WorldWideScience

Sample records for business aviation pilots

  1. Supply and demand for business education in naval aviation

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Obra L.

    2005-01-01

    MBA Professional Report In light of the Navy's transformation plan, advanced business education is increasing in importance. As part of the Navy's Sea Power 21 strategy, Sea Enterprise encourages Naval Aviation to steer historical management practices towards better business practices. As pilots and Naval Flight Officers evolve from Mission Commander to Commanding Officer, they must be equipped with requisite business skill sets to engage the challenge of balancing aircraft modernization w...

  2. General Aviation Pilots Over 70 Years Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorio, Alpo; Asmayawati, Saryani; Budowle, Bruce; Griffiths, Robin; Strandberg, Timo; Kuoppala, Jaana; Sajantila, Antti

    2017-02-01

    Currently it is not unusual for general aviation pilots in the United States to continue to fly beyond the age of 70, even into their 80s and 90s. Pilots have regular examinations according to protocols which do not specify special or additional requirements for pilots over 70 yr of age. Additionally, the third class medical reforms passed by the U.S. Senate on 15 July 2016 could potentially result in even less stringent medical certification requirements for general aviation pilots. Accident rates, medical parameters, autopsy findings, and toxicological findings from the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) general aviation (GA) accident database were analyzed to assess potential risk factors with accident outcomes. During 2003-2012, there were 114 (113 men, 1 woman) general aviation fatal accidents involving pilots ages 70 to 92 yr. A combination of 3 or more drugs were found in 13 (13%) of deceased pilots. The most frequent drugs were first generation antihistamines and antidepressants represented the next highest proportion of possible performance-affecting medications. This study indicates that there are critical medical factors that may contribute to fatal accidents among elderly pilots. Polypharmacy use should be taken into consideration, especially during periodic health examinations and fatal aviation investigations involving elderly pilots.Vuorio A, Asmayawati S, Budowle B, Griffiths R, Strandberg T, Kuoppala J, Sajantila A. General aviation pilots over 70 years old. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(2):142-145.

  3. General Aviation Pilots Over 70 Years Old

    OpenAIRE

    Vuorio, Alpo; Asmayawati, Saryani; Budowle, Bruce; Griffiths, Robin; Strandberg, Timo; Kuoppala, Jaana; Sajantila, Antti

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently it is not unusual for general aviation pilots in the United States to continue to fly beyond the age of 70, even into their 80s and 90s. Pilots have regular examinations according to protocols which do not specify special or additional requirements for pilots over 70 yr of age. Additionally, the third class medical reforms passed by the U.S. Senate on 15 July 2016 could potentially result in even less stringent medical certification requirements for general aviation pilo...

  4. Job Satisfaction among Turkish Business Aviation Technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Uyar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The most applicable models in safety management put the human factors, employers’ attitudes and behaviors at the center. This study reports an investigation of job satisfaction among business aviation technicians. A demographic information form and Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS were used to collect data from 44 individuals. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Student’s t-test. Our results show that there is significant difference in total job satisfaction levels with regard to marital status while other personal factors are not related to the total job satisfaction levels. However several sub dimensions of job satisfaction are affected by the workers’ military or civilian origin, their training background, types of companies they work in or their license category. No difference is found in age and position groups. Secondly, study shows that technicians are the most satisfied from the nature of their work, while they are the least satisfied by operational procedures.

  5. Supply and Demand for Business Education in Naval Aviation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, Obra L

    2005-01-01

    ... modernization with current readiness. This project analyzes the supply and demand for postgraduate business education to determine how prepared Naval Aviation is to achieve long-term transformation objectives...

  6. PRODUCT ANALYSIS OF BUSINESS AVIATION COMPANIES: A TWO-DIMENSIONAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana KIRSCHNEROVÁ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The traditional and current approach to business models in business aviation is based only on aircraft ownership and does not describe the business aviation segment of civil aviation sufficiently. In this paper, we apply a two-dimensional approach analysing the product of companies competing in the business aviation segment of civil aviation. Our analysis combines two product-related components: fleet attributes and portfolio of services to confirm a diversity of business aviation companies and their business models. Using data of thirty business aviation companies from world regions, we reveal a diversity of business models in business aviation that is contradicting with a traditional approach to business models in business aviation.

  7. Air transport pilot involvement in general aviation accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    General aviation (GA) fatal accident records of airport transport pilots (ATPs) : were : compared to those of private pilots (PVTs). : ATPs are safer GA pilots than the PVTs. : They have comparable exposure in GA airplanes and account for 7.5% of all...

  8. Cognitive aging and flight performances in general aviation pilots

    OpenAIRE

    Causse, Mickael; Dehais, Frédéric; Arexis, Mahé; Pastor, Josette

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Unlike professional pilots who are limited by the FAA's age rule, no age limit is defined in general aviation. Our overall goal was to examine how age-related cognitive decline impacts piloting performance and weather-related decision-making. This study relied on three components: cognitive assessment (in particular executive functioning), pilot characteristics (age and flight experience), and flight performance. The results suggest that in comparison to chronological ...

  9. Aging Effects on Brain Efficiency in General Aviation Pilots

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Zarrin; Causse, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the effect of aging on brain efficiency and executive functions is important for high risk activities such as general aviation. In this study, ten private pilots in the age group 19-25 and ten in the 52-72 range completed the spatial working memory (SWM) and spatial planning and reasoning (One Touch Stockings, OTS) from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. The change in deoxygenated and oxygenated hemogoblin (HbO2) was measured. Younger pilots were found to ...

  10. Cognitive aging and flight performances in general aviation pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causse, Mickaël; Dehais, Frédéric; Arexis, Mahé; Pastor, Josette

    2011-09-01

    Unlike professional pilots who are limited by the FAA's age rule, no age limit is defined in general aviation. Our overall goal was to examine how age-related cognitive decline impacts piloting performance and weather-related decision-making. This study relied on three components: cognitive assessment (in particular executive functioning), pilot characteristics (age and flight experience), and flight performance. The results suggest that in comparison to chronological age, cognitive assessment is a better criterion to predict the flight performance, in particular because of the inter-individual variability of aging impact on cognitive abilities and the beneficial effect of flight experience.

  11. 14 CFR 121.548 - Aviation safety inspector's credentials: Admission to pilot's compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector's credentials: Admission to pilot's compartment. 121.548 Section 121.548 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Operations § 121.548 Aviation safety inspector's credentials: Admission to pilot's compartment. Whenever, in...

  12. Tricyclic Antidepressants Found in Pilots Fatally Injured in Civil Aviation Accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulkadir, Zeki; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Craft, Kristi J; Hickerson, Jeffery S; Cliburn, Kacey D

    2017-01-01

    Prevalence of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) has not been explored in pilots. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) aviation accident and the Federal Aviation Administration's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) toxicology and medical certification databases were searched for pilots fatally injured in aviation accidents. During 1990-2012, CAMI received bio-samples of pilots from 7037 aviation accidents. Of these, 2644 cases were positive for drugs. TCAs were present in 31. TCA blood concentrations ranged from therapeutic to toxic levels. The NTSB determined that the use of drugs and ethanol as the probable cause or contributing factor in 35% (11 of 31) of the accidents. None of the 31 pilots reported the use of TCAs during their aviation medical examination. The prevalence of TCAs in aviators was less than 0.5% (31 of 7037 cases). There is a need for aviators to fully disclose the use of medications at the time of their medical examination. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Training General Aviation Pilots for Convective Weather Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blickensderfer, Elizabeth L; Lanicci, John M; Vincent, Michael J; Thomas, Robert L; Smith, MaryJo; Cruit, Jessica K

    2015-10-01

    Over the past 10-15 yr, considerable research has occurred for the development, testing, and fielding of real-time Datalink weather products for general aviation (GA) pilots to use before and during flight. As is the case with the implementation of most new technologies, work is needed to ensure that the users (in this case, the pilots) understand both the capabilities and limitations of the new technologies as well as how to use the new systems to improve their task performance. The purpose of this study was to replicate and extend a previous study on training pilots how and when to use these new weather technologies. This field study used a quasi-experimental design (pre- vs. post-test with a control group). There were 91 GA pilots from the Midwest, Northeastern, and Southeastern United States who participated in a 2-h short course or a control activity. The lecture-based short course covered radar basics, Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD), NEXRAD specifics/limitations, thunderstorm basics, radar products, and decision making. The pilots who participated in the course earned higher knowledge test scores, improved at applying the concepts in paper-based flight scenarios, had higher self-efficacy in post-training assessments as compared to pre-training assessments, and also performed better than did control subjects on post-test knowledge and skills assessments. GA pilots lack knowledge about real-time Datalink weather technology. This study indicates that a relatively short training program was effective for fostering Datalink weather-related knowledge and skills in GA pilots.

  14. General aviation data link survey analysis : National Business Aircraft Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is interested in integrating Data Link communications technology into the General Aviation (GA) community. But, how much does the GA community know about the Data Link concept, the services that are possible,...

  15. Cognitive Task Analysis of Business Jet Pilots' Weather Flying Behaviors: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorella, Kara; Pliske, Rebecca; Hutton, Robert; Chrenka, Jason

    2001-01-01

    This report presents preliminary findings from a cognitive task analysis (CTA) of business aviation piloting. Results describe challenging weather-related aviation decisions and the information and cues used to support these decisions. Further, these results demonstrate the role of expertise in business aviation decision-making in weather flying, and how weather information is acquired and assessed for reliability. The challenging weather scenarios and novice errors identified in the results provide the basis for experimental scenarios and dependent measures to be used in future flight simulation evaluations of candidate aviation weather information systems. Finally, we analyzed these preliminary results to recommend design and training interventions to improve business aviation decision-making with weather information. The primary objective of this report is to present these preliminary findings and to document the extended CTA methodology used to elicit and represent expert business aviator decision-making with weather information. These preliminary findings will be augmented with results from additional subjects using this methodology. A summary of the complete results, absent the detailed treatment of methodology provided in this report, will be documented in a separate publication.

  16. Safety and business benefit analysis of NASA's aviation safety program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-20

    NASA Aviation Safety Program elements encompass a wide range of products that require both public and private investment. Therefore, two methods of analysis, one relating to the public and the other to the private industry, must be combined to unders...

  17. Prevalence of Chlorpheniramine in Aviation Accident Pilot Fatalities, 1991-1996

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soper, John

    1999-01-01

    .... This side effect has a potential to impair performance and to be a factor in accidents. Therefore, this study was conducted to establish the prevalence of this drug in pilot fatalities of aviation accidents...

  18. AVIATION PSYCHOLOGY,

    Science.gov (United States)

    PSYCHOLOGY , AERONAUTICS, FLIGHT, PILOTS, PERCEPTION, ATTENTION, READING, MEMORY( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY, EMOTIONS, FATIGUE(PHYSIOLOGY), AVIATION SAFETY, AVIATION ACCIDENTS, PSYCHOMOTOR TESTS, PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, TRAINING.

  19. Computer-aided assessment of aviation pilots attention: Design of an integrated test and its empirical validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Cannavò

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a battery of seven computerized tests, encompassing classical and innovative solutions inspired by the literature in the field, for the integrated measurement of the attention factors of aviation pilots. The computer software is validated by means of an experimental trial with 50 experienced aviation pilots and 50 untrained people as controls. Statistical analyzes confirm that the instrument can effectively classify aviation pilots, and identify a subset of distinctive attention factors that could be used for monitoring their duty.

  20. Keratoconus in Civil Aviation Pilots in a Report of Six Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Albert; Rodrigues, Bênesson; Pereira, Marcos

    2017-06-01

    Keratoconus is a progressive noninflammatory ectatic corneal dystrophy, characterized by corneal thinning and increased curvature with central or paracentral tapered protrusion. Such changes in corneal morphology induce irregular astigmatism and myopia, resulting in visual acuity impairment. This report assesses cases in which keratoconus is not an absolute disabling condition for civil aviation pilots. Six cases of keratoconus in active pilots are presented. This report includes cases which were treated with crosslinking therapy and even corneal transplantation. In such cases, the civil aviation medical authority considered four aspects in the medical assessment: best corrected visual acuity, condition stability, risk of sudden incapacitation, and pilot category. Six civil pilots with ages between 19 and 45 yr of age presented with keratoconus in different stages. Using the Snellen scale, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was measured in 12 eyes, all of them having equal or better than 20/30 (20/20, N = 9; 20/25, N = 2; 20/30, N = 1). All of them are currently fit for aviation activity and have been given an aviation medical certificate with limitation of use of corrective lenses by the Brazilian Civil Aviation Authority (ANAC in Portuguese). Among these cases, there is a pilot who had undergone treatment with crosslinking therapy and another that had undergone corneal transplantation. These cases demonstrate that keratoconus is not always a disabling condition for civil aviation pilots. Nevertheless, it has to be analyzed on a case-by-case basis.Rebello A, Rodrigues B, Pereira M. Keratoconus in civil aviation pilots in a report of six cases. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(6):574-578.

  1. Aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Richard C

    2009-01-01

    An increased awareness of the need for safety in medicine in general and in surgery in particular has prompted comparisons between the cockpit and the operating room. These comparisons seem to make sense but tend to be oversimplified. Attempts in healthcare to mimic programs that have been credited for the safety of commercial aviation have met with varying results. The risk here is that oversimplified application of an aviation model may result in the abandonment of good ideas in medicine. This paper describes in more depth the differences between medicine and commercial aviation: from the hiring process, through initial operating experience, recurrent training, and the management of emergencies. These programs add up to a cultural difference. Aviation assumes that personnel are subject to mistake making and that systems and culture need to be constructed to catch and mitigate error; medicine is still focused on the perfection of each individual's performance. The implications of these differences are explored.

  2. Worth assessments of approach to landing. [for general aviation and air carrier pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of worth assessment is to determine a descriptive model of how attributes of a set of objects are combined into preferences for the objects. The technique is described and is applied to the assessment of worth functions in approach to landing for general aviation and air carrier pilots.

  3. Validation of MMPI Scales for Personality Disorders: A ’Pilot’ and other Aviator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    of MMPI Scales for Personality Disorders: A ’Pilot* and Other Aviator Study In recent years, psychiatric nosology and nomenclature have commanded...notations on Axis II independently rendered by psychiatrists (based on diagnostic interviewing , records review, and other clinical information excluding... interview and compilation of other clinical information (excluding psychological testing). Furthering interdiagnoser reliability, all diagnoses were

  4. Morbidity among airline pilots: the AMAS experience. Aviation Medicine Advisory Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, P E; Stepp, R J; Snyder, Q C

    2001-09-01

    Various cohort studies, military databases, and Federal Aviation Administration databases have characterized morbidity and disability in pilots. However, an overriding limitation of these studies is acquiring complete and accurate medical information from pilots with a profession, hobby, or aircraft investment to protect (6). The unique role of Aviation Medicine Advisory Service (AMAS) as pure pilot advocate with guaranteed patient confidentiality eliminates the aviator's need to conceal medical problems. Therefore, analyses of cases reported to AMAS might provide additional insight regarding the true prevalence of morbidity in airline pilots. All AMAS cases of airline pilots and flight engineers from January 1996 through November 1999 were reviewed (n = 20,522). During that time, AMAS provided consultation to approximately 51 U.S. and Canadian airlines. Diagnoses were stratified by decades ranging from 20 to 69 yr of age. Notably, the five conditions most frequently inquired about at AMAS were similar to the major causes of long term disability found in a cohort of Air Canada pilots (5). Cardiovascular conditions accounted for almost 25% of the inquiries. However, the relative percentage especially in the older population was less than that reported previously. Interestingly, orthopedic and musculoskeletal cases (10-11%) rated second only to cardiovascular cases. These findings are limited by the inability to draw an exact reference population at risk, the use of proportional measures for description and the inherent difficulty in attempting to utilize an administrative index as an epidemiological tool. Further study addressing the impact of aviator nondisclosure of medical problems on the reported prevalence of disease among U.S. airline pilots may help target preventive efforts in the future.

  5. Aviation Neuropsychiatry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, David

    2000-01-01

    .... A few of the specific objectives include: Elucidating the use of the Adaptability Rating for Military Aviation, providing a general understanding of human factors in aviation, examining concepts regarding pilot personality, covering...

  6. Pilot Designed Aircraft Displays in General Aviation: An Exploratory Study and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Cody R.

    From 2001-2011, the General Aviation (GA) fatal accident rate remained unchanged (Duquette & Dorr, 2014) with an overall stagnant accident rate between 2004 and 2013. The leading cause, loss of control in flight (NTSB, 2015b & 2015c) due to pilot inability to recognize approach to stall/spin conditions (NTSB, 2015b & 2016b). In 2013, there were 1,224 GA accidents in the U.S., accounting for 94% of all U.S. aviation accidents and 90% of all U.S. aviation fatalities that year (NTSB, 2015c). Aviation entails multiple challenges for pilots related to task management, procedural errors, perceptual distortions, and cognitive discrepancies. While machine errors in airplanes have continued to decrease over the years, human error still has not (NTSB, 2013). A preliminary analysis of a PC-based, Garmin G1000 flight deck was conducted with 3 professional pilots. Analyses revealed increased task load, opportunities for distraction, confusing perceptual ques, and hindered cognitive performance. Complex usage problems were deeply ingrained in the functionality of the system, forcing pilots to use fallible work arounds, add unnecessary steps, and memorize knob turns or button pushes. Modern computing now has the potential to free GA cockpit designs from knobs, soft keys, or limited display options. Dynamic digital displays might include changes in instrumentation or menu structuring depending on the phase of flight. Airspeed indicators could increase in size to become more salient during landing, simultaneously highlighting pitch angle on Attitude Indicators and automatically decluttering unnecessary information for landing. Likewise, Angle-of-Attack indicators demonstrate a great safety and performance advantage for pilots (Duquette & Dorr, 2014; NTSB, 2015b & 2016b), an instrument typically found in military platforms and now the Icon A5, light-sport aircraft (Icon, 2016). How does the design of pilots' environment---the cockpit---further influence their efficiency and

  7. Landing practices of general aviation pilots in single-engine light airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, M. W.; Obryan, T. C.; Yenni, K. R.; Cannaday, R. L.; Mayo, M. H.

    1976-01-01

    The methods and techniques used by a group of general aviation pilots during the landing phase of light airplane operations are documented. The results of 616 landings made by 22 pilots in 2 modern, four-place, single-engine, flight airplanes (one having a low wing and the other, a high wing) are presented. The landings were made on both a long runway (1524 m (5000 ft)) and a short runway (762 m (2500 ft)); both runways were considered typical of those used in general aviation. The results generally show that most of the approaches were fast with considerable floating during the flares and with touchdowns that were relatively flat or nose-low.

  8. The impact of brain size on pilot performance varies with aviation training and years of education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Maheen M.; Samarina, Viktoriya; Xiangyan, Xu; Huynh, Virginia; Kennedy, Quinn; Weiner, Michael; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have consistently reported age-related changes in cognitive abilities and brain structure. Previous studies also suggest compensatory roles for specialized training, skill, and years of education in the age-related decline of cognitive function. The Stanford/VA Aviation Study examines the influence of specialized training and skill level (expertise) on age-related changes in cognition and brain structure. This preliminary report examines the effect of aviation expertise, years of education, age, and brain size on flight simulator performance in pilots aged 45–68 years. Fifty-one pilots were studied with structural magnetic resonance imaging, flight simulator, and processing speed tasks. There were significant main effects of age (p .1) or education (p > .1), on flight simulator performance. However, even though age and brain size were correlated (r = −0.41), age differences in flight simulator performance were not explained by brain size. Both aviation expertise and education were involved in an interaction with brain size in predicting flight simulator performance (p age-related cognitive changes. PMID:20193103

  9. The impact of brain size on pilot performance varies with aviation training and years of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Maheen M; Samarina, Viktoriya; Xiangyan, Xu; Huynh, Virginia; Kennedy, Quinn; Weiner, Michael; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L

    2010-05-01

    Previous studies have consistently reported age-related changes in cognitive abilities and brain structure. Previous studies also suggest compensatory roles for specialized training, skill, and years of education in the age-related decline of cognitive function. The Stanford/VA Aviation Study examines the influence of specialized training and skill level (expertise) on age-related changes in cognition and brain structure. This preliminary report examines the effect of aviation expertise, years of education, age, and brain size on flight simulator performance in pilots aged 45-68 years. Fifty-one pilots were studied with structural magnetic resonance imaging, flight simulator, and processing speed tasks. There were significant main effects of age (p brain size (p > .1) or education (p > .1), on flight simulator performance. However, even though age and brain size were correlated (r = -0.41), age differences in flight simulator performance were not explained by brain size. Both aviation expertise and education were involved in an interaction with brain size in predicting flight simulator performance (p < .05). These results point to the importance of examining measures of expertise and their interactions to assess age-related cognitive changes.

  10. Exploratory spatial analysis of pilot fatality rates in general aviation crashes using geographic information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Jurek G; Curriero, Frank C; Baker, Susan P; Li, Guohua

    2002-03-01

    Geographic information systems and exploratory spatial analysis were used to describe the geographic characteristics of pilot fatality rates in 1983-1998 general aviation crashes within the continental United States. The authors plotted crash sites on a digital map; rates were computed at regular grid intersections and then interpolated by using geographic information systems. A test for significance was performed by using Monte Carlo simulations. Further analysis compared low-, medium-, and high-rate areas in relation to pilot characteristics, aircraft type, and crash circumstance. Of the 14,051 general aviation crashes studied, 31% were fatal. Seventy-four geographic areas were categorized as having low fatality rates and 53 as having high fatality rates. High-fatality-rate areas tended to be mountainous, such as the Rocky Mountains and the Appalachian region, whereas low-rate areas were relatively flat, such as the Great Plains. Further analysis comparing low-, medium-, and high-fatality-rate areas revealed that crashes in high-fatality-rate areas were more likely than crashes in other areas to have occurred under instrument meteorologic conditions and to involve aircraft fire. This study demonstrates that geographic information systems are a valuable tool for injury prevention and aviation safety research.

  11. Periodontal diseases in military aviation crew: A pilot study in armed forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth Thankappan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent literature suggests psychosomatic and occupational stresses have a bearing on the etiology of periodontitis. The aviation field is a high-risk environment and rich in potential stresses which can be potent environmental factors. The purpose of this pilot study was to clinically evaluate the incidence of periodontitis amongst military aviators and its management on the health-related quality of life recovery. Materials and Methods : A total of 252 individuals were examined, equally divided into ground duty and flying groups. In addition to standard parameters, the clinical attachment loss (CAL was estimated according to a three-point scale. Stress factor was evaluated as per short form of Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ. Numbers of visits after diagnosis, limitation from flying tasks due to the acute phase of disease and during treatment were recorded. The subjects who presented with active phases of disease were taken up for surgical mode of treatment. Results: Out of 252 individuals examined in this study, active periodontitis was found in 7.9% of the total population. Group 1 and 2 subjects presented an incidence rate of 5.6 and 10.3%, respectively. Among the aviators, 12.2% of the helicopter crews, 10.3% of fighter pilots, and 8.9% of the transport crews showed active form of periodontal diseases during routine annual medical examination. Ten cases presented limitation from flying due to acute phase of disease. Conclusions : Periodontitis causes early teeth loss and compromises the quality of life. It is mandatory for quick recovery and return to professional activities in the aviators. The annual medical checkup must include a thorough check up by a dental officer/periodontist and assessment with an appropriate radiograph once in every 3years advised. The screening examination used is suggested for use as part of each aviator′s annual dental examination.

  12. In-Flight Decision-Making by General Aviation Pilots Operating in Areas of Extreme Thunderstorms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Douglas D

    2017-12-01

    General aviation (comprised mainly of noncommercial, light aircraft) accounts for 94% of civil aviation fatalities in the United States. Although thunderstorms are hazardous to light aircraft, little research has been undertaken on in-flight pilot decision-making regarding their avoidance. The study objectives were: 1) to determine if the thunderstorm accident rate has declined over the last two decades; and 2) assess in-flight (enroute/landing) airman decision-making regarding adherence to FAA separation minima from thunderstorms. Thunderstorm-related accidents were identified from the NTSB database. To determine en route/arriving aircraft real-time thunderstorm proximity/relative position and airplane location, using a flight-tracking (Flight Aware®) website, were overlaid on a graphical weather image. Statistics employed Poisson and Chi-squared analyses. The thunderstorm-related accident rate was undiminished over the 1996-2014 period. In a prospective analysis the majority (enroute 77%, landing 93%) of flights violated the FAA-recommended separation distance from extreme convection. Of these, 79 and 69% (en route and landing, respectively) selected a route downwind of the thunderstorm rather than a less hazardous upwind flight path. Using a mathematical product of binary (separation distance, relative aircraft-thunderstorm position) and nominal (thunderstorm-free egress area) parameters, airmen were more likely to operate in the thunderstorm hazard zone for landings than en route operations. The thunderstorm-related accident rate, carrying a 70% fatality rate, remains unabated, largely reflecting nonadherence to the FAA-recommended separation minima and selection of a more hazardous route (downwind) for circumnavigation of extreme convective weather. These findings argue for additional emphasis in ab initio pilot training/recurrency on thunderstorm hazards and safe practices (separation distance and flight path).Boyd DD. In-flight decision-making by general

  13. Howard Hughes and the Cold War Aviation Film Jet Pilot (1957

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Andrew Voeltz

    2016-10-01

    War.  But sexual intimacy, conspicuous consumption, and aviation technology also inserted themselves into the perfect safetly of American domestic bliss. This paper will analyze how the eccentric Cold War romantic comedy Jet Pilot (1957 so associated with the compulsiveness of Howard Hughes, produced and written by Jules Furthman, directed ( partially by Josef von Sternburg and starring John Wayne and Janet Leigh, reflects all these themes making it the paradigmatic Cold Film that remains a camp classic from the American popular cultyre of the 1950s.

  14. Evaluating non-technical skills and mission essential competencies of pilots in military aviation environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsifetakis, Emmanuel; Kontogiannis, Tom

    2017-05-25

    To develop and validate a classification of non-technical skills (NTS) in military aviation, a study was conducted, using data from real operations of F16 aircraft formations. Phase 1 developed a NTS classification based on the literature review (e.g. NOTECHS) and a workshop with pilots. The Non-TEChnical-MILitary-Skills (NOTEMILS) scheme was tested in Phase 2 in a series of Principal Component Analysis with data from After-Action-Review sessions (i.e. 900 records from a wide range of operations). The NTS were found to make a good prediction of Mission Essential Components (R2 > 0.80) above the effect of experience. Phase 3 undertook a reliability analysis where three raters assessed the NOTEMILS scheme with good results (i.e. all rwg > 0.80). To look into the consistency of classifications, another test indicated that, at least, two out of three raters were in agreement in over 70% of the assessed flight segments. Practitioner Summary: A classification scheme of Non-Technical Skills (NTS) was developed and tested for reliability in military aviation operations. The NTS scheme is a valuable tool for assessing individual and team skills of F-16 pilots in combat. It is noteworthy that the tool had a good capability of predicting Mission Essential Competencies.

  15. Measurement of doses to aviator pilots using thermoluminescent dosemeters; Medicion de la dosis a pilotos aviadores usando dosimetros termoluminiscentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin N, J.; Cruz C, D. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, ESIME Culhuacan (Mexico)]. e-mail: azorin@xanum.uam.mx

    2004-07-01

    During the development of their work, the aviator pilots are exposed at high levels of natural radiation of bottom caused mainly by the cosmic radiation of galactic origin and lot. For such reason, the Metropolitan Autonomous University (UAM) and the Union Association of Aviator Pilots (ASPA), subscribed an agreement with the purpose of to measure the doses of ionizing radiation received by the aviator pilots of diverse air companies that man different types of airships and to determine if these doses surpass the one limit of 0.11 mSv/h settled down by the IAEA for the public in general; and if therefore, these workers should be considered as personnel occupationally exposed. In this work the obtained results when measuring the absorbed dose received by Mexican civil aviator pilots during the development of their work, using thermoluminescent dosemeters of LiF:Mg,Cu,P + Ptfe of national production are presented. The obtained results during the years of 2001 and 2002 show that the monthly doses received by the pilots surpass the one it limits established for the public in general, for what they should be considered as personnel occupationally exposed. (Author)

  16. Well Clear: General Aviation and Commercial Pilots' Perceptioin of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This research explored how different pilots perceived the concept of the Well Clear Boundary (WCB) and observed if that boundary changed when dealing with manned versus unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), and the effects of other variables. Pilots' WCB perceptions were collected objectively through simulator recordings and subjectively through questionnaires. Objectively, significant differences were found in WCB perception between two pilot types (general aviation [GA], and Airline Transport Pilots [ATPs]), and significant WCB differences were evident when comparing two intruder types (manned versus unmanned aircraft). Differences were dependent on other manipulated variables (intruder approach angle, ownship speed, and background traffic levels). Subjectively, there were differences in WCB perception across pilot types; GA pilots trusted UAS aircraft higher than the more experienced ATPs. Conclusions indicate pilots' WCB mental models are more easily perceived as time-based boundaries in front of ownship, and more easily perceived as distance-based boundaries to the rear of ownship.

  17. Aviation safety and pilot control: understanding and preventing unfavorable pilot-vehicle interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Natl. Research Council Staff

    1997-01-01

    ... of Aircraft-Pilot Coupling on Flight Safety Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1997 Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, paper original however, for version formatting, authoritative the typesetting-...

  18. Well clear: General aviation and commercial pilots' perception of unmanned aerial vehicles in the national airspace system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Joseph T.

    The purpose of this research was to determine how different pilot types perceived the subjective concept of the Well Clear Boundary (WCB) and to observe if that boundary changed when dealing with manned versus unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) as well as the effects of other variables. Pilots' perceptions of the WCB were collected objectively through simulator recordings and subjectively through questionnaires. Together, these metrics provided quantitative and qualitative data about pilot WCB perception. The objective results of this study showed significant differences in WCB perception between two different pilot types, as well as WCB significant differences when comparing two different intruder types (manned versus unmanned aircraft). These differences were dependent on other manipulated variables, including intruder approach angle, ownship speed, and background traffic levels. Subjectively, there were evident differences in WCB perception across pilot types; general aviation (GA) pilots appeared to trust UAS aircraft slightly more than did the more experienced Airline Transport Pilots (ATPs). Overall, it is concluded that pilots' mental models of the WCB are more easily perceived as time-based boundaries in front of ownship, while being more easily perceived as distance-based boundaries to the rear of ownship.

  19. Pilot Project Technology Business Case: Mobile Work Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lawrie, Sean [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States); Niedermuller, Josef [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Performance advantages of the new pilot project technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on demonstrating actual cost reductions that can be credited to budgets and thereby truly reduce O&M or capital costs. Technology enhancements, while enhancing work methods and making work more efficient, often fail to eliminate workload such that it changes overall staffing and material cost requirements. It is critical to demonstrate cost reductions or impacts on non-cost performance objectives in order for the business case to justify investment by nuclear operators. The Business Case Methodology (BCM) was developed in September of 2015 to frame the benefit side of II&C technologies to address the “benefit” side of the analysis—as opposed to the cost side—and how the organization evaluates discretionary projects (net present value (NPV), accounting effects of taxes, discount rates, etc.). The cost and analysis side is not particularly difficult for the organization and can usually be determined with a fair amount of precision (not withstanding implementation project cost overruns). It is in determining the “benefits” side of the analysis that utilities have more difficulty in technology projects and that is the focus of this methodology. The methodology is presented in the context of the entire process, but the tool provided is limited to determining the organizational benefits only. This report describes a the use of the BCM in building a business case for mobile work packages, which includes computer-based procedures and other automated elements of a work package. Key to those impacts will be identifying where the savings are

  20. Making an impact. The influence of policies to reduce emissions from aviation on the business travel patterns of individual corporations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Zoe G.; Armsworth, Paul R. [Biodiversity and Macroecology Group, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    The contribution of aviation to global carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions is projected to triple by 2050. As nations strive to meet CO{sub 2} reduction targets, policy interventions to manage the growth of emissions arising from air travel are likely. Here, we investigate the potential influence of aviation emissions reduction policies on the business travel patterns of individual corporations. Using travel data from six UK-based companies, we find that increased ticket prices can deliver substantial emissions cuts, particularly on premium class flights, and may provide strong financial incentives to seek modal and/or technological alternatives to flying. We also find that corporations from different business sectors vary in their responsiveness to a range of policy options. Finally, we examine questionnaire data to determine whether companies more broadly are going beyond compliance to mitigate their environmental impact by managing travel-related emissions voluntarily. Although many corporations are measuring and reporting emissions, only a limited number are willing to implement in-house reduction policies prior to regulation. (author)

  1. Flight experience and executive functions predict unlike professional pilots who are limited by the FAA's age rule, no age limit is defined in general aviation (GA)

    OpenAIRE

    Causse, Mickael; Dehais, Frédéric; Pastor, Josette

    2010-01-01

    Unlike professional pilots who are limited by the FAA's age rule, no age limit is defined in general aviation (GA). Some studies revealed significant aging issues on accident rates but these results are criticized. Our overall goal is to study how the effect of age on executive functions (EFs), high level cognitive abilities, impacts on the flying performance in GA pilots. This study relies on three components: EFs assessment, pilot characteristics (age, flight experience), and the naviga...

  2. Excess weight in regular aviation pilots associated with work and sleep characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza Palmeira, Magna Lúcia; Cristina Marqueze, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the prevalence and associated factors of overweight and obesity in Brazilian commercial airline pilots. Methods An observational, cross-sectional study involving 1198 Brazilian commercial airline pilots with a sampling power >80% (ß=20%) and confidence level of 95% (α=5%) was carried out. The pilots completed an on-line questionnaire collecting data on sociodemographics, work, health, lifestyle and sleep. Poisson regression, with robust variance (stepwise forward ...

  3. Drugs and alcohol in civil aviation accident pilot fatalities from 2004-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The FAA Office of Aerospace Medicine sets medical standards needed to protect the public and pilots from death : or injury due to incapacitation of the pilot. As a part of this process, toxicology testing is performed by the FAA : on almost every pil...

  4. 77 FR 64837 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fourth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 227, Standards of Navigation Performance AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION... 15, 2012. Kathy Hitt, Management Analyst, Business Operations Group, Federal Aviation Administration...

  5. 78 FR 41183 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Meeting: RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management.... Paige Williams, Management Analyst, NextGen, Business Operations Group, Federal Aviation Administration...

  6. A European Seal of Approval for 'gay' businesses: findings from an HIV-prevention pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Nigel; Gugglberger, Lisa

    2014-05-01

    'Gay' businesses can be important settings through which to deliver health promotion interventions to vulnerable populations, such as men who have sex with men (MSM) regarding HIV prevention. This article draws on data from the European Everywhere project, which represents the first scheme to develop and pre-test a common framework for HIV/STI prevention in 'gay' businesses across eight European countries. The scientific basis of the Everywhere framework was developed using a comprehensive consensus-building process over 30 months. This process included: formative scoping research; interviews with 54 'gay' businesses; meetings/workshops with representatives from project partners, 'gay' businesses, public health administrations and external experts; 15 interviews and three focus groups with project partners; a five-month pilot action phase in eight countries, together with support from the project's Advisory Group; and all Everywhere project partners including the Scientific Steering Committee. A voluntary European code setting out differentiated HIV/STI-prevention standards for 'gay' businesses (including sex venues, 'gay' and 'gay' friendly social spaces, travel agencies, hotels, dating websites) was developed and piloted in eight European cities. During a five-month pilot action, 83 'gay' businesses were certified with the Everywhere Seal of Approval representing a considerable increase on the expected pilot target of 30. Everywhere offers a major contribution to the public health and/or health promotion field in the form of a practical, policy-relevant, settings-based HIV-prevention framework for 'gay' businesses that is common across eight European countries. Findings suggest that a European-wide model of prevention is acceptable and feasible to businesses.

  7. ALGORITHMIC SUPPORT OF ASSESSMENT OF THE PREPARED CIVIL AVIATION PILOTS FOR PERFORMING PROFESSIONAL FUNCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Polyakov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of providing an assessment of pilots training for work the airlines in order to ensure flight safety. In this regard, a draft comprehensive methodology for assessing professional training of pilots is offered. It is divided into three stages: 1 introduction into profession; 2 active flight activity and stage in improving professional of skills in case of incidents or accidents in flight.

  8. Excess weight in regular aviation pilots associated with work and sleep characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Palmeira, Magna Lúcia; Cristina Marqueze, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    To identify the prevalence and associated factors of overweight and obesity in Brazilian commercial airline pilots. Methods An observational, cross-sectional study involving 1198 Brazilian commercial airline pilots with a sampling power >80% (ß=20%) and confidence level of 95% (α=5%) was carried out. The pilots completed an on-line questionnaire collecting data on sociodemographics, work, health, lifestyle and sleep. Poisson regression, with robust variance (stepwise forward technique), was employed to analyze the factors associated with excess weight (overweight and obesity). The models were adjusted for the variables age, marital status and education. The data were analyzed using the STATA 12.0 program. The prevalence of overweight among the pilots was 53.7% and of obesity was 14.6%. The probability of being overweight was highest among pilots working night shifts for 6-10 years and that had difficulty relaxing after work, where perceived morningness was a protective factor. Risk factors for obesity included working night-shifts for 6-10 years, having difficulty relaxing after work, sleeping airline pilots was high and represents a public health problem in this population. Excess weight was associated with time working night-shifts, difficulty relaxing after work, inadequate sleep on days off, having other chronic diseases, and physical inactivity. In this context, nutritional status can be regarded as the result of dynamic and complex interactions promoted by occupational, sleep and health factors.

  9. Aviation Safety Hotline Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Aviation Safety Hotline Information System (ASHIS) collects, stores, and retrieves reports submitted by pilots, mechanics, cabin crew, passengers, or the public...

  10. Excess weight in regular aviation pilots associated with work and sleep characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magna Lúcia de Souza Palmeira

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: It was concluded that the prevalence of overweight and obesity among the commercial airline pilots was high and represents a public health problem in this population. Excess weight was associated with time working night-shifts, difficulty relaxing after work, inadequate sleep on days off, having other chronic diseases, and physical inactivity. In this context, nutritional status can be regarded as the result of dynamic and complex interactions promoted by occupational, sleep and health factors.

  11. Epidemiology of Toxicological Factors in Civil Aviation Accident Pilot Fatalities, 1999-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    a wide range of task performance and mood measures (9,10). Studies such as the presence of methamphetamine in toxic con- centration in a civil...United States, autopsied biological samples (blood, urine , liver, kidney, vitreous fl uid, and other body specimens) collected from pilot...Fatalities† Schedules I and II Drugs‡ Amphetamine/ Methamphetamine 1 5 5 11 Barbiturates§ 0 2 8 10 Cocaine/Metabolite(s) 3 4 8 16 Codeine/Morphine 4 13

  12. Identification of Human Factors in Unmanned Aviation Via Pilot Incident Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Alan; Cardoza, Colleen; Null, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for incident data relevant to the operation of civilian unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in the National Air Space (NAS). Currently, very limited incident and accident data are available from military sources, and the tightly-restricted civilian UAS industry has produced very few incident reports that could shed light on design issues relevant to human factors. An exploratory study is being conducted to examine the feasibility of collecting voluntary critical incident reports from UAS pilots, and using the information to identify areas where human factors guidelines will be of assistance. Experienced UAS pilots are participating in small focus groups in which they are prompted to describe critical incidents that either reveal a system flaw, or highlight a case where the human operator contributed to system resilience or mission success. The de-identified incidents are being analyzed to identify contributing factors, with a focus on design issues that either hindered or assisted the pilot in dealing with the incident. Preliminary findings will be described.

