.5% ovalbumin. During the experimental period, bronchoconstriction tests are performed, and lung function parameters are measured. The blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid are collected to assess cellular content, and serum is used for cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-4, and interleukin-6) assays. Histamine assays of lung tissue are performed using lung tissue homogenate. The results suggest that in ovalbumin-sensitized model control animals, tidal volume is decreased, respiration rate is increased, and both the total and differential cell counts in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid are increased significantly compared with nonsensitized controls. MONB treatment shows improvement in all parameters except bronchoalveolar lavage tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-4. Moreover, MONB treatment demonstrates protection against acetylcholine-induced bronchoconstriction and airway inflammation. These results indicate that MONB has an inhibitory effect on airway inflammation. Thus, MONB possesses an antiasthmatic property through modulation of the relationship between Th1/Th2 cytokine imbalances.

  6. Efficient carbon dioxide utilization and simultaneous hydrogen enrichment from off-gas of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by succinic acid producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Aiyong; Kong, Xiangping; Wang, Chao; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Min; Ma, Jiangfeng; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-08-01

    The off-gas from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was firstly used to be CO2 source (co-substrate) for succinic acid production. The optimum ratio of H2/CO2 indicated higher CO2 partial pressures with presence of H2 could enhance C4 pathway flux and reductive product productivity. Moreover, when an inner recycling bioreactor was used for CO2 recycling at a high total pressure (0.2Mpa), a maximum succinic acid concentration of 65.7g·L(-1) was obtained, and a productivity of 0.76g·L(-1)·h(-1) and a high yield of 0.86g·g(-1) glucose were achieved. Furthermore, the hydrogen content was simultaneously enriched to 92.7%. These results showed one successful attempt to reuse the off-gas of ABE fermentation which can be an attractive CO2 source for succinic acid production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative assessment of the relative antineoplastic potential of the n-butanolic leaf extract of Annona muricata Linn. in normal and immortalized human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, V Cijo; Kumar, D R Naveen; Rajkumar, V; Suresh, P K; Kumar, R Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Natural products have been the target for cancer therapy for several years but there is still a dearth of information on potent compounds that may protect normal cells and selectively destroy cancerous cells. The present study was aimed to evaluate the cytotoxic potential of n-butanolic leaf extract of Annona muricata L. on WRL-68 (normal human hepatic cells), MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma cells) and HaCaT (human immortalized keratinocyte cells) lines by XTT assay. Prior to cytotoxicity testing, the extract was subjected to phytochemical screening for detecting the presence of compounds with therapeutic potential. Their relative antioxidant properties were evaluated using the reducing power and DPPH* radical scavenging assay. Since most of the observed chemo-preventive potential invariably correlated with the amount of total phenolics present in the extract, their levels were quantified and identified by HPLC analysis. Correlation studies indicated a strong and significant (PAnnona muricata. Isolation of the active metabolites from the extract is in prospect.

  8. The n-butanolic extract of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten enhances long-term memory in the passive avoidance task in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Dong Hyun; Park, Se Jin; Park, Dong Hyun; Jung, Seo Yun; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Lee, Yong Sup; Jin, Changbae; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2010-08-16

    Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten Makino (Cactaceae) is used to treat burns, edema, dyspepsia, and asthma in traditional medicine. The present study investigated the beneficial effects of the n-butanolic extract of O. ficus-indica var. saboten (BOF) on memory performance in mice and attempts to uncover the mechanisms underlying its action. Memory performance was assessed with the passive avoidance task, and western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to measure changes in protein expression and cell survival. After the oral administration of BOF for 7 days, the latency time in the passive avoidance task was significantly increased relative to vehicle-treated controls (P<0.05). Western blotting revealed that the expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylated cAMP response element binding-protein (pCREB), and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) 1/2 were significantly increased in hippocampal tissue after 7 days of BOF administration (P<0.05). Doublecortin and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining also revealed that BOF significantly enhanced the survival of immature neurons, but did not affect neuronal cell proliferation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These results suggest that the subchronic administration of BOF enhances long-term memory, and that this effect is partially mediated by ERK-CREB-BDNF signaling and the survival of immature neurons. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between Secondhand Smoke in Hospitality Venues and Urinary 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanol Concentrations in Non-Smoking Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghoon Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between urinary cotinine and total 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanol (NNAL concentrations in non-smoking staff and the indoor levels of fine particles (PM2.5 in hospitality venues that allow smoking, with respect to demographic and indoor environmental factors. We evaluated 62 hospitality venues that allowed smoking in Seoul, Korea. A real-time aerosol monitor was used to measure indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Field technicians recorded indoor environmental characteristics. One non-smoking staff member in each hospitality venue was tested for urinary cotinine and total NNAL concentrations. Demographic characteristics were obtained from self-reported staff questionnaires. Natural-log (ln-transformed PM2.5 concentrations were significantly correlated with the ln-transformed cotinine (r = 0.31 and the total NNAL concentrations (r = 0.32. In multivariable regression analysis, the urinary cotinine concentrations of the staff members were significantly correlated with indoor PM2.5 concentrations; those with the highest concentrations were more likely to be women or staff members that worked in venues with a volume <375 m3. Total NNAL concentrations were significantly correlated only with indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Indoor PM2.5 may be used as an indicator for urinary cotinine and total NNAL concentrations in non-smoking staff members in hospitality venues that allow smoking.

  10. Surface tension of dilute alcohol-aqueous binary fluids: n-Butanol/water, n-Pentanol/water, and n-Hexanol/water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kuok Kong; Park, Chanwoo

    2017-07-01

    Surface tension of pure fluids, inherently decreasing with regard to temperature, creates a thermo-capillary-driven (Marangoni) flow moving away from a hot surface. It has been known that few high-carbon alcohol-aqueous solutions exhibit an opposite behavior of the surface tension increasing with regard to temperature, such that the Marangoni flow moves towards the hot surface (self-rewetting effect). We report the surface tensions of three dilute aqueous solutions of n-Butanol, n-Pentanol and n-Hexanol as self-rewetting fluids measured for ranges of alcohol concentration (within solubility limits) and fluid temperatures (25-85 °C). A maximum bubble pressure method using a leak-tight setup was used to measure the surface tension without evaporation losses of volatile components. It was found from this study that the aqueous solutions with higher-carbon alcohols exhibit a weak self-rewetting behavior, such that the surface tensions remain constant or slightly increases above about 60 °C. These results greatly differ from the previously reported results showing a strong self-rewetting behavior, which is attributed to the measurement errors associated with the evaporation losses of test fluids during open-system experiments.

  11. Secondhand smoke exposure within semi-open air cafes and tobacco specific 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) concentrations among nonsmoking employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardavas, Constantine I; Karabela, Maria; Agaku, Israel T; Matsunaga, Yuko; Myridakis, Antonis; Kouvarakis, Antonis; Stephanou, Euripides G; Lymperi, Maria; Behrakis, Panagiotis K

    2014-10-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) is a defined occupational hazard. The association though between SHS exposure in semi-open air venues and tobacco specific carcinogen uptake is an area of debate. A cross sectional survey of 49 semi-open air cafes in Athens, Greece was performed during the summer of 2008, prior to the adoption of the national smoke free legislation. All venues had at least 1 entire wall open to allow for free air exchange. Indoor concentrations of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) attributable to SHS were assessed during a work shift, while 1 non-smoking employee responsible for indoor and outdoor table service from each venue provided a post work shift urine sample for analysis of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL). Post work shift NNAL concentrations were correlated with work shift PM2.5 concentrations attributable to SHS (r = 0.376, p = 0.0076). Urinary NNAL concentrations among employees increased by 9.5%, per 10 μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5 concentrations attributable to SHS after controlling for the time of day and day of week. These results indicate that the commonly proposed practice of maintaining open sliding walls as a means of free air exchange does not lead to the elimination of employee exposure to tobacco specific carcinogens attributable to workplace SHS.

  12. Longer term exposure to secondhand smoke and health outcomes in COPD: Impact of urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Peyton; Benowitz, Neal L.; Balmes, John; Blanc, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Secondhand smoke (SHS) contains respiratory irritants and has the potential to adversely affect adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but few studies have evaluated the impact of SHS on COPD. Methods We used data from 72 nonsmoking participants in a cohort study of COPD. Urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) was measured as an indicator of longer term SHS exposure, whereas urine cotinine was assessed as a measure of more recent exposure. The impact of SHS exposure on COPD-related health status was examined using multivariate linear regression (controlling for age, sex, race, educational attainment, and smoking history). Health status was measured using a validated COPD severity score, reported dyspnea, a standard health status measure (Short Form-12), and activity restriction. Results The urine NNAL-to-creatinine ratio (per interquartile increment) was associated with greater COPD severity (mean score increase 1.7 points; 95% CI 0.6–2.8; p = .0003). Higher urine NNAL was also related to greater dyspnea, poorer physical health status, and more restricted activity (p ≤ .05 in all cases). When considered simultaneously, longer term exposure (NNAL) had a greater negative impact on COPD status than shorter term exposure (cotinine). Discussion Urine NNAL can be used to estimate longer term SHS exposure and negatively affects a number of health outcomes among adults with COPD. Screening for and prevention of SHS exposure among persons with COPD may be beneficial. PMID:19587064

  13. Inhibition of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis by topical application of the butanol extract of Cordyceps bassiana in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guang; Li, Lan; Sung, Gi Ho; Kim, Tae Woong; Byeon, Se Eun; Cho, Jae Youl; Park, Chun Wook; Park, Hyoung Jin

    2011-03-24

    The Cordyceps species are insect-borne mushrooms that have been ethnopharmacologically used for skin diseases such as eczema and dermatitis. In this study, we investigated the curative effects of the butanol fraction (CBBF) of Cordyceps bassiana on atopic dermatitis. Dermatitis was induced by repeated application of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) in NC/Nga mice. After a topical application of CBBF on the skin lesions, the dermatitis score, epidermal thickness, mast cell number, and interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-γ, as well as the levels of histamine and immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the serum, were measured. Moreover, effect of CBBF on histamine release was examined using RBL-2H3 under stimulation with 2,4-dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA). CBBF inhibited atopic dermatitis symptoms and signs in the DNFB-treated NC/Nga mice. The suppressive activity of topically applied CBBF may be due to the dose-dependent blockade of a series of immunopathological events, including the release of histamine, the production of IgE, and the secretion of IL-4 and IFN-γ. However, this extract did not directly suppress the degranulation process, assessed by measuring β-hexosaminidase release. Our results suggest that CBBF can be applied as an effective herbal remedy to treat atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between Secondhand Smoke in Hospitality Venues and Urinary 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol Concentrations in Non-Smoking Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonghoon; Lee, Kiyoung; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Lee, Do Hoon; Kim, KyooSang

    2016-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between urinary cotinine and total 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) concentrations in non-smoking staff and the indoor levels of fine particles (PM2.5) in hospitality venues that allow smoking, with respect to demographic and indoor environmental factors. We evaluated 62 hospitality venues that allowed smoking in Seoul, Korea. A real-time aerosol monitor was used to measure indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Field technicians recorded indoor environmental characteristics. One non-smoking staff member in each hospitality venue was tested for urinary cotinine and total NNAL concentrations. Demographic characteristics were obtained from self-reported staff questionnaires. Natural-log (ln)-transformed PM2.5 concentrations were significantly correlated with the ln-transformed cotinine (r = 0.31) and the total NNAL concentrations (r = 0.32). In multivariable regression analysis, the urinary cotinine concentrations of the staff members were significantly correlated with indoor PM2.5 concentrations; those with the highest concentrations were more likely to be women or staff members that worked in venues with a volume hospitality venues that allow smoking.

  15. Effects of dichloromethane and butanol fractions of Gochnatia polymorpha floccosa in maternal reproductive outcome, embryo-fetal development and DNA integrity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessatto, Lucas Roberto; Auharek, Sarah Alves; Gonçalves, Caroline Amélia; de David, Natan; Monreal, Antônio Carlos Duenhas; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite; Antoniolli-Silva, Andréia Conceição Milan Brochado; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano

    2017-03-22

    Gochnatia polymorpha ssp. floccosa (Asteraceae) also known as ''Cambará'' is used as medicinal plant in Brazil to treat infections and inflammation. Previous studies showed that its ethanolic extract could be bioprospecting of a new anti-inflammatory phytotherapy for use during pregnancy. This work aimed to evaluate dichloromethane (DCM) and butanolic (BT) fractions from G. polymorpha on embryo-fetal development and DNA integrity in mice. Female mice were treated with 50 and 20mg/kg of the DCM and BT fractions, respectively, during organogenesis and gestational period. The present study shows that DCM and BT fractions from G. polymorpha possess mutagenic activity but are not teratogenic. Based on the fact that the reproductive indices are similar in control and treated animals, we may infer that the mutagenic effect was in somatic cell, at least in part, because the reabsorption number and reabsorption rates did not change in DCM and BT exposed groups. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Neuroprotective effect of n-butanol extract of Chinese toon seeds on mouse with injury of ischemia-reperfusion and its mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di MA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the neuroprotective effect and its mechanism of n-butanol extract (n-BuE of Chinese toon seeds on mouse with ischemia-reperfusion (I-R injury of the brain in vivo. Methods  The brain I-R model was established in 42 mice by ligation of bilateral common carotid arteries for 2 times combined with injection of sodium nitroprusside. Animals were randomly divided into 6 groups (7 each: sham-operated group, I-R model group, vehicle control group, two treatment groups [treated with n-BuE of Chinese toon seeds 28mg/(kg.d or 42mg/(kg.d, respectirely, for 7 days], and positive control group [treated with aspirin 14mg/(kg. d]. The animals were sacrificed by decapitation after the experimental procedure, and the water content of brain tissue was determined by weighing. The permeability of the blood brain barrier was evaluated by measurement of Evans blue (EB content with spectrophotometer. The contents of malondialdehyde (MDA and nitrogen mono-oxide (NO, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX in brain tissue were determined with spectrophotometer. Results  The water content and EB content of brain tissue, and the contents of MDA and NO, and the activities of SOD and GPX in hippocampal tissue increased significantly in I-R model group than in sham-operation group (P<0.05 or P<0.01, while they decreased obviously in the two treatment groups when compared with those in I-R model group (P<0.05 or P<0.01. Conclusion  n-BuE of Chinese toon seeds may play a neuroprotective effect on the brain tissue I-R injured mice due to its anti-oxidative stress effect.

  17. Nonadditive empirical force fields for short-chain linear alcohols: methanol to butanol. Hydration free energetics and Kirkwood-Buff analysis using charge equilibration models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-09-02

    Building upon the nonadditive electrostatic force field for alcohols based on the CHARMM charge equilibration (CHEQ) formalism, we introduce atom-pair specific solute-solvent Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for alcohol-water interaction force fields targeting improved agreement with experimental hydration free energies of a series of small molecule linear alcohols as well as ab initio water-alcohol geometries and energetics. We consider short-chain, linear alcohols from methanol to butanol as they are canonical small-molecule organic model compounds to represent the hydroxyl chemical functionality for parametrizing biomolecular force fields for proteins. We discuss molecular dynamics simulations of dilute aqueous solutions of methanol and ethanol in TIP4P-FQ water, with particular discussion of solution densities, structure defined in radial distribution functions, electrostatic properties (dipole moment distributions), hydrogen bonding patterns of water, as well as a Kirkwood-Buff (KB) integral analysis. Calculation of the latter provides an assessment of how well classical force fields parametrized to at least semiquantitatively match experimental hydration free energies capture the microscopic structures of dilute alcohol solutions; the latter translate into macroscopic thermodynamic properties through the application of KB analysis. We find that the CHEQ alcohol force fields of this work semiquantitatively match experimental KB integrals for methanol and ethanol mole fractions of 0.1 and 0.2. The force field combination qualitatively captures the concentration dependence of the alcohol-alcohol and water-water KB integrals, but due to inadequacies in the representation of the microscopic structures in such systems (which cannot be parametrized in any systematic fashion), a priori quantitative description of alcohol-water KB integrals remains elusive.

