WorldWideScience

Sample records for buses final evaluation

  1. King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Final Evaluation Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

    2006-12-01

    Final technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington. The evaluation lasted 12 months.

  2. Project Startup: Evaluating the Performance of Electric Buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is evaluating the in-service performance of fast-charge battery electric buses compared to compressed natural gas (CNG) buses operated by Foothill Transit in West Covina, California. Launched in 2015 in collaboration with the California Air Resources Board, this study aims to improve understanding of the overall use and effectiveness of fast-charge electric buses and associated charging infrastructure in transit operation.

  3. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2007-03-01

    This report provides an evaluation of three prototype fuel cell-powered transit buses operating at AC Transit in Oakland, California, and six baseline diesel buses similar in design to the fuel cell buses.

  4. Evaluation of Orion/BAE Hybrid Buses and Orion CNG Buses at New York City Transit: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Barnitt, R.; Chandler, K.

    2005-05-01

    This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses the NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric transit buses operated by New York City Transit.

  5. Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

    2005-03-21

    The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

  6. Air quality in inter-city buses : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-06-29

    Various studies have suggested that air quality inside automobiles and school buses may be poorer than ambient or nearby air quality, and that concentrations of vehicle-related pollutants in city buses may be sufficiently elevated to pose concerns for vehicle occupants and operators. This paper presented the results of preliminary investigation of levels of some pollutants in inter-city buses to determine whether a fuller investigation is warranted. Another objective of the investigation was to develop methods for assessing air quality within road vehicles. Students carried monitoring equipment on 28 inter-city trips made by Greyhound Canada buses during July and August 2004. The equipment recorded average levels of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), as well as concentrations of particulate matter. Bus routes were selected that allowed for an average of 10 hours of total sampling time in a day. Data was recorded on pumps, run times and routes taken. Results indicated that levels of CO in the buses were much lower than the national standard of acceptable levels for CO. Levels of NO{sub 2} were on average lower, but 5 of the 19 recorded values exceeded acceptable levels. Average particulate levels recorded in the buses were considered acceptable, although some of the recorded levels were higher than desirable. It was concluded that further work on in-vehicle levels of NO{sub 2} and particulate matter could be warranted. Although several procedural and equipment problems were encountered, the methods used in the investigation appeared to be valid, and were thought to be suitable for further work on in-vehicle concentrations of pollutants. 21 refs.

  7. To Evaluate Zero Emission Propulsion and Support Technology for Transit Buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Chandler; Leslie Eudy

    2006-11-01

    This report provides evaluation results for prototype fuel cell transit buses operating at Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) in San Jose, California, in partnership with the San Mateo County Transit District in San Carlos, California. VTA has been operating three fuel cell transit buses in extra revenue service since February 28, 2005. This report provides descriptions of the equipment used, early experiences, and evaluation results from the operation of the buses and the supporting hydrogen infrastructure from March 2005 through July 2006.

  8. Overcoming obstacles to the commercialization of natural gas school buses and shuttle buses. Final report, February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biederman, R.; Blazek, C.

    1993-03-01

    The report provides an overview of the objectives, conclusions and recommendations discussed during the GRI-sponsored workshop. The workshop was unique in that it brought together a number of industry groups - chassis builders, engine manufacturers, end users, and natural gas distribution companies. The workshop focused upon identifying obstacles to the commercialization of natural gas school buses and shuttle buses in the near-term, defined as 1993 to 1996. Additional topics included R and D and technology transfer needs, infrastructure development, and legislative and regulatory impacts. Considerable attention was also devoted to the experience of end users, with regard to methods of facilitating fleet conversion and improving conversion economics.

  9. Interim Evaluation Results from New Flyer/Allison Hybrid Buses at King County Metro: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Eudy, L.

    2005-05-01

    This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric articulated transit buses operated by King County Metro.

  10. Reliability Evaluation Of The City Transport Buses Under Actual Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymarz Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to present a reliability comparison of two types of city transport buses. Case study on the example of the well-known brands of city buses: Solaris Urbino 12 and Mercedes-Benz 628 Conecto L used at Municipal Transport Company in Lublin was presented in details. A reliability index for the most failure parts and complex systems for the period of time failures was determined. The analysis covered damages of the following systems: engine, electrical system, pneumatic system, brake system, driving system, central heating and air-conditioning and doors. Reliability was analyzed based on Weibull model. It has been demonstrated, that during the operation significant reliability differences occur between the buses produced nowadays.