  13. [Correction of the functional state of deck aviation pilots by the course of inhalation of therapeutic doses of xenon during long march].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubeev, Iu A; Kal'manov, A S; Kotrovskaia, T I

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with efficiency of the course of O2-Xe inhalation for correction of the functional state of deck aviation pilots in a long march. The course was shown to stabilize vagosympathetic balance in organism, to compensate functioning and to retain reserve of the cardiovascular system that resulted in significant psychoemotional animation attested by self-appreciation, amelioration and cheerfulness, and weakening of reactive anxiety. These observations point to applicability of xenon-based gas mixtures to correction of the pilot's functional state in the most intensive periods of service. Guidelines for broad adoption of the method by military medicine have been developed.

  14. Corporate Social Responsibility in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Edwin D.

    2006-01-01

    The dialog within aviation management education regarding ethics is incomplete without a discussion of corporate social responsibility (CSR). CSR research requires discussion involving: (a) the current emphasis on CSR in business in general and aviation specifically; (b) business and educational theory that provide a basis for aviation companies to engage in socially responsible actions; (c) techniques used by aviation and aerospace companies to fulfill this responsibility; and (d) a glimpse of teaching approaches used in university aviation management classes. The summary of this research suggests educators explain CSR theory and practice to students in industry and collegiate aviation management programs. Doing so extends the discussion of ethical behavior and matches the current high level of interest and activity within the aviation industry toward CSR.

  15. General aviation statistical databook & industry outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    2009 was one of the toughest years the general aviation industry has ever : experienced. The global economic crisis which included major constraints : on credit, coupled with the mischaracterization of business aviation led some : operators to divest...

  16. Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herter, Karen; Wayland, Seth; Rasin, Josh

    2009-09-25

    This report documents a field study of 78 small commercial customers in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District service territory who volunteered for an integrated energy-efficiency/demand-response (EE-DR) program in the summer of 2008. The original objective for the pilot was to provide a better understanding of demand response issues in the small commercial sector. Early findings justified a focus on offering small businesses (1) help with the energy efficiency of their buildings in exchange for occasional load shed, and (2) a portfolio of options to meet the needs of a diverse customer sector. To meet these expressed needs, the research pilot provided on-site energy efficiency advice and offered participants several program options, including the choice of either a dynamic rate or monthly payment for air-conditioning setpoint control. An analysis of hourly load data indicates that the offices and retail stores in our sample provided significant demand response, while the restaurants did not. Thermostat data provides further evidence that restaurants attempted to precool and reduce AC service during event hours, but were unable to because their air-conditioning units were undersized. On a 100 F reference day, load impacts of all participants during events averaged 14%, while load impacts of office and retail buildings (excluding restaurants) reached 20%. Overall, pilot participants including restaurants had 2007-2008 summer energy savings of 20% and bill savings of 30%. About 80% of participants said that the program met or surpassed their expectations, and three-quarters said they would probably or definitely participate again without the $120 participation incentive. These results provide evidence that energy efficiency programs, dynamic rates and load control programs can be used concurrently and effectively in the small business sector, and that communicating thermostats are a reliable tool for providing air-conditioning load shed and enhancing the ability

  17. Concerning Intelligent ICT Exploitation in some Maritime Business Organizations: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Bauk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines to which extent some maritime business organizations intelligently use their Information and Communication Technology (ICT resources. The research is done as a pilot study, since it includes relatively small number of maritime business entities from Montenegro, Albania, Croatia, Slovenia and Italy. Our intention was to indirectly check whether these organizations are ready for the adoption and routinization of novel ICT systems like e-Navigation, Maritime Cloud, e-Maritime, National/Maritime Single Window (N/MSW etc., through assessing how intelligently they exploit existing ICT solutions. Even though all interviewed managers have evaluated knowledge, organizational culture and managerial skills as key constructs that provide the business organizations’ success, the level of intelligent exploitation of the available ICT solutions is not high. This is problematic, especially if we bare in mind the necessity of making quick adaptation to the considerably more complex, sophisticated and demanding ICT solutions within the context of actual huge digital turbulence in the maritime community.

  18. Aviation safety courses available through the FAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-02

    The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) offers a 1-day training course to familiarize U.S. civil aviation pilots and flight crews with the physiological and psychological stresses of flight. Pilots who are knowledgeable about physiological p...

  19. General Aviation Weather Encounter Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a compilation of 24 cases involving general aviation (GA) pilots weather encounters over the : continental U.S. The project team interviewed pilots who had experienced a weather encounter, and we : examined their backgrounds, f...

  20. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 1 Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 100 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS OTHER THAN PILOTS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No...

  1. Alcohol and civil aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdener, F

    1993-07-01

    In aviation medicine until the early 1960s the idea that pilots would fly while under the influence of alcohol was taboo. In the United States of America, the taboo was broken when it became known that 30% of fatally injured pilots in general aviation had been under the influence of alcohol. Since then the rate has declined to 10%. No fatal accidents involving alcohol have been recorded in airline passenger transport. The prevalence of pilots flying under the influence of alcohol is unknown. The lowest studied blood alcohol concentration (BAC) with impaired flying skill today is 0.025%, effectively suggesting that the permitted level should be zero, but many aviation authorities have not yet translated such findings into rules and regulations. In the early 1970s the US Federal Air Surgeon began to re-issue licences for rehabilitated alcoholic pilots. Previously alcoholism had been a reason for mandatory permanent grounding. The possibility of returning to the cockpit first opened the way to early recognition of alcoholic pilots on a larger scale. Today many airlines have their own alcohol programmes. This paper gives a brief account of the Swissair programme with its four phases: observation, intervention, treatment and follow-up.

  2. Spatial Distribution of Cosmetic-Procedure Businesses in Two U.S. Cities: A Pilot Mapping and Validation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bryn Austin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic procedures have proliferated rapidly over the past few decades, with over $11 billion spent on cosmetic surgeries and other minimally invasive procedures and another $2.9 billion spent on U.V. indoor tanning in 2012 in the United States alone. While research interest is increasing in tandem with the growth of the industry, methods have yet to be developed to identify and geographically locate the myriad types of businesses purveying cosmetic procedures. Geographic location of cosmetic-procedure businesses is a critical element in understanding the public health impact of this industry; however no studies we are aware of have developed valid and feasible methods for spatial analyses of these types of businesses. The aim of this pilot validation study was to establish the feasibility of identifying businesses offering surgical and minimally invasive cosmetic procedures and to characterize the spatial distribution of these businesses. We developed and tested three methods for creating a geocoded list of cosmetic-procedure businesses in Boston (MA and Seattle (WA, USA, comparing each method on sensitivity and staff time required per confirmed cosmetic-procedure business. Methods varied substantially. Our findings represent an important step toward enabling rigorous health-linked spatial analyses of the health implications of this little-understood industry.

  3. Distribution of ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Acid in Postmortem Biological Fluids and Tissues From Pilots Fatally Injured in Aviation Accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Philip M; Cardona, Patrick S; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Soper, John W

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the postmortem distribution of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its major metabolite, 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH). Data from 55 pilots involved in fatal aviation accidents are presented in this study. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis obtained mean THC concentrations in blood from multiple sites, liver, lung, and kidney of 15.6 ng/mL, 92.4 ng/g, 766.0 ng/g, 44.1 ng/g and mean THCCOOH concentrations of 35.9 ng/mL, 322.4 ng/g, 42.6 ng/g, 138.5 ng/g, respectively. Heart THC concentrations (two cases) were 184.4 and 759.3 ng/g, and corresponding THCCOOH measured 11.0 and 95.9 ng/g, respectively. Muscle concentrations for THC (two cases) were 16.6 and 2.5 ng/g; corresponding THCCOOH, "confirmed positive" and 1.4 ng/g. The only brain tested in this study showed no THC detected and 2.9 ng/g THCCOOH, low concentrations that correlated with low values in other specimens from this case. This research emphasizes the need for postmortem cannabinoid testing and demonstrates the usefulness of a number of tissues, most notably lung, for these analyses. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. 75 FR 39090 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Gwinnett County Airport Briscoe Field (LZU), Lawrenceville, Georgia. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has completed its review of the Gwinnett County Airport Briscoe Field (LZU) preliminary...

  5. The E-Business Research Network: summary of the results of the Dutch pilot survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van der Wiele (Ton); A.R.T. Williams (Roger); J.D. van Iwaarden (Jos); M. Wilson (Melanie); B.G. Dale (Barry)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractA project has been started with the intention to develop an E-Business Research Network on E-business related research in business and management. The initiative has been taken in co-operation between Erasmus University and UMIST to develop a project in which the first stage concerns the

  6. Aviation Medicine: global historical perspectives and the development of Aviation Medicine alongside the growth of Singapore's aviation landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, W H; Low, R; Singh, J

    2011-05-01

    Aviation Medicine traces its roots to high altitude physiology more than 400 years ago. Since then, great strides have been made in this medical specialty, initially catalysed by the need to reduce pilot medical attrition during the World Wars, and more recently, fuelled by the explosive growth in globalised commercial air travel. This paper traces the historical milestones in Aviation Medicine, and maps its development in Singapore since the 1960s. Advancements in military aviation platforms and technology as well as the establishment of Singapore as an international aviation hub have propelled Aviation Medicine in Singapore to the forefront of many domains. These span Aviation Physiology training, selection medical standards, performance maximisation, as well as crew and passenger protection against communicable diseases arising from air travel. The year 2011 marks the centennial milestone of the first manned flight in Singapore, paving the way for further growth of Aviation Medicine as a mature specialty in Singapore.

  7. Entrepreneurship within General Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, Brian M.

    1995-01-01

    Many modern economic theories place great importance upon entrepreneurship in the economy. Some see the entrepreneur as the individual who bears risk of operating a business in the face of uncertainty about future conditions and who is rewarded through profits and losses. The 20th century economist Joseph Schumpter saw the entrepreneur as the medium by which advancing technology is incorporated into society as businesses seek competitive advantages through more efficient product development processes. Due to the importance that capitalistic systems place upon entrepreneurship, it has become a well studied subject with many texts to discuss how entrepreneurs can succeed in modern society. Many entrepreneuring and business management courses go so far as to discuss the characteristic phases and prominent challenges that fledgling companies face in their efforts to bring a new product into a competitive market. However, even with all of these aids, start-up companies fail at an enormous rate. Indeed, the odds of shepherding a new company through the travails of becoming a well established company (as measured by the ability to reach Initial Public Offering (IPO)) have been estimated to be six in 1,000,000. Each niche industry has characteristic challenges which act as barriers to entry for new products into that industry. Thus, the applicability of broad generalizations is subject to limitations within niche markets. This paper will discuss entrepreneurship as it relates to general aviation. The goals of this paper will be to: introduce general aviation; discuss the details of marrying entrepreneurship with general aviation; and present a sample business plan which would characterize a possible entrepreneurial venture.

  8. Clearing the Air: Applied Linguistic Perspectives on Aviation Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, John; Knoch, Ute

    2009-01-01

    As a result of investigations showing that communication problems can be a significant contributing factor to major aviation accidents, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has established a set of Language Proficiency Requirements. All pilots and air traffic controllers engaged in international aviation must be certified by their…

  9. Feasibility Study for Aviation Programs at Hudson Valley Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Edward P.

    This is a report on a survey to determine the feasibility of establishing aviation training programs at a New York community college. It examines existing sources, and present and future needs for commercial pilots, aviation mechanics, and airline stewardesses. Among the conclusions are the discovery that the aviation industry is on the threshold…

  10. Russian eruption warning systems for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, C.; Girina, O.; Senyukov, S.; Rybin, A.; Osiensky, J.; Izbekov, P.; Ferguson, G.

    2009-01-01

    More than 65 potentially active volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula and the Kurile Islands pose a substantial threat to aircraft on the Northern Pacific (NOPAC), Russian Trans-East (RTE), and Pacific Organized Track System (PACOTS) air routes. The Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) monitors and reports on volcanic hazards to aviation for Kamchatka and the north Kuriles. KVERT scientists utilize real-time seismic data, daily satellite views of the region, real-time video, and pilot and field reports of activity to track and alert the aviation industry of hazardous activity. Most Kurile Island volcanoes are monitored by the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT) based in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk. SVERT uses daily moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite images to look for volcanic activity along this 1,250-km chain of islands. Neither operation is staffed 24 h per day. In addition, the vast majority of Russian volcanoes are not monitored seismically in real-time. Other challenges include multiple time-zones and language differences that hamper communication among volcanologists and meteorologists in the US, Japan, and Russia who share the responsibility to issue official warnings. Rapid, consistent verification of explosive eruptions and determination of cloud heights remain significant technical challenges. Despite these difficulties, in more than a decade of frequent eruptive activity in Kamchatka and the northern Kuriles, no damaging encounters with volcanic ash from Russian eruptions have been recorded. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  11. Aviation Medicine Translations: Annotated Bibliography of Recently Translated Material. IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-04-01

    TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION Office of Aviation Medicine Washington, D.C. 20591 c,20 &30o113 70 NOTICE This document is disseminated under the...13. Type of Report and Period Covered 12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Address Office of Aviation Medicine OAM Report Federal Aviation Administration 800...metlsrsospyclgiaatvtynlss variables in the personality of the pilot.) Revista athewrplcndsnadiditrvws de psieologia general y aplicada (Madrid) Kuerschner, D

  12. Satellite Delivery of Aviation Weather Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Haendel, Richard

    2001-01-01

    With aviation traffic continuing to increase worldwide, reducing the aviation accident rate and aviation schedule delays is of critical importance. In the United States, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established the Aviation Safety Program and the Aviation System Capacity Program to develop and test new technologies to increase aviation safety and system capacity. Weather is a significant contributor to aviation accidents and schedule delays. The timely dissemination of weather information to decision makers in the aviation system, particularly to pilots, is essential in reducing system delays and weather related aviation accidents. The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating improved methods of weather information dissemination through satellite broadcasting directly to aircraft. This paper describes an on-going cooperative research program with NASA, Rockwell Collins, WorldSpace, Jeppesen and American Airlines to evaluate the use of satellite digital audio radio service (SDARS) for low cost broadcast of aviation weather information, called Satellite Weather Information Service (SWIS). The description and results of the completed SWIS Phase 1 are presented, and the description of the on-going SWIS Phase 2 is given.

  13. Initial cognitive performance predicts longitudinal aviator performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesavage, Jerome A; Jo, Booil; Adamson, Maheen M; Kennedy, Quinn; Noda, Art; Hernandez, Beatriz; Zeitzer, Jamie M; Friedman, Leah F; Fairchild, Kaci; Scanlon, Blake K; Murphy, Greer M; Taylor, Joy L

    2011-07-01

    The goal of the study was to improve prediction of longitudinal flight simulator performance by studying cognitive factors that may moderate the influence of chronological age. We examined age-related change in aviation performance in aircraft pilots in relation to baseline cognitive ability measures and aviation expertise. Participants were aircraft pilots (N = 276) aged 40-77.9. Flight simulator performance and cognition were tested yearly; there were an average of 4.3 (± 2.7; range 1-13) data points per participant. Each participant was classified into one of the three levels of aviation expertise based on Federal Aviation Administration pilot proficiency ratings: least, moderate, or high expertise. Addition of measures of cognitive processing speed and executive function to a model of age-related change in aviation performance significantly improved the model. Processing speed and executive function performance interacted such that the slowest rate of decline in flight simulator performance was found in aviators with the highest scores on tests of these abilities. Expertise was beneficial to pilots across the age range studied; however, expertise did not show evidence of reducing the effect of age. These data suggest that longitudinal performance on an important real-world activity can be predicted by initial assessment of relevant cognitive abilities.

  14. The Impact of Commercial Aviation on Naval Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    aviators more comparable to the airlines . The current ACCP plan is projected to cost the Navy $33.2 million in FY17, $35.3 million in FY18, $36.9...was the low end of the spectrum. Currently, the five airlines analyzed in this study are projected to hire a combined 2,500 new pilots in 2016...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) For the first time in over 15 years, commercial airlines are hiring large numbers of pilots and

  15. Distribution of Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Acid in Postmortem Biological Fluids and Tissues From Pilots Fatally Injured in Aviation Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Schoor M. Letter: effects of marihuana on flying ability. JAMA 230(9):1258 (1974). 8. Janowsky DS, Meacham MP, Blaine JD, Schoor M, Bozzetti LP...Simulated flying performance after marihuana intoxication. Aviat Space Environ Med 47(2):124-128 (1976a). 9. Janowsky DS, Meacham MP, Blaine JD, Schoor M

  16. 76 FR 19267 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 61 RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical... for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools. This document reinstates two... Aviation and Commercial Division, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation Administration, 800...

  17. Background of the Military Aviation Meteorological Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Zshumatiy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the birth of aviation and its meteorological service in the early twentieth century. The article details the military aviation meteorological services in Italy, France, Germany, Austria, the USA and Russia. Are described the problems, which arose with the takeoff and landings of flight vehicles with complex weather conditions. It is shown that the information about the actual and forthcoming weather is capable of reducing a quantity of failures of flight vehicles, of increasing safety of pilots and accuracy of the defeat of enemy, of planning the application of aviation.

  18. Aviation Flight Regulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... This regulation covers aircraft operations, crew requirements and flight rules. It also covers Army aviation general provisions, training, standardization, and management of aviation resources...

  19. Aviation and externalities : the accomplishments and problems

    OpenAIRE

    Janić, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Civil aviation has become a major industry and in one of the fastest growing sectors of the world economy. The growth of civil aviation has advantages and disadvantages for the society. The advantages include the direct and indirect generation of new jobs within and around the sector as well as providing a strong stimulus to the globalisation of the industry, business and long distance tourism. Disadvantages include its negative impacts on the environment. This paper presents an overview of t...

  20. 78 FR 44873 - Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ...--International Law, Legislation, and Regulations Division, AGC-240, Federal Aviation Administration, 800... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 61 RIN 2120-AJ67 Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations; Correction AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Final...

  1. The role of female entrepreneurial networks and small business development: a pilot study based on Sri Lankan migrant entrepreneurs of tourism industry in London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A.K.N.S.Surangi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years much has been written about the rapid spread of various types of firm networking, the area of female entrepreneurs’ networks and small business entrepreneurship is still a challenging research field. This study aims to explore the role of female entrepreneurs’ networks and examine the importance influences for female entrepreneurs’ networking behaviour. Pilot studies are mostly under-reported in the qualitative research literature and this article specifically focuses on the pilot study findings.Having established that a qualitative methodology is most suitable for this study, the in-depth narrative interviews and observation are deemed a particularly suitable research tools. For this study, the pilot work was conducted in London prior to the main stage of data gathering in Sri Lanka. Five Sri Lankan migrant women entrepreneurs in London were purposively approached and interviewed.Findings show that the female entrepreneurs’ networking experience provides a valuable insight for developing their own small businesses. More specifically, majority of the female entrepreneurs emphasized the purpose- driven nature of their contacts and they organized their networks around the family and social domains rather than professional ties. Further, influences: competing family responsibilities and business matters (being a good mum, gender, trust and running home based business, are important and they affect networking behaviour of female entrepreneurs. This study adds to the extant literature through its two-dimensional focus on entrepreneurial networking .The structural dimension which investigates who are parts of the entrepreneurial networks; the relational side which explores the contributions each tie brings to the entrepreneurial venture. Further, it brings new evidence to bear by examine the importance influences for women networking behaviour by showing how the phenomenon of entrepreneurship is context specific and the

  2. An Analysis of Female Representation and Marines Performance in Aviation and Logistics Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    21 Figure 12. Percentage of male enlisted recruits eligible for aviation and logistics PEFs , by PEF and...accession cohort, FY 1990 to FY 2013 ....... 21 Figure 13. Percentage of female enlisted recruits eligible for aviation and logistics PEFs , by PEF ...Aviation and logistics PEFs , FY 2014 ......................................................... 19 Table 3. Characteristics of pilot and NFO

  3. High Speed Mobility Through On-Demand Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mark D.; Goodrich, Ken; Viken, Jeff; Smith, Jeremy; Fredericks, Bill; Trani, Toni; Barraclough, Jonathan; German, Brian; Patterson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Game changing advances come about by the introduction of new technologies at a time when societal needs create the opportunity for new market solutions. A unique opportunity exists for NASA to bring about such a mobility revolution in General Aviation, extendable to other aviation markets, to maintain leadership in aviation by the United States. This report outlines the research carried out so far under NASA's leadership towards developing a new mobility choice, called Zip Aviation1,2,3. The feasibility, technology and system gaps that need to be addressed, and pathways for successful implementation have been investigated to guide future investment. The past decade indicates exciting trends in transportation technologies, which are quickly evolving. Automobiles are embracing automation to ease driver tasks as well as to completely control the vehicle with added safety (Figure 1). Electric propulsion is providing zero tail-pipe emission vehicles with dramatically lower energy and maintenance costs. These technologies have not yet been applied to aviation, yet offer compelling potential benefits across all aviation markets, and in particular to General Aviation (GA) as an early adopter market. The benefits of such an adoption are applicable in the following areas: ?? Safety: The GA market experiences accident rates that are substantially higher than automobiles or commercial airlines, with 7.5 fatal accidents per 100 million vehicle miles compared to 1.3 for automobiles and.068 for airlines. Approximately 80% of these accidents are caused by some form of pilot error, with another 13% caused by single point propulsion system failure. ?? Emissions: Environmental constraints are pushing for the elimination of 100Low Lead (LL) fuel used in most GA aircraft, with aviation fuel the #1 source of lead emissions into the environment. Aircraft also have no emission control systems (i.e. no catalytic converters etc.), so they are gross hydrocarbon polluters compared to

  4. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  5. Fuzzy Logic Decoupled Lateral Control for General Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Noel

    1997-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a human pilot uses the same set of generic skills to control a wide variety of aircraft. If this is true, then it should be possible to construct an electronic controller which embodies this generic skill set such that it can successfully control different airplanes without being matched to a specific airplane. In an attempt to create such a system, a fuzzy logic controller was devised to control aileron or roll spoiler position. This controller was used to control bank angle for both a piston powered single engine aileron equipped airplane simulation and a business jet simulation which used spoilers for primary roll control. Overspeed, stall and overbank protection were incorporated in the form of expert systems supervisors and weighted fuzzy rules. It was found that by using the artificial intelligence techniques of fuzzy logic and expert systems, a generic lateral controller could be successfully used on two general aviation aircraft types that have very different characteristics. These controllers worked for both airplanes over their entire flight envelopes. The controllers for both airplanes were identical except for airplane specific limits (maximum allowable airspeed, throttle ]ever travel, etc.). This research validated the fact that the same fuzzy logic based controller can control two very different general aviation airplanes. It also developed the basic controller architecture and specific control parameters required for such a general controller.

  6. Fuzzy Logic Decoupled Longitudinal Control for General Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Noel

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a human pilot uses the same set of generic skills to control a wide variety of aircraft. If this is true, then it should be possible to construct an electronic controller which embodies this generic skill set such that it can successfully control difference airplanes without being matched to a specific airplane. In an attempt to create such a system, a fuzzy logic controller was devised to control throttle position and another to control elevator position. These two controllers were used to control flight path angle and airspeed for both a piston powered single engine airplane simulation and a business jet simulation. Overspeed protection and stall protection were incorporated in the form of expert systems supervisors. It was found that by using the artificial intelligence techniques of fuzzy logic and expert systems, a generic longitudinal controller could be successfully used on two general aviation aircraft types that have very difference characteristics. These controllers worked for both airplanes over their entire flight envelopes including configuration changes. The controllers for both airplanes were identical except for airplane specific limits (maximum allowable airspeed, throttle lever travel, etc.). The controllers also handled configuration changes without mode switching or knowledge of the current configuration. This research validated the fact that the same fuzzy logic based controller can control two very different general aviation airplanes. It also developed the basic controller architecture and specific control parameters required for such a general controller.

  7. Spirometric assessment of potential respiratory impairment in general aviation airmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lategola, M T; Flux, M; Lyne, P J

    1977-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease continues to manifest an increasing prevalence in male Americans. A recent study of commercial airline pilots revealed a 12% prevalence of more-than-minor spirometric impairment. Because commensurate data were not available for general aviation pilots, in whom such impairment could also compromise flight safety, a parallel study was made. The BMRC and smoking questionnaires, chest expansion, and spirometric measurements of FEV1, FVC, FEV1%, MVV, and FFF 25-75% were assessed in 181 male general aviation pilots. All showed a general relationship to increasing age and smoking amount. Based on FEV1% and FEF 25-75% combined, minor or more-than-minor degrees of spirometric impairment were manifested by 25.4% of the pilots and moderate degrees by 12.7%. Very little impairment was reflected in the remaining spirometric parameters. Subsequent testing of such spirometrically impaired pilots for altitude, fatigue, and orthostatic tolerances related to general aviation flight safety is planned.

  8. Green Aviation – A Paradigm shift from Quantitative to Qualitative Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Gollnick, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Changing global climate and energy situation requires new reflexion of aviation development. To enable aviation development and growth a change from quantitative growth in terms of aircraft, movements and passengers to qualitative development as a source for business should be considered. Classical aviation technologies reached a high level of maturity. Further development will be driven by communication systems and services

  9. Securing General Aviation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elias, Bart

    2005-01-01

    General aviation (GA) -- a catch-all category that includes about 57% of all civilian aviation activity within the United States -- encompasses a wide range of airports, aircraft, and flight operations...

  10. Air safety, language assessment policy and policy implementation : the case of aviation English.

    OpenAIRE

    Alderson, J. Charles

    2009-01-01

    The language of international aviation communication is English, but numerous aviation incidents and accidents have involved miscommunication between pilots and air traffic controllers, many of whom are not native speakers of the language. In 2004 the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) published a set of Language Proficiency Requirements and a Proficiency Rating Scale, and by 5 March 2008, air traffic controllers and pilots were required by the ICAO to have a certificate attesti...

  11. Widespread Effects on Aviation of the 2008 Eruption of Chaiten Volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Benitez, C.; Andrioli, M.; Romero, R.; Casadevall, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    The 2008 eruption of Chaiten in southern Chile was the first eruption to pose widespread hazards to aviation in southern South America since the VEI 5 eruption of Chile's Cerro Hudson in 1991. Five encounters of aircraft with volcanic-ash clouds occurred in the week following the start of the eruption on 2 May 2008; three of these encounters occurred at low altitudes (less than 2 km) near the airport in Bariloche about 225 km from the volcano and involved significant engine damage. An airline company in Argentina reported that turbine damage from one encounter cost USD 2.5 million to repair. Operations at 16 airports in Chile, Argentina, and Uruguay at distances up to 2300 km from Chaiten were disrupted by flight cancellations or airport closures. The airport in the town of Chaiten, located about 15 kilometers from the eruptive vent, was severely damaged by ash fall and secondary lahars and is closed for the duration. Bariloche airport was closed for nearly four weeks in May and June 2008, during the start of the region's busy ski season, because of continuing concerns about the possible presence of ash in the surrounding airspace. Cancellation of 158 flights to Bariloche in May resulted in loss to an airline of USD 0.7 million. From the beginning of the eruption, advisories to aviation about the presence of ash in the atmosphere were issued by the Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), one of nine VAAC worldwide established by the International Civil Aviation Organization. Aviation meteorological offices and civil aviation agencies used the VAAC advisories as the basis for formal volcanic-ash warnings to airline operations centers, pilots, and air-traffic control centers. The Buenos Aires VAAC worked to improve its operational capabilities for ash-dispersion forecasting and also coordinated its advisories with the adjacent Toulouse VAAC when ash clouds moved into airspace over the Atlantic Ocean.

  12. 75 FR 68018 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ...] Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Receipt and Acceptance for Review: Preliminary Application for Airglades Airport (2IS), Clewiston, Florida... Airport's preliminary application for participation in the airport privatization pilot program received...

  13. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. 61.73 Section 61.73 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a...

  14. Aviation suicide: a review of general aviation accidents in the UK, 1970-96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, S A

    1998-07-01

    A review was undertaken of 415 general aviation accidents. Three were definite cases of suicide and in another seven it seemed possible that the deceased had taken their own lives. Therefore, in the United Kingdom, suicide definitely accounts for 0.72% of general aviation accidents and possibly for more than 2.4%. The latter accords more closely with the findings from Germany than from the United States. Previous psychiatric or domestic problems and alcohol misuse are features of these cases. Aerobatics before the final impact is another frequent finding. The investigation of fatal accidents involving "pilot error" is incomplete without an examination of the victim's social and psychological history. An assessment of a pilot's mental well-being is an essential part of aviation medical examinations.

  15. 75 FR 39091 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Mu oz Mar n International Airport (SJU), San Juan, Puerto Rico. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has completed its review of the Luis Mu oz Mar n International Airport International Airport...

  16. Social franchising principles do work: the business approach to removal and disposal of faecal sludge – from pilot to scale

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies undertaken in South Africa have found that social franchising partnerships for the routine maintenance of infrastructure could alleviate and address many challenges in the management of water services. A three-year pilot project has drawn...

  17. Aspects of the business success important to female entrepreneurs in urban areas of the Republic of Serbia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stošić Danijela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of an empirical study of the importance of qualitative and quantitative dimensions of business success for female entrepreneurs in the Republic of Serbia. There is empirical evidence that qualitative components, such as customer and employee satisfaction, relations with stakeholders, and family-work balance are more important to Serbian female entrepreneurs. Quantitative components (profit and employment growth, personal wealth, and other personal goals, although lower ranked, are also an important aspect of business success. These results also confirm that female entrepreneurs in Serbia have a diverse perception of business success.

  18. Aviation and the Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Harold L.; Watson, Russell W.

    This report summarizes the major conclusions of the Aviation Briefing for Community Colleges, which met to establish dialogue between community colleges and the aviation industry. Included are: (1) an overview of community college aviation, covering the topics of the aviation industry, the rationale for aviation in the community college, the types…

  19. Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Created in 2009 as part of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate's Integrated Systems Research Program, the Environmentally Responsible Aviation...

  20. Aspects of general aviation flight safety research

    OpenAIRE

    Gratton, GB; Bromfield, MA

    2008-01-01

    The largest cause of General Aviation Accidents is shown through an analysis of the 283 UK fatal accidents between 1980 and 2006 to be loss of control, most usually at low level. Evaluating the reasons behind this, it is shown to be due to a combination of aircraft characteristics and pilot situational awareness and response. The statistical analysis also shows that there are marked differences in the incidence of these accidents between some aircraft types, and this along with systems anal...

  1. Aviation Safety Reporting System: Process and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Linda J.

    1997-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) was established in 1976 under an agreement between the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cooperative safety program invites pilots, air traffic controllers, flight attendants, maintenance personnel, and others to voluntarily report to NASA any aviation incident or safety hazard. The FAA provides most of the program funding. NASA administers the program, sets its policies in consultation with the FAA and aviation community, and receives the reports submitted to the program. The FAA offers those who use the ASRS program two important reporting guarantees: confidentiality and limited immunity. Reports sent to ASRS are held in strict confidence. More than 350,000 reports have been submitted since the program's beginning without a single reporter's identity being revealed. ASRS removes all personal names and other potentially identifying information before entering reports into its database. This system is a very successful, proof-of-concept for gathering safety data in order to provide timely information about safety issues. The ASRS information is crucial to aviation safety efforts both nationally and internationally. It can be utilized as the first step in safety by providing the direction and content to informed policies, procedures, and research, especially human factors. The ASRS process and procedures will be presented as one model of safety reporting feedback systems.

  2. National General Aviation Design Competition Project Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the management of the National General Aviation Design Competition on behalf of NASA, the FAA and the Air Force by the Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC) for the time period October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2000. This was the VSGC's sixth year of managing the Competition, which the Consortium originally designed, developed and implemented for NASA and the FAA. The seventh year of the Competition was announced in July 2000. Awards to winning university teams were presented at a ceremony held at AirVenture 2000, the Experimental Aircraft Association's Annual Convention and Fly-In at Oshkosh, WIS. NASA, FAA and AOPA administrators presented the awards. The competition calls for individuals or teams of undergraduate and graduate students from U.S. engineering schools to participate in a major national effort to rebuild the U.S. general aviation sector. For the purpose of the contest, General aviation aircraft are defined as fixed wing, single or dual engine (turbine or piston), single-pilot aircraft for 2-6 passengers. In addressing design challenges for a small aircraft transportation system, the competition seeks to raise student awareness of the importance of general aviation and to stimulate breakthroughs in technology and their application in the general aviation market. The Competition has two categories: Innovative Design, and Design It, Build It, Fly It. Awards were given in both categories for this reporting year.

  3. Using the Balanced Scorecard to Enhance Undergraduate Education in a First Year Business Course: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Irma; Taylor, Ronald K.; Winter, Anthony; Mackie, J. Jay; Fisher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Several research studies found that managers lacked a basic understanding of a balanced scorecard (BSC) approach to evaluate an organization. Because of this, the authors saw an opportunity to reorganize a course in order to provide students with an opportunity to address this issue. Therefore, a recent pilot study was conducted to ascertain…

  4. Saúde e gestão na aviação: a experiência de pilotos e controladores de tráfego aéreo Health and management in aviation: the experience of air flight pilots and air trafic controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Itani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A aviação comercial é um ramo de atividade que apresenta um alto crescimento nas últimas duas décadas. Esse crescimento tem um impacto sobre a saúde do trabalhador do transporte aéreo, regulada por normas da aviação civil, sob responsabilidade do Estado. As políticas de gestão da saúde podem ser analisadas por meio do estudo realizado com pilotos e controladores de tráfego aéreo no período entre 1992 e 2004. Partiu-se da hipótese que a saúde é um atributo principal de qualificação, mas as práticas de gestão da saúde são contraditórias às exigências para o exercício das funções.The civil aviation has presented a high growth in the past three decades which has an actual effect on the aviation worker's health. the health of the aviation worker is ruled by civil aviation laws under the responsibility of the State. The health policies can be analysed by the data from pilots and air traffic controllers study undertaken during the period of 1992 and 2004. the hypothesis is that health is an important attribute of the qualification among pilots and air traffic controllers but the health management policies are contradictory when compared to the job demands.

  5. Human Factors Directions for Civil Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    2002-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in understanding human capabilities and limitations, incorporating human factors into aircraft design, operation, and certification, and the emergence of new technologies designed to reduce workload and enhance human performance in the system, most aviation accidents still involve human errors. Such errors occur as a direct or indirect result of untimely, inappropriate, or erroneous actions (or inactions) by apparently well-trained and experienced pilots, controllers, and maintainers. The field of human factors has solved many of the more tractable problems related to simple ergonomics, cockpit layout, symbology, and so on. We have learned much about the relationships between people and machines, but know less about how to form successful partnerships between humans and the information technologies that are beginning to play a central role in aviation. Significant changes envisioned in the structure of the airspace, pilots and controllers' roles and responsibilities, and air/ground technologies will require a similarly significant investment in human factors during the next few decades to ensure the effective integration of pilots, controllers, dispatchers, and maintainers into the new system. Many of the topics that will be addressed are not new because progress in crucial areas, such as eliminating human error, has been slow. A multidisciplinary approach that capitalizes upon human studies and new classes of information, computational models, intelligent analytical tools, and close collaborations with organizations that build, operate, and regulate aviation technology will ensure that the field of human factors meets the challenge.

  6. Aviation safety and ICAO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Jiefang

    2009-01-01

    The thesis addresses the issue of aviation safety under the rule of law. Aviation safety is a global concern. While air transport is considered a safe mode of travel, it is susceptible to inherent risks of flight, the use of force, and terrorist acts. Consequently, within the framework of the

  7. Mapping automotive like controls to a general aviation aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Christopher G.

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop fly-by-wire control laws enabling a general aviation aircraft to be flown with automotive controls, i.e. a steering wheel and gas/brake pedals. There was a six speed shifter used to change the flight mode of the aircraft. This essentially allows the pilot to have control over different aspects of the flight profile such as climb/descend or cruise. A highway in the sky was used to aid in the navigation since it is not intuitive to people without flight experience how to navigate from the sky or when to climb and descend. Many believe that general aviation could become as widespread as the automobile. Every person could have a personal aircraft at their disposal and it would be as easy to operate as driving an automobile. The goal of this thesis is to fuse the ease of drivability of a car with flight of a small general aviation aircraft. A standard automotive control hardware setup coupled with variably autonomous control laws will allow new pilots to fly a plane as easily as driving a car. The idea is that new pilots will require very little training to become proficient with these controls. Pilots with little time to stay current can maintain their skills simply by driving a car which is typically a daily activity. A human factors study was conducted to determine the feasibility of the applied control techniques. Pilot performance metrics were developed to compare candidates with no aviation background and experienced pilots. After analyzing the relative performance between pilots and non-pilots, it has been determined that the control system is robust and easy to learn. Candidates with no aviation experience whatsoever can learn to fly an aircraft as safely and efficiently as someone with hundreds of hours of flight experience using these controls.

  8. The age 60 rule: age discrimination in commercial aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Robin

    2002-03-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration's Age 60 Rule, promulgated in 1959, prohibits airline pilots from working in Part 121 operations once they have reached the age of 60. The Age 60 Rule remains a most contentious and politically sensitive topic, with challenges to the Rule currently mounted in both legislative and legal arenas. An extensive review of the medical literature was accomplished using MEDLINE. Pertinent Federal Regulations were examined. Legal proceedings and public domain documents were noted. Letters and personal communication were solicited where necessary information could not be ascertained by other means. The Age 60 Rule was not based on any scientific data showing that airline pilots aged 60 and older were any less safe than younger pilots, and there is evidence to indicate that the choice of age 60 was actually based on economic rather than safety considerations. Airline pilots consistently exceed general population norms for longevity, physical health, and mental abilities. Fear of an adverse pilot health event causing a crash in standard multi-crew operations is not justified. For decades, airline pilots under age 60 have been granted the means to demonstrate their fitness for flying by taking medical, cognitive, and performance evaluations that are denied to airline pilots when they reach age 60. Actual flight experience demonstrates that older pilots are as safe as younger pilots. International aviation experience indicates that abolishing the Age 60 Rule will not compromise aviation safety. There appears to be no medical, scientific, or safety justification for the Age 60 Rule. As such, perpetuation of the Age 60 Rule, where age alone is used as the single criterion of older pilot fitness, represents age discrimination in commercial aviation.