  18. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Biofilm Protein Profile After Exposure to n-Butanolic Cyclamen coum Extract Alone and in Combination with Ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Morvarid; Abdi-Ali, Ahya; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Vali, Hojatollah; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Akbari Noghabi, Kambiz

    2017-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-related infections are the major cause of premature death in cystic fibrosis patients. Strategies to induce biofilm dispersal are of interest, because of their potential in preventing biofilm-related infections. Our previous work demonstrated that n-butanolic Cyclamen coum extract with ciprofloxacin could eliminate 1- and 3-day-old P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. To gain new insights into the role of C. coum extract and its synergistic effect with ciprofloxacin in eliminating P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in combination with mass spectrometry-based protein identification were used. Changes in the bacterial protein expression were analyzed when 3-day-old biofilm cells were exposed to the C. coum extract alone and in combination with ciprofloxacin. Proteins involved in alginate biosynthesis, quorum sensing, adaptation/protection, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism showed a weaker expression in the C. coum extract-ciprofloxacin-treated biofilm cells compared to those in the untreated cells. Interestingly, the proteome of C. coum extract-ciprofloxacin-treated biofilm revealed more resemblance to the planktonic phenotype than to the biofilm phenotype. It appears that saponin extract in combination with ciprofloxacin causes biofilm disruption due to several mechanisms such as motility induction, cell envelope integrity perturbation, stress protein expression reduction, and more importantly, signal transduction perturbation. In conclusion, exposure to a combination of biofilm dispersal such as saponin extract and antimicrobial agents may offer a novel strategy to control preestablished, persistent P. aeruginosa biofilms and biofilm-related infections.

  19. Non-additive Empirical Force Fields for Short-Chain Linear Alcohols: Methanol to Butanol. Hydration Free Energetics and Kirkwood-Buff Analysis Using Charge Equilibration Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Building upon the nonadditive electrostatic force field for alcohols based on the CHARMM charge equilibration (CHEQ) formalism, we introduce atom-pair specific solute-solvent Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for alcohol-water interaction force fields targeting improved agreement with experimental hydration free energies of a series of small molecule linear alcohols as well as ab initio water-alcohol geometries and energetics. We consider short-chain, linear alcohols from methanol to butanol as they are canonical small-molecule organic model compounds to represent the hydroxyl chemical functionality for parameterizing biomolecular force fields for proteins. We discuss molecular dynamics simulations of dilute aqueous solutions of methanol and ethanol in TIP4P-FQ water, with particular discussion of solution densities, structure defined in radial distribution functions, electrostatic properties (dipole moment distributions), hydrogen bonding patterns of water, as well as a Kirkwood-Buff (KB) integral analysis. Calculation of the latter provides an assessment of how well classical force fields parameterized to at least semi-quantitatively match experimental hydration free energies capture the microscopic structures of dilute alcohol solutions; the latter translate into macroscopic thermodynamic properties through the application of KB analysis. We find that the CHEQ alcohol force fields of this work semi-quantitatively match experimental KB integrals for methanol and ethanol mole fractions of 0.1 and 0.2. The force field combination qualitatively captures the concentration dependence of the alcohol-alcohol and water-water KB integrals, but due to inadequacies in the representation of the microscopic structures in such systems (which cannot be parameterized in any systematic fashion), a priori quantitative description of alcohol-water KB integrals remains elusive. PMID:20687517

  20. Análisis de estabilidad de un sistema de fermentación acetona-butanol-etanol (ABE a partir de glucosa empleando Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Johana Castellanos Suárez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la dinámica y estabilidad en la producción de butanol por fermentación en un biorreactor continuo. La respuesta dinámica del sistema se estudió eligiendo como criterio de evaluación la concentración de butanol, en un modelo cinético validado estadísticamente, que describe el comportamiento oscilatorio de cultivos continuos teniendo en cuenta la influenciadel pH, inhibición por productos y los parámetros influyentes en el sistema. Se tomaron como parámetros de bifurcación la dilución (D y la concentración de sustrato de alimentación (Sf. Se empleó una rutina de cálculo en Matlab® y la herramienta Matcont® para generar diagramas de comportamiento dinámico, valores de estado estacionario y diagramas de bifurcación. Los resultados muestran que es conveniente operar a velocidades de dilución pequeñas (D<0,1[h^-1 y concentraciones de sustrato de alimentación(Sf en un rango de 40 a 90 [g/L] para obtener las concentraciones más altas de butanol. Las implicaciones prácticas de los fenómenos descubiertos se analizancon el objetivo de aplicar una metodología adecuada para este tipo de estudios y para la puesta en marcha de este tipo de bioprocesos.

  1. Energy-decomposition analysis of ion-neutral complexes along reaction coordinates of unimolecular proton-transfer reaction in gas phase: Comparison between 2-butanol radical ion and protonated 2-ethoxypropane ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Natsuhiko; Igarashi, Yoko; Aoyama, Reiko; Shibue, Toshimichi

    2017-10-01

    An energy-decomposition analysis clarified the physical origins that change in gas-phase unimolecular proton-transfer reactions via ion-neutral complexes of the 2-butanol radical ion and protonated 2-ethoxypropane ion. In the bond cleavage and new bond-formation parts of the reaction coordinates, exchange and polarization energies provide a major source of the attraction. In the ion-neutral complex-formation part of the reaction coordinate, different major attractive sources, dispersion, and electrostatic energies were observed. The physical origins of weak interaction in the ion-neutral complexes were affected by the local charges and distances between the ion moieties and the neutral moieties.

  2. Otimização da esterificação de ácido hexanóico com n-butanol empregando lipase (Termomyces lanuginosus imobilizada em gelatina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Skoronski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of Lipozyme (Termomyces lanuginosus immobilized in gelatin gel in aliphatic ester synthesis was investigated taking the esterification of hexanoic acid with n-butanol as a model reaction. Conditions were optimized by factorial design and the highest conversion was obtained under the following conditions: molar ratio alcohol: acid of 2:1, reaction time of 48 h and biocatalyst weight of 7.0 g. Under these conditions the esterification yield was around 98 %. The operational stability of the immobilized lipase was assessed and results showed that after 12 batch runs, the enzyme showed no significant loss of activity.

  3. Butanol/Gasoline Test Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    collar ) 10’-8 3/4” Cruise Speed 24 knots @ 4500 RPM Operational Draft (DIW4 with engines vertical) 3’-0 3/4” Maximum Operating Distance from...A Class) 150 NM (B Class) LOA 29’-4” (A Class) 29’-6.5” (B Class) Max Speed 46 knots @ 6000 RPM Beam Overall (includes collar ) 8’-6” Cruise...Human health studies indicate that prolonged and/or repeated overexposure to benzene may cause damage to the blood-forming system (particularly bone

  4. Butanol / Gasoline Mercury CRADA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Metal Shark, the boat manufacturer, using 300 HP Mercury Verado engines. As the graph shows, the data collected during the operational tests agrees...well with Metal Shark’s testing. Figure 5. Mercury engine speed vs. fuel consumption. 1 For...Freshly polished.  1B= Slight  tarnish.  4 = worst, severe corrosion.  Appears as  blackened  test coupon.    6. RON always greater than MON and

  5. {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4}-induced improvements of the catalytic behavior of MoO{sub 3}-(010) in the oxygen-assisted dehydration of 2-butanol: implications in selective oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaigneaux, E.M. [Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique of Belgium (Belgium); Naeye, M.L.; Dupont, O.; Ruiz, P.; Delmon, B. [Unite de Catalyse et Chimie des Materiaux Divises, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Callant, M.; Kartheuser, B. [CERTECH, Senefffe (Belgium)

    1998-12-31

    This article concerns the synergetic effects between an MoO{sub 3} sample composed of crystallites exposing preferentially the (010) basal faces and {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4} in the oxygen-assisted dehydration of 2-butanol at 220 C. The conversion of 2-butanol and the yield to butene improved when MoO{sub 3} was reacted in the presence of {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The origin of the synergism is discussed. When reacted in the absence of {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4}, MoO{sub 3} got over-reduced and fragmented to MoO{sub 2}. MoO{sub 2} is intrinsically less active than MoO{sub 3} thus explaining that the deep reduction of MoO{sub 3} corresponds to its tendency to deactivate. In the presence of {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4}, the formation of MoO{sub 2} is inhibited with, as a consequence, the absence of deactivation. This leads to the synergetic effects obtained with the mechanical mixture of MoO{sub 3} with {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4}. (orig.)

  6. Catalytic conversion of bio-oil to oxygen-containing fuels by simultaneous reactions with 1-butanol and 1-octene over solid acids: Model compound studies and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Sui, Shu-Juan; Tan, Shun; Wang, Qing-Wen; Pittman, Charles U

    2013-02-01

    Upgrading bio-oil by addition reactions across olefins represents a route to refine bio-oil to combustible and stable oxygen-containing fuels. Development and application of highly active strong solid acid catalysts with good hydrothermal stability has become a key determinant for success, because bio-oil's complexity includes large amounts of water. Temperatures of 120°C or more are needed for satisfactory kinetics. Batch upgrading of a model bio-oil (phenol/water/acetic acid/acetaldehyde/hydroxyacetone/d-glucose/2-hydroxymethylfuran) over five water-tolerant solid acid catalysts (Dowex50WX2, Amberlyst15, Amberlyst36, silica sulfuric acid (SSA) and Cs(2.5)H(0.5)PW(12)O(40) supported on K-10 clay (Cs(2.5)/K-10, 30wt.%)) with 1-octene/1-butanol were studied at 120°C/3h. SSA, , exhibited the highest water tolerance and activity. Upgrading using olefin/1-butanol is complex, involving many simultaneous competing esterification, etherification, olefin hydration, phenol alkylation, aldol condensation, sugar dehydration etc. reactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reichardt's dye and its reactions with the alkylating agents 4-chloro-1-butanol, ethyl methanesulfonate, 1-bromobutane and Fast Red B - a potentially useful reagent for the detection of genotoxic impurities in pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Damion K; Whitcombe, Michael J; McCrossen, Sean; Piletsky, Sergey

    2009-04-01

    Alkylating agents are potentially genotoxic impurities that may be present in drug products. These impurities occur in pharmaceuticals as by-products from the synthetic steps involved in drug production, as impurities in starting materials or from in-situ reactions that take place in the final drug product. Currently, analysis for genotoxic impurities is typically carried out using either HPLC/MS or GC/MS. These techniques require specialist expertise, have long analysis times and often use sample clean-up procedures. Reichardt's dye is well known for its solvatochromic properties. In this paper the dye's ability to undergo alkylation is reported. The reaction between Reichardt's dye and alkylating agents such as 4-chloro-1-butanol and ethyl methanesulfonate was monitored spectrophotometrically at 618 nm in acetonitrile and 624 nm in N,N-dimethylformamide. Changes in absorption were observed using low levels of alkylating agent (5-10 parts per million). Alkylation of the dye with 4-chloro-1-butanol and ethyl methanesulfonate was confirmed. Reichardt's dye, and its changing UV absorption, was examined in the presence of paracetamol (10 and 100 mg/ml). Whilst the alkylation-induced changes in UV absorption were not as pronounced as with standard solutions, detection of alkylation was still possible. Using standard solutions and in the presence of a drug matrix, Reichardt's dye shows promise as a reagent for detection of low levels of industrially important alkylating agents.

  8. Antidiabetic, antioxidant and anti inflammatory properties of water and n-butanol soluble extracts from Saharian Anvillea radiata in high-fat-diet fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandouli, Chouaib; Cassien, Mathieu; Mercier, Anne; Delehedde, Caroline; Ricquebourg, Emilie; Stocker, Pierre; Mekaouche, Mourad; Leulmi, Zineb; Mechakra, Aicha; Thétiot-Laurent, Sophie; Culcasi, Marcel; Pietri, Sylvia

    2017-07-31

    polyphenolics-enriched hydroalcoholic and ethyl acetate extracts, the lyophilized aqueous (AQL) and butanol extracts were not toxic in cells (≤ 400µg/mL) or when given orally in normal mice (≤ 2000mg/kg), exerted a dose-dependent hypoglycemic action in diabetic mice, which was maximal at the dose of 150mg/kg. Upon administering this dose for 12 weeks, both extracts significantly ameliorated body weight control capacity, recovery of plasma glucose and insulin level, reduced oxidative stress in blood, myocardial and skeletal muscles, and improved hyperlipidemic and inflammatory status. Moreover, diabetes-related complications were optimally ameliorated by oral therapy based on halved doses (75mg/kg) of a mixture of AQL and metformin. Current investigation supports the traditional medicinal usage of Anvillea radiata and suggests that both readily accessible and low-cost bio-extracts have the potency to develop an antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic and protective agent against beta-cells and muscle dysfunction at doses compatible with the common practices of indigenous people for the management of metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct and Indirect Determinations of Elementary Rate Constants H + O2: Chain Branching; the Dehydration of tertiary-Butanol; the Retro Diels-Alder Reaction of Cyclohexene; the Dehydration of Isopropanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, Joshua S.

    Due to growing environmental concern over the continued use of fossil fuels, methods to limit emissions and partially replace fossil fuel use with renewable biofuels are of considerable interest. Developing chemical kinetic models for the chemistry that affects combustion properties is important to understanding how new fuels affect combustion energy conversion processes in transportation devices. This thesis reports the experimental study of several important reactions (the H + O2 branching reaction, the key decomposition reactions of tertiary-butanol, the dehydration reaction of isopropanol, and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene) and develops robust analysis methods to estimate the absolute uncertainties of specific elementary rate constants derived from the experimental data. In the study of the above reactions, both a direct and indirect rate constant determination technique with associated uncertainty estimation methodologies are developed. In the study of the decomposition reactions, a direct determination technique is applied to experimental data gathered in preparation of this thesis. In the case of the dehydration reaction of tertiary-butanol and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene, both of which are used as internal standards for relative rate studies (Herzler et al. 1997) and chemical thermometry (Rosado-Reyes et al. 2013) , analysis showed an ˜20 K difference in the reaction rate between the reported results and the previous recommendations. In light of these discrepancies, an uncertainty estimation of previous recommendations illuminated an uncertainty of at least 20 K for the dehydration reaction of tertiary-butanol and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene, thus resolving the discrepancies. The determination of the H + O2 branching reaction and decomposition reactions of isopropanol used an indirect determination technique. The uncertainty of the H + O2 branching reaction rate is shown to be underestimated by previous

  10. A narrow pH range supports butanol, hexanol, and octanol production from syngas in a continuous co-culture of Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri with in-line product extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanno Richter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Carboxydotrophic bacteria (CTB have received attention due to their ability to synthesize commodity chemicals from producer gas and synthesis gas (syngas. CTB have an important advantage of a high product selectivity compared to chemical catalysts. However, the product spectrum of wild-type CTB is narrow. Our objective was to investigate whether a strategy of combining two wild-type bacterial strains into a single, continuously fed bioprocessing step would be promising to broaden the product spectrum. Here, we have operated a syngas-fermentation process with Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri with in-line product extraction through gas stripping and product condensing within the syngas recirculation line. The main products from C. ljungdahlii fermentation at a pH of 6.0 were ethanol and acetate at net volumetric production rates of 65.5 and 431 mmol C•L-1•d-1, respectively. An estimated 2/3 of total ethanol produced was utilized by C. kluyveri to chain elongate with the reverse β-oxidation pathway, resulting in n-butyrate and n-caproate at net rates of 129 and 70 mmol C•L-1•d-1, respectively. C. ljungdahlii likely reduced the produced carboxylates to their corresponding alcohols with the reductive power from syngas. This resulted in the longer-chain alcohols n-butanol, n-hexanol, and n-octanol at net volumetric production rates of 39.2, 31.7, and 0.045 mmol C•L-1•d-1, respectively. The continuous production of the longer-chain alcohols occurred only within a narrow pH spectrum of 5.7-6.4 due to the pH discrepancy between the two strains. Regardless whether other wild-type strains could overcome this pH discrepancy, the specificity (mol carbon in product per mol carbon in all other liquid products for each longer-chain alcohol may never be high in a single bioprocessing step. This, because two bioprocesses compete for intermediates (i.e., carboxylates: 1 chain elongation; and 2 biological reduction. This innate

  11. Effects of butanol fraction of Ziziphus mucronata root ethanol extract on glucose homeostasis, serum insulin and other diabetes-related parameters in a murine model for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-12-01

    Ziziphus mucronata Willd (Rhamnaceae) is currently used in Nigerian traditional treatment of diabetes mellitus. However, detailed information on the antidiabetic potential of the plant parts is presently unknown. The present study investigated the antidiabetic effects of the butanol fraction of Z. mucronata root (ZMBF) in a type 2 diabetes (T2D) model of rats. T2D was induced in rats by feeding a 10% fructose solution ad libitum for two weeks followed by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (40 mg/kg bw) and the animals were orally treated with ZMBF 150 or 300 mg/kg bw for five days a week for four weeks. Food and fluid intake, body weight changes and blood glucose levels were monitored during the experiment while other blood and organ specific diabetes-associated parameters were measured at the end of the experiment. After four-week treatment, significantly (p  0.05) affected by the treatment of ZMBF. Results of this study suggest that ZMBF treatment, at 300 mg/kg bw, possess antidiabetic activity, but could not ameliorate some diabetes-related parameters in type 2 diabetic rats.

