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Sample records for buspirone

  1. Compound list: buspirone [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available buspirone BPR 00173 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro.../buspirone.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/buspirone.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ...

  2. Buspirone pharmacokinetics in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, K; Poulsen, H E; Garred, P

    1987-01-01

    was similar in the two groups (0.6 vs 0.7 h), but mean maximum concentration Cmax was higher in patients (18.8 +/- 16.3 s.d. ng ml-1) than in normals (1.2 +/- 0.8 s.d. ng ml-1). Mean elimination half-life of buspirone was greater in cirrhotics, but this difference was marginally significant statistically...

  3. Buspirone is an effective augmenting agent of serotonin selective re ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Buspirone has previously been reported to be effective in the augmentation of the antidepressant effect of serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors (SSRls) in depressed outpatients. We report on buspirone augmentation of SSRls in severe treatment-refractory depression in inpatients. Methods. A retrospective ...

  4. Possible modulation of the antidiabetic effect of rosiglitazone by buspirone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa R. Mohamed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from relative or absolute insulin deficiency with or without insulin resistance. As anxiolytics may have influence on glycemic control in diabetics, the present study was conducted to investigate the possible influence of buspirone in streptozotocin-induced DM and its possible interactions with rosiglitazone, an insulin sensitizer. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (50 mg/kg i.p.. Rats were classified into five groups namely: normal control, diabetic control, rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg p.o., buspirone (20 mg/kg i.p. or combination of both rosiglitazone and buspirone, respectively. All groups received daily treatments for 2 weeks after induction of DM including the normal group which received 1% Tween 80. There was no significant interaction between rosiglitazone and buspirone on the levels of serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide or liver glycogen content. Similarly, no interaction was observed between rosiglitazone and buspirone on oxidative stress parameters including serum malondialdehyde and blood glutathione levels or blood superoxide dismutase activity. In conclusion, the present study revealed that co-administration of buspirone with rosiglitazone does not produce serious reactions and buspirone can be safely administered as an anxiolytic in diabetic patients treated with rosiglitazone.

  5. Buspirone is an effective augmenting agent of serotonin selective re ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    led to a rapid and significant improvement in depression in. 6 of 14 (43%) patients. Conclusion. Despite the limitations of the study design, our resutts support previous work. suggesting the need for further controlled research on the use of buspirone in the augmentation of the antidepressant response to the. SSRls.

  6. Clinical effects of buspirone in social phobia : A double-blind placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    denBoer, JA; Westenberg, HGM; Pian, KLH

    Background: The results of open pilot studies suggest that the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist buspirone might be effective in social phobia. Method: In the present study, the efficacy of buspirone was investigated in patients with social phobia using a 12-week double-blind placebo-controlled

  7. [Clinical potential and possibilities of using buspirone in the treatment of anxiety disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzampaev, A T; Suvorova, I A; Damulin, I V

    2014-01-01

    The article reviews current publications on the epidemiology, psychopathology, diagnostic criteria and comorbidity of most frequently encountered in the practice anxiety disorders: generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder. Special attention is paid to the pharmacotherapy of anxiety disorders in the aspect of efficacy of main classes of drugs, including buspirone. The results of clinical trials of buspirone are presented.

  8. Buspirone maintenance does not alter the reinforcing, subjective, and cardiovascular effects of intranasal methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Anna R; Strickland, Justin C; Stoops, William W; Lile, Joshua A; Rush, Craig R

    2017-12-01

    Medications development efforts for methamphetamine-use disorder have targeted central monoamines because these systems are directly involved in the effects of methamphetamine. Buspirone is a dopamine autoreceptor and D3 receptor antagonist and partial agonist at serotonin 1A receptors, making it a logical candidate medication for methamphetamine-use disorder. Buspirone effects on abuse-related behaviors of methamphetamine have been mixed in clinical and preclinical studies. Experimental research using maintenance dosing, which models therapeutic use, is limited. This study evaluated the influence of buspirone maintenance on the reinforcing effects of methamphetamine using a self-administration procedure, which has predictive validity for clinical efficacy. The impact of buspirone maintenance on the subjective and cardiovascular response to methamphetamine was also determined. Eight research participants (1 female) reporting recent illicit stimulant use completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind protocol in which the pharmacodynamic effects of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 15, and 30mg) were assessed after at least 6days of buspirone (0 and 45mg/day) maintenance. Intranasal methamphetamine functioned as a reinforcer and produced prototypical stimulant-like subjective (e.g., increased ratings of Good Effects and Like Drug) and cardiovascular (e.g., elevated blood pressure) effects. These effects of methamphetamine were similar under buspirone and placebo maintenance conditions. Maintenance on buspirone was well tolerated and devoid of effects when administered alone. These data suggest that buspirone is unlikely to be an effective pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine-use disorder. Given the central role of monoamines in methamphetamine-use disorder, it is reasonable for future studies to continue to target these systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Buspirone, but not sumatriptan, induces miosis in humans: relevance for a serotoninergic pupil control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciullacci, M; Sicuteri, R; Alessandri, M; Geppetti, P

    1995-03-01

    Drugs that act on the serotoninergic system have been shown to influence the pupil size. However, the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor type or subtype that affects pupil diameter has not been defined in humans. With a placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized design, we investigated in healthy volunteers the effect on pupil size of buspirone and sumatriptan, which mainly act on 5-HT1A- and the 5-HT1-like receptors, respectively. The pupil area was measured by means of a videopupillometer before and after a single oral administration of placebo or of three different doses of active drugs. Heart rate and arterial blood pressure were recorded after pupil area measurement. Buspirone (5, 10, and 20 mg) caused a dose-dependent miosis. Sumatriptan (50, 100, and 200 mg) did not affect the pupil size. Twenty milligrams of buspirone reduced the mydriasis induced by pretreatment with homatropine eyedrops. A 20 mg dose of buspirone reduced blood pressure without change in heart rate, whereas buspirone, at doses lower than 20 mg, and sumatriptan did not affect heart rate and blood pressure. This study suggests that buspirone, but not sumatriptan, the selective agonist of 5-HT1-like receptors, causes miosis in humans by activation of 5-HT1A receptors, possibly located in the central nervous system where they inhibit iris sympathetic pathways. Measurement of pupil size seems to provide a valuable and sensitive index of 5-HT1A receptor function in humans.

  10. The effect of Buspirone on symptoms and quality of life in patients with functional dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed masood Tabib

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional dyspepsia (FD is a heterogeneous disorder of yet unknown etiology which causes a significant reduction in the quality of life. In this study, we compared the effect of buspirone as an agonist of serotonin 5HT1A receptor with amitriptyline and placebo on improving the symptoms and quality of life in patients with functional dyspepsia. Methods: This study was a double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial. Using a sequential sampling, patients with the diagnostic criteria of Rome 2 and normal gastrointestinal findings were selected. The subjects were randomly divided into three therapeutic groups receiving amitriptyline, buspirone, and placebo. We used Nepean Dyspepsia Inde (NDI to evaluate the quality of life before and after the treatment. Results: The mean age of subjects was 35.38±12.94 years. Symptom and quality of life scores of the three groups were equal at the beginning but at the end of treatment, these scores were different. Buspirone was more effective than both amitriptyline and placebo in reducing the symptom of early satiety. Buspirone showed a better improvement in quality of life compared to placebo. Both Buspirone and amitriptyline were more effective than placebo in decreasing the symptom of epigastric pain. Conclusion: Our study confirmed the positive effect of buspirone on the quality of life and symptoms (like early satiety and abdominal pain in patients with functional dyspepsia. Since the mechanism of action of buspirone and also the pathophysiology of functional dyspepsia are still unknown, further studies are necessary to clarify every aspect of the disease and therapeutic effects of various treatments on it.

  11. Buspirone Counteracts MK-801-Induced Schizophrenia-Like Phenotypes through Dopamine D3 Receptor Blockade

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    Sebastiano Alfio Torrisi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several efforts have been made to develop effective antipsychotic drugs. Currently, available antipsychotics are effective on positive symptoms, less on negative symptoms, but not on cognitive impairment, a clinically relevant dimension of schizophrenia. Drug repurposing offers great advantages over the long-lasting, risky and expensive, de novo drug discovery strategy. To our knowledge, the possible antipsychotic properties of buspirone, an azapirone anxiolytic drug marketed in 1986 as serotonin 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR partial agonist, have not been extensively investigated despite its intriguing pharmacodynamic profile, which includes dopamine D3 (D3R and D4 receptor (D4R antagonist activity. Multiple lines of evidence point to D3R as a valid therapeutic target for the treatment of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that buspirone, behaving as dopamine D3R antagonist, may have antipsychotic-like activity.Materials and Methods: Effects of acute administration of buspirone was assessed on a wide-range of schizophrenia-relevant abnormalities induced by a single administration of the non-competitive NMDAR antagonist MK-801, in both wild-type mice (WT and D3R-null mutant mice (D3R-/-.Results: Buspirone (3 mg⋅kg-1, i.p. was devoid of cataleptogenic activity in itself, but resulted effective in counteracting disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI, hyperlocomotion and deficit of temporal order recognition memory (TOR induced by MK-801 (0.1 mg⋅kg-1, i.p. in WT mice. Conversely, in D3R-/- mice, buspirone was ineffective in preventing MK-801-induced TOR deficit and it was only partially effective in blocking MK-801-stimulated hyperlocomotion.Conclusion: Taken together, these results indicate, for the first time, that buspirone, might be a potential therapeutic medication for the treatment of schizophrenia. In particular, buspirone, through its D3R antagonist activity

  12. Effect of blueberry juice on clearance of buspirone and flurbiprofen in human volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Michael J; Masse, Gina; Harmatz, Jerold S; Cancalon, Paul F; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Court, Michael H; Greenblatt, David J

    2013-01-01

    Aim The present study evaluated the possibility of drug interactions involving blueberry juice (BBJ) and substrate drugs whose clearance is dependent on cytochromes P4503A (CYP3A) and P4502C9 (CYP2C9). Methods A 50:50 mixture of lowbush and highbush BBJ was evaluated in vitro as an inhibitor of CYP3A activity (hydroxylation of triazolam and dealkylation of buspirone) and of CYP2C9 activity (flurbiprofen hydroxylation) using human liver microsomes. In clinical studies, clearance of oral buspirone and oral flurbiprofen was studied in healthy volunteers with and without co-treatment with BBJ. Results BBJ inhibited CYP3A and CYP2C9 activity in vitro, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of less than 2%, but without evidence of mechanism-based (irreversible) inhibition. Grapefruit juice (GFJ) also inhibited CYP3A activity, but inhibitory potency was increased by pre-incubation, consistent with mechanism-based inhibition. In clinical studies, GFJ significantly increased area under the plasma concentration−time curve (AUC) for the CYP3A substrate buspirone. The geometric mean ratio (GMR = AUC with GFJ divided by AUC with water) was 2.12. In contrast, the effect of BBJ (GMR = 1.39) was not significant. In the study of flurbiprofen (CYP2C9 substrate), the positive control inhibitor fluconazole significantly increased flurbiprofen AUC (GMR = 1.71), but BBJ had no significant effect (GMR = 1.03). Conclusion The increased buspirone AUC associated with BBJ is quantitatively small and could have occurred by chance. BBJ has no effect on flurbiprofen AUC. The studies provide no evidence for concern about clinically important pharmacokinetic drug interactions of BBJ with substrate drugs metabolized by CYP3A or CYP2C9. PMID:22943633

  13. Acute buspirone abolishes the expression of behavioral dopaminergic supersensitivity in mice

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    Queiroz C.M.T.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that rats withdrawn from long-term treatment with dopamine receptor blockers exhibit dopaminergic supersensitivity, which can be behaviorally evaluated by enhanced general activity observed in an open-field. Recently, it has been reported that co-treatment with the non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic buspirone attenuates the development of haloperidol-induced dopaminergic supersensitivity measured by open-field behavior of rats. The aims of the present study were: 1 to determine, as previously reported for rats, if mice withdrawn from long-term neuroleptic treatment would also develop dopaminergic supersensitivity using open-field behavior as an experimental paradigm, and 2 to examine if acute buspirone administration would attenuate the expression of this behavioral dopaminergic supersensitivity. Withdrawal from long-term haloperidol treatment (2.5 mg/kg, once daily, for 20 days induced a significant (30% increase in ambulation frequency (i.e., number of squares crossed in 5-min observation sessions but did not modify rearing frequency or immobility duration in 3-month-old EPM-M1 male mice observed in the open-field apparatus. Acute intraperitoneal injection of buspirone (3.0 and 10 but not 1.0 mg/kg, 12-13 animals per group 30 min before open-field exposure abolished the increase in locomotion frequency induced by haloperidol withdrawal. These data suggest that the open-field behavior of mice can be used to detect dopaminergic supersensitivity, whose expression is abolished by acute buspirone administration.

  14. Flow injection analysis with tubular membrane ion-selective electrode and coated wires for buspirone hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour; Issa, Yousry; Shoukry, Adel; Ahmed, Howayda

    2007-01-01

    New Plastic membrane ion-selective electrode for buspirone hydrochloride based on buspironium tetraphenylborate was prepared. The electrode exhibited mean slope of calibration graph of 58.4 mV per decade of BusCl concentration at 25 degrees C. The electrode can be used within the concentration range 6.3 x 10(-5) - 10(-2) M BusCl at a pH range of 2.5-7.0. The standard electrode potentials were determined at different temperatures and used to calculate the isothermal temperature coefficient of the electrode, amounting to 0.00056 V degrees C(-1). The electrode showed a very good selectivity for BusCl with respect to a number of inorganic cations, sugars and amino acids. The electrode was applied to the potentiometric determination of the buspirone ion and its pharmaceutical preparation under batch and flow injection conditions. Also, buspirone was determined by conductimetric titrations. Graphite rod, copper and silver coated wire electrodes were prepared and characterized as sensors for the drug under investigation.

  15. Changes in cognitive symptoms after a buspirone-melatonin combination treatment for Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targum, Steven D; Wedel, Pamela C; Fava, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive deficits are often associated with acute depressive episodes and contribute to the functional impairment seen in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Many patients sustain residual cognitive deficits after treatment that may be independent of the core MDD disorder. We tracked changes in cognitive deficits relative to antidepressant treatment response using the patient self-rated Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire (MGH-CPFQ) during a 6-week, double-blind trial of a combination antidepressant treatment (buspirone 15 mg with melatonin-SR 3 mg) versus buspirone (15 mg) monotherapy versus placebo in MDD patients with acute depressive episodes. The CPFQ includes distinct cognitive and physical functioning dimension subscales. Treatment response was determined using the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDSc30). Treatment responders improved significantly more on the total CPFQ than non-responders (p cognitive dimension of the CPFQ score favored the combination treatment over the other two groups (ANCOVA: p = 0.050). Among the treatment non-responders, the effect size for the CPFQ cognitive dimension was 0.603 favoring the combination treatment over the over two groups and 0.113 for the CPFQ physical dimension. These preliminary findings suggest that a combination of buspirone with melatonin may benefit cognitive function distinct from mood symptoms and that some aspects of cognition may be specific targets for treatment within a population of patients with MDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Outcomes on the pharmacopsychometric triangle in bupropion-SR vs. buspirone augmentation of citalopram in the STAR*D trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P; Fava, Maurizio; Trivedi, M H

    2012-01-01

    Bech P, Fava M, Trivedi MH, Wisniewski SR, Rush AJ. Outcomes on the pharmacopsychometric triangle in bupropion-SR vs. buspirone augmentation of citalopram in the STAR*D trial. Objective: To compare within the framework of a novel pharmacopsychometric triangle, augmentation treatment with bupropion...... intention to treat sample was used. Results: Within the pharmacopsychometric triangle, bupropion-SR (sustained release) was superior to buspirone when augmented to the current citalopram treatment. Thus, in the domain of pure antidepressive effect, bupropion-SR was superior (P = 0.05) on the HAM-D(6) , IDS......-C(6) , and IDS-C(30) , but not on the HAM-D(17) . In the domain of side effects, the total scores on the Patient Rated Inventory of Side Effects (PRISE) were reduced significantly more by bupropion-SR than by buspirone (P = 0.03). In the domain of quality of life, the total scores on the Quality...

  17. Buspirone versus methylphenidate in the treatment of children with attention- deficit/ hyperactivity disorder: randomized double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Hafezi, Poopak; Galeiha, Ali; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2012-01-01

    A recent randomized clinical trial showed buspirone efficacy in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. However, results from a recent multi-site controlled clinical trial of transdermal buspirone failed to separate it from placebo in a large sample of children with ADHD. Therefore, due to these inconsistent findings, this study was designed to assess the efficacy of buspirone in the treatment of children with ADHD compared to methylphenidate in a double blind randomized clinical trial. Forty outpatients with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of ADHD were study population of this trial. Subjects were recruited from an outpatient child and adolescent clinic for a 6 week double blind, randomized clinical trial. All study subjects were randomly assigned to receive treatment using tablet of buspirone at a dose of 20-30 mg/day depending on weight (20 mg/day for 30kg) (group 1) or methylphenidate at a dose of 20-30 mg/day depending on weight (20 mg/day for 30kg (group 2) for a 6 week double blind, randomized clinical trial. The principal measure of outcome was the Teacher and Parent ADHD Rating Scale IV. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 21 and 42 days after the medication started. Significant differences were observed between the two groups on the Parent and Teacher Rating Scale scores. The changes at the endpoint compared to baseline were: -8.95±8.73 (mean±SD) and -15.60±7.81 (mean±SD) for buspirone and methyphenidate, for Parent ADHD Rating Scale. The changes at the endpoint compared to baseline were: -9.80 ±7.06 (mean±SD) and -22.40±9.90 (mean±SD) for buspirone and methyphenidate, respectively for Teacher ADHD Rating Scale. The difference between the buspirone and methylphenidate groups in the frequency of side effects was not significant except for decreased appetite, headache and insomnia that were observed more frequently in the methylphenidate group. The results of this study suggest that administration of buspirone was

  18. Buspirone Versus Methylphenidate in the Treatment of Children with Attention- Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder: Randomized Double-Blind Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Akhondzadeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A recent randomized clinical trial showed buspirone efficacy in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in children. However, results from a recent multi-site controlled clinical trial of transdermal buspirone failed to separate it from placebo in a large sample of children with ADHD. Therefore, due to these inconsistent findings, this study was designed to assess the efficacy of buspirone in the treatment of children with ADHD compared to methylphenidate in a double blind randomized clinical trial. Forty outpatients with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of ADHD were study population of this trial. Subjects were recruited from an outpatient child and adolescent clinic for a 6 week double blind, randomized clinical trial. All study subjects were randomly assigned to receive treatment using tablet of buspirone at a dose of 20-30 mg/day depending on weight (20 mg/day for 30kg (group 1 or methylphenidate at a dose of 20-30 mg/day depending on weight (20 mg/day for 30kg (group 2 for a 6 week double blind, randomized clinical trial. The principal measure of outcome was the Teacher and Parent ADHD Rating Scale IV. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 21 and 42 days after the medication started. Significant differences were observed between the two groups on the Parent and Teacher Rating Scale scores. The changes at the endpoint compared to baseline were: -8.95±8.73 (mean±SD and -15.60±7.81 (mean±SD for buspirone and methyphenidate, for Parent ADHD Rating Scale. The changes at the endpoint compared to baseline were: -9.80 ±7.06 (mean±SD and -22.40±9.90 (mean±SD for buspirone and methyphenidate, respectively for Teacher ADHD Rating Scale. The difference between the buspirone and methylphenidate groups in the frequency of side effects was not significant except for decreased appetite, headache and insomnia that were observed more frequently in the methylphenidate group. The results of this study suggest that administration of

  19. Efficacy of Low-Dose Buspirone for Restricted and Repetitive Behavior in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugani, Diane C; Chugani, Harry T; Wiznitzer, Max; Parikh, Sumit; Evans, Patricia A; Hansen, Robin L; Nass, Ruth; Janisse, James J; Dixon-Thomas, Pamela; Behen, Michael; Rothermel, Robert; Parker, Jacqueline S; Kumar, Ajay; Muzik, Otto; Edwards, David J; Hirtz, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    To determine safety and efficacy of the 5HT1A serotonin partial agonist buspirone on core autism and associated features in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Children 2-6 years of age with ASD (N = 166) were randomized to receive placebo or 2.5 or 5.0 mg of buspirone twice daily. The primary objective was to evaluate the effects of 24 weeks of buspirone on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) Composite Total Score. Secondary objectives included evaluating the effects of buspirone on social competence, repetitive behaviors, language, sensory dysfunction, and anxiety and to assess side effects. Positron emission tomography measures of tryptophan metabolism and blood serotonin concentrations were assessed as predictors of buspirone efficacy. There was no difference in the ADOS Composite Total Score between baseline and 24 weeks among the 3 treatment groups (P = .400); however, the ADOS Restricted and Repetitive Behavior score showed a time-by-treatment effect (P = .006); the 2.5-mg buspirone group showed significant improvement (P = .003), whereas placebo and 5.0-mg buspirone groups showed no change. Children in the 2.5-mg buspirone group were more likely to improve if they had fewer foci of increased brain tryptophan metabolism on positron emission tomography (P = .018) or if they showed normal levels of blood serotonin (P = .044). Adverse events did not differ significantly among treatment groups. Treatment with 2.5 mg of buspirone in young children with ASD might be a useful adjunct therapy to target restrictive and repetitive behaviors in conjunction with behavioral interventions. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00873509. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inflammatory Pain and Corticosterone Response in Infant Rats: Effect of 5-HT1A Agonist Buspirone Prior to Gestational Stress

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    Irina P. Butkevich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our researches have shown that gestational stress causes exacerbation of inflammatory pain in the offspring; the maternal 5-HT1A agonist buspirone before the stress prevents the adverse effect. The serotonergic system and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis are closely interrelated. However, interrelations between inflammatory pain and the HPA axis during the hyporeactive period of the latter have not been studied. The present research demonstrates that formalin-induced pain causes a gradual and prolonged increase in plasma corticosterone level in 7-day-old male rats; twenty-four hours after injection of formalin, the basal corticosterone level still exceeds the initial basal corticosterone value. Chronic treatments of rat dams with buspirone before restraint stress during gestation normalize in the offspring pain-like behavior and induce during the acute phase in the formalin test the stronger corticosterone increase as compared to the stress hormonal elevation in animals with other prenatal treatments. Negative correlation between plasma corticosterone level and the number of flexes+shakes is revealed in buspirone+stress rats. The new data enhance the idea about relativity of the HPA axis hyporeactive period and suggest that maternal buspirone prior to stress during gestation may enhance an adaptive mechanism of the inflammatory nociceptive system in the infant male offspring through activation of the HPA axis peripheral link.