  9. Social franchising principles do work: The business approach to removal and disposal of faecal sludge -- from pilot to scale

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available these standards, and run and grow their own business. Reinforcing this, management systems ensure quality control over the operations, sustainability through economically viable pricing systems, and responsible health and safety and environmental management... to poor governance and weak public administration systems in much of South Africa, timely payment for work completed can be uncertain. Payments to the franchisees had thus to be initially covered through partner funding and by Amanz’ abantu, these costs...

  10. Industrial neuroscience in aviation evaluation of mental states in aviation personnel

    CERN Document Server

    Borghini, Gianluca; Di Flumeri, Gianluca; Babiloni, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses the emerging field of industrial neuroscience, and reports on the authors’ cutting-edge findings in the evaluation of mental states, including mental workload, cognitive control and training of personnel involved either in the piloting of aircraft and helicopters, or in managing air traffic. It encompasses neuroimaging and cognitive psychology techniques and shows how they have been successfully applied in the evaluation of human performance and human-machine interactions, and to guarantee a proper level of safety in such operational contexts. With an introduction to the most relevant concepts of neuroscience, neurophysiological techniques, simulators and case studies in aviation environments, it is a must-have for both students and scientists in the field of aeronautic and biomedical engineering, as well as for various professionals in the aviation world. This is the first book to intensively apply neurosciences to the evaluation of human factors and mental states in aviation.

  11. Aviation and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    This report provides background on aviation emissions and the factors affecting them; it discusses the tools available to control emissions, including existing authority under the Clean Air Act and proposed economy-wide cap-and-trade legislation; and...

  12. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Temporary Extension of Time To Allow for Certain Training and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certification. 2. Special Qualification Requirements. The sections of 14 CFR that prescribes these requirements... FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS... all part 121 and 135 check airmen (simulator) and flight instructors (simulator), part 121 aircraft...

  13. 76 FR 24358 - Airworthiness Directives; Dassault-Aviation Model FALCON 7X Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... Model FALCON 7X Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation.... Applicability (c) This AD applies to Dassault-Aviation Model FALCON 7X airplanes, certificated in any category... compromise the pilot capacity to react to abnormal or failure landing conditions. * * * * * Compliance (f...

  14. Subsidies in Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Gössling

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Relatively little attention has been paid to the existence of subsidies in aviation. As the sector’s importance for economic development is often highlighted, this paper seeks to provide a conceptual overview of the various forms of subsidies in aviation, as a contribution to a more holistic understanding of economic interrelationships. Based on a purposive sampling strategy, existing forms of subsidies are identified and categorized along the value chain. Focus is on industrialized countries, for which more information is available. Results indicate that significant subsidies are extended to manufacturers, infrastructure providers and airlines. These contribute to global economic growth related to aviation, but they also influence capacity in global aviation markets, strengthen the market position of individual airlines, and create conflicts between airlines and the countries they are based in. While the actual scale of subsidies cannot be determined within the scope of this paper, it provides a discussion of options to empirically assess the effects of aviation subsidies on market outcomes. Finally, general conclusions regarding the impact of subsidies on the overall sustainability of the air transport sector are drawn: These include rapidly growing capacity in the aviation system, economic vulnerabilities, and negative climate change related impacts. Results call for a better understanding of the distribution, character and implications of subsidies.

  15. Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards for Rotorcraft, Helicopter, Gyroplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The Commercial Pilot Rotorcraft (Helicopter and Gyroplane) Practical Test : Standards (PTS) book has been published by the Federal Aviation : Administration (FAA) to establish the standards for commercial pilot certification : practical tests for the...

  16. General aviation single pilot IFR autopilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    Five levels of autopilot complexity were flown in a single engine IFR simulation for several different IFR terminal operations. A comparison was made of the five levels of complexity ranging from no autopilot to a fully coupled lateral and vertical guidance mode to determine the relative benefits versus complexity/cost of state-of-the-art autopilot capability in the IFR terminal area. Of the five levels tested, the heading select mode made the largest relative difference in decreasing workload and simplifying the approach task. It was also found that the largest number of blunders was detected with the most highly automated mode. The data also showed that, regardless of the autopilot mode, performance during an IFR approach was highly dependent on the type of approach being flown. These results indicate that automation can be useful when making IFR approaches in a high workload environment, but also that some disturbing trends are associated with some of the higher levels of automation found in state-of-the-art autopilots.

  17. A Statistically Based Training Diagnostic Tool for Marine Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous viewing of ATF scores for a specific trainee This layout provides a snapshot a PUI’s performance over the course of the syllabus , as well...instructors conducting each training syllabus event are required to complete an aviation tracking file (ATF) that records the pilot under... the unit’s leadership on how that individual pilot is performing and progressing through the designated syllabus . This information is reviewed by

  18. Towards a neuroergonomics approach to understand inattentional deafness in aviation

    OpenAIRE

    Dehais, Frédéric; Vachon, Alexandre; Tremblay, Sébastien; Causse, Mickael

    2014-01-01

    Aviation safety analyses often reveal that pilots persist in erroneous decision-making despite auditory warning. Classically, the lack of response to alarms is attributed to pilots ignoring consciously such warnings due to decision biases or risk taking. However these explanations do not fully account for the misperception of critical auditory alarms as observed in flight simulators (Dehais, Tessier, Christophe, & Reuzeau, 2009). A relevant approach is to consider the concept of inattentiona...

  19. 75 FR 56857 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 141 RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification AGENCY... Register on August 21, 2009. That final rule revised the training, qualification, certification, and... Certification and Training Branch, AFS-810, General Aviation and Commercial Division, Flight Standards Service...

  20. Impact of aviation upon the atmosphere. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentier, J. [Comite Avion-Ozone, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    The commercial air traffic, either for business or for tourism will induce a special increase of long haul flights, with cruising altitudes of about 10 to 12 km. These altitudes correspond to the upper troposphere for the low latitudes (tropical zones) and to the lower stratosphere for middle and high latitudes. The prospect of a world air traffic multiplied by a factor 2 within the next fifteen years, with an increasing part of the long-haul flights, raises the problem of the impact of aircraft emissions on the upper troposphere and on the lower stratosphere. The air traffic growth which is forecast for the next two decades as well as for long term will be larger than the GDP growth. But technical progress concerning airframes, engines, navigation systems and improvements of air traffic control and airports will keep the aircraft emissions growth at a rate which will not exceed the GDP growth rate. The aviation`s share of global anthropogenic emissions will remain lower than 3 percent. The regulations related to NO{sub x} emissions from aircraft will reduce the aviation`s share of nitrogen oxides from human sources at a level of 1 percent. (R.P.)

  1. Wind farm turbulence impacts on general aviation airports in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbines and wind farms have become popular in the State of Kansas. Some general aviation pilots have expressed a concern about the : turbulence that the spinning blades are creating. If a wind farm is built near an airport, does this affect the...

  2. Age and pilot performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyraud, M Y; Borowsky, M S

    1985-06-01

    In military and civilian aviation, pilot age is a major factor which determines if the individual is allowed to continue flying. Many factors, including legal considerations, escalating personnel and training costs, and higher skill levels necessitated by increasing equipment complexity, have generated considerable interest in the development of "age free" criteria to determine continued suitability for aviation duty. Central to this issue is a demonstration that older pilots are not necessarily unsafe pilots. Naval Safety Center data relating mishap rates and causal factors to pilot age are presented and policy implications discussed. Results indicate that there are significant differences in mishap rates and mishap causal factors as a function of age, but these differences are not those which might be expected based on a knowledge of the aging literature.

  3. Developing the Business Modelling Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meertens, Lucas Onno; Iacob, Maria Eugenia; Nieuwenhuis, Lambertus Johannes Maria; Shishkov, B; Shishkov, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Currently, business modelling is an art, instead of a science, as no scientific method for business modelling exists. This, and the lack of using business models altogether, causes many projects to end after the pilot stage, unable to fulfil their apparent promise. We propose a structured method to

  4. Real Language Meets Real Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Muirhead; Schechter, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Real Business Language Challenge was a collaborative pilot project between Coca-Cola Enterprises (CCE) and Routes into Languages East for Year 9 and 10 pupils. It was based on CCE's award-winning Real Business Challenge, part of its highly acclaimed education programme. The Real Business Language Challenge transformed the project into a…

  5. Aplikasi Air (Aviation Information Rule) Berebasis Android Se-bagai Media Pembelajaran Praktis Dunia Penerbangan Studi Kasus: Komunitas Ilmu Terbanga

    OpenAIRE

    Setiawan, Bayu Dwi; Luthfi, Emha Taufiq

    2015-01-01

    Currently aviation is a job that is quite popular in Indonesia, the need for pilots and experts in the field of aviation continues to increase. And this makes the public interest and growing aviation world, but to support the development of the aviation world is very little information available and quite difficult to be able to. Most of the information was derived from the book are difficult to understand for people who are new to the world of aviation and information available on the intern...

  6. The Effects of Tobacco on Aviation Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    THE EFFECTS OF TOBACCO ON AVIATION SAFETY4 I 8. Performing 0rganization Report No. J. .L... orL ~l MrM K. 1 1 rJnder_____ 9.. .-tPer’rorming Organization...no medical certificate. 3.0 Aerobatics, age 60, diabetic , arteriosclerotic vascular disease. 3.4 Age 67, pilot incapacitation due to disturbance of... Diabetes , hypertension, RA level of 111 mso, age 52, 2,000 ft. 6.1 BA level of 252 mg%, unauthorized use of aircraft. 6.3 4,700 ft, low-level

  7. Aviation in the Support of MOUT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-10

    II00-155-77, July 1977, page 3. 6. Graham, Robert L., LTC and Franklin, Rey "N", LTC. " MOBA ," Army Aviation Di&est, Vol. 22, No. 2, February 1976, page 5...and therefore usually depends on the ZSU’s radar , ’ for information re&..ýrding possible tagets until they are visually acquired. U The SA-9, like...harder to acquire visually . Another passive countermeasure in production is the AN/APR-39 Radar Warning Receiver. It warns the pilot that he is being

  8. A psychologist's view of validating aviation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Earl S.; Wagner, Dan

    1994-01-01

    All systems, no matter what they are designed to do, have shortcomings that may make them less productive than was hoped during the initial development. Such shortcomings can arise at any stage of development: from conception to the end of the implementation life cycle. While systems failure and errors of a lesser magnitude can occur as a function of mechanical or software breakdown, the majority of such problems, in aviation are usually laid on the shoulders of the human operator and, to a lesser extent, on human factors. The operator bears the responsibility and blame even though, from a human factors perspective, error may have been designed into the system. Human factors is not a new concept in aviation. The name may be new, but the issues related to operators in the loop date back to the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century and certainly to the aviation build-up for World War I. During this first global confrontation, military services from all sides discovered rather quickly that poor selection and training led to drastically increased personnel losses. While hardware design became an issue later, the early efforts were primarily focused on increased care in pilot selection and on their training. This actually involved early labor-intensive simulation, using such devices as sticks and chairs mounted on rope networks which could be manually moved in response to control input. The use of selection criteria and improved training led to more viable person-machine systems. More pilots survived training and their first ten missions in the air, a rule of thumb arrived at by experience which predicted ultimate survival better than any other. This rule was to hold through World War II. At that time, personnel selection and training became very sophisticated based on previous standards. Also, many psychologists were drafted into Army Air Corps programs which were geared towards refining the human factor. However, despite the talent involved in these programs

  9. Systems concept for speech technology application in general aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, R. A.; Bergeron, H.

    1984-01-01

    The application potential of voice recognition and synthesis circuits for general aviation, single-pilot IFR (SPIFR) situations is examined. The viewpoint of the pilot was central to workload analyses and assessment of the effectiveness of the voice systems. A twin-engine, high performance general aviation aircraft on a cross-country fixed route was employed as the study model. No actual control movements were considered and other possible functions were scored by three IFR-rated instructors. The SPIFR was concluded helpful in alleviating visual and manual workloads during take-off, approach and landing, particularly for data retrieval and entry tasks. Voice synthesis was an aid in alerting a pilot to in-flight problems. It is expected that usable systems will be available within 5 yr.

  10. Analysis of Alerting System Failures in Commercial Aviation Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumaw, Randall J.

    2017-01-01

    The role of an alerting system is to make the system operator (e.g., pilot) aware of an impending hazard or unsafe state so the hazard can be avoided or managed successfully. A review of 46 commercial aviation accidents (between 1998 and 2014) revealed that, in the vast majority of events, either the hazard was not alerted or relevant hazard alerting occurred but failed to aid the flight crew sufficiently. For this set of events, alerting system failures were placed in one of five phases: Detection, Understanding, Action Selection, Prioritization, and Execution. This study also reviewed the evolution of alerting system schemes in commercial aviation, which revealed naive assumptions about pilot reliability in monitoring flight path parameters; specifically, pilot monitoring was assumed to be more effective than it actually is. Examples are provided of the types of alerting system failures that have occurred, and recommendations are provided for alerting system improvements.

  11. Naval Aviation Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    modeling and simulation, distributed testing, and ground testing. The fully instrumented and integrated Atlantic Test Range supports cradle -to-grave...be taking “ cats ” and “traps” for many years to come. Naval aviatioN visioN • JaNuary 2012109 Sergeant Jesus J. Castro Title: KC-130J Super Hercules

  12. Politics of aviation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivent, Jacques

    1922-01-01

    In short, the "politics of aviation" lies in a few propositions: the need of having as large a number of fields as possible and of sufficient area; the utilization of the larger part of the existing military fields; the selection of uncultivated or unproductive fields, whenever technical conditions permit; ability to disregard (save in exceptional cases) objections of an agricultural nature.

  13. Review of Aviator Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    achieved by a battery that reliably and accurately measures general intelligence: psychomotor skills; selective and divided attention; working memory ...aviator selection, including the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (Caldwell, O’Hara, Caldwell, Stephens, & Krueger, 1993), Eysenck Personality...administered tests measuring psychomotor skills, short-term memory , time- sharing ability, and attitudes toward risk-taking. Across several studies, the

  14. 78 FR 6276 - Aviation Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 87 Aviation Communications AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed... pertaining to Aviation Communications remain up-to-date and continues to further the Commission's goals of... letter from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) asking that the Commission not implement the...

  15. 78 FR 61203 - Aviation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 87 Aviation Services AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule... permit ground testing of aviation data link systems, and decline to authorize remote monitoring of... the airport surface, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) seeks to expand the use of ASDE-X to...

  16. Developing the Business Modelling Method

    OpenAIRE

    Meertens, Lucas Onno; Iacob, Maria Eugenia; Nieuwenhuis, Lambertus Johannes Maria; Shishkov, B; Shishkov, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Currently, business modelling is an art, instead of a science, as no scientific method for business modelling exists. This, and the lack of using business models altogether, causes many projects to end after the pilot stage, unable to fulfil their apparent promise. We propose a structured method to create “as-is” business models in a repeatable manner. The method consists of the following steps: identify the involved roles, recognize relations among roles, specify the main activities, and qua...

  17. Business ethics across the curriculum?

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkmann, Johannes; Sims, Ronald R.; Nelson, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    This is the authors’ final, accepted and refereed manuscript to the article. This article describes and discusses team teaching and particularly guest lectures as a way of integrating ethics into the business curriculum. After a brief discussion of business school responsibilities and the teaching of ethics, the article looks at efforts to integrate the teaching of ethics across the curriculum. Then, findings from a small pilot study among business ethics and business school co...

  18. 77 FR 58208 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... participation of Luis Mu oz Mar n International Airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico (SJU) in the Airport... 28, 2012, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Title 49 U.S.C. Section 47134 establishes an airport...

  19. Locomotor problems of supersonic aviation and astronautics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes, P

    1989-04-01

    Modern high-speed aviation and space flight are fraught with many problems and require a high standard of health and fitness. Those responsible for the health of pilots must appreciate the importance of early diagnosis even before symptoms appear. This is particularly true in terms of preventing spinal injuries where even a single Schmorl's node may make a pilot unfit for high-speed flying. Spinal fractures are frequent during emergency ejection and landing. Helicopter crews are particularly prone to spinal disc degeneration due to vibration. By effective lowering of vibration by changes in the seats, a reduction in such lesions is possible. The osteoporosis and muscle atrophy occurring among astronauts subjected to prolonged weightlessness can be prevented by regular physical exercises.

  20. Reassessing the position of Aviation English: from a special language to English for Specific Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Aiguo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available “Aviation English” is not only confined to pilots and air traffic controllers (ATC, it also refers to English on general terms in aeronautical and/or aviation universities. It can be designed as integrated ESP (English for Specific Purposes curricula for students in the fields of aeronautics and/or aviation. Learners of ESP are supposed to master the vocabulary in their specific discipline as well as the English language skills. This paper explores the possibility of establishing Aviation English as an ESP specialty in aeronautical and/or aviation colleges and universities. Needs analysis has been made and curricula designed for an integrated course of study in the Chinese context, so that learners of ESP can learn the target language more effectively and meet the standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO. It reconsiders the ESP theories and aims to develop a possible approach to ESP teaching more suitable for the Chinese learners.

  1. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in commercial airline pilots: a cohort study of 2630 pilots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, S.; Venemans-Jellema, A.; Cannegieter, S. C.; van Haften, M.; Middeldorp, S.; Büller, H. R.; Rosendaal, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Airline pilots may be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) because air travel has recently been established as a risk factor for VTE. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of VTE in a cohort of Dutch airline pilots. Airline pilots who had been active members of the Dutch aviation

  2. Using random forests to diagnose aviation turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John K

    Atmospheric turbulence poses a significant hazard to aviation, with severe encounters costing airlines millions of dollars per year in compensation, aircraft damage, and delays due to required post-event inspections and repairs. Moreover, attempts to avoid turbulent airspace cause flight delays and en route deviations that increase air traffic controller workload, disrupt schedules of air crews and passengers and use extra fuel. For these reasons, the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have funded the development of automated turbulence detection, diagnosis and forecasting products. This paper describes a methodology for fusing data from diverse sources and producing a real-time diagnosis of turbulence associated with thunderstorms, a significant cause of weather delays and turbulence encounters that is not well-addressed by current turbulence forecasts. The data fusion algorithm is trained using a retrospective dataset that includes objective turbulence reports from commercial aircraft and collocated predictor data. It is evaluated on an independent test set using several performance metrics including receiver operating characteristic curves, which are used for FAA turbulence product evaluations prior to their deployment. A prototype implementation fuses data from Doppler radar, geostationary satellites, a lightning detection network and a numerical weather prediction model to produce deterministic and probabilistic turbulence assessments suitable for use by air traffic managers, dispatchers and pilots. The algorithm is scheduled to be operationally implemented at the National Weather Service's Aviation Weather Center in 2014.

  3. Innovation in Carrier Aviation (Naval War College Newport Papers, 37)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    centers. Second, rapid demobilization after war’s end had sent masses of former servicemen back into civilian life and had cut dramatically the output from... demobilization was followed by a longer-term decline: “The Navy reduced aviation forces 80 percent to a total of 10,232 pilots, 56,767 aviation ratings, and...with a capacity of eigh- teen thousand pounds and an end speed of a hundred knots (maximum acceleration 3.5g). For the future, lessons learned in its

  4. Agile Web Pilot Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lang, Mark

    1997-01-01

    ... in an increasingly competitive global marketplace. The pilot program allowed 18 small and medium sized enterprises to experiment with new agile business practices in competitive manufacturing environments by forming virtual organizations within...

  5. Aviation Industry – Mitigating Climate Change Impacts Through Technology and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Capoccitti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the challenges facing the aviation industry and what is it doing about reducing its environmental footprint. The paper concludes that aviation industry needs to look past their traditional business model and move to a model that allows them to operate in a new global business environment which puts emphasis on environmental alignment of business goals. In the interim, the aviation industry continues to explore the issues related to alternative fuels, more efficient engine technology, better traffic management and policy mechanisms (such as emissions trading and carbon offsets with some degree of success. The paper strongly recommends the involvement of governments in establishing ground rules to help global aviation industry to mitigate climate change risks.

  6. 14 CFR 61.315 - What are the privileges and limits of my sport pilot certificate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... sport pilot certificate? 61.315 Section 61.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.315 What are the privileges and limits of my sport pilot certificate? (a) If you hold a sport pilot certificate you may act as pilot in command of a light-sport aircraft, except as...

  7. Thermal Imaging in Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Štumper

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the use of thermal imaging in aviation. In the never ending pursuit of lower costs, the Thermal Imaging offers shorter inspection times thanks to its application in aircraft inspections and can reduce the number of costly goarounds using the Enhanced Vision System, which also increases safety in one of the most dangerous parts of flight. Thermal Imaging also offers solutions for Airport Perimeter Security and it can be used for construction of ground surveillance system.

  8. The Impact of Collegiate Aviation Student Learning Styles on Flight Performance: A Scenario-Based Training Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriman, Stanley L.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the glass cockpit, as well as a whole new generation of high performance general aviation aircraft, highlights the need for a comprehensive overhaul of the traditional approach to training pilots. Collegiate aviation institutions that are interested in upgrading their training aircraft fleets will need to design new curricula…

  9. University Aviation Degree Courses: A Study of Labour Market and Student Retention Challenges for Sustainable Course Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Devinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Universities offering aviation degree courses face a dilemma when integrating flying training, which is vocational skills training, into an academic degree programme. Whilst flying training for a pilot's licence is provided by flying schools regulated by a country's Civil Aviation Authority, the HE sector is responsible for the academic standards…

  10. Human factors in aviation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salas, Eduardo; Maurino, Daniel E

    2010-01-01

    .... HFA offers a comprehensive overview of the topic, taking readers from the general to the specific, first covering broad issues, then the more specific topics of pilot performance, human factors...

  11. Development of Business Models of Low-Cost Airlines

    OpenAIRE

    Andrija Vidović; Igor Štimac; Damir Vince

    2013-01-01

    The global economic crisis that affects all industries, including the aviation industry, has forced airlines to adjust their business models to existing market conditions. Low-cost airlines, which till the onset of economic crises in most cases followed the base low-cost business model, have adapted their business model in such a way that they have implemented segments of traditional airlines business models and thus created a hybrid between traditional and low-cost business models. This pape...

  12. Pilot age and expertise predict flight simulator performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Quinn; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Expert knowledge may compensate for age-related declines in basic cognitive and sensory-motor abilities in some skill domains. We investigated the influence of age and aviation expertise (indexed by Federal Aviation Administration pilot ratings) on longitudinal flight simulator performance. Methods Over a 3-year period, 118 general aviation pilots aged 40 to 69 years were tested annually, in which their flight performance was scored in terms of 1) executing air-traffic controller communications; 2) traffic avoidance; 3) scanning cockpit instruments; 4) executing an approach to landing; and 5) a flight summary score. Results More expert pilots had better flight summary scores at baseline and showed less decline over time. Secondary analyses revealed that expertise effects were most evident in the accuracy of executing aviation communications, the measure on which performance declined most sharply over time. Regarding age, even though older pilots initially performed worse than younger pilots, over time older pilots showed less decline in flight summary scores than younger pilots. Secondary analyses revealed that the oldest pilots did well over time because their traffic avoidance performance improved more vs younger pilots. Conclusions These longitudinal findings support previous cross-sectional studies in aviation as well as non-aviation domains, which demonstrated the advantageous effect of prior experience and specialized expertise on older adults’ skilled cognitive performances. PMID:17325270

  13. COPRA Aviation Security Research Roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    Hasberg, M.P.; Leisman, L.; Van De Voorde, I; Weissbrodt, J.

    2013-01-01

    The EU funded project COPRA (Comprehensive European Approach to the Protection of Civil Aviation) developed a roadmap for future research activities, which could lead to a more resilient, flexible and comprehensive approach. Tackling 70 existing and potential threats to aviation (security) identified during the COPRA project, the research roadmap supports the drafting of national and European research agendas that intend to create the knowledge and the technologies to ensure secure aviation i...

  14. Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards for Lighter-Than-Air Balloon, Airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The Commercial Pilot Lighter-Than-Air Practical Test Standards (PTS) book has been published by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to establish the standards for commercial pilot certification practical tests for the lighter-than-air category,...

  15. Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Lighter-Than-Air Balloon, Airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Private Pilot - Lighter-Than-Air (Balloon and Airship) Practical Test Standards (PTS) book has been published by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to establish the standards for private pilot certification practical tests for the lighter-...

  16. 77 FR 10798 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of withdrawal of task assignment to the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC). SUMMARY: The FAA has withdrawn a task assigned to the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory...

  17. Technology outlook for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, L.

    1976-01-01

    Growth projections for aviation technology are put forth for a quarter-century ahead. Three main trends envisaged are towards: great efficiency and economy and longer range and endurance for subsonic aircraft; new generations of short-range fixed-wing craft and rotorcraft with versatile applicability; supersonic and hypersonic speeds. Improvements in lift/drag ratio, specific fuel consumption, structural weight factor, aerodynamic improvements (laminar flow control, increased wing aspect ratio, drag reduction for specified lift, propulsion efficiency, higher bypass ratios, composite structures) are discussed along with V/STOL, controllable twist rotors, circulation control rotors, variable-cycle engines, and higher structural efficiencies.

  18. Improving Aviation Safety with information Visualization: A Flight Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Hearst, Marti

    2005-01-01

    Many aircraft accidents each year are caused by encounters with invisible airflow hazards. Recent advances in aviation sensor technology offer the potential for aircraft-based sensors that can gather large amounts of airflow velocity data in real-time. With this influx of data comes the need to study how best to present it to the pilot - a cognitively overloaded user focused on a primary task other than that of information visualization. In this paper, we present the results of a usability study of an airflow hazard visualization system that significantly reduced the crash rate among experienced helicopter pilots flying a high fidelity, aerodynamically realistic fixed-base rotorcraft flight simulator into hazardous conditions. We focus on one particular aviation application, but the results may be relevant to user interfaces in other operationally stressful environments.

  19. Successful Fighter Combat: An Historical Comparison Fighter Aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    that would have made comparison with modern U.S. aviators very difficult. In addition, the author is not multi- lingual and research of foreign pilots...Ethel. Escort to Berlin: The th Fighter Group in World War II. New York: Arco Publishing, Inc., 1980. 7. Hess, W. N. The American Aces of World War...II and Korea. New York: Arco Publishing, Inc., 1968. "" 8. Jackson, Robert. Fighter Pilots of World War II. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1976. 9

  20. Occupational aviation fatalities--Alaska, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Aircraft crashes are the second leading cause of occupational deaths in Alaska; during the 1990s, a total of 108 fatal aviation crashes resulted in 155 occupational fatalities. To update data and identify risk factors for occupational death from aircraft crashes, CDC reviewed data from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the Alaska Occupational Injury Surveillance System. During 2000--2010, a total of 90 occupational fatalities occurred as a result of 54 crashes, an average of five fatal aircraft crashes and eight fatalities per year. Among those crashes, 21 (39%) were associated with intended takeoffs or landings at landing sites not registered with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Fifteen crashes (28%) were associated with weather, including poor visibility, wind, and turbulence. In addition, 11 crashes (20%) resulted from pilots' loss of aircraft control; nine (17%) from pilots' failure to maintain clearance from terrain, water, or objects; and seven (13%) from engine, structure, or component failure. To reduce occupational fatalities resulting from aircraft crashes in the state, safety interventions should focus on providing weather and other flight information to increase pilots' situational awareness, maintaining pilot proficiency and decision-making abilities, and expanding the infrastructure used by pilots to fly by instruments.

  1. 76 FR 39884 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... SECURITY Aviation Security Advisory Committee AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS. ACTION... Security Administration (TSA) announces the re-establishment of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee...-governmental organizations (NGOs) and stakeholder representatives concerning potential risks to aviation...

  2. 76 FR 78966 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Kona International Airport at Keahole, Keahole, North Kona, HI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its findings on the noise compatibility program...

  3. 75 FR 6433 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Assessment and Public...: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental... Chicago, Illinois. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes to fund, construct, and...

  4. The identification of factors contributing to self-reported anomalies in civil aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejczak, Chris; Karwowski, Waldemar; Thompson, William

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze anomalies voluntarily reported by pilots in civil aviation sector and identify factors leading to such anomalies. Experimental data were obtained from the NASA aviation safety reporting system (ASRS) database. These data contained a range of text records spanning 30 years of civilian aviation, both commercial (airline operations) and general aviation (private aircraft). Narrative data as well as categorical data were used. The associations between incident contributing factors and self-reported anomalies were investigated using data mining and correspondence analysis. The results revealed that a broadly defined human factors category and weather conditions were the main contributors to self-reported civil aviation anomalies. New associations between identified factors and reported anomaly conditions were also reported.

  5. Age Learning Factors Affecting Pilot Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, Brison

    This document, intended for pilot education and flight safety specialists, consists chiefly of a review of the literature on physiological factors that affect pilot education and an examination of environmental factors that should be scrutinized in order to improve the effectiveness of aviation learning facilities. The physiological factors…

  6. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhaus C

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Neuhaus,1,2 Jochen Hinkelbein2,31Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue Working Group, German Society of Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3–6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots.Keywords: cognitive response, aviation training, pilot, hypoxia, oxygen, loss of consciousness

  7. Explosives detection for aviation security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainberg, A

    1992-03-20

    The threat of terrorism against commercial aviation has received much attention in the past few years. In response, new ways to detect explosives and to combine techniques based on different phenomena into integrated security systems are being developed to improve aviation security. Several leading methods for explosives and weapons detection are presented.

  8. COPRA Aviation Security Research Roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasberg, M.P.; Leisman, L.; Voorde, I. van de; Weissbrodt, J.

    2013-01-01

    The EU funded project COPRA (Comprehensive European Approach to the Protection of Civil Aviation) developed a roadmap for future research activities, which could lead to a more resilient, flexible and comprehensive approach. Tackling 70 existing and potential threats to aviation (security)

  9. Representational Momentum in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattler, Colin; Ferrari, Vincent; Didierjean, Andre; Marmeche, Evelyne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of expertise on motion anticipation. We conducted 2 experiments in which novices and expert pilots viewed simulated aircraft landing scenes. The scenes were interrupted by the display of a black screen and then started again after a forward or backward shift. The participant's task was to…

  10. MODELS AND METHODS OF ESTIMATION OF THE PROTECTION OF THE AVIATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Bachkalo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the security assessment of the primary aviation system from the effects of hazards reduces only the assessment of legality of flight. Such an approach to the assessment of flight safety is not aimed at systemic accounting of the moral and psychological aspects associated with human participation in the aviation system’s management. At the same time, the official statistics showed that the absolute majority of aviation accidents occurred due to the influence of the human factor, most often it was the personal factor of the flight crew. All of the above mentioned determines the necessity of the systemic accounting of the negative manifestations of the aviation specialists’ personal factor, who are involved in the aviation system, primarily they are members of a flight crew. The article substantiates the application of the personal methodological approach to the assessment of the aviation system’s security from the effects of hazardous factors. The features of the application of such an approach are shown in the flight safety assessment model. This model allowed us to develop a methodological apparatus for assessment of the aviation system state. The methodological apparatus is a complex of techniques allowing us to assess the security of a particular flight, taking into consideration the impact of the moral and psychological aspects, which are associated with the personality of a particular pilot, and the state flight safety in aviation formation with the impact of flight crew factor. On the basis of the derived integral indicator, which determines the total amount of threats to the state of the aviation system from the pilot’s personal factor, the methodology for as­sessment of the flight safety level assurance with the influence of the pilot's personal factor and the methodology for assessment of the flight safety state in aviation formation with the influence of the human factor of the flight crew were developed.

  11. International Aviation (Selected Articles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-25

    guests and thC-q f IDUSInESS! r-r and toUri *LtS 4.I GENERAL DESCRIPTIO0I17 The CFTRC currently enploys about 2000 engineeis and technii:, includinr... business . Examples of these efforts include improving the capabilities of surface sir;.ulation testing, development of different types of testing and...Adci’ns tration Bur eaus az-corldirig to tl’o: rEfcr;-. policy of separatingj govErnm.Ient ar.- busineSS , CAAC announced inLr Xian or, 23 April of this year

  12. RISK DEFINITION IN CIVIL UNMANNED AVIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kharchenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The risks in unmanned civil aviation are considered as one of the most important. In the article is proved applicability of ensuring the flight safety of aircraft and considered the basic risks of manned civil aviation. Methods: Analyzed statistical data on aviation accidents, organized probabilities distribution of aviation accidents for manned and unmanned civil aviation to identify factors that influence the occurrence of emergency situations in manned and unmanned aviation. Results: We proposed typology of risk components in civil aviation and systematized methods and techniques to reduce risks. Over the analogies defined possible risks, their causes and remedies in civil unmanned aircraft. Weight coefficients distribution was justified between risk types for development of recommendations on risk management in unmanned civil aviation. Discussion: We found that the most probable risk in manned civil aviation is the human factor, organization of air traffic control, design flaws of unmanned aviation system as a whole, as well as maintenance of unmanned aviation system.

  13. 78 FR 72141 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) meeting. SUMMARY: The... December 12, 2013. ADDRESSES: The meeting will take place at the Federal Aviation Administration, 800...

  14. 78 FR 50138 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) meeting. SUMMARY: The... September 12, 2013. ADDRESSES: The meeting will take place at the Federal Aviation Administration, 800...

  15. 78 FR 34139 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) meeting. SUMMARY: The... 13, 2013. ADDRESSES: The meeting will take place at the Federal Aviation Administration, 800...

  16. 75 FR 60493 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Renewal AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Regulations, the FAA gives notice it has renewed the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) for a 2..., Executive Director, Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee. BILLING CODE 4910-13-P ...

  17. Operational Helicopter Aviation Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    and tail fuselages are a danger and not neces- sary. They contribute to parasitic power so he puts coax rotors and eliminates tail rotor losses. He has...6vacuations airiennes pour les trois derniers mois de 1965 (500 000 honues estant engages au Vietnam). L’avantage de ce systbwe, sans parlor du...of two occupants. One occurred when an OH-58 pilot was severely lacerated in the thigh by the main rotor blade. The leg became infected from

  18. Business Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Duong, Thi

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present examples of business ethics issues. What is business ethics, things concerned in this field are and why it is needed and important when doing business? The concept of business ethics has connotations to provision, rules and standards in directing the behavior of actors in the business. Business ethics involves compliance with the law, the implementation of ethical responsibilities of a business, the protection of the rights of those who are related to the ...

  19. Prevalence of drugs and alcohol in fatal civil aviation accidents between 1994 and 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, D V; Hordinsky, J; Millett, D P; Endecott, B; Smith, D

    2001-02-01

    The use of drugs and alcohol in aviation is closely monitored by the FAA Office of Aviation Medicine's (OAM's) Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) through the toxicological analysis of specimens from pilots who have died in aviation accidents. Frozen specimens received from local pathologists were tested and the results entered into a computer database for future analysis. The data were sorted based on the class of drug, controlled dangerous substance schedules II, and I controlled dangerous substance schedules III-V, prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, and alcohol. Specimens from 1683 pilots were analyzed between 1994 to 1998. Controlled dangerous substances, CDS, (schedules I and II) were found in 89 of the pilots analyzed. Controlled dangerous substances (schedules III-V) were found in 49 of the pilots tested. Prescription drugs were found in 240 of the pilots analyzed. Over-the-counter drugs were found in 301 of the pilots analyzed. Alcohol at or above the legal limit of 0.04% was found in 124 pilots. No abused drugs were found in Class 1 air transport fatal pilots. This research supports the very low incidence rate of drugs found in the FAA random drug-testing program. Over-the-counter medications are the most frequently found drugs in fatal aviation accidents and many of these drugs could impair a pilot's ability to safely fly an aircraft. This data is helpful to the FAA in developing programs to reduce the usage of dangerous drugs and identify potentially incapacitating medical conditions that may cause an accident. Data collected from this research can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the FAA drug-testing program.

  20. Mediating Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and globally. The book explores the history of key innovations and innovators in the business press. It analyzes changes in the discourse of business journalism associated with the growth in business news and the development of new ways of framing business issues and events. Finally, it examines......"Mediating Business" is a study of the expansion of business journalism. Building on evidence from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, "Mediating Business" is a comparative and multidisciplinary study of one of the major transformations of the mass media and the realm of business - nationally...... the organizational implications of the increased media visibility of business and, in particular, the development of corporate governance and media relations....

  1. A Guide To Aviation Education Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Coalition for Aviation Education, Washington, DC.

    This guide to aviation education resources was compiled by the National Coalition for Aviation Education (NCAE) which represents government, industry, and labor. NCAE's mission is to: (1) promote aviation education activities and resources; (2) increase public understanding of the importance of aviation; and (3) support educational initiatives at…

  2. Damage Adaptive Guidance for Piloted Upset Recovery Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aircraft Loss-Of-Control (LOC) has been a longstanding contributor to fatal aviation accidents. Inappropriate pilot action for healthy aircraft, control failures,...

  3. The effects of alcohol on pilot performance during instrument flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Sixteen instrument-rated pilots, eight of whom were very experienced professional aviators, flew instrument landing system approaches in a Cessna 172 under simulated instrument flight conditions while sober and while under the influence of 40, 80, an...

  4. 75 FR 44998 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ...-OST-2010-0074] The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice.... ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC): Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of meeting... meeting of the FAAC Aviation Safety Subcommittee, which will be held August 24, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois...

  5. 75 FR 57103 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation... of Transportation. ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC): Aviation Safety... Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Aviation Safety Subcommittee, which will be held September 28...

  6. 75 FR 60163 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation... of Transportation. ACTION: The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC): Aviation Safety... Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Aviation Safety Subcommittee, which will be held October 19, 2010...

  7. 75 FR 34520 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... competitiveness of the U.S. aviation industry and its capability to manage effectively the evolving transportation... The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Aviation Safety Subcommittee; Notice of Meeting... Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC): Aviation Safety Subcommittee; notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The...

  8. Aviation and Remote Sensing Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Efficiency and effectiveness of aerial photograph acquisition by the Region 3 Aviation Program will be improved with use of newly purchased upgrades for the Applanix...

  9. Volcanic hazards and aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; Thompson, Theodore B.; Ewert, John W.; ,

    1996-01-01

    An aeronautical chart was developed to determine the relative proximity of volcanoes or ash clouds to the airports and flight corridors that may be affected by volcanic debris. The map aims to inform and increase awareness about the close spatial relationship between volcanoes and aviation operations. It shows the locations of the active volcanoes together with selected aeronautical navigation aids and great-circle routes. The map mitigates the threat that volcanic hazards pose to aircraft and improves aviation safety.