  11. In-Use Fleet Evaluation of Fast-Charge Battery Electric Transit Buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prohaska, Robert; Kelly, Kenneth; Eudy; Leslie

    2016-06-27

    With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts real-world performance evaluations of advanced medium- and heavy-duty fleet vehicles. Evaluation results can help vehicle manufacturers fine-tune their designs and assist fleet managers in selecting fuel-efficient, low-emission vehicles that meet their economic and operational goals. In 2015, NREL launched an in-service evaluation of 12 battery electric buses (BEBs) compared to conventional compressed natural gas (CNG) buses operated by Foothill Transit in West Covina, California. The study aims to improve understanding of the overall usage and effectiveness of fast-charge BEBs and associated charging infrastructure in transit operation. To date, NREL researchers have analyzed more than 148,000 km of in-use operational data, including driving and charging events. Foothill Transit purchased the BEBs with grant funding from the Federal Transit Administration's Transit Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction Program.

  12. Long Beach Transit: Two-Year Evaluation of Gasoline-Electric Hybrid Transit Buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, M.

    2008-06-01

    This report focuses on a gasoline-electric hybrid transit bus propulsion system. The propulsion system is an alternative to standard diesel buses and allows for reductions in emissions (usually focused on reductions of particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen) and petroleum use. Gasoline propulsion is an alternative to diesel fuel and hybrid propulsion allows for increased fuel economy, which ultimately results in reduced petroleum use.

  13. Evaluation of city buses installed diesel particulate filter systems on fleet test; Diesel particulate filter system wo tosaishita rosen bus no soko chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, H. [Japan Automobile Research Institute Inc., Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    An environmental air quality of suspended particulate matter is insufficient in the big city area. To reduce the particulate matter, improvement of engine and development of the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) system are carrying. The purpose of this report is to investigate a possibility of practical use of the city buses installed DPF systems. From March 1995, investigation for practical use of these DPF systems on a route buses was carried in regular service operation of the Tokyo and Yokohama Transportation Bureau. The investigation items are service situation, smoke density and preparation inspection. From the result for 2 years service operation, each DPF systems needed some failure correspondence. but these were not fatal problem on using the DPF system. Then the subject of relative to durability and reliability became clear, and the performance of a low particulate emission DPF system obtained the high value evaluation for users. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Was Busing the Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watras, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    On 15 April 2002, the Dayton Board of Education, the Ohio State Department of Education, and the NAACP reached an agreement ending busing for racial balance in the city schools. Participants agreed that the era for litigated desegregation was over because busing had failed to raise academic achievement of African American children and court…

  15. Data Collection, Testing, and Analysis of Hybrid Electric Trucks and Buses Operating in California Fleets. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duran, Adam [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ragatz, Adam [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cosgrove, Jon [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sindler, Petr [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Russell, Robert [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Johnson, Kent [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2015-06-12

    The objective of this project was to evaluate and quantify the emission impacts of commercially available hybrid medium- and heavy-duty vehicles relative to their non-hybrid counterparts. This effort will allow the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and other agencies to more effectively encourage development and commercial deployment of the most efficient, lowest emitting hybrid technologies needed to meet air quality and climate goals.

  16. ASEDRA Evaluation Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J; Detwiler, Dr. Rebecca; Sjoden, Dr, Glenn E.

    2008-09-01

    The performance of the Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm (ASEDRA) was evaluated by performing a blind test of 29 sets of gamma-ray spectra that were provided by DNDO. ASEDRA is a post-processing algorithm developed at the Florida Institute of Nuclear Detection and Security at the University of Florida (UF/FINDS) that extracts char-acteristic peaks in gamma-ray spectra. The QuickID algorithm, also developed at UF/FINDS, was then used to identify nuclides based on the characteristic peaks generated by ASEDRA that are inferred from the spectra. The ASEDRA/QuickID analysis results were evaluated with respect to the performance of the DHSIsotopeID algorithm, which is a mature analysis tool that is part of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS). Data that were used for the blind test were intended to be challenging, and the radiation sources included thick shields around the radioactive materials as well as cargo containing naturally occurring radio-active materials, which masked emission from special nuclear materials and industrial isotopes. Evaluation of the analysis results with respect to the ground truth information (which was provided after the analyses were finalized) showed that neither ASEDRA/QuickID nor GADRAS could identify all of the radiation sources correctly. Overall, the purpose of this effort was primarily to evaluate ASEDRA, and GADRAS was used as a standard against which ASEDRA was compared. Although GADRAS was somewhat more accurate on average, the performance of ASEDRA exceeded that of GADRAS for some of the unknowns. The fact that GADRAS also failed to identify many of the radiation sources attests to the difficulty of analyzing the blind-test data that were used as a basis for the evaluation. This evaluation identified strengths and weaknesses of the two analysis approaches. The importance of good calibration data was also clear because the performance of both analysis methods was impeded by the