  12. Fraction n-Butanol of Radix Notoginseng Protects PC12 Cells from Aβ25–35-Induced Cytotoxicity and Alleviates Cognitive Deficits in SAMP8 Mice by Attenuating Oxidative Stress and Aβ Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lan Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese medicine has been used for Alzheimer’s disease (AD treatment for thousands of years with more effective and fewer side effects. Therefore, developing effective potential candidates from Chinese medicine against AD would be considered as critical and efficient therapy for AD treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the neuronal protective effect of fraction n-butanol (NB of Radix Notoginseng on Aβ25–35-induced PC12 cells, explore the effect of the tested fraction on spatial learning and memory, and characterize the impacts of fraction NB on antioxidant enzymes, Aβ production, and APP and BACE1 expressions. The results revealed that fraction NB could promote proliferation of PC12 cells and protect and rescue PC12 cells from Aβ25–35-induced cell death. Moreover, fraction NB could improve spatial learning and memory impairments of senescence-accelerated prone8 (SAMP8 mice and attenuate oxidative stress and reduce the production of Aβ by inhibiting the expressions of APP and BACE1 in the brains of SAMP8 mice. The result of single dose acute toxicity assay showed that fraction NB had a mild toxicity in vivo. The pronounced actions against AD and in vivo low toxicity of fraction NB suggest that fraction NB may be a useful alternative to the current AD treatment.

  13. Butanol fraction of Parkia biglobosa (Jacq.) G. Don leaves enhance pancreatic β-cell functions, stimulates insulin secretion and ameliorates other type 2 diabetes-associated complications in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Habila, James Dama; Koorbanally, Neil Anthony; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2016-05-13

    Ethnopharmacological surveys have reported that Parkia biglobosa (Jacq.) G. Don (Leguminosae) is among the plants commonly used in the traditional management of diabetes mellitus in Nigeria and Togo. This study investigated the anti-diabetic activity of the butanol fraction of P. biglobosa leaves (PBBF) in a type 2 diabetes (T2D) model of rats and a possible bioactive compound in the fraction. T2D was induced by feeding rats with a 10% fructose solution ad libitum for two weeks followed by an intraperitoneal injection of 40mg/kg body weight streptozotocin and the animals were orally treated with 150 and 300mg/kg BW of the PBBF for five days in a week. Another group of rats was non-diabetic but similarly administered with 300mg/kg BW of the PBBF. Food and fluid intakes, body weight changes and blood glucose levels were monitored during the experiment while other relevant diabetes-associated parameters were measured at the end of the experiment. The PBBF treatments significantly (Pfunction (HOMA-β), stimulate insulin secretions, decrease insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), restore liver glycogen, ameliorate serum dyslipidaemia and prevent hepatic and renal damages compared to untreated diabetic rats. Phytochemical analysis of the fraction led to the isolation of lupeol which inhibited α-glucosidase and α-amylase in non-competitive and uncompetitive inhibition patterns respectively. It was concluded that PBBF possessed remarkable anti-T2D activity which is mediated through modulation of β-cell function and stimulation of insulin secretion and the lower dose (150mg/kg BW) was found optimum for anti-T2D activity compared to the high dose (300mg/kg BW) in this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Otimização da esterificação de ácido hexanóico com n-butanol empregando lipase (Termomyces lanuginosus imobilizada em gelatina Optimization of n-butyl hexanoate synthesis applying lipase immobilized (Termomyces Lanuginosus in gelatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Skoronski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of Lipozyme (Termomyces lanuginosus immobilized in gelatin gel in aliphatic ester synthesis was investigated taking the esterification of hexanoic acid with n-butanol as a model reaction. Conditions were optimized by factorial design and the highest conversion was obtained under the following conditions: molar ratio alcohol: acid of 2:1, reaction time of 48 h and biocatalyst weight of 7.0 g. Under these conditions the esterification yield was around 98 %. The operational stability of the immobilized lipase was assessed and results showed that after 12 batch runs, the enzyme showed no significant loss of activity.

  15. Excess molar volume, viscosity, and refractive index study for the ternary mixture {l_brace}2-methyl-2-butanol (1) + tetrahydrofuran (2) + propylamine (3){r_brace} at different temperatures. Application of the ERAS-model and Peng-Robinson-Stryjek-Vera equation of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattahi, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Bu-Ali Sina, Hamedan 65174 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Iloukhani, H., E-mail: iloukhani@basu.ac.i [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Bu-Ali Sina, Hamedan 65174 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Densities, viscosities, and refractive indices of the ternary mixture consist of {l_brace}2-methyl-2-butanol (1) + tetrahydrofuran (THF) (2) + propylamine (3){r_brace} at a temperature of 298.15 K and related binary mixtures were measured at temperatures of (288.15, 298.15, and 308.15) K at ambient pressure. Data were used to calculate the excess molar volumes and the deviations of the viscosity and refractive index. The Redlich-Kister and the Cibulka equations were used for correlating binary and ternary properties, respectively. The ERAS-model has been applied for describing the binary and ternary excess molar volumes and also Peng-Robinson-Stryjek-Vera (PRSV) equation of state (EOS) has been used to predict the binary and ternary excess molar volumes and viscosities.

  16. nduced hyperlipidemic rats. Methods: Column chromatographic fractionation of butanol fraction of total methanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. yields four sub-fractions (sub-fraction A-D. All sub-fractions tested for their anti-hyperlipidemic activity. Sub-fractions administered at a dose of 65 mg/kg (oral to the Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats and total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and VLDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect and evaluation of Anti-hyperlipidemic activity guided subfraction isolated from total methanolic extract of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. leaves on Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats. Methods: Column chromatographic fractionation of butanol fraction of total methanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. yields four subfractions (sub-fraction A-D. All sub-fractions tested for their anti-hyperlipidemic activity. Subfractions administered at a dose of 65 mg/kg (oral to the Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats and total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and VLDL level in the blood were checked. Results: Sub-fraction D showed significant reduction (P<0.05 among four sub-fraction in comparison with standard drug fenofibrate. Conclusions: From the above study it could be concluded that butanol sub-fraction D of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. not only have resulted in significant reduction in cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, VLDL level but also increases the HDL level at a reduced dose level.

  17. Path-dependent variational effects and multidimensional tunneling in multi-path variational transition state theory: rate constants calculated for the reactions of HO2 with tert-butanol by including all 46 paths for abstraction at C and all six paths for abstraction at O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Sripa, Pattrawan; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-01-14

    Multi-path variational transition state theory (MP-VTST) provides a conformationally complete framework for calculating gas-phase rate constants. For reactions in which the transition state has distinguishable torsional minima (which include most reactions), there are multiple possible reaction paths. In principle MP-VTST includes the contributions from all the reaction paths, and it should explicitly treat the variational and tunneling effects of each path, but in practice one may need to truncate the number of paths included in MP-VTST calculations in order to achieve a balance between computational cost and accuracy. In this work, we present calculations including all paths for two prototype combustion reactions, namely the two hydrogen abstraction reactions from tert-butanol by HO2 radical. For both reactions we included all the reaction paths. Since abstraction at C has 46 paths, it provided a good opportunity to carry out a case study in which we investigated the errors introduced by truncating the number of paths. For the reaction studied, we found that the variational and multidimensional tunneling transmission coefficients are very different for different reaction paths, which provides new evidence that MP-VTST is necessary for treating path-dependent variational effects and multidimensional tunneling. We found that tunneling transmission coefficients can be much larger for higher-energy paths than for lower-energy ones. Interestingly, the simple hypothesis that higher barriers are narrower does not explain this finding in the present case; we found instead that the effect is due to higher-energy barriers having the possibility of tunneling at energies farther below the barrier top. We also show that a previously applied criterion for judging convergence with respect to the number of paths may not be reliable at low temperature.

  18. Engineering Escherichia coli for autoinducible production of n-butanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglong Wang

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: The expression system using Phya is effective in applications that involve expression plasmids as also applicable in ectopic expression as single copy on the chromosome. Results imply that Phya can be subjected for broader application in bioproduction of more feedstock chemicals.

  19. Effects of 1-butanol, neomycin and calcium on the photosynthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that, PC maintained its relative high Pn through the increase of stomatal conductance. It was proved by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) that, when compared with the WT, the stomatal density of PC leaves increased while the stomatal aperture also increased ...

  20. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Biofuels (Ethanol, Biodiesel, n-Propanol, n-Butanol, and iso-Butanol) in Aquifer Sediment (PP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the late 1990s, there was a perception that “green” fuels such as ethanol posed less of a threat to ground water because they were readily degraded. This lead to a conclusion that the transition to “green” fuels would require less vigilance and that the existing level of effo...

  1. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Biofuels (Ethanol, Biodiesel, n-Propanol, n-Butanol, and iso-Butanol) in Aquifer Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the late 1990s, there was a perception that “green” fuels such as ethanol posed less of a threat to ground water because they were readily degraded. This lead to a conclusion that the transition to “green” fuels would require less vigilance and that the existing level of effo...

  2. Bio-based n-butanol prepared from poly-3-hydroxybutyrate: optimization of the reduction of n-butyl crotonate to n-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using metabolic engineering approaches, the biopolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P3HB) can be over-produced in organisms such as bacteria and plants such as switchgrass. Thermolysis of P3HB, either in isolated form or within biomass, yields crotonic acid. It is a potential bio-derived platform chemic...

  3. Patterns from dried water-butanol binary-based nanofluid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Maryam; Boubaker, Riadh; Harmand, Souad; Sefiane, Khellil; Bigerelle, Maxence; Deltombe, Raphaël

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the behavior of evaporating binary-based nanofluid sessile droplets deposited on a smooth silicon substrate at different temperatures is explored. The formation of deposition patterns during the evaporation is studied by tracking particle clusters using optical microscopy. Similarly to evaporation of pure water-based nanofluid droplets, three distinctive deposition patterns are left behind the complete evaporation: a relatively uniform coverage pattern (on a nonheated surface); a "dual-ring" pattern at higher temperature, i.e., 81 °C; and a "stick-slip" pattern at 99 °C. Infrared thermography technique was employed to visualize the evolution of thermal patterns on the surface of the drying droplets. Thermal imaging shows that the evaporation of binary mixture droplets can be classified into three regimes. In the first regime, multiple convection vortices can be observed at the droplet interface, corresponding to the chaotic motion of nanoparticles captured by video microscopy. This flow regime is believed to be driven by surface tension gradients arising from local concentration gradients. As evaporation time proceeds, the number of convection vortices decreases in regime I, and a few numbers of those are left in the second regime. The flow slows down and a rapid transition (the second regime) occurs; this is followed by the last regime. At the two highest temperatures of 81 and 99 °C, the end of the transition regime is associated with the existence of two distinctive counter-rotating vortices. For the third regime, the results from both infrared thermography and video microscopy show identical behavior to those of water-based nanofluid droplets at the same substrate temperatures. This reveals that most of the more volatile component (not all) has evaporated after the first two regimes; hence, the solutal Marangoni driven by local concentration gradients is significantly weakened and has no further role in the flow structure in the last regime. Instead, the thermocapillary effect and continuity are the underlying reasons for the internal flow structure of the evaporating droplets during the last regime. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Anticancer activity of ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicity and antitumor activities of this herb have never been reported. The objective of this study was to examine the cytotoxic and antitumor activities of ethyl acetate and nbutanol partitioned extracts prepared from the rhizomes of this herb. The breast cancer cell lines, MCF- 7 and MDA-MB231 and the lung cancer cell line ...

  5. Anticancer activity of ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-25

    Apr 25, 2011 ... Agapetes megacarpa W.W. Smith, also known as Pratat Doi, is one of the commonly used medicinal herbs in northern Thailand. The water extract of the herb has been used for lactation and body shape- up by gestation women. Toxicity and antitumor activities of this herb have never been reported. The.

  6. A microbial platform for renewable propane synthesis based on a fermentative butanol pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Menon, N; Pasztor, A.; Menon, BRK; Kallio, P. (Pekka); Fisher, K; Akhtar, MK; Leys, D; Jones, PR; Scrutton, NS

    2015-01-01

    Background Propane (C3H8) is a volatile hydrocarbon with highly favourable physicochemical properties as a fuel, in addition to existing global markets and infrastructure for storage, distribution and utilization in a wide range of applications. Consequently, propane is an attractive target product in research aimed at developing new renewable alternatives to complement currently used petroleum-derived fuels. This study focuses on the construction and evaluation of alternative microbial biosy...

  7. A microbial platform for renewable propane synthesis based on a fermentative butanol pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Menon, Navya; Pásztor, András; Menon, Binuraj Rk; Kallio, Pauli; Fisher, Karl; Akhtar, M Kalim; Leys, David; Jones, Patrik R; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2015-01-01

    Propane (C3H8) is a volatile hydrocarbon with highly favourable physicochemical properties as a fuel, in addition to existing global markets and infrastructure for storage, distribution and utilization in a wide range of applications...

  8. Analyse eines membranunterstützten Reaktivrektifikationsverfahrens zur Umesterung von Methylacetat mit Butanol

    OpenAIRE

    Bolivar, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    Die Kopplung von Reaktivrektifikation und Membrantrennung zu einem reaktiven hybriden Trennverfahren stellt einen weiteren Schritt auf dem Weg zu einem intensivierten Produktionsprozess in der chemischen Industrie dar. Bisherige Arbeiten auf diesem Gebiet beschränken sich bislang auf eine Betrachtung einzelner Teilaspekte des kombinierten Prozesses oder basieren auf Modellierungsansätzen, die keine Übertragung auf den industriellen Maßstab ermöglichen. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird daher da...

  9. In vitro antioxidant activity of n-butanol extract of Curcuma longa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidant activity of Curcuma longa rhizomes (Turmeric) has been widely investigated in Asia. This work evaluated the antioxidant potential of Nigerian variety of Curcuma longa with the main hypothesis that variation in plant phytochemicals in type and/or amount is a function of geographical location/soil type.

  10. Enthalpy of dilution of poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether in 1-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Ch.

    This document is part of Subvolume D2 'Polymer Solutions - Physical Properties and their Relations I (Thermodynamic Properties: PVT -Data and miscellaneous Properties of polymer Solutions) of Volume 6 `Polymers' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII `Advanced Materials and Technologies'.

  11. pVT data of poly(propylene oxide) in 1-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Ch.

    This document is part of Subvolume D2 'Polymer Solutions - Physical Properties and their Relations I (Thermodynamic Properties: PVT -Data and miscellaneous Properties of polymer Solutions) of Volume 6 `Polymers' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII `Advanced Materials and Technologies'.