  1. Outcomes on the pharmacopsychometric triangle in bupropion-SR vs. buspirone augmentation of citalopram in the STAR*D trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, P; Fava, M; Trivedi, M H; Wisniewski, S R; Rush, A J

    2012-04-01

    To compare within the framework of a novel pharmacopsychometric triangle, augmentation treatment with bupropion vs. buspirone in the acute therapy of major depression in the STAR*D study. The triangle provides a composite view in three domains of antidepressive activity, side effects, and quality of life. Within the pharmacopsychometric triangle, the short six-item subscales of the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D(17)) and of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C(30)), referred to as HAM-D(6) and IDS-C(6), were focussed on pure antidepressive effect. Side-effects (tolerable vs. intolerable) and quality of life were measured using patient-administered questionnaires. A modified intention to treat sample was used. Within the pharmacopsychometric triangle, bupropion-SR (sustained release) was superior to buspirone when augmented to the current citalopram treatment. Thus, in the domain of pure antidepressive effect, bupropion-SR was superior (P = 0.05) on the HAM-D(6), IDS-C(6), and IDS-C(30), but not on the HAM-D(17). In the domain of side effects, the total scores on the Patient Rated Inventory of Side Effects (PRISE) were reduced significantly more by bupropion-SR than by buspirone (P = 0.03). In the domain of quality of life, the total scores on the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (QLES-Q) showed a trend (P = 0.10) from baseline to endpoint of a superiority for bupropion-SR compared with buspirone. In all domains of the pharmacopsychometric triangle, bupropion-SR was superior to buspirone as augmentation therapy in depressed outpatients not responding to citalopram. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Decision time and perseveration of adolescent rats in the T-maze are affected differentially by buspirone and independent of 5-HT-1A expression.

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    Rhoads, Dennis E; Grimes, Nicole; Kaushal, Sunaina; Mallari, Janine; Orlando, Krystal

    2012-07-01

    Disruption of spontaneous alternation behavior (SAB) by the serotonin 1A (5-HT-1A) receptor agonist, 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetraline (8-OH-DPAT), results in repetitive behaviors that have been used to model the perseveration and indecisiveness of human obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In the present study, we compared the effects of buspirone to those of 8-OH-DPAT in two strains of adolescent rats and analyzed repetitive choices of arms of the maze and prolonged apparent decision time due to induction of vicarious trial and error (VTE) behavior. In adolescent Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, 8-OH-DPAT induced repetitive choices of arms of the maze (perseveration) and increased the apparent decision time. Buspirone induced VTE behavior and increased apparent decision time without perseveration. This distinct effect of buspirone was seen in SD adolescents but not in Long-Evans (LE) adolescents which appeared to be insensitive to buspirone. Lack of responsiveness to buspirone was dependent on the developmental stage because buspirone induced VTE behavior and prolonged decision time in LE adults. Western blotting of brain 5-HT-1A receptors showed expression of receptor protein in adolescent LE brain was comparable to that of adolescent SD and adult LE. The 5-HT-1A antagonist WAY 100365 blocked the effect 8-OH-DPAT on repetitive choice of arms but not the effect of buspirone on VTE behavior. We conclude that the adolescent LE rat has normal levels of 5-HT-1A receptor and that the effect of buspirone on VTE behavior is not mediated by the 5-HT-1A receptor. The LE strain may provide a useful system for further study of the adolescent brain and potential genetic differences in induction of repetitive behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of buspirone for relapse-prevention in adults with cocaine dependence: an efficacy trial conducted in the real world.

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    Winhusen, Theresa; Brady, Kathleen T; Stitzer, Maxine; Woody, George; Lindblad, Robert; Kropp, Frankie; Brigham, Gregory; Liu, David; Sparenborg, Steven; Sharma, Gaurav; Vanveldhuisen, Paul; Adinoff, Bryon; Somoza, Eugene

    2012-09-01

    Cocaine dependence is a significant public health problem for which there are currently no FDA-approved medications. Hence, identifying candidate compounds and employing an efficient evaluation process is crucial. This paper describes key design decisions made for a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) study that uses a novel two-stage process to evaluate buspirone (60 mg/day) for cocaine-relapse prevention. The study includes pilot (N=60) and full-scale (estimated N=264) trials. Both trials will be randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled and both will enroll treatment-seeking cocaine-dependent participants engaged in inpatient/residential treatment and scheduled for outpatient treatment post-discharge. All participants will receive contingency management in which incentives are given for medication adherence as evaluated by the Medication Events Monitoring System (MEMS). The primary outcome measure is maximum days of continuous cocaine abstinence, as assessed by twice-weekly urine drug screens (UDS) and self-report, during the 15-week outpatient treatment phase. Drug-abuse outcomes include cocaine use as assessed by UDS and self-report of cocaine use, other substance use as assessed by UDS and self-report of substance use (i.e., alcohol and/or illicit drugs), cocaine bingeing, HIV risk behavior, quality of life, functioning, and substance abuse treatment attendance. Unique aspects of the study include conducting an efficacy trial in community treatment programs, a two-stage process to efficiently evaluate buspirone, and an evaluation of mediators by which buspirone might exert a beneficial effect on relapse prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of buspirone and the dopamine D3 receptor compound PG619 on cocaine and methamphetamine self-administration in rhesus monkeys using a food-drug choice paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, William S; Banala, Ashwini K; Newman, Amy H; Nader, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    The dopamine (DA) D2 and D3 receptors have been associated with cocaine abuse. A recent study with the D3 receptor (D3R) partial agonist PG619 found that it attenuated cocaine-induced reinstatement and the D2-like receptor antagonist buspirone has shown positive outcomes in two studies of cocaine abuse in monkeys. However, a recent clinical trial indicated that buspirone did not improve abstinence in treatment-seeking cocaine abusers. The objective of the study was to examine PG619 and buspirone under a food-drug choice paradigm in order to better model the clinical findings. In addition, we extended the characterization of both compounds to include methamphetamine (MA) self-administration (SA). Six adult male rhesus monkeys were trained to respond under a concurrent food (1.0-g pellets) and drug (0.01-0.3 mg/kg/injection cocaine or MA) choice paradigm in which complete SA dose-response curves were determined each session (N = 3/group). Monkeys received 5 days of treatment with either PG619 (0.1-3.0 mg/kg, i.v.) or buspirone (0.01-1.0 mg/kg, i.m.). In a follow-up study, the SA doses were reduced (0.003-0.1 mg/kg/injection) to increase reinforcement frequency and buspirone was retested. PG619 did not affect cocaine or MA choice, while buspirone increased low-dose cocaine choice. Changing the SA doses increased the number of reinforcers received each session, but buspirone did not decrease drug choice. Consistent with clinical findings, these results do not support the use of buspirone for psychostimulant abuse and suggest that food-drug choice paradigms may have greater predictive validity than the use of other schedules of reinforcement.

  5. Effect of the 5-HT(1A) partial agonist buspirone on regional brain electrical activity in man: a functional neuroimaging study using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderer, P; Saletu, B; Pascual-Marqui, R D

    2000-12-04

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, the effects of 20 mg buspirone - a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist - on regional electrical generators within the human brain were investigated utilizing three-dimensional EEG tomography. Nineteen-channel vigilance-controlled EEG recordings were carried out in 20 healthy subjects before and 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after drug intake. Low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA; Key Institute for Brain-Mind Research, software: http://www.keyinst.unizh.ch) was computed from spectrally analyzed EEG data, and differences between drug- and placebo-induced changes were displayed as statistical parametric maps. Data were registered to the Talairach-Tournoux human brain atlas available as a digitized MRI (McConnell Brain Imaging Centre: http://www.bic.mni.mcgill.ca). At the pharmacodynamic peak (1st hour), buspirone increased theta and decreased fast alpha and beta sources. Areas of theta increase were mainly the left temporo-occipito-parietal and left prefrontal cortices, which is consistent with PET studies on buspirone-induced decreases in regional cerebral blood flow and fenfluramine-induced serotonin activation demonstrated by changes in regional cerebral glucose metabolism. In later hours (8th hour) with lower buspirone plasma levels, delta, theta, slow alpha and fast beta decreased, predominantly in the prefrontal and anterior limbic lobe. Whereas the results of the 1st hour speak for a slight CNS sedation (more in the sense of relaxation), those obtained in the 8th hour indicate activation. Thus, LORETA may provide useful and direct information on drug-induced changes in central nervous system function in man.

  6. Effect of the serotonin receptor agonist, buspirone, on immune function in HIV-infected individuals: a six-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Benfield, Thomas; Axen, T E

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Previous studies have shown that agents modulating the cAMP/PKA pathway have a beneficial effect on immune reconstitution in HIV-infected individuals. Here we evaluate the effect of buspirone on immune function as measured by CD4 and CD8 T-cell counts, CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio, HIV viral load......, and response to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) in antiretroviral naive HIV-1-infected individuals. METHOD: Twenty-three HIV-infected patients with CD4 T-cell counts above 300 per microL were enrolled in a 6-month double-blinded placebo controlled trial. No patients received antiretroviral therapy during the study...... to placebo-treated patients was observed. There were no significant differences in CD4 T-cell counts, HIV viral load, or proliferative response to PWM between those receiving placebo and those receiving buspirone. CONCLUSION: Buspirone treatment leads to significant changes in CD8 T-cell count and in CD4/CD8...

  7. Treatment of Anxiety Disorders and Comorbid Alcohol Abuse with Buspirone in a Patient with Antidepressant-Induced Platelet Dysfunction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mazhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of abnormal bleeding with serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been known, but there is insufficient evidence base to guide pharmacological treatment of anxiety in patients with underlying haematological conditions. The following case report is about a 50-year-old female with generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, and alcohol abuse where pharmacological treatment of anxiety symptoms has been difficult as it would lead to bruising due to the patient’s underlying qualitative platelet dysfunction. Treatment with venlafaxine, citalopram, escitalopram, and clomipramine resulted in improvement and anxiety symptoms, as well as reduction in alcohol use, but pharmacological treatment has to be discontinued because of bruising and hematomas. In view of an active substance use disorder, benzodiazepines were avoided as a treatment option. The patient’s anxiety symptoms and comorbid alcohol abuse responded well to pharmacological treatment with buspirone which gradually titrated up to a dose of 30 mg BID. Patient was followed for around a six-month period while she was on buspirone before being discharged to family doctor’s care. Buspirone is unlikely to have a significant effect on platelet serotonin transponder and could be an effective alternative for pharmacological treatment of anxiety in patients with a bleeding diathesis.

  8. Different MK-801 administration schedules induce mild to severe learning impairments in an operant conditioning task: role of buspirone and risperidone in ameliorating these cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Frick, Luciana Romina; Bernardez-Vidal, Micaela; Zanutto, Bonifacio Silvano

    2013-11-15

    Blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) by the noncompetitive NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK-801 produces behavioral abnormalities and alterations in prefrontal cortex (PFC) functioning. Due to the critical role of the PFC in operant conditioning task learning, we evaluated the effects of acute, repeated postnatal injections of MK-801 (0.1mg/kg) on learning performance. We injected Long-Evans rats i.p. with MK-801 (0.1mg/kg) using three different administration schedules: injection 40 min before beginning the task (during) (n=12); injection twice daily for six consecutive days prior to beginning the experimental procedures (prior) (n=12); or twice daily subcutaneous injections from postnatal day 7 to 11 (postnatal) (n=12). Next, we orally administered risperidone (serotonin receptor 2A and dopamine receptor 2 antagonist, 1mg/kg) or buspirone (serotonin receptor 1A partial agonist, 10mg/kg) to animals treated with the MK-801 schedule described above. The postnatal and prior administration schedules produced severe learning deficits, whereas injection of MK-801 just before training sessions had only mild effects on acquisition of an operant conditioning. Risperidone was able to reverse the detrimental effect of MK-801 in the animals that were treated with MK-801 during and prior training sessions. In contrast, buspirone was only effective at mitigating the cognitive deficits induced by MK-801 when administered during the training procedures. The data demonstrates that NMDA antagonism disrupts basic mechanisms of learning in a simple PFC-mediated operant conditioning task, and that buspirone and risperidone failed to attenuate the learning deficits when NMDA neurotransmission was blocked in the early stages of the postnatal period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dissociating the effects of habituation, black walls, buspirone and ethanol on anxiety-like behavioral responses in shoaling zebrafish. A 3D approach to social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaswinkel, Hans; Le, Xi; He, Lucy; Zhu, Liqun; Weng, Wei

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the different patterns of anxiety-like behavioral responses is of great interest for pharmacological and genetic research. Here we report the effects of 3.5-hr habituation, buspirone and ethanol on those responses in shoaling zebrafish (Danio rerio). Since in these experiments we used a container with white walls, the effects of black-vs.-white walls were tested in a separate experiment. An important objective was to determine whether factors unrelated to anxiety played a role in modulating the responses. The anxiety-like behavioral responses studied here are social cohesion, distance from bottom and bottom-dwell time, radial distribution (to study thigmotaxis), transparent-wall preference (to study escape responses), locomotion and freezing. The experimental conditions yielded distinctly different response patterns. Thigmotaxis was the most obvious response to white walls and it was significantly reduced after 3.5-hr habituation. It was not affected by any of the drugs. The reduction of social cohesion after 3.5-hr habituation and in the 0.5% ethanol group was probably the most interesting effect seen in this study. A role of anxiety herein was suggested but could not be established with certainty. Other hypotheses were also discussed. The large increase of distance-from-bottom resulting in swimming close to the water surface, which occurred in both buspirone groups and in the 0.5%-ethanol group, is most likely not an anxiolytic response, because of the discrepancy with the in the literature well-established time-course and the absence of any effect of 3.5-hr habituation or black walls on vertical measures. Finally, locomotion and duration freezing could not be specifically taken as indicators for the state of anxiety and the results concerning transparent-wall preference were not sufficient clear. We conclude that the neuronal and ethological mechanisms underlying the effects of habituation, white-aversion, buspirone and ethanol on anxiety

  10. Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Phase I/IIa Study (Safety and Efficacy) with Buspirone/Levodopa/Carbidopa (SpinalonTM) in Subjects with Complete AIS A or Motor-Complete AIS B Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Mohan; Steuer, Inge; Prince, Francois; Roberts, Mary; Mongeon, David; Kia, Maryam; Dyck, Sasha; Matte, Gilbert; Vaillancourt, Mario; Guertin, Pierre A

    2017-01-01

    No drug treatment capable of restoring locomotor capabilities in patients suffering a motor-complete spinal cord injury (SCI) has ever been developed. We assessed the safety and efficacy of an activator of spinal locomotor neurons in humans, which were shown in paraplegic animals to elicit temporary episodes of involuntary walking. Single administration of buspirone/levodopa/carbidopa (SpinalonTM), levodopa/carbidopa (ratio 4: 1), and buspirone or placebo was performed using a dose-escalation design in 45 subjects placed in supine position who had had an SCI classified as complete (AIS A) or motor-complete/sensory incomplete (AIS B) for at least 3 months. Blood samples before and at regular intervals (15, 30, 60, 120, 240 min) after treatment were collected for hematological and pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of eight muscles (four per leg) was monitored prior to and at several time points after drug administration. SpinalonTM (10-35 mg buspirone/100-350 mg levodopa/25-85 mg carbidopa) displayed no sign of safety concerns - only mild nausea was found in 3 cases. At higher doses, 50 mg/500 mg/125 mg SpinalonTM was considered to have reached maximum tolerated dose (MTD) since 3 out of 4 subjects experienced related adverse events including vomiting. PK analyses showed comparable data between groups suggesting no significant drugdrug interaction with SpinalonTM. Only the SpinalonTM-treated groups displayed significant EMG activity accompanied by locomotor-like characteristics - that is with rhythmic and bilaterally alternating bursts. Therefore, this study provides evidence of safety and preliminary efficacy following a single administration of SpinalonTM in subjects with SCI. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Modulatory effect of the 5-HT1A agonist buspirone and the mixed non-hallucinogenic 5-HT1A/2A agonist ergotamine on psilocybin-induced psychedelic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Thomas; Preller, Katrin H; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-04-01

    The mixed serotonin (5-HT) 1A/2A/2B/2C/6/7 receptor agonist psilocybin dose-dependently induces an altered state of consciousness (ASC) that is characterized by changes in sensory perception, mood, thought, and the sense of self. The psychological effects of psilocybin are primarily mediated by 5-HT2A receptor activation. However, accumulating evidence suggests that 5-HT1A or an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors may contribute to the overall effects of psilocybin. Therefore, we used a double-blind, counterbalanced, within-subject design to investigate the modulatory effects of the partial 5-HT1A agonist buspirone (20mg p.o.) and the non-hallucinogenic 5-HT2A/1A agonist ergotamine (3mg p.o.) on psilocybin-induced (170 µg/kg p.o.) psychological effects in two groups (n=19, n=17) of healthy human subjects. Psychological effects were assessed using the Altered State of Consciousness (5D-ASC) rating scale. Buspirone significantly reduced the 5D-ASC main scale score for Visionary Restructuralization (VR) (ppsilocybin-induced 5D-ASC main scale scores. The present finding demonstrates that buspirone exerts inhibitory effects on psilocybin-induced effects, presumably via 5-HT1A receptor activation, an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, or both. The data suggest that the modulation of 5-HT1A receptor activity may be a useful target in the treatment of visual hallucinations in different psychiatric and neurological diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. Buspirone is an effective augmenting agent of serotonin selective re ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    substance abuse, or borderline or antisocial personality disorder. The patient was physically healthy. The depression had begun 4 years previously. and had failed to respond to courses of tricyclics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and SSRls, despite adequate treatment dosage and duration. Uthium and thyroid hormone ...

  13. 75 FR 64310 - Determination That BUSPAR (Buspirone Hydrochloride) Tablets, 10 Milligrams, 15 Milligrams, and 30...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... approved under an ANDA procedure. ANDA applicants must, with certain exceptions, show that the drug for... as the ``listed drug,'' which is a version of the drug that was previously approved. ANDA applicants... drug application (NDA). The only clinical data required in an ANDA are data to show that the drug that...

  14. Behavioral Studies on the Mechanism of Buspirone, an Atypical Anti-Anxiety Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-17

    central nervous system (CNS) depressants such as alcohol , with potentially lethal consequences !Harvey, 1985). Recent research into the biological basis...Balster, 1977) . In one study, baboons i ’\\ trained to discriminate lorazepam , a BZ, from saline did not generalize this discrimination to

  15. Dgroup: DG01483 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available xetine ... D10184 ... Vortioxetine (USAN) ... D10185 ... Vortioxetine hydrobromide (JAN/USAN) ... ...) ... DG00913 ... Buspirone ... D07593 ... Buspirone (INN) ... D00702 ... Buspirone hydrochloride (USP) ... DG00965 ... Vortio

  16. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of seven augmentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results revealed that T3 was more efficacious than lithium, TCAs, AAPs, AEDs, buspirone and CBT with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.58, 1.56, 1.51, 1.47, 1.77 and 1.25, respectively. ORs favoured CBT compared with lithium, TCAs, AAPs, AEDs and buspirone. Buspirone was the least efficacious of all the other augmentation ...