  17. Interior noise profile of buses in Curitiba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannin, Paulo H. T.; Giovanini, Clifton R.; Diniz, Fabiano B.; Ferreira, Jose C.

    2002-11-01

    Evaluating the noise levels to which the bus drivers of Curitiba are exposed to during their working days is the main scope of this study. The city is served by an internationally known public transportation system featuring 1902 buses, which attend 1.9 million people per day. Two measurements have been taken inside each one of the 60 buses surveyed, one close to the driver and another one at the back of the bus. The results have showed that the dose levels the drivers are exposed to were below 50% in 92% out of the buses, but the normalized exposure levels were over 65 dB(A) in all cases. This level is considered as the threshold of comfort according to the Brazilian legislation on occupancy health NR-17--Ergonomics. The surveyed buses have been divided into three categories, according to their characteristics: feeder, rapid, and bi-articulated. A total of 20 buses within each category have been surveyed. Among the different categories, it has been found that the feeders have presented the highest noise levels. (To be presented in Portuguese.)

  18. Training evaluation final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Jose A.

    1992-01-01

    In the area of management training, 'evaluation' refers both to the specific evaluation instrument used to determine whether a training effort was considered effective, and to the procedures followed to evaluate specific training requests. This report recommends to evaluate new training requests in the same way new procurement or new projects are evaluated. This includes examining training requests from the perspective of KSC goals and objectives, and determining expected ROI of proposed training program (does training result in improved productivity, through savings of time, improved outputs, and/or personnel reduction?). To determine whether a specific training course is effective, a statement of what constitutes 'good performance' is required. The user (NOT the Training Branch) must define what is 'required level of performance'. This 'model' will be the basis for the design and development of an objective, performance-based, training evaluation instrument.

  19. Communication Buses and Protocols for Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mason

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper overviews existing digital communication buses which are commonly used in sensor networks, discusses sensor network architectures, and introduces a new sensor bus for low power microsystem applications. The new intra-module multi-element microsystem (IM2 bus is nine-line interface with 8b serial data which implements several advanced features such as power management and plug-n-play while maintaining minimum hardware overhead at the sensor node. Finally, some issues in wireless sensor networking are discussed. The coverage of these issues provides a guideline for choosing the appropriate bus for different sensor network applications.

  20. St. Louis Metro Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: 12-Month Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnitt, R.; McCormick, R. L.; Lammert, M.

    2008-07-01

    The St. Louis Metro Bodiesel Transit Bus Evaluation project is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between NREL and the National Biodiesel Board to evaluate the extended in-use performance of buses operating on B20 fuel. The objective of this research project is to compare B20 and ultra-low sulfur diesel buses in terms of fuel economy, veicles maintenance, engine performance, component wear, and lube oil performance.

  1. BAE/Orion Hybrid Electric Buses at New York City Transit: A Generational Comparison (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnitt, R.

    2008-03-01

    Paper describes the evaluation of hybrid-electric transit buses purchased by New York City Transit (NYCT) in an order group of 200 (Gen II) and compares their performance to those of similar hybrid-electric transit buses purchased by NYCT in an order group of 125 (Gen I).

  2. Evaluating Social Marketing - Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    Billings, Jenny R.; Hashem, Ferhana; Hellyer, N.; Kocman, D.

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this one-year project was to locate, monitor and evaluate health promotion interventions that are characterised and embedded in the use of social marketing techniques. This project was comprised of two phases – The aims of Phase One were to: Identify and prioritise those projects that have used social marketing techniques Agree an evaluation plan in collaboration with local and national experts The completion of the scoping exercise for Phase One highlighted that ...