  10. From F/A to F or A: Training Hornet Aviators to New Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    F/ A -18 aircrew are currently being asked to maintain proficiency in more mission areas than the current technology allows for. The F/ A -18 is a ...capable dual mission aircraft, however the pilot of the F/ A -18 requires significantly more training time than is currently allotted/available to deliver the...essentially, turning an average multi-role aviator into an expert single role fighter or attack aircraft pilot. To ensure continued and future success, a

  11. Cyber threats within civil aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitner, Kerri A.

    Existing security policies in civil aviation do not adequately protect against evolving cyber threats. Cybersecurity has been recognized as a top priority among some aviation industry leaders. Heightened concerns regarding cyber threats and vulnerabilities surround components utilized in compliance with the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Next Generation Air Transportation (NextGen) implementation. Automated Dependent Surveillance-B (ADS-B) and Electronic Flight Bags (EFB) have both been exploited through the research of experienced computer security professionals. Civil aviation is essential to international infrastructure and if its critical assets were compromised, it could pose a great risk to public safety and financial infrastructure. The purpose of this research was to raise awareness of aircraft system vulnerabilities in order to provoke change among current national and international cybersecurity policies, procedures and standards. Although the education of cyber threats is increasing in the aviation industry, there is not enough urgency when creating cybersecurity policies. This project intended to answer the following questions: What are the cyber threats to ADS-B of an aircraft in-flight? What are the cyber threats to EFB? What is the aviation industry's response to the issue of cybersecurity and in-flight safety? ADS-B remains unencrypted while the FAA's mandate to implement this system is rapidly approaching. The cyber threat of both portable and non-portable EFB's have received increased publicity, however, airlines are not responding quick enough (if at all) to create policies for the use of these devices. Collectively, the aviation industry is not being proactive enough to protect its aircraft or airport network systems. That is not to say there are not leaders in cybersecurity advancement. These proactive organizations must set the standard for the future to better protect society and it's most reliable form of transportation.

  12. Transferring Aviation Practices into Clinical Medicine for the Promotion of High Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Dunford, Nicole; McPherson, Mark K; Pina, Joseph S; Gaydos, Steven J

    2017-05-01

    Aviation is a classic example of a high reliability organization (HRO)-an organization in which catastrophic events are expected to occur without control measures. As health care systems transition toward high reliability, aviation practices are increasingly transferred for clinical implementation. A PubMed search using the terms aviation, crew resource management, and patient safety was undertaken. Manuscripts authored by physician pilots and accident investigation regulations were analyzed. Subject matter experts involved in adoption of aviation practices into the medical field were interviewed. A PubMed search yielded 621 results with 22 relevant for inclusion. Improved clinical outcomes were noted in five research trials in which aviation practices were adopted, particularly with regard to checklist usage and crew resource-management training. Effectiveness of interventions was influenced by intensity of application, leadership involvement, and provision of staff training. The usefulness of incorporating mishap investigation techniques has not been established. Whereas aviation accident investigation is highly standardized, the investigation of medical error is characterized by variation. The adoption of aviation practices into clinical medicine facilitates an evolution toward high reliability. Evidence for the efficacy of the checklist and crew resource-management training is robust. Transference of aviation accident investigation practices is preliminary. A standardized, independent investigation process could facilitate the development of a safety culture commensurate with that achieved in the aviation industry.Powell-Dunford N, McPherson MK, Pina JS, Gaydos SJ. Transferring aviation practices into clinical medicine for the promotion of high reliability. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(5):487-491.

  13. IMPACT OF AVIATION ON CLIMATE: FAA's Aviation Climate Change Research Initiative (ACCRI) Phase II

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guy P Brasseur; Mohan Gupta; Bruce E Anderson; Sathya Balasubramanian; Steven Barrett; David Duda; Gregggg Fleming; Piers M Forster; Jan Fuglestvedt; Andrew Gettelman; Rangasayi N Halthore; S Daniel Jacob; Mark Z Jacobson; Arezoo Khodayari; Kuo-Nan Liou; Marianne T Lund; Richard C Miake-Lye; Patrick Minnis; Seth Olsen; Joyce E Penner; Ronald Prinn; Ulrich Schumann; Henry B Selkirk; Andrei Sokolov; Nadine Unger; Philip Wolfe; Hsi-Wu Wong; Donald W Wuebbles; Bingqi Yi; Ping Yang; Cheng Zhou

    2016-01-01

      Aviation emissions are mostly concentrated on flight corridor regions. [...]studies are needed to better understand the geographical disparities in regional climate impacts of aviation emissions...

  14. Nobody Seems to Speak English Here Today: Enhancing Assessment and Training in Aviation English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Dan

    2014-01-01

    In 2003 the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) strengthened the provisions that English be made available for international radiotelephony communication. ICAO also developed standards for English proficiency for international pilots and air traffic controllers. However, these standards are applied variably from country to country and…

  15. Wind farm turbulence impacts on general aviation airports in Kansas : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbines and wind farms have become popular in the State of Kansas. Some general aviation : pilots have expressed a concern about the turbulence that the spinning blades are creating. If a : wind farm is built near an airport, does this affect t...

  16. Catalytic conversion wood syngas to synthetic aviation turbine fuels over a multifunctional catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiangu Yan; Fei Yu; Jian Liu; Jason Street; Jinsen Gao; Zhiyong Cai; Jilei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    A continuous process involving gasification, syngas cleaning, and Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis was developed to efficiently produce synthetic aviation turbine fuels (SATFs). Oak-tree wood chips were first gasified to syngas over a commercial pilot plant downdraft gasifier. The raw wood syngas contains about 47% N2, 21% CO, 18% H2...

  17. An Examination of Safety Management Systems and Aviation Technologies in the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Steven A.

    The Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) industry has a significant role in the transportation of injured patients, but has experienced more accidents than all other segments of the aviation industry combined. With the objective of addressing this discrepancy, this study assesses the effect of safety management systems implementation and aviation technologies utilization on the reduction of HEMS accident rates. Participating were 147 pilots from Federal Aviation Regulations Part 135 HEMS operators, who completed a survey questionnaire based on the Safety Culture and Safety Management System Survey (SCSMSS). The study assessed the predictor value of SMS implementation and aviation technologies to the frequency of HEMS accident rates with correlation and multiple linear regression. The correlation analysis identified three significant positive relationships. HEMS years of experience had a high significant positive relationship with accident rate (r=.90; psafety culture within the HEMS industry.

  18. Aviation Systems Test and Integration Lab (AvSTIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aviation Systems Test and Integration Laboratory offers an innovative approach to aviation system and subsystem testing by fully immersing aviation platforms in...

  19. 14 CFR 294.31 - Use of business name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of business name. 294.31 Section 294.31 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS CANADIAN CHARTER AIR TAXI OPERATORS General Rules for Registrants § 294.31 Use of business name...

  20. Scientific Contributions to Aviation Safety: A User's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stills, M.; Guffanti, M.; Salinas, L.

    2009-12-01

    Volcanic ash poses a significant threat to aviation, and steps are taken by commercial operators to avoid encounters in order to protect the safety of passengers and crews. To minimize the risk of damage to aircraft, pilots, dispatchers, and meteorologists plan routes that avoid ash and sometimes execute fuel stops and/or diversions when necessary. Preventing damaging encounters to ensure safety is paramount, but route changes and diversions need to be as efficient as possible in terms of time and fuel expended. Many airlines have experience dealing with possible ash hazards, and dispatchers, pilots, and weather units rely heavily on information from volcano and meteorological scientists. Formal warning messages from civil aviation authorities and aviation weather offices also are an integral part of all operational decisions. Airline operation centers need a range of products and services from scientific groups, including: global synoptic views of activity that may impact flight routes; specific forecasts (predictions) of impending volcanic activity; clear descriptions of ash-dispersion model capabilities and remote-sensing detection techniques. More in-depth issues may also need to be addressed such as dispersion model differences; satellite sensor inadequacy, as it relates to the detection of specific physical phenomena; clarity of labeling of time-series data, such as sequential remote-sensing imagery; and direct access to subject matter experts during events. Information flow needs to be consistent and issued at specific intervals and in specific formats to facilitate procedural development in the aviation community. These issues provide a strong argument in the United States for continued collaboration among air carriers, Volcano Observatories, and Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers.

  1. A new approach to modeling aviation accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Arjun Harsha

    views aviation accidents as a set of hazardous states of a system (pilot and aircraft), and triggers that cause the system to move between hazardous states. I used the NTSB's accident coding manual (that contains nearly 4000 different codes) to develop a "dictionary" of hazardous states, triggers, and information codes. Then, I created the "grammar", or a set of rules, that: (1) orders the hazardous states in each accident; and, (2) links the hazardous states using the appropriate triggers. This approach: (1) provides a more correct count of the causes for accidents in the NTSB database; and, (2) checks for gaps or omissions in NTSB accident data, and fills in some of these gaps using logic-based rules. These rules also help identify and count causes for accidents that were not discernable from previous analyses of historical accident data. I apply the model to 6200 helicopter accidents that occurred in the US between 1982 and 2015. First, I identify the states and triggers that are most likely to be associated with fatal and non-fatal accidents. The results suggest that non-fatal accidents, which account for approximately 84% of the accidents, provide valuable opportunities to learn about the causes for accidents. Next, I investigate the causes of inflight loss of control using both a conventional approach and using the state-based approach. The conventional analysis provides little insight into the causal mechanism for LOC. For instance, the top cause of LOC is "aircraft control/directional control not maintained", which does not provide any insight. In contrast, the state-based analysis showed that pilots' tendency to clip objects frequently triggered LOC (16.7% of LOC accidents)--this finding was not directly discernable from conventional analyses. Finally, I investigate the causes for improper autorotations using both a conventional approach and the state-based approach. The conventional approach uses modifiers (e.g., "improper", "misjudged") associated with "24520

  2. Pilot age and expertise predict flight simulator performance: a 3-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joy L; Kennedy, Quinn; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome A

    2007-02-27

    Expert knowledge may compensate for age-related declines in basic cognitive and sensory-motor abilities in some skill domains. We investigated the influence of age and aviation expertise (indexed by Federal Aviation Administration pilot ratings) on longitudinal flight simulator performance. Over a 3-year period, 118 general aviation pilots aged 40 to 69 years were tested annually, in which their flight performance was scored in terms of 1) executing air-traffic controller communications; 2) traffic avoidance; 3) scanning cockpit instruments; 4) executing an approach to landing; and 5) a flight summary score. More expert pilots had better flight summary scores at baseline and showed less decline over time. Secondary analyses revealed that expertise effects were most evident in the accuracy of executing aviation communications, the measure on which performance declined most sharply over time. Regarding age, even though older pilots initially performed worse than younger pilots, over time older pilots showed less decline in flight summary scores than younger pilots. Secondary analyses revealed that the oldest pilots did well over time because their traffic avoidance performance improved more vs younger pilots. These longitudinal findings support previous cross-sectional studies in aviation as well as non-aviation domains, which demonstrated the advantageous effect of prior experience and specialized expertise on older adults' skilled cognitive performances.

  3. 14 CFR 61.305 - What are the age and language requirements for a sport pilot certificate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for a sport pilot certificate? 61.305 Section 61.305 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.305 What are the age and language requirements for a sport pilot certificate? (a) To be eligible for a sport pilot certificate you must: (1) Be at least 17 years old (or 16...

  4. 14 CFR 61.307 - What tests do I have to take to obtain a sport pilot certificate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... sport pilot certificate? 61.307 Section 61.307 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.307 What tests do I have to take to obtain a sport pilot certificate? To obtain a sport pilot certificate, you must pass the following tests: (a) Knowledge test. You must pass a...

  5. 14 CFR 61.309 - What aeronautical knowledge must I have to apply for a sport pilot certificate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... apply for a sport pilot certificate? 61.309 Section 61.309 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.309 What aeronautical knowledge must I have to apply for a sport pilot certificate? Except as specified in § 61.329, to apply for a sport pilot certificate you must...

  6. Simulation Training in U.K. General Aviation: An Undervalued Aid to Reducing Loss of Control Accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, A; Dixon-Hardy, DW; Wright, SJ

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of data from 1,007 U.K. general aviation (GA) accidents demonstrates the predominant cause of accidents is loss of control, exacerbated by a lack of recent flying experience. These are long-standing problems that can be targeted effectively with simulation training. Discussion on training strategies in commercial aviation reinforces the logic of introducing simulation training for the GA pilot. Conclusions drawn affirm the notion that GA safety would benefit from implementation of re...

  7. Distributed Aviation Concepts and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Aviation has experienced one hundred years of evolution, resulting in the current air transportation system dominated by commercial airliners in a hub and spoke infrastructure. While the first fifty years involved disruptive technologies that required frequent vehicle adaptation, the second fifty years produced a stable evolutionary optimization of decreasing costs with increasing safety. This optimization has resulted in traits favoring a centralized service model with high vehicle productivity and cost efficiency. However, it may also have resulted in a system that is not sufficiently robust to withstand significant system disturbances. Aviation is currently facing rapid change from issues such as environmental damage, terrorism threat, congestion and capacity limitations, and cost of energy. Currently, these issues are leading to a loss of service for weaker spoke markets. These catalysts and a lack of robustness could result in a loss of service for much larger portions of the aviation market. The impact of other competing transportation services may be equally important as casual factors of change. Highway system forecasts indicate a dramatic slow down as congestion reaches a point of non-linearly increasing delay. In the next twenty-five years, there is the potential for aviation to transform itself into a more robust, scalable, adaptive, secure, safe, affordable, convenient, efficient and environmentally friendly system. To achieve these characteristics, the new system will likely be based on a distributed model that enables more direct services. Short range travel is already demonstrating itself to be inefficient with a centralized model, providing opportunities for emergent distributed services through air-taxi models. Technologies from the on-demand revolution in computers and communications are now available as major drivers for aviation on-demand adaptation. Other technologies such as electric propulsion are currently transforming the automobile

  8. Assessment of the Aviation Environmental Design Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-29

    A comprehensive Tools Suite to allow for : thorough evaluation of the environmental effects and impacts : of aviation is currently being developed by the U.S. This suite : consists of the Environmental Design Space (EDS), the : Aviation Environmental...

  9. 76 FR 2745 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Eighty-Fourth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee...

  10. A revolutionary approach to general aviation airplane design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, Jan; Gomer, Charles

    1991-01-01

    The accumulation of such advanced technologies as digital guidance/display concepts, flow laminarization techniques, smart structures, and composite primary structures, is presently considered systematically with a view to such novel features' integration in a next-generation general aviation aircraft. This Advanced Personal Transport is conceived as a six-passenger aircraft with 1200 nautical mile range; a tractor and a pusher configuration were considered, with the pusher configuration being of twin-boom empennage, three-lifting-surface type. Attention is given to pilot-workload reductions achievable through the proposed Integrated GPS/Glonass system.

  11. 77 FR 56909 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC); Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC); Renewal AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Renewal. SUMMARY: The FAA announces the charter renewal of the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC), a Federal Advisory Committee that works with...

  12. Eco-efficiency in aviation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grewe, V.; Linke, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Air traffic guarantees mobility and serves the needs of society to travel over long distances in a decent time. But aviation also contributes to climate change. Here, we present various mitigation options, based on technological and operational measures and present a framework to compare the

  13. Managing the Aviation Insider Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    World Airport NSAS National Strategy for Aviation Security OIS Office of Intelligence SIDA Security Identification Display Area STA Security...Security of the secured area”, 1542.205, “Security of the security identification display area ( SIDA )”, and 1542.209, “Fingerprint-based criminal

  14. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 2 Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50-2...

  15. 75 FR 12809 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, DFW Airport, Texas AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... Aviation Administration, Southwest Region, Airports Division, Texas Airports Development Office, ASW-650...

  16. 78 FR 25524 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Request To Release Airport Property AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Intent to Rule on Request to Release Airport Property..., Airports Compliance Specialist, Federal Aviation Administration, Airports Division, ACE- 610C, 901 Locust...

  17. Aviation Maintenance Technology. General. Curriculum Implementation Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John, Jr.; And Others

    This curriculum implementation guide is a scope and sequence for the general section of a course in aviation maintenance technology. The course materials were prepared through a cooperative effort of airframe and powerplant mechanics, general aviation industry representatives, Federal Aviation Administration representatives, and vocational…

  18. Predicting pilot-error incidents of US airline pilots using logistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, K L

    1997-06-01

    In a population of 70,164 airline pilots obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration, 475 males and 22 females had pilot-error incidents in the years 1986-1992. A simple chi-squared test revealed that female pilots employed by major airlines had a significantly greater likelihood of pilot-error incidents than their male colleagues. In order to control for age, experience (total flying hours), risk exposure (recent flying hours) and employer (major/non-major airline) simultaneously, the author built a model of male pilot-error incidents using logistic regression. The regression analysis indicated that youth, inexperience and non-major airline employer were independent contributors to the increased risk of pilot-error incidents. The results also provide further support to the literature that pilot performance does not differ significantly between male and female airline pilots.

  19. Business Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how to do business with EPA's Clean Air Markets, including registering to use the Emissions Collection and Monitoring Plan System (ECMPS), the CAMD Business System (CBS), and learn how to submit monitored emissions data.

  20. Progressive Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian O.

    2016-01-01

    Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015.......Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015....

  1. Psychophysiological monitoring of operator's emotional stress in aviation and astronautics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonov, P V; Frolov, M V; Ivanov, E A

    1980-01-01

    The level of emotional stress depending on the power of motivation and the estimation by the subject of the probability (possibility) of goal achievement, largely influences the operator's skill performance (that of a pilot, controller, astronaut). A decrease in the emotional tonus leads to drowsiness, lack of vigilance, missing of significant signals, and to slower reactions. The extremely high stress level disorganizes the activity, complicates it with a trend toward untimely acts and reactions to the insignificant signals (false alarms). The best methods to monitor the degree of the operator's emotional state during his skill performance are the integral estimation of the changes in heart-rate and T-peak amplitude, as well as the analysis of spectral and intonational characteristics of the human voice during radio conversation. These methods were tested on paratroopers, pilots in civil aviation, and airport controllers.

  2. 78 FR 77572 - Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. The FAA unintentionally... published a final rule entitled, ``Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 61, 121, and 135 RIN 2120-AJ67 Pilot Certification and...

  3. 78 FR 53025 - Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... regulations to create new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations..., the FAA published a final rule entitled, ``Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 141 RIN 2120-AJ67 Pilot Certification and Qualification...

  4. 14 CFR 121.505 - Flight time limitations: Two pilot crews: airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: airplanes. 121.505 Section 121.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operations § 121.505 Flight time limitations: Two pilot crews: airplanes. (a) If a certificate holder... relieve that pilot of all duty with it during that rest period. (b) No pilot of an airplane that has a...

  5. 14 CFR 91.3 - Responsibility and authority of the pilot in command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 91.3 Responsibility and authority of the pilot in command. (a) The pilot in command of an aircraft is... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility and authority of the pilot in command. 91.3 Section 91.3 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. E-Business: The Business Officer's Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Contends e-business is particularly the domain of college and university business officers, with today's officers facing an unprecedented opportunity to exercise a critical leadership role in the deployment of advanced information technology solutions on campus. Describes relevant issues and advances, and presents ten initiatives that business…

  7. Playful Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten; Hansen, Poul H. Kyvsgård; Nielsen, Louise Møller

    2011-01-01

    ” The term business model can be defined as a business concept that has been put into practice. The increase in dynamics in markets, technology, economies etc. challenge the requirements to make consistent and synchronized decisions on which business models to develop and implement. Complexity se...

  8. A Formal Messaging Notation for Alaskan Aviation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Data exchange is an increasingly important aspect of the National Airspace System. While many data communication channels have become more capable of sending and receiving data at higher throughput rates, there is still a need to use communication channels efficiently with limited throughput. The limitation can be based on technological issues, financial considerations, or both. This paper provides a complete description of several important aviation weather data in Abstract Syntax Notation format. By doing so, data providers can take advantage of Abstract Syntax Notation's ability to encode data in a highly compressed format. When data such as pilot weather reports, surface weather observations, and various weather predictions are compressed in such a manner, it allows for the efficient use of throughput-limited communication channels. This paper provides details on the Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) implementation for Alaskan aviation data, and demonstrates its use on real-world aviation weather data samples as Alaska has sparse terrestrial data infrastructure and data are often sent via relatively costly satellite channels.

  9. The use of contact lenses by USAF aviators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredici, T J; Flynn, W J

    1987-05-01

    Contact lenses are an alternative method to spectacles for correcting refractive errors, but the U.S. Air Force prohibits the wearing of contact lenses by all aircrew members unless medically or optically indicated (AFR 167-3). USAFSAM has a clinical contact lens study consisting of 55 individuals wearing contact lenses for eye defects such as keratoconus, aphakia, anisometropia, and other special indications. Of these 55 individuals, 33 had medical conditions affecting their vision and were unconditionally grounded. Of these individuals, 31 (18 of 19 pilots, 8 of 9 navigators, 5 of 5 other categories) were visually rehabilitated and returned to full flight status by the use of contact lenses. Hard lenses were used in 70% of the cases and soft lenses in 30%. The large number of USAF aviators required to wear spectacles and new head-borne equipment has created compatibility problems with the standard USAF aviators' spectacle. For this spectacle compatibility problem, contact lenses appear as a viable alternative. However, for wide-spread use, concerns remain about the potential aviation hazards, such as +Gz effects, bubble formation, and corneal hypoxia.

  10. 75 FR 53007 - Gulf Opportunity Pilot Loan Program (GO Loan Pilot)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Loans has continued during FY2010 in response to the ongoing need to rebuild the Gulf Coast areas... ADMINISTRATION Gulf Opportunity Pilot Loan Program (GO Loan Pilot) AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration... the extension of the ``Notice of waiver of regulatory provisions'' for SBA's GO Loan Pilot until...

  11. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Fatal Accidents in Aviation Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkala, Tanja; Bor, Robert; Budowle, Bruce; Sajantila, Antti; Navathe, Pooshan; Sainio, Markku; Vuorio, Alpo

    2017-09-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with symptoms of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interfere with functioning and/or development. ADHD occurs in about 2.5% of adults. ADHD can be an excluding medical condition among pilots due to the risk of attentional degradation and therefore impact on flight safety. Diagnosis of ADHD is complex, which complicates aeromedical assessment. This study highlights fatal accident cases among pilots with ADHD and discusses protocols to detect its presence to help to assess its importance to flight safety. To identify fatal accidents in aviation (including airplanes, helicopters, balloons, and gliders) in the United States between the years 2000 to 2015, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) database was searched with the terms ADHD, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and attention deficit disorder (ADD). The NTSB database search for fatal aviation accidents possibly associated with ADHD yielded four accident cases of interest in the United States [4/4894 (0.08%)]. Two of the pilots had ADHD diagnosed by a doctor, one was reported by a family member, and one by a flight instructor. An additional five cases were identified searching for ADD [5/4894 (0.1%)]. Altogether, combined ADHD and ADD cases yielded nine accident cases of interest (0.18%). It is generally accepted by aviation regulatory authorities that ADHD is a disqualifying neurological condition. Yet FAA and CASA provide specific protocols for tailor-made pilot assessment. Accurate evaluation of ADHD is essential because of its potential negative impact on aviation safety.Laukkala T, Bor R, Budowle B, Sajantila A, Navathe P, Sainio M, Vuorio A. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and fatal accidents in aviation medicine. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(9):871-875.

  12. BUSINESS ETHICS

    OpenAIRE

    Nelu BURCEA; Croitoru, Ion

    2014-01-01

    Through this study we seek to explore the concept of business ethics, in those aspects that we consider to be essential and concrete. We started from a few questions: Could the two concepts be compatible? If not, why not? If yes, could they be complementary? How real is the use of ethics in the profits of a business? How can be business ethics be exemplified and what principles are essential in doing business? How does the business environment react to the concept? These are some of the eleme...

  13. Business support within business incubators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.

    2009-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) have been established worldwide as tools for company creation and small businesses support. BIs claim to help their tenants by providing them with the optimal conditions for increasing early stage survival. Practitioners and researchers agree that business support is a

  14. Business support within business incubators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.

    2009-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) have been established worldwide as tools for company creation and small businesses support. BIs claim to help their tenants by providing them with the optimal conditions for increasing early stage survival. Practitioners and researchers agree that business support is a

  15. Business model for business rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eline Haan; Koen Smit; Martin Zoet

    2014-01-01

    Business rule models are widely applied, standalone and embedded in smart objects. They have become segregated from information technology and they are now a valuable asset in their own right. As more business rule models are becoming assets, business models to monetize these assets are designed.

  16. A review of telemedicine business models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengnan; Cheng, Alice; Mehta, Khanjan

    2013-04-01

    Telemedicine has become an increasingly popular option for long-distance/virtual medical care and education, but many telemedicine ventures fail to grow beyond the initial pilot stage. Studying the business models of successful telemedicine ventures can help develop business strategies for upcoming ventures. This article describes business models of eight telemedicine ventures from different regions of the world using Osterwalder's "Business Model Canvas." The ventures are chosen on the basis of their apparent success and their diverse value chains. The business models are compared to draw inferences and lessons regarding their business strategy and contextual factors that influenced it. Key differences between telemedicine business practices in developing and developed countries are also discussed. The purpose of this article is to inform and inspire the business strategy of the next generation of telemedicine ventures to be economically sustainable and to successfully address local healthcare challenges.

  17. Pilot licensing after aortic valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syburra, Thomas; Schnüriger, Hans; Kwiatkowski, Barbara; Graves, Kirk; Reuthebuch, Oliver; Genoni, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart malformation, and a high percentage of patients with this condition will develop complications over time. It is rare that pilots undergo aortic valve surgery, and the confirmation of flight-licensing requirements after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a challenge for the patient's cardiac surgeon and, particularly, for the Aeromedical Examiner (AME). Only AMEs are able to determine the flight status of pilots. Furthermore, in military and in civil aviation (e.g., Red Bull Air Race), the high G-load environment experienced by pilots is an exceptional physiological parameter, which must be considered postoperatively. A review was conducted of the aeronautical, surgical and medical literature, and of European pilot-licensing regulations. Case studies are also reported for two Swiss Air Force pilots. According to European legislation, pilots can return to flight duty from the sixth postoperative month, with the following limitations: that an aortic bioprosthesis presents no restrictions in cardiac function, requires no cardioactive medications, yet requires a flight operation with co-pilot, the avoidance of accelerations over +3 Gz and, in military aviation, restricts the pilot to non-ejection-seat aircraft. The patient follow up must include both echocardiographic and rhythm assessments every six months. Mechanical prostheses cannot be certified because the required anticoagulation therapy is a disqualifying condition for pilot licensing. Pilot licensing after aortic valve surgery is possible, but with restrictions. The +Gz exposition is of concern in both military and civilian aviation (aerobatics). The choice of bioprosthesis type and size is determinant. Pericardial and stentless valves seem to show better flow characteristics under high-output conditions. Repetitive cardiological controls are mandatory for the early assessment of structural valve disease and rhythm disturbances. A pre-emptive timing is

  18. Airborne volcanic ash; a global threat to aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Guffanti, Marianne C.

    2010-01-01

    The world's busy air traffic corridors pass over or downwind of hundreds of volcanoes capable of hazardous explosive eruptions. The risk to aviation from volcanic activity is significant - in the United States alone, aircraft carry about 300,000 passengers and hundreds of millions of dollars of cargo near active volcanoes each day. Costly disruption of flight operations in Europe and North America in 2010 in the wake of a moderate-size eruption in Iceland clearly demonstrates how eruptions can have global impacts on the aviation industry. Airborne volcanic ash can be a serious hazard to aviation even hundreds of miles from an eruption. Encounters with high-concentration ash clouds can diminish visibility, damage flight control systems, and cause jet engines to fail. Encounters with low-concentration clouds of volcanic ash and aerosols can accelerate wear on engine and aircraft components, resulting in premature replacement. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with national and international partners, is playing a leading role in the international effort to reduce the risk posed to aircraft by volcanic eruptions.

  19. Aviator Selection 1919-1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-04

    Hutchins and Pomarolli (72), and Willingham (143) indicated some relationship between more finely coordinated muscular skills ( gymnastic and swimming per... rhythmic tapping. A biserial correlation of .42 was observed for predicting training success. Divided attention during the performance of simultaneous...H. Gymnastics grades as predictors to attri- tion to flight training. SR #58-15, Naval School of Aviation Medicine, Pensacola, Florida, 1958. 118

  20. General Aviation Land Use Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Isenberg, Nick; Payne, Brian; Muia, Maria

    2017-01-01

    In this session we discuss the value of land use planning sessions in determining airside and landside short-, mid-, and long-term needs of the airport. Land use plans have been used to secure funding and increase commercial landside and military airside growth. Currently a plan is being used to develop the first general aviation aerotropolis concept. Join us to learn how a land use plan can increase the marketability and revenue generation of your airport.

  1. The effect of spectrally selective filters on color perception and aviation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svec, Leedjia

    Color vision is within ourselves as well as the environment. Color vision is of extreme importance to pilots and in other occupations that require excellent color discrimination. Advancements in laser technology, however, have required the need for laser eye protection. Laser eye protection alters the spectral world that pilots and other professionals must work in. Understanding the effects of these alterations is necessary to prevent mishaps and further applied color vision knowledge. The present study experimentally manipulated the spectral environment and aviation tasks faced by military pilots. Several spectrally selective filters were used to modify the spectral environment. Subjects performed a wide and inclusive range of color vision and aviation tasks with the filters. The effects of these filters on color vision were modeled after current theories of color processing. The predicted results were compared with the actual results. It was found that color vision is both enhanced and decreased by spectrally selective filters, with certain filters safety is compromised when pilots are distracted, and computational modeling may offer predictive benefits in understanding filter and vision interactions. This research contributes to both applied and basic theories regarding the complex relationship between color vision, filters, and aviation.

  2. Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Hudgins, C. H.; Plant, J. V.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.; Howard, R.; Corporan, E.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The rising cost of oil coupled with the need to reduce pollution and dependence on foreign suppliers has spurred great interest and activity in developing alternative aviation fuels. Although a variety of fuels have been produced that have similar properties to standard Jet A, detailed studies are required to ascertain the exact impacts of the fuels on engine operation and exhaust composition. In response to this need, NASA acquired and burned a variety of alternative aviation fuel mixtures in the Dryden Flight Research Center DC-8 to assess changes in the aircraft s CFM-56 engine performance and emission parameters relative to operation with standard JP-8. This Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment, or AAFEX, was conducted at NASA Dryden s Aircraft Operations Facility (DAOF) in Palmdale, California, from January 19 to February 3, 2009 and specifically sought to establish fuel matrix effects on: 1) engine and exhaust gas temperatures and compressor speeds; 2) engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) gas phase and particle emissions and characteristics; and 3) volatile aerosol formation in aging exhaust plumes

  3. Analysis of Controller-Pilot Voice Communications from Kansas City Air Route Traffic Control Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The implementation of Controller Pilot Datalink Communications (CPDLC) in domestic en route airspace is a key enabling technology in the Next Generation Air Transportation System. The Federal Aviation Administration plans to implement en route CPDLC ...

  4. Disrupting Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff; Bazzichelli, Tatiana

    Disruptive Business explores some of the interconnections between art, activism and the business concept of disruptive innovation. With a backdrop of the crisis of financial capitalism, austerity cuts in the cultural sphere, the idea is to focus on potential art strategies in relation to a broken...... economy. In a perverse way, we ask whether this presents new opportunities for cultural producers to achieve more autonomy over their production process. If it is indeed possible, or desirable, what alternative business models emerge? The book is concerned broadly with business as material for reinvention...

  5. Reducing Aviation Weather-Related Accidents Through High-Fidelity Weather Information Distribution and Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, H. Paul, III; Shafer, Daniel B.; Schaffner, Philip R.; Martzaklis, Konstantinos S.

    2000-01-01

    In February 1997, the US President announced a national goal to reduce the fatal accident rate for aviation by 80% within ten years. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration established the Aviation Safety Program to develop technologies needed to meet this aggressive goal. Because weather has been identified (is a causal factor in approximately 30% of all aviation accidents, a project was established for the development of technologies that will provide accurate, time and intuitive information to pilots, dispatchers, and air traffic controllers to enable the detection and avoidance of atmospheric hazards. This project addresses the weather information needs of general, corporate, regional, and transport aircraft operators. An overview and status of research and development efforts for high-fidelity weather information distribution and presentation is discussed with emphasis on weather information in the cockpit.

  6. Taxation of United States general aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieralski, Joseph Bernard

    General aviation in the United States has been an important part of the economy and American life. General aviation is defined as all flying excluding military and scheduled airline operations, and is utilized in many areas of our society. The majority of aircraft operations and airports in the United States are categorized as general aviation, and general aviation contributes more than one percent to the United States gross domestic product each year. Despite the many benefits of general aviation, the lead emissions from aviation gasoline consumption are of great concern. General aviation emits over half the lead emissions in the United States or over 630 tons in 2005. The other significant negative externality attributed to general aviation usage is aircraft accidents. General aviation accidents have caused over 8000 fatalities over the period 1994-2006. A recent Federal Aviation Administration proposed increase in the aviation gasoline tax from 19.4 to 70.1 cents per gallon has renewed interest in better understanding the implications of such a tax increase as well as the possible optimal rate of taxation. Few studies have examined aviation fuel elasticities and all have failed to study general aviation fuel elasticities. Chapter one fills that gap and examines the elasticity of aviation gasoline consumption in United States general aviation. Utilizing aggregate time series and dynamic panel data, the price and income elasticities of demand are estimated. The price elasticity of demand for aviation gasoline is estimated to range from -0.093 to -0.185 in the short-run and from -0.132 to -0.303 in the long-run. These results prove to be similar in magnitude to automobile gasoline elasticities and therefore tax policies could more closely mirror those of automobile tax policies. The second chapter examines the costs associated with general aviation accidents. Given the large number of general aviation operations as well as the large number of fatalities and

  7. Prescribing Spectacles for Aviators: USAF Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    spectacles or contact lenses , it is 20 26 a0 36 40 4 so mandatory, per Air Force Regulation (AFR) 60-16, AGE paragraph 6-3 (3 March 1989), that they carry in...operators (from USAFSAM-SR-89-5). case of trouble with spectacles or contact lenses , fliers Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine - January, 1992...aviators. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES spectacles; presbyopia ; bifocals; trifocals; multifocals; _ vision, aviators; flyers; aircrew members

  8. 78 FR 49595 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new task assignment for the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC). SUMMARY: The FAA assigned the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) a new task to...

  9. 77 FR 10797 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of withdrawal of task assignment for the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC). SUMMARY: The FAA has withdrawn a task assigned to the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory...

  10. 77 FR 69916 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation... public of a meeting of the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee. DATES: The meeting will be held on December 6, 2012, at 1:00 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will take place at the Federal Aviation...

  11. 76 FR 81009 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new task assignment for the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC). SUMMARY: The FAA assigned the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) a new task to...

  12. 76 FR 21936 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new task assignment for the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC). SUMMARY: The FAA assigned the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) a new task to...

  13. 78 FR 11728 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) meeting. SUMMARY: The... held on March 5, 2013, at 1:00 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will take place at the Federal Aviation...

  14. [Personal traits and a sense of job-related stress in a military aviation crew].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarkapa, Milanko; Korica, Vesna; Rodjenkov, Sanja

    2011-02-01

    Accelerated technological and organizational changes in numerous professions lead to increase in job-related stress. Since these changes are particularly common in military aviation, this study examined the way military aviation crew experiences job-related stress during a regular aviation drill, depending on particular social-demographic factors and personal traits. The modified Cooper questionnaire was used to examine the stress related factors at work. The questionnaire was adapted for the aviation crew in the army environment. Personal characteristics were examined using the NEO-PI-R personality inventory. The study included 50 examinees (37 pilots and 13 other crew members) employed in the Serbian Army. The studies were performed during routine physical examinations at the Institute for Aviation Medicine during the year 2007. Statistical analysis of the study results contained descriptive analysis, one-way analysis of variance and correlation analysis. It was shown that army aviation crew works under high stress. The highest stress value had the intrinsic factor (AS = 40.94) and role in organisation (AS = 39.92), while the lowest one had the interpersonal relationship factor (AS = 29.98). The results also showed that some social-demographic variables (such as younger examinees, shorter working experience) and neuroticism as a personality trait, were in correlation with job-related stress. Stress evaluation and certain personality characteristics examination can be used for the development of the basic anti-stress programs and measures in order to achieve better psychological selection, adaptation career leadership and organization of military pilots and other crew members.

  15. Personal traits and a sense of job-related stress in a military aviation crew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čabarkapa Milanko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Accelerated technological and organizational changes in numerous professions lead to increase in jobrelated stress. Since these changes are particularly common in military aviation, this study examined the way military aviation crew experiences job-related stress during a regular aviation drill, depending on particular social-demographic factors and personal traits. Methods. The modified Cooper questionnaire was used to examine the stress related factors at work. The questionnaire was adapted for the aviation crew in the army environment. Personal characteristics were examined using the NEO-PI-R personality inventory. The study included 50 examinees (37 pilots and 13 other crew members employed in the Serbian Army. The studies were performed during routine physical examinations at the Institute for Aviation Medicine during the year 2007. Statistical analysis of the study results contained descriptive analysis, one-way analysis of variance and correlation analysis. Results. It was shown that army aviation crew works under high stress. The highest stress value had the intrinsic factor (AS = 40.94 and role in organisation (AS = 39.92, while the lowest one had the interpersonal relationship factor (AS = 29.98. The results also showed that some social-demographic variables (such as younger examinees, shorter working experience and neuroticism as a personality trait, were in correlation with job-related stress. Conclusion. Stress evaluation and certain personality characteristics examination can be used for the devalopment of the basic anti-stress programs and measures in order to achieve better psychological selection, adaptation career leadership and organization of military pilots and other crew members.

  16. Fleet Aviation Maintenance Organic Support (FAMOS) Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Fleet Aviation Maintenance Organic Support (FAMOS) Laboratory at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, NJ provides rapid engineering...

  17. Wind energy and aviation interests - interim guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The impact on aviation of increasing the number of wind farms in the United Kingdom is discussed by the Wind Energy, Defence and Civil Aviation Interests Working Group, comprising the Department of Trade and Industry, the Civil Aviation Authority, the Ministry of Defence, and the British Wind Energy Association. The report offers guidance to wind farm developers, local authorities and statutory consultees within the aviation community: the main thrust of the guidelines is to support the UK Government's wind energy targets. Although the document does not contain in-depth technical discussions, it does provide references to such information.

  18. Aviation Information Systems Development Laboratory (AISDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Aviation Information Systems Development Laboratory (AISDL) provides the tools, reconfigurability and support to ensure the quality and integrity of new...