  17. Evidence of an enhanced central 5HT response in irritable bowel syndrome and in the rat maternal separation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, S; Chua, A S B; Quigley, E M M; Clarke, G; Shanahan, F; Keeling, P W N; Dinan, T G

    2008-06-01

    Efforts to define either a biomarker for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or a valid animal model have proven disappointing. The aims of this study were to determine if buspirone stimulates prolactin release through the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)1a receptor and whether this response is altered in patients with IBS and in the rat maternal separation model. Buspirone (30 mg) was used to stimulate prolactin release in 40 patients with IBS and in 40 healthy controls. In study 1, 10 IBS patients and 10 controls underwent pretreatment with pindolol (5HT1a antagonist) or placebo followed by buspirone. In study 2, 30 patients with IBS and 30 healthy controls had prolactin release stimulated by buspirone. Maternally separated and nonseparated rats were also treated with buspirone and prolactin monitored. Serotonin metabolites were measured together with the expression of the 5HT1a and serotonin transporter (SERT) gene. Pindolol produced a dose-dependent decrease in the buspirone prolactin response. Patients with IBS and maternally separated rats showed an exaggerated release of prolactin in response to buspirone. In the animal model, an increased turnover of 5HT was found in the brainstem together with a trend toward increased activity of the SERT gene. In conclusion altered central serotonin responses are found in both IBS and in an animal model.

  18. Vortioxetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your condition, symptoms, and personal and family medical history. You and your doctor will decide what type ... buspirone; carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol); diuretics ('water pills'); fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Fentora, Lazanda, others); lithium (Lithobid); medications ...

  19. Placebo Medication Use for Behavior Management in an Adult with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, K. A.; Brown, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Buspar (buspirone) is an anxiolytic medication used to reduce symptoms associated with anxiety. The current study provides a case description of a man diagnosed with autistic disorder where Buspar was prescribed on an "as needed" basis in order to decelerate tantrum behavior associated with undifferentiated anxiety. After successful reduction of…

  20. South African Medical Journal - Vol 87, No 4 (1997)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abnormal eating attitudes in secondary-school girls in South Africa - a preliminary study · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Buspirone is an effective augmenting agent of serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors in severe treatment-refractory depression · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  1. Tritherapy (Spinalon)-Elicited Spinal Locomotor Network Activation: Phase I-IIa Clinical Trial in Spinal Cord-Injured Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    disease 11. Receiving antihypertensive drugs 12. Receiving tricyclic antidepressant 13. Receiving dopamine D2 receptor antagonists (e.g., phenothiazines...buspirone, levodopa or carbidopa Yes No Receiving sympathomimetic amines e.g., epinephrine, pseudoephedrine Yes No Receiving antihypertensive drugs Yes No

  2. Comparison of TiO2 photocatalysis, electrochemically assisted Fenton reaction and direct electrochemistry for simulation of phase I metabolism reactions of drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruokolainen, Miina; Gül, Turan; Permentier, Hjalmar; Sikanen, Tiina; Kostiainen, Risto; Kotiaho, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysis, electrochemically assisted Fenton reaction (EC-Fenton) and direct electrochemical oxidation (EC) for simulation of phase I metabolism of drugs was studied by comparing the reaction products of buspirone, promazine, testosterone and

  3. Automated dried blood spots standard and QC sample preparation using a robotic liquid handler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Long; Zhang, Duxi; Aubry, Anne-Francoise; Arnold, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    A dried blood spot (DBS) bioanalysis assay involves many steps, such as the preparation of standard (STD) and QC samples in blood, the spotting onto DBS cards, and the cutting-out of the spots. These steps are labor intensive and time consuming if done manually, which, therefore, makes automation very desirable in DBS bioanalysis. A robotic liquid handler was successfully applied to the preparation of STD and QC samples in blood and to spot the blood samples onto DBS cards using buspirone as the model compound. This automated preparation was demonstrated to be accurate and consistent. However the accuracy and precision of automated preparation were similar to those from manual preparation. The effect of spotting volume on accuracy was evaluated and a trend of increasing concentrations of buspirone with increasing spotting volumes was observed. The automated STD and QC sample preparation process significantly improved the efficiency, robustness and safety of DBS bioanalysis.

  4. Benzodiazepine dependence: management of discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, K; Case, W G; Schweizer, E; Garcia-Espana, F; Fridman, R

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses the management of benzodiazepine (BZ) withdrawal in patients who are chronically benzodiazepine dependent. Gradual benzodiazepine discontinuation is preferable to abrupt discontinuation, particularly for patients on short half-life benzodiazepines. For a small number of patients, replacement of short half-life with long half-life benzodiazepines may also be helpful. Finally, we present new preliminary data from a controlled, double-blind study that suggest that adjunctive use of such drugs as carbamazepine, imipramine, and buspirone may be helpful in managing gradual benzodiazepine discontinuation. Initiating adjunctive medication prior to, and continuing it during and after benzodiazepine discontinuation led to significantly higher discontinuation success rates for carbamazepine (91%), buspirone (85%), and imipramine (79%) than for placebo (58%) (p less than .05). Careful followup for an extended period of time is needed after benzodiazepine discontinuation because, frequently, emerging psychiatric symptoms may again necessitate psychiatric intervention.

  5. Other forms of treatment for anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, H W

    1985-10-26

    Other methods for the treatment of anxiety are discussed--psychotherapeutic, behavioural and pharmacological. Among the psychotherapeutic methods are psychoanalytical and supportive therapy, psycho-education, cognitive therapy and paradoxical intention. Behaviour- modifying methods include systematic desensitization, flooding, thought blocking and biofeedback. However, none of these methods in isolation seems to be effective in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Drugs such as beta-blockers, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs and buspirone are reviewed. Buspirone seems to be as effective as the benzodiazepines in the alleviation of anxiety and may have less untoward effects. A few new drugs that are still being evaluated--fenobam, suriclone, synaptamine, fominoben and tracazolate--are mentioned.

  6. A Novel Animal Model for Panic Disorder: Attempted Reproduction of the Fear of Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-04

    infusions in panic disorder patients and normal controls, 63% of panic disorder patients but only 11 % of control subjects panicked (Freedman, Ianni ...Interoceptive Stimuli Non-human Primate Models Freedman, Ianni , and Ettedgui (1987) have proposed a model of "Panic Disorder" based on subcutaneous...of buspirone on panic disorder: a case report. 10urnal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 7, 11 8-119. Freedman, R.R. , Ianni , P., & Ettedgui, E. (1984

  7. Therapeutic strategies for the patient with treatment-resistant anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, J D; Tiffon, L; Gorman, J M

    1993-05-01

    Outcome of anxiety disorder treatment with psychotherapy and medication is generally as good as or better than that of other psychiatric illnesses. Nevertheless, refractory cases occur. The first step in approaching the treatment-resistant patient with an anxiety disorder is to be certain that the treatment has been adequate. Failure to provide an adequate dose of medication for adequate periods of time may be the most common cause of "treatment resistance." The second step is to reconsider the diagnosis and/or determine if new diagnoses have emerged since the original consultation. Depression and substance abuse are especially likely to complicate anxiety disorders. Several studies have shown that concomitant personality disorders (axis II) increase the occurrence of resistance to standard treatment and must be addressed through psychotherapy. Last, a variety of possible underlying medical conditions, including thyroid disorder, arrhythmia, and complex partial seizure, should be considered. Then, the clinician should consider a variety of pharmacologic approaches that are specific to each anxiety disorder. Panic disorder patients who are refractory to imipramine frequently respond to high-potency benzodiazepines, monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or various combinations. Generalized anxiety disorder, if unresponsive to benzodiazepines, may respond to buspirone or a tricyclic antidepressant. Patients with obsessive compulsive disorder who have failed to respond to clomipramine or fluoxetine and other serotonin reuptake blockers may benefit from augmentation strategies using combination therapies including buspirone, fenfluramine, and neuroleptics. Social phobia refractory to beta-blockers and MAO inhibitors may benefit from buspirone, fenfluramine, and neuroleptics. Social phobia refractory to beta-blockers and MAO inhibitors may benefit from buspirone, fluoxetine, or alprazolam.

  8. Facilitation of 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission in dorsal periaqueductal grey matter accounts for the panicolytic-like effect of chronic fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoveli, Janaina M; Pobbe, Roger L H; de Bortoli, Valquiria C; Carvalho, Milene C; Brandão, Marcus L; Zangrossi, Helio

    2010-09-01

    Chronic administration of antidepressants such as fluoxetine and imipramine increases the responsiveness of 5-HT(1A) receptors in dorsal periaqueductal grey matter (DPAG), a midbrain area consistently implicated in the pathogenesis of panic disorder. This effect has been related to the clinically relevant anti-panic action of these drugs. In this study we determined whether long-term administration of fluoxetine also affects 5-HT efflux in DPAG. As a comparison, the effect of chronic treatment with the anxiolytic 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist buspirone on DPAG 5-HT levels was assessed. We also investigated whether the inhibitory effect of chronic fluoxetine on escape behaviour in the rat elevated T-maze, considered as a panicolytic-like effect, is counteracted by intra-DPAG injection of the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY 100635. Male Wistar rats were treated (1 or 21 d, i.p.) with fluoxetine, buspirone or vehicle, once daily. After treatment, 5-HT in DPAG was measured by in-vivo microdialysis coupled to HPLC. In another study, rats treated (21 d, i.p.) with either fluoxetine or vehicle also received intra-DPAG injection of WAY 100635 or saline 10 min before being tested in the elevated T-maze. Chronic, but not acute, administration of fluoxetine significantly raised extracellular levels of 5-HT in DPAG. Long-term treatment with buspirone was ineffective. In the elevated T-maze, intra-DPAG injection of WAY 100635 fully blocked the anti-escape effect of chronic administration of fluoxetine. Therefore, chronic fluoxetine facilitates 5-HT(1A)-mediated neurotransmission within DPAG and this effect accounts for the panicolytic-like effect of this antidepressant in the elevated T-maze.

  9. A Computer-Based Visual Analog Scale,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    3. Menkes, D.B., Howard, R.C., Spears, G.F., and Cairns, E.R., "Salivary THC Following Cannabis Smoking Correlates With Subjective Intoxication and...Simpson, MA., Schoeman, H.S. & Alman, BJ., "A Profile of Buspirone in the Treatment of Anxiety in General Practice Patients." Current Therapeutic ...System Stimulants." In A.G. Gilman, L.S. Goodman, T.W. Rall, and F. Murad (Eds.), The Phainnacological Basis of Therapeutics , pp. 589-603, MacMillan

  10. THE ROLE OF THE SEROTONERGIC SYSTEM IN THE "WET DOG" SHAKE BEHAVIOUR INDUCED BY SODIUM N-DIPROPYL ACETATE

    OpenAIRE

    EKİNCİ, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that experimental animals used in pharmacological research behave incertain ways with the influence of various neurotransmitters in the central nervoussystem. In this research, we have studied the effect of buspiron on the wet dog shake behaviour, with respect to its relationship with the serotonergic system, after the administration of n-dipropyl acetate which is used in the treatment of epilepsy and 5-hydroxytryptophan which is a serotonin precursor.Key words: "Wet dog"...

  11. THE ROLE OF THE SEROTONERGIC SYSTEM IN THE "WET DOG" SHAKE BEHAVIOUR INDUCED BY SODIUM N-DIPROPYL ACETATE

    OpenAIRE

    EKİNCİ, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that experimental animals used in pharmacological research behave incertain ways with the influence of various neurotransmitters in the central nervoussystem. In this research, we have studied the effect of buspiron on the wet dog shake behaviour, with respect to its relationship with the serotonergic system, after the administration of n-dipropyl acetate which is used in the treatment of epilepsy and 5-hydroxytryptophan which is a serotonin precursor.Key words: "Wet dog" shake, n...

  12. A pilot study of serotonin-1A receptor genotypes and rapid eye movement sleep sensitivity to serotonergic/cholinergic imbalance in humans: a pharmacological model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biard K

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen Biard,1,2 Alan B Douglass,2,3 Rébecca Robillard,2 Joseph De Koninck1,2 1School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, 2University of Ottawa Institute for Mental Health Research, 3Royal Ottawa Mental Health Center, University of Ottawa Institute for Mental Health Research, Ottawa, ON, Canada Rationale: The serotonergic and cholinergic systems are jointly involved in regulating sleep but this system is theorized to be disturbed in depressed individuals. We previously reported that cholinergic and serotonergic agents induce sleep changes partially consistent with monoamine models of sleep disturbances in depression. One potential cause of disturbed neurotransmission is genetic predisposition. The G(-1019 allele of the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A receptor promoter region predicts an increased risk for depression compared to the wild-type C(-1019 allele. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate how serotonin-1A receptor genotypes mediate sleep sensitivity to pharmacological probes modeling the serotonergic/cholinergic imbalance of depression. Methods: Seventeen healthy female participants homozygous for either C (n=11 or G (n=6 alleles aged 18–27 years were tested on four nonconsecutive nights. Participants were given galantamine (an anti-acetylcholinesterase, buspirone (a serotonergic agonist, both drugs together, or placebos before sleeping. Results: As reported previously, buspirone significantly increased rapid eye movement (REM latency (P<0.001, as well as awakenings, percentage of time spent awake, and percentage of time asleep spent in stage N1 (P<0.019. Galantamine increased awakenings, percentage of time spent awake, percentage of time asleep spent in stage N1, and percentage of time asleep spent in REM, and decreased REM latency and percentage of time asleep spent in stage N3 (P<0.019. Galantamine plus buspirone given together disrupted sleep more than either drug alone, lowering sleep efficiency and percentage of time asleep

  13. Nicotine addiction and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, J E

    1996-01-01

    The persistence of cigarette smoking despite widespread awareness of adverse health effects results from an underlying addiction to nicotine. Unaided attempts to quit smoking are generally unsuccessful. This article discusses nicotine addition and therapeutic techniques that have been or are being developed to relieve smoking withdrawal symptoms and promote abstinence from smoking. These techniques include nicotine chewing gum, skin patches, nasal sprays, and inhalers, as well as pharmacotherapies such as mecamylamine and clonidine, serotonergic treatments such as buspirone, and antidepressants such as buproprion. A nondrug approach using cigarette substitutes that mimic the airway sensations produced by cigarette smoke is also discussed.

  14. Pharmacologic treatment options for hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolour, Sheila Y; Braunstein, Glenn D

    2005-09-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder is the most common cause of sexual dysfunction in women. According to a national survey, approximately a third of all women experience low sexual desire. The etiology of the disorder is often multifactorial. Research in treatment options for hypoactive sexual desire disorder is limited. In this article, treatment options including sex therapy, hormone therapy (estrogen, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, tibolone), non-hormonal medical therapies (buproprion, buspirone, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, amantadine and apomorphine) and herbal therapies (Avlimil(R), Arginmax(R), Zestra(R), yohimbine and Ginkgo biloba) are reviewed.

  15. Interaction between serotonin 5-HT1A receptors and beta-endorphins modulates antidepressant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navinés, Ricard; Martín-Santos, Rocío; Gómez-Gil, Esther; Martínez de Osaba, María J; Gastó, Cristòbal

    2008-12-12

    Interactions between serotonergic and the endogenous opioid systems have been suggested to be involved in the etiopathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressants. Activation of serotonin 5-HT1A receptors has been shown to increase plasma beta-endorphin (beta-END) levels in animal studies and in healthy humans. To assess interaction abnormalities between 5-HT1A receptors and the endogenous opioid system in patients with major depression and the possible modulating effect of citalopram. The beta-END response to the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, buspirone (30 mg), was measured in 30 patients with major depression and in 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls before and after an 8-week treatment with citalopram. Pre-treatment score of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) was >or=17. Antidepressant response was defined by a 50% decrease in the HRSD. Pre- and post-treatment maximum peak response (Deltamax) and the area under the curve (AUC) of beta-END response were compared. Three time points were measured (60, 90 and 120 min). We also examined the correlations between the beta-END response and the antidepressant response. Buspirone plasma levels were not measured. At baseline, beta-END response was similar in patients and controls. After 8 weeks of citalopram treatment depressed patients showed a significant decrease in the beta-END response (Deltamax: pmechanism of action and response to antidepressant drugs.

  16. The olfactory hole-board test in rats: a new paradigm to study aversion and preferences to odors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin eWernecke

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Odors of biological relevance (e.g. predator odors, sex odors are known to effectively influence basic survival needs of rodents such as anti-predatory defensiveness and mating behaviors. Research focused on the effects of these odors on rats’ behavior mostly includes multi-trial paradigms where animals experience single odor exposures in subsequent, separated experimental sessions. In the present study, we introduce a modification of the olfactory hole-board test that allows studying the effects of different odors on rats’ behavior within single trials. First, we demonstrated that the corner holes of the hole-board were preferentially visited by rats. The placement of different odors under the corner holes changed this hole preference. We showed that holes with carnivore urine samples were avoided, while corner holes with female rat urine samples were preferred. Furthermore, corner holes with urine samples from a carnivore, herbivore and omnivore were differentially visited indicating that rats can discriminate these odors. To test whether anxiolytic treatment specifically modulate the avoidance of carnivore urine holes, we treated rats with buspirone. Buspirone treatment completely abolished the avoidance of carnivore urine holes. Taken together, our findings indicate that the olfactory hole-board test is a valuable tool for measuring avoidance and preference responses to biologically-relevant odors.

  17. Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, Irwin; Kim, Noel N.; Clayton, Anita H

    2017-01-01

    dysfunction affecting approximately 10% of adult women. Etiologic factors include conditions or drugs that decrease brain dopamine, melanocortin, oxytocin, and norepinephrine levels and augment brain serotonin, endocannabinoid, prolactin, and opioid levels. Symptoms include lack or loss of motivation...... by history and assessment of symptoms. Sex therapy has been the standard treatment, although there is a paucity of studies assessing efficacy, except for mindfulness-based cognitive behavior therapy. Bupropion and buspirone may be considered off-label treatments for HSDD, despite limited safety and efficacy...... data. Menopausal women with HSDD may benefit from off-label testosterone treatment, as evidenced by multiple clinical trials reporting some efficacy and short-term safety. Currently, flibanserin is the only Food and Drug Administration–approved medication to treat premenopausal women with generalized...

  18. Benzodiazepine withdrawal: behavioural pharmacology and neurochemical changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, S E; Andrews, N

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes pharmacological treatments that can reverse the anxiogenic response detected in animal tests when rats are withdrawn from chronic treatment with diazepam. Concurrent treatment with the calcium channel antagonist verapamil prevented this withdrawal response and the benzodiazepine-receptor antagonist flumazenil reversed the anxiogenic response and restored the system to a drug-naive state. Other treatments that reversed the anxiogenic response were the GABAB agonist baclofen, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone, and the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (R,S)-zacopride (GABA = gamma-aminobutyric acid; 5-HT = 5-hydroxytryptamine). Both the enantiomers of zacopride contributed to this reversal. These behavioural reversals are interpreted in the light of biochemical studies showing increased 45Ca2+ flux and [3H]5-HT release from the hippocampus, during benzodiazepine withdrawal (Fig. 1).

  19. What happens to anxiety disorders in later life?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne Gerard JA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders decline in prevalence with advancing age but remain more common than depressive disorders. They are often of late-onset and there is frequent comorbidity with depressive disorders and physical illness. While anxiety disorders in older people are likely to respond to the same non-pharmacological interventions that have been shown to work in younger people, there is currently little formal evidence of this. Although there is some evidence that the non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic medication, buspirone, is effective against late life anxiety symptoms, clinical trials in older people with rigorously diagnosed anxiety disorders are needed. An anxiety scale with demonstrated reliability and validity in older people is needed for screening for pathological anxiety and for measuring change in older patients undergoing treatment for anxiety disorders.

  20. Various functions of PBMC from colon cancer patients are not decreased compared to healthy blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, P; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    -2 and its receptor proteins in T helper cells. The proliferative responses and IL-2 synthesis of PBMC have earlier been shown to be reduced in patients with colon cancer. Recently immune modulating agents have been demonstrated to increase the proliferative response of PBMC in vitro, probably...... by inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and induction of IL-2 mRNA expression. We have therefore studied the proliferative responses of PBMC from colon cancer patients to PWM and tested the effect of immune modulating agents, such as Serotonin, Sumatriptan, and Buspirone on these PBMC. We found...... no difference in levels of intracellular cAMP, IL-2 mRNA expression, IL-2R mRNA expression, or proliferative responses of PBMC from colon cancer patients compared to healthy blood donors. There was no effect of the immune modulating agents on PBMC from colon cancer patients....