  3. In-use fuel economy of hybrid-electric school buses in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmark, Shauna; Sperry, Bob; Mudgal, Abhisek

    2011-05-01

    Although it is much safer and more fuel-efficient to transport children to school in buses than in private vehicles, school buses in the United States still consume 822 million gal of diesel fuel annually, and school transportation costs can account for a significant portion of resource-constrained school district budgets. Additionally, children in diesel-powered school buses may be exposed to higher levels of particulates and other pollutants than children in cars. One solution to emission and fuel concerns is use of hybrid-electric school buses, which have the potential to reduce emissions and overall lifecycle costs compared with conventional diesel buses. Hybrid-electric technologies are available in the passenger vehicle market as well as the transit bus market and have a track record indicating fuel economy and emissions benefits. This paper summarizes the results of an in-use fuel economy evaluation for two plug-in hybrid school buses deployed in two different school districts in Iowa. Each school district selected a control bus with a route similar to that of the hybrid bus. Odometer readings, fuel consumption, and maintenance needs were recorded for each bus. The buses were deployed in 2008 and data were collected through May 2010. Fuel consumption was calculated for each school district. In Nevada, IA, the overall average fuel economy was 8.23 mpg for the hybrid and 6.35 mpg for the control bus. In Sigourney, IA, the overall average fuel economy was 8.94 mpg for the hybrid and 6.42 mpg for the control bus. The fuel consumption data were compared for the hybrid and control buses using a Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results indicate that fuel economy for the Nevada hybrid bus was 29.6% better than for the Nevada control bus, and fuel economy for the Sigourney hybrid bus was 39.2% higher than for the Sigourney control bus. Both differences were statistically significant. PMID:21608490

  4. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. R. Zirker; J. E. Francfort; J. J. Fielding

    2006-03-01

    This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation final report documents the feasibility of using oil bypass filters on 17 vehicles in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fleet during a 3-year test period. Almost 1.3 million test miles were accumulated, with eleven 4-cycle diesel engine buses accumulating 982,548 test miles and six gasoline-engine Chevrolet Tahoes accumulating 303,172 test miles. Two hundred and forty oil samples, taken at each 12,000-mile bus servicing event and at 3,000 miles for the Tahoes, documented the condition of the engine oils for continued service. Twenty-eight variables were normally tested, including the presence of desired additives and undesired wear metals such as iron and chrome, as well as soot, water, glycol, and fuel. Depending on the assumptions employed, the INL found that oil bypass filter systems for diesel engine buses have a positive payback between 72,000 and 144,000 miles. For the Tahoes, the positive payback was between 66,000 and 69,000 miles.

  5. A case study of real-world tailpipe emissions for school buses using a 20% biodiesel blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Claudio; Kuhns, Hampden D; Moosmüller, Hans; Witt, Jay; Nussbaum, Nicholas J; Oliver Chang, M-C; Parthasarathy, Gayathri; Nathagoundenpalayam, Suresh Kumar K; Nikolich, George; Watson, John G

    2007-10-15

    Numerous laboratory studies report carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and particulate matter emission reductions with a slight nitrogen oxides emission increase from engines operating with biodiesel and biodiesel blends as compared to using petroleum diesel. We conducted a field study on a fleet of school buses to evaluate the effects of biodiesel use on gaseous and particulate matter fuel-based emission factors under real-world conditions. The field experiment was carried out in two phases during winter 2004. In January (phase I), emissions from approximately 200 school buses operating on petroleum diesel were measured. Immediately after the end of the first phase measurement period, the buses were switched to a 20% biodiesel blend. Emission factors were measured again in March 2004 (phase II) and compared with the January emission factors. To measure gaseous emission factors we used a commercial gaseous remote sensor. Particulate matter emission factors were determined with a combination of the gaseous remote sensor, a Lidar (light detection and ranging), and transmissometer system developed at the Desert Research Institute of Reno, NV, U.S.A. Particulate matter emissions from school buses significantly increased (up to a factor of 1.8) after the switch from petroleum diesel to a 20% biodiesel blend. The fuel used during this campaign was provided by a local distributor and was independently analyzed at the end of the on-road experiment. The analysis found high concentrations of free glycerin and reduced flash points in the B 100 parent fuel. Both measures indicate improper separation and processing of the biodiesel product during production. The biodiesel fuels used in the school buses were not in compliance with the U.S.A. ASTM D6751 biodiesel standard that was finalized in December of 2001. The U.S.A. National Biodiesel Board has formed a voluntary National Biodiesel Accreditation Program for producers and marketers of biodiesel to ensure product quality and