  12. pVT data of poly(propylene glycol) in 1-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Ch.

    This document is part of Subvolume D2 'Polymer Solutions - Physical Properties and their Relations I (Thermodynamic Properties: PVT -Data and miscellaneous Properties of polymer Solutions) of Volume 6 `Polymers' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII `Advanced Materials and Technologies'.

  13. pVT data of poly(ethylene glycol) in 1-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Ch.

    This document is part of Subvolume D2 'Polymer Solutions - Physical Properties and their Relations I (Thermodynamic Properties: PVT -Data and miscellaneous Properties of polymer Solutions) of Volume 6 `Polymers' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII `Advanced Materials and Technologies'.

  14. Enthalpy of dilution of poly(ethylene glycol) in 1-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Ch.

    This document is part of Subvolume D2 'Polymer Solutions - Physical Properties and their Relations I (Thermodynamic Properties: PVT -Data and miscellaneous Properties of polymer Solutions) of Volume 6 `Polymers' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII `Advanced Materials and Technologies'.

  15. pVT data of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate in 1-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Ch.

    This document is part of Subvolume D2 'Polymer Solutions - Physical Properties and their Relations I (Thermodynamic Properties: PVT -Data and miscellaneous Properties of polymer Solutions) of Volume 6 `Polymers' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII `Advanced Materials and Technologies'.

  16. Enthalpy of dilution of poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) in 1-butanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Ch.

    This document is part of Subvolume D2 'Polymer Solutions - Physical Properties and their Relations I (Thermodynamic Properties: PVT -Data and miscellaneous Properties of polymer Solutions) of Volume 6 `Polymers' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII `Advanced Materials and Technologies'.

  17. Modeling the Fate of Groundwater Contaminants Resulting from Leakage of Butanol-blended Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    certify military aircraft and ground vehicle fleets to use synthetic fuel (Bartis et al., 2008; Rodriguez and Bartsch , 2008). The USAF certification...fuels by 2016 (Rodriguez and Bartsch , 2008; Warwick, 2009). At the same time, in order to reduce dependence on oil, the USAF and DoD continue to...on aqueous anaerobic biodegradation bBased on aqueous aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation As illustrated in Table 2-6, based on kinetic

  18. Production of acetone, butanol, and ethanol from biomass of the green seaweed Ulva lactuca

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der H.; Sperber, B.L.H.M.; Houweling-Tan, G.B.N.; Bakker, R.R.C.; Brandenburg, W.A.; Lopez Contreras, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Green seaweed Ulva lactuca harvested from the North Sea near Zeeland (The Netherlands) was characterized as feedstock for acetone, ethanol and ethanol fermentation. Solubilization of over 90% of sugars was achieved by hot-water treatment followed by hydrolysis using commercial cellulases. A

  19. Barley Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS) as Feedstock for Production of Acetone, Butanol and Ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling-Tan, G.B.N.; Sperber, B.L.H.M.; Wal, van der H.; Bakker, R.R.C.; Lopez Contreras, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) represent important co-product from commercial yeast fermentations, including bioethanol, from grains. In view of the current expansion of the bioethanol fermentation process, with the concomitant increase in production of DDGS, alternative applications

  20. Acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of corn stover: current production methods, economic viability and commercial use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Nawa R; Slutzky, Lauren; Shah, Ajay; Ezeji, Thaddeus C; Cornish, Katrina; Christy, Ann

    2016-03-01

    Biobutanol is a next-generation liquid biofuel with properties akin to those of gasoline. There is a widespread effort to commercialize biobutanol production from agricultural residues, such as corn stover, which do not compete with human and animal foods. This pursuit is backed by extensive government mandates to expand alternative energy sources. This review provides an overview of research on biobutanol production using corn stover feedstock. Structural composition, pretreatment, sugar yield (following pretreatment and hydrolysis) and generation of lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitory compounds (LDMICs) from corn stover are discussed. The review also discusses different Clostridium species and strains employed for biobutanol production from corn stover-derived sugars with respect to solvent yields, tolerance to LDMICs and in situ solvent recovery (integrated fermentation). Further, the economics of cellulosic biobutanol production are highlighted and compared to corn starch-derived ethanol and gasoline. As discussed herein, the economic competitiveness of biobutanol production from corn stover largely depends on feedstock processing and fermentation process design. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. [Molluscicide activity of a butanol extract from Phytolacca dodecandra (endod) on Biomphalaria glabrata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, C P; Mendes, N M; Araújo, N; Katz, N

    1987-01-01

    A buthanol extract of Phytolacca dodecandra (type 44) obtained from Ethiopia berries, was tested as molluscicide in our laboratory and in the field. The lethal dose (LD90) for adult snails, newly hatched and egg-masses of Biomphalaria glabrata, in 24 hours exposure, were of 4.5, 23.0 and 102.0 ppm respectively. The LD90 for the fish Lebistes reticulatus was of 2.0 ppm. These results are similar to those of Lemma (1984) in Ethiopia. In two water ponds treated with 10 ppm of the buthanol extract or 3 ppm of niclosamide the mortality rates of B. glabrata were of 84.6 and 100.0%, respectively. Both treatments were toxic for L. reticulatus in the field trials. The possibility of using molluscicides derived from plants is discussed as an alternative for treatment of schistosomiasis foci in Brazil.

  2. 76 FR 25362 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Butanol Fuel Blend Usage With Marine Outboard...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ..., disadvantages, required technology enhancements, performance, costs, and other issues associated with using... authorized by the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986 (Pub. L. 99- 502, codified at 15 U.S.C. 3710(a)). A CRADA promotes the transfer of technology to the private sector for commercial use as well as specified...

  3. Liquid-Liquid Extraction in Systems Containing Butanol and Ionic Liquids – A Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Artur Kubiczek; Władysław Kamiński

    2017-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are a moderately new class of liquid substances that are characterized by a great variety of possible anion-cation combinations giving each of them different properties...

  4. PERFORMANCE & EMISSION ANALYSIS OF CI ENGINE BY USING BLENDS OF COTTONSEED OIL & BUTANOL

    OpenAIRE

    Shivram B. Janjal *, Prof. D. N. Hatkar

    2016-01-01

    With a recent energy crisis, alternative fuel, especially for transportation, has been explored to reduce the consumption of gasoline, on the way of which use of alcohol & biodiesel have been successfully promoted to reduce this uneven diesel -gasoline consumption pattern; whereas, Diesel- Biodiesel& ethanol blends was tested for performance and emission with acceptable results. However, diesel biodiesel-ethanol blends still faces challenges in finding suitable emulsifier, preventing water ab...

  5. Rapid identification of target genes for 3-methyl-1-butanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoondermark-Stolk, Sung A.; Jansen, Michael; Veurink, Janine H.; Verkleij, Arie J.; Verrips, C. Theo; Euverink, Gert-Jan W.; Boonstra, Johannes; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular conditions determine the taste of fermented foods by affecting metabolite formation by the micro-organisms involved. To identify targets for improvement of metabolite formation in food fermentation processes, automated high-throughput screening and cDNA microarray approaches were

  6. In Vitro Antioxidant Activity of N-Butanol Extract Of Curcuma Longa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bulus et al.

    curcumin/curcumin-rich ethanolic extracts obtained from Curcuma longa cultivated in Asian countries with virtually few studies on extracts from Nigerian cultivars. This is important when one considers that variation in phytochemicals such as phenols and flavonoids has been established among same plant cultivated in.

  7. Poly(Amido Amine)s containing agmatine and butanol side chains as efficient gene carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Won, Young-Wook; Ankone, Martinus J.K.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Feijen, Jan; Kim, S.W.

    2016-01-01

    A new type of bioreducible poly(amido amine) copolymer is synthesized by the Michael addition polymerization of cystamine bisacrylamide (CBA) with 4-aminobutylguanidine (agmatine, AGM) and 4-aminobutanol (ABOL). Since the positively charged guanidinium groups of AGM and the hydroxybutyl groups of

  8. Production of longer-chain alcohols from biomass - butanol, isopropanol and 2,3-butanediol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Contreras, A.M.; Kuit, W.; Siemerink, M.A.J.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Springer, J.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Bioethanol is one of the main biofuels capable of substituting petroleum usage in vehicles, and has had one of the largest impacts to date. The first generation of bioethanol production has had a worldwide impact, though it is restricted by energy intensive grain-to-bioethanol production technology,

  9. Hybrid Vapor Stripping-Vapor Permeation Process for Recovery and Dehydration of 1-Butanol and Acetone/Butanol/Ethanol from Dilute Aqueous Solutions. Part 2. Experimental Validation with Simple Mixtures and Actual Fermentation Broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: In Part1 of this work, a process integrating vapor stripping, vapor compression, and a vapor permeation membrane separation step, Membrane Assisted Vapor Stripping (MAVS), was predicted to produce energy savings compared to traditional distillation systems for separat...

  10. Gene expression profiling in persons with multiple chemical sensitivity before and after a controlled n-butanol exposure session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus

    2017-01-01

     min after being exposed to and 4 hours after the exposure. Participants suffering from MCS and healthy controls were recruited through advertisement at public places and in a local newspaper. 36 participants who considered themselves sensitive were prescreened for eligibility. 18 sensitive persons...... fulfilling the criteria for MCS were enrolled together with 18 healthy controls. 17 genes showed sufficient transcriptional level for analysis. Group comparisons were conducted for each gene at the 3 times points and for the computed area under the curve (AUC) expression levels. MCS participants and controls...

  11. Characterization of the effects of n-butanol on the cell envelope of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, Eugene; Pilizota, Teuta; Davies, Philip R.

    2016-01-01

    Biofuel alcohols have severe consequences on the microbial hosts used in their biosynthesis, which limits the productivity of the bioconversion. The cell envelope is one of the most strongly affected structures, in particular, as the external concentration of biofuels rises during biosynthesis...

  12. Binary Solid-Liquid Phase Diagram of Phenol and t-Butanol: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinhua; Wang, Xiaogang; Wu, Meifen

    2014-01-01

    The determination of the solid-liquid phase diagram of a binary system is always used as an experiment in the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory courses. However, most phase diagrams investigated in the lab are simple eutectic ones, despite the fact that complex binary solid-liquid phase diagrams are more common. In this article, the…

  13. Acetone Enhances the Direct Analysis of Total Condensed Tannins in Forage Legumes by the Butanol-HCl Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depending on concentration, condensed tannins (CT) in forages have no effect, enhance, or impede protein utilization and performance of ruminants. Defining optimal forage CT levels has been elusive, partly because current methods for estimating total soluble plus insoluble CT are laborious or inaccu...

  14. Determinação da massa molar por crioscopia: terc-butanol, um solvente extremamente adequado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Anderson R. dos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We intend to divulge an easy experiment that permits the determination of molar masses of various compounds by cryoscopy. The major advantage of this is the use of the tert-butyl alcohol as a solvent, which requires simple apparatus and easy procedures. The melting point of this alcohol is around 25 ºC, which makes it easy to freeze and then melt the solutions. This solvent has a high cryoscopic constant and is miscible with both polar and non-polar compounds. The molar masses of acetone, water, chloroform, dichloro-methane, ethanol, hexane, carbon tetrachloride and toluene were determined. The results were good except for water. Even though there are reliable techniques of molar mass determination nowadays, this method is still frequently taught in undergraduate courses.

  15. The production of butanol fuel from renewable systems using a membrane assisted fermentation system, MBTC DOT-3018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    The U.S. presently imports over 60% of the crude oil that is used to generate most of the 180 billion gallons of gasoline and diesel fuel that are annually consumed in this country. It is estimated that in the U.S., there are at least 500 million dry...

  16. A systematic study of the isothermal crystallization of the mono-alcohol n-butanol monitored by dielectric spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikkel Hartmann; Hecksher, Tina; Niss, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    . An explanation for the difference was proposed on the background of an Avrami analysis and a Maxwell-Wagner analysis. Both types of analysis suggest that the morphology of the crystal growth changes from a higher dimension to a lower at a point during the crystallization. More generally, we conclude...

  17. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Biofuels (Ethanol and Biodiesel) and Proposed Biofuels (n-Propanol, iso-Propanol, n-Butanol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel, are a growing component of the nation’s fuel supply. Ethanol is the primary biofuel in the US market, distributed as a blend with petroleum gasoline, in concentrations ranging from 10% ethanol (E10) to 85% ethanol (E85). Biodiesel, made fr...

  18. Bioconversion of barley straw and corn stover to butanol (a biofuel) in integrated fermentation and simultaneous product recovery bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In these studies concentrated sugar solutions of barley straw and corn stover hydrolysates were fermented with simultaneous product recovery and compared with the performance of a control glucose batch fermentation process. The control glucose batch fermentation resulted in the production of 23.25 g...

  19. Butanolic fraction of Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) attenuates isoprotrenol-induced cardiac necrosis and oxidative stress in rats: an EPR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sunanda

    2015-01-01

    The preventive effect of Moringa oleifera polyphenolic fraction (MOPF) on cardiac damage was evaluated in isoproterenol (ISO) induced cardiotoxicity model of Wistar rats. Male rats in different groups were treated with MOPF orally at the dose of 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg/day for 28 days and were subsequently administered (s.c.) with ISO (85 mg/kg body weight) for the last two days. At the end of the experiment levels of serum troponin-T, creatine kinase-MB, lactate dehydrogenase, content of malondialdehyde (MDA), activities/levels of different cellular antioxidants were estimated in control and experimental groups. Additionally, scavenging potential to the hydroxyl radical of the fraction was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). ISO administered rats showed significant increase in the levels of serum troponin-I, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and heart tissue MDA content. Furthermore, marked reduction in the activities of antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione levels were observed. EPR study showed an increase in signal intensity in ISO-induced rats. Triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining of heart section revealed a marked increase in infarcted area in ISO-induced rats. Histological features of the heart also indicated a disruption in the structure of cardiac myofibrils in these animals. MOPF (100 mg/kg body weight) pretreatment prevented all these adverse effects of ISO. Present results show that the rich polyphenolic content of Moringa oleifera significantly reduced the myocardial damage and decreased the oxidative stress, possibly through hydroxyl radical scavenging activity as evidenced from the EPR spectra.

  20. Synthetic resin-bound truncated Candida antarctica lipase B for production of fatty acid alkyl esters by transesterification of corn and soybean oils with ethanol or butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen R; Moser, Bryan R; Robinson, Samantha; Cox, Elby J; Harmsen, Amanda J; Friesen, Jon A; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Jones, Marjorie A; Pinkelman, Rebecca; Bang, Sookie S; Tasaki, Ken; Doll, Kenneth M; Qureshi, Nasib; Liu, Siqing; Saha, Badal C; Jackson, John S; Cotta, Michael A; Rich, Joseph O; Caimi, Paolo

    2012-05-31

    A gene encoding a synthetic truncated Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was generated via automated PCR and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Western blot analysis detected five truncated CALB variants, suggesting multiple translation starts from the six in-frame ATG codons. The longest open reading frame, which corresponds to amino acids 35-317 of the mature lipase, appeared to be expressed in the greatest amount. The truncated CALB was immobilized on Sepabeads® EC-EP resin and used to produce ethyl and butyl esters from crude corn oil and refined soybean oil. The yield of ethyl esters was 4-fold greater from corn oil than from soybean oil and was 36% and 50% higher, respectively, when compared to a commercially available lipase resin (Novozym 435) using the same substrates. A 5:1 (v/v) ratio of ethanol to corn oil produced 3.7-fold and 8.4-fold greater yields than ratios of 15:1 and 30:1, respectively. With corn oil, butyl ester production was 56% higher than ethyl ester production. Addition of an ionic catalytic resin step prior to the CALB resin increased yields of ethyl esters from corn oil by 53% compared to CALB resin followed by ionic resin. The results suggest resin-bound truncated CALB has potential application in biodiesel production using biocatalysts. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Production of Solvent (acetone-butanol-ethanol in Continuous Fermentation by Clostridium saccharobutylicum DSM 13864 Using Gelatinised Sago Starch as a Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liew, S. T.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Solvent production by Clostridium saccharobutylicum DSM 13864 was carried out in a single stage continuous culture using 2 L stirred tank fermenter with gelatinised sago starch as a carbon source. From the study it was found that the condition could be adjusted to suit for acids production (high dilution rate and high pH or solvent production (low dilution rate and low pH by manipulating the dilution rate and culture pH of single stage continuous fermentation. The highest solvent concentration in outflow (9.10 g/L was obtained at pH 4.5 and dilution rate of 0.05 h^1, which corresponds to overall productivity of 0.46 g/L.h. However, the highest total solvent productivity (0.85 g/L.h was obtained at dilution rate of 0.11 h-1 and pH 4.5, which gave a total solvent yield of 0.29 g solvent/g sago starch. Although the total solvent productivity was greatly increased in continuous culture, the final solvent concentration attained in outflow was decreased by about 53% as compared to batch culture.