  1. A Review of Vilazodone, Serotonin, and Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thase, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanism of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)–mediated serotonergic neurotransmission, focusing on serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, which are proposed to be involved in delaying therapeutic efficacy. Vilazodone was specifically designed to function both as an SSRI and a partial agonist at 5-HT1A receptors. This combined mechanism is proposed to decrease time to efficacy, minimize sexual side effects, and provide concomitant anxiolytic properties. Data Sources: A PubMed search of all English-language articles from January 1990 to January 2013 was conducted using the search terms depression and 5-HT1A, depression and buspirone, depression and pindolol, and vilazodone. Study Selection: We found 47 articles and abstracts that were selected for inclusion on the basis of information about the pharmacology of 5-HT1A receptors and the clinical data on pindolol, buspirone, and vilazodone in depression. Data Extraction: This review summarizes current literature involving antidepressant activity, the role of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and clinical trials involving serotonin reuptake inhibition in conjunction with 5-HT1A agonists and partial agonists, with a focus on vilazodone. Results:Vilazodone has demonstrated efficacy in 2 large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in major depressive disorder. Results suggest that vilazodone has a low incidence of sexual side effects and is effective in patients with high levels of anxiety. A pooled analysis shows evidence of significant symptom reduction after only 1 week of therapy. Conclusions: If future studies corroborate the clinical benefits attributed to its mechanism of action, vilazodone may show potential advantages in terms of onset of action, sexual side effects, and anxiolytic activity in patients with major depressive disorder. PMID:24940527

  2. Ice-cold saline for the induction of mild hypothermia in patients with acute ischemic stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmar, Rainer; Schellinger, Peter D; Steigleder, Tobias; Köhrmann, Martin; Schwab, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Neuroprotective effects of induced hypothermia depend on its time point of initiation after acute brain injury. Preliminary studies in cardiac arrest patients indicate that rapid infusion of ice cold saline (ICS) is safe and effective for induction of hypothermia. We investigated its use in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Patients (n=10) with AIS were included within 3 hours after symptom onset. After cranial CT, they were treated-if indicated-with rt-PA. ICS of 4 degrees C (25 mL/kg body weight) was administered via peripheral intravenous lines. Patients received buspirone/pethidine to prevent and treat shivering. After infusion of the target volume of ICS, no further efforts were made to maintain hypothermia by other methods. Ten patients with a median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 5.5 (range 4 to 12) on admission were included into the study. Nine patients were treated with thrombolysis within a time window of 104+/-25 minutes. A mean amount of 2163+/-256 mL ICS was infused 17+/-11 minutes after rt-PA infusion had started. Tympanic temperature dropped significantly by a maximum of 1.6+/-0.3 degrees C (P<0.005) at 52+/-16 minutes after ICS was started. The procedure was well tolerated. The NIHSS score improved significantly to a median of 1 (range 1 to 15) at discharge compared to admission (P<0.02). This pilot study suggests that rapid ICS infusions in combination with pethidine and buspirone lower the body temperature significantly without major side effects.

  3. Dual role of serotonin in the acquisition and extinction of reward-driven learning: involvement of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Luciana Romina; Bernardez-Vidal, Micaela; Hocht, Christian; Zanutto, Bonifacio Silvano; Rapanelli, Maximiliano

    2015-01-15

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been proposed as a possible encoder of reward. Nevertheless, the role of this neurotransmitter in reward-based tasks is not well understood. Given that the major serotonergic circuit in the rat brain comprises the dorsal raphe nuclei and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and because the latter structure is involved in the control of complex behaviors and expresses 1A (5-HT1A), 2A (5-HT2A), and 3 (5-HT3) receptors, the aim was to study the role of 5-HT and of these receptors in the acquisition and extinction of a reward-dependent operant conditioning task. Long Evans rats were trained in an operant conditioning task while receiving fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake inhibitor, 10mg/kg), tianeptine (serotonin reuptake enhancer, 10mg/kg), buspirone (5-HT1A partial agonist, 10mg/kg), risperidone (5-HT2A antagonist, 1mg/kg), ondansetron (5-HT3 antagonist, 2mg/kg) or vehicle. Then, animals that acquired the operant conditioning without any treatment were trained to extinct the task in the presence of the pharmacological agents. Fluoxetine impaired acquisition but improved extinction. Tianeptine administration induced the opposite effects. Buspirone induced a mild deficit in acquisition and had no effects during the extinction phase. Risperidone administration resulted in learning deficits during the acquisition phase, although it promoted improved extinction. Ondansetron treatment showed a deleterious effect in the acquisition phase and an overall improvement in the extinction phase. These data showed a differential role of 5-HT in the acquisition and extinction of an operant conditioning task, suggesting that it may have a dual function in reward encoding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Depressão resistente a tratamento: uma revisão das estratégias farmacológicas de potencialização de antidepressivos Treatment-resistant depression: review of pharmacologic antidepressant strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Antunes Santos

    2006-01-01

    , LILACS and Cochrane Library, from 1990 to June 2006 using the words treatment, resistant, refractory, depression and the medical subject headings depression, drug resistance and augmentation. Double-blind controlled trials and reviews were included. We also consulted reference of the articles in order to obtain studies and original articles of historical value from before 1990. RESULTS: There were 17 double-blind trials with lithium, six with thyroid hormone, two with buspirone, six with pindolol one with carbamazepine, two with lamotrigine and four with olanzapine. Forty-one percent of the trials with lithium, 60% of those with thyroid hormone and tricyclics, 0% of the ones with thyroid hormone and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI, 50% of those with pindolol, 100% of those with carbamazepine and 40% of the ones with olanzapine were favorable. No trials with buspirone were favorable. The only trial with lamotrigine did not show efficacy using the main outcome measures. Otherwise, there was superiority over placebo on secondary measures. CONCLUSION: Only lithium and thyroid hormone showed efficacy as antidepressant augmentation strategies for TRD. Olanzapine was reasonably studied and did not prove its efficacy. There were just a few studies on buspirone and pindolol and they were not favorable to them. Carbamazepine was studied very little. Lamotrigine was not adequately evaluated.

  5. The effect of 5-HT1A receptor agonists on locomotor activity in the guinea-pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenden, J L

    1994-07-01

    1. The present study examined the effects of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), flesinoxan, ipsapirone and buspirone, all agonists at the 5-HT1A receptor, on the locomotor activity of guinea-pigs. The effects of these drugs were contrasted with those of the non-selective 5-HT agonist, 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyl tryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) and the dopamine D2 antagonist, raclopride. 2. 8-OH-DPAT, flesinoxan and 5-MeO-DMT markedly increased the locomotor activity of naive, unhabituated guinea-pigs in a dose-dependent manner. Buspirone also did so, although to a lesser extent and for a shorter time. The doses at which this effect was seen were higher than those normally employed in rats. Ipsapirone and raclopride had no significant effects on locomotor activity. 3. The locomotor activity increasing effect of 1.0 mg kg-1 8-OH-DPAT was blocked by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist (S)-UH-301 (3.0 and 10.0 mg kg-1), but not by (-)-alprenolol (15.0 mg kg-1). Ipsapirone (30.0 mg kg-1) and raclopride (3.0 mg kg-1) antagonized 8-OH-DPAT-induced locomotor activity but only to a small extent. The 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, zimelidine (10.0 mg kg-1) had no effect. 4. The effect of the 5-HT1A agonists in the guinea-pig contrasts with the effects of 8-OH-DPAT on the locomotor activity of unhabituated rats and mice tested in the same apparatus, but are similar to the effects of 8-OH-DPAT on habituated rats, which show a low baseline of activity. 5. These results support the suggestion that 5-HTIA agonists may have an intrinsic activating effect which may be masked by other effects of the drug (e.g. hypothermia, 5-HT syndrome). The rank ordering of the 5-HTIA agonists also suggests that the degree to which the drugs increase locomotor activity is related to their agonist efficacy at the postsynaptic 5-HTIA receptor.

  6. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis and pharmacokinetics of 6'-hydroxy justicidin A, a potential antitumor active component isolated from Justicia procumbens, in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Zhou, Shujun; Fu, Shujun; Kong, Weijun; Yang, Shihai; Yang, Meihua

    2012-11-01

    A sensitive and accurate LC-ESI-MS/MS method was developed and validated of for the determination of 6'-hydroxy justicidin A (HJA), a potential antitumor active component isolated from Justicia procumbens in rat plasma using a simple liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) method for sample preparation. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an Agilent Zorbax-C(18) column (2.1 mm × 50 mm, 3.5 μm) using a step gradient program with the mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid aqueous solution and acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid. HJA and IS (buspirone) were detected using electrospray positive ionization mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. This method demonstrated good linearity and did not show any endogenous interference with the active compound and IS peaks. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of HJA was 0.50 ng/ml in 50 μl rat plasma. The developed and validated method has been successfully applied to the quantification and pharmacokinetic study of HJA in rats after intravenous and oral administration of 0.25 mg/kg HJA. The oral bioavailability (F) of HJA was estimated to be 36.0±13.4% with an elimination half-life (t(1/2)) value of 1.04±0.20 h. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Anxiety treatment. A commonsense approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckit, M A

    1984-02-01

    Common sense should guide the nonpsychiatrist physician in diagnosing and treating the symptom of anxiety. Possible causes of anxiety include various medical disorders in which anxiety is inherent, chronic illness, CNS stimulant intoxication, CNS depressant withdrawal, and primary psychiatric disorders, including the primary anxiety disorders. If none of these conditions is found, situational anxiety may be the diagnosis by exclusion. Generally, treatment should involve education and supportive psychotherapy, behavioral therapies designed to promote relaxation and adjustment to stress, and short-term pharmacotherapy. Although some clinical data from uncontrolled studies point to the possible importance of others drugs (eg, beta-blocking agents) in treating anxiety, the major pharmacotherapy rests with antianxiety drugs, particularly the benzodiazepine. Because each benzodiazepine appears to be relatively effective, a specific agent is selected for a particular clinical situation on the basis of its kinetic (especially its half-life) and side-effect profiles. A nonbenzodiazepine soon to be released in the United States, buspirone (Buspar), appears to be effective and nonaddictive and is not potentiated by alcohol. However, the final verdict as to its usefulness and safety in treating anxiety awaits results of further testing.

  8. Shortage of psychotropic medications in community pharmacies in Saudi Arabia: Causes and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazed Sulaiman Al-Ruthia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety, who seek medical care in private psychiatric clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, have recently expressed concerns to doctors about difficulty in filling psychotropic medications, such as Amitriptyline and Aripiprazole, at retail community pharmacies. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a shortage of some commonly prescribed psychotropic medications in retail community pharmacies in Saudi Arabia, and if so, to explore the possible reasons behind the shortage of these medications. Methods: The availability of 28 commonly prescribed psychotropic medications was checked in multiple retail community pharmacies in 4 different regions of Saudi Arabia. Further, potential reasons behind the shortage of some psychotropic medications in retail community pharmacies were also explored. Results: Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Aripiprazole, Bupropion, Buspirone, Duloxetine, Haloperidol, Hydroxyzine, Lithium, Prochlorperazine, Procyclidine, Promethazine, Thioridazine, Trazodone, and Trifluoperazine were unavailable in over half of the 248 community pharmacies surveyed. Four possible reasons behind the shortage of these medications were reported by 31 pharmacists working in different retail community pharmacies’ purchasing departments, with a majority (58.06% reporting the primary reason for a shortage of these medications that they are slow-moving items with low profit margins. Conclusions: The findings of this study should expedite the reform process in both the Ministry of Health and the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA to publish and enforce an essential list of medications for retail community pharmacies, which should include the most commonly prescribed psychotropic medications.

  9. Anxiolytic-like profile of mirtazapine in rat conditioned fear stress model: Functional significance of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor and alpha1-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakui, Nobukazu; Yokoyama, Fumikazu; Yamauchi, Miki; Kitamura, Koichi; Imanishi, Taiichiro; Inoue, Takeshi; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2009-05-01

    Mirtazapine is an antidepressant with a unique mechanism of action and has been categorized as a Noradrenergic and Specific Serotonergic Antidepressant (NaSSA). Although numerous clinical trials suggested the usefulness of mirtazapine for not only major depressive disorders but also a variety of anxiety disorders, efficacy studies in animal anxiety models have been rarely reported. The present study investigated a potential anxiolytic-like profile of mirtazapine in rat conditioned fear stress model. A 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 1A receptor partial agonist, buspirone (1-5 mg/kg) exhibited a significant reduction in freezing time, and its maximal effect was reversed by a selective 5-HT(1A) antagonist, WAY-100635 (1 mg/kg). Mirtazapine (1-10 mg/kg) also reduced the freezing time in a dose-related fashion, a substantial proportion (approx. 50%) of which was likewise antagonized by WAY-100635 (1 mg/kg). Mianserin (1-30 mg/kg), a structural analogue for mirtazapine, was ineffective. Furthermore, co-administration of alpha1 adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (0.03 mg/kg) completely reversed mirtazapine (10 mg/kg)-induced reduction of freezing time. These findings represent the first demonstration that the anxiolytic-like action of mirtazapine involves activation of 5-HT(1A) receptor and alpha1 adrenoceptor to different extents, and are compatible with one aspect of mirtazapine's pharmacological profile as NaSSA.

  10. Modifying 5-HT1A receptor gene expression as a new target for antidepressant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Albert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Major depression is the most common form of mental illness, and is treated with antidepressant compounds that increase serotonin (5-HT neurotransmission. Increased 5-HT1A autoreceptor levels in the raphe nuclei act as a “brake” to inhibit the 5-HT system, leading to depression and resistance to antidepressants. Several 5-HT1A receptor agonists (buspirone, flesinoxan, ipsapirone that preferentially desensitize 5-HT1A autoreceptors have been tested for augmentation of antidepressant drugs with mixed results. One explanation could be the presence of the C(-1019G 5-HT1A promoter polymorphism that prevents gene repression of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor. Furthermore, down-regulation of 5-HT1A autoreceptor expression, not simply desensitization of receptor signaling, appears to be required to enhance and accelerate antidepressant action. The current review focuses on the transcriptional regulators of 5-HT1A autoreceptor expression, their roles in permitting response to 5-HT1A-targeted treatments and their potential as targets for new antidepressant compounds for treatment-resistant depression.

  11. Increased 5-HT release mediates the anxiogenic response during benzodiazepine withdrawal: a review of supporting neurochemical and behavioural evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, N; File, S E

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the biochemical and behavioural evidence that the increased anxiety that occurs during benzodiazepine withdrawal is caused by increased 5-HT activity. In hippocampal slices taken from rats withdrawn for 24 h from chronic diazepam treatment (2 mg/kg/day for 21 days) there was a significant increase in K(+)-evoked release of [3H]5-HT and in 45Ca2+ uptake and both of these changes were reversed by the GABAB agonist, baclofen. Baclofen also reversed the anxiogenic response that is detected on withdrawal from chronic diazepam treatment. Other drugs that reduce 5-HT function (tianeptine which increases 5-HT uptake; buspirone, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist/partial agonist; zacopride, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist) also reversed this anxiogenic response. Finally, we present data from a group of rats that did not develop tolerance to the anxiolytic effects of diazepam (2 mg/kg), even after 5 weeks treatment. This group failed to show an anxiogenic response on withdrawal from diazepam, nor was there an increase in hippocampal 5-HT release. We discuss the extent to which increased hippocampal 5-HT release can be causally linked to the increased anxiety during benzodiazepine withdrawal.

  12. Treatment of Comorbid Alcohol Dependence and Anxiety Disorder: Review of the Scientific Evidence and Recommendations for Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Carmen; Dorado, Marisa Luisa; Roncero, Carlos; Szerman, Nestor; Vega, Pablo; Balanzá-Martínez, Vicent; Alvarez, F. Javier

    2017-01-01

    Patients with alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) have a high prevalence of anxiety disorders (AnxDs). “Co-occurring disorders” refers to the coexistence of an AUD and/or drug related disorders with another non-addictive psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of psychopharmacological treatments and psychotherapy in patients with AUD and AnxD and to propose recommendations for the treatment of patients with comorbid AnxDs and AUDs. Randomized clinical trials, meta-analyses, and clinical guidelines were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Paroxetine was found to be effective in social anxiety patients with alcohol dependence. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), especially sertraline, showed effective results in posttraumatic stress disorder and in comorbid AnxD–AUD. However, SSRIs should be used with caution when patients are actively drinking because they may increase alcohol consumption. Buspirone, gabapentin, and pregabalin were found to be effective in comorbid AnxD–AUD. The treatment of dual AnxDs should start as early as possible. Since AUDs and AnxDs can reinforce each other, treatments targeting both pathologies can be effective. Women suffer from higher levels of stress and AnxDs than men, and they are also more vulnerable to maintaining alcohol consumption levels. Further research is needed in this comorbid patient population, including the study of different types of patients and gender perspectives. PMID:29018367

  13. Management of psychotropic-induced hyperprolactinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marken, P A; Haykal, R F; Fisher, J N

    1992-10-01

    The effects of individual psychotropic medications on serum prolactin concentrations are described, and recommendations for dealing with adverse effects are provided. Hyperprolactinemia can result in galactorrhea, amenorrhea, irregular menses, and anovulation; in men, impotence and azoospermia, with or without lactation and gynecomastia, can occur. Antipsychotics may block dopamine receptors in the pituitary prolactin-secreting cells and prevent dopamine-induced reduction of prolactin release. The magnitude of the increase in prolactin concentration correlates with the amount of antipsychotic drug given. The treatment of choice is reduction of the antipsychotic dosage or discontinuation of therapy. If adjustments to the antipsychotic dosage fail to resolve symptoms, the dopamine agonists bromocriptine and amantadine may be tried. Antidepressants may produce elevated serum prolactin concentrations, especially with long-term administration. However, the frequency of antidepressant-induced hyperprolactinemia is much lower than that seen with antipsychotics, and serious adverse clinical effects are uncommon. Other psychotropic drugs such as lithium, valproic acid, buspirone, carbamazepine, and benzodiazepines either are only rarely associated with symptomatic hyperprolactinemia or do not produce clinically important changes in prolactin concentrations. Antipsychotic drugs are the psychotropic agents most likely to cause symptomatic hyperprolactinemia. Bromocriptine or amantadine may provide symptomatic relief if withdrawal or adjustment of the antipsychotic dosage does not eliminate the symptoms.

  14. Gabapentin-induced delirium and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszewski, Stefan P; Paczynski, Richard P; Kahn, David A

    2009-07-01

    Gabapentin (Neurontin) is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of epilepsy and post-herpetic neuralgia. Despite lack of strong evidence, gabapentin is also often prescribed off-label for psychiatric conditions. The case described here involved a 38-year-old male physician with substance intoxication delirium and psychoactive substance dependence due to high self-administered doses of gabapentin, which had been prescribed at lower doses in combination with buspirone and bupropion for depression and anxiety. This unusual case of gabapentin dependence and abuse involved toxic delirium, intense cravings, and a prolonged post-withdrawal confusional state reminiscent of benzodiazepine withdrawal. Gabapentin is a central nervous system inhibitory agent with likely gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic and non-GABAergic mechanisms of action. The similarity between benzodiazepine withdrawal and what this patient experienced with gabapentin suggests a common role for GABA-related effects. The case reported here suggests the need for heightened concern regarding the off-label prescription of this drug to vulnerable individuals with psychiatric conditions.

  15. Weight Bearing Over-ground Stepping in an Exoskeleton with Non-invasive Spinal Cord Neuromodulation after Motor Complete Paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Parag; Gerasimenko, Yury; Zdunowski, Sharon; Turner, Amanda; Sayenko, Dimitry; Lu, Daniel C; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2017-01-01

    We asked whether coordinated voluntary movement of the lower limbs could be regained in an individual having been completely paralyzed (>4 year) and completely absent of vision (>15 year) using two novel strategies-transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation at selected sites over the spine as well as pharmacological neuromodulation by buspirone. We also asked whether these neuromodulatory strategies could facilitate stepping assisted by an exoskeleton (EKSO, EKSO Bionics, CA) that is designed so that the subject can voluntarily complement the work being performed by the exoskeleton. We found that spinal cord stimulation and drug enhanced the level of effort that the subject could generate while stepping in the exoskeleton. In addition, stimulation improved the coordination patterns of the lower limb muscles resulting in a more continuous, smooth stepping motion in the exoskeleton along with changes in autonomic functions including cardiovascular and thermoregulation. Based on these data from this case study it appears that there is considerable potential for positive synergistic effects after complete paralysis by combining the over-ground step training in an exoskeleton, combined with transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation either without or with pharmacological modulation.