  6. The New Energy Buses in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jingyu; Liu, Yingqi; Kokko, Ari

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of “low carbon” economy, new energy vehicles are increasingly favored by the Chinese government and manufacturers. New energy buses have become an important channel for the promotion of new energy utilizations. Based on the summary of policies, this paper conducts a thorough resea...... price. We draw the conclusions that clear direction and detailed plans will enhance the new energy bus promotion and rising oil prices will promote new energy buses as well....... research on the technology and promotion achievements on new energy buses. We have found that the promotion achievements have difference with plans and gaps exist in different cities. In the paper we discuss the policy efficiency, the correlation between achievements, policies and the influence from oil...

  7. Clean School Bus USA: Tomorrow's Buses for Today's Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is ensuring that all new buses meet tighter standards developed to reduce diesel emissions and improve safety. Today's new buses are cleaner--60 times cleaner than buses built before 1990--and feature additional emergency exits, improved mirror systems, and pedestrian safety devices. But replacing…

  8. Smart Procurement of Naturally Generated Energy (SPONGE) for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Buses

    OpenAIRE

    Naoum-Sawaya, Joe; Crisostomi, Emanuele; Liu, Mingming; Gu, Yingqi; Shorten, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a recently introduced ECO-driving concept known as SPONGE in the context of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Buses (PHEB)'s.Examples are given to illustrate the benefits of this approach to ECO-driving. Finally, distributed algorithms to realise SPONGE are discussed, paying attention to the privacy implications of the underlying optimisation problems.

  9. Emergency building temperature restrictions. Final evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-11-01

    On July 5, 1979, DOE promulgated final regulations of the Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions program, placing emergency restrictions on thermostat settings for space heating, space cooling, and hot water in commercial, industrial, and nonresidential public buildings. The final regulations restricted space heating to a maximum of 65/sup 0/F, hot water temperature to a maximum of 105/sup 0/F, and cooling temperature to a minimum of 78/sup 0/F. A comprehensive evaluation of the entire EBTF program for a nine-month period from July 16, 1979 is presented. In Chapter 1, an estimate of the population of buildings covered by EBTR is presented. In Chapter 2, EBTR compliance by building type and region is reported. Exemptions are also discussed. In Chapter 3, the simulations of building energy use are explained and the relative impact of various building characteristics and effectiveness of different control strategies are estimated. Finally, in Chapter 4, the methodology for scaling the individual building energy savings to the national level is described, and estimated national energy savings are presented.

  10. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2011-11-01

    This status report, fifth in a series of annual status reports from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), discusses the achievements and challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transit and summarizes the introduction of fuel cell transit buses in the United States. Progress this year includes an increase in the number of fuel cell electric buses (FCEBs), from 15 to 25, operating at eight transit agencies, as well as increased diversity of the fuel cell design options for transit buses. The report also provides an analysis of the combined results from fuel cell transit bus demonstrations evaluated by NREL with a focus on the most recent data through July 2011 including fuel cell power system reliability and durability; fuel economy; roadcall; and hydrogen fueling results. These evaluations cover 22 of the 25 FCEBs currently operating.

  11. Unit Monitors Manchester-Format Data Buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Jose J.

    1994-01-01

    Circuit card converts data signals into convenient hexadecimal form for troubleshooting. Bus-monitoring unit converts data signals from Manchester II format used on data bus into hexadecimal format. Monitoring circuit causes hexadecimal words to display on video terminal, where test engineer compares them with hexadecimal records for troubleshooting. Circuit monitors one bus or two buses simultaneously.