  2. Investigation of the Performance of a Ford 4.1 L 6 Cylinder SI Engine Operating on Methonol Iso-Butanol Gasoline Fuel Blends,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    alloy cylinder head, a Stromberg BX carburettor fitted with a 360 main jet and Motorcraft AGR 42 spark plugs (as recommended by the manufacturer) was used...limited amount of testing was also carried out using a variable carburettor main jet to determine the effect on performance and efficiency caused by

  3. Equilibrio líquido-vapor de misturas de álcoois superiores contendo 2-propanol, 2-metil-1-propanol e 3-metil-1-butanol

    OpenAIRE

    Telma Porcina Vilas Boas Dias

    2011-01-01

    Resumo: Os álcoois superiores são provenientes, em sua maior parte, de transformações de aminoácidos durante o processo de fermentação. São álcoois com números de átomos de carbono entre três e cinco, como o álcool propílico, álcool amílico e seus isômeros, responsáveis pelo odor de algumas bebidas alcoólicas. Eles estão presentes na composição do óleo fúsel, que é a fração alcoólica menos volátil obtida durante a destilação do etanol. Embora o óleo fúsel seja um dos principais subprodutos da...

  4. Src/Syk/IRAK1-targeted anti-inflammatory action of Torreya nucifera butanol fraction in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Hong, Yong Deog; Kim, Eunji; Baik, Kwang-Soo; Yoon, Deok Hyo; Kim, Sunggyu; Lee, Mi-Nam; Rho, Ho Sik; Shin, Song Seok; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-07-21

    Seed of Torreya nucifera (L.) Siebold & Zucc is used to treat several diseases in Asia. Reports document that T. nucifera has anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative activities. In spite of numerous findings on its pharmacological effects, the understanding of the molecular inhibitory mechanisms of the plant remains to be studied. Therefore, we aimed to explore in vitro anti-inflammatory mechanisms of ethyl acetate fraction (Tn-EE-BF) prepared from the seed of T. nucifera in LPS-stimulated macrophage inflammatory responses. For this purpose, we measured nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, using RT-PCR, luciferase reporter gene assay, immunoblotting analysis, and kinase assay, the levels of inflammatory genes, transcription factors, and inflammatory signal-regulatory proteins were investigated. Finally, the constituent of Tn-EE-BF was identified using HPLC. Tn-EE-BF inhibits NO and PGE2 production and also blocks mRNA levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in a dose dependent manner. Tn-EE-BF reduces nuclear levels of the transcriptional factors NF-κB (p65) and AP-1 (c-Jun and FRA-1). Surprisingly, we found that Tn-EE-BF inhibits phosphorylation levels of Src and Syk in the NF-κB pathway, as well as, IRAK1 at the protein level, part of the AP-1 pathway. By kinase assay, we confirmed that Src, Syk, and IRAK1 are suppressed directly. HPLC analysis indicates that arctigenin, amentoflavone, and quercetin may be active components with anti-inflammatory activities. Tn-EE-BF exhibits anti-inflammatory activities by direct inhibition of Src/Syk/NF-κB and IRAK1/AP-1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The mechanism of switching from an acidogenic to butanol-acetone fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. Technical progress report, July 1990--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, P.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to elucidate the detailed mechanism by which solvent-forming bacteria such as Clostridium acetobutylicum regulate the well-known shift in fermentation pathway between alcohol-acetone and organic acid production. It is desired to eventually isolate and describe: (1) the regulatory genes and protein elements that determine induction of synthesis of the solvent-pathway enzymes; and (2) how this regulation system interacts with the sporulatin induction and development program and with related pathways such as granulse and exopolysaccharide formation in clostridia. A working model forhow clostridial control systems work can be derived from recent research on stress systems in E. coli and sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

  6. Noble Metal Decoration and Presulfation on TiO2: Increased Photocatalytic Activity and Efficient Esterification of n-Butanol with Citric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 has been widely used as a key catalyst in photocatalytic reactions; it also shows good catalytic activity for esterification reactions. Different sulfated M-TiO2 nanoparticles (M = Ag, Au, Rh, and Pt were prepared by photodeposition and ultrasonic methods. The results show that the noble metal nanoparticles, which were loaded onto a TiO2 surface, slightly affected the crystal phase and particle size of TiO2. Among all the catalysts, SO42-/Au-TiO2 exhibited the best catalytic activity in the esterification reaction for the synthesis of citric acid n-butyl acetate and in the decomposition of methyl orange, as confirmed by a high conversion rate of up to 98.2% and 100% degradation rate, respectively. This can be attributed to an increase in the Lewis acidity of the catalyst and increased separation efficiency of electron-hole pairs. This superior catalyst has great potential applications in esterification reactions and wastewater treatments.

  7. (Vapour + liquid) equilibrium of binary mixtures (1,3-dioxolane or 1,4-dioxane + 2-methyl-1-propanol or 2-methyl-2-propanol) at isobaric conditions[(Vapour+liquid) equilibrium; Cyclic ethers; Butanols; ASOG; UNIFAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Antonio; Lafuente, Carlos; Minones, Jose; Kragl, Udo; Royo, Felix M. E-mail: femer@posta.unizar.es

    2004-02-01

    Isobaric (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of (1,3-dioxolane or 1,4-dioxane + 2-methyl-1-propanol or 2-methyl-2-propanol) at 40.0 kPa and 101.3 kPa has been studied with a dynamic recirculating still. The experimental VLE data are thermodynamically consistent. From these data, activity coefficients were calculated and correlated with the Margules, van Laar, Wilson, NRTL and UNIQUAC equations. The VLE results have been compared with the predictions by the UNIFAC and ASOG methods.

  8. Environmental Risk Limits for alcohols, glycols, and some other relatively soluble and/or volatile compounds 1. Ecotoxicological evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen EMJ; Rila JP; Traas TP; Posthuma-Doodeman CJAM; Posthumus R; SEC

    2006-01-01

    In this report, maximum permissible concentrations (MPC), negligible concentrations (NC) and serious risk concentrations (SRCeco) are derived for the following compounds: 1-butanol, 2-butanol, n-butyl acetate, cyclohexylamine, diethylene glycol, ethyl acetate, ethylene glycol, methanol, methyl ethyl

  9. Bull.Chem.Soc.Ethiop. 1992,6(2) 87—95. THE PREPARATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    copper(ll) chloride (0.01 mole) in 30 ml butanol, a solution of aspartic acid (0.03 mole) in 30 ml butanol:water (3:1, VN) was added ... n 20 ml butanol) was allowed to react with a solution of glycine (0.04 mole in 20 ml butanol) at ca. 60° for 2 hrs. .... concept of lone-pair donation by nitrogen atoms. Lowtemperature studies on ...

  10. Validação intra-laboratorial da determinação do acetaldeído, acetato de etilo, metanol e alcoóis superiores e aguardentes vínicas, aguardente vínicas envelhecidas e bagaceiras por GC-FID

    OpenAIRE

    Luís, A.C.M.; Mota, D.; Anjos, O.; Caldeira, I.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the determination of principal volatile compounds (acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, methanol, 2-butanol, 1-propanol, 2-methyl- 1-propanol, 2-propen-1-ol, 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol) in wine spirits, brandies and grape marc spirits by GC-FID. The method was evaluated in terms of suitability of chromatographic system, accuracy, precision, linearity and detection and quantifi cation limits. The method showed good accuracy for the majority of the ...

  11. Biofuel production by recombinant microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, James C.; Atsumi, Shota; Cann, Anthony F.

    2017-07-04

    Provided herein are metabolically-modified microorganisms useful for producing biofuels. More specifically, provided herein are methods of producing high alcohols including isobutanol, 1-butanol, 1-propanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-phenylethanol from a suitable substrate.

  12. Enhanced Down-Stream Processing of Biobutanol in the ABE Fermentation Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bîldea, Costin Sorin; Patraşcu, Iulian; Segovia Hernandez, J. G.; Kiss, Anton A.; Kravanja, Zdravko; Bogataj, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Butanol is considered a superior biofuel, as it is more energy dense and less hygroscopic than bioethanol, resulting in higher possible blending ratios with gasoline. However, the production cost of the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process is high, mainly due to the low butanol titer,

  13. Yeast genomics on food flavours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoondermark-Stolk, Sung Ah

    2005-01-01

    The appearance and concentration of the fusel alcohol 3-methyl-1-butanol is important for the flavour of fermented foods. 3-Methyl-1-butanol is formed by yeast during the conversion of L-leucine. Identification of the enzymes and genes involved in the formation of 3-methyl-1-butanol is a major

  14. Untitled

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    molecules, work on interactions between isomeric butanol and di-n-butyl ether is presented. 2. Experimental. AR grade 1-butanol, 1-methyl-1-propanol, 2-butanol and 2-methyl-2-propanol (SD. Chemicals) were purified by fractional distillation. Di-n-butyl ether, Fluka, AG. 99%, GC pure, was used without further purification.

  15. Effect of Alcohol Structure on the Optimum Condition for Novozym 435-Catalyzed Synthesis of Adipate Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Basyaruddin Abdul Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B, Novozym 435, was used as the biocatalyst in the esterification of adipic acid with four different isomers of butanol (n-butanol, sec-butanol, iso-butanol, and tert-butanol. Optimum conditions for the synthesis of adipate esters were obtained using response surface methodology approach with a four-factor-five-level central composite design concerning important reaction parameters which include time, temperature, substrate molar ratio, and amount of enzyme. Reactions under optimized conditions has yielded a high percentage of esterification (>96% for n-butanol, iso-butanol, and sec-butanol, indicating that extent of esterification is independent of the alcohol structure for primary and secondary alcohols at the optimum conditions. Minimum reaction time (135 min for achieving maximum ester yield was obtained for iso-butanol. The required time for attaining maximum yield and also the initial rates in the synthesis of di-n-butyl and di-sec-butyl adipate were nearly the same. Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B was also capable of esterifying tert-butanol with a maximum yield of 39.1%. The enzyme is highly efficient biocatalyst for the synthesis of adipate esters by offering a simple production process and a high esterification yield.

  16. Chiral Separation of G-type Chemical Warfare Nerve Agents via Analytical Seupercritical Fluid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    butanol , and isopropanol) and H2O were all purchased from Sigma- Aldrich as Chromasolv-Plus reagents (≥99.9% pure). Bovine pancreas α-Chymotrypsin was...m/z 131). Adduction of frag- ment ions with a solvent molecule is rare under ESI condi- tions, but such adducts have been reported for acetonitrile ...propanol and n- butanol , were also included with polarity ranging from high to low: methanol> ethanol> n-propanol n- butanol > isopropanol for the whole

  17. Biofuels: from microbes to molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    .... The production of different biofuel molecules including hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, higher chain alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives, from genetically engineered microbes...

  18. Gambierol and n-alkanols inhibit Shaker Kv channel via distinct binding sites outside the K(+) pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Morales, Evelyn; Kopljar, Ivan; Rainier, Jon D; Tytgat, Jan; Snyders, Dirk J; Labro, Alain J

    2016-09-15

    The marine polycyclic-ether toxin gambierol and 1-butanol (n-alkanol) inhibit Shaker-type Kv channels by interfering with the gating machinery. Competition experiments indicated that both compounds do not share an overlapping binding site but gambierol is able to affect 1-butanol affinity for Shaker through an allosteric effect. Furthermore, the Shaker-P475A mutant, which inverses 1-butanol effect, is inhibited by gambierol with nM affinity. Thus, gambierol and 1-butanol inhibit Shaker-type Kv channels via distinct parts of the gating machinery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibacterial, Antifungal, and Insecticidal Potentials of Oxalis corniculata and Its Isolated Compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rehman, Azizur; Rehman, Ali; Ahmad, Ijaz

    2015-01-01

    .... The crude, chloroform, and n-butanol soluble fractions showed excellent activities against Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella typhi, and Bacillus subtilis but have no activity against...

  20. Flash Point Measurements and Modeling for Ternary Partially Miscible Aqueous­Organic Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Liaw, Horng-Jang; Gerbaud, Vincent; Wu, Hsuan-Ta

    2010-01-01

    Flash point is the most important variable used to characterize the fire and explosion hazard of liquids. This paper presents the first partially miscible aqueousorganic mixtures flash point measurements and modeling for the ternary type-I mixtures, water + ethanol + 1-butanol, water + ethanol + 2-butanol, and the type-II mixture, water + 1-butanol + 2-butanol. Results reveal that the flash points are constant in each tie line. Handling the non-ideality of the liquid phase through the use of...

  1. Effect of Solvent, Dye-Loading Time, and Dye Choice on the Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rajab, Fahd M

    2016-01-01

    .... The dyes are dissolved in different solvent mixtures, including supercritical carbon dioxide, as well as combinations of more traditional solvents including mixtures of acetonitrile, and t-butanol...