  16. The Psychopharmacology Algorithm Project at the Harvard South Shore Program: An Algorithm for Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abejuela, Harmony Raylen; Osser, David N

    2016-01-01

    This revision of previous algorithms for the pharmacotherapy of generalized anxiety disorder was developed by the Psychopharmacology Algorithm Project at the Harvard South Shore Program. Algorithms from 1999 and 2010 and associated references were reevaluated. Newer studies and reviews published from 2008-14 were obtained from PubMed and analyzed with a focus on their potential to justify changes in the recommendations. Exceptions to the main algorithm for special patient populations, such as women of childbearing potential, pregnant women, the elderly, and those with common medical and psychiatric comorbidities, were considered. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are still the basic first-line medication. Early alternatives include duloxetine, buspirone, hydroxyzine, pregabalin, or bupropion, in that order. If response is inadequate, then the second recommendation is to try a different SSRI. Additional alternatives now include benzodiazepines, venlafaxine, kava, and agomelatine. If the response to the second SSRI is unsatisfactory, then the recommendation is to try a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI). Other alternatives to SSRIs and SNRIs for treatment-resistant or treatment-intolerant patients include tricyclic antidepressants, second-generation antipsychotics, and valproate. This revision of the GAD algorithm responds to issues raised by new treatments under development (such as pregabalin) and organizes the evidence systematically for practical clinical application.

  17. Shortage of psychotropic medications in community pharmacies in Saudi Arabia: Causes and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ruthia, Yazed Sulaiman; Mansy, Wael; Barasin, Mohammad; Ghawaa, Yazeed Mohammad; AlSultan, Mohammed; Alsenaidy, Mohammad A; Alhawas, Solaiman; AlGhadeer, Sultan

    2017-07-01

    Background: Patients with mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety, who seek medical care in private psychiatric clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, have recently expressed concerns to doctors about difficulty in filling psychotropic medications, such as Amitriptyline and Aripiprazole, at retail community pharmacies. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a shortage of some commonly prescribed psychotropic medications in retail community pharmacies in Saudi Arabia, and if so, to explore the possible reasons behind the shortage of these medications. Methods: The availability of 28 commonly prescribed psychotropic medications was checked in multiple retail community pharmacies in 4 different regions of Saudi Arabia. Further, potential reasons behind the shortage of some psychotropic medications in retail community pharmacies were also explored. Results: Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Aripiprazole, Bupropion, Buspirone, Duloxetine, Haloperidol, Hydroxyzine, Lithium, Prochlorperazine, Procyclidine, Promethazine, Thioridazine, Trazodone, and Trifluoperazine were unavailable in over half of the 248 community pharmacies surveyed. Four possible reasons behind the shortage of these medications were reported by 31 pharmacists working in different retail community pharmacies' purchasing departments, with a majority (58.06%) reporting the primary reason for a shortage of these medications that they are slow-moving items with low profit margins. Conclusions: The findings of this study should expedite the reform process in both the Ministry of Health and the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA) to publish and enforce an essential list of medications for retail community pharmacies, which should include the most commonly prescribed psychotropic medications.

  18. Weight Bearing Over-ground Stepping in an Exoskeleton with Non-invasive Spinal Cord Neuromodulation after Motor Complete Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Gad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We asked whether coordinated voluntary movement of the lower limbs could be regained in an individual having been completely paralyzed (>4 year and completely absent of vision (>15 year using two novel strategies—transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation at selected sites over the spine as well as pharmacological neuromodulation by buspirone. We also asked whether these neuromodulatory strategies could facilitate stepping assisted by an exoskeleton (EKSO, EKSO Bionics, CA that is designed so that the subject can voluntarily complement the work being performed by the exoskeleton. We found that spinal cord stimulation and drug enhanced the level of effort that the subject could generate while stepping in the exoskeleton. In addition, stimulation improved the coordination patterns of the lower limb muscles resulting in a more continuous, smooth stepping motion in the exoskeleton along with changes in autonomic functions including cardiovascular and thermoregulation. Based on these data from this case study it appears that there is considerable potential for positive synergistic effects after complete paralysis by combining the over-ground step training in an exoskeleton, combined with transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation either without or with pharmacological modulation.

  19. Comparison of TiO2 photocatalysis, electrochemically assisted Fenton reaction and direct electrochemistry for simulation of phase I metabolism reactions of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokolainen, Miina; Gul, Turan; Permentier, Hjalmar; Sikanen, Tiina; Kostiainen, Risto; Kotiaho, Tapio

    2016-02-15

    The feasibility of titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysis, electrochemically assisted Fenton reaction (EC-Fenton) and direct electrochemical oxidation (EC) for simulation of phase I metabolism of drugs was studied by comparing the reaction products of buspirone, promazine, testosterone and 7-ethoxycoumarin with phase I metabolites of the same compounds produced in vitro by human liver microsomes (HLM). Reaction products were analysed by UHPLC-MS. TiO2 photocatalysis simulated the in vitro phase I metabolism in HLM more comprehensively than did EC-Fenton or EC. Even though TiO2 photocatalysis, EC-Fenton and EC do not allow comprehensive prediction of phase I metabolism, all three methods produce several important metabolites without the need for demanding purification steps to remove the biological matrix. Importantly, TiO2 photocatalysis produces aliphatic and aromatic hydroxylation products where direct EC fails. Furthermore, TiO2 photocatalysis is an extremely rapid, simple and inexpensive way to generate oxidation products in a clean matrix and the reaction can be simply initiated and quenched by switching the UV lamp on/off. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Comprehensive Review of Treatment Options for Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Shalini; Trevino, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome that involves a combination of emotional and physical symptoms that result in significant functional impairment. Because of the debilitating nature of PMDD, multiple treatment options have been considered. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these therapeutic regimens to help health care professionals provide adequate treatment for PMDD and premenstrual syndrome. The treatments that are reviewed are organized into the following categories: psychiatric, anovulatory, supplements, herbal, nonpharmacological, and other. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been established as the first-line treatment for PMDD. Although luteal phase or continuous dosing can be used, additional research is needed to more thoroughly compare the efficacies and differential symptom response of continuous, semi-intermittent, luteal phase, and symptoms-onset dosing. The psychiatric medications venlafaxine, duloxetine, alprazolam, and buspirone have also been found to be useful treatments for PMDD. Various anovulatory-related treatments have demonstrated efficacy; however, the use of some of these treatments remains limited due to potential side effects and/or the availability of cheaper alternatives. Although a variety of supplement and herbal-related treatments have been proposed, with some warranting further research, at this time only calcium supplementation has demonstrated a consistent therapeutic benefit. In conclusion, serotoninergic antidepressants have been established as the first-line treatment option for PMDD; however, there are a variety of additional treatment options that should be considered if a patient fails to achieve an adequate therapeutic response with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

  1. Treatment of Comorbid Alcohol Dependence and Anxiety Disorder: Review of the Scientific Evidence and Recommendations for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Gimeno

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with alcohol-use disorders (AUDs have a high prevalence of anxiety disorders (AnxDs. “Co-occurring disorders” refers to the coexistence of an AUD and/or drug related disorders with another non-addictive psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of psychopharmacological treatments and psychotherapy in patients with AUD and AnxD and to propose recommendations for the treatment of patients with comorbid AnxDs and AUDs. Randomized clinical trials, meta-analyses, and clinical guidelines were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Paroxetine was found to be effective in social anxiety patients with alcohol dependence. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, especially sertraline, showed effective results in posttraumatic stress disorder and in comorbid AnxD–AUD. However, SSRIs should be used with caution when patients are actively drinking because they may increase alcohol consumption. Buspirone, gabapentin, and pregabalin were found to be effective in comorbid AnxD–AUD. The treatment of dual AnxDs should start as early as possible. Since AUDs and AnxDs can reinforce each other, treatments targeting both pathologies can be effective. Women suffer from higher levels of stress and AnxDs than men, and they are also more vulnerable to maintaining alcohol consumption levels. Further research is needed in this comorbid patient population, including the study of different types of patients and gender perspectives.

  2. Duloxetine-induced Sleep Bruxism in Fibromyalgia Successfully Treated With Amitriptyline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Şahin Onat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 44-year-old woman, who was suffering from widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, and sleep disorder, was diagnosed as fibromyalgia. There was no apparent organic disease. Duloxetine therapy was introduced with a dose of 60 mg/day at bedtime. A few days later her husband noted severe teeth clenching and associated loud grinding noises during sleep. Then, duloxetine dosage was reduced to 30 mg/day. The bruxism continued with this dosage, thus the therapy was discontinued. The bruxism resolved after cessation. Three weeks later, duloxetine therapy was restarted at the dosage of 60 mg/day. On the third day of the therapy, bruxism started again and amitriptyline therapy at the dosage of 10 mg/day was added to duloxetine therapy. The dosage of amitriptyline was incrementally adjusted to 25 mg/ day. On the fourth day of the combined therapy, bruxism symptoms improved. Two months later, the bruxism symptoms were resolved and the complaints for fibromyalgia were under control. Although bruxism has been reported due to venlafaxine use, there is only one duloxetine-induced bruxism case in the literature which was treated with buspirone. However, we report duloxetine-induced bruxism treated successfully with amitriptyline in a patient with fibromyalgia. Tricyclic antidepressants have a suppression effect on the REM phase of the sleep cycle; this may help to cease the bruxism symptoms appearing in that phase of the sleep cycle. This is the first reported case of fibromyalgia with duloxetine-induced sleep bruxism successfully treated with amitriptyline.

  3. Gender differences in cannabis use disorder treatment: Change readiness and taking steps predict worse cannabis outcomes for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Brian J; Baker, Nathaniel L; McRae-Clark, Aimee L

    2016-09-01

    Gender differences in cannabis use and cannabis use disorder have been established. Regarding treatment, some evidence suggests that women are less responsive, though the mechanisms are not well understood. Motivation to change and self-efficacy are associated with better outcomes overall, and may help explain gender differences in cannabis use outcomes. A secondary data analysis of a double-blind placebo controlled trial of buspirone treatment for cannabis dependence (N=175) was conducted. Self-report assessments of motivation to change, self-efficacy, and other clinical correlates were completed at baseline, and cannabis use was measured throughout the study. There was a significant interaction between gender and taking steps on abstinence. Counter to hypothesis, higher taking steps reduced likelihood of achieving abstinence among women; there was no association among men. Subsequently, taking steps was associated with self-efficacy and quantity of use among men, and cannabis related problems among women. There was a significant interaction between gender and readiness to change on creatinine adjusted cannabinoid levels. Change readiness was positively associated with cannabinoid levels among women, but not men. Motivation to change and initiation of change behavior predict worse cannabis outcomes in women. Men and women differ in what motivates change behavior. Social desirability, neurobiology, and treatment type may impact these effects. Gender differences in cannabis use and treatment responsiveness must be considered in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Medication Discovery for Addiction: Translating the Dopamine D3 Receptor Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Amy Hauck; Blaylock, Brandi L.; Nader, Michael A.; Bergman, Jack; Sibley, David R.; Skolnick, Phil

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) has been investigated as a potential target for medication development to treat substance use disorders (SUDs) with a particular focus on cocaine and methamphetamine. Currently, there are no approved medications to treat cocaine and methamphetamine addiction and thus developing pharmacotherapeutics to compliment existing behavioral strategies is a fundamental goal. Novel compounds with high affinity and D3R selectivity have been evaluated in numerous animal models of drug abuse and favorable outcomes in nonhuman primate models of self-administration and relapse have provided compelling evidence to advance these agents into the clinic. One approach is to repurpose drugs that share the D3R mechanism and already have clinical utility, and to this end buspirone has been identified as a viable candidate for clinical trials. A second, but substantially more resource intensive and risky approach involves the development of compounds that exclusively target D3R, such as GSK598809 and PG 619. Clinical investigation of these drugs or other novel D3R-selective agents will provide a better understanding of the role D3R plays in addiction and whether or not antagonists or partial agonists that are D3R selective are effective in achieving abstinence in this patient population. PMID:22781742

  5. Direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising and the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R A; Kravitz, R L; Wilkes, M S

    1999-11-01

    Drug manufacturers are intensely promoting their products directly to consumers, but the impact has not been widely studied. Consumers' awareness and understanding of, attitudes toward, and susceptibility to direct-to-consumer (DTC) drug advertising were examined. Random-digit dialing telephone survey with a random household member selection procedure (completion and response rates, 58% and 69%, respectively). Respondents were interviewed while they were at their residences. Complete data were obtained from 329 adults in Sacramento County, California. Outcome measures included awareness of advertisements for 10 selected drugs, misconceptions about DTC advertising, attitudes toward DTC ads, and behavioral responses to such promotions. The influence of demographic characteristics, health status, attitudes, beliefs, and media exposure on awareness and behaviors was examined. On average, respondents were aware of advertisements for 3.7 of the 10 drugs; awareness varied from 8% for Buspar (buspirone) to 72% for Claritin (loratadine). Awareness was associated with prescription drug use, media exposure, positive attitudes toward DTC advertising, poorer health, and insurance status. Substantial misconceptions were revealed; e.g., 43% thought that only "completely safe" drugs could be advertised. Direct-to-consumer advertisements had led one third of respondents to ask their physicians for drug information and one fifth to request a prescription. Direct-to-consumer advertisements are reaching the public, but selectively so, and affecting their behaviors. Implications for public policy are examined.

  6. Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke (ICTuS): early clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyden, Patrick D; Allgren, Robin L; Ng, Ken; Akins, Paul; Meyer, Brett; Al-Sanani, Fahmi; Lutsep, Helmi; Dobak, John; Matsubara, Bradley S; Zivin, Justin

    2005-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the safety and feasibility of mild therapeutic hypothermia using an endovascular temperature management system in awake acute ischemic stroke patients. The Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke (ICTuS) study was an uncontrolled, multicenter development and feasibility study of conscious patients (n = 18) presenting within 12 hours of onset of an acute ischemic stroke at 5 clinical sites in the United States. Enrolled patients were to undergo core temperature management using an endovascular cooling system to induce and maintain mild, therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature of 33.0 degrees C) for a period of either 12 or 24 hours, followed by controlled rewarming to 36.5 degrees C over the subsequent 12-hour period. Nine patients underwent 12 hours of cooling followed by 12 hours of controlled rewarming, and 6 patients underwent 24 hours of cooling followed by 12 hours of controlled rewarming. Three patients underwent <1.5 hours of hypothermia due to clinical or technical issues. We also developed an antishivering regimen using buspirone and meperidine administered prophylactically to suppress shivering. The endovascular cooling catheter was well tolerated, with acceptable adverse event rates. Increasing the duration of hypothermia administration from 12 hours to 24 hours did not appear to increase the incidence or severity of adverse effects. Endovascular cooling with a proactive antishivering regimen can be accomplished in awake stroke patients. Further studies are needed to establish the safety and efficacy of this approach.

  7. Reevaluating Antidepressant Selection in Patients With Bruxism and Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Royce; Sun, Ye-Ming

    2017-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is a broad pain disorder that refers to several conditions affecting the temporomandibular joint of the jaw and the muscles of mastication. As with most pain disorders, a high prevalence of depression and anxiety is associated with TMD. Research has shown that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the first-line drug therapy for major depressive disorder, may not be suitable for TMD patients because SSRIs can induce teeth-grinding, otherwise known as bruxism. This is problematic because bruxism is believed to further exacerbate TMD. Therefore, the purpose of this literature review is to better understand the mechanism of SSRI-induced bruxism, as well as discuss alternative antidepressant options for treating depression and anxiety in patients with bruxism and TMD. Alternative classes of antidepressants reviewed include serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, atypical antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Findings indicate that dopamine agonists and buspirone are currently the most effective medications to treat the side effects of SSRI-induced bruxism, but results regarding the effectiveness of specific antidepressants that avoid bruxism altogether remain inconclusive.

  8. An improved human anxiety process biomarker: characterization of frequency band, personality and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadli, S M; Glue, P; McIntosh, J; McNaughton, N

    2015-12-15

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental illness in the western world with a major impact on disability. But their diagnosis has lacked objective biomarkers. We previously demonstrated a human anxiety process biomarker, goal-conflict-specific electroencephalography (EEG) rhythmicity (GCSR) in the stop-signal task (SST). Here we have developed and characterized an improved test appropriate for clinical group testing. We modified the SST to produce balanced numbers of trials in clearly separated stop-signal delay groups. As previously, right frontal (F8) GCSR was extracted as the difference in EEG log Fourier power between matching stop and go trials (that is, stop-signal-specific power) of a quadratic contrast of the three delay values (that is, power when stopping and going are in balanced conflict compared with the average of when stopping or going is greater). Separate experiments assessed drug sensitivity (n=34) and personality relations (n=59). GCSR in this new SST was reduced by three chemically distinct anxiolytic drugs (administered double-blind): buspirone (10 mg), triazolam (0.25 mg) and pregabalin (75 mg); had a frequency range (4-12 Hz) consistent with rodent model data; and positively correlated significantly with neuroticism and nonsignificantly with trait anxiety scores. GCSR, measured in our new form of the SST, should be suitable as a biomarker for one specific anxiety process in the testing of clinical groups and novel drugs and in the development of measures suitable for individual diagnosis.

  9. Depression, antidepressants, and sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, B S

    1995-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's), prescribed for the relief of depression, can cause sexual dysfunction in up to fifty percent of those taking them. The SSRI's--including fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil)--affect mood stabilization by promoting the transmission of the neurotransmitter serotonin, although enhancing serotonergic function can decrease libido or lead to erectile difficulties. As an alternative to lowering antidepressant dosages and risking losing therapeutic gains, administering serotonin-blockers, such as cyproheptadine (Periactin) and yohimbine (Yocon), has been shown to restore sexual function. However, the serotonin antagonist, cyproheptadine, causes sedation and can reverse the antidepressant or anti-obsessive effect of the SSRI. Yohimbine enhances transmission of the neurotransmitter epinephrine, increasing the flow of blood to erectile tissue and stimulating sexual desire by activating the cerebral cortex. Its drawbacks are increased levels of panic attacks and higher required dosages. Other potential biochemical stratagems are: amantadine (Symmetrel), bromcriptine (Parlodel), and buspirone (Buspar), which enhance dopamine and serotonin transmission; and bethanecol (Urechline), which enhances choline transmission. One study indicates improved sexual response when the nonserotonergic, mildly dopamine-enhancing buproprion (Welbutrin) is substituted for fluoxetine.

  10. The 5-HT1A Receptor and the Stimulus Effects of LSD in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissig, C.J.; Eckler, J.R.; Rabin, R.A.; Winter, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale It has been suggested that the 5-HT1A receptor plays a significant modulatory role in the stimulus effects of the indoleamine hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Objectives The present study sought to characterize the effects of several compounds with known affinity for the 5-HT1A receptor on the discriminative stimulus effects of LSD. Methods 12 Male F-344 rats were trained in a two-lever, fixed ratio10, food reinforced task with LSD (0.1 mg/kg; IP; 15 min pretreatment) as a discriminative stimulus. Combination and substitution tests with the 5-HT1A agonists, 8-OH-DPAT, buspirone, gepirone, and ipsapirone, with LSD-induced stimulus control were then performed. The effects of these 5-HT1A ligands were also tested in the presence of the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100,635 (0.3 mg/kg; SC; 30 min. pretreatment). Results In combination tests stimulus control by LSD was increased by all 5-HT1A receptor ligands with agonist properties. Similarly, in tests of antagonism, the increase in drug-appropriate responding caused by stimulation of the 5-HT1A receptor was abolished by administration of WAY-100,635. Conclusions These data, obtained using a drug discrimination model of the hallucinogenic effects of LSD, provide support for the hypothesis that the 5-HT1A receptor has a significant modulatory role in the stimulus effects of LSD. PMID:16025319

  11. The 5-HT1A receptor and the stimulus effects of LSD in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissig, C J; Eckler, J R; Rabin, R A; Winter, J C

    2005-10-01

    It has been suggested that the 5-HT1A receptor plays a significant modulatory role in the stimulus effects of the indoleamine hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). The present study sought to characterize the effects of several compounds with known affinity for the 5-HT1A receptor on the discriminative stimulus effects of LSD. Twelve male Fischer 344 rats were trained in a two-lever, fixed-ratio (FR) 10, and food-reinforced task with LSD (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.; 15-min pretreatment) as a discriminative stimulus. Combination and substitution tests with the 5-HT(1A) agonists, 8-OH-DPAT, buspirone, gepirone, and ipsapirone, with LSD-induced stimulus control were then performed. The effects of these 5-HT1A ligands were also tested in the presence of the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100,635 (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.; 30-min pretreatment). In combination tests, stimulus control by LSD was increased by all 5-HT1A receptor ligands with agonist properties. Similarly, in tests of antagonism, the increase in drug-appropriate responding caused by stimulation of the 5-HT1A receptor was abolished by administration of WAY-100,635. These data, obtained using a drug discrimination model of the hallucinogenic effects of LSD, provide support for the hypothesis that the 5-HT1A receptor has a significant modulatory role in the stimulus effects of LSD.