  12. [Evaluation of labor-related and physical risk factors for cardiovascular disease in drivers of urban transport buses in Montes Claros in the state of Minas Gerais].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquimim, Andréia Farias; Barral, Ana Beatris Cezar Rodrigues; Gomes, Kênnya Caroline; Rezende, Mayra Costa de

    2012-08-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate risk factors for cardiovascular disease among bus drivers in Montes Claros in the state of Minas Gerais. A semi-structured questionnaire covering personal, anthropometric, professional and labor-related data was used, in addition to a questionnaire on the level of stress. 53 bus drivers were surveyed and the average age was 30 to 39 years of age. 81.1% were non-smokers; 58% of the sample were teetotalers; and 50% took regular exercise. In the assessment of BMI, 40 drivers (75.4%) were overweight. The prevalence in eating habits revealed excess consumption of sugar (66.0%), fat (64.2%), coffee (69.8%), salt (60.4%), coca cola (64.2%) and soft drinks (54.7%). Among reports of chronic diseases, no diabetic (98.1%) or hypertensive (94.3%) drivers were observed. Most of the sample (69.7%) had normal stress levels. With respect to laboratory data, the vast majority of drivers had hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia. HDL levels were satisfactory, and the LDL revealed normal and desirable levels in more than half of the sample. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease was low. PMID:22899155

  13. Bacterial Quality of Drinking Water in Bushehr Intercity Buses in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Ranjbar Vakilabadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Road transportation and specifically bus travel accounts for the bulk of travel. Contaminated drinking water consumption is one of the issues that threaten health, and always there is pollution possibility in drinking water in buses. This study evaluated the microbial quality of consumed drinking water in buses and also compared it with available standards. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study. By considering similar studies, 95% confidence interval and based on the samples size formula for tradition of proportion, 80 buses from 122 buses that entered Bushehr Passenger Depot from other cities or exited it were randomly selected. Over a three-month period, samples were taken from drinking water in these buses. Temperature, pH, residual chlorine, total coliform (TC, and fecal coliform (E. coli in each sample were measured in accordance with the standard method. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out with SPSS Version 16, and the t-test was performed for statistical difference. Results: The results showed that residual chlorine in 97.5% was zero and pH values of the samples were in the range of 6.8-8.7. TC and E. coli numbers in 12.5% and 8.8% of the samples were higher than those of standards, respectively. Conclusion: Use of ice, washing time of the drinking water tank (daily or weekly, and method of usage and storage of drinking water (with 20-liter tanks had significant effects on the bacterial loads of the drinking water in the tanks (p value <0.05. Some factors such as tank material, driver's education and age, type and model of the bus, filling time of the tank (daily or weekly, the method of filling and emptying the tank (complete clearing out of the tank or otherwise, and distance had no significant effect on the quality of the drinking water in the buses.

  14. Txatarra: vivienda transitoria con buses de transporte público

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Arenas Vargas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente análisis del proyecto Casa Linda parte de una exploración conceptual en torno a un hábitat sostenible, mediante la generación de un tipo de vivienda transitoria que reutiliza buses de transporte público destinados a ser reducidos a chatarra. La necesidad de replantear la labor de configurar espacios con materiales y formas predeterminados llevó a los autores a comprender cómo resultan insuficientes los medios tradicionales de construcción, en los que se acostumbra emplear materias primas en presentaciones estandarizadas y con acabados predefinidos que se adaptan a los requerimientos y necesidades del proyecto. Enfrentar el proyecto a partir del reciclaje de materiales y objetos (chatarra, de diversas dimensiones y en variadas condiciones, generó un proceso cuya característica principal es la imposibilidad de anticipar con exactitud los procesos constructivos y los acabados finales.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Temperatures within Tour Buses under Real-Time Traffic Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Fu Chiu

    Full Text Available This study monitored the carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations and temperatures of three 43-seat tour buses with high-passenger capacities in a course of a three-day, two-night school excursion. Results showed that both driver zones and passenger zones of the tour buses achieved maximum CO2 concentrations of more than 3000 ppm, and maximum daily average concentrations of 2510.6 and 2646.9 ppm, respectively. The findings confirmed that the CO2 concentrations detected in the tour buses exceeded the indoor air quality standard of Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (8 hr-CO2: 1000 ppm and the air quality guideline of Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department (1 hr-CO2: 2500 ppm for Level 1 for buses. Observations also showed that high-capacity tour bus cabins with air conditioning system operating in recirculation mode are severely lacking in air exchange rate, which may negatively impact transportation safety. Moreover, the passenger zones were able to maintain a temperature of between 20 and 25°C during travel, which effectively suppresses the dispersion of volatile organic compounds. Finally, the authors suggest that in the journey, increasing the ventilation frequency of tour bus cabin, which is very beneficial to maintain the travel safety and enhance the quality of travel.