  19. History of Turkish Air Force Aviation School and the Process of Transition to Air Force Academy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman YALÇIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Turkish aviation has started as a military entity. The foundation of ‘’Tayyare Komisyonu’’ (Airplane Comission in June 1, 1911 has been accepted as the official starting point. The organization of aviation includes pilot training, airplane supply, fondation of aviation school, establishment of combatant units, and building the air vehicles with local and national endeavour. Later, air defense systems, meteorology, training observers, machine specialist and technicians has gained importance as well. Turkish aviation has been built upon the ruins of the last wars of Ottoman Empire. After the invasion of the British and the French, Ottoman aviators moved to Maltepe and then to various parts of Anatolia eventually. During the Independence War, aviation school was founded in Eskişehir, moved to Adana, Konya, and came back to Adana again. After the Greek forces were expelled from Anatolia via İzmir, aviation school was moved to İzmir. In 1925, it was brought back to Eskişehir on October 1, 1951. After WWII, the duration of training in order to be a pilot was six years. In 1929, aviation school turned out to be an academic institution as well. On October 1, 1951, Air Force Academy was established in Eskişehir. Due to high sound of jet air planes, the academy was moved to İzmir in 1954. Education and training were restructured there and the quality was raised. In 1967, Air Force Academy was moved back to Yeşilköy where Turkish aviation was born some 47 years ago. Due to academic diversity and rich culture heritage, a productive period has started in Istanbul. Air Force Academy has been an institution offering BA level education since 2001 whose process goes back to 1990s. Around 90 civilian and 50 military academicians conduct education and research per year. Military training including Yalova encampment site, affective domain training, and sports activities are also conducted as well. With a 103 years history and around 16.000 graduates

  20. Gaining Through Training: Pilot Proficiency in Modern Combat Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Orvil A. Anderson , the senior AACMO instructor in the Eastern Zone, witnessed a demonstration of the Link Trainer.23 He was so impressed with the...6 Allan R. Millett and Peter Maslowski, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America

  1. Aviation turbulence processes, detection, prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Anyone who has experienced turbulence in flight knows that it is usually not pleasant, and may wonder why this is so difficult to avoid. The book includes papers by various aviation turbulence researchers and provides background into the nature and causes of atmospheric turbulence that affect aircraft motion, and contains surveys of the latest techniques for remote and in situ sensing and forecasting of the turbulence phenomenon. It provides updates on the state-of-the-art research since earlier studies in the 1960s on clear-air turbulence, explains recent new understanding into turbulence generation by thunderstorms, and summarizes future challenges in turbulence prediction and avoidance.

  2. Workload management and geographic disorientation in aviation incidents: A review of the ASRS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Henry P.; Tham, Mingpo; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) incident reports are reviewed in two related areas: pilots' failures to appropriately manage tasks, and breakdowns in geographic orientation. Examination of 51 relevant reports on task management breakdowns revealed that altitude busts and inappropriate runway usee were the most frequently reported consequences. Task management breakdowns appeared to occur at all levels of expertise, and prominent causal factors were related to breakdowns in crew communications, over-involvement with the flight management system and, for small (general aviation) aircraft, preoccupation with weather. Analysis of the 83 cases of geographic disorientation suggested that these too occurred at all levels of pilot experience. With regard to causal factors, a majority was related to poor cockpit resource management, in which inattention led to a loss of geographic awareness. Other leading causes were related to poor weather and poor decision making. The potential of the ASRS database for contributing to research and design issues is addressed.

  3. History of aviation safety; the satisfying sighs of relief due to developments in Aviation safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, J.A.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aviation safety is an Integral part of my career. Being part of TU Delft’s impressive record of research on Aviation safety, my career has been with a sense of purpose and a responsibility to equip students to deal with the status quo challenges on Aviation safety, developments, Investigations and

  4. Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues. UNO Aviation Monograph Series. UNOAI Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent, Ed.

    This document contains four papers concerning collegiate aviation research and education solutions to critical safety issues. "Panel Proposal Titled Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues for the Tim Forte Collegiate Aviation Safety Symposium" (Brent Bowen) presents proposals for panels on the…

  5. Aviation Maintenance (Aircraft Mechanics & Aircraft & Instrument Repair Personnel). Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines career opportunities in aviation maintenance. The booklet provides the following information about aviation maintenance jobs: nature of the work, working conditions, where the jobs are, wages and benefits, opportunities for advancement, requirements to enter the job, opportunities for…

  6. Aviation and the Environment. A Selected, Annotated Bibliography Related to Aviation's Responses Toward Improving the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jane

    This informal, brief bibliography attempts to stress the positive side of aviation, annotating documents that explain how the airlines, aircraft engine manufacturers, government agencies, military aviation, and general aviation are meeting their responsibilities in solving environmental problems. Topics arousing public concern are identified:…

  7. An understanding of how aviation is handled in Helsinki and Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Jens Hundevad; Lassen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    framework is based on the relatively new aeromobility paradigm that embraces a holistic societal perspective on aviation. Based on interviews with key stakeholders, such as representatives from airport, airline, government, unions including business and tourism organizations, the article produce...... an understanding of how aviation in Finland is influenced by time/place relations. The natural geographical position in relation to traffic between Europe and Asia is exploited by long term focus on the national carrier: Finavia, Helsinki airport and traffic rights. Development of these areas requires long term...... commitment, understanding of dynamics with in aviation systems and willingness to invest; even in turbulence times. The narrative related to ‘Finland is an island’ is a key driver for political awareness, stronghold and essential for understanding the strategies and politics behind Helsinki as an airport hub...

  8. 14 CFR 61.415 - What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.415 Section 61.415 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.415 What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport...

  9. 14 CFR 61.313 - What aeronautical experience must I have to apply for a sport pilot certificate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... apply for a sport pilot certificate? 61.313 Section 61.313 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.313 What aeronautical experience must I have to apply for a sport... aeronautical experience you must have to apply for a sport pilot certificate: If you are applying for a sport...

  10. 14 CFR 61.427 - What must I do if my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating expires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate with a sport pilot rating expires? 61.427 Section 61.427 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.427 What must I do if my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating expires? You may exchange your expired flight instructor...

  11. 77 FR 34784 - Removal of Six Month Line Check Requirement for Pilots Over Age 60; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... limitations regarding the requirements in (d) and (e) that apply to the line check requirements for pilots... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 121 Removal of Six Month Line Check Requirement for Pilots..., in Section 305 of the Act, removed the line check performance evaluation requirements for pilots over...

  12. Age and Expertise Effects in Aviation Decision Making and Flight Control in a Flight Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy L.; Reade, Gordon; Yesavage, Jerome A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Age (due to declines in cognitive abilities necessary for navigation) and level of aviation expertise are two factors that may affect aviation performance and decision making under adverse weather conditions. We examined the roles of age, expertise, and their relationship on aviation decision making and flight control performance during a flight simulator task. Methods Seventy-two IFR-rated general aviators, aged 19–79 yr, made multiple approach, holding pattern entry, and landing decisions while navigating under Instrument Flight Rules weather conditions. Over three trials in which the fog level varied, subjects decided whether or not to land the aircraft. They also completed two holding pattern entries. Subjects’ flight control during approaches and holding patterns was measured. Results Older pilots (41+ yr) were more likely than younger pilots to land when visibility was inadequate (older pilots’ mean false alarm rate: 0.44 vs 0.25). They also showed less precise flight control for components of the approach, performing 0.16 SD below mean approach scores. Expertise attenuated an age-related decline in flight control during holding patterns: older IFR/CFI performed 0.73 SD below mean score; younger IFR/CFI, younger CFII/ATP, older CFII/ATP: 0.32, 0.26, 0.03 SD above mean score. Additionally, pilots with faster processing speed (by median split) had a higher mean landing decision false alarm rate (0.42 vs 0.28), yet performed 0.14 SD above the mean approach control score. Conclusions Results have implications regarding specialized training for older pilots and for understanding processes involved in older adults’ real world decision making and performance. PMID:20464816

  13. A concept for a fuel efficient flight planning aid for general aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B. P.; Haines, A. L.; Wales, C. J.

    1982-01-01

    A core equation for estimation of fuel burn from path profile data was developed. This equation was used as a necessary ingredient in a dynamic program to define a fuel efficient flight path. The resultant algorithm is oriented toward use by general aviation. The pilot provides a description of the desired ground track, standard aircraft parameters, and weather at selected waypoints. The algorithm then derives the fuel efficient altitudes and velocities at the waypoints.

  14. Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Mary N. Hill

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal

  15. Application of speech recognition and synthesis in the general aviation cockpit

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, R. A.; Mountford, S. J.; Bergeron, H.

    1984-01-01

    Interactive speech recognition/synthesis technology is assessed as a method for the aleviation of single-pilot IFR flight workloads. Attention was given during this series of evaluations to the conditions typical of general aviation twin-engine aircrft cockpits, covering several commonly encountered IFR flight condition scenarios. The most beneficial speech command tasks are noted to be in the data retrieval domain, which would allow the pilot access to uplinked data, checklists, and performance charts. Data entry tasks also appear to benefit from this technology.

  16. BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS CORRUPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Georgieva Hadzi Krsteski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The business corruption is established and active in the circle of the businesses partners that express a gratitude, return a service or bribes (apart from ordinary price for a business transfer to be provided. Those prohibited transfers differs from the usual business transfers, such as activities related to marketing and public relations where they have a specific goal to use illegal means in order to infringe the recipients` identity of prohibited value in an interchange for a inducement. That is a procedure of enticement, which prevents the useful instruments in the permitted bazaar and not solitary that it is harmful for the businesses whose representatives accept bribe, however it is also harmful for the civilisation as an entire. The occurrence of business corruption is intended as a amount of companies that presented cash, a gratitude or a service in return, in adding to every usual deal of any person who is working for a business entity from the private sector in any capacity, including the one through a mediator, happening to at minimum single juncture in the past 12 months previous to this research. The usual commonness of the business-to-corruption in the Republic of Macedonia is 3% compared to 4% at a regional level. While it is fewer than the regular pervasiveness of salaried briberies by enterprises to civic bureaucrats, this discovery designates that bribery in the secluded segment is a difficult in the Republic of Macedonia.

  17. 76 FR 72967 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY... Meeting. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation... matters affecting civil aviation security. This meeting is open to the public, but participation is...

  18. 77 FR 26641 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... 4, 2012 Part III Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration Aviation... Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS... Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) on May...

  19. 78 FR 20685 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) will meet in Arlington, VA. This.... L. 92-463). The Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) provides advice and makes...

  20. 78 FR 41413 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY... Meeting. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation... and provides advice and recommendations for improving aviation security measures to the Administrator...

  1. Business Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Föh, Kennet Fischer; Mandøe, Lene; Tinten, Bjarke

    Business Law is a translation of the 2nd edition of Erhvervsjura - videregående uddannelser. It is an educational textbook for the subject of business law. The textbook covers all important topic?s within business law such as the Legal System, Private International Law, Insolvency Law, Contract law......, Instruments of debt and other claims, Sale of Goods and real estate, Charges, mortgages and pledges, Guarantees, Credit agreements, Tort Law, Product liability and Insurance, Company law, Market law, Labour Law, Family Law and Law of Inheritance....

  2. Agricultural aviation application in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States has the most advanced equipment and applications in agricultural aviation. It also has a complete service system in agricultural aviation. This article introduces the current status of aerial application including service, equipment, and aerial application techniques. It has a c...

  3. 76 FR 17613 - Aviation Service Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 87 Aviation Service Regulations AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... Communications Commission proposes to amend 47 CFR part 87 as follows: PART 87--AVIATION SERVICES 1. The...

  4. Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akselsson, R.; Koornneef, F.; Stewart, S.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    Chapter 2: Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations The European Commission HILAS project (Human Integration into the Lifecycle of Aviation Systems - a project supported by the European Commission’s 6th Framework between 2005-2009) was focused on using human factors knowledge and

  5. 19 CFR 122.167 - Aviation smuggling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aviation smuggling. 122.167 Section 122.167... TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Penalties § 122.167 Aviation smuggling. (a) Civil penalties. Any aircraft.... More severe penalties are provided in 19 U.S.C. 1590 if the smuggled merchandise is a controlled...

  6. Questions and Countermeasures on Developing General Aviation Industry in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu Yongming; Liu Yongchao

    2017-01-01

    China’s general aviation industry has exposed many problems with the low-altitude airspace expanding openness. General aviation is an important part of national economy and defence forces, the development of general aviation has a practical and far-reaching significance. By analysing the China’s current general aviation industry, combined with the importance of the development of general aviation, propose some countermeasures and suggestions for the development of China’s general aviation ind...

  7. Questions and Countermeasures on Developing General Aviation Industry in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yongming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available China’s general aviation industry has exposed many problems with the low-altitude airspace expanding openness. General aviation is an important part of national economy and defence forces, the development of general aviation has a practical and far-reaching significance. By analysing the China’s current general aviation industry, combined with the importance of the development of general aviation, propose some countermeasures and suggestions for the development of China’s general aviation industry.

  8. How Usability Testing Resulted in Improvements to Ground Collision Software for General Aviation: Improved Ground Collision Avoidance System (IGCAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarr, Michael; Chinske, Chris; Williams, Ethan; Law, Cameron; Skoog, Mark; Sorokowski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The NASA improved Ground Collision Avoidance System (iGCAS) team conducted an onsite usability study at Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Air Venture in Oshkosh, Wisconsin from July 19 through July 26, 2015. EAA Air Venture had approximately 550,000 attendees from which the sample pool of pilots were selected. The objectives of this study were to assess the overall appropriateness and acceptability of iGCAS as a warning system for General Aviation aircraft, usability of the iGCAS displays and audio cues, test terrain avoidance characteristics, performance, functionality, pilot response time, and correlate terrain avoidance performance and pilot response time data.

  9. Business Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This essay outlines the overall scope and location of business anthropology within the overall field of the discipline. It outlines its foundations as an applied form of anthropology in early developments in the United States (in particular, in Western Electric’s Hawthorne Project and the Human...... Relations School at Harvard University), as well as in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, before turning to five areas of research and practice: academic ethnographies of business practices, regional studies, case studies developed by practitioners, theoretical applications, and methods. The essay then asks...... what a future program for business anthropology might look like and suggests four areas for theoretical development against a background of education, engagement, and comparative work. These are an examination of structures of power in, between, and dependent on business organizations of all kinds...

  10. Mindful Application of Aviation Practices in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Brennan, Peter A; Peerally, Mohammad Farhad; Kapur, Narinder; Hynes, Jonny M; Hodkinson, Peter D

    2017-12-01

    Evidence supports the efficacy of incorporating select recognized aviation practices and procedures into healthcare. Incident analysis, debrief, safety brief, and crew resource management (CRM) have all been assessed for implementation within the UK healthcare system, a world leader in aviation-based patient safety initiatives. Mindful application, in which aviation practices are specifically tailored to the unique healthcare setting, show promise in terms of acceptance and long-term sustainment. In order to establish British healthcare applications of aviation practices, a PubMed search of UK authored manuscripts published between 2005-2016 was undertaken using search terms 'aviation,' 'healthcare,' 'checklist,' and 'CRM.' A convenience sample of UK-authored aviation medical conference presentations and UK-authored patient safety manuscripts were also reviewed. A total of 11 of 94 papers with UK academic affiliations published between 2005-2016 and relevant to aviation modeled healthcare delivery were found. The debrief process, incident analysis, and CRM are the primary practices incorporated into UK healthcare, with success dependent on cultural acceptance and mindful application. CRM training has gained significant acceptance in UK healthcare environments. Aviation modeled incident analysis, debrief, safety brief, and CRM training are increasingly undertaken within the UK healthcare system. Nuanced application, in which the unique aspects of the healthcare setting are addressed as part of a comprehensive safety approach, shows promise for long-term success. The patient safety brief and aviation modeled incident analysis are in earlier phases of implementation, and warrant further analysis.Powell-Dunford N, Brennan PA, Peerally MF, Kapur N, Hynes JM, Hodkinson PD. Mindful application of aviation practices in healthcare. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(12):1107-1116.

  11. Eco-efficiency in aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Grewe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Air traffic guarantees mobility and serves the needs of society to travel over long distances in a decent time. But aviation also contributes to climate change. Here, we present various mitigation options, based on technological and operational measures and present a framework to compare the different mitigation options by taking into account aspects, such as changes in operational costs, climate impact reduction, eco-efficiency, possible starting point of the mitigation option and the investment costs. We show that it is not possible to directly rank these options because of the different requirements and framework conditions. Instead, we introduce two different presentations that take into account these different aspects and serve as a framework for intercomparison.

  12. Aviation Research and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Antoinette M.

    1995-01-01

    The Internet is a network of networks. It was originally funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency or DOD/DARPA and evolved in part from the connection of supercomputer sites across the United States. The National Science Foundation (NSF) made the most of their supercomputers by connecting the sites to each other. This made the supercomputers more efficient and now allows scientists, engineers and researchers to access the supercomputers from their own labs and offices. The high speed networks that connect the NSF supercomputers form the backbone of the Internet. The World Wide Web (WWW) is a menu system. It gathers Internet resources from all over the world into a series of screens that appear on your computer. The WWW is also a distributed. The distributed system stores data information on many computers (servers). These servers can go out and get data when you ask for it. Hypermedia is the base of the WWW. One can 'click' on a section and visit other hypermedia (pages). Our approach to demonstrating the importance of aviation research through the Internet began with learning how to put pages on the Internet (on-line) ourselves. We were assigned two aviation companies; Vision Micro Systems Inc. and Innovative Aerodynamic Technologies (IAT). We developed home pages for these SBIR companies. The equipment used to create the pages were the UNIX and Macintosh machines. HTML Supertext software was used to write the pages and the Sharp JX600S scanner to scan the images. As a result, with the use of the UNIX, Macintosh, Sun, PC, and AXIL machines, we were able to present our home pages to over 800,000 visitors.

  13. Simulation and augmented reality in endovascular neurosurgery: lessons from aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitha, Alim P; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Janjua, Major Jameel J; Albuquerque, Felipe C; McDougall, Cameron G

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular neurosurgery is a discipline strongly dependent on imaging. Therefore, technology that improves how much useful information we can garner from a single image has the potential to dramatically assist decision making during endovascular procedures. Furthermore, education in an image-enhanced environment, especially with the incorporation of simulation, can improve the safety of the procedures and give interventionalists and trainees the opportunity to study or perform simulated procedures before the intervention, much like what is practiced in the field of aviation. Here, we examine the use of simulators in the training of fighter pilots and discuss how similar benefits can compensate for current deficiencies in endovascular training. We describe the types of simulation used for endovascular procedures, including virtual reality, and discuss the relevant data on its utility in training. Finally, the benefit of augmented reality during endovascular procedures is discussed, along with future computerized image enhancement techniques.

  14. Aviation model cognitive risk factors applied to medical malpractice cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripe, Stephen C; Best, Lyle G; Cole-Harding, Shirley; Fifield, Bryce; Talebdoost, Farzin

    2006-01-01

    Aviation accidents have been reduced substantially by training pilots to avoid high-risk behaviors caused by cognitive errors. To determine whether similar cognitive cause factors or errors are involved in medical malpractice cases, and to evaluate the reliability of identifying such factors, physicians reviewed state and federal malpractice cases in a legal database. Reviewing physicians evaluated 30 cases meeting inclusion criteria from state and federal malpractice cases for the year 2004 in the 8th US Circuit Court of Appeals region, using criteria for cognitive factors derived from aviation. The cases were categorized into three classes based on the degree of agreement between the reviewers. The results as to prevalence of the factors and reliability of identifying the factors were then analyzed statistically. Fifty-nine percent of the cases met criteria for strong and good correlation with the factors. Cognitive factors involving IMSAFE (illness, medications, stress, alcohol, physiogical (f), and emotional) and medical team management/leadership can be reliably identified. Other factors, such as hazardous attitudes and loss of situational awareness, were identified with minimal reliability. The aeronautical cognitive causative approach can be translated into a medical approach to reliably identify cognitive causes of errors in a significant proportion of medical malpractice cases from a legal database.

  15. Aviation security cargo inspection queuing simulation model for material flow and accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Glenn O.; Olama, Mohammed M.; Rose, Terri A.; Brumback, Daryl

    2009-05-01

    Beginning in 2010, the U.S. will require that all cargo loaded in passenger aircraft be inspected. This will require more efficient processing of cargo and will have a significant impact on the inspection protocols and business practices of government agencies and the airlines. In this paper, we develop an aviation security cargo inspection queuing simulation model for material flow and accountability that will allow cargo managers to conduct impact studies of current and proposed business practices as they relate to inspection procedures, material flow, and accountability.

  16. Prevalence of fatigue among commercial pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Craig A; Earl, Laurie

    2006-06-01

    Short-haul pilots have largely been neglected in studies of fatigue, sleep loss and circadian disruption created by flight operations, but anecdotal evidence from pilots suggests that with the increasing amount of low-cost air travel, commercial pilots working short-haul operations may be becoming seriously fatigued. This study attempted to ascertain how much subjective fatigue short-haul pilots reported, and makes comparisons between low-cost and scheduled airline pilots. Pilots completed anonymous questionnaires (encompassing aviation factors, flight experience and a fatigue scale) posted on the Professional Pilots' Rumours Network website. Data were collected from 162 short-haul pilots and statistical adjustment for operational factors was made. Seventy-five percent reported severe fatigue and 81% reported the fatigue to be worse than 2 years ago. Eighty percent considered their thought processes were reduced while flying. Severe fatigue was reported more frequently by low-cost airline pilots than scheduled airline pilots (P = 0.05) and fatigue ratings were higher in this group (P = 0.03). Pilots who reported regularly flying into their 'discretion' hours had lower physical and psychological health, and overall fatigue scores, and poorer self-rated general health. Flying into discretion time occurred no more frequently in low-cost airline pilots than scheduled airline pilots. Identifiable fatigue problems are reported by short-haul pilots, but this cannot be attributed solely to the work schedules of low-cost airlines as regular use of discretion time appears to be associated with fatigue regardless of airline.

  17. 77 FR 27538 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee-Continuing a Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee--Continuing a Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of continuing a task assignment for the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC). SUMMARY: The FAA assigned the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee...

  18. [Psychopharmacology in aviation and astronautics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, P V; Glod, G D

    1977-01-01

    Flights aboard modern vehicles are associated with high nervous-emotional and physical stresses. This may induce depletion of reserve capabilities, development of fatigue and, consequently, reduction of work capacity of crewmembers. The paper discusses approaches and results of the use of drugs by pilots and cosmonauts in order to alleviate their fatigue and emotional stress. It gives indications and contraindications for the adminstration of stimulants and tranquilizers. On the basis of a comprehensive analysis of the literature data and their own findings, the authors draw the conclusion that the use of stimulants and anxiolytics may increase the level of reliability and performance of air- and spacecraft pilots during programmed and, particularly, contigent situations of the flight.

  19. Is there a role for the use of aviation assessment instruments in surgical training preparation? A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk-Vos, Aline C; Heres, Marion H; Kesteloo, Jasper; Verburg, Dick; Hiddema, Frans; Lie, Desiree A; de Korne, Dirk F

    2017-01-01

    Selection for surgical residency programmes could potentially be improved through pretraining preparation, after assessment of surgical candidates' sensorimotor skills and personality traits. Existing aviation pilot selection instruments are available to test sensorimotor skills and personality traits. This study examined selected instruments to assess medical trainees' sensorimotor skills and personality traits. Aviation's validated computer-based Computerized Pilot Aptitude and Screening System (COMPASS) and Checklist Professional Profile (CPP) were applied to 166 final year medical students during a surgical clerkship between 2013 and 2015. All trainees completed COMPASS and CPP within the prescribed 2 hours. Compared with an age-matched and gender-matched cohort of 165 pilot candidates, medical trainees scored significantly higher on eye-hand coordination (paviation's sensorimotor skills and personality traits selection instruments within the set time frame. They scored differently from aviation trainees on selected skills and personality traits. The applicability and utility of aviation instruments to presurgical training preparation remains to be tested. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Multidimensional Aptitude Battery-Second Edition Intelligence Testing of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Training Candidates Compared with Manned Airframe Training Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , and autism spectrum disorders ) and not on very high functioning populations such as aviators...whether such persons are aeromedically suitable to pursue such a challenging and high-risk occupation. Our current understanding of the psychological ...Retzlaff P, Barto E, Ree MJ, Teachout MS. Standard cognitive psychological tests predict military pilot training outcomes. Aviat Psychol Appl Hum Factors

  1. The social context of the aeronautical education experience of African-American civilian, commercial, and military pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Taurean Mashawn

    The purpose of this research is to explore the social context (the nature and cultural environment) of the aeronautical training experience of African-American civilian, commercial, and military pilots. This research highlights the challenges African-American pilots are exposed to in addition to drawing parallels between the social context and the obstacles they are subjected to along the way. This study is valuable for stakeholders, African-American pilot aspirants, aviation corporations, Federal Aviation Administration, flight schools - in the aviation industry in understanding ways to initiate a paradigm shift and increase awareness about representation and participation of African-American aviation professionals. The qualitative approach was selected to gather a better understanding of the sociological hurdles black aviators face while going through the journey of becoming a pilot. Hardiman (2010) states, "While quantitative research is valuable, qualitative research provides the researcher the ability to view real world situations as they naturally unfold" ( p. 25). According to OBAP (2014), less than 2% of pilots in the United States are African-American. The experiences shared by the participants can provide helpful insight of possible policy implications for the aeronautical industry. There were three research questions in the study: 1) What factors hindered pilot training? 2) What were the resilience factors experienced during pilot training? 3) What were the defining features of the social context surrounding pilot training? Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted of six professional pilots. A qualitative data analysis was conducted to illustrate the context of the social challenges during the course of pilot training. Three themes were revealed: 1) access, 2) perception of inferiority, and 3) support. Implications of the significance of providing social networks to expose African-Americans to aviation were discussed. Additional means of

  2. Assessing the impact of aviation on climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Marais

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an assessment of the marginal climate impacts of new aviation activities. We use impulse response functions derived from carbon-cycle and atmospheric models to estimate changes in surface temperature for various aviation impacts (CO2, NOx on methane, NOx on ozone, sulfates, soot, and contrails/induced cirrus. We use different damage functions and discount rates to explore health, welfare and ecological costs for a range of assumptions and scenarios. Since uncertainty is high regarding many aviation effects, we explicitly capture some uncertainty by representing several model parameters as probabilistic distributions. The uncertainties are then propagated using Monte Carlo analysis to derive estimates for the impact of these uncertainties on the marginal future climate impacts. Our goal is to provide a framework that will communicate the potential impacts of aviation on climate change under different scenarios and assumptions, and that will allow decision-makers to compare these potential impacts to other aviation environmental impacts. We present results to describe the influence of parametric uncertainties, scenarios, and assumptions for valuation on the expected marginal future costs of aviation impacts. Estimates of the change in global average surface temperature due to aviation are most sensitive to changes in climate sensitivity, the radiative forcing attributed to short-lived effects (in particular those related to contrails and aviation-induced cirrus, and the choice of emissions scenario. Estimates of marginal future costs of aviation are most sensitive to assumptions regarding the discount rate, followed by assumptions regarding climate sensitivity, and the choice of emissions scenario.

  3. English with Flying Colors: The Aviation English and the International Civil Aviation Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraśnicka Izabela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several reasons for the English language to become lingua franca of aviation including some historical turning points for the world aviation and some specific linguistic features of the language itself. This paper aims to firstly present a short, yet interesting history of implementation of English as standardized language for aviation. It will provide introductory historical background, establishment of arguments necessary for standardization and leading to the implementation of the Language Proficiency Requirements (LPRs within the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO. It will then provide an overview of the ICAO’s actions to support its members states in implementation of the English language standards for aviation and try to evaluate the effects based on the powers granted to the Organization. Such evaluation will be presented in the comparative perspective with the powers and instruments used within the European Union to achieve the same goal - standardization of the aviation English.

  4. MUNICIPAL AVIATION FUNCTIONING AS ONE OF FUTURE TYPES OF THE AVIATION ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kharchenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the article we represent the basic principles of municipal air transport within the metropolis. The main tasks of creating municipal transport are defined to further develop of aviation technologies for municipal economy and life support of the city and its air-transport system. In order to further development of aviation technology in the interests of the urban economy and life of the city, its air transportation system is necessary to decide three main objectives: development of aviation equipment and saturation of City Aviation park by light helicopters which will ensure solving of special tasks for the benefit of urban services, commercial transportation and air operations; development of urban aviation infrastructure, including heliports and helipads; the organization of safe use of the airspace over the city. The use of technology in aviation can be done while ensuring sanitary and environmental standards of environmental protection.

  5. Pilot Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Maria Ie

    This PhD dissertation engages in the study of pilot (system) implementation. In the field of information systems, pilot implementations are commissioned as a way to learn from real use of a pilot system with real data, by real users during an information systems development (ISD) project and before...... objective. The prevalent understanding is that pilot implementations are an ISD technique that extends prototyping from the lab and into test during real use. Another perception is that pilot implementations are a project multiple of co-existing enactments of the pilot implementation. From this perspective...

  6. World experience in aviation companies staffing executive and administrative personnel

    OpenAIRE

    T.N. Shkoda

    2011-01-01

    Leading international aviation companies experience in staffing executive and administrative personnel is considered in the article. The author analyzes staffing specifics of such aviation companies as Southwest Airlines, Lufthansa AG, and work of such staffing agencies as Aeropeople Aerotek in this direction. It is defined that Ukrainian aviation companies should use world leading aviation companies experience.

  7. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation safety...

  8. 76 FR 11308 - Aviation Noise Impacts Roadmap Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Noise Impacts Roadmap Annual Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of meeting participation. SUMMARY: This notice advises interested persons that the First Annual Meeting of the Aviation Noise Impacts Roadmap will be held on April...

  9. 32 CFR 705.32 - Aviation events and parachute demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aviation events and parachute demonstrations... STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.32 Aviation events and... appropriate for aviation participation include: Dedication of airports; aviation shows; aircraft exposition...

  10. Cooperative Demonstration Program To Train Aviation Maintenance Technicians. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama Aviation and Technical Coll., Ozark.

    The Alabama Aviation and Technical College, working with representatives of the aviation industry, the military, the Alabama Department of Aeronautics, and the Federal Aviation Administration, developed a training program for aviation maintenance technicians. The program also aimed to emphasize and expand opportunities for minorities, females, and…

  11. Can Competency-Based Training Fly?: An Overview of Key Issues for "Ab Initio" Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Peter; Hay, Stephen; Mavin, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Competency-based training (CBT) for pilots was formally introduced in 1999 by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) for training leading to the issue of aeroplane private and commercial pilot licences. This initiative followed the Australian government's introduction of CBT policy for vocational and workplace training in the late 1980's.…

  12. Private and Commercial Pilot: Ligher-Than-Air Airship. Flight Test Guide. (Part 61 Revised).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    The flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the flight test for the Private or Commercial Pilot Certificate with a Lighter-Than-Air Category and Airship Class Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information and guidance concerning pilot operations, procedures, and…

  13. Private and Commercial Pilot: Gyroplane. Flight Test Guide, Part 61 Revised 1973, AC 61-60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the Private or Commercial Pilot Rotocraft Certificate with Gyroplane Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information concerning pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test required for these…

  14. Private and Commercial Pilot: Glider. Flight Test Guide, Part 61 Revised, AC 61-61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the Private or Commercial Pilot Certificate with Glider Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information and guidance concerning the pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test required for that…

  15. Commercial Pilot; Airplane. Flight Test Guide, Part 61 Revised, AC 61-55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the Commercial Pilot Certificate with Airplane Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information concerning pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test required for the certificate. Preflight duties,…

  16. Private and Commercial Pilot; Heliocoptor. Flight Test Guide, Part 61 Revised, AC 61-59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the Private or Commercial Pilot Rotocraft Certificate with Helicopter Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information and guidance concerning the pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test required…

  17. 14 CFR 91.1097 - Pilot and flight attendant crewmember training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... training programs. 91.1097 Section 91.1097 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... training programs. (a) Each program manager must establish and maintain an approved pilot training program... approved flight attendant training program, that is appropriate to the operations to which each pilot and...

  18. 14 CFR 135.341 - Pilot and flight attendant crewmember training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... training programs. 135.341 Section 135.341 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Training § 135.341 Pilot and flight attendant crewmember training programs. (a..., shall establish and maintain an approved pilot training program, and each certificate holder who uses a...

  19. Multi-Dimensional Assessment of Professional Competence during Initial Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Douglas Andrew

    2017-01-01

    A twenty-year forecast predicting significant increases in global air transportation portends a need to increase the capacity and effectiveness of initial pilot training. In addition to quantitative concerns related to the supply of new pilots, industry leaders have expressed dissatisfaction with the qualitative output of current aviation training…

  20. Proactive Management of Aviation System Safety Risk

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aviation safety systems have undergone dramatic changes over the past fifty years. If you take a look at the early technology in this area, you'll see that there was...

  1. Improved Hearing Protection for Aviation Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKinley, Richard L; Bjorn, Valerie S; Hall, John A

    2005-01-01

    .... Normally, the source of the noise cannot be quieted without loss in performance. Therefore hearing protection is the primary tool to mitigate aviation personnel noise exposures during operations of aircraft...

  2. Airspace Integration Plan for Unmanned Aviation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    ...) by Department of Defense (DoD) Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA). It is based upon ongoing work performed in support of the joint Office of the Secretary of Defense-Federal Aviation Administration (OSD-FAA...

  3. [The profile training of aviation doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaginin, A A; Lizogub, I N

    2011-11-01

    Authors consider the trends of training doctors in the specialty "physician in aerospace medicine". First level is initial training for faculty training of doctors. The higher level is vocational retraining and advanced training in the departments of postgraduate and further education. It solved the issues of preparation of specialists in various areas of aviation medicine: medical-chairman of the Flight Commission, an expert medical doctor-flight expert committee, a specialist laboratory (Cabinet) of Aviation Medicine, the Medical Director of Aviation (enterprise, organization), etc. The highest level of training is residency. The necessity of legislative consolidation of an independent direction for the organization of training and medical support of aviation operations is proved.

  4. Redefining White Light Chromaticity Boundaries for Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-05

    Several aspects are involved in the recognition of an aviation signal light's color, including its chromaticity, layout on the airfield, and the chromaticity of other light sources in view. The LRC conducted a human factors investigation of the bound...

  5. Human factors in general aviation accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-07-01

    During the twelve months ending October 31, 1965, there were 122 fatal general aviation accidents in the Western Region in which the Regional Flight Surgeon's office was notified and the wreckage was located within one week. Autopsies were obtained i...

  6. Operational Risk Management and Military Aviation Safety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ashley, Park

    1999-01-01

    .... The Army's Class A aviation mishap rate declined after it implemented risk management (RM) principles in 1987. This reduction caught the attention of Air Force leadership who have since stated that the application of operational risk management...

  7. Aviation Noise Impacts: State of the Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Basner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is defined as “unwanted sound.” Aircraft noise is one, if not the most detrimental environmental effect of aviation. It can cause community annoyance, disrupt sleep, adversely affect academic performance of children, and could increase the risk for cardiovascular disease of people living in the vicinity of airports. In some airports, noise constrains air traffic growth. This consensus paper was prepared by the Impacts of Science Group of the Committee for Aviation Environmental Protection of the International Civil Aviation Organization and summarizes the state of the science of noise effects research in the areas of noise measurement and prediction, community annoyance, children’s learning, sleep disturbance, and health. It also briefly discusses civilian supersonic aircraft as a future source of aviation noise.

  8. 78 FR 25337 - Federal Aviation Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; Clearance... Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork...

  9. Aviation Noise Impacts: State of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Mathias; Clark, Charlotte; Hansell, Anna; Hileman, James I.; Janssen, Sabine; Shepherd, Kevin; Sparrow, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Noise is defined as “unwanted sound.” Aircraft noise is one, if not the most detrimental environmental effect of aviation. It can cause community annoyance, disrupt sleep, adversely affect academic performance of children, and could increase the risk for cardiovascular disease of people living in the vicinity of airports. In some airports, noise constrains air traffic growth. This consensus paper was prepared by the Impacts of Science Group of the Committee for Aviation Environmental Protection of the International Civil Aviation Organization and summarizes the state of the science of noise effects research in the areas of noise measurement and prediction, community annoyance, children’s learning, sleep disturbance, and health. It also briefly discusses civilian supersonic aircraft as a future source of aviation noise. PMID:29192612

  10. Human factors in safety and business management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Joachim; Leonhardt, Jorg; Koper, Birgit; Pennig, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    Human factors in safety is concerned with all those factors that influence people and their behaviour in safety-critical situations. In aviation these are, for example, environmental factors in the cockpit, organisational factors such as shift work, human characteristics such as ability and motivation of staff. Careful consideration of human factors is necessary to improve health and safety at work by optimising the interaction of humans with their technical and social (team, supervisor) work environment. This provides considerable benefits for business by increasing efficiency and by preventing incidents/accidents. The aim of this paper is to suggest management tools for this purpose. Management tools such as balanced scorecards (BSC) are widespread instruments and also well known in aviation organisations. Only a few aviation organisations utilise management tools for human factors although they are the most important conditions in the safety management systems of aviation organisations. One reason for this is that human factors are difficult to measure and therefore also difficult to manage. Studies in other domains, such as workplace health promotion, indicate that BSC-based tools are useful for human factor management. Their mission is to develop a set of indicators that are sensitive to organisational performance and help identify driving forces as well as bottlenecks. Another tool presented in this paper is the Human Resources Performance Model (HPM). HPM facilitates the integrative assessment of human factors programmes on the basis of a systematic performance analysis of the whole system. Cause-effect relationships between system elements are defined in process models in a first step and validated empirically in a second step. Thus, a specific representation of the performance processes is developed, which ranges from individual behaviour to system performance. HPM is more analytic than BSC-based tools because HPM also asks why a certain factor is

  11. Aviation Safety Concerns for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian E.; Roelen, Alfred L. C.; den Hertog, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    The Future Aviation Safety Team (FAST) is a multidisciplinary international group of aviation professionals that was established to identify possible future aviation safety hazards. The principle was adopted that future hazards are undesirable consequences of changes, and a primary activity of FAST became identification and prioritization of possible future changes affecting aviation. Since 2004, FAST has been maintaining a catalogue of "Areas of Change" (AoC) that could potentially influence aviation safety. The horizon for such changes is between 5 to 20 years. In this context, changes must be understood as broadly as possible. An AoC is a description of the change, not an identification of the hazards that result from the change. An ex-post analysis of the AoCs identified in 2004 demonstrates that changes catalogued many years previous were directly implicated in the majority of fatal aviation accidents over the past ten years. This paper presents an overview of the current content of the AoC catalogue and a subsequent discussion of aviation safety concerns related to these possible changes. Interactions among these future changes may weaken critical functions that must be maintained to ensure safe operations. Safety assessments that do not appreciate or reflect the consequences of significant interaction complexity will not be fully informative and can lead to inappropriate trade-offs and increases in other risks. The FAST strongly encourages a system-wide approach to safety risk assessment across the global aviation system, not just within the domain for which future technologies or operational concepts are being considered. The FAST advocates the use of the "Areas of Change" concept, considering that several possible future phenomena may interact with a technology or operational concept under study producing unanticipated hazards.

  12. Military Aviation in Ireland 1921- 1945

    OpenAIRE

    O'Malley, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This thesis initially sets out to examine the context of the purchase of two aircraft, on the authority of Michael Collins and funded by the second Dail, during the Treaty negotiations of 1921. The subsequent development of civil aviation policy including the regulation of civil aviation, the management of a civil aerodrome and the possible start of a state sponsored civil air service to Britain or elsewhere is also explained. Michael Collins’ leading role in the establishment ...