  12. Tratamento farmacológico do transtorno de ansiedade generalizada: perspectivas futuras Pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Andreatini

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo apresenta uma visão atualizada e ampla do tratamento farmacológico do transtorno de ansiedade generalizada (TAG. São revistos os medicamentos com eficácia comprovada em estudos controlados e atualmente disponíveis na clínica (benzodiazepínicos, buspirona, antidepressivos, betabloqueadores, antipsicóticos e extrato de kava-kava. A seguir, baseados nesses dados, propõe-se um algoritmo de tratamento do TAG. São apresentadas as principais linhas de pesquisa de novos fármacos ansiolíticos, descrevendo os principais achados clínicos e pré-clínicos.This article presents an updated and broad perspective of the pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD. Medications proven to be efficacious in controlled studies and available in the clinic setting were reviewed (benzodiazepines, buspirone, antidepressives, beta-blocking agents, antipsychotics and kava-kava extract. From this data, an algorithm for GAD treatment is proposed. In addition, the main research lines on new anxiolytic drugs and their stage of clinical or pre-clinical development are presented.

  13. Testing Homeopathy in Mouse Emotional Response Models: Pooled Data Analysis of Two Series of Studies

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    Paolo Bellavite

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two previous investigations were performed to assess the activity of Gelsemium sempervirens (Gelsemium s. in mice, using emotional response models. These two series are pooled and analysed here. Gelsemium s. in various homeopathic centesimal dilutions/dynamizations (4C, 5C, 7C, 9C, and 30C, a placebo (solvent vehicle, and the reference drugs diazepam (1 mg/kg body weight or buspirone (5 mg/kg body weight were delivered intraperitoneally to groups of albino CD1 mice, and their effects on animal behaviour were assessed by the light-dark (LD choice test and the open-field (OF exploration test. Up to 14 separate replications were carried out in fully blind and randomised conditions. Pooled analysis demonstrated highly significant effects of Gelsemium s. 5C, 7C, and 30C on the OF parameter “time spent in central area” and of Gelsemium s. 5C, 9C, and 30C on the LD parameters “time spent in lit area” and “number of light-dark transitions,” without any sedative action or adverse effects on locomotion. This pooled data analysis confirms and reinforces the evidence that Gelsemium s. regulates emotional responses and behaviour of laboratory mice in a nonlinear fashion with dilution/dynamization.

  14. Treatment of anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin; Michaelis, Sophie; Wedekind, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder/agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, and others) are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders, and are associated with a high burden of illness. Anxiety disorders are often underrecognized and undertreated in primary care. Treatment is indicated when a patient shows marked distress or suffers from complications resulting from the disorder. The treatment recommendations given in this article are based on guidelines, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews of randomized controlled studies. Anxiety disorders should be treated with psychological therapy, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of both. Cognitive behavioral therapy can be regarded as the psychotherapy with the highest level of evidence. First-line drugs are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Benzodiazepines are not recommended for routine use. Other treatment options include pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, buspirone, moclobemide, and others. After remission, medications should be continued for 6 to 12 months. When developing a treatment plan, efficacy, adverse effects, interactions, costs, and the preference of the patient should be considered. PMID:28867934

  15. Pinelliae rhizoma, a toxic chinese herb, can significantly inhibit CYP3A activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinjun; Cheng, Zaixing; He, Shugui; Shi, Jian; Liu, Shuqiang; Zhang, Guiyu; Zhu, Lijun; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhongqiu; Lin, Na; Lu, Linlin

    2015-01-07

    Raw Pinelliae Rhizoma (RPR) is a representative toxic herb that is widely used for eliminating phlegm or treating cough and vomiting. Given its irritant toxicity, its processed products, including Pinelliae Rhizoma Praeparatum (PRP) and Pinelliae Rhizoma Praeparatum cum Zingibere et Alumine (PRPZA), are more commonly applied and administered concomitantly with other chemical drugs, such as cough medications. This study aimed to investigate the effects of RPR, PRP, and PRPZA on CYP3A activity. Testosterone (Tes) and buspirone (BP) were used as specific probe substrates ex vivo and in vivo, respectively. CYP3A activity was determined by the metabolite formation ratios from the substrates. Ex vivo results show that the metabolite formation ratios from Tes significantly decreased, indicating that RPR, PRP, and PRPZA could inhibit CYP3A activity in rats. CYP3A protein and mRNA levels were determined to explore the underlying mechanism. These levels showed marked and consistent down-regulation with CYP3A activity. A significant decrease in metabolite formation ratios from BP was also found in PRPZA group in vivo, implying that PRPZA could inhibit CYP3A activity. Conclusively, co-administration of PR with other CYP3A-metabolizing drugs may cause drug-drug interactions. Clinical use of PR-related formulae should be monitored carefully to avoid adverse interactions.

  16. Pinelliae Rhizoma, a Toxic Chinese Herb, Can Significantly Inhibit CYP3A Activity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjun Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Raw Pinelliae Rhizoma (RPR is a representative toxic herb that is widely used for eliminating phlegm or treating cough and vomiting. Given its irritant toxicity, its processed products, including Pinelliae Rhizoma Praeparatum (PRP and Pinelliae Rhizoma Praeparatum cum Zingibere et Alumine (PRPZA, are more commonly applied and administered concomitantly with other chemical drugs, such as cough medications. This study aimed to investigate the effects of RPR, PRP, and PRPZA on CYP3A activity. Testosterone (Tes and buspirone (BP were used as specific probe substrates ex vivo and in vivo, respectively. CYP3A activity was determined by the metabolite formation ratios from the substrates. Ex vivo results show that the metabolite formation ratios from Tes significantly decreased, indicating that RPR, PRP, and PRPZA could inhibit CYP3A activity in rats. CYP3A protein and mRNA levels were determined to explore the underlying mechanism. These levels showed marked and consistent down-regulation with CYP3A activity. A significant decrease in metabolite formation ratios from BP was also found in PRPZA group in vivo, implying that PRPZA could inhibit CYP3A activity. Conclusively, co-administration of PR with other CYP3A-metabolizing drugs may cause drug–drug interactions. Clinical use of PR-related formulae should be monitored carefully to avoid adverse interactions.

  17. Advances in pharmacotherapy for treating female sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Rossella E; Cucinella, Laura

    2015-04-01

    'Female sexual dysfunction' (FSD) is an umbrella term comprising a range of common disorders, including hypoactive sexual desire, reduced subjective and/or physical genital arousal (poor sensation, vasocongestion, lubrication), sexual pain and inability to achieve orgasm/satisfaction, which are multidimensional by nature and often coexisting. Psychological and contextual factors have a significant influence on organic components of sexual response and behavior and a tailored medical approach to sexual symptoms is inevitably limited. The paper reports the most recent advances in pharmacotherapy for women taking into account the biopsychosocial model. Hormone therapy, including estrogens, testosterone, tibolone and dehydroepiandrosterone, are discussed in term of efficacy and safety in postmenopausal women both for female sexual interest/arousal disorder (FSIAD) and genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder. Ospemifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, approved to treat dyspareunia at menopause, is also discussed. Data on psychoactive agents for treatment of FSIAD in premenopausal women are discussed, including the potential use of on-demand combined hormonal (testosterone) and non-hormonal (buspirone or sildenafil) treatments to address possible neurophysiological profiles of women. We are still waiting for an approved pharmacotherapy for FSD. This is not the result of gender inequality in sexual medicine, but it reflects the need of balancing benefits and risks in order to provide effective and safe treatments to women of any age.

  18. Azapirones versus placebo for panic disorder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Hissei; Tajika, Aran; Chen, Peiyao; Pompoli, Alessandro; Guaiana, Giuseppe; Castellazzi, Mariasole; Bighelli, Irene; Girlanda, Francesca; Barbui, Corrado; Koesters, Markus; Cipriani, Andrea; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2014-09-30

    Panic disorder is common in the general population. It is often associated with other psychiatric disorders, such as drug dependence, major depression, bipolar disorder, social phobia, specific phobia and generalised anxiety disorder. Azapirones are a class of drugs used as anxiolytics. They are associated with less drowsiness, psychomotor impairment, alcohol potentiation and potential for addiction or abuse than benzodiazepines. However, azapirones are not widely used in the treatment of panic disorder and evidence for their efficacy is unclear. It is important to find out if azapirones are effective and acceptable in the treatment of panic disorder. To assess the effects of azapirones on panic disorder in adults, specifically:1. to determine the efficacy of azapirones in alleviating symptoms of panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia, in comparison with placebo;2. to review the acceptability of azapirones in panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia, in comparison with placebo; and3. to investigate adverse effects of azapirones in panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, including general prevalence of adverse effects, compared with placebo. We searched the Cochrane Depression Anxiety and Neurosis Group Trials Specialised Register (CCDANCTR, search date: 10th January 2014), which includes relevant randomised controlled trials from The Cochrane Library (all years), MEDLINE (1950-), EMBASE (1974-), and PsycINFO (1967-). Randomised controlled trials that compared azapirones with placebo for panic disorder in adults. Three review authors independently identified studies, assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. Three studies involving 170 participants compared the azapirone buspirone with placebo. No study provided enough usable information on our primary efficacy outcome (response). For our primary acceptability outcome, moderate-quality evidence indicated that azapirones had lower acceptability than

  19. The Preclinical and Clinical Effects of Vilazodone for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahli, Zeyad T; Banerjee, Pradeep; Tarazi, Frank I

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the leading cause of disability worldwide, and according to the STAR*D trial, only 33% of patients with MDD responded to initial drug therapy. Augmentation of the leading class of antidepressant treatment, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone has been shown to be effective in treating patients that do not respond to initial SSRI therapy. This suggests that newer treatments may improve the clinical picture of MDD. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the antidepressant drug vilazodone (EMD 68843), a novel SSRI and 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist. Vilazodone has a half-life between 20-24 hours, reaches peak plasma concentrations at 3.7-5.3 hours, and is primarily metabolized by the hepatic CYP450 3A4 enzyme system. The authors review the preclinical and clinical profile of vilazodone. The roles of serotonin, the 5-HT1A receptor, and current pharmacotherapy approaches for MDD are briefly reviewed. Next, the preclinical pharmacological, behavioral, and physiological effects of vilazodone are presented, followed by the pharmacokinetic properties and metabolism of vilazodone in humans. Last, a brief summary of the main efficacy, safety, and tolerability outcomes of clinical trials of vilazodone is provided. Vilazodone has shown efficacy versus placebo in improving depression symptoms in several double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. The long-term safety and tolerability of vilazodone treatment has also been established. Further studies are needed that directly compare patients treated with an SSRI (both with and without an adjunctive 5-HT1A partial agonist) versus patients treated with vilaozodone.

  20. Dopamine D3 receptor ligands for drug addiction treatment: update on recent findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Foll, Bernard; Collo, Ginetta; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Boileau, Isabelle; Merlo Pich, Emilio; Sokoloff, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor is located in the limbic area and apparently mediates selective effects on motivation to take drugs and drug-seeking behaviors, so that there has been considerable interest on the possible use of D3 receptor ligands to treat drug addiction. However, only recently selective tools allowing studying this receptor have been developed. This chapter presents an overview of findings that were presented at a symposium on the conference Dopamine 2013 in Sardinia in May 2013. Novel neurobiological findings indicate that drugs of abuse can lead to significant structural plasticity in rodent brain and that this is dependent on the availability of functional dopamine D3 autoreceptor, whose activation increased phosphorylation in the ERK pathway and in the Akt/mTORC1 pathway indicating the parallel engagement of a series of intracellular signaling pathways all involved in cell growth and survival. Preclinical findings using animal models of drug-seeking behaviors confirm that D3 antagonists have a promising profile to treat drug addiction across drugs of abuse type. Imaging the D3 is now feasible in human subjects. Notably, the development of (+)-4-propyl-9-hydroxynaphthoxazine ligand used in positron emission tomography (PET) studies in humans allows to measure D3 and D2 receptors based on the area of the brain under study. This PET ligand has been used to confirm up-regulation of D3 sites in psychostimulant users and to reveal that tobacco smoking produces elevation of dopamine at the level of D3 sites. There are now novel antagonists being developed, but also old drugs such as buspirone, that are available to test the D3 hypothesis in humans. The first results of clinical investigations are now being provided. Overall, those recent findings support further exploration of D3 ligands to treat drug addiction. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Abnormal behavior and adaptation problems in dogs and cats and their pharmacologic control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöchle, W

    1998-11-01

    Small animal practitioners are increasingly confronted with patients showing adaptation related problems (ARP) which are expressed as disturbed or abnormal behavior (DAB). As a result, practitioners are asked increasingly to euthanize animals which seemingly cannot be socialized. In healthy dogs and cats, three main causes for DAB can be detected: refusal of obedience because of the drive for dominance; anxiety and frustration; and geriatric DAB. Increasingly, disease conditions not readily diagnosed can cause DAB, especially hypothyroidism. Influencing and contributing factors to DAB are breed, sex, experiences as a puppy, behavior of owners, changes in the pet's environment. ARPs may also cause disturbances in the condition of skin and fur, e.g. atopic dermatitis, pruritus sine materia, lick granuloma, and of the intestinal organs (vomiting, irritated bowel syndrome) and may result in an immune deficiency. Therapeutic approaches include behavioral therapy, surgical or hormonal castration with progestins or antiandrogens, substitution with thyroxin in cases with hypothyroidism, and/or the use of psychopharmaca, most prominently of modern antidepressiva like amitriptyline; buspirone; clomipramine and fluoxetine, but also of selegiline, a mono-aminoxydase inhibitor. These compounds, among other effects, are elevating prolactin levels. This seems to allow to formulate a working hypothesis: in the canine species, prolactin is obviously a hormone enabling socialization; hence all drugs which safely cause an increase in prolactin production might be suitable to manage or control ARPs and DAB in the dog, but also in the cat. Higher levels of prolactin than those required for socialization, as seen in nursing bitches or some clinically overt cases of pseudopregnancy, may cause maternal aggression and can be controlled with prolactin inhibitors, if needed.

  2. The modified Geller-Seifter test in rats was insensitive to GABAB receptor positive modulation or blockade, or 5-HT1A receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Neil E; Hanania, Taleen

    2010-03-17

    Both the GABA(B) receptor positive modulator GS39783 and the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP46381 exhibit anxiolytic-like properties in animal models. In the present studies, the effects of GS39783 and CGP46381 in the modified Geller-Seifter task were assessed. First, the predictive validity of the task was confirmed by assessing the effects of multiple anxiolytic and non-anxiolytic compounds on punished and unpunished responding. Rats were trained in the modified Geller-Seifter task. After successful acquisition of the task, chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, MPEP, haloperidol, GS39783, 8-OH-DPAT, alprazolam and CGP46381 were tested consecutively. For each test compound, doses were administered in a randomized, counter-balanced, within-subjects design. Drug tests were performed only when rats exhibited baseline performance (the punished and time-out response rates were less than 10% of the unpunished response rate). Chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, alprazolam and MPEP released punished responding with variable effects on unpunished responding. Haloperidol had a small but significant effect on punished responding at an intermediate dose, and decreased unpunished responding at the highest dose tested. In contrast, administration of the GABA(B) receptor positive modulator GS398783 or the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP46381 at doses up to 30 mg/kg had no effects on either punished or unpunished responding. The 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT did not release punished responding, but significantly decreased unpunished responding at the highest dose tested. The modified Geller-Seifter task generally exhibits good predictive validity for anxiolytic-like compounds. Neither GABA(B) receptor positive allosteric modulation nor blockade exhibited anxiolytic-like properties in the modified Geller-Seifter task. The 5-HT(1A) partial agonist buspirone was similarly ineffective. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased plasma corticosterone levels after periaqueductal gray stimulation-induced escape reaction or panic attacks in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lee Wei; Blokland, Arjan; van Duinen, Marlies; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Tan, Sonny; Vlamings, Rinske; Janssen, Mark; Jahanshahi, Ali; Aziz-Mohammadi, Mujzgan; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Schruers, Koen; Temel, Yasin

    2011-04-15

    The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is involved in stress, depression and anxiety. Controversy exists on HPA axis activation during panic attacks (PAs). We examined whether the HPA axis is involved in the escape or panic-like response in an animal model of PAs induced by electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) in rats. Additionally, rats were also treated with chronic administration of buspirone (BUSP) and escitalopram (ESCIT), respectively; and they were stimulated in the open-field arena for panic-like reaction. Levels of stress hormone corticosterone were measured following 30 min after escape or panic condition. Our results demonstrated that the levels of plasma corticosterone were significantly increased after the induction of escape or panic-like response in comparison with the sham animals. The levels of corticosterone were significantly decreased in the dlPAG stimulated groups after rats were treated chronically with the ESCIT but not the BUSP as compared to the saline treated animals. Importantly, the increase of corticosterone level after escape or panic-like response was paralleled by an increase of neuronal activation of c-Fos in both the parvocellular and magnocellular paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Moreover, the c-Fos data also showed a decrease in the number of positive cells particularly for the ESCIT as well as the BUSP in comparison with the saline stimulated animals. In conclusion, the present study clearly demonstrated that PA or escape response activates the HPA axis and it remains difficult to anticipate the mechanism underlying HPA axis during PAs and its relationship with 5-HT drugs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antagonism by 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetraline and other serotonin agonists of muscarinic M1-type receptors coupled to inositol phospholipid breakdown in human IMR-32 and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, C.J. (Astra Research Centre AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden) Karolinska Institutet (Sweden)); Ahlgren, P.C. (Karolinska Institutet (Sweden)); O' Neill, C. (Huddinge Univ. Hospital (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    IMR-32 and SK-N-MC cells were found to contain ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate specific binding sites inhibited by pirenzepine in a manner suggesting the presence of both M1-type and M2-type muscarinic receptor recognition sites. Neither cell had detectable ({sup 3}H)8-OH-DPAT binding sites. Carbachol stimulated the rate of inositol phospholipid breakdown in IMR-32 and SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cells with an EC{sub 50} value of about 50 {mu}M in both cases. Pirenzepine inhibited the carbachol stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown in both cells with Hill slopes of unity and IC{sub 50} values of 15 nM (IMR-32) and 12 nM (SK-N-MC). The 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT competitively inhibited carbachol-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown with pA{sub 2} values of 5.78 (IMR-32) and 5.61 (SK-N-MC). The 5-HT agonists 5-MeODMT and buspirone at micromolar concentrations inhibited carbachol-stimulated breakdown in IMR-32 cells. The inhibition by 8-OH-DPAT and 5-MeODMT was not affected by preincubation with (-)alprenolol. 5-HT was without effect on either basal or carbachol-stimulated breakdown. It is concluded that IMR-32 and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells express muscarinic M1-type but not serotoninergic receptors coupled to phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. 8-OH-DPAT acts as a weak antagonist at these muscarinic receptors.

  5. Resistive polymer versus forced-air warming: comparable heat transfer and core rewarming rates in volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberger, Oliver; Held, Christine; Stadelmann, Karin; Mayer, Nikolaus; Hunkeler, Corinne; Sessler, Daniel I; Kurz, Andrea

    2008-11-01

    Mild perioperative hypothermia increases the risk of several severe complications. Perioperative patient warming to preserve normothermia has thus become routine, with forced-air warming being used most often. In previous studies, various resistive warming systems have shown mixed results in comparison with forced-air. Recently, a polymer-based resistive patient warming system has been developed. We compared the efficacy of a standard forced-air warming system with the resistive polymer system in volunteers. Eight healthy volunteers participated, each on two separate study days. Unanesthetized volunteers were cooled to a core temperature (tympanic membrane) of 34 degrees C by application of forced-air at 10 degrees C and a circulating-water mattress at 4 degrees C. Meperidine and buspirone were administered to prevent shivering. In a randomly designated order, volunteers were then rewarmed (until their core temperatures reached 36 degrees C) with one of the following active warming systems: (1) forced-air warming (Bair Hugger warming cover #300, blower #750, Arizant, Eden Prairie, MN); or (2) polymer fiber resistive warming (HotDog whole body blanket, HotDog standard controller, Augustine Biomedical, Eden Prairie, MN). The alternate system was used on the second study day. Metabolic heat production, cutaneous heat loss, and core temperature were measured. Metabolic heat production and cutaneous heat loss were similar with each system. After a 30-min delay, core temperature increased nearly linearly by 0.98 (95% confidence interval 0.91-1.04) degrees C/h with forced-air and by 0.92 (0.85-1.00) degrees C/h with resistive heating (P = 0.4). Heating efficacy and core rewarming rates were similar with full-body forced-air and full-body resistive polymer heating in healthy volunteers.