  16. Conceptual Design of the TPF-O SC Buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Lloyd R.

    2007-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder - Occulter (TPF-O) mission has two Spacecraft (SC) buses, one for a space telescope and the other for a formation-flying occulter. SC buses typically supply the utilities (support structures, propulsion, attitude control, power, communications, etc) required by the payloads. Unique requirements for the occulter SC bus are to provide the large delta V required for the slewing maneuvers of the occulter, and comunications for formation flying. The TPF-O telescope SC bus shares some key features of the one for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST): both support space telescopes designed to observe in the visible to near infrared range of wavelengths with comparable primary mirror apertures (2.4 m for HST, 2.4 - 4.0 m for TPF-O). However, TPF-O is expected to have a Wide Field Camera (WFC) with a Field of View (FOV) much larger than that of HST. Ths WFC is also expected to provide fine guidance. TPF-O is designed to operate in an orbit around the Sun-Earth Lagrange 2 (SEL2) point. The longer communications range to SEL2 and the large science FOV require higher performance communications than HST. Maintaining a SEL2 orbit requires TPF-O, unlike HST, to have a propulsion system. The velocity required for reachng SEL2 and the limited capabilities of affordable launch vehicles require both TPF-O elements to have compact, low-mass designs. Finally, it is possible that TPF-O may utilize a modular design derived fiom that of HST to allow servicing in the SEL2 orbit.

  17. Evaluation of Resource Acquisition Approaches : Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, Maura L.; Mortimer, Tom; Palermini, Debbi; Nelson, Kari

    1991-09-12

    Over the last few years, Bonneville has been addressing this need and has developed numerous ways of acquiring resources. Four of these Approaches, the Competitive Acquisition, Billing Credits, and Targeted Acquisition Programs, and the Cowlitz Falls Hydroelectric Project, were the subject of this evaluation project. Each Approach is currently in different stages of a process, and Bonneville felt it was an appropriate time that an evaluation be conducted. The purpose of this evaluation is to analyze the various Approaches` processes, to learn what`s working and what`s not, and to offer recommendations as to how Bonneville might improve their resources acquisition efforts. The evaluation was conducted with no preconceived biases.

  18. School Buses Answer Calls for Help in Crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2005-01-01

    Five days after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, a convoy of 142 air-conditioned school buses from the 209,000-student Texas district rumbled to life. Loaded with food and bottled water, staffed by 350 school employees, and accompanied by bus-repair trucks and a phalanx of school police cars, the yellow buses traveled all night to reach the…

  19. COORDINATION OF THE WORK OF BUSES IN CITY ROUTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad DASHDAMIROV

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied the work of bus routes passing through a street. Optimality criterion was chosen for the development of appropriate models of effective work of buses on the land. The paper proposes a new model costing time passengers at bus stops. A method of technique was developed to coordinate the buses running on the combined section of route.

  20. 46 CFR 111.30-19 - Buses and wiring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buses and wiring. 111.30-19 Section 111.30-19 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-19 Buses and wiring. (a) General. Each bus must meet the requirements...

  1. IUC/OCLC Network Evaluation. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westat Research, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    The operation of the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC) on-line bibliographic system in Texas and New Mexico Libraries was evaluated. The economic aspects of automated cataloging and card production were compared with previous methods; the effectiveness of the system as a tool for pre-order searching was evaluated; and the impact of the system's…

  2. [Energy Conservation and Emissions Reduction Benefits Analysis for Battery Electric Buses Based on Travel Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-dan; Tian, Liang; Lü, Bin; Yang, Jian-xin

    2015-09-01

    Battery Electric Bus (BEB) has become one of prior options of urban buses for its "zero emission" during the driving stage. However, the environmental performance of electric buses is affected by multi-factors from the point of whole life cycle. In practice, carrying capacity of BEB and power generation structures can both implement evident effects on the energy consumption and pollutants emission of BEB. Therefore, take the above factors into consideration, in this article, Life Cycle Assessment is employed to evaluate the energy conservation and emissions reduction benefits of BEB. Results indicate that, travel service is more reasonable as the functional unit, rather than mileage, since the carrying capacity of BEB is 15% lower than the diesel buses. Moreover, compared with diesel buses, the energy conservation and emissions reduction benefits of battery electric buses are all different due to different regional power structures. Specifically, the energy benefits are 7. 84%, 11. 91%, 26. 90%, 11. 15%, 19. 55% and 20. 31% respectively in Huabei, Huadong, Huazhong, Dongbei, Xibei and Nanfang power structure. From the point of comprehensive emissions reduction benefits, there is no benefit in Huabei power structure, as it depends heavily on coal. But in other areas, the comprehensive emissions reduction benefits of BEB are separately 3. 46%, 26. 81%, 1. 17%, 13. 74% and 17. 48% in Huadong, Huazhong, Dongbei, Xibei and Nanfang. Therefore, it suggests that, enlargement of carrying capacity should be taken as the most prior technology innovation direction for BEB, and the grids power structure should be taken into consideration when the development of BEB is in planning. PMID:26717718