  2. Atmospheric chemistry of HFE-7000 (CF(3)CF (2)CF (2)OCH (3)) and 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluoro-1-butanol (CF (3)CF (2)CF (2)CH (2)OH): kinetic rate coefficients and temperature dependence of reactions with chlorine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Mera, Yolanda; Aranda, Alfonso; Bravo, Iván; Rodríguez, Diana; Rodríguez, Ana; Moreno, Elena

    2008-10-01

    The adverse environmental impacts of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the Earth's ozone layer have focused attention on the effort to replace these compounds by nonchlorinated substitutes with environmental acceptability. Hydrofluoroethers (HFEs) and fluorinated alcohols are currently being introduced in many applications for this purpose. Nevertheless, the presence of a great number of C-F bonds drives to atmospheric long-lived compounds with infrared absorption features. Thus, it is necessary to improve our knowledge about lifetimes and global warming potentials (GWP) for these compounds in order to get a complete evaluation of their environmental impact. Tropospheric degradation is expected to be initiated mainly by OH reactions in the gas phase. Nevertheless, Cl atoms reaction may also be important since rate constants are generally larger than those of OH. In the present work, we report the results obtained in the study of the reactions of Cl radicals with HFE-7000 (CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)OCH(3)) (1) and its isomer CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH (2). Kinetic rate coefficients with Cl atoms have been measured using the discharge flow tube-mass spectrometric technique at 1 Torr of total pressure. The reactions of these chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) substitutes have been studied under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions in excess of the fluorinated compounds over Cl atoms. The temperature ranges were 266-333 and 298-353 K for reactions of HFE-7000 and CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH, respectively. The measured room temperature rate constants were k(Cl+CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)OCH(3)) = (1.24 +/- 0.28) x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)and k(Cl+CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH) = (8.35 +/- 1.63) x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (errors are 2sigma + 10% to cover systematic errors). The Arrhenius expression for reaction 1 was k (1)(266-333 K) = (6.1 +/- 3.8) x 10(-13)exp[-(445 +/- 186)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k (2)(298-353 K) = (1.9 +/- 0.7) x 10(-12)exp[-(244 +/- 125)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (errors are 2sigma). The reactions are reported to proceed through the abstraction of an H atom to form HCl and the corresponding halo-alkyl radical. At 298 K and 1 Torr, yields on HCl of 0.95 +/- 0.38 and 0.97 +/- 0.16 (errors are 2sigma) were obtained for CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)OCH(3) and CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH, respectively. The obtained kinetic rate constants are related to the previous data in the literature, showing a good agreement taking into account the error limits. Comparing the obtained results at room temperature, k (1) and k (2), HFE-7000 is significantly less reactive than its isomer C(3)F(7)CH(2)OH. A similar behavior has been reported for the reactions of other fluorinated alcohols and their isomeric fluorinated ethers with Cl atoms. Literature data, together with the results reported in this work, show that, for both fluorinated ethers and alcohols, the kinetic rate constant may be considered as not dependent on the number of -CF(2)- in the perfluorinated chain. This result may be useful since it is possible to obtain the required physicochemical properties for a given application by changing the number of -CF(2)- without changes in the atmospheric reactivity. Furthermore, lifetimes estimations for these CFCs substitutes are calculated and discussed. The average estimated Cl lifetimes are 256 and 38 years for HFE-7000 and C(3)H(7)CH(2)OH, respectively. The studied CFCs' substitutes are relatively short-lived and OH reaction constitutes their main reactive sink. The average contribution of Cl reactions to global lifetime is about 2% in both cases. Nevertheless, under local conditions as in the marine boundary layer, tau (Cl) values as low as 2.5 and 0.4 years for HFE-7000 and C(3)H(7)CH(2)OH, respectively, are expected, showing that the contribution of Cl to the atmospheric degradation of these CFCs substitutes under such conditions may constitute a relevant sink. In the case of CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)OCH(3), significant activation energy has been measured, thus the use of kinetic rate coefficient only at room temperature would result in underestimations of lifetimes and GWPs. The results obtained in this work may be helpful within the database used in the modeling studies of coastal areas. The knowledge of the atmospheric behavior and the structure-reactivity relationship discussed in this work may also contribute to the development of new environmentally acceptable chemicals. New volatile materials susceptible of emission to the troposphere should be subject to the study of their reactions with OH and Cl in the range of temperature of the troposphere. The knowledge of the temperature dependence of the kinetic rate constants, as it is now reported for the case of reactions 1 and 2, will allow more accurate lifetimes and related magnitudes like GWPs. Nevertheless, a better knowledge of the vertical Cl tropospheric distribution is still required.

  3. Ultrasonic study of molecular interaction in binary liquid mixtures at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THF) with 1-butanol and tert-butanol, at 30°C, over the entire composition range were measured. From these data isentropic compressibility, s, intermolecular free length f, relative association A, acoustic impedance , molar sound speed m ...

  4. Process Intensification of Enzymatic Fatty Acid Butyl Ester Synthesis Using a Continuous Centrifugal Contactor Separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilmi, Miftahul; Abduh, Muhammad Yusuf; Hommes, Arne; Winkelman, Jozef; Hidayat, C.; Heeres, Hero

    2018-01-01

    Fatty acid butyl esters were synthesized from sunflower oil with 1-butanol using a homogeneous Rhizomucor miehei lipase in a biphasic organic (triglyceride, 1-butanol, hexane)– water (with enzyme) system in a continuous setup consisting of a cascade of a stirred tank reactor and a continuous

  5. Antibacterial effects of cyanogenic glucoside isolated from the stem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical contents and in vitro antibacterial effects of the n-butanol column fractions, stem bark methanol extracts of Bauhinia rufescens Lam. were evaluated in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using disc diffusion technique. The n-butanol soluble portion from the stem bark methanol extract was successively ...

  6. Evaluation of In-vivo Antimalarial Activity of Methanol Leaf Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The phytochemical profile of ethylacetate, n-butanol, and residual aqueous fractions of the methanol extract of G. brevis were determined using ... weight) of the ethylacetate, n-butanol and residual aqueous fractions daily, using artemisinin (5 mg/kg body weight per day) as standard drug, over a period of four days.

  7. Nonionic emulsion-mediated synthesis of zeolite beta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    phobic chain of the surfactant, the butanol to lower the interfacial tension, and the surfactant (and butanol) to interact with the aluminosilicate species in solution via van der Waal's forces. The emulsion inducing rapid growth was also reported by Shantz et al when they investigated the nonionic-microemulsion mediated.

  8. Antiviral activity of Conyza canadensis (L.) Cronquist extracts grown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethyl acetate, chloroform, butanol and methanol extracts of the aerial parts of Conyza Canadensis L. Cronquist were investigated for their antiviral activity against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) AD-169 and Cox-B3 viruses by modification of the widely used shell-vial assay. The results showed that butanol and methanol ...

  9. Chemical constituents from the stem bark of Pentaclethra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and methods: The pulverized stem bark of P. macrophylla was extracted to exhaustion with 70% methanol and the combined crude methanol extract after removal of solvent was partitioned with ethyl acetate and n-butanol to give ethyl acetate and n-butanol soluble fractions. Antibacterial activity was evaluated on ...

  10. Ultrasonic study of molecular interaction in binary liquid mixtures at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THF is commonly used for preparation of the Grignard reagents, the most useful and versatile reagents known to the organic chemists. The use of alcohols in preparing a number of compounds like aldehydes, ketones, acids, alkenes, alkanes, alkynes, halides, etc. are well-known. Thus, THF+1-butanol/tert-butanol mixed.

  11. PHASE STABILITY OF MONOATOMIC ALCOHOL-GASOLINE MIXTURES FOR DIFFERENT COMPOSITIONS AND HYDRODYNAMIC CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerian Cerempei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates phase stability for the mixtures of monoatomic alcohols (ethanol, butanol with gasoline in the presence of water. There have been determined the optimal storage conditions of mixtures depending on their composition and mixing conditions. The positive influence of butanol on the phase stability of ethanol-gasoline mixtures was detected.

  12. An Efficient Method for the Preparative Isolation and Purification of Flavonoid Glycosides and Caffeoylquinic Acid Derivatives from Leaves of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Using High Speed Counter-Current Chromatography (HSCCC) and Prep-HPLC Guided by DPPH-HPLC Experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Daijie; Du, Ning; Wen, Lei; Zhu, Heng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Du, Jinhua; Li, Shengbo

    2017-01-01

    .... japonica using high speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) and prep-HPLC. The n-butanol extract was firstly isolated by HSCCC using methyl tert-butyl ether/n-butanol/acetonitrile/water (0.5% acetic acid) (2:2:1:5, v/v...

  13. Saponin-containing subfractions of soybean molasses induce enteritis in the distal intestine of Atlantic salmon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knudsen, D.; Urán, P.; Arnous, A.; Koppe, W.

    2007-01-01

    The current work aimed at tracing the causative components for soybean-induced enteritis in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Soybean molasses was subjected to phase separation using n-butanol. Three subfractions were obtained as follows: butanol phase, precipitate, and water phase. The biochemical

  14. Pre-treatment of lignocellulosic feedstocks using biorenewable alcohols: : towards complete biomass valorisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancefield, Christopher S.; Panovic, Isabella; Deuss, Peter J.; Barta, Katalin; Westwood, Nicholas J.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report on the ability of the biomass derived solvents ethanol and, in particular, n-butanol to fractionate lignocellulose into its main components. An organosolv system consisting of n-butanol containing 5% water and 0.2 M HCl at reflux was found to remove effectively the lignin and

  15. Downstream process options for the ABE fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Anton

    2016-05-01

    Butanol is a very interesting substance both for the chemical industry and as a biofuel. The classical distillation process for the removal of butanol is far too energy demanding, at a factor of 220% of the energy content of butanol. Alternative separation processes studied are hybrid processes of gas-stripping, liquid-liquid extraction and pervaporation with distillation and a novel adsorption/drying/desorption hybrid process. Compared with the energy content of butanol, the resulting energy demand for butanol separation and concentration of optimized hybrid processes is 11%-22% for pervaporation/distillation and 11%-17% for liquid-liquid extraction/distillation. For a novel adsorption/drying/desorption process, the energy demand is 9.4%. But all downstream process options need further proof of industrial applicability. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Anthelmintic activity of Cocos nucifera L. on intestinal nematodes of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, C T C; Bevilaqua, C M L; Morais, S M; Camurça-Vasconcelos, A L F; Maciel, M V; Braga, R R; Oliveira, L M B

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the anthelmintic activity of the liquid extracted from the bark of the green coconut (LBGC), as well as butanol extract obtained from LBGC, on mouse intestinal nematodes. Thirty-six naturally infected mice were distributed into six groups receiving the following treatments: Group I: 1000 mg/kg of LBGC; Group II: 2000 mg/kg of LBGC; Group III: 500 mg/kg of butanol extract; Group IV: 1000 mg/kg of butanol extract; Group V: 0.56 mg/kg febendazole; and Group VI: 3% dimethylsulfoxide. The chemical composition of the LBGC and its butanol extract was determined by phytochemical tests. A dose of 1000 mg/kg of butanol extract had 90.70% efficacy in reducing the mouse worm burden (pcontrol of intestinal nematodes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of isomeric pentanols under elevated pressures determined by the acoustic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzida, M.

    2008-02-01

    Three isomeric pentanols were studied: pentan-1-ol, 2-methyl-1-buta- nol, and 2-methyl-2-butanol. Isobaric heat capacities and internal pressure at pressures up to 100 MPa and temperatures ranging from 293 K to 318 K were determined by the acoustic method. In calculations the measured speeds of sound as function of temperature and pressure together with densities as function of temperature under atmospheric pressure and the literature isobaric heat capacities for the atmospheric pressure were used. To this end, the method, based on the suggestion of Davis and Gordon [1] was applied. The results obtained show that the effect of pressure on and the values of isobaric heat capacity and internal presure of 2-methyl-2-butanol is higher than that of pentan-1-ol, 2-methyl-1-butanol over the whole pressure range. That facilitates telling 2-methyl-2-butanol from pentan-1-ol and 2-methyl-1-butanol.

  18. Effects of substitution on counterflow ignition and extinction of C3 and C4 alcohols

    KAUST Repository

    Alfazazi, Adamu

    2016-06-17

    Dwindling reserves and inherent uncertainty in the price of conventional fuels necessitates a search for alternative fuels. Alcohols represent a potential source of energy for the future. The structural features of an alcohol fuel have a direct impact on combustion properties. In particular, substitution in alcohols can alter the global combustion reactivity. In this study, experiments and numerical simulations were conducted to investigate the critical conditions of extinction and autoignition of n-propanol, 1-butanol, iso-propanol and iso-butanol in non-premixed diffusion flames. Experiments were carried out in the counterflow configuration, while simulations were conducted using a skeletal chemical kinetic model for the C3 and C4 alcohols. The fuel stream consists of the pre-vaporized fuel diluted with nitrogen, while the oxidizer stream is air. The experimental results show that autoignition temperatures of the tested alcohols increase in the following order: iso-propanol > iso-butanol > 1-butanol ≈ n-propanol. The simulated results for the branched alcohols agree with the experiments, while the autoignition temperature of 1-butanol is slightly higher than that of n-propanol. For extinction, the experiments show that the extinction limits of the tested fuels increase in the following order: n-propanol ≈ 1-butanol > iso-butanol > iso-propanol. The model suggests that the extinction limits of 1-butanol is slightly higher than n-propanol with extinction strain rate of iso-butanol and iso-propanol maintaining the experimentally observed trend. The transport weighted enthalpy (TWE) and radical index (Ri) concepts were utilized to rationalize the observed reactivity trends for these fuels.

  19. Syntrophic Interactions Within a Butane-Oxidizing Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Puguang Gas Field in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Deng, Chun-Ping; Shen, Bin; Yang, Jin-Shui; Wang, En-Tao; Yuan, Hong-Li

    2016-10-01

    Butane oxidation by the hydrocarbon degradation bacteria has long been described, but little is known about the microbial interaction in this process. To investigate this interaction, the efficiency of butane oxidation was estimated in monocultures and co-cultures of six strains of butane-oxidizing bacteria (BOB) and a butanol-oxidizing strain. Results showed that the butane degradation velocity was at least 26 times higher in the co-culture of the seven strains (228.50 nmol h(-1)) than in the six individual monocultures (8.71 nmol h(-1)). Gas chromatographic analysis of metabolites in the cultures revealed the accumulation of butanol in the monocultures of BOB strains but not in the co-culture with the butanol-oxidizing strain. These results evidenced a novel syntrophic association between BOB and butanol-oxidizing bacteria in the butane oxidation. The BOB strains oxidized butane into butanol, but this activity was inhibited by the accumulated butanol in monocultures, whereas the removal of butanol by the butanol-oxidizing strain in co-culture could eliminate the suppression and improve the butane degradation efficiency. In the co-culture, both BOB and butanol-oxidizing bacteria could grow and the time needed for butane complete removal was shortened from more than 192 h to less than 4 h. The unsuppressed effect of the co-culture was also consistent with the results of reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) of bmoX gene because increased expression of this gene was detected during the syntrophic growth compared with that in monoculture, pointing to the upregulation of bmoX in the syntrophic interaction.

  20. Estudo do comportamento da lipase comercial Lipozyme RM IM em reações de esterificação para obtenção de biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika C. G. Aguieiras

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study monoalkyl ester synthesis catalyzed by immobilized lipase Lipozyme RM IM via the esterification reaction. Yields of over 90% were obtained with butanol in esterification reactions with oleic acid. In the reactions with deodorizer distillates of vegetable oils and butanol, the conversion obtained was greater than 80% after 2.5 h. For the esterification reaction of palm fatty acid deodorizer distillate (PFAD and butanol, seven reuse cycles of Lipozyme RM IM were carried out and the final conversion was 42% lower than the initial conversion.

  1. Synergic effects in the extraction of paracetamol from aqueous NaCl solution by the binary mixtures of diethyl ether and low molecular weight primary alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, G. M.; Živković, J. V.; Atanasković, D. S.; Nikolić, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction of paracetamol from aqueous NaCl solutions was performed with diethyl ether, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, isobutanol, 1-pentanol, and binary mixtures diethyl ether/1-propanol, diethyl ether/1-butanol, and diethyl ether/isobutanol. Among the pure solvents investigated in this study best extraction efficacy was obtained with 1-butanol. Synergic effects in the extraction with binary mixtures was investigated and compared with some other systems used for the extraction of poorly extractable compounds. Results obtained in this study may be of both fundamental and practical importance.

  2. Production of Antibiotics from Soil-Isolated Actinomycetes and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    butanol, silicon oil, dimethyl sulphoxide. (DMSO), n-hexane, tryptone, lactose, maltose, fructose, yeast extract powder, nutrient agar, agar powder, International ... characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy [13]. RESULTS. Fermentation process. The optimization data for optimum growth.

  3. Antibacterial phenolics from the mangrove Lumnitzera racemosa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, L.; Wahidullah, S.; PrabhaDevi

    Antimicrobial activity of the methanolic extract and fractions of Lumnitzera racemosa was evaluated against fungi, virus and pathogenic bacteria. Crude methanolic extract and n-butanol fraction were ineffective against fungi and virus tested...

  4. In vitro antifungal activities of leaf extracts of Lippia alba (Verbenaceae against clinically important yeast species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Teixeira de Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction There are few studies reporting the antifungal activities of Lippia alba extracts. Methods A broth microdilution assay was used to evaluate the antifungal effects of Lippia alba extracts against seven yeast species of Candida and Cryptococcus. The butanol fraction was investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results The butanol fraction showed the highest activity against Candida glabrata. The fraction also acted synergistically with itraconazole and fluconazole against C. glabrata. The dominant compounds in the butanol fraction were 2,2,5-trimethyl-3,4-hexanedione, 3,5-dimethyl-4-octanone and hexadecane. Conclusions The butanol fraction may be a good candidate in the search for new drugs from natural products with antifungal activity.

  5. Antibiotic activity of two Anabaena species against four fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... Three organic extracts (chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol) of ten cyanobacterial species ... bioactive compounds of the cyanobacterial species, mainly: ..... microalgae in controlling growth of Fusarium oxysporum and.