  6. Glutarimides: Biological activity, general synthetic methods and physicochemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović-Đorđević Jelena B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutarimides, 2,6-dioxopiperidines are compounds that rarely occur in natural sources, but so far isolated ones exert widespread pharmacological activities, which makes them valuable as potential pharmacotherapeutics. Glutarimides act as androgen receptor antagonists, anti-inflammatory, anxiolytics, antibacterials, and tumor suppressing agents. Some synthetic glutarimide derivatives are already in use as immunosuppressive and sedative (e.g., thalidomide or anxiolytics (buspirone drugs. The wide applicability of this class of compounds, justify the interest of scientists to explore new pathways for its syntheses. General methods for synthesis of six-membered imide ring, are presented in this paper. These methods include: a reaction of dicarboxylic acids with ammonia or primary amine, b reactions of cyclization: amido-acids, diamides, dinitriles, nitrilo-acids, amido-nitriles, amido-esters, amidoacyl-chlorides or diacyl-chlorides, c adition of carbon-monoxide on a,b-unsaturated amides, d oxidation reactions, e Michael adition of active methylen compounds on methacrylamide or conjugated amides. Some of the described methods are used for closing glutarimide ring in syntheses of farmacological active compounds sesbanimide and aldose reductase inhibitors (ARI. Analyses of the geometry, as well as, the spectroscopic analyses (NMR and FT-IR of some glutarimides are presented because of their broad spectrum of pharmacological activity. To elucidate structures of glutarimides, geometrical parameters of newly synthesized tert-pentyl-1-benzyl-4-methyl-glutarimide-3-carboxylate (PBMG are analyzed and compared with the experimental data from X-ray analysis for glutarimide. Moreover, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP surface which is plotted over the optimized geometry to elucidate the reactivity of PBMG molecule is analyzed. The electronic properties of glutarimide derivatives are explained on the example of thalidomide. The Frontier Molecular Orbital

  7. Evaluation of aggressiveness of female mice using a semi-automated apparatus for measurement of aggressive biting behavior toward an inanimate object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchiiwa, Toshiko; Kuchiiwa, Satoshi

    2016-01-15

    Most laboratory research on aggressive behavior has focused on intraspecific intermale aggression tests. The intraspecific confrontation is not available for the evaluation of female aggressiveness, since androgens are critical for maintenance of this behavior, whereas aggressive biting behavior toward inanimate objects (ABI) occurs in both males and females. We propose an experimental method for evaluating female aggressiveness. We improved the previously developed semi-automated apparatus (Aggression Response Meter, ARM) to apply it to measurement of female ABI, and measured changes of ABI in stressed mice and drug actions on ABI. ABI assessment was performed daily in sexually mature female mice using ARM. The intensity and number of ABI in one session did not significantly change during an estrous cycle, suggesting that ABI is not influenced by the dynamics of sex hormones. Additional female mice were socially isolated for 7 weeks and then re-socialized for 2 weeks, and ABI was monitored weekly. ABI significantly increased during the isolation period, and then significantly decreased during re-socialization; both were time-dependent. In prolonged-isolated aggressive mice, a serotonin 1A receptor agonist, buspirone, significantly decreased ABI. There are no experimental methods or apparatus available for evaluating female aggressiveness using one individual repeatedly. We could measure ABI semi-quantitatively using the ARM. ABI is a useful behavioral paradigm in the evaluation of aggressiveness in female mice, regardless of the estrous cycle, and can also be used for evaluating the actions of drugs on aggressiveness. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacological Treatments of Alzheimer’s Disease: Current Medication,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mowla

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD that is identified by progressive cognitive deficit and behavioral disturbances (BD are the most common form of dementia. As the population is aging, patients with AD are becoming a serious burden for societies. In this study, current medication for cognitive deficit and behavioral disturbances are reviewed. Also the new treatment strategies for cognitive dysfunction and behavioral disturbances are surveyed. Methods: The method employed in this researh was a systematic bibliographic review, in which only the double-blind placebo-controlled studies or the clinically detailed enough open-labeled studies using validated scales were retained. Results: The efficacy of cholinesterase inhibitors (Tacrine, Rivastigmine, Donapezil and Galantamine has been demonstrated in several double blind placebo controlled clinical trials. They have shown a mild efficacy in mild to moderate AD. Memantine, a NMDA antagonist is the only drug that has demonstrated mild efficacy in moderate to severe AD in controlled clinical trial. Clinical trials surveying the efficacy of active and passive immunization against B amyloid protoin has halted due to serious adverse events. Studies of inducing neurogenesis in brain of AD patients are preliminary. Antipsychotics have shown efficacy for controlling BD of AD patients but they are associated with adverse events. Except for carbamazepine, there is not enough evidence for other anticanvulsants to be effective for behavioral disturbances of AD patients. A controlled clinical trial and some open studies have shown the efficacy of citalopram for BD. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of other medications like trazadon, buspiron and beta blockers for BD. Conclusion: Cholinesterase inhibitors have demonstrated disappointing results. Memantine is only mildly effective for cognitive deficit. To date, no amyloid-modifying therapy has yet been successful in phase 3 clinical trials

  9. Evidence-based guideline: treatment of tardive syndromes: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Fahn, Stanley; Weiner, William J; Gronseth, Gary S; Sullivan, Kelly L; Zesiewicz, Theresa A

    2013-07-30

    To make evidence-based recommendations regarding management of tardive syndromes (TDS), including tardive dyskinesias (TDD), by addressing 5 questions: 1) Is withdrawal of dopamine receptor blocking agents (DRBAs) an effective TDS treatment? 2) Does switching from typical to atypical DRBAs reduce TDS symptoms? 3) What is the efficacy of pharmacologic agents in treating TDS? 4) Do patients with TDS benefit from chemodenervation with botulinum toxin? 5) Do patients with TDS benefit from surgical therapy? PsycINFO, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane were searched (1966-2011). Articles were classified according to a 4-tiered evidence-rating scheme; recommendations were tied to the evidence. Clonazepam probably improves TDD and ginkgo biloba probably improves TDS (both Level B); both should be considered as treatment. Risperidone may improve TDS but cannot be recommended as treatment because neuroleptics may cause TDS despite masking symptoms. Amantadine and tetrabenazine might be considered as TDS treatment (Level C). Diltiazem should not be considered as TDD treatment (Level B); galantamine and eicosapentaenoic acid may not be considered as treatment (Level C). Data are insufficient to support or refute use of acetazolamide, bromocriptine, thiamine, baclofen, vitamin E, vitamin B6, selegiline, clozapine, olanzapine, melatonin, nifedipine, fluperlapine, sulpiride, flupenthixol, thiopropazate, haloperidol, levetiracetam, quetiapine, ziprasidone, sertindole, aripiprazole, buspirone, yi-gan san, biperiden discontinuation, botulinum toxin type A, electroconvulsive therapy, α-methyldopa, reserpine, and pallidal deep brain stimulation as TDS treatments (Level U). Data are insufficient to support or refute TDS treatment by withdrawing causative agents or switching from typical to atypical DRBA (Level U).

  10. Development and evaluation of fixed dose bi therapy sublingual tablets for treatment stress hypertension and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A El-Nabarawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A stress induced rise in the blood pressure. Some believe that patients with hypertension are characterized by a generalized state of increased anxiety. Aim: The purpose of this study is to prepare a fixed dose bi therapy using bisoprolol hemifumarate (BH as antihypertensive drug and buspirone hydrochloride (BuHCl as anxiolytic drug, which can be used to treat both diseases concomitantly. Using sublingual tablets is hopeful to improve the BuHCl poor oral bioavailability and to facilitate administration to patients experiencing problems with swallowing. Materials and Methods: A total of 5mg BH and 10mg BuHCl were selected based on compatibility study. A 3×22 full factorial design was adopted for the optimization of the tablets prepared by direct compression method. The effects of the filler type, the binder molecular weight, and the binder type were studied. The prepared formulae were evaluated according to their physical characters as hardness, friability, disintegration time (new modified method and in vivo disintegration time and wetting properties. In vitro drugs dissolute, permeation through the buccal mucosa and the effect of storage were analyzed by a new valid high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC method. Bioavailability study of the selected formula study was carried out and followed by the clinical. Results: The optimized tablet formulation showed accepted average weight, hardness, wetting time, friability, content uniformity, disintegration time (less than 3 min. Maximum drug release could be achieved with in 10 min. In addition enhancing drug permeation through the buccal mucosa and, the maximum concentration of the drug that reached the blood was in the first 10 min which means a rapid onset of action and improved the extent of both drug′s absorption. Conclusion: The results revealed that sublingual (F6 tablets containing both drugs would maintain rapid onset of action, and increase bioavailability. BuHCl with BH

  11. Therapy of anxiety disorders – the problem of choosing a drug in the primary health care physician’s practice

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    Łukasz Święcicki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental disorders. A vast majority of patients with such problems are treated by the primary health care physicians. In practice, the most available form of treatment at this level of health care is pharmacotherapy. The most frequently chosen drugs belong to the group of benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepine anxiolytics exhibit the commonly known advantages: they are effective in the short run and very well tolerated. A bit less attention is paid to their severe disadvantages. These disadvantages comprise first of all: inclination to induce dependence which is often connected with the need to increase the dose of the drug to obtain a comparable effect, adverse impact on cognitive functions, and the risk of a significant increase in the dose of the drug after discontinuation of benzodiazepine (rebound phenomena. The article presents disadvantages and advantages of benzodiazepines and benefits connected with the use of the underestimated though effective anxiolytic – hydroxyzine. The results of controlled studies point to the efficacy of this drug in therapy of generalized anxiety disorder. Hydroxyzine may be also effectively used during discontinuation of benzodiazepines. This drug does not exhibit any addictive properties and its administration does not cause disturbances in cognitive functions. Psychotherapy continues to be the basic form of treatment of anxiety disorders, but its use in everyday medical practice conditions is often very difficult. In pharmacotherapy of anxiety the use of hydroxyzine is safer than the use of benzodiazepines, and it is often equally effective. Also other drugs, which are not discussed extensively in this article, such as antidepressants in the group of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, buspirone and pregabalin, exhibit significant anti-anxiety effects.

  12. The cannabis withdrawal syndrome: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnet U

    2017-04-01

    post-acute rehabilitation. There are promising results with gabapentin and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol analogs in the treatment of CWS. Mirtazapine can be beneficial to treat CWS insomnia. According to small studies, venlafaxine can worsen the CWS, whereas other antidepressants, atomoxetine, lithium, buspirone, and divalproex had no relevant effect. Certainly, further research is required with respect to the impact of the CWS treatment setting on long-term CUD prognosis and with respect to psychopharmacological or behavioral approaches, such as aerobic exercise therapy or psychoeducation, in the treatment of CWS. The up-to-date ICD-11 Beta Draft is recommended to be expanded by physical CWS symptoms, the specification of CWS intensity and duration as well as gender effects. Keywords: marijuana, humans, neurobiology, treatment, course, detoxification, symptoms

  13. [Dependence on benzodiazepines. Clinical and biological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissolo, A; Bisserbe, J C

    1994-01-01

    half-life. The relapse develops later with a progressive reapparance of pre-treatment symptoms. In practice recurrence and rebound are often difficult to isolate: recurrence can follow rebound. Different operational criteria of definition for this different entities have been proposed but there is a need for a consensual position. The treatment length, a high daily dose, an alcohol abuse history, a dependent personality and the severity of the psychopathology of the patients have been found to be predictive for the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms. Behavioural therapies (individual or in group) have been proposed with some success for the treatment of benzodiazepine dependence; drug treatment with carbamazepine or imipramine have demonstrated some efficacy. Other drug as buspirone clonidine having anxiolytic properties have not demonstrated efficacy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  14. Pharmacological interventions for benzodiazepine mono-dependence management in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, C; Fatséas, M; Lavie, E; Auriacombe, M

    2006-07-19

    the trial. Buspirone and Progesterone failed to suppress any benzodiazepine symptoms. Carbamazepine might have promise as an adjunctive medication for benzodiazepine withdrawal, particularly in patients receiving benzodiazepines in daily dosages of 20 mg/d or more of diazepam (or equivalents). The results of this systematic review point to the potential value of carbamazepine as an effective intervention for benzodiazepine gradual taper discontinuation. Carbamazepine has shown rather modest benefit in reducing withdrawal severity, although it did significantly improve drug-free outcome. Larger controlled studies are needed to confirm these benefits, to assess adverse effects and to identify when its clinical use might be most indicated. Other suggested treatment approaches to benzodiazepine discontinuation management should be explored (antidepressants, benzodiazepine receptors modulator).

  15. Systematic evaluation of commercially available ultra-high performance liquid chromatography columns for drug metabolite profiling: optimization of chromatographic peak capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbelman, Anne-Charlotte; Cuyckens, Filip; Dillen, Lieve; Gross, Gerhard; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vreeken, Rob J

    2014-12-29

    The present study investigated the practical use of modern ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation techniques for drug metabolite profiling, aiming to develop a widely applicable, high-throughput, easy-to-use chromatographic method, with a high chromatographic resolution to accommodate simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of small-molecule drugs and metabolites in biological matrices. To this end, first the UHPLC system volume and variance were evaluated. Then, a mixture of 17 drugs and various metabolites (molecular mass of 151-749Da, logP of -1.04 to 6.7), was injected on six sub-2μm particle columns. Five newest generation core shell technology columns were compared and tested against one column packed with porous particles. Two aqueous (pH 2.7 and 6.8) and two organic mobile phases were evaluated, first with the same flow and temperature and subsequently at each column's individual limit of temperature and pressure. The results demonstrated that pre-column dead volume had negligible influence on the peak capacity and shape. In contrast, a decrease in post-column volume of 57% resulted in a substantial (47%) increase in median peak capacity and significantly improved peak shape. When the various combinations of stationary and mobile phases were used at the same flow rate (0.5mL/min) and temperature (45°C), limited differences were observed between the median peak capacities, with a maximum of 26%. At higher flow though (up to 0.9mL/min), a maximum difference of almost 40% in median peak capacity was found between columns. The finally selected combination of solid-core particle column and mobile phase composition was chosen for its selectivity, peak capacity, wide applicability and peak shape. The developed method was applied to rat hepatocyte samples incubated with the drug buspirone and demonstrated to provide a similar chromatographic resolution, but a 6 times higher signal-to-noise ratio than a more traditional UHPLC

  16. Quantitative methods in electroencephalography to access therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Roseane Costa; Fontenele, Andrea Martins Melo; Carmo, Luiza Helena Araújo do; Ribeiro, Aurea Celeste da Costa; Sales, Fábio Henrique Silva; Monteiro, Sally Cristina Moutinho; Sousa, Ana Karoline Ferreira de Castro

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacometrics or Quantitative Pharmacology aims to quantitatively analyze the interaction between drugs and patients whose tripod: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and disease monitoring to identify variability in drug response. Being the subject of central interest in the training of pharmacists, this work was out with a view to promoting this idea on methods to access the therapeutic response of drugs with central action. This paper discusses quantitative methods (Fast Fourier Transform, Magnitude Square Coherence, Conditional Entropy, Generalised Linear semi-canonical Correlation Analysis, Statistical Parametric Network and Mutual Information Function) used to evaluate the EEG signals obtained after administration regimen of drugs, the main findings and their clinical relevance, pointing it as a contribution to construction of different pharmaceutical practice. Peter Anderer et. al in 2000 showed the effect of 20mg of buspirone in 20 healthy subjects after 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8h after oral ingestion of the drug. The areas of increased power of the theta frequency occurred mainly in the temporo-occipital - parietal region. It has been shown by Sampaio et al., 2007 that the use of bromazepam, which allows the release of GABA (gamma amino butyric acid), an inhibitory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system could theoretically promote dissociation of cortical functional areas, a decrease of functional connectivity, a decrease of cognitive functions by means of smaller coherence (electrophysiological magnitude measured from the EEG by software) values. Ahmad Khodayari-Rostamabad et al. in 2015 talk that such a measure could be a useful clinical tool potentially to assess adverse effects of opioids and hence give rise to treatment guidelines. There was the relation between changes in pain intensity and brain sources (at maximum activity locations) during remifentanil infusion despite its potent analgesic effect. The statement of mathematical and computational

  17. Anxiety in Patients with Schizophrenia: Epidemiology and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmingh, Henk; Stein, Dan J

    2015-01-01

    randomized and open trials have shown that aripiprazole and risperidone may be efficacious for obsessive-compulsive and social anxiety symptoms, and quetiapine and olanzapine for generalized anxiety. Older agents such as trifluoperazine may also reduce comorbid anxiety symptoms. Alternative options include selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) augmentation of antipsychotics, although evidence is based on a few randomized trials, small open trials, and case series, and caution is needed with regards to cytochrome P450 interactions and QTc interval prolongation. Buspirone and pregabalin augmentation may also be considered. Diagnosis and treatment of anxiety symptoms and disorders in schizophrenia is an important and often neglected aspect of the management of schizophrenia.

  18. Regulation of Hippocampal 5-HT Release by P2X7 Receptors in Response to Optogenetic Stimulation of Median Raphe Terminals of Mice

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    Flóra Gölöncsér

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic and glutamatergic neurons of median raphe region (MRR play a pivotal role in the modulation of affective and cognitive functions. These neurons synapse both onto themselves and remote cortical areas. P2X7 receptors (P2rx7 are ligand gated ion channels expressed by central presynaptic excitatory nerve terminals and involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release. P2rx7s are implicated in various neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and depression. Here we investigated whether 5-HT release released from the hippocampal terminals of MRR is subject to modulation by P2rx7s. To achieve this goal, an optogenetic approach was used to selectively activate subpopulation of serotonergic terminals derived from the MRR locally, and one of its target area, the hippocampus. Optogenetic activation of neurons in the MRR with 20 Hz was correlated with freezing and enhanced locomotor activity of freely moving mice and elevated extracellular levels of 5-HT, glutamate but not GABA in vivo. Similar optical stimulation (OS significantly increased [3H]5-HT and [3H]glutamate release in acute MRR and hippocampal slices. We examined spatial and temporal patterns of [3H]5-HT release and the interaction between the serotonin and glutamate systems. Whilst [3H]5-HT release from MRR neurons was [Ca2+]o-dependent and sensitive to TTX, CNQX and DL-AP-5, release from hippocampal terminals was not affected by the latter drugs. Hippocampal [3H]5-HT released by electrical but not OS was subject to modulation by 5- HT1B/D receptors agonist sumatriptan (1 μM, whereas the selective 5-HT1A agonist buspirone (0.1 μM was without effect. [3H]5-HT released by electrical and optical stimulation was decreased in mice genetically deficient in P2rx7s, and after perfusion with selective P2rx7 antagonists, JNJ-47965567 (0.1 μM, and AZ-10606120 (0.1 μM. Optical and electrical stimulation elevated the extracellular level of ATP. Our results demonstrate for the

  19. The cannabis withdrawal syndrome: current insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Udo; Preuss, Ulrich W

    2017-01-01

    The cannabis withdrawal syndrome (CWS) is a criterion of cannabis use disorders (CUDs) (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fifth Edition) and cannabis dependence (International Classification of Diseases [ICD]-10). Several lines of evidence from animal and human studies indicate that cessation from long-term and regular cannabis use precipitates a specific withdrawal syndrome with mainly mood and behavioral symptoms of light to moderate intensity, which can usually be treated in an outpatient setting. Regular cannabis intake is related to a desensitization and downregulation of human brain cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors. This starts to reverse within the first 2 days of abstinence and the receptors return to normal functioning within 4 weeks of abstinence, which could constitute a neurobiological time frame for the duration of CWS, not taking into account cellular and synaptic long-term neuroplasticity elicited by long-term cannabis use before cessation, for example, being possibly responsible for cannabis craving. The CWS severity is dependent on the amount of cannabis used pre-cessation, gender, and heritable and several environmental factors. Therefore, naturalistic severity of CWS highly varies. Women reported a stronger CWS than men including physical symptoms, such as nausea and stomach pain. Comorbidity with mental or somatic disorders, severe CUD, and low social functioning may require an inpatient treatment (preferably qualified detox) and post-acute rehabilitation. There are promising results with gabapentin and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol analogs in the treatment of CWS. Mirtazapine can be beneficial to treat CWS insomnia. According to small studies, venlafaxine can worsen the CWS, whereas other antidepressants, atomoxetine, lithium, buspirone, and divalproex had no relevant effect. Certainly, further research is required with respect to the impact of the CWS treatment setting on long-term CUD prognosis and with respect to