  13. USA Aviation Digest Index, 1989. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    project number(s), task NASA - Leave blank. number(s), and work unit number(s). Use the NTIS - Leave blank. following labels: C - Contract PR - Project ...representative for operator’s manuals changes. USA Aviation Digest; Jun 1989: p. 34-35. NARRP SEE HELMET ASSEMBLY REFUELING REARMING PERSONNEL ( HARRP ...PERSONNEL ( HARRP ) New helmet for rearming refueling personnel. USA Aviation Digest; Sept-Oct 1989: p. 46-48. 20 HELMETS ,eLmets: From Roman chariots to

  14. Integrated system for training of aviation specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stankunas

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Co-operation between university and industrial potential is one of the most effective ways of organizing expensive studies in a small country. Co-operation between civil universities and military schools and structures is expedient in preparing reserve military specialist. An integrated system for the preparation of the specialists of civil and military aviation is precondition for the development of integrated management system of aviation and air space

  15. Commercial technology for aviation configuration management.

    OpenAIRE

    White, P. Scott

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the current policy and procedures used to manage naval aviation configuration control. It recommends that the Navy consult with SABRE Decision Technologies, or a company with a similar background, to re- engineer the process for approving configuration changes and create an information technology system to manage the process. During this study, I have identified two major challenges to naval aviation configuration ...

  16. Aviation dentistry: Past to present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhant Pathak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Airline industry has gained popularity in recent years and not much known about the dental problems associated with the high altitude. It is most common in frequent flyers, crew members, pilots etc. Due to the closed chamber pressure gets accumulated in these organs causing pain, discomfort, and organ dysfunction. The presence of dental abscesses, periodontitis, deep carious lesions and deep unlined restorations in oral cavity can stimulate severe pain due to the extreme altitude changes. With proper diagnosis, the various complications can be avoided. Thus, dentist needs to be well versed with these facts and should provide a comprehensive treatment.

  17. Business Leksikon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2002-01-01

    This review article deals with a specialised dictionary recently introduced to the Danish market. It covers traditional business subjects and is designed for semi-experts and laypeople. Through Danish definitions and English, French and German equivalents, it aims at fulfilling the functions text...

  18. Unfinished Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckett, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Adult learning is not a tidy business: adults fit learning into the spaces left by the other demands on complex lives, and into the spaces left in administrative structures overwhelmingly designed for other people. No simple metric can capture adults' diverse purposes and achievements, and no single programme can capture the full range of things…

  19. Business Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Anders

    2001-01-01

    Cílem této bakalářské práce je seznámení s Business Intelligence a zpracování vývojového trendu, který ovlivňuje podobu řešení Business Intelligence v podniku ? Business Activity Monitoring. Pro zpracování tohoto tématu byla použita metoda studia odborných pramenů, a to jak v českém, tak v anglickém jazyce. Hlavním přínosem práce je ucelený, v českém jazyce zpracovaný materiál pojednávající o Business Activity Monitoring. Práce je rozdělena do šesti hlavních kapitol. Prvních pět je věnováno p...

  20. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Process for Requesting Waiver of Mandatory Separation Age for a Federal Aviation Administration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Separation Age for a Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Control Specialist In Flight Service... Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION..., SFAR 103 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 103—Process for Requesting Waiver of Mandatory...

  1. An Evaluation of Automatic Control System Concepts for General Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, E. C.

    1990-01-01

    A piloted simulation study of automatic longitudinal control systems for general aviation airplanes has been conducted. These automatic control systems were designed to make the simulated airplane easy to fly for a beginning or infrequent pilot. Different control systems are presented and their characteristics are documented. In a conventional airplane control system each cockpit controller commands combinations of both the airspeed and the vertical speed. The best system in the present study decoupled the airspeed and vertical speed responses to cockpit controller inputs. An important feature of the automatic system was that neither changing flap position nor maneuvering in steeply banked turns affected either the airspeed or the vertical speed. All the pilots who flew the control system simulation were favorably impressed with the very low workload and the excellent handling qualities of the simulated airplane.

  2. Civil aviation in Ukraine: problems of state regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Малярчук, Назар Вікторович; Хом'яченко, Світлана Іванівна

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with a government regulation of activities in the aviation sphere, aviation security, the interests of the state, national security and the needs of society and economy in air transport and air operations. English abstractN. Malyarchuk, S. Homyachenko Civil aviation in Ukraine: problems of state regulation The article deals with a government regulation of activities in the aviation sphere, aviation security, the interests of the state, national security and the needs of soci...

  3. Small Business Size Standards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Certain government programs, such as SBA loan programs and contracting opportunities, are reserved for small business concerns. In order to qualify, businesses must...

  4. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  5. Petri net-based modelling of human-automation conflicts in aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizziol, Sergio; Tessier, Catherine; Dehais, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of aviation safety reports reveal that human-machine conflicts induced by poor automation design are remarkable precursors of accidents. A review of different crew-automation conflicting scenarios shows that they have a common denominator: the autopilot behaviour interferes with the pilot's goal regarding the flight guidance via 'hidden' mode transitions. Considering both the human operator and the machine (i.e. the autopilot or the decision functions) as agents, we propose a Petri net model of those conflicting interactions, which allows them to be detected as deadlocks in the Petri net. In order to test our Petri net model, we designed an autoflight system that was formally analysed to detect conflicting situations. We identified three conflicting situations that were integrated in an experimental scenario in a flight simulator with 10 general aviation pilots. The results showed that the conflicts that we had a-priori identified as critical had impacted the pilots' performance. Indeed, the first conflict remained unnoticed by eight participants and led to a potential collision with another aircraft. The second conflict was detected by all the participants but three of them did not manage the situation correctly. The last conflict was also detected by all the participants but provoked typical automation surprise situation as only one declared that he had understood the autopilot behaviour. These behavioural results are discussed in terms of workload and number of fired 'hidden' transitions. Eventually, this study reveals that both formal and experimental approaches are complementary to identify and assess the criticality of human-automation conflicts. Practitioner Summary: We propose a Petri net model of human-automation conflicts. An experiment was conducted with general aviation pilots performing a scenario involving three conflicting situations to test the soundness of our formal approach. This study reveals that both formal and experimental approaches

  6. Throw Away that Telework Manual!' - the Limitations of Existing Telework Literature in the B2C e-Business Context

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gani, Zoohan

    2004-01-01

    ... failing to consider the different circumstances of the individual teleworkers. This paper reports on the pilot study that examined telework in the business-to-consumer e-business application as part of a Ph.D. study...

  7. Crew Factors in Flight Operations XV: Alertness Management in General Aviation Education Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Co, Elizabeth L.; Neri, David F.; Oyung, Raymond L.; Mallis, Melissa M.; Cannon, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Regional operations encompass a broad range of pilots and equipment. This module is intended to help all those involved in regional aviation, including pilots, schedulers, dispatchers, maintenance technicians, policy makers, and others, to understand the physiological factors underlying fatigue, how flight operations affect fatigue, and what can be done to counteract fatigue and maximize alertness and performance in their operations. The overall purpose of this module is to promote aviation safety, performance, and productivity. It is intended to meet three specific objectives: (1) to explain the current state of knowledge about the physiological mechanisms underlying fatigue; (2) to demonstrate how this knowledge can be applied to improving flight crew sleep, performance, and alertness; and (3) to offer strategies for alertness management. Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) and National Transportation Safety Board (NISH) reports are used throughout this module to demonstrate that fatigue is a safety issue in the regional operations community. The appendices at the end of this module include the ASRS reports used for the examples contained in this publication, brief introductions to sleep disorders and relaxation techniques, summaries of relevant NASA publications, and a list of general readings on sleep, sleep disorders, and circadian rhythms.

  8. Visual misperception in aviation: glide path performance in a black hole environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Randy; Schvaneveldt, Roger; Gray, Rob

    2008-08-01

    We sought to improve understanding of visual perception in aviation to mitigate mishaps in approaches to landing. Research has attempted to identify the most salient visual cues for glide path performance in impoverished visual conditions. Numerous aviation accidents caused by glide path overestimation (GPO) have occurred when a low glide path was induced by a black hole illusion (BHI) in featureless terrain during night approaches. Twenty pilots flew simulated approaches under various visual cues of random terrain objects and approach lighting system (ALS) configurations. Performance was assessed relative to the desired 3 degrees glide path in terms of precision, bias, and stability. With the high-ratio (long, narrow) runway, the overall performance between 8.3 and 0.9 km from the runway depicted a concave approach shape found in BHI mishaps. The addition of random terrain objects failed to improve glide path performance, and an ALS commonly used at airports induced GPO and the resulting low glide path. The worst performance, however, resulted from a combination ALS consisting of both side and approach lights. Surprisingly, novice pilots flew more stable approaches than did experienced pilots. Low, unsafe approaches occur frequently in conditions with limited global and local visual cues. Approach lights lateral of the runway may counter the bias of the BHI. The variability suggested a proactive, cue-seeking behavior among experienced pilots as compared with novice pilots. Visual spatial disorientation training in flight simulators should be used to demonstrate visual misperceptions in black hole environments and reduce pilots' confidence in their limited visual capabilities.

  9. Multiple Kernel Learning for Heterogeneous Anomaly Detection: Algorithm and Aviation Safety Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Santanu; Srivastava, Ashok N.; Matthews, Bryan L.; Oza, Nikunj C.

    2010-01-01

    The world-wide aviation system is one of the most complex dynamical systems ever developed and is generating data at an extremely rapid rate. Most modern commercial aircraft record several hundred flight parameters including information from the guidance, navigation, and control systems, the avionics and propulsion systems, and the pilot inputs into the aircraft. These parameters may be continuous measurements or binary or categorical measurements recorded in one second intervals for the duration of the flight. Currently, most approaches to aviation safety are reactive, meaning that they are designed to react to an aviation safety incident or accident. In this paper, we discuss a novel approach based on the theory of multiple kernel learning to detect potential safety anomalies in very large data bases of discrete and continuous data from world-wide operations of commercial fleets. We pose a general anomaly detection problem which includes both discrete and continuous data streams, where we assume that the discrete streams have a causal influence on the continuous streams. We also assume that atypical sequence of events in the discrete streams can lead to off-nominal system performance. We discuss the application domain, novel algorithms, and also discuss results on real-world data sets. Our algorithm uncovers operationally significant events in high dimensional data streams in the aviation industry which are not detectable using state of the art methods

  10. Pilot plants for polymers: Safety considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, C.F.; Zvanut, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Air Products and Chemicals is a major manufacturer of polyvinyl alcohol, vinyl acetate-ethylene emulsions and suspension PVC. Polyvinyl alcohol is a water soluble polymer and its primary end-uses are as a textile sizing agent and in adhesives. The emulsion products are used primarily in adhesives, paper, paints, and non-wovens. In order to support these business areas and to expand into new product lines, Air Products operates several polymer pilot plants. The safe operation of these pilot plants mandates careful attention to both design and operating procedures. Often, more care is needed in operating a polymer pilot plant than in other pilot plants or manufacturing facilities.

  11. BUSINESS ECOSYSTEMS VS BUSINESS DIGITAL ECOSYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela Lazarica

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available E-business is often described as the small organisations’ gateway to global business and markets. The adoption of Internet-based technologies for e-business is a continuous process, with sequential steps of evolution. The latter step in the adoption of Internet-based technologies for business, where the business services and the software components are supported by a pervasive software environment, which shows an evolutionary and self-organising behaviour are named digital business ecosystems. The digital business ecosystems are characterized by intelligent software components and services, knowledge transfer, interactive training frameworks and integration of business processes and e-government models.

  12. Distributed electric propulsion for small business aircraft a concept-plane for key-technologies investigations.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermetz, Jean; Ridel, Michael; Doll, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Electric propulsion for aircraft begins to be effective in the field of leisure aviation mainly for initial training. However, some challenges appear when performance-level needs to be increased to address more demanding application such as business travel even for small passenger capacity. Based on its expertise in all disciplines of aviation design, and in the following of projects dedicated to future Air Transport System, ONERA started exploratory studies, a few yea...

  13. Understanding Aviation English as a Lingua Franca: Perceptions of Korean Aviation Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Elder, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Researchers exploring the use of language use in radiotelephony communication have tended to focus on the limitations of the non-native English user and the threats which their limited control of English may pose for aviation safety (e.g. Atsushi, 2003, 2004). Hence the recent International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) policy places the onus…

  14. Aviation Program Administrators' Perceptions of Specialized Aviation Accreditation under Public Law 111-216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Cody

    2013-01-01

    Sherman (2006) and Prather (2007) studied why so few of the schools offering aviation-related curriculum leading to an associate's or bachelor's degree do not seek specialized accreditation. The goal of this study was to update the field of specialized aviation accreditation in the new environment of the Airline Safety and Federal Aviation…

  15. Emerging trends in alternative aviation fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Cody

    The days of petroleum-based aviation fuels are numbered. New regulations to be set in place in the coming years will force current fuels to be phased out in favor of cleaner fuels with less toxic emissions. The alternative fuel industry has already taken its foothold in other modes of transportation, and aviation will soon follow suit. Many companies have cropped up over the last decade, and a few have been around longer, that work hard to develop the alternative aviation fuels of the future. It is important, however, for the aviation community to know what to expect and when to expect it concerning alternative fuels. This study investigates where various companies in the alternative aviation fuel industry currently stand in their development and production processes, and how their products will affect aircraft owners and operators. By interviewing representatives from these companies and analyzing their responses to identify trends, an educated prediction can be made about where the industry is headed and when the aviation community can expect these fuel to be available. The findings of this study indicate that many companies are still in their developmental stages, with a few notable outliers, and that most of these companies expect to see production of their product by 2017. Also, the fuel manufacturers are dealing with all the legal hurdles regarding alternative fuels, so little to no effort will be required on the part of the consumer. These findings, along with their analysis, will enable the aviation community to make educated decisions concerning fuel and their aircraft, as well and do their part to help these beneficial fuels get to market.

  16. Business Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    allies to trust its Government. Thus Poland must implement an ethical program within the MOD acquisition community by increasing international...Generally, the MOD does not clearly communicate their interest in ethical standards when cooperating with industry even though laws and policies...conduct. This code would also clearly communicate the MOD’s acceptable standards of ethical business practices. The MOD should regulate employment

  17. Business History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per H.

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that a cultural and narrative perspective can enrich the business history field, encourage new and different questions and answers, and provide new ways of thinking about methods and empirical material. It discusses what culture is and how it relates to narratives. Taking...... a cultural and narrative approach may affect questions, sources, and methodologies, as well as the status of our results. Finally, a narrative approach may contribute to our historical understanding of entrepreneurship and globalization....

  18. Prevalence of fatigue in a group of airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cátia; Mestre, Catarina; Canhão, Helena

    2013-08-01

    Fatigue is a common phenomenon in airline pilots that can impair alertness and ability of crewmembers to safely operate an aircraft and perform safety related tasks. Fatigue can increase the risk of an incident or even an accident. This study provides the first prevalence values for clinically significant fatigue in Portuguese airline pilots. The hypothesis that medium/short-haul pilots may currently present different levels of fatigue than long-haul pilots was also tested. A survey was conducted by requesting Portuguese airline pilots to complete questionnaires placed in the pilots' personal lockers from 1 April until 15 May 2012. The questionnaire included the self-response Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) to measure subjective fatigue and some additional questions concerning perception of fatigue by pilots. The prevalence values for total and mental fatigue achieved in the Portuguese airline pilots were: 89.3% (FSS > or = 4) and 94.1% (FSS > or = 4) when splitting the sample in two subsamples, long- and medium/short-haul pilots. Levels of total and mental fatigue were higher for medium/short-haul pilots. The analysis of fatigue levels in each type of aviator showed that medium/short-haul pilots presented the highest levels of total and mental fatigue. This study produced the first prevalence values of total and mental fatigue among Portuguese airline pilots, which represents a great step to understanding and addressing this critical phenomenon.

  19. BENCHMARKING LEARNER EDUCATION USING ONLINE BUSINESS SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred H. Miller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For programmatic accreditation by the Accreditation Council of Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP, business programs are required to meet STANDARD #4, Measurement and Analysis of Student Learning and Performance. Business units must demonstrate that outcome assessment systems are in place using documented evidence that shows how the results are being used to further develop or improve the academic business program. The Higher Colleges of Technology, a 17 campus federal university in the United Arab Emirates, differentiates its applied degree programs through a ‘learning by doing ethos,’ which permeates the entire curricula. This paper documents benchmarking of education for managing innovation. Using business simulation for Bachelors of Business, Year 3 learners, in a business strategy class; learners explored through a simulated environment the following functional areas; research and development, production, and marketing of a technology product. Student teams were required to use finite resources and compete against other student teams in the same universe. The study employed an instrument developed in a 60-sample pilot study of business simulation learners against which subsequent learners participating in online business simulation could be benchmarked. The results showed incremental improvement in the program due to changes made in assessment strategies, including the oral defense.

  20. NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) collects, analyzes, and distributes de-identified safety information provided through confidentially submitted reports from frontline aviation personnel. Since its inception in 1976, the ASRS has collected over 1.4 million reports and has never breached the identity of the people sharing their information about events or safety issues. From this volume of data, the ASRS has released over 6,000 aviation safety alerts concerning potential hazards and safety concerns. The ASRS processes these reports, evaluates the information, and provides selected de-identified report information through the online ASRS Database at http:asrs.arc.nasa.gov. The NASA ASRS is also a founding member of the International Confidential Aviation Safety Systems (ICASS) group which is a collection of other national aviation reporting systems throughout the world. The ASRS model has also been replicated for application to improving safety in railroad, medical, fire fighting, and other domains. This presentation will discuss confidential, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting systems and their advantages in providing information for safety improvements.

  1. External costs of aviation. Background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dings, J.M.W.; Wit, R.C.N.; Leurs, B.A.; De Bruyn, S.M.; Davidson, M.D. [CE, Delft (Netherlands); Fransen, W. [INTEGRAL Knowledge Utilization, Landsmeer (Netherlands)

    2002-02-01

    Besides numerous benefits to citizens and companies, air transport also brings undesired side-effects such as emissions and noise nuisance. Most of these negative 'external' effects, as they are called, are currently not priced or only to a limited degree. Consequently, the market place creates insufficient incentives to reduce these external effects. The study, commissioned by the German Umweltbundesamt, aims to contribute to the ongoing international process to create market-based incentives to the aviation industry to reduce the environmental impact of aviation. It does to by assessing, within margins as small as possible, external costs of aviation. The report at hand is a background report to the study 'External costs of aviation'. It contains four technical annexes. The first annex contains an overview of the international literature on the valuation of greenhouse gas emissions. The second annex describes the dependence of climatic impact of aviation on the occurrence of contrails, and the dependence of contrail formation on operational circumstances. The third annex contains an assessment of international literature on the valuation of non-greenhouse gas emissions, such as NOx and SO2. The fourth annex contains a short description of the methodology by which emissions and noise are allocated to passenger and freight transport in this study.

  2. Evaluation of aging pilots: evidence, policy, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salive, M E

    1994-02-01

    Current Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations require that pilots of large commercial passenger and cargo aircraft be under age 60. However, the requirement does not apply to other pilots and the courts have ruled that mandatory retirement of test pilots at age 60 violates the Age Discrimination in Employment Act. FAA medical standards establish three levels of medical qualification, which require certain age-specific screening tests. This paper reviews the epidemiologic and clinical evidence relevant to the evaluation of aging pilots. This evidence is compared and contrasted with the current FAA requirements and past recommendations of the American Medical Association, the Institute of Medicine, and the Office of Technology Assessment. An opportunity exists to assess the class I examination and other tests through the consent decree covering aging test pilots. Another course of action would be to implement special issuances for older pilots.

  3. Airline pilot scan patterns during simulated ILS approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spady, A. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A series of instrument landing system approaches were conducted using seven airline-rated Boeing 737 pilots in a Federal Aviation Administration qualified simulator. The test matrix included both manual and coupled approaches with and without atmospheric turbulence in Category II visibility conditions. A nonintrusive oculometer system was used to track the pilot eye-point-of-regard throughout the approach. The results indicate that, in general, the pilots use different scan techniques for the manual and coupled conditions and that the introduction of atmospheric turbulence does not greatly affect the scan behavior in either case. The pilots consistently ranked the instruments in terms of most used to least used. The ranking obtained from the oculometer data agrees with the pilot ranking for the flight director and airspeed, the most important instruments. However, the pilots apparently ranked the other instruments in terms of their concern for information rather than according to their actual scanning behavior.

  4. Business modelling agility : Turning ideas into business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikkila, J.; Heikkila, M.; Bouwman, W.A.G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Business Model Innovation is attracting more and more attention from business as well as from academics. Business Model Innovation deals with both technological and knowledge related changes that either may disrupt or sustain existing product/market strategies. Timing of Business Model Innovation

  5. A business case method for business models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meertens, Lucas Onno; Starreveld, E.; Iacob, Maria Eugenia; Nieuwenhuis, Lambertus Johannes Maria; Shishkov, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Intuitively, business cases and business models are closely connected. However, a thorough literature review revealed no research on the combination of them. Besides that, little is written on the evaluation of business models at all. This makes it difficult to compare different business model

  6. [Aviation and high-altitude medicine for anaesthetists. Part 4: human performance limitations and crew resource management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerth, Martin; Pump, Stefan; Graf, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    For pilots and doctors, as well as a variety of other professions the knowledge of human performance limitations is essential, especially in critical situations. Crew resource management was developed in the 1980s in the aviation industry in order to ensure systematic training and support in such instances. Just recently, the value is recognized not only in other high reliability organizations but also in medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Designing systems to satisfy their users - The coming changes in aviation weather and the development of a central weather processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the development history of the Central Weather Processor (CWP) program of the Federal Aviation Administration. The CWP will interface with high speed digital communications links, accept data and information products from new sources, generate data processing products, and provide meteorologists with the capability to automate data retrieval and dissemination. The CWP's users are operational (air traffic controllers, meteorologists and pilots), institutional (logistics, maintenance, testing and evaluation personnel), and administrative.

  8. Scary Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platts, Todd; Clasen, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Despite horror films representing business ventures intended to turn profit, box office analyses of the genre have remained rare in scholarly literature. Our study fills that gap through an examination of 117 horror films that reached the top 100 in domestic grosses in the North American film...... statistical approach, we identify a strong presence of supernatural horror films in the period under discussion as well as a relatively weak presence of zombie, vampire, and torture porn films. We argue that supernatural horror films have dominated the top-grossing films in the timeframe because such films...

  9. Selected supplies prognosis problems of aviation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żurek, J.; Czapla, R.

    2016-06-01

    Aviation technology, i.e. aircraft, control and airfield infrastructure wear out, become defective and need servicing. It seems indispensible to maintain facilities and spare parts at a level necessary to keep the technology in commission. The paper discusses the factors influencing spare parts supply requirements to secure air operations. Aviation technology has been classified with regard to various criteria, which influence the choice of supply management strategies, along with availability and aircraft exploitation cost. The method of optimization of the stock for a complex system characterized by series reliability structure according to the wear-out and cost criteria assuming Poisson's process of demand has been presented.

  10. Computer technology forecast study for general aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacord, C. L.; Vaughn, D.

    1976-01-01

    A multi-year, multi-faceted program is underway to investigate and develop potential improvements in airframes, engines, and avionics for general aviation aircraft. The objective of this study was to assemble information that will allow the government to assess the trends in computer and computer/operator interface technology that may have application to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. The current state of the art of computer hardware is assessed, technical developments in computer hardware are predicted, and nonaviation large volume users of computer hardware are identified.

  11. Unmanned Aircraft System / Remotely Piloted Aircraft (UAS/RPA) Human Factors and Human Systems Integration Research Workshop Held in Dayton, Ohio on November 8-9, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    that RPA crews suffer from Acute Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue, Burnout , and Quality of Life Issues to a greater extent than manned aviation crews...2009). Fatigue in pilots of remotely piloted aircraft before and after shift work adjustment. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine , 80, 454...be adaptive to the student’s performance, continually comparing actual performance with how the student ought to be performing, and allowing

  12. General Aviation Flight Test of Advanced Operations Enabled by Synthetic Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Hughhes, Monica F.; Parrish, Russell V.; Takallu, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    A flight test was performed to compare the use of three advanced primary flight and navigation display concepts to a baseline, round-dial concept to assess the potential for advanced operations. The displays were evaluated during visual and instrument approach procedures including an advanced instrument approach resembling a visual airport traffic pattern. Nineteen pilots from three pilot groups, reflecting the diverse piloting skills of the General Aviation pilot population, served as evaluation subjects. The experiment had two thrusts: 1) an examination of the capabilities of low-time (i.e., <400 hours), non-instrument-rated pilots to perform nominal instrument approaches, and 2) an exploration of potential advanced Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC)-like approaches in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Within this context, advanced display concepts are considered to include integrated navigation and primary flight displays with either aircraft attitude flight directors or Highway In The Sky (HITS) guidance with and without a synthetic depiction of the external visuals (i.e., synthetic vision). Relative to the first thrust, the results indicate that using an advanced display concept, as tested herein, low-time, non-instrument-rated pilots can exhibit flight-technical performance, subjective workload and situation awareness ratings as good as or better than high-time Instrument Flight Rules (IFR)-rated pilots using Baseline Round Dials for a nominal IMC approach. For the second thrust, the results indicate advanced VMC-like approaches are feasible in IMC, for all pilot groups tested for only the Synthetic Vision System (SVS) advanced display concept.

  13. Flight instructors’ perceptions of pilot behaviour related to gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopold P. Vermeulen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated flight instructors’ perceptions with regard to gender-related pilot behaviour. The subjects fell into two sample groups. The first sample consisted of 93 flight instructors and the second sample was a control group of 93 commercial pilots. The Aviation Gender Attitude Questionnaire (AGAQ was administered to measure the perceptions that both groups held about female pilots’ flying proficiency and safety orientation. Statistical analysis revealed that flight instructors and commercial pilots differed significantly in their perceptions of female pilots’ flying proficiency but that the two groups did not differ in their perceptions of female pilots’ safety orientation.

  14. DEFINITION OF COMPOSITE THERMAL STABILITY at enterprises of aviation industry for their safe and effective application in heat-stressed units of new gen aircraft engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kopylov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with topical issues of development, introduction to businesses of aviation industry the experimental setup and test methods to determine the thermal stability of composites based on carbon materials (carbon fiber, matrix, which are the main structural material of heat-stressed components of aircraft engines of new generation. The article describes the ways of solving these problems.

  15. Human factors in aviation maintenance, phase five : progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The fifth phase of research on human factors in aviation maintenance continued to look at the human's role in the aviation maintenance system via investigations, demonstrations, and evaluations of the research program outputs. This report describes t...

  16. Aviation/Aerospace Teacher Education Workshops: Program Development and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Aviation/Aerospace Teacher Education Workshops have been recommended by the Illinois Task force for Aviation/Space Education (1988) as a way of encouraging aeronautical education. The workshop will be offered to elementary school teachers. During...

  17. Empirical analysis of extreme weather conditions and aviation safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0.05) which shows that weather condition has significant influence on aviation safety. Baseline studies on flight operation, government intervention in aviation industry, maintenance culture were recommended. Keywords: Fog, Thunderstorm ...

  18. Introduction of Enhanced Vision System and its Application for General Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Matyáš

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced Vision System (EVS technology has been developing since 1980s. The research itself has been mainly focused on controlling Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs. In this area, some methods were successfully tested, from take-off to landing. This paper is meant to be an introduction for further research and testing within general aviation area for use of EVS technology by high experienced as well as low experienced pilots in order to increase the level of safety during critical stages of flight.

  19. Proceedings, Air Quality and Aviation: An International Conference, 16-18 October 1978, Reston, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-01

    Air Pollution on the Local Scale, Transportation start vehicles). Research Board, January 16-20, 1978. 11. F. L. Ludwig et al., "Users’ Manual for...Aviation Conference of the Air Pollution Control modeling experience. Frank Ludwig gave me the Association and the Society of Automotive Engineers...of the W2B angina were flown to the U.S. for pro- even a test pilot -- to fly a supersonic airplane. 127 Z7 ý44 ~4 - 0> 𔃾 Fr 0) ý4) *-0 -40 >0 w0

  20. Nobody seems to speak English here today: Enhancing assessment and training in aviation English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Douglas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2003 the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO strengthened the provisions that English be made available for international radiotelephony communication. ICAO also developed standards for English proficiency for international pilots and air traffic controllers. However, these standards are applied variably from country to country and in no country are native speakers of English tested for their ability to employ what has been termed "interactional competence" when using English for intercultural communication. Problems with this situation are reviewed and suggestions made for improving English assessment and training.

  1. Hypertension in Indonesian air force pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarma Siagian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate the association between aircraft noise and blood pressure.Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted on Indonesian Air Force pilots doing annual medical check-ups at the Saryanto Institute for Aviation and Aerospace Health (LAKESPRA from 2003 – 2008. The data extracted from medical records were age, total flight hours, type of aircraft, fasting blood glucose and cholesterol levels, waist circumference, height and weight (Body Mass Index, and blood pressure.Results: There were 549 pilots, 49 were found to be hypertensive, with SBP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or DBP ≥ 90 mmHg. Helicopters pilots were at an almost 2 fold risk of hypertension compared to pilots of the fixed wing aircrafts. Pilots with more than 1400 hours of flight had more than 2 fold risk of being hypertensive compared to those with 1400 flight hours or less.Conclusion: The type of aircraft, which is related to the noise generated, may be a risk factor for developing hypertension in pilots. Increased total flight hours also increased the risk of hypertension. (Med J Indones 2012;21:38-43Keywords: Aircraft noise, hypertension, pilots

  2. 75 FR 52807 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issues-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... airplanes. This initiative originated in response to a request by aviation industry organizations who... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issues--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new task...

  3. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    The National Aviation Weather Program Strategic Plan (1997) and the National Aviation Weather Initiatives (1999) both identified volcanic ash as a high-priority informational need to aviation services. The risk to aviation from airborne volcanic ash is known and includes degraded engine performance (including flameout), loss of visibility, failure of critical navigational and operational instruments, and, in the worse case, loss of life. The immediate costs for aircraft encountering a dense plume are potentially major—damages up to $80 million have occurred to a single aircraft. Aircraft encountering less dense volcanic ash clouds can incur longer-term costs due to increased maintenance of engines and external surfaces. The overall goal, as stated in the Initiatives, is to eliminate encounters with ash that could degrade the in-flight safety of aircrews and passengers and cause damage to the aircraft. This goal can be accomplished by improving the ability to detect, track, and forecast hazardous ash clouds and to provide adequate warnings to the aviation community on the present and future location of the cloud. To reach this goal, the National Aviation Weather Program established three objectives: (1) prevention of accidental encounters with hazardous clouds; (2) reduction of air traffic delays, diversions, or evasive actions when hazardous clouds are present; and (3) the development of a single, worldwide standard for exchange of information on airborne hazardous materials. To that end, over the last several years, based on numerous documents (including an OFCMsponsored comprehensive study on aviation training and an update of Aviation Weather Programs/Projects), user forums, and two International Conferences on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety (1992 and 2004), the Working Group for Volcanic Ash (WG/VA), under the OFCM-sponsored Committee for Aviation Services and Research, developed the National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation and Support of the

  4. Pilot age and geographic region of commuter and air taxi crashes: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebok, George W; Qiang, Yandong; Baker, Susan P; Li, Guohua

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies of major airline and general aviation crashes have identified a host of risk factors. We examined risk factors related to crashes involving commuter air carrier and air taxi flights. A matched case-control design was applied to assess the association of pilot age, total flight time, and geographic region with commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes (14 CFR Part 135) from 1983-2002 in the United States. A total of 2033 commuter air carrier or air taxi crashes from the National Transportation Safety Board aviation crash database were identified as eligible cases. Controls were randomly selected incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) aviation incident database coded under Part 135 operation. Relative to controls, commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes were less likely to occur in pilots under 30 yr of age (adjusted odds ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.54-0.88) after adjusting for geographic region and total flight time. With adjustment for pilot age and total flight time, the commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes with pilot error were nearly 13 times as likely to be in Alaska as their matched controls (adjusted odds ratio 12.84, 95% confidence interval 5.24-31.45). These results suggest that pilot age may be associated with risk of crash involvement in Part 135 operations. The excess crash risk in Alaska with or without pilot error underscores the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety.

  5. Radio speech communication problems reported in a survey of military pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtinen, Taija M M; Huttunen, Kerttu H; Kuronen, Pentti O; Sorri, Martti J; Leino, Tuomo K

    2010-12-01

    Despite technological advances in conveying information, speech communication is still a key safety factor in aviation. Effective radio communication is necessary, for example, in building and maintaining good team situation awareness. However, little has been reported concerning the prevalence and nature of radio communication problems in everyday working environments in military aviation. We surveyed Finnish Defense Forces pilots regarding the prevalence of radio speech communication problems. Of the 225 pilots contacted, 75% replied to our survey. Altogether 138 of the respondents were fixed-wing pilots and 31 were helicopter pilots. Problems in radio communication occurred, on average, during 14% of flight time. The most prevalent problems were multiple speakers on the same radio frequency band causing overlapping speech, missing acknowledgments, high background noise especially during helicopter operations, and technical problems. Of the respondents, 18% (31 pilots) reported having encountered at least one potentially dangerous event caused by problems in radio communication during their military aviation career. If the employer were to offer extra hearing protection, such as custom-made ear plugs, 93% of the pilots indicated that they would use it. Communication can be a flight safety factor especially during intense air combat exercises and other information-loaded flights. During these situations, communication should be clear and focused on the most essential information. So, training and technical improvements are necessary for better communication. High quality radio speech communication also improves operational effectiveness in military aviation.

  6. Self-rated changes in cognition and piloting skills: a comparison of younger and older airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebok, George W; Li, Guohua; Baker, Susan P; Grabowski, Jurek G; Willoughby, Sharon

    2002-05-01

    The relationship of chronological age to self-rated changes in cognition has been studied extensively. However, the relationship of these changes to age-related changes in piloting skills is not well understood. This study aims to determine whether airline pilots report age-related changes in cognitive abilities, and whether these changes are related to self-rated changes in piloting skills. A total of 1310 airline pilots (28-59 yr, mean age = 45.5 yr; mean total flight time = 11,992 h) currently employed by a major U.S. commercial air carrier participated in the study. A 13-item Aviation Experience Survey (AES) was completed by each pilot, using 5-point Likert ratings and yes/no responses comparing current cognitive abilities (e.g., concentration, reaction speed) and piloting skills (e.g., piloting in adverse weather, decision making while flying) with those of 10 yr ago. Cognitive abilities and piloting skills were more likely to be rated as "better' or "much better" than 10 yr ago by pilots age 39 or under than by pilots in their 40s and 50s, who were more likely to rate their abilities and skills as "the same." Fewer than 20% of pilots in any age group rated their cognitive abilities or piloting skills as "worse" or "much worse" than 10 yr ago. Pilots who reported more anxiety or stress while flying reported more negative changes in abilities, skills, and health status regardless of age. Self-ratings of cognition and piloting skills vary by age, but older pilots are not more likely to report negative changes in their abilities and skills than younger pilots. Further research is needed to verify whether these self-appraisals reflect true changes in skills over time.

  7. Designing a Better Navy Aviation Retention Bonus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    human worth, community.  Military bearing/character—Appearance, conduct, physical fitness , adherence to Navy Core Values.  Teamwork—Contributions...Federal Aviation Administration FITREP fitness report FOS failure of selection FRG Fleet Replenishment Group FRS Fleet Replenishment Squadron IFS...retention bonus while fitting within the current promotion and advancement system. C. STUDY ORGANIZATION The study is separated into six chapters that

  8. Technologies to counter aviation security threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoly, Steve

    2017-11-01

    The Aviation and Transportation Security Act (ATSA) makes TSA responsible for security in all modes of transportation, and requires that TSA assess threats to transportation, enforce security-related regulations and requirements, and ensure the adequacy of security measures at airports and other transportation facilities. Today, TSA faces a significant challenge and must address a wide range of commercial, military grade, and homemade explosives and these can be presented in an infinite number of configurations and from multiple vectors. TSA screens 2 million passengers and crew, and screens almost 5 million carry-on items and 1.2 million checked bags daily. As TSA explores new technologies for improving efficiency and security, those on the forefront of research and development can help identify unique and advanced methods to combat terrorism. Research and Development (R&D) drives the development of future technology investments that can address an evolving adversary and aviation threat. The goal is to rethink the aviation security regime in its entirety, and rather than focusing security at particular points in the enterprise, distribute security from the time a reservation is made to the time a passenger boards the aircraft. The ultimate objective is to reengineer aviation security from top to bottom with a continued focus on increasing security throughout the system.

  9. Aircraft Manufacturing Occupations. Aviation Careers Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in the aircraft manufacturing industry. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the aerospace industry (of which aircraft manufacturing is one part), including the numbers of various types of workers employed in those…

  10. Demonstration Aids for Aviation Education. [Volume II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Debbie; Hickson, Carol

    This series consists of four packets containing simple, concrete activities for students in the upper elementary grades. The purpose of the series is to illustrate certain principles related to various concepts of aviation and space. Each packet forms a coherent program of instruction on a single topic: (1) non-powered flight; (2) aerospace and…

  11. Officer Career Development: Modeling Married Aviator Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    1. _2. SSN - First M.I. Last AVIATION OFFICER CAEER QUESTIOTN;AI.-X Privacy Act Notice Under the authority of 5 USC 301, information regarding your... Student 1 16. Please indicate the relative opportunity .-f obtaining each of the following characteristics in the Navy versus your expectations of

  12. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  13. Aviation Noise Impacts: State of the Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basner, M.; Clark, C.; Hansell, A.; Hileman, J.; Janssen, S.; Shepherd, K.; Sparrow, V.

    2017-01-01

    Noise is defined as 'unwanted sound.' Aircraft noise is one, if not the most detrimental environmental effect of aviation. It can cause community annoyance, disrupt sleep, adversely affect academic performance of children, and could increase the risk for cardiovascular disease of people living in

  14. Flight Attendants. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the career opportunities of airline flight attendants. General information about airline hiring policies for flight attendants are discussed, and the following information about the flight attendant job classification is provided: nature of the work, working conditions, where the jobs…

  15. Airline Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airlines. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the airline industry, including salaries, working conditions, job requirements, and projected job opportunities. In the main part of the booklet, the following 22 job…

  16. 76 FR 31511 - Aviation Data Modernization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... data by the government, the airline industry, consumers, and other stakeholders. We proposed revisions... aviation economic data collection. The ANPRM noted that the Origin-Destination Survey of Airline Passenger... statutory responsibilities. Also, because of difficulties private industry would have in assembling these...