  6. [Study on ultraviolet-screening effect of extracts from mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn.) pericarp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengzhong; Bu, Qitao; Zheng, Yi'nan; Song, Bo; Li, Wei

    2011-07-01

    To analyze the ultraviolet-screening of the n-butanol extracts of mangosteen pericarp and alpha-mangostin, compare the ultraviolet-screening effect of the extracts with rutin and ultramicro-titanium dioxide (TiO2). The samples (n-butanol extract from mangosteen pericarp, alpha-mangostin, rutin and TiO2) were scanned at different wavelength and Pan-wavelength by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The n-butanol extracts and alpha-mangostin had relatively satisfactory effects on ultraviolet-screening when the concentration was over 0.40 mg/ml and the effects on ultraviolet-screening was better than TiO2. The n-butanol extracts and alpha-mangostin had a positive ultraviolet-screening activity which was better than TiO2.

  7. Characterisation of tequila according to their major volatile composition using multilayer perceptron neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos-Magaña, Silvia G; de Pablos, Fernando; Jurado, José Marcos; Martín, María Jesús; Alcázar, Ángela; Muñiz-Valencia, Roberto; Gonzalo-Lumbreras, Raquel; Izquierdo-Hornillos, Roberto

    2013-02-15

    Differentiation of silver, gold, aged and extra-aged tequila using 1-propanol, ethyl acetate, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-methyl-1-butanol and furan derivatives like 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde and 2-furaldehyde has been carried out. The content of 1-propanol, ethyl acetate, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-methyl-1-butanol was determined by means of head space solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass-spectrometry. 5-(Hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde and 2-furaldehyde were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to highlight significant differences between types of tequila. Principal component analysis was applied as visualisation technique. Linear discriminant analysis and multilayer perceptron artificial neural networks were used to construct classification models. The best classification performance was obtained when multilayer perceptron model was applied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Parasiticidal, antifungal and antibacterial activities of Onosma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... chloroform fraction (CHCl3) fraction > n-butanol (BUOH) fraction > aqueous fraction. Similarly moderate antifungal activity was displayed by the crude methanolic extract against Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium solani. Against the Staphylococcus aureus, the aqueous fraction demonstrated moderate antibacterial activity.

  9. NEW STRAINS PRODUCER OF BIOBUTANOL. ІІ. RENEWABLE LIGNOCELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigunova O. O.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our work was to study generic and specific affinity of domestic strainsproducers, comparative productivity butanol strains-producers screening, fermentation of sugars being a part of renewable lignocelluloses raw materials and to determine the conditions for the butanol yield increasing. The objects of research were strains Clostridium acetobutylicum ІМВ В-7407 (IFBG C6H, IFBG C4B and IFBG C7P from «Collection microorganism’s stains and plants line for food and agriculture biotechnology» of Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. It was determined that domestic butanol-producing strains were relatively more productive and might be promising for improvement technology of butanol production.

  10. Effect of membrane and process characteristics on cost and energy usage for separating alcohol–water mixtures using a hybrid vapor stripping–vapor permeation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Alcohols, including ethanol and butanol, are receiving increased attention as renewable liquid biofuels. Alcohol concentrations may be low in a biological process due to product inhibition and, for non-starch feedstocks, limited substrate concentrations. The result is...

  11. Molluscicidal activities of medicinal plants from eastern China against Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang-xing Han

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In a search for natural products that could be used to control schistosomiasis, nineteen extracts of eleven medicinal plants from eastern China have been tested for molluscicidal activity against snail Oncomelania hupensis. The n-butanol fraction of the fresh leaf from Buddleja lindleyana Fortune, Buddlejaceae, showed significant activity against the snails. Statistical analysis revealed that the LC50 and LC90 values for the n-butanol fraction were 39.91 mg L-1 and 59.28 mg L-1 for 48 h, respectively. Otherwise, the LC50 values for the n-butanol fraction to zebrafish was 403.24 mg L-1 for 48 h. Therefore, the n-butanol fraction of the fresh leaf from B. lindleyana may be a potent and safe molluscicides.

  12. Antiamoebic activity of marine sponge Haliclona exigua (Krikpatrick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Lakshmi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The methanol and methanol-chloroform (1:1 extracts of the freshly collected Haliclona exigua showed minumim inhibitory concentration (MIC of 125 ug/ml and 250 ug/ml respectively in in vitro studies, but when both of these were tested in vivo in rats, only methanol-chloroform showed 80% inhibition of trophozoites at the dose of 900 mg/kg body weight against Entamoeba histolytica. Therefore only methanol-chloroform extract was further fractionated into four fractions (hexane, chloroform, n-butanol soluble and n-butanol insoluble fractions. Out of these, only hexane and n-butanol soluble fractions showed 80% inhibition of trophozoites at 900 mg/kg dose. Further the chromatography of the n-butanol fraction yielded araguspongin-C which showed promising results at different doses.

  13. [Resolution of clenbuterol hydrochloride enantiomers by thin-layer chromatography on silica gel impregnated with beta-cyclodextrin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingang; Huang, Kelong; Jiao, Feipeng; Peng, Xiahui

    2005-07-01

    The resolution of clenbuterol hydrochloride enantiomers was achieved by thin-layer chromatography on silica gel GF254 plates impregnated w ith beta-cyclodextrin. The effect of stereoselective auxiliary (acetonitrile and alcohol) was investigated. Resolution of clenbuterol hydrochloride enantiomers could be attained by using alcohols of butanol, 2-butanol or tert-butanol together with acetonitrile as developing solvent. The optimal conditions of resolution were determined as follows: a plate prepared with 15.00 g silica gel GF254 impregnated with 1.00 g beta-cyclodextrin, acetonitrile-2-butanol (20:80, v/v) as developing solvent and developed at room temperature. Under these conditions, Rf of the two isomers of clenbuterol hydrochloride enantiomers were 0.34 and 0.72 respectively. The resolution was 4.09 with baseline separation and the spots in chromatogram were almost of the same size.

  14. Identification of a new strain of Actinomadura isolated from Saharan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of a new strain of Actinomadura isolated from Saharan soil and ... soil, with strong antifungal activity against pathogenic and toxinogenic fungi, was ... The butanolic extract contained four bioactive spots detected on thin layer ...

  15. Enzymatic transesterification of Jatropha oil

    OpenAIRE

    Garlapati Vijay; Mahapatra Paramita; Kumari Annapurna; Banerjee Rintu

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Transesterification of Jatropha oil was carried out in t-butanol solvent using immobilized lipase from Enterobacter aerogenes. The presence of t-butanol significantly reduced the negative effects caused by both methanol and glycerol. The effects of various reaction parameters on transesterification of Jatropha oil were studied. Results The maximum yield of biodiesel was 94% (of which 68% conversion was achieved with respect to methyl oleate) with an oil:methanol molar rati...

  16. Improving Effectiveness of Bioremediation at DNAPL Source Zone Sites by Applying Partitioning Electron Donors (PEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    VOCs to groundwater. 3 2.0 TECHNOLOGY The following sections provide an overview of the technology (Section 2.1) and a discussion of the...undergoes hydrolysis to form acetate and n-butanol. The n-butanol can then be utilized by fermenting organisms to produce butanoate, acetate, and...effort would require capital cost expenditures; and • Site characteristics – sites lacking suitable microorganisms to ferment the PED and/or sites

  17. A three step approach for the purification of alkaline phosphatase from non-pasteurized milk

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan; Verma, Nishant

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a three step purification of alkaline phosphatase from non-pasteurized milk has been described. It included cream extraction, n-butanol treatment and acetone precipitation. Different parameters such as buffer concentration, temperature, pH, substrate concentration, acetone and n-butanol treatment were optimized to maximize the enzyme activity. The enzyme was fruitfully purified up to homogeneity from the milk, with percentage recovery and fold purification of 56.17 and 17.67 re...

  18. Diversity in Butane Monooxygenases among Butane-Grown Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Hamamura, Natsuko; Storfa, Ryan T.; Semprini, Lewis; Arp, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Butane monooxygenases of butane-grown Pseudomonas butanovora, Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5, and an environmental isolate, CF8, were compared at the physiological level. The presence of butane monooxygenases in these bacteria was indicated by the following results. (i) O2 was required for butane degradation. (ii) 1-Butanol was produced during butane degradation. (iii) Acetylene inhibited both butane oxidation and 1-butanol production. The responses to the known monooxygenase inactivator, ethylene...

  19. Antibacterial activity of Artocarpus heterophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M R; Omoloso, A D; Kihara, M

    2003-07-01

    The crude methanolic extracts of the stem and root barks, stem and root heart-wood, leaves, fruits and seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus and their subsequent partitioning with petrol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and butanol gave fractions that exhibited a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. The butanol fractions of the root bark and fruits were found to be the most active. None of the fractions were active against the fungi tested.

  20. Physico-Chemical Properties and Phase Behaviour of Pyrrolidinium-Based Ionic Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Urszula Domańska

    2010-01-01

    A review of the relevant literature on 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids has been presented. The phase diagrams for the binary systems of {1-ethyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate) [EMPYR][CF3SO3] + water, or + 1-butanol} and for the binary systems of {1-propyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate) [PMPYR][CF3SO3] + water, or + an alcohol (1-butanol, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol, 1-decanol)} have been determined at atmospheric pressure usi...

  1. Separation of Acetic Acid from Aqueous Solution using Various Organic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Zaved Hossain Khan

    2014-01-01

    In the study a model has been developed to separate the acetic acid from aqueous solution by liquid-liquid extraction and find out the proper solvent for this separation. Various solvents such as n-butanol, iso butanol, amyl alcohol and ethyl acetate are used for separation of acetic acid from water. The binodal curves (mutual solubility curves) for acetic acid distributed between water and an organic solvent were obtained by titrating known mixtures of two components (water and solvents) wit...

  2. Heat Transfer of Single and Binary Systems inPool Boiling

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas J. Sultan; Balasim A. Abid

    2010-01-01

    The present research focuses on the study of the effect of mass transfer resistance on the rate of heat transfer in pool boiling. The nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficients for binary mixtures (ethanol-n-butanol, acetone-n-butanol, acetone-ethanol, hexane-benzene, hexane-heptane, and methanol-water) were measured at different concentrations of the more volatile components. The systems chosen covered a wide range of mixture behaviors.The experimental set up for the present investigat...

  3. Molluscicidal activities of medicinal plants from eastern China against Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum Atividades moluscicida de plantas medicinais do leste da China contra Oncomelania hupensis, o hospedeiro intermediário da Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang-xing Han

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In a search for natural products that could be used to control schistosomiasis, nineteen extracts of eleven medicinal plants from eastern China have been tested for molluscicidal activity against snail Oncomelania hupensis. The n-butanol fraction of the fresh leaf from Buddleja lindleyana Fortune, Buddlejaceae, showed significant activity against the snails. Statistical analysis revealed that the LC50 and LC90 values for the n-butanol fraction were 39.91 mg L-1 and 59.28 mg L-1 for 48 h, respectively. Otherwise, the LC50 values for the n-butanol fraction to zebrafish was 403.24 mg L-1 for 48 h. Therefore, the n-butanol fraction of the fresh leaf from B. lindleyana may be a potent and safe molluscicides.Na busca por produtos naturais que podem ser utilizados para controle da esquistossomose, dezenove extratos de onze plantas medicinais do leste da China foram testados para atividade moluscicida contra o caramujo Oncomelania hupensis. A fração n-butanol das folhas frescas de Buddleja lindleyana Fortune, Buddlejaceae, mostrou atividade significativa contra os caracóis. A análise estatística revelou que os valores de CL50 e CL90 para a fração n-butanol foram 39,91 mg L-1 e 59,28 mg L-1 por 48 h, respectivamente. Por outro lado, a CL50 para a fração n-butanol para peixe-zebra foi 403,24 mg L-1 por 48 h. Portanto, a fração n-butanol das folhas frescas de B. lindleyana poderá vir a ser um moluscicidas potente e seguro.

  4. Solubility of esomeprazole magnesium trihydrate in alcohols at temperatures from 298.15 to 318.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhesaniya, K.; Baluja, S.

    2013-12-01

    The solubility of esomeprazole magnesium trihydrate in methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and 1-butanol was determined at temperatures ranging from 298.15 to 318.15 K at atmospheric pressure using gravimetrical method. The highest solubility is found in 1-butanol and lowest in ethanol. The experimental solubility data are correlated by the modified Apelblat equation. Thermodynamic properties such as dissolution enthalpy, Gibb's energy, and entropy of mixing have been determined from the solubility data.

  5. An Efficient Method for the Preparative Isolation and Purification of Flavonoid Glycosides and Caffeoylquinic Acid Derivatives from Leaves of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Using High Speed Counter-Current Chromatography (HSCCC) and Prep-HPLC Guided by DPPH-HPLC Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Daijie Wang; Ning Du; Lei Wen; Heng Zhu; Feng Liu; Xiao Wang; Jinhua Du; Shengbo Li

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the n-butanol extract from leaves of Lonicera japonica Thunb. (L. japonica) was reacted with DPPH and subjected to a HPLC analysis for the guided screening antioxidants (DPPH-HPLC experiments). Then, nine antioxidants, including flavonoid glycosides and caffeoylquinic acid derivatives, were isolated and purified from leaves of L. japonica using high speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) and prep-HPLC. The n-butanol extract was firstly isolated by HSCCC using methyl tert...

  6. Solvation of Nucleosides in Aqueous Mixtures of Organic Solvents: Relevance to DNA Open Basepairs

    OpenAIRE

    Ababneh, Anas M.; Large, C.C.; Georghiou, S

    2003-01-01

    Toward the goal of understanding how open basepairs in DNA interact with their heterogeneous environment, we have studied the steady-state intrinsic fluorescence properties of the purine and pyrimidine deoxynucleosides in organic solvents in the presence of small amounts of water. The organic solvents used in the present study were: n-butanol, acetonitrile, methanol, n-propanol, isopropanol, and isobutanol. For n-butanol and acetonitrile, which have a high degree of amphiphilicity and weak hy...

  7. Concerning 1e- transfer in reduction by dihydronicotinamide: reaction of oxidized flavin and flavin radical with N-benzyl-1,5-dihydronicotinamide.

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, M F; Wong, W. H.; Bruice, T C

    1982-01-01

    The rates of reaction of 5-ethyl-3-methyllumiflavinium perchlorate and 5-ethyl-3-methyllumiflavinyl radical with a NADH analogue, N-benzyl-1,4-dihydronicotinamide, were measured anaerobically in tert-butanol and 5% acetonitrile/95% tert-butanol solutions at 30 degrees C. The biphasic kinetics observed for the reaction of flavin radical with dihydronicotinamide were interpreted in terms of both a 1e- and a 2e- mechanism; the former was found to be inadequate based on experimental requirements ...