  20. Effect of Yi-nao-jie-yu decoction on γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor in the hippocampus and serum inflammatory factors in a rat model of poststroke anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wen Zhang,1 Ruizhen Zhao,1 Xiaoli Li,1 Xia Cui,1 Zijun Zhao,1 Yingqiu Mao,2 Fengzhi Wu,3 Qisheng Tang1 1Department of Encephalopathy, The Third Affiliated Hospital, 2Center of Scientific Research, 3Center of Journals, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Chaoyang District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: The Yi-nao-jie-yu decoction (YNJYD is a herbal preparation widely used in the clinics of traditional Chinese medicine and has been recently used as an important new therapeutic agent in poststroke anxiety (PSA. The neuroendocrine–immune system plays an important role in PSA mechanisms, although the modulating effects of YNJYD remain unknown. This study investigated the potential effects of YNJYD on the neuroendocrine–immune system in a rat model of PSA.Materials and methods: The PSA model was induced by injecting collagenase (type VII into the right globus pallidus, accompanied by empty water bottle stimulation for 2 weeks. The sham group and the PSA model group were gavaged with saline, while the treatment groups received buspirone (BuSpar or YNJYD. Behavior was evaluated with the open field test and elevated plus maze once a week. Pathological changes were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL-6, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, IL-1α, and cortisol were detected by radioimmunoassay. Expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR α2 subunit was examined by Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: YNJYD-treated rats exhibited significantly better recovery than BuSpar-treated rats at 21 days and 28 days in the open field test and elevated plus maze. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed neural repair in the hippocampus in the treatment groups. Serum levels of IL-1α in the YNJYD group were significantly less than those in the model group and the Bu

  1. Cerebellar Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman

    2000-05-01

    There is nothing more discouraging than for a patient to be given a specific diagnosis, then to be told that there is nothing that can be done. Physicians are equally disheartened to see exponential progress being made in the understanding of the pathophysiology of a complex disorder but few direct benefits resulting for their patients. Over the past 5 years, molecular genetic research has completely revolutionized the way in which the progressive cerebellar ataxias are classified and diagnosed, but it has yet to produce effective gene-based, neuroprotective, or neurorestorative therapies. The treatment of cerebellar ataxia remains primarily a neurorehabilitation challenge, employing physical, occupational, speech, and swallowing therapy; adaptive equipment; driver safety training; and nutritional counseling. Modest additional gains are seen with the use of medications that can improve imbalance, incoordination, or dysarthria (amantadine, buspirone, acetazolamide); cerebellar tremor (clonazepam, propranolol); and cerebellar or central vestibular nystagmus (gabapentin, baclofen, clonazepam). Many of the progressive cerebellar syndromes have associated features involving other neurologic systems (eg, spasticity, dystonia or rigidity, resting or rubral tremor, chorea, motor unit weakness or fatigue, autonomic dysfunction, peripheral or posterior column sensory loss, neuropathic pain or cramping, double vision, vision and hearing loss, dementia, and bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction), which can impede the treatment of the ataxic symptoms or can worsen with the use of certain drugs. Treatment of the associated features themselves may in turn worsen the ataxia either directly (as side effects of medication) or indirectly (eg, relaxation of lower limb spasticity that was acting as a stabilizer for an ataxic gait). Secondary complications of progressive ataxia can include deconditioning or immobility, weight loss or gain, skin breakdown, recurrent pulmonary and

  2. Characterization of a novel /sup 3/H-5-hydroxytryptamine binding site subtype in bovine brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuring, R.E.; Peroutka, S.J.

    1987-03-01

    /sup 3/H-5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) binding sites were analyzed in bovine brain membranes. The addition of either the 5-HT1A-selective drug 8-OH-DPAT (100 nM) or the 5-HT1C-selective drug mesulergine (100 nM) to the assay resulted in a 5-10% decrease in specific /sup 3/H-5-HT binding. Scatchard analysis revealed that the simultaneous addition of both drugs decreased the Bmax of /sup 3/H-5-HT binding by 10-15% without affecting the KD value (1.8 +/- 0.3 nM). Competition studies using a series of pharmacologic agents revealed that the sites labeled by /sup 3/H-5-HT in bovine caudate in the presence of 100 nM 8-OH-DPAT and 100 nM mesulergine appear to be homogeneous. 5-HT1A selective agents such as 8-OH-DPAT, ipsapirone, and buspirone display micromolar affinities for these sites. RU 24969 and (-)pindolol are approximately 2 orders of magnitude less potent at these sites than at 5-HT1B sites which have been identified in rat brain. Agents displaying nanomolar potencies for 5-HT1C sites such as mianserin and mesulergine are 2-3 orders of magnitude less potent at the /sup 3/H-5-HT binding sites in bovine caudate. In addition, both 5-HT2- and 5-HT3-selective agents are essentially inactive at these binding sites. These /sup 3/H-5-HT sites display nanomolar affinity for 5-carboxyamidotryptamine, 5-methoxytryptamine, metergoline, and 5-HT. Apparent Ki values of 10-100 nM are obtained for d-LSD, RU 24969, methiothepin, tryptamine, methysergide, and yohimbine, whereas I-LSD and corynanthine are significantly less potent. In addition, these /sup 3/H-5-HT labeled sites are regulated by guanine nucleotides and calcium. Regional studies indicate that this class of sites is most dense in the basal ganglia but exists in all regions of bovine brain. These data therefore demonstrate the presence of a homogeneous class of 5-HT1 binding sites in bovine caudate that is pharmacologically distinct from previously defined 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1C, 5-HT2, and 5-HT3 receptor subtypes

  3. Drug Discovery Targeting Serotonin G Protein-Coupled Receptors in the Treatment of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsing, Daniel E.

    Clinical data show that activation of 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can treat obesity (lorcaserin/BelviqRTM) and psychotic disorders (aripiprazole/Abilify.), including schizophrenia. 5-HT2C GPCRs are members of the 5-HT2 sub-family of 5-HT GPCRs, which include 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT 2C GPCRs. 5-HT2C is structurally similar to 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B GPCRs, but activation of 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT 2B causes deleterious effects, including hallucinations and cardiac valvulopathy. Thus, there is a challenge to develop drugs that selectively activate only 5-HT2C. Prolonged activation of GPCRs by agonists reduces their function via a regulatory process called desensitization. This has clinical relevance, as 45% of drugs approved by the FDA target GPCRs, and agonist drugs (e.g., morphine) typically lose efficacy over time due to desensitization, which invites tolerance. Agonists that cause less desensitization may show extended clinical efficacy as well as a more acceptable clinical dose range. We hypothesized that structurally distinct agonists of the 5-HT2C receptor may cause varying degrees of desensitization by stabilizing unique 5-HT2C receptor conformations. Discovery of 5-HT2C agonists that exhibit minimal desensitization is therapeutically relevant for the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of chronic diseases such as obesity and psychotic disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor has recently been discovered as a druggable target, and selective activation of the 5-HT7 receptor has been shown to alleviate locomotor deficits in mouse models of Rett Syndrome. Additionally, buspirone has been shown to display therapeutically relevant affinity at 5-HT 1A and is currently in phase II clinical trials to treat stereotypy in children with autism. The 5-PAT chemical scaffold shows high affinity towards the 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors. Modulations around the 5-phenyl moiety were able to improve selectivity in binding towards the 5-HT 7 receptor, whereas modulations of the alkyl chains

  4. Neuromodulators for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (Disorders of Gut-Brain Interaction): A Rome Foundation Working Team Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossman, Douglas A; Tack, Jan; Ford, Alexander C; Szigethy, Eva; Törnblom, Hans; Van Oudenhove, Lukas

    2017-12-22

    Central neuromodulators (antidepressants, antipsychotics, and other central nervous system-targeted medications) are increasingly used for treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), now recognized as disorders of gut-brain interaction. However, the available evidence and guidance for the use of central neuromodulators in these conditions is scanty and incomplete. In this Rome Foundation Working Team report, a multidisciplinary team summarized available research evidence and clinical experience to provide guidance and treatment recommendations. The working team summarized the literature on the pharmacology of central neuromodulators and their effects on gastrointestinal sensorimotor function and conducted an evidence-based review on their use for treating FGID syndromes. Because of the paucity of data for FGIDs, we included data for non-gastrointestinal painful disorders and specific symptoms of pain, nausea, and vomiting. This information was combined into a final document comprising a synthesis of available evidence and recommendations for clinical use guided by the research and clinical experience of the experts on the committee. The evidence-based review on neuromodulators in FGID, restricted by the limited available controlled trials, was integrated with open-label studies and case series, along with the experience of experts to create recommendations using a consensus (Delphi) approach. Due to the diversity of conditions and complexity of treatment options, specific recommendations were generated for different FGIDs. However, some general recommendations include: (1) low to modest dosages of tricyclic antidepressants provide the most convincing evidence of benefit for treating chronic gastrointestinal pain and painful FGIDs and serotonin noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors can also be recommended, though further studies are needed; (2) augmentation, that is, adding a second treatment (adding quetiapine, aripiprazole, buspirone α2δ ligand

  5. O tratamento farmacológico da fobia social Pharmacologic treatment of social phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Egidio Nardi

    1999-12-01

    . There are two specifiers for social phobia: the circumscribed, for those who just fear one situation; and generalized, for those who fear almost all social situations. The clinical features of social phobia are the anticipatory anxiety, the physical symptoms, the avoidance and the low self-esteem. Depending on diagnostic criteria, it is reported a lifetime prevalence ranging from 5% to 13% of the population resulting in different degrees of occupational and social limitations. The ideal treatment should use antidepressant drug and cognitive-behavior therapy. Beta-blocking drugs (atenolol, propranolol, monoamino oxidase inhibitors - MAOI (fenelzine, tanilcipromine, reversible monoamino oxidase-A inhibitors (moclobemide, brofaromine, benzodiazepines (clonazepam, bromazepam, alprazolam and serotonin selective recaptors inhibitors - SSRI (paroxetine, sertraline, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine and some other drugs (venlafaxine, nefazodone, gabapentin, clonidine have been shown efficacy in several studies with different methodology. The tricyclic antidepressants ( imipramine, clomipramine, valproic acid and buspirone have shown negative results. Paroxetine is the most studied substance in double-blind trials with good results and well tolerated. Nowadays the individuals with social phobia can have a efficacious treatment to get an assertive behavior in social situations.

  6. Efficacy and Safety of On-Demand Use of 2 Treatments Designed for Different Etiologies of Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder: 3 Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuiten, Adriaan; van Rooij, Kim; Bloemers, Jos; Eisenegger, Christoph; van Honk, Jack; Kessels, Rob; Kingsberg, Sheryl; Derogatis, Leonard R; de Leede, Leo; Gerritsen, Jeroen; Koppeschaar, Hans P F; Olivier, Berend; Everaerd, Walter; Frijlink, Henderik W; Höhle, Daniël; de Lange, Robert P J; Böcker, Koen B E; Pfaus, James G

    2018-02-01

    In women, low sexual desire and/or sexual arousal can lead to sexual dissatisfaction and emotional distress, collectively defined as female sexual interest/arousal disorder (FSIAD). Few pharmaceutical treatment options are currently available. To investigate the efficacy and safety of 2 novel on-demand pharmacologic treatments that have been designed to treat 2 FSIAD subgroups (women with low sensitivity for sexual cues and women with dysfunctional over-activation of sexual inhibition) using a personalized medicine approach using an allocation formula based on genetic, hormonal, and psychological variables developed to predict drug efficacy in the subgroups. 497 women (21-70 years old) with FSIAD were randomized to 1 of 12 8-week treatment regimens in 3 double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-finding studies conducted at 16 research sites in the United States. Efficacy and safety of the following on-demand treatments was tested: placebo, testosterone (T; 0.5 mg), sildenafil (S; 50 mg), buspirone (B; 10 mg) and combination therapies (T 0.25 mg + S 25 mg, T 0.25 mg + S 50 mg, T 0.5 mg + S 25 mg, T 0.5 mg + S 50 mg, and T 0.25 mg + B 5 mg, T 0.25 mg + B 10 mg, T 0.5 mg + B 5 mg, T 0.5 mg + B 10 mg). The primary efficacy measure was the change in satisfying sexual events (SSEs) from the 4-week baseline to the 4-week average of the 8-week active treatment period after medication intake. For the primary end points, the combination treatments were compared with placebo and the respective monotherapies on this measure. In women with low sensitivity for sexual cues, 0.5 mg T + 50 mg S increased the number of SSEs from baseline compared with placebo (difference in change [Δ] = 1.70, 95% CI = 0.57-2.84, P = .004) and monotherapies (S: Δ = 1.95, 95% CI = 0.44-3.45, P = .012; T: Δ = 1.69, 95% CI = 0.58-2.80, P = .003). In women with overactive inhibition, 0.5 mg T + 10 mg B increased the number of SSEs from baseline compared with placebo (

  7. [Treatment of a serious autistic disorder in a child with Naltrexone in an oral suspension form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, S; Doyen, C; Contejean, Y; Kaye, K; Paubel, P

    2009-04-01

    CLINICAL BACKGROUND: Autism is a developmental disorder that is usually diagnosed in early childhood. According to ICD-10 criteria, autism can be characterized by delays in language skills, by impaired social interaction, verbal or non-verbal communication and by repetitive, stereotyped or severely restricted activities and interests. The causes of autism are not yet elucidated, but both genetics and environment seem to play a role in 10 to 25% of autism cases. Several biochemical abnormalities, such as impairment of serotoninergic, catecholinergic, dopaminergic, and opioid systems have been reported. Autism therapies are designed to treat symptoms, and medication can be associated with psychoeducational and environmental interventions. Generally, the medications that are currently used are not intended for autism, and must be used with caution and selected according to the type and intensity of symptoms. The most common medication consists of psychotropic therapies by administration of dopaminergic and/or serotoninergic receptor antagonists (haloperidol, risperidone, clomipramine). Several drugs, such as anxiolytics (buspirone), mood stabilisers (lithium, sodium valproate), vitamins (vitamins B6, B12) or opioid antagonists (naltrexone) can be prescribed, in second intention, in cases of severe behavioural disorders. The prescription of opioid antagonists is based on the possible implication of an opioid system disorder observed in some cases. Nevertheless, several clinical studies reveal its variable effectiveness. Naltrexone is a competitive antagonist of opioid receptors OPRM1, OPRD1 and OPRK1. In France, this drug is prescribed for treating opioid and alcohol dependence. Moreover, several studies describe naltrexone as a possible treatment of autistic children in cases of developmental disorder and hyperactivity. In the Child and Adolescent Psychopathology Department of Sainte-Anne's Hospital, autistic children benefit from a multidisciplinary treatment program

  8. Plantas medicinais no tratamento do transtorno de ansiedade generalizada: uma revisão dos estudos clínicos controlados Medicinal plants for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: a review of controlled clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita Thais Faustino

    2010-12-01

    medicinal (OR specific name plants" e "anxie* OR anxioly* OR tranquil* OR GAD", limited to "human OR clinical trial OR randomized controlled trial OR meta-analysis OR review". The search was restricted to English language. RESULTS: Piper methysticum presented an unequivocal anxiolytic effect, but most studies also included patients with other anxiety disorders (e.g. phobias. Isolated studies with Ginkgo biloba, Galphimia glauca, Matricaria recutita, Passiflora incarnata and Valeriana officinalis showed a potential use for anxious diseases. Despite this low number of studies, Ginkgo biloba and Matricaria recutita showed an effect size (Cohen's d = 0.47 to 0.87 similar or higher to standard anxiolytics drugs (benzodiazepines, buspirone and antidepressants - 0.17 to 0.38. No additional study with other plants was found. CONCLUSION: Despite the therapeutic potential of medicinal plants in generalized anxiety disorder, very few controlled trials assessing herbal medicines in generalized anxiety disorder were found. Additionally, these studies present serious flaw design.

  9. Pharmacotherapies for cannabis dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kushani; Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    evidence for all of the pharmacotherapies investigated, and for many of the outcomes the quality was downgraded due to small sample sizes, inconsistency and risk of attrition bias. The quantitative analyses that were possible, combined with general findings of the studies reviewed, indicate that SSRI antidepressants, mixed action antidepressants, atypical antidepressants (bupropion), anxiolytics (buspirone) and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (atomoxetine) are probably of little value in the treatment of cannabis dependence. Preparations containing THC are of potential value but, given the limited evidence, this application of THC preparations should be considered still experimental. Further studies should compare different preparations of THC, dose and duration of treatment, adjunct medications and therapies. The evidence base for the anticonvulsant gabapentin and the glutamatergic modulator N-acetylcysteine is weak, but these medications are also worth further investigation. PMID:25515775

  10. Treatment for speech disorder in Friedreich ataxia and other hereditary ataxia syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Folker, Joanne; Poole, Matthew L

    2014-10-28

    low dose of the intervention), in heterogenous groups of degenerative cerebellar ataxias. Three compounds were studied in two trials each: a levorotatory form of 5-hydroxytryptophan (L-5HT), idebenone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone tartrate (TRH-T); each of the other compounds (riluzole, varenicline, buspirone, betamethasone, coenzyme Q10 with vitamin E, α-tocopheryl quinone and erythropoietin) were studied in one trial. The 14th trial, involving a mixed group of participants with spinocerebellar ataxia, compared the effectiveness of nonspecific physiotherapy and occupational therapy within an inpatient hospital setting to no treatment. No studies utilised traditional speech therapies. We defined the primary outcome measure in this review as the percentage change (improvement) in overall speech production immediately following completion of the intervention or later, measured by any validated speech assessment tool. None of the trials included speech as a primary outcome or examined speech using any validated speech assessment tool. Eleven studies reported speech outcomes derived from a subscale embedded within disease rating scales. The remaining three studies used alternative assessments to measure speech, including mean time to produce a standard sentence, a subjective rating of speech on a 14-point analogue scale, patient-reported assessment of the impact of dysarthria on activities of daily living and acoustic measures of syllable length. One study measured speech both subjectively as part of a disease rating scale and with further measures of speech timing. Three studies utilised the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) and one used the Child Health Questionnaire as measures of general quality of life. A further study utilised the Functional Independence Measure to assess functional health.Five studies reported statistically significant improvement on an overall disease rating scale in which a speech subscale was included. Only three of those studies provided

  11. [Review of psychopharmacological treatments in adolescents and adults with autistic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadli, A; Gonnier, V; Aussilloux, C

    2002-01-01

    behaviours. Nevertheless, these studies have used small size sample and have not been replicated. Category II. This category correspond to drugs supposed to be active on neurochemical disturbances found in autism but their target symptoms are not autism specific signs as defined by the ICD 10. Buspirone: This serotonine agonist may have a good impact on emotional disorders and sleeping confusions. Methylphenidate: Most of the current studies about this noradrenergic drug concern children. The results are variable. Paradoxical effects may exist in children with severe mental retardation. Propanolol: Some isolated studies habe reported its efficiency on behavioural disturbances. Clonidine: This adrenergic drug treats efficiently some cases of aggressive behaviour and hyperactivity. Category III. This category contains a wide range of drugs, vitamins or method used in autism after sporadic observations of their positive effects. Secretine: An important improvement has been reported in isolated cases. However, controlled studies in children do not confirm these results. Vitamines B6, B12 and Magnesium: An improvement in socialization and in behavioural disorders have been reported in some cases, but these results are not yet confirmed. Lithium, Carbamazépine, Valproate: Results of some case studies have found it to be efficient in cyclic disorders. Gluten and casein free diet: An improvement of social behaviour have been reported by some parents after these diets. No controlled study has validated this observation. Conclusion - There is no consensus on the use of psychopharmacological treatments in autism. Although there exist many clinical observations, only few controlled studies have validated the efficiency and safety of these treatments. At the present time and until having sufficient studies, drugs are generally limited to severe disorders, for which usual psycho-educational approaches are insufficient.

  12. [Neurobiology and pharmacotherapy of social phobia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouizerate, B; Martin-Guehl, C; Tignol, J

    2004-01-01

    symptoms (eg, tachycardia, sweating and dry mouth). However, they are not effective in the generalized form of social phobia. Other pharmacologic alternatives seem helpful for the management of social phobia, including venlafaxine, gabapentin, bupropion, nefazodone or augmentation with buspirone. Preliminary studies point to promising effects of these agents. Larger controlled clinical trials are now needed to confirm their potential role in the treatment of social phobia.