  17. Ocular Problems of the Aging Military Aviator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    degeneration 5 as were the causes for grounding of these individuals. Cataracts 4 One could ask an important question here: Have Color vision defects 3...The Age 60 rule came into being and one of us Glaucoma with visual field defects 1 (TJT) began his career caring for AF aviators, back then Pigmentary

  18. 14 CFR Appendix - Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 13 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Pt. 25, SFAR No. 13 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 13 1. Applicability. Contrary provisions o...

  19. 78 FR 3908 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY... Meeting. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation... Administrator of TSA on matters affecting civil aviation security. This meeting is open to the public, but...

  20. 77 FR 52203 - Airworthiness Directives; Goodyear Aviation Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2012-0881; Directorate Identifier 2012-CE-029-AD; Amendment 39-17164; AD 2012-17-01] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Goodyear Aviation Tires AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for comments...

  1. 77 FR 53902 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY... Meeting. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation... of the International Aviation Sub-committee, placed in the public docket. You may submit comments on...

  2. Alternative Aviation Fuels: Overview of Challenges, Opportunities, and Next Steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-28

    The Alternative Aviation Fuels: Overview of Challenges, Opportunities, and Next Steps report, published by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) provides an overview of the current state of alternative aviation fuels, based upon findings from recent peer-reviewed studies, scientific working groups, and BETO stakeholder input provided during the Alternative Aviation Fuel Workshop.

  3. 78 FR 58973 - Airworthiness Directives; Dassault Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... design are included in Dassault Aviation Falcon 2000EX (F2000EX) Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM... specified in Dassault Aviation F2000EX AMM chapter 5-40 at revision 3. Since that AD was issued, Dassault Aviation issued F2000EX AMM chapter 5-40 at revision 7, which introduces new or more restrictive...

  4. 77 FR 44511 - Airworthiness Directives; Alpha Aviation Concept Limited Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Alpha Aviation... (AD) for Alpha Aviation Concept Limited Model R2160 Airplanes. This proposed AD results from mandatory... following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov . Follow the instructions...

  5. A NATIONAL STUDY OF THE AVIATION MECHANICS OCCUPATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALLEN, DAVID; AND OTHERS

    A NATIONAL SURVEY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO PROVIDE DATA FOR THE ACCOMPLISHMENT OF THREE OBJECTIVES--(1) TO INVESTIGATE THE TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE AND MANIPULATIVE SKILLS OF AVIATION MECHANICS AS REQUIRED BY THE AVIATION INDUSTRY, (2) TO IDENTIFY A CORE CURRICULUM FOR THE TRAINING OF AVIATION MECHANICS, AND (3) TO IDENTIFY THE SCOPE OF TRAINING OFFERED BY…

  6. The UNO Aviation Monograph Series: Aviation Security: An Annotated Bibliography of Responses to the Gore Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, John S.; Schaaf, Michaela M.

    1998-01-01

    This monograph is a companion to UNOAI Monograph 96-2, "The Image of Airport Security: An Annotated Bibliography," compiled in June 1996. The White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security, headed by Vice President Al Gore, was formed as a result of the TWA Flight 800 crash in August 1996. The Commission's final report included 31 recommendations addressed toward aviation security. The recommendations were cause for security issues to be revisited in the media and by the aviation industry. These developments necessitated the need for an updated bibliography to review the resulting literature. Many of the articles were written in response to the recommendations made by the Gore Commission. "Aviation Security: An Annotated Bibliography of Responses to the Gore Commission" is the result of this need.

  7. FBO and Airport Internships for University Aviation Students: Benefits for Students, Universities, and the Aviation Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesse, James L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes five types of internships for aviation education: job shadowing, departmental rotation, single department based, academic, and specific task. Gives examples in two settings: airports and fixed-base operators. (SK)

  8. On Developing Business Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei

    1996-01-01

    Examines the significance of foreign languages for business, particularly Business Chinese, in the 1990s; its curriculum requirements; and the impact of business languages on international business. The article proposes a developmental plan for Business Chinese at the college level including goals, course materials, learning activities, and…

  9. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    implementation, and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can...

  10. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  11. Energy Beverage Consumption Among Naval Aviation Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Thomas E; Delorey, Donald R

    2016-06-01

    Since the debut of energy beverages, the consumption of energy beverages has been immensely popular with young adults. Research regarding energy beverage consumption has included college students, European Union residents, and U.S. Army military personnel. However, energy beverage consumption among naval aviation candidates in the United States has yet to be examined. The purpose of this study was to assess energy beverage consumption patterns (frequency and volume) among naval aviation candidates, including attitudes and perceptions regarding the benefits and safety of energy beverage consumption. A 44-item survey was used to assess energy beverage consumption patterns of 302 students enrolled in the Aviation Preflight Indoctrination Course at Naval Air Station Pensacola, FL. Results indicated that 79% of participants (N = 239) reported consuming energy beverages within the last year. However, of those who reported consuming energy beverages within the last year, only 36% (N = 85) reported consuming energy beverages within the last 30 d. Additionally, 51% (N = 153) of participants reported no regular energy beverages consumption. The majority of participants consumed energy beverages for mental alertness (67%), mental endurance (37%), and physical endurance (12%). The most reported side effects among participants included increased mental alertness (67%), increased heart rate (53%), and restlessness (41%). Naval aviation candidates appear to use energy drinks as frequently as a college student population, but less frequently than expected for an active duty military population. The findings of this study indicate that naval aviation candidates rarely use energy beverages (less than once per month), but when consumed, they use it for fatigue management.

  12. 75 FR 67805 - The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Aviation Safety; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation The Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC) Subcommittee on Aviation Safety; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the... the Secretary of Transportation, announces a meeting of the FAAC Subcommittee on Aviation Safety...

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Nebraska Aviation Education Association Conference (1st, Omaha, Nebraska, January 1994). The UNO Aviation Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crehan, James E., Ed.

    This collection of six papers constitutes the proceedings of the First Annual Conference of the Nebraska Aviation Education Association. These papers present many issues that the discipline of aviation is confronting, including those related to the aviation industry. The papers included are as follows: (1) "Using the DAT for Selection of…

  14. Psychology of family business

    OpenAIRE

    Taylyakova, Feruzahon

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the basic psychological characteristics of family businesses. The author describes the psychological properties that contribute to improve individual and family businesses. The article also discusses mental properties adversely affect the development of a family business.

  15. Business Continuity Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corbitt, Scott

    1999-01-01

    .... Interruptions that affect any of these resources will have a detrimental impact on business. Disasters that affect these resources will likely have a far reaching impact on business and may result in the failure of the business or organization...

  16. Risky Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    During my internship I worked on two major projects, recommending improvements for the Center's Risk Management Workshop and helping with the strategic planning efforts for Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA). The risk management improvements is the key project I worked on this semester through my internship, while the strategic planning is the secondary assignment. S&MA Business Office covers both aspects in its delegation, getting both spans some of the work done in the office. A risk is a future event with a negative consequence that has some probability of occurring. Safety and Mission Assurance identifies, analyzes, plans, and tracks risk. The directorate offers the Center a Risk Management Workshop, and part of the ongoing efforts of S&MA is to make continuous improvements to the RM Workshop. By using the Project Management Institute's (PMI) Standard for Risk Management, I performed a gap analysis to make improvements for our materials. I benchmarked the PMI's Risk Management Standard, compared our Risk Management Workshop materials to PMI's standard, and identified any gaps in our material. My major findings were presented to the Business Office of S&MA for a decision on whether or not to incorporate the improvements. These suggestions were made by attending JSC working group meetings, Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) panel reviews and various risk review meetings. The improvements provide better understanding of risk management processes and enhanced risk tracking knowledge and skills. Risk management is an integral part of any engineering discipline, getting exposed to this section of engineering will greatly help shape my career in the future. Johnson Space Center is a world leader in risk management processes; learning risk management here gives me a huge advantage over my peers, as well as understanding decision making in the context of risk management will help me to be a well-rounded engineer. Strategic planning is an area I had not previously

  17. Effectiveness of the Civil Aviation Security Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-06

    chartered by 2 men. During the flight, 1 of the men pointed a gun at the pilot and directed him to fly to Nogales , Mexico. The pilot was held captive but...had the weapon. Further inquiry determined that the man had Just been released from a hospital where he had received treatment for diabetes . " A man

  18. Keselamatan Penerbangan: Teori dan Problematika (Aviation Safety: Theory and Problematic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhy Riadhy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available “Keselamatan Penerbangan: Teori dan Problematika (Aviation Safety: Theory and Problematic” is written by aviation practioner in Indonesia. The writer explores the aviation problematic based on his experience in more than three decades. Many issues out of box in aviation arise in this book, such as “Kebenaran Dalam Penerbangan (The Truth in Aviation” which is focus on international aviation policy and regulations made by ICAO through research and development (scientific truth and written on 18 Annexes and relevant documents, as living guidances of standards and recommended practices that must be implemented by states.

  19. Business-to-Business -markkinointistrategia sosiaalisessa mediassa

    OpenAIRE

    Kähärä, Karri

    2011-01-01

    Tämä opinnäytetyö keskittyy markkinointistrategian kehittämiseen business-to-business -yritykselle sosiaalisissa medioissa tapahtuvaa markkinointia varten. Opinnäytetyössä tarkastellaan sosiaalisia medioita ja markkinointistrategian luomista eri kirjallisuus- ja verkkolähteiden avulla. Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on selvittää sosiaalisten medioiden mahdollisuuksia business-to-business -markkinointia harjoittavalle yritykselle ja kehittää konkreettinen markkinointi-suunnitelma sosiaalisissa medi...

  20. [Estimating the morbidity profile amongst Colombian civil aviation personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanca, María A; Fajardo, Hugo A

    2009-01-01

    Describing main morbidity rate amongst Colombian civil aviation cockpit and air traffic control personnel. This was a cross-sectional study. A random sample of 1,059 records (pilots, flight attendants, air traffic controllers) was taken from Colombian aeronautical authority files. Identification, background, morbidity and limitation data was reviewed for each one. 68,2 % of the records concerned males. Average age was 37. 22,9 % of the sample had some medical antecedent recorded on their first certification. Alcohol consumption (occasional) was recorded for 17,1 % of the sample and 11,9 % were smokers. The main diagnoses made were: vision disorders (52,2 %), dyslipidemias (40,6 %), being overweight (37,5 %), having hearing loss (22,0 %), being healthy (14,0 %) and suffering from hypertension (8,1 %). Each group had the same diagnoses, but occurring in a different order. Others studies have found cardiovascular disease to be the main cause of morbidity amongst cockpit and air traffic control personnel. Vision disorders were the main disorder occurring in Colombia. We do not know if there is a predisposition amongst Colombians to suffer such morbidity. Cardiovascular risk factors were found in second place in Colombia, meaning that public health prevention and promotion countermeasures should be taken.

  1. Application of diffusion maps to identify human factors of self-reported anomalies in aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejczak, Chris; Karwowski, Waldemar; Mikusinski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    A study investigating what factors are present leading to pilots submitting voluntary anomaly reports regarding their flight performance was conducted. Diffusion Maps (DM) were selected as the method of choice for performing dimensionality reduction on text records for this study. Diffusion Maps have seen successful use in other domains such as image classification and pattern recognition. High-dimensionality data in the form of narrative text reports from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) were clustered and categorized by way of dimensionality reduction. Supervised analyses were performed to create a baseline document clustering system. Dimensionality reduction techniques identified concepts or keywords within records, and allowed the creation of a framework for an unsupervised document classification system. Results from the unsupervised clustering algorithm performed similarly to the supervised methods outlined in the study. The dimensionality reduction was performed on 100 of the most commonly occurring words within 126,000 text records describing commercial aviation incidents. This study demonstrates that unsupervised machine clustering and organization of incident reports is possible based on unbiased inputs. Findings from this study reinforced traditional views on what factors contribute to civil aviation anomalies, however, new associations between previously unrelated factors and conditions were also found.

  2. Demonstration and implementation of ethanol as an aviation fuel. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the viability of ethanol as an aviation fuel at appropriate locations and audiences in the participating Biomass Energy Program Regions, and to promote implementation projects in the area. Seven demonstrations were to be performed during the Summer 1995 through December 1996 period. To maximize the cost effectiveness of the program, additional corporate co-sponsorships were sought at each demonstration site and the travel schedule was arranged to take advantage of appropriate events taking place in the vicinity of the schedule events or enroute. This way, the original funded amount was stretched to cover another year of activities increasing the number of demonstrations from seven to thirty-nine. While the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) contract focused on ethanol as an aviation fuel, RAFDC also promoted the broader use of ethanol as a transportation fuel. The paper summarizes locations and occasions, and gives a brief description of each demonstration/exhibit/presentation held during the term of the project. Most of the demonstrations took place at regularly scheduled air shows, such as the Oshkosh, Wisconsin Air Show. The paper also reviews current and future activities in the areas of certification, emission testing, the international Clean Airports Program, air pollution monitoring with instrumented aircraft powered by renewable fuels, training operation and pilot project on ethanol, turbine fuel research, and educational programs.

  3. Aviation Safety Risk Modeling: Lessons Learned From Multiple Knowledge Elicitation Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxhoj, J. T.; Ancel, E.; Green, L. L.; Shih, A. T.; Jones, S. M.; Reveley, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aviation safety risk modeling has elements of both art and science. In a complex domain, such as the National Airspace System (NAS), it is essential that knowledge elicitation (KE) sessions with domain experts be performed to facilitate the making of plausible inferences about the possible impacts of future technologies and procedures. This study discusses lessons learned throughout the multiple KE sessions held with domain experts to construct probabilistic safety risk models for a Loss of Control Accident Framework (LOCAF), FLightdeck Automation Problems (FLAP), and Runway Incursion (RI) mishap scenarios. The intent of these safety risk models is to support a portfolio analysis of NASA's Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). These models use the flexible, probabilistic approach of Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) and influence diagrams to model the complex interactions of aviation system risk factors. Each KE session had a different set of experts with diverse expertise, such as pilot, air traffic controller, certification, and/or human factors knowledge that was elicited to construct a composite, systems-level risk model. There were numerous "lessons learned" from these KE sessions that deal with behavioral aggregation, conditional probability modeling, object-oriented construction, interpretation of the safety risk results, and model verification/validation that are presented in this paper.

  4. Physiological effects of thermal stress on aviators flying a UH-60 helicopter simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, M; Fraser, B; Omer, J

    1998-05-01

    An evaluation of the physiological effects on aviators of heat stress (90 degrees F wet bulb globe temperature [WBGT]) versus a cooler condition (70 degrees F WBGT) when wearing either a MOPP0 (Mission-Oriented Protective Posture 0) uniform or a MOPP4 ensemble encumbered with a ballistic chest plate and overwater survival gear was performed at the United States Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory. The study used a repeated-measures design with 14 aviators flying 4-hour missions in a UH-60 helicopter simulator. Average crew endurance in the MOPP4-hot condition was reduced to one-third of the fully completed mission time of 309 minutes. For the hot condition, core temperature in the simulator rose 1.4 degrees F/hour when aviators wore the encumbered MOPP4 ensemble versus 0.27 degree F/hour when they wore the MOPP0 uniform. Sweating rate in the MOPP4-hot condition was 1,523 ml/hour, resulting in 2.5% dehydration, in contrast to 183 ml/hour and 0.9% dehydration in the MOPP4-cool condition. In this study, pilots flying realistic UH-60 simulator sorties rapidly incurred significant physiological heat strain when wearing an encumbered MOPP4 flight ensemble in hot cockpit conditions.

  5. Achieving optimal business performance through business practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kirstam

    Miss N.B. Neneh is a researcher in the Department of Business Management at the University of the Free State. Dr J.H. van Zyl is Head of ... SMEs, business practices, SME performance, optimal performance, South. Africa. Introduction ...... examination', Managing Global Transitions, 2(3): 107–122. Business Times. 1997.

  6. Business Inspiration: Small Business Leadership in Recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, David; Price, Liz; Bosworth, Gary; Parkinson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Business Inspiration was a short, action-centred leadership and innovation development programme designed for owners and managers of smaller firms to address business survival and repositioning needs arising from the UK's economic downturn. The article examines the design and delivery of Business Inspiration and the impact of the programme on…

  7. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  8. Business Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gilkey

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The newspaper industry has absorbed a tremendous financial impact during the last three years in revenues and bottom lines. As a whole, industry players were slow to react to ever-changing marketplace dynamics. Newspapers report on other companies and industries in their business pages every day. However, they failed to listen to and heed some of the advice and counsel they offered on those some pages. As they have to come to acknowledge the trend, it has triggered a re-evaluation of the company’s organizational structure on the revenue and expense sides of the equation. The change in revenue streams had become so extreme that many large newspaper groups have opted to file bankruptcy in order to continue operations while relieving themselves of crushing loan payments and obsolete labor agreements. The newspaper industry, as a whole, is a capital-intensive one, with heavy investment required for printing and equipment for compiling and collating revenue-rich inserts, along with fleets of delivery trucks and vans

  9. Modelling climate impacts on the aviation sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul

    2017-04-01

    The climate is changing, not just where we live at ground level, but also where we fly at 35,000 feet. We have long known that air travel contributes to climate change through its emissions. However, we have only recently become aware that climate change could have significant consequences for air travel. This presentation will give an overview of the possible impacts of climate change on the aviation sector. The presentation will describe how the impacts are modelled and how their social and economic costs are estimated. The impacts are discussed in the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO's) latest Environmental Report (Puempel and Williams 2016). Some of the possible impacts are as follows. Rising sea levels and storm surges threaten coastal airports, such as La Guardia in New York, which was flooded by the remnants of Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Warmer air at ground level reduces the lift force and makes it more difficult for planes to take-off (Coffel and Horton 2015). More extreme weather may cause flight disruptions and delays. Clear-air turbulence is expected to become up to 40% stronger and twice as common (Williams and Joshi 2013). Transatlantic flights may collectively be airborne for an extra 2,000 hours each year because of changes to the jet stream, burning an extra 7.2 million gallons of jet fuel at a cost of US 22 million, and emitting an extra 70 million kg of carbon dioxide (Williams 2016). These modelled impacts provide further evidence of the two-way interaction between aviation and climate change. References Coffel E and Horton R (2015) Climate change and the impact of extreme temperatures on aviation. Weather, Climate, and Society, 7, 94-102. http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/WCAS-D-14-00026.1 Puempel H and Williams PD (2016) The impacts of climate change on aviation: Scientific challenges and adaptation pathways. ICAO Environmental Report 2016: On Board A Sustainable Future, pp 205-207. http

  10. Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Bushnell, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    While transportation fueling can accommodate a broad range of alternate fuels, aviation fueling needs are specific, such as the fuel not freezing at altitude or become too viscous to flow properly or of low bulk energy density that shortens range. The fuel must also be compatible with legacy aircraft, some of which are more than 50 years old. Worldwide, the aviation industry alone uses some 85-95 billion gallons of hydrocarbon-based fossil fuel each year, which is about 10% of the transportation industry. US civil aviation alone consumes nearly 14 billion gallons. The enormity of the problem becomes overwhelming, and the aviation industry is taking alternate fueling issues very seriously. Biofuels (algae, cyanobacteria, halophytes, weeds that use wastelands, wastewater and seatwater), when properly sourced, have the capacity to be drop-in fuel replacements for petroleum fuels. As such, biojet from such sources solves the aviation CO2 emissions issue without the downsides of 'conventional' biofuels, such as competing with food and fresh water resources. Of the many current fundamental problems, the major biofuel problem is cost. Both research and development and creative engineering are required to reduce these biofuels costs. Research is also ongoing in several 'improvement' areas including refining/processing and biologics with greater disease resistance, greater bio-oil productivity, reduced water/nutrient requirements, etc. The authors' current research is aimed at aiding industry efforts in several areas. They are considering different modeling approaches, growth media and refining approaches, different biologic feedstocks, methods of sequestering carbon in the processes, fuel certification for aviation use and, overall, ensuring that biofuels are feasible from all aspects - operability, capacity, carbon cycle and financial. The authors are also providing common discussion grounds/opportunities for the various parties, disciplines and concerned organization to

  11. The Research of China's Civil Aviation Passenger Multi-Channel Service Technology Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhibing, Xue; Xinming, Wang

    IATA is promoting Simplifying the Business. The traditional passenger services and business process, such as ticketing, airport counters, had a great influence. The airlines have the passenger service and convenience as the next product development requirements. With civil aviation industry and their company's products construction, the authors propose a solution of passenger multi-channel service product platform. The solution is to streamline the business as the breakthrough point, around the convenience of passengers travel services to travelers as the center, using the current mainstream and the latest IT technology to establish passenger service product platform. The solution will promote DCS e-ticketing business development and service channel diversity. In this paper, the research results have been applied in the product platform construction of the authors' company. The practice shows that through traditional business with the latest IT technologies, traditional passenger services into the emerging service model, passenger service product platform has strong advantages and characteristics. Based on the platform, various types of service products is growing rapidly.

  12. 77 FR 76588 - Request for Proposal Platform Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... download information from a central point using a consistent process to locate business opportunities that... small businesses and new entrants, these needs include: (i) Making the language in statements of work... expanded before decisions are made on making the platform permanent. 2. Requirements for pilot procurements...

  13. FORMING MANAGEMENT IMPACTS IN AVIATION COMPANIES ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Prokhorova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Oriented reflective approach to management involves restructuring of goal, ideal and pragmatic, creating a program of action, organizing, correcting, control the definition of the new strategy. This process is only possible with multidimensional analysis and reflection of all the administrative restructuring process and its elements in determining and planning activities, creating conditions of restructuring, predicting outcomes and consequences of making a choice of ways to solve problems means to achieve the goal of information called ' bonds with participants restructuring process and correction flow management process based on continuous reflection. Methods: Development of the system of economic development now requires the use of mechanisms for continuous monitoring of internal and external environment to identify factors that threaten businesses. Rest of this is possible through the use of diagnostic tests: static analysis, expert diagnosis, linear and dynamic programming. Results: Built as part of the study economic and mathematical models can determine the status and level of economic development potential of aerospace companies that were investigated, confirming the need for action to manage economic development. To develop the mechanism of competition in the aircraft building sector must: implementation in practice of management motivation mechanisms to ensure the appropriate level of interest in the functioning of airlines on the basis of private property; formation of economic market institutions in the field of aircraft construction, affecting the creation of a competitive environment. Discussion: Stipulates that in difficult economic crisis positive results can be achieved managers who are constantly looking for original approaches to inclusion in the development process by aligning internal external opportunities generated by market. It is concluded that aviation business management in times of economic instability or

  14. Social Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina ENACHE

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The field of social business is growing rapidly and attracting increased attention from many sectors. The term itself shows up frequently in the media, is referenced by public officials, have become common on universities. The reasons behind the popularity of social entrepreneurship are many. On the most basic level, there’s something inherently interesting and appealing about entrepreneurs and the stories of why and how they do what they do. The interest in social entrepreneurship transcends the phenomenon of popularity and fascination with people. Social entrepreneurship signals the imperative to drive social change, and it is that potential payoff, with its lasting, transformational benefit to society, that sets the field and its practitioners apart. Although the potential benefits offered by social entrepreneurship are clear to many of those promoting and funding these activities, the actual definition of what social entrepreneurs do to produce this order of magnitude return is less clear. In fact, we would argue that the definition of social entrepreneurship today is anything but clear. As a result, social entrepreneurship has become so inclusive that it now has an immense tent into which all manner of socially beneficial activities fit. In some respects this inclusiveness could be a good thing. If we can achieve a rigorous definition, then those who support social entrepreneurship can focus their resources on building and strengthening a concrete and identifiable field. Absent that discipline, proponents of social entrepreneurship run the risk of giving the skeptics an ever-expanding target to shoot at, and the cynics even more reason to discount social innovation and those who drive it.

  15. Synthetic and Biomass Alternate Fueling in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R.C.; Bushnell, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, aviation alone uses 85 to 95 billion gallons of nonrenewable fossil fuel per year (2008). General transportation fueling can accommodate several different fuels; however, aviation fuels have very specific requirements. Biofuels have been flight demonstrated, are considered renewable, have the capacity to become "drop-in" replacements for Jet-A fuel, and solve the CO2 climate change problem. The major issue is cost; current biomass biofuels are not economically competitive. Biofuel feedstock sources being researched are halophytes, algae, cyanobacteria, weeds-to-crops, wastes with contingent restraints on use of crop land, freshwater, and climate change. There are five major renewable energy sources: solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, drilled geothermal and biomass, each of which have an order of magnitude greater capacity to meet all energy needs. All five address aspects of climate change; biomass has massive potential as an energy fuel feedstock.

  16. Skin in aviation and space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sanjiv

    2011-01-01

    The aerospace environment is a dynamic interaction between man, machine and the environment. Skin diseases are not particularly significant aeromedically, yet they could permanently affect an aviator's status for continued flying duty. A number of dermatological conditions lend themselves to flying restrictions for the aviator. Aircrew and ground crew are exposed to a myriad of elements that could also adversely impact their flying status. Inflight stresses during flights as well as space travel could impact certain behaviors from a dermatological standpoint. With the advent of space tourism, dermatological issues would form an integral part of medical clearances. With limited literature available on this subject, the review article aims to sensitize the readers to the diverse interactions of dermatology with the aerospace environment.

  17. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in commercial airline pilots: a cohort study of 2630 pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, S; Venemans-Jellema, A; Cannegieter, S C; van Haften, M; Middeldorp, S; Büller, H R; Rosendaal, F R

    2014-08-01

    Airline pilots may be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) because air travel has recently been established as a risk factor for VTE. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of VTE in a cohort of Dutch airline pilots. Airline pilots who had been active members of the Dutch aviation society (VNV) were questioned for the occurrence of VTE, presence of risk factors for VTE and number of flight hours per year and rank. Incidence rates among pilots were compared with those of the general Dutch population and with a population of frequently flying employees of multinational organizations. A total of 2630 male pilots were followed-up for a total of 20420 person-years (py). Six venous thromboses were reported, yielding an incidence rate of 0.3 per 1000 py. The standardized morbidity ratio, comparing these pilots with the general Dutch population adjusted for age, was 0.8. Compared with the international employee cohort, the standardized morbidity ratio was 0.7 when all employees were included and 0.6 when only the frequently travelling employees were included. The incidence rate did not increase with number of flight hours per year and did not clearly vary by rank. We conclude that the risk of VTE is not increased amongst airline pilots. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  18. Caffeine Consumption Among Naval Aviation Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Thomas E; Williams, Ronald D; Delorey, Donald R; Woolsey, Conrad L

    2017-04-01

    Education frequently dictates students need to study for prolonged periods of time to adequately prepare for examinations. This is especially true with aviation preflight indoctrination (API) candidates who have to assimilate large volumes of information in a limited amount of time during API training. The purpose of this study was to assess caffeine consumption patterns (frequency, type, and volume) among naval aviation candidates attending API to determine the most frequently consumed caffeinated beverage and to examine if the consumption of a nonenergy drink caffeinated beverage was related to energy drink consumption. Data were collected by means of an anonymous 44-item survey administered and completed by 302 students enrolled in API at Naval Air Station Pensacola, FL. Results indicated the most frequently consumed caffeinated beverage consumed by API students was coffee (86.4%), with daily coffee consumption being approximately 28% and the most frequent pattern of consumption being 2 cups per day (85%). The least frequently consumed caffeinated beverages reported were energy drinks (52%) and energy shots (29.1%). The present study also found that the consumption patterns (weekly and daily) of caffeinated beverages (coffee and cola) were positively correlated to energy drink consumption patterns. Naval aviation candidates' consumption of caffeinated beverages is comparable to other college and high school cohorts. This study found that coffee and colas were the beverages of choice, with energy drinks and energy shots being the least frequently reported caffeinated beverages used. Additionally, a relationship between the consumption of caffeinated beverages and energy drinks was identified.Sather TE, Williams RD, Delorey DR, Woolsey CL. Caffeine consumption among naval aviation candidates. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(4):399-405.

  19. Improving Fuel Statistics for Danish Aviation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.

    This report contains fuel use figures for Danish civil aviation broken down into domestic and international numbers from 1985 to 2000, using a refined fuel split procedure and official fuel sale totals. The results from two different models are used. The NERI (National Environmental Research Inst......, which facilitates the further summing of fuel according to different requirements. Methods on how to allocate the fuel use for passenger and cargo transportation are also discussed...

  20. Civil Aviation GALILEO E5 receivers architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Bastide, Frédéric; Roturier, Benoit; Julien, Olivier; Macabiau, Christophe; Rebeyrol, Emilie; Raimondi, Mathieu; Ouzeau, Christophe; Kubrak, Damien

    2006-01-01

    International audience; The Galileo E5 signal is of particular interest to the civil aviation community. Indeed, it will be broadcast in an Aeronautical Radio Navigation Services (ARNS). Moreover, combined with the Galileo E1 signal, Galileo E5 will allow dual-frequency ionosheric-free pseudoranges combinations supporting a dramatic increase of accuracy. In addition, one of its components, E5b, will carry the Galileo integrity message needed by the user to benefit from the Safety-of-Life serv...

  1. Assessment of Fatigue in Aviation Crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    metabolism, nutrition, anoxia, heat stress, sleep decrement, cognitive work capacity, vision decrement, vibration and sleep patterns. This list represents... cognitive and behavioral disorganization. These are states which most probably will deviate from a person’s internal demands. And, therefore, the concern...Mishaps and Fatigue," Aviation- Space. and Environmental Medicine, June 1983, Vol. 54, No. 6, pp. 535-538. Cameron, C.A., "Theory of Fatigue," Ergonomi

  2. Psychophysiological Sensing and State Classification for Attention Management in Commercial Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrivel, Angela R.; Liles, Charles; Stephens, Chad L.; Ellis, Kyle K.; Prinzel, Lawrence J.; Pope, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-related human performance limiting states (AHPLS) can cause pilots to lose airplane state awareness (ASA), and their detection is important to improving commercial aviation safety. The Commercial Aviation Safety Team found that the majority of recent international commercial aviation accidents attributable to loss of control inflight involved flight crew loss of airplane state awareness, and that distraction of various forms was involved in all of them. Research on AHPLS, including channelized attention, diverted attention, startle / surprise, and confirmation bias, has been recommended in a Safety Enhancement (SE) entitled "Training for Attention Management." To accomplish the detection of such cognitive and psychophysiological states, a broad suite of sensors has been implemented to simultaneously measure their physiological markers during high fidelity flight simulation human subject studies. Pilot participants were asked to perform benchmark tasks and experimental flight scenarios designed to induce AHPLS. Pattern classification was employed to distinguish the AHPLS induced by the benchmark tasks. Unimodal classification using pre-processed electroencephalography (EEG) signals as input features to extreme gradient boosting, random forest and deep neural network multiclass classifiers was implemented. Multi-modal classification using galvanic skin response (GSR) in addition to the same EEG signals and using the same types of classifiers produced increased accuracy with respect to the unimodal case (90 percent vs. 86 percent), although only via the deep neural network classifier. These initial results are a first step toward the goal of demonstrating simultaneous real time classification of multiple states using multiple sensing modalities in high-fidelity flight simulators. This detection is intended to support and inform training methods under development to mitigate the loss of ASA and thus reduce accidents and incidents.

  3. The U.S. commercial air tour industry: a review of aviation safety concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Sarah-Blythe

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations defines commercial air tours as "flight[s] conducted for compensation or hire in an airplane or helicopter where a purpose of the flight is sightseeing." The incidence of air tour crashes in the United States is disproportionately high relative to similar commercial aviation operations, and air tours operating under Part 91 governance crash significantly more than those governed by Part 135. This paper reviews the government and industry response to four specific areas of air tour safety concern: surveillance of flight operations, pilot factors, regulatory standardization, and maintenance quality assurance. It concludes that the government and industry have successfully addressed many of these tenet issues, most notably by: advancing the operations surveillance infrastructure through implementation of en route, ground-based, and technological surveillance methods; developing Aeronautical Decision Making and cue-based training programs for air tour pilots; consolidating federal air tour regulations under Part 136; and developing public-private partnerships for raising maintenance operating standards and improving quality assurance programs. However, opportunities remain to improve air tour safety by: increasing the number and efficiency of flight surveillance programs; addressing pilot fatigue with more restrictive flight hour limitations for air tour pilots; ensuring widespread uptake of maintenance quality assurance programs, especially among high-risk operators not currently affiliated with private air tour safety programs; and eliminating the 25-mile exception allowing Part 91 operators to conduct commercial air tours without the safety oversight required of Part 135 operators.

  4. European Natural Disaster Coordination and Information System for Aviation (EUNADICS-AV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotawa, Gerhard; Hirtl, Marcus; Arnold, Delia; Katzler-Fuchs, Susanne; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Mona, Lucia; Sofiev, Mikhail; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Theys, Nicolas; Brenot, Hugues; Plu, Matthieu; Rockitansky, Carl-Herbert; Eschbacher, Kurt; Apituley, Arnoud; Som de Cerff, Wim

    2017-04-01

    Commercial aviation is one of the key infrastructures of our modern world. Even short interruptions can cause economic damages summing up to the Billion-Euro range. As evident from the past, aviation shows vulnerability with regard to natural hazards. Safe flight operations, air traffic management and air traffic control is a shared responsibility of EUROCONTROL, national authorities, airlines and pilots. All stakeholders have one common goal, namely to warrant and maintain the safety of flight crews and passengers. Currently, however, there is a significant gap in the Europe-wide availability of real time hazard measurement and monitoring information for airborne hazards describing "what, where, how much" in 3 dimensions, combined with a near-real-time European data analysis and assimilation system. This gap creates circumstances where various stakeholders in the system may base their decisions on different data and information. The H-2020 project EUNADICS-AV ("European Natural Disaster Coordination and Information System for Aviation"), started in October 2016, intends to close this gap in data and information availability, enabling all stakeholders in the aviation system to obtain fast, coherent and consistent information. The project intends to combine and harmonize data from satellite earth observation, ground based and airborne platforms, and to integrate them into state-of-the art data assimilation and analysis systems. Besides operational data sources, data from the research community are integrated as well. Hazards considered in the project include volcano eruptions, nuclear accidents and events, and forest fires. The availability of consistent and coherent data analysis fields based on all available measurements will greatly enhances our capability to respond to disasters effectively and efficiently, minimizing system downtimes and thus economic damage while maintaining the safety of millions of passengers.

  5. Volcanic Ash and Aviation - the 2014 Eruptions of Kelut and Sangeang Api, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupper, A. C.; Jansons, E.

    2014-12-01

    Two significant eruptions in Indonesia during the first part of 2014 have highlighted the continuing challenges of safe air traffic management around volcanic ash clouds. The stratospheric eruption of Kelut (also known as Kelud) in Java late on 13 February 2014 resulted in widespread aviation disruption over Indonesia and at least one serious volcanic ash encounter from an international airline. An upper-tropospheric eruption of Sangeang Api in the Lesser Sunda Islands on 30 May 2014 did not result in any known aircraft encounters, but did result in many delays and flight cancellations between Indonesia and Australia. In both cases, the eruption and resultant ash clouds were relatively well observed, if subject to the usual issues in characterising such clouds. For example, as tropical eruptions frequently reach 15 km amsl and above due to the height of the tropical tropopause, it is frequently very difficult to provide an accurate estimation of conditions at the cruising levels of aircraft, at 10-11 km (or lower for shorter domestic routes). More critically, the challenge of linking operational results from two scientific professions (volcanology and meteorology) with real-time aviation users remains strongly evident. Situational awareness of domestic and international airlines, ground-based monitoring and communications prior to and during the eruption, receiving and sharing pilot reports of volcanic ash, and appropriate flight responses all remain inadequate even in relatively fine conditions, with an unacceptable ongoing risk of serious aviation encounters should improvements not be made. Despite the extensive efforts of the International Civil Aviation Organization, World Meteorological Organization, and all partners in the International Airways Volcano Watch, and despite the acceleration of work on the issue since 2010, volcanic ash management remains sub-optimal.

  6. Global civil aviation black carbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stettler, Marc E J; Boies, Adam M; Petzold, Andreas; Barrett, Steven R H

    2013-09-17

    Aircraft black carbon (BC) emissions contribute to climate forcing, but few estimates of BC emitted by aircraft at cruise exist. For the majority of aircraft engines the only BC-related measurement available is smoke number (SN)-a filter based optical method designed to measure near-ground plume visibility, not mass. While the first order approximation (FOA3) technique has been developed to estimate BC mass emissions normalized by fuel burn [EI(BC)] from SN, it is shown that it underestimates EI(BC) by >90% in 35% of directly measured cases (R(2) = -0.10). As there are no plans to measure BC emissions from all existing certified engines-which will be in service for several decades-it is necessary to estimate EI(BC) for existing aircraft on the ground and at cruise. An alternative method, called FOX, that is independent of the SN is developed to estimate BC emissions. Estimates of EI(BC) at ground level are significantly improved (R(2) = 0.68), whereas estimates at cruise are within 30% of measurements. Implementing this approach for global civil aviation estimated aircraft BC emissions are revised upward by a factor of ~3. Direct radiative forcing (RF) due to aviation BC emissions is estimated to be ~9.5 mW/m(2), equivalent to ~1/3 of the current RF due to aviation CO2 emissions.

  7. Perspectives for Sustainable Aviation Biofuels in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís A. B. Cortez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aviation industry has set ambitious goals to reduce carbon emissions in coming decades. The strategy involves the use of sustainable biofuels, aiming to achieve benefits from environmental, social, and economic perspectives. In this context, Brazilian conditions are favorable, with a mature agroindustry that regularly produces automotive biofuel largely adopted by Brazilian road vehicles, while air transportation has been growing at an accelerating pace and a modern aircraft industry is in place. This paper presents the main conclusions and recommendations from a broad assessment of the technological, economic, and sustainability challenges and opportunities associated with the development of drop-in aviation biofuels in Brazil. It was written by a research team that prepared the initial reports and conducted eight workshops with the active participation of more than 30 stakeholders encompassing the private sector, government institutions, NGOs, and academia. The main outcome was a set of guidelines for establishing a new biofuels industry, including recommendations for (a filling the identified research and development knowledge gaps in the production of sustainable feedstock; (b overcoming the barriers in conversion technology, including scaling-up issues; (c promoting greater involvement and interaction between private and government stakeholders; and (d creating a national strategy to promote the development of aviation biofuels.

  8. Aviation Fueling: A Cleaner, Greener Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Bushnell, Dennis M.; Shouse, Dale T.

    2010-01-01

    Projected growth of aviation depends on fueling where specific needs must be met. Safety is paramount, and along with political, social, environmental and legacy transport systems requirements, alternate aviation fueling becomes an opportunity of enormous proportions. Biofuels sourced from halophytes, algae, cyanobacteria, and weeds using wastelands, waste water, and seawater have the capacity to be drop-in fuel replacements for petroleum fuels. Biojet fuels from such sources solves the aviation CO2 emissions issue and do not compete with food or freshwater needs. They are not detrimental to the social or environmental fabric and use the existing fuels infrastructure. Cost and sustainable supply remains the major impediments to alternate fuels. Halophytes are the near-term solution to biomass/biofuels capacity at reasonable costs; they simply involve more farming, at usual farming costs. Biofuels represent a win-win approach, proffering as they do at least the ones we are studying massive capacity, climate neutral-to-some sequestration, and ultimately, reasonable costs.