  8. Basic Studies Relative to the Syntheses of Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine and Monomethylhydrazine by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-07

    a solution of KOH in n- butanol was carried out in the presence of NH3 at room temperature. The major products were 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, the... acetonitrile , is 2,2-dimethyltriazanium chloride. Mechanisms are proposed for the chloraminations in both solvents. Chloraminations of dimethylhydrazone of...this a precooled solution of potassium hydroxide (0.2 mole) in 150 ml. n- butanol was added. The exit of the reaction vessel was connected to a dry ice

  9. Monitoring of Pesticide Disposal Practices, Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Burlington, Iowa 52600, September 1974 - January 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-15

    6) n- butanol - ACS grade. (7) Sulfuric Acid - concentrated. (8) Deionized H 20. (9) 2,2,4-trimethylpentane - nanograde. 3. EXTRACTION AND...n- butanol and 3 drops concentrated H2SO . Stopper tube and plaoe in boiling water bath for 30 minutes. Release pressure after 2-3 minutes. (2) Add 20...use. Desired activity remains for about 5 days. 4. NONPOLAR ELUTING MIXTURE. Petroluem ether. 5. POLAR ELUTING MIXTURE. 1% acetonitrile , 19% hexane

  10. Screening of some indigenous Qatari medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasneh, Adel M

    2002-12-01

    Aqueous, ethanol and butanol crude extracts of the aerial parts of ten plants exhibited variable degrees of antimicrobial activity against four bacterial and two fungal species. Aqueous extracts had low antimicrobial activity against E.coli, P.aeruginosa, B. cerreus, S.aureus, C.albicans and A.flavus. Avicennia marina (AM) aqueous extract exhibited a moderate antifungal activity. Ethanol and butanol crude extracts exhibited an improved antimicrobial activity. However, butanol exhibited a superior antimicrobial activity compared with aqueous and ethanol crudes. Compared with the standard antibiotics tested the butanol extract had the highest activity. Butanol extracts at 2000 microg/disc of AM, Lotus halophilus (LA), Pulicaria gnaphaloides (PG) and Capparis spinosa (CS) had a very good antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and -negative bacteria as well as moderate to good antifungal activity against C. albicans and A. flavus. Medicago laciniata (ML), Limonium axillare (LA) and (PG) butanol crude extract compared with standard chloramphenicol, tetracycline and nalidixic acid exhibited a superior antifungal activity. Copyright 2002 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  11. Intensified Biobutanol Recovery by using Zeolites with Complementary Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Perre, Stijn; Gelin, Pierre; Claessens, Benjamin; Martin-Calvo, Ana; Cousin Saint Remi, Julien; Duerinck, Tim; Baron, Gino V; Palomino, Miguel; Sánchez, Ledys Y; Valencia, Susana; Shang, Jin; Singh, Ranjeet; Webley, Paul A; Rey, Fernando; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2017-07-21

    A vapor-phase adsorptive recovery process is proposed as an alternative way to isolate biobutanol from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation media, offering several advantages compared to liquid phase separation. The effect of water, which is still present in large quantities in the vapor phase, on the adsorption of the organics could be minimized by using hydrophobic zeolites. Shape-selective all-silica zeolites CHA and LTA were prepared and evaluated with single-component isotherms and breakthrough experiments. These zeolites show opposite selectivities; adsorption of ethanol is favorable on all-silica CHA, whereas the LTA topology has a clear preference for butanol. The molecular sieving properties of both zeolites allow easy elimination of acetone from the mixture. The molecular interaction mechanisms are studied by density functional theory (DFT) simulations. The effects of mixture composition, humidity and total pressure of the vapor stream on the selectivity and separation behavior are investigated. Desorption profiles are studied to maximize butanol purity and recovery. The combination of LTA with CHA-type zeolites (Si-CHA or SAPO-34) in sequential adsorption columns with alternating adsorption and desorption steps allows butanol to be recovered in unpreceded purity and yield. A butanol purity of 99.7 mol % could be obtained at nearly complete butanol recovery, demonstrating the effectiveness of this technique for biobutanol separation processes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Activated Carbon Preparation and Modification for Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuhe

    Butanol is considered a promising, infrastructure-compatible biofuel. Butanol has a higher energy content than ethanol and can be used in conventional gas engines without modifications. Unfortunately, the fermentation pathway for butanol production is restricted by its toxicity to the microbial strains used in the process. Butanol is toxic to the microbes, and this can slow fermentation rates and reduce butanol yields. Gas stripping technology can efficiently remove butanol from the fermentation broth as it is produced, thereby decreasing its inhibitory effects. Traditional butanol separation heavily depends on the energy intensive distillation method. One of the main issues in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation is that butanol concentrations in the fermentation broth are low, ranging from 1 to 1.2 percent in weight, because of its toxicity to the microorganisms. Therefore distillation of butanol is even worse than distillation of corn ethanol. Even new separation methods, such as solid- extraction methods involve adding substances, such as polymer resin and zeolite or activated carbon, to biobutanol fermentatioon broth did not achieve energy efficient separation of butanol due to low adsorption selectivity and fouling in broth. Gas-stripping - condensation is another new butanol recovery method, however, the butanol in gas-stripping stream is too low to be condensed without using expensive and energy intensive liquid nitrogen. Adsorption can then be used to recover butanol from the vapor phase. Activated carbon (AC) samples and zeolite were investigated for their butanol vapor adsorption capacities. Commercial activated carbon was modified via hydrothermal H2O2 treatment, and the specific surface area and oxygen-containing functional groups of activated carbon were tested before and after treatment. Hydrothermal H2O 2 modification increased the surface oxygen content, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, micropore volume, and total pore volume of active carbon

  13. Production of gasohol from isobutanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Z.; Gozan, M.

    2017-05-01

    Butanol is a four carbon chain alcohol compound of a non-polar used as a solvent and as an intermediate in several consumer products. It can be produced from petrochemical process route as well as biochemical process. A common petrochemical route to produce butanol is hydroformylation of propylene as primary feedstock followed by hydrogenation. The increasing demand for butanol and the scarcity of petrochemical basestock has put the urgent need for a renewable resource of butanol production. Biobutanol is butanol produced from renewable, biological feedstock through fermentation of plant materials types of food, non-food and biomass. One isomer of butanol which is more similar with gasoline property is isobutanol. The use of isobutanol is commonly as solvent in coatings industry, as lacquers, melamine or phenolic resin. Isobutanol can be potentially used as a gasoline blending component, and it is better than ethanol due to its higher heating value, lower volatility and less corrosive. A brief review of process technology for butanol production is outlined in this paper. The benefit of isobutanol over ethanol was also overviewed. In order to prove the compatibility on fuel application, the production of gasohol was carried out by mixing isobutanol and base gasoline, then evaluated according to commercial fuel specification. From the research work, it has been shown that the addition of isobutanol in base gasoline by certain volum fraction has met the typical fuel specifications used for spark-ignition engine. The physical and chemical properties of the mixture was quite similar to gasoline 88 and gasoline 92 specifications.

  14. Evaluation of berries of Phytolacca dodecandra for growth inhibition of Histoplasma capsulatum var. farciminosum and treatment of cases of epizootic lymphangitis in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Negesse; Makonnen, Eyasu; Aklilu, Nigatu; Ameni, Gobena

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the berries of Phytolacca dodecandra (P. dodecandra) for its effect on Histoplasma capsulatum var. farciminosum (HCF) and for the treatment of cases of epizootic lymphangitis (EL). Samples were collected from un-ruptured nodules of cases of EL at Debre Zeit and Akaki (central Ethiopia). Mycological culture and isolation of HCF were performed at the Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology. Phytochemical screening was done for n-butanol extract of P. dodecandra to detect alkaloids, saponins, phenolic compounds and flavonoids. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) of aqueous and n-butanol extracts of P. dodecandra against HCF were determined by agar dilution assay. For the in vivo trial, 5% simple ointment was prepared from n-butanol extract and applied topically to 24 (twelve early and twelve moderate) cases of EL. Phytochemical screening showed that n-butanol extract of P. dodecandra was positive for alkaloids, saponins and phenolic compounds but negative for flavonoids. The MICs of n-butanol and aqueous extracts of P. dodecandra were (0.039%-0.078%) and (0.625%-1.250%), respectively. The MFCs of n-butanol and aqueous extracts of P. dodecandra were (0.078%-0.156%) and (1.250%-2.500%), respectively. The MIC and MFC of ketoconazole (positive control) was (1.200×10(-5)%-2.500×10(-5)%) and (5.000×10(-5)%-1.000×10(-4)%), respectively while growth was observed on free medium (negative control). From the total of 24 treated cases of EL, 14 (58.3%) responded to treatment; however, 10 (41.7%) did not respond to treatment. There was no significant difference in the degree of response to treatment between early and moderate cases (χ(2)=0.686; P=0.408). It can be concluded that n-butanol extract of P. dodecandra demonstrates antifungal effects while the aqueous extract shows no antifungal activity.

  15. Influence of Hydroxyl Group Position and Temperature on Thermophysical Properties of Tetraalkylammonium Hydroxide Ionic Liquids with Alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Pankaj; Baik, Ku Youn.; Venkatesu, Pannuru; Kim, In Tae; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have explored the thermophysical properties of tetraalkylammonium hydroxide ionic liquids (ILs) such as tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAH) and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) with isomers of butanol (1-butanol, 2-butanol and 2-methyl-2-propanol) within the temperature range 293.15–313.15 K, with interval of 5 K and over the varied concentration range of ILs. The molecular interactions between ILs and butanol isomers are essential for understanding the function of ILs in related measures and excess functions are sensitive probe for the molecular interactions. Therefore, we calculated the excess molar volume (VE) and the deviation in isentropic compressibility (Δκs) using the experimental values such as densities (ρ) and ultrasonic sound velocities (u) that are measured over the whole compositions range at five different temperatures (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 313.15 K) and atmospheric pressure. These excess functions were adequately correlated by using the Redlich–Kister polynomial equation. It was observed that for all studied systems, the VE and Δκs values are negative for the whole composition range at 293.15 K. And, the excess function follows the sequence: 2-butanol>1-butanol>2-methyl-2-propanol, which reveals that (primary or secondary or tertiary) position of hydroxyl group influence the magnitude of interactions with ILs. The negative values of excess functions are contributions from the ion-dipole interaction, hydrogen bonding and packing efficiency between the ILs and butanol isomers. Hence, the position of hydroxyl group plays an important role in the interactions with ILs. The hydrogen bonding features between ILs and alcohols were analysed using molecular modelling program by using HyperChem 7. PMID:24489741

  16. Gynura procumbens Merr. decreases blood pressure in rats by vasodilatation via inhibition of calcium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    See-Ziau Hoe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Gynura procumbens has been shown to decrease blood pressure via inhibition of the angiotensinconverting enzyme. However, other mechanisms that may contribute to the hypotensive effect have not been studied. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the cardiovascular effects of a butanolic fraction of Gynura procumbens in rats. METHODS: Anaesthetized rats were given intravenous bolus injections of butanolic fraction at doses of 2.5-20 mg/kg in vivo. The effect of butanolic fraction on vascular reactivity was recorded in isolated rat aortic rings in vitro. RESULTS: Intravenous administrations of butanolic fraction elicited significant (p<0.001 and dose-dependent decreases in the mean arterial pressure. However, a significant (p<0.05 decrease in the heart rate was observed only at the higher doses (10 and 20 mg/kg. In isolated preparations of rat aortic rings, phenylephrine (1×10-6 M- or potassium chloride (8×10-2 M-precontracted endothelium-intact and -denuded tissue; butanolic fraction (1×10-6-1×10-1 g/ml induced similar concentration-dependent relaxation of the vessels. In the presence of 2.5×10-3 and 5.0×10-3 g/ml butanolic fraction, the contractions induced by phenylephrine (1×10-9-3×10-5 M and potassium chloride (1×10-2-8×10-2 M were significantly antagonized. The calcium-induced vasocontractions (1×10-4-1×10-2 M were antagonized by butanolic fraction concentration-dependently in calcium-free and high potassium (6×10-2 M medium, as well as in calcium- and potassium-free medium containing 1×10-6 M phenylephrine. However, the contractions induced by noradrenaline (1×10-6 M and caffeine (4.5×10-2 M were not affected by butanolic fraction. CONCLUSION: Butanolic fraction contains putative hypotensive compounds that appear to inhibit calcium influx via receptor-operated and/or voltage-dependent calcium channels to cause vasodilation and a consequent fall in blood pressure.

  17. Simultaneous Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Commercial Alcoholic Beverages by Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Min; Yang, Gun; Kim, Jung Yoon; Yoon, Sang Jun; Shin, Byong-Kyu; Lee, Jeongmi; Park, Jeong Hill; Kwon, Sung Won

    2017-09-01

    A simple and fast method was developed for the determination of volatile organic compounds in alcoholic beverages. Eleven volatile organic compounds (acetaldehyde, methanol, 2-propanol, tert-butanol, 1-propanol, ethyl acetate, 2-butanol, isobutanol, 1-butanol, 3-methyl-1butanol, and 2-methyl-1-butanol) in alcoholic beverages were analyzed with a simple direct-injection method using GC with flame ionization detection. These compounds should be monitored in the QC of production processes because they are detrimental to human health. The method was validated with four types of alcoholic beverages (beers, fruit wines, rice wines, and spirits) to confirm the versatility of the method. Linearity showed r2 values from 0.9986 to 0.9995, with LODs ranging from 0.010 to 1.000 mg/L. Precision and accuracy showed acceptable results, proving the effectiveness of the method. The developed method was applied to 40 commercial samples representing the four types of alcoholic beverages, and principal component analysis was performed to determine profiles of the volatile organic compounds, depending on the type of alcoholic beverage.

  18. Intracellular conditions required for initiation of solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terracciano, J.S.; Kashket, E.R.

    1986-07-01

    The authors investigated the intracellular physiological conditions associated with the induction of butanol-producing enzymes in Clostridium acetobutylicum. During the acidogenic phase of growth, the internal pH decreased in parallel with the decrease in the external pH, but the internal pH did not go below 5.5 throughout batch growth. Butanol was found to dissipate the proton motive force of fermenting C. acetobutylicum cells by decreasing the transmembrane pH gradient, whereas the membrane potential was affected only slightly. In growing cells, the switch from acid to solvent production occurred when the internal undissociated butyric acid concentration reached 13 mM and the total intracellular undissociated acid concentration (acetic plus butyric acids) was at least 40 to 45 mM. Similar values were obtained when cultures were supplemented with 50 mM butyric acid initally or when a phosphate-buffered medium was used instead of an acetate-buffered medium. To measure the induction of the enzymes involved in solvent synthesis, the authors determined the rates of conversion of butyrate to butanol in growing cells. The rate of butanol formation reached a maximum in the mid-solvent phase, when the butanol concentration was 50 mM. Although more solvent accumlated later, de novo enzyme synthesis decreased and then ceased. 43 references.

  19. Experimental investigation on cyclic variability, engine performance and exhaust emissions in a diesel engine using alcohol-diesel fuel blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurgen Samet

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the impacts of using n-butanol-diesel fuel and ethanol-diesel fuel blends on engine performance, exhaust emission, and cycle-by-cycle variation in a Diesel engine. The engine was operated at two different engine speed and full load condition with pure diesel fuel, 5% and 10% (by vol. ethanol and n-butanol fuel blends. The coefficient of variation of indicated mean effective pressure was used to evaluate the cyclic variability of n-butanol-diesel fuel and ethanol-diesel fuel blends. The results obtained in this study showed that effective efficiency and brake specific fuel consumption generally increased with the use of the n-butanol-diesel fuel or ethanol-diesel fuel blends with respect to that of the neat diesel fuel. The addition of ethanol or n-butanol to diesel fuel caused a decrement in CO and NOx emissions. Also, the results indicated that cycle-by-cycle variation has an increasing trend with the increase of alcohol-diesel blending ratio for all engine speed. An increase in cyclic variability of alcohol-diesel fuel blends at low engine speed is higher than that of high engine speed.

  20. Metabolic and process engineering of Clostridium cellulovorans for biofuel production from cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaorui; Xu, Mengmeng; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-11-01

    Production of cellulosic biofuels has drawn increasing attention. However, currently no microorganism can produce biofuels, particularly butanol, directly from cellulosic biomass efficiently. Here we engineered a cellulolytic bacterium, Clostridium cellulovorans, for n-butanol and ethanol production directly from cellulose by introducing an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE2), which converts butyryl-CoA to n-butanol and acetyl-CoA to ethanol. The engineered strain was able to produce 1.42 g/L n-butanol and 1.60 g/L ethanol directly from cellulose. Moreover, the addition of methyl viologen as an artificial electron carrier shifted the metabolic flux from acid production to alcohol production, resulting in a high biofuel yield of 0.39 g/g from cellulose, comparable to ethanol yield from corn dextrose by yeast fermentation. This study is the first metabolic engineering of C. cellulovorans for n-butanol and ethanol production directly from cellulose with significant titers and yields, providing a promising consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) platform for biofuel production from cellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.