  9. Doing Business in 2005

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation; World Bank

    2004-01-01

    2004 was a good year for doing business in most transition economies, the World Bank Group concluded in its Doing Business in 2005 survey, the second in its series tracking regulatory reforms aimed at improving the ease of doing business in the world's economies. However, the survey found that conditions for starting and running a business in poorer countries were consistently more burdens...

  10. Competitiveness of Family Businesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.A.M. Leenders (Mark); E. Waarts (Eric)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study is to systematically examine the advantages and disadvantages of different types of family businesses. We distinguish four different types of family businesses based on their family and business orientation: (1) House of Business, (2) Family Money Machine, (3)

  11. Global Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten

    insight from the literature about business models, international product policy, international entry modes and globalization into a conceptual model of relevant design elements of global business models, enabling global business model innovation to deal with differences in a downstream perspective...... regarding the customer interface and in an upstream perspective regarding the supply infrastructure. The paper offers a coherent conceptual dynamic meta-model of global business model innovation. Students, scholars and managers within the field of international business can use this conceptualization...... to understand, to study, and to create global business model innovation. Managerial and research implications draw on the developed ideal type of global business model innovation....

  12. FEATURES OF AN ESTIMATION OF INVESTMENT PROJECTS AT THE ENTERPRISES OF AVIATION INSTRUMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr P. Dobrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of this study due to the fact that the current situation in Russia is complemented by the negative effects of market reforms in the economy and economic sanctions adopted against our country and in particular the different level companies. In view of this, to effectively manage the activities and the development of aviation instrument companies and enterprises of different ownership forms are highly relevant issues related to the assessment of investment projects. The general crisis that engulfed almost all industry in Russia, demanded the application of a new ideology of the organization and management of investment projects, as well as their assessment at the enterprises of aviation instrument. In Russia, began a new stage in the development of project management establishment of a domestic methodology, complex tools and training for professional project management on the basis of domestic achievements, global experience and creativity of its processing based on the actual conditions of our country. The need for the use of project management methodology in Russia is determined by two factors: the increasing complexity of projects and the organizations that operate them, and the fact that project management is widely used in countries with market economies. Projects at the enterprises of aviation instrument making and evaluation are characterized by complexity and uncertainty, a significant dependence on the dynamic environment, including socio-economic, political, financial, economic, legislative influence of both the state and competing companies. In this paper, a study of modern methods of evaluating investment projects at the enterprises of aviation instrument. Methodology. The methodological basis of this paper appeared comparative and economic-mathematical analysis methods. Results. As part of the presentation of the present article the author, it was found that the activity of modern companies is not linear and is

  13. Business plan competition

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Venture – Companies for tomorrow" is a business plan competition, which supports students and other junior entrepreneurs in developing their business plans. The sixth edition of the competition is now taking place. Venture 2008 highlights: - prize money totalling CHF 150’000; - possibility to optimize business ideas and business plans with the help of experienced coaches: around 200 coaches are available, with a wide range of backgrounds, entrepreneurs as well as venture capitalists; -\tpossibility to present business ideas and business plans to potential investors ("Investor Days" - 17 January and 7 May); - active involvement in the start-up community; -\tcontribution to potential independence. The competition consists of two phases: Phase I, Business idea, Deadline for submission of business idea: 5 December 2007 (online at http://www.venture.ch). Award Ceremony: 17 January 2008 Phase II, Business plan Deadline for submission of business plan: 2 April 2008 (online at...

  14. Deliverable 1.2.1 Market Analysis and Business Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth

    2009-01-01

    Deliverable 1.2.1 - Market Analysis and Business Plan The main objective of this deliverable is to provide a short overview of 4 communities involved in the pilots, envisaged type of solutions and architectures to be deployed (chapter 2) and market analysis at regional level (chapter 3......) with related business cases. The Market analysis will provide an overview of market requirements, current status and opportunities for the pilot service that will be provided in the context of ISISEMD. This will be realised by performing detailed studies on various sources. Proposals for business modelling...... and business cases (chapter 4) will rely on the concept of value chains. Value chains typically consist of several providers, which together produce a complex product or service....

  15. Efficacy of Low-Cost PC-Based Aviation Training Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savern l Reweti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore whether a full cost flight training device (FTD was significantly better for simulator training than a low cost PC-Based Aviation Training Device (PCATD. Background: A quasi-transfer study was undertaken to ascertain whether a Civil Aviation Authority certified Flight Training Device (FTD was more effective at improving pilot proficiency in the performance of a standard VFR traffic pattern (Overhead Rejoin Procedure than a customised low cost PCATD. Methodology: In this quasi-transfer study, a high fidelity FTD rather than an aircraft was used to test both training and transfer tasks. Ninety-three pilots were recruited to participate in the study. Contribution: The use of PCATDs is now well established for pilot training, especially for Instrument Flight Rules (IFR skills training. However, little substantive research has been undertaken to examine their efficacy for VFR training. Findings: There was no evidence of a pre-test/post-test difference in VFR task perfor-mance between participants trained on the PCATD and the FTD, when post tested on the FTD. The use of both PCATD and FTD demonstrated signifi-cant improvements in VFR task performance compared to a control group that received no PCATD or FTD training. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: We discuss the possibility that low cost PCATDs may be a viable alternative for flight schools wishing to use a flight simulator but not able to afford a FTD. Recommendation for Researchers: We discuss the introduction of improved low cost technologies that allow PCATDs to be used more effectively for training in VFR procedures. The development and testing of new technologies requires more research. Impact on Society: Flight training schools operate in a difficult economic environment with continued increases in the cost of aircraft maintenance, compliance costs, and aviation fuel. The increased utilisation of low cost PCATD’s especially for VFR

  16. System for Secure Integration of Aviation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao; Keller, Rich; Chidester, Tom; Statler, Irving; Lynch, Bob; Patel, Hemil; Windrem, May; Lawrence, Bob

    2007-01-01

    The Aviation Data Integration System (ADIS) of Ames Research Center has been established to promote analysis of aviation data by airlines and other interested users for purposes of enhancing the quality (especially safety) of flight operations. The ADIS is a system of computer hardware and software for collecting, integrating, and disseminating aviation data pertaining to flights and specified flight events that involve one or more airline(s). The ADIS is secure in the sense that care is taken to ensure the integrity of sources of collected data and to verify the authorizations of requesters to receive data. Most importantly, the ADIS removes a disincentive to collection and exchange of useful data by providing for automatic removal of information that could be used to identify specific flights and crewmembers. Such information, denoted sensitive information, includes flight data (here signifying data collected by sensors aboard an aircraft during flight), weather data for a specified route on a specified date, date and time, and any other information traceable to a specific flight. The removal of information that could be used to perform such tracing is called "deidentification." Airlines are often reluctant to keep flight data in identifiable form because of concerns about loss of anonymity. Hence, one of the things needed to promote retention and analysis of aviation data is an automated means of de-identification of archived flight data to enable integration of flight data with non-flight aviation data while preserving anonymity. Preferably, such an automated means would enable end users of the data to continue to use pre-existing data-analysis software to identify anomalies in flight data without identifying a specific anomalous flight. It would then also be possible to perform statistical analyses of integrated data. These needs are satisfied by the ADIS, which enables an end user to request aviation data associated with de-identified flight data. The ADIS

  17. POTENTIAL OF BUSINESS

    OpenAIRE

    Julija Avakumovic, Jelena Avakumovic

    2014-01-01

    Potential of businesses is available and relevant developed business opportunities which under certain conditions can affect the results of the business. Those are certain conditions possible exposure of the company. The success of a business depends of the knowledge of these resources and the way how to find the optimum combination of scale, structure and dynamics of available resources by the management of the business.

  18. Corporate Business Diplomacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    This article illustrates the interdisciplinary nature of the field of corporate business diplomacy using examples from academic disciplines, such as economics and political science, which can contribute to the understanding of corporate business diplomacy. Examples also show that corporate business...... diplomacy can complement business theories such as stakeholder theory and agency theory. Examples from practice show that in a broad sense, corporate business diplomacy is concerned with managing external stakeholders, while in a narrow sense, it is concerned with managing internal stakeholders...

  19. Competitiveness of Family Businesses

    OpenAIRE

    Leenders, Mark; Waarts, Eric

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study is to systematically examine the advantages and disadvantages of different types of family businesses. We distinguish four different types of family businesses based on their family and business orientation: (1) House of Business, (2) Family Money Machine, (3) Family Life Tradition, and (4) Hobby Salon. In our empirical research among family businesses (n=220), we find that all four different types co-exist. In addition, we find that differences in family...

  20. Civilian Pilot Training Skills, Curricula, and Costs; Defense and Commercial Pilot Procurement, Training and Career Systems. Interim Report. Volume I and Volume II, March 1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logistics Management Inst., Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration of the Department of Transportation controls civilian pilot training. Through its regulations and testing and licensing procedures, the FAA sets minimum criteria for course content and knowledge and skill acquisition. Since few training organizations have the economic resources required to do original research…

  1. A simulator investigation of the use of digital data link for pilot/ATC communications in a single pilot operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, David A.; Lohr, Gary W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have shown that radio communications between pilots and air traffic control contribute to high pilot workload and are subject to various errors. These errors result from congestion on the voice radio channel, and missed and misunderstood messages. The use of digital data link has been proposed as a means of reducing this workload and error rate. A critical factor, however, in determining the potential benefit of data link will be the interface between future data link systems and the operator of those systems, both in the air and on the ground. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate the pilot interface with various levels of data link capability, in simulated general aviation, single-pilot instrument flight rule operations. Results show that the data link reduced demands on pilots' short-term memory, reduced the number of communication transmissions, and permitted the pilots to more easily allocate time to critical cockpit tasks while receiving air traffic control messages. The pilots who participated unanimously indicated a preference for data link communications over voice-only communications. There were, however, situations in which the pilot preferred the use of voice communications, and the ability for pilots to delay processing the data link messages, during high workload events, caused delays in the acknowledgement of messages to air traffic control.

  2. Higher landing accuracy in expert pilots is associated with lower activity in the caudate nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheen M Adamson

    Full Text Available The most common lethal accidents in General Aviation are caused by improperly executed landing approaches in which a pilot descends below the minimum safe altitude without proper visual references. To understand how expertise might reduce such erroneous decision-making, we examined relevant neural processes in pilots performing a simulated landing approach inside a functional MRI scanner. Pilots (aged 20-66 were asked to "fly" a series of simulated "cockpit view" instrument landing scenarios in an MRI scanner. The scenarios were either high risk (heavy fog-legally unsafe to land or low risk (medium fog-legally safe to land. Pilots with one of two levels of expertise participated: Moderate Expertise (Instrument Flight Rules pilots, n = 8 or High Expertise (Certified Instrument Flight Instructors or Air-Transport Pilots, n = 12. High Expertise pilots were more accurate than Moderate Expertise pilots in making a "land" versus "do not land" decision (CFII: d' = 3.62 ± 2.52; IFR: d' = 0.98 ± 1.04; p<.01. Brain activity in bilateral caudate nucleus was examined for main effects of expertise during a "land" versus "do not land" decision with the no-decision control condition modeled as baseline. In making landing decisions, High Expertise pilots showed lower activation in the bilateral caudate nucleus (0.97 ± 0.80 compared to Moderate Expertise pilots (1.91 ± 1.16 (p<.05. These findings provide evidence for increased "neural efficiency" in High Expertise pilots relative to Moderate Expertise pilots. During an instrument approach the pilot is engaged in detailed examination of flight instruments while monitoring certain visual references for making landing decisions. The caudate nucleus regulates saccade eye control of gaze, the brain area where the "expertise" effect was observed. These data provide evidence that performing "real world" aviation tasks in an fMRI provide objective data regarding the relative expertise of pilots and brain regions

  3. The Effects of Advanced 'Glass Cockpit' Displayed Flight Instrumentation on In-flight Pilot Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigerwald, John

    The Cognitive Continuum Theory (CCT) was first proposed 25 years ago to explain the relationship between intuition and analytical decision making processes. In order for aircraft pilots to make these analytical and intuitive decisions, they obtain information from various instruments within the cockpit of the aircraft. Advanced instrumentation is used to provide a broad array of information about the aircraft condition and flight situation to aid the flight crew in making effective decisions. The problem addressed is that advanced instrumentation has not improved the pilot decision making in modern aircraft. Because making a decision is dependent upon the information available, this experimental quantitative study sought to determine how well pilots organize and interpret information obtained from various cockpit instrumentation displays when under time pressure. The population for this study was the students, flight instructors, and aviation faculty at the Middle Georgia State College School of Aviation campus in Eastman, Georgia. The sample was comprised of two groups of 90 individuals (45 in each group) in various stages of pilot licensure from student pilot to airline transport pilot (ATP). The ages ranged from 18 to 55 years old. There was a statistically significant relationship at the p pilots in making decisions that will result in better organization of information. Understanding the relationship between the intuitive and analytical decisions that pilots make and the information source they use to make those decisions will aid engineers in the design of instrumentation in the aircraft cockpit, improve pilot decision making, and increase the safety of flight.

  4. Age, flight experience, and risk of crash involvement in a cohort of professional pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohua; Baker, Susan P; Grabowski, Jurek G; Qiang, Yandong; McCarthy, Melissa L; Rebok, George W

    2003-05-15

    Federal aviation regulations prohibit airline pilots from flying beyond the age of 60 years. However, the relation between pilot age and flight safety has not been rigorously assessed using empirical data. From 1987 to 1997, the authors followed a cohort of 3,306 commuter air carrier and air taxi pilots who were aged 45-54 years in 1987. During the follow-up period, the pilots accumulated a total of 12.9 million flight hours and 66 aviation crashes, yielding a rate of 5.1 crashes per million pilot flight hours. Crash risk remained fairly stable as the pilots aged from their late forties to their late fifties. Flight experience, as measured by total flight time at baseline, showed a significant protective effect against the risk of crash involvement. With adjustment for age, pilots who had 5,000-9,999 hours of total flight time at baseline had a 57% lower risk of a crash than their less experienced counterparts (relative risk = 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 0.87). The protective effect of flight experience leveled off after total flight time reached 10,000 hours. The lack of an association between pilot age and crash risk may reflect a strong "healthy worker effect" stemming from the rigorous medical standards and periodic physical examinations required for professional pilots.

  5. Age-related vision problems in commuter and air taxi pilots: a study of 3019 pilots, 1987-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebok, George W; Qiang, Yandong; Baker, Susan P; Li, Guohua

    2007-07-01

    Vision problems have become an increasingly important health and safety concern for pilots due to the aging of the pilot population. This paper examines the incidence of age-related vision problems in a birth cohort of commuter air carrier and air taxi pilots. A cohort of 3019 male pilots ages 45-54 yr at baseline and holding Class I medical certificates in 1987 were retrospectively studied from 1987 to 1997 through the medical certification system of the Federal Aviation Administration. Poisson regression modeling based on generalized estimation equations was used to assess the associations of pilot characteristics with risk of developing vision problems. The study period accumulated 419 incident cases of vision problems, yielding an incidence of 20.3 per 1000 person-years. For pilots ages 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, and 60-64, the incidence of vision problems was 17, 20, 24, and 39 per 1000 person-years, respectively. A baseline history of eye problems and older age were each significantly associated with an increased incidence of vision problems. The adjusted relative risks of vision problems for pilot age were 1.0 (45-49 yr), 1.2 (50-54 yr), 1.4 (55-59 yr), and 3.0 (60-64 yr). The three most prevalent types of visual problems were corneal problems (16%), glaucoma (15%), and cataracts (7%). Identifying and preventing pathological changes that alter visual performance among pilots is an important component of aviation safety. With the increasing maturity of the pilot population, it is essential that appropriate visual screening and correction be emphasized for specific age-related ophthalmic conditions.

  6. Leveraging the Reserve Component: Associating Active and Reserve Aviation Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    conducted by Jennifer Buck again validates the 3:1 ratio while in garrison. Her Active versus Reserve Brigade Combat teams analysis stated the...Aviation Combat Readiness/Safety Center. (email March 20, 2013) 61 2012 Aviation Force Structure Book. (Fort Rucker , Alabama: U.S. Army Aviation Center...Force Reserve squadrons at Pope Field next to Fort Bragg face similar challenges. Fort Rucker , Alabama offers a unique opportunity as the home of

  7. Aviation security and terrorism: a review of the economic issues

    OpenAIRE

    Cletus C. Coughlin; Cohen, Jeffrey P.; Khan, Sarosh R.

    2002-01-01

    Following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the passage of the Aviation and Transportation Security Act mandated a substantial increase in resources devoted to aviation security. This paper summarizes the specific changes stemming from this legislation. In addition, the paper examines the economic issues underlying the regulation and provision of aviation security. The fact that security at one airport can affect the well being of those at other airports and elsewhere, an example o...

  8. Does the Marine Corps Need an Enlisted Aviation Production Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    MOS MP MPP-20 NAPP NAITC PEF RA Acronyms Aviation Maintenance Squadron. Aviation Production Management Active Reserve Aviation Logistics...program enlisted for code ( PEF ), which will dictate the basic field into which they will go. Near the end of their initial training EAMTMU, as a...the preparation, administrative support, and hosting of MTRR’s. 10. Program Enlisted For ( PEF ). A list of skills that are available to the enlistee

  9. Naval aviation aging wiring: prognostic and diagnostic solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Nieto, Mark E.

    2000-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Navy and Marine Corps provide key forward-presence, crisis response and war-fighting capabilities to our nation's leaders and joint commanders. Naval Aviation plays a central role in every naval mission. Unfortunately, the tools of naval aviation's power, its aircraft, are becoming alarmingly old. The average age of the naval aviation inventory is in excess of eighteen years old. The nerve center of today's sophisticated aircraft, ...

  10. Sensors and Systems to Enhance Aviation Safety Against Weather Hazards

    OpenAIRE

    Mahapatra, Pravas R; Zrnic, Dusan S

    1991-01-01

    Weather-related factors are among major causes of aviation hazards, passenger discomfort, poor airline schedule-keeping, and poor operating economy. A variety of new high-technology electronic sensors and systems for aviation weather are being developed and installed across the US. The aviation weather monitoring system of the future will be centered around Doppler weather radars which offer the best combination of coverage, resolution, and agility for this purpose, and are able to detect and...

  11. Apolipoprotein E ε4 influences on episodic recall and brain structures in aging pilots

    OpenAIRE

    Adamson, Maheen M.; Landy, Kelly M.; Duong, Susan; Fox-Bosetti, Sabrina; Ashford, J. Wesson; Greer M. Murphy; Weiner, Michael; Joy L. Taylor

    2008-01-01

    The apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele is associated with cognitive deficits and hippocampal atrophy in nondemented middle-aged and older adults. It is not known to what extent this genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) impacts performance in late middle-aged and older workers in cognitively demanding occupations. This cross-sectional analysis examines brain–cognitive–genetic relationships in actively flying general aviation pilots, half of whom are APOE ε4 carriers. Fifty pilots were...

  12. Diaspora Business Model Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Harima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores how diasporans achieve business model innovatin by using their unique resources. The hypothesis underlying the paper is that the unique backgrounds and resources of the diaspora businesses, due to diffrent sources of informatin and experiences as well as multile networks, contributes to business model innovatin in a distictie manner. We investiate the English school market in the Philippines which is established by East Asian diaspora who innovate a business model of conventinal English schools. Two case studies were conducted with Japanese diaspora English schools. Their business is analyzed using a business model canvas (Osterwalder & Pigneur, 2010 and contrasted with the conventinal business model. The empirical cases show that diaspora businesses use knowledge about their country of origin and engage with country of residence and multile networks in diffrent locatins and constellatins to identiy unique opportunitis, leading to a business model innovatin.

  13. Safety for non-microlight pilots

    OpenAIRE

    Gratton, GB

    1999-01-01

    Microlight aircraft are some of the safest, cheapest and most fun aircraft flying in the UK. The fatal accident rate, at around 1 per 30,000 flying hours is similar to that of General Aviation overall, and rather better than some parts of it in recent years. However, at the BMAA we see several perfectly serviceable aircraft per year written off by very experienced GA pilots, typically with several thousand hours. Why? - well because they are different, not more difficult or more dangerous,...

  14. High altitude hypoxia, a mask and a Street. Donation of an aviation BLB oxygen mask apparatus from World War 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M G; Street, N E

    2017-03-01

    The history of hypoxia prevention is closely inter-related with high altitude mountain and aviation physiology. One pioneering attempt to overcome low inspired oxygen partial pressures in aviation was the BLB mask-named after the three designers-Walter M Boothby, W Randolph Lovelace II and Arthur H Bulbulian. This mask and its variations originated just prior to World War 2 when aircraft were able to fly higher than 10,000 feet and pilot hypoxia affecting performance was an increasing problem. We give a brief description of the mask and its designers and discuss the donation of a model used by the British War Office in October 1940 and donated to the Harry Daly Museum at the Australian Society of Anaesthetists by the family of Dr Fred Street. Dr Street was a pioneering paediatric surgeon in Australia and served as a doctor in the Middle East and New Guinea in World War 2. He received the Military Cross.

  15. A Review of General Aviation Safety (1984-2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Douglas D

    2017-07-01

    General aviation includes all civilian aviation apart from operations involving paid passenger transport. Unfortunately, this category of aviation holds a lackluster safety record, accounting for 94% of civil aviation fatalities. In 2014, of 1143 general aviation accidents, 20% were fatal compared with 0 of 29 airline mishaps in the United States. Herein, research findings over the past 30 yr will be reviewed. Accident risk factors (e.g., adverse weather, geographical region, post-impact fire, gender differences) will be discussed. The review will also summarize the development and implementation of stringent crashworthiness designs with multi-axis dynamic testing and head-injury protection and its impact on mitigating occupant injury severity. The benefits and drawbacks of new technology and human factor considerations associated with increased general aviation automation will be debated. Data on the safety of the aging general aviation population and increased drug usage will also be described. Finally, areas in which general aviation occupant survival could be improved and injury severity mitigated will be discussed with the view of equipping aircraft with 1) crash-resistant fuel tanks to reduce post-impact conflagration; 2) after-market ballistic parachutes for older aircraft; and 3) current generation electronic locator beacons to hasten site access by first responders.Boyd DD. A review of general aviation safety (1984-2017). Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(7):657-664.

  16. [Progress in synthesis technologies and application of aviation biofuels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Xuebing; Yang, Ming; Liu, Dehua

    2013-03-01

    Development of aviation biofuels has attracted great attention worldwide because that the shortage of fossil resources has become more and more serious. In the present paper, the development background, synthesis technologies, current application status and existing problems of aviation biofuels were reviewed. Several preparation routes of aviation biofuels were described, including Fischer-Tropsch process, catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic cracking of bio-oil. The status of flight tests and commercial operation were also introduced. Finally the problems for development and application of aviation biofuels were stated, and some accommodation were proposed.

  17. Global, regional and local health impacts of civil aviation emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Steve H. L.; Lee, Gideon L.; Lee, In Hwan; Allroggen, Florian; Ashok, Akshay; Caiazzo, Fabio; Eastham, Sebastian D.; Malina, Robert; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2015-03-01

    Aviation emissions impact surface air quality at multiple scales—from near-airport pollution peaks associated with airport landing and take off (LTO) emissions, to intercontinental pollution attributable to aircraft cruise emissions. Previous studies have quantified aviation’s air quality impacts around a specific airport, in a specific region, or at the global scale. However, no study has assessed the air quality and human health impacts of aviation, capturing effects on all aforementioned scales. This study uses a multi-scale modeling approach to quantify and monetize the air quality impact of civil aviation emissions, approximating effects of aircraft plume dynamics-related local dispersion (˜1 km), near-airport dispersion (˜10 km), regional (˜1000 km) and global (˜10 000 km) scale chemistry and transport. We use concentration-response functions to estimate premature deaths due to population exposure to aviation-attributable PM2.5 and ozone, finding that aviation emissions cause ˜16 000 (90% CI: 8300-24 000) premature deaths per year. Of these, LTO emissions contribute a quarter. Our estimate shows that premature deaths due to long-term exposure to aviation-attributable PM2.5 and O3 lead to costs of ˜21 bn per year. We compare these costs to other societal costs of aviation and find that they are on the same order of magnitude as global aviation-attributable climate costs, and one order of magnitude larger than aviation-attributable accident and noise costs.

  18. New Refractive Surgery Procedures and Their Implications for Aviation Safety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakagawara, Van B; Wood, Kathryn J; Montgomery, Ron W

    2006-01-01

    ...., myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism) with corrective surgery. Prior Federal Aviation Administration research studies have shown that the number of civil airmen with refractive surgery continues to increase...

  19. Geographic region, weather, pilot age, and air carrier crashes: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohua; Pressley, Joyce C; Qiang, Yandong; Grabowski, Jurek G; Baker, Susan P; Rebok, George W

    2009-04-01

    Information about risk factors of aviation crashes is crucial for developing effective intervention programs. Previous studies assessing factors associated with crash risk were conducted primarily in general aviation, air taxis, and commuter air carriers. A matched case-control design was used to examine the associations of geographic region, basic weather condition, and pilot age with the risk of air carrier (14 CFR Part 121) crash involvement. Cases (N = 373) were air carrier crashes involving aircraft made by Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, and Airbus recorded in the National Transportation Safety Board's aviation crash database during 1983 through 2002, and controls (N = 746) were air carrier incidents involving aircraft of the same three makes selected at random from the Federal Aviation Administration's aviation incident database. Each case was matched with two controls on the calendar year when the index crash occurred. Conditional logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. With adjustment for basic weather condition, pilot age, and total flight time, the risk of air carrier crashes in Alaska was more than three times the risk for other regions ladjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-7.49]. Instrument meteorological conditions were associated with an increased risk for air carrier crashes involving pilot error (adjusted OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.15-4.44) and a decreased risk for air carrier crashes without pilot error (adjusted OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.37-0.96). Neither pilot age nor total flight time were significantly associated with the risk of air carrier crashes. The excess risk of air carrier crashes in Alaska and the effect of adverse weather on pilot-error crashes underscore the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety.

  20. Soviet Naval Aviation: Continuity and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    larger platform could handle more aircraft, with only a 25 percent increase in cost. 7 9 Admiral Pushkin presented the submarines case. Pushkin , in a...Soviet Naval Aviation," p. 143; Kir’ian, p. 39; Robert A. Kilmarx, A History of Soviet Air Power (New York: Praeger, 1962), p. 37. 16 Alexander Boyd...sbornik, No. 6, June, 1978, p. 93. 7 9 1bid., p. 99. 8 0 A. Pushkin , "Boevye deisviia Amerikansikh i Iaponshikh podvodnykh lodok protiv avianostev v period

  1. CAPPS II: the foundation of aviation security?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Arnold

    2004-08-01

    A new computer system is being developed to classify U.S. air travelers by the degree of terrorist threat they might pose. Reports indicate that the system--called CAPPS II--would use large amounts of information about each passenger, perhaps including such personal details as his or her magazine-subscription behavior. We argue that what is publicly known about CAPPS II raises questions about how substantially the system would improve aviation security. We discuss conditions under which CAPPS II could yield safety benefits, but suggest that it might be more prudent to view the system as one component of future security arrangements rather than the centerpiece of these arrangements.

  2. RISK MANAGEMENT IN ENSURING AVIATION (TRANSPORT SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Prozorov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with risk management in aviation (transport security based on the three-level assessment of the current threat levels according to the method of application of countermeasures, presented by ICAO in the form of a matrix of risk management, as well as by the introduction of measures to ensure transport safety, depending on the category of transport infrastructure (or vehicle and the level of Iransport safety. The article illustrates the complementarity of the two approaches, suggesting a higher efficiency of relevant processes in their joint application.

  3. Aviation security x-ray detection challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a review of the background and some drivers are provided for X-ray screening for aviation security. Some of the key considerations are highlighted along with impacts of the image-based approaches and signature approaches. The role of information theory is discussed along with some recent work that may influence the technical direction by posing the question: "what measurements, parameters and metrics should be considered in future system design?" A path forward should be based on information theory, however electronic machines will likely interface with humans and be dollar-cost driven, so ultimately solutions must consider additional parameters other than only technical performance factors.

  4. Explosives detection technology for commercial aviation security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafrik, Robert E.

    1994-03-01

    The threat posed to commercial aviation by small, concealed plastic explosives is particularly onerous. Small amounts of these highly energetic explosives are difficult to reliably detect using current technologies. But they can cause significant damage to an aircraft that can result in the destruction of the aircraft, resulting in loss of life. The key issues regarding explosive detection technologies include: What methods can detect plastic explosives? How do these methods perform in practice? How can the different methods be best employed to counter the terrorist threat?

  5. Particle Count Limits Recommendation for Aviation Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Filtration – gravimetric limit 1.0 mg/L (MIL-STD-3004) • ASTM D3240 – Undissolved Water in Aviation Turbine Fuels – 10 PPM (MIL-STD-3004, ATP 4-43...Unclassified • September 2012 – March 2015 • ASTM D5452 Laboratory filtration • IP 564 – Parker ACM20 (59 samples only) • IP 565/ASTM D7619 – Stanhope-Seta...0.415 mg/L • repeatability formula based on 5 liter sample • 36 samples may be lower than 1.0 mg/L based on repeatability calculations. • 14 samples have

  6. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Osman, Mohammed; Godso, David; King, Brent; Ricciardi, Michael

    1998-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the design developed for the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC). We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models within the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC system design. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has six chapters, a bibliography, three appendices and one attachment.

  7. Business statistics for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Score higher in your business statistics course? Easy. Business statistics is a common course for business majors and MBA candidates. It examines common data sets and the proper way to use such information when conducting research and producing informational reports such as profit and loss statements, customer satisfaction surveys, and peer comparisons. Business Statistics For Dummies tracks to a typical business statistics course offered at the undergraduate and graduate levels and provides clear, practical explanations of business statistical ideas, techniques, formulas, and calculations, w

  8. Business Plans For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Tiffany, Paul; Barrow, Colin

    2011-01-01

    A full updated and extended second edition of an established UK bestseller Business Plans For Dummies 2nd Edition features new and updated information on formulating a solid business plan to build a secure business - even in an economic downturn. Complete with a brand new business plan template to get you started this expert guide offers fresh advice on reading the competitive marketplace and assessing your business in the current economic climate. It walks you step-by-step through every aspect of planning achievable business goals and diversification strategies, identifying trends, exploring

  9. Aviation Technology Life Cycle Management: Importance for Aviation Companies, Aerospace Industry Organizations and Relevant Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Szabo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper in the introductory part underlines some aspects concerning the importance of Aviation Technology Life Cycle Management and informs on basic international standards for the processes and stages of life cycle. The second part is focused on definition and main objectives of system life cycle management. The authors subsequently inform on system life cycle stages (in general and system life cycle processes according to ISO/IEC/IEEE 15288:2015 standard. Following the fact, that life cycle cost (LCC is inseparable part and has direct connection to the life cycle management, the paper contains brief information regarding to LCC (cost categories, cost breakdown structure, cost estimation a.o.. Recently was issued the first part of Aviation Technology Life Cycle Management monograph (in Slovak: ”Manažment životného cyklu leteckej techniky I”, written by I.Koblen and S.Szabo. Following this fact and direct relation to the topic of article it is a part of article briefly introduced the content of two parts of this monograph (the 2nd part of monograph it has been prepared for the print. The last part of article is focused on issue concerning main assumptions and conditions for successful application of aviation technology life cycle management in aviation companies, aerospace industry organizations as well as from the relevant stakeholders side.

  10. Lack of international uniformity in assessing color vision deficiency in professional pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dougal B

    2014-02-01

    Color is an important characteristic of the aviation environment. Pilots must rapidly and accurately differentiate and identify colors. The medical standards published by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) require that pilots have "the ability to perceive readily those colors the perception of which is necessary for the safe performance of duties." The general wording of that color vision (CV) standard, coupled with the associated flexibility provisions, allows for different approaches to the assessment of color vision deficient (CVD) pilots. Data was gathered and analyzed regarding medical assessment practices applied by different countries to CVD pilots. Data was obtained from 78 countries, representing 78% of the population and 92% of the aviation activity of the world. That data indicates wide variation in the medical assessment of CVD pilots. Countries use different tools and procedures for the testing of pilots, and also apply different result criteria to those tests. At one extreme an applicant making one error upon Ishihara 24-plate pseudoisochromatic plate (PIP) testing is declined a class 1 medical assessment, while at another extreme an applicant failing every color vision test required by the regulatory authority may be issued a medical assessment allowing commercial and airline copilot privileges. The medical assessment of CVD applicants is not performed consistently across the world. Factors that favor uniformity have been inadequate to encourage countries toward consistent medical assessment outcomes. This data is not consistent with the highest practicable degree of uniformity in medical assessment outcomes, and encourages aeromedical tourism.

  11. The Future Of American Aviation Industry In International Markets (case Studies Of The New Bedford Airport And Chinese Aviation Market)

    OpenAIRE

    Yiyun, Hao; Wen Yu, Chien

    2013-01-01

    This project discovers the opportunities and challenges for the American aviation industry in international markets, through on-site case-study methods. The research hypothesis is this: “If there is better alignment with innovative international cooperation, then the American aviation industry’s success rates will be improved.” The project provides practical application, and it builds an optimal development model for addressing current problems facing the aviation industry in the United State...

  12. ICAO AVIATION OCCURRENCE CATEGORIES SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECTING AVIATION SAFETY IN POLAND FROM 2008 TO 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł GŁOWACKI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Poland, as a member of the EU, is represented within the ICAO, by the European Aviation Safety Agency. However, this does not relieve our country from the responsibility of developing a state safety programme (SSP. The need to set up such a programme, which has to be specific to every country involved in aviation operation, was introduced by the ICAO’s Annex 19. One of the important points in Annex 19 is: “5.2.1 Each State shall establish and maintain a safety database to facilitate the effective analysis of information on actual or potential safety deficiencies obtained, including that from its incident reporting systems, and to determine any actions required for the enhancement of safety”. The Polish Civil Aviation Authority, along with other databases, manages the European Coordination Centre for Aviation Incident Reporting Systems (ECCAIRS. The authors (who are specialists dealing with exploitation processes in aviation have conducted a laborious processing of the data contained in the ECCAIRS database, analysing them based on various criteria: aviation occurrence categories (as defined by the ICAO, phases of flight for different airports in Poland etc. Aircraft with an maximum take-off mass (MTOM 5,700 kg (commercial aviation were considered separately. It was found that the most events are those that relate to power plant (SCF-PP airframes and related system (SCF-NP failures, followed by collisions with birds (BIRD, events related to airports (ADRM and events related to the required separation of aircraft (MAC. For lighter aircraft, the dominant categories are ARC, CTOL, GTOW and LOC-I events. The article presents a proposed method for predicting the number of events, determining the alert levels for the next years and assuming a normal distribution (Gaussian. It is one of the first attempts to use actual data contained in the database of events on airports in Poland. The results of this analysis may support the decisions of

  13. Using Artificial Intelligence to Inform Pilots of Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Lodha, Suresh K.

    2006-01-01

    An automated system to assist a General Aviation (GA) pilot in improving situational awareness of weather in flight is now undergoing development. This development is prompted by the observation that most fatal GA accidents are attributable to loss of weather awareness. Loss of weather awareness, in turn, has been attributed to the difficulty of interpreting traditional preflight weather briefings and the difficulty of both obtaining and interpreting traditional in-flight weather briefings. The developmental automated system not only improves weather awareness but also substantially reduces the time a pilot must spend in acquiring and maintaining weather awareness.

  14. Art Interrupting Business, Business interrupting Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    performing online art that raises awareness about hidden aspects of business practices. As digital artists place the spotlight on activities and business strategies that are not part of corporate plans for communicating their “transparency,” they also work to reconfigure and re(de)fine this interface. To set...

  15. Business Structures Considered "Success" in Business Contemporary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanţa Enea

    2016-01-01

    The consequence of globalization of markets, while maintaining local specificity. Even smallcompanies involved in international business. Internationalization is not just a privilege of largecorporations. In this paper, we present some important milestones of entrepreneurial structuresthat stood out in the world so "strong" business.

  16. Business Models and Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai J.; Saebi, Tina

    2017-01-01

    While research on business models and business model innovation continue to exhibit growth, the field is still, even after more than two decades of research, characterized by a striking lack of cumulative theorizing and an opportunistic borrowing of more or less related ideas from neighbouring...

  17. Teaching Business Ethics or Teaching Business Ethically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stablein, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    Notes that one of the most important contexts for ethical decision-making is the nature and operation of "contemporary capitalisms." Suggests that rather than issuing a call for teaching business ethics, the author emphasizes the need for more ethical business teaching. (SG)

  18. Smart Business Networks Design and Business Genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L-F. Pau (Louis-François)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWith the emergence of smart business networks, agile networks, etc. as important research areas in management, for all the attractiveness of these concepts, a major issue remains around their design and the selection rules. While smart business networks should provide advantages due to

  19. What is the Business of Business?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2014-01-01

    environment but, in turn, is affected by it. Sustainability has until relatively recently been seen as irrelevant to business practice, but, today, environmental issues are increasingly becoming a key business concern at local, national, international and global levels (e.g. Worthington, 2013). Corporate......This paper argues that environment issues in general and energy transition in particular have become central issues in the twenty-first century. Environmental problems pervade all areas of daily life, including the world of business. Put simply, business activity not only affects the natural...... Sustainability Responsibility (CSR) is an important part of the “greening” of business (Worthington, 2013). But it is also used as “greenwashing”. Thus, CSR is an exemplar of the type of “wicked problem” that characterizes much of sustainability: It is a solution that poses as many threats and complications...

  20. ADMINISTRATIVE-LAW REGULATION SAFETY OF CIVIL AVIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgen Yeryashov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the purpose of our research is an analysis the norms of the Air Code of Ukraine concerning aviation safety and academic literature with aim to give definition administrative-law regulation safety of civil aviation. Methods: using the methods of comparison and analysis in conjunction with formal legal determined by the nature are given definitions environmental safety, economic safety and information safety. Also is given definition administrative-law regulation safety of civil aviation. Results: in the context of analysis the norms of the Air Code of Ukraine and academic literature the author considers an aviation safety as a complex legal phenomenon that, on the one hand is a relatively stable condition, and on another consists of five elements. Аn environmental safety, economic safety and information safety should be given a definition and included in the Article 1 of the Air Code of Ukraine. The article provided the following definition of administrative-law regulation safety of civil aviation: it is carried out by the State overbearing influence on the operators of aircraft and other aviation activities by adopting regulations varying legal force (as well as authorization in to national legislation regional and international agreements regarding a safe usage of aviation objectives in order to ensure of a safety of civil aviation. Discussion: in this article the author to consider of a concept of aviation safety and its elements. Also presents own definition of some elements of a safety of civil aviation and a concept of administrative-law regulation safety of civil aviation.