  3. [Energy Conservation and Emissions Reduction Benefits Analysis for Battery Electric Buses Based on Travel Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-dan; Tian, Liang; Lü, Bin; Yang, Jian-xin

    2015-09-01

    Battery Electric Bus (BEB) has become one of prior options of urban buses for its "zero emission" during the driving stage. However, the environmental performance of electric buses is affected by multi-factors from the point of whole life cycle. In practice, carrying capacity of BEB and power generation structures can both implement evident effects on the energy consumption and pollutants emission of BEB. Therefore, take the above factors into consideration, in this article, Life Cycle Assessment is employed to evaluate the energy conservation and emissions reduction benefits of BEB. Results indicate that, travel service is more reasonable as the functional unit, rather than mileage, since the carrying capacity of BEB is 15% lower than the diesel buses. Moreover, compared with diesel buses, the energy conservation and emissions reduction benefits of battery electric buses are all different due to different regional power structures. Specifically, the energy benefits are 7. 84%, 11. 91%, 26. 90%, 11. 15%, 19. 55% and 20. 31% respectively in Huabei, Huadong, Huazhong, Dongbei, Xibei and Nanfang power structure. From the point of comprehensive emissions reduction benefits, there is no benefit in Huabei power structure, as it depends heavily on coal. But in other areas, the comprehensive emissions reduction benefits of BEB are separately 3. 46%, 26. 81%, 1. 17%, 13. 74% and 17. 48% in Huadong, Huazhong, Dongbei, Xibei and Nanfang. Therefore, it suggests that, enlargement of carrying capacity should be taken as the most prior technology innovation direction for BEB, and the grids power structure should be taken into consideration when the development of BEB is in planning.

  4. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation Results: Second Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-09-01

    Second report evaluating a fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL published its first report on the demonstration in February 2014. This report is an update to the previous report; it covers 3 full years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2014 and focuses on the final experiences and lessons learned.

  5. Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC`s Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available.

  6. Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC's Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available

  7. Electric Buses in Urban Transport, The Situation and Development Trends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jakub Slavlk

    2014-01-01

    A study called "E-mobilita v MHD" (e-mobility in urban mass transit) has been conducted by the author's private consultancy to inform Czech public transport operators about the technologies and operational experience to date and stimulate the e-bus utilization as well as their involvement in e-bus research and development projects. The study covers trolley-buses, diesel hybrids and e-buses including fuel cell buses. These electric urban buses have been compared with combustion engine vehicles represented by diesel and CNG (compressed natural gas) buses, in terms of energy consumption and cost, greenhouse gas emissions, noise and life cycle cost. Relations between urban transport e-mobility and the "smart grid" concept have been presented as well. Comprehensive reports prepared on the European Union and the USA levels have been the basis for the study, completed by information from the field research, focused especially on the bus operational reliability and other parameters important for a transport operator and covering, interalia, 12 case studies. The results show electric buses as a promising urban transport mode with massive technology development overcoming their operational limitations. Synergies between electric buses and other urban systems, such as power supply, are notable as well.

  8. Comparison of Life Cycle energy consumption and GHG emissions of natural gas, biodiesel and diesel buses of the Madrid transportation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a comparative study on the use of three after-treatment technologies: i) EGR + DPF, ii) SCR + Urea and iii) 3-way catalyst when implemented in urban buses, to determinate the energy requirements, greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), direct Land Use Change (dLUC), abiotic depletion of fossil energy by means of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The process of production, conditioning and transporting of the fuels used by the buses (diesel, biodiesel (B100), a blended biodiesel at 20% (B20) and natural gas) were also analyzed (Well-to-Tank analysis) along with the environmental impact due to its combustion in the bus (Tank-to-Wheel analysis). The environmental impact of the manufacturing, maintenance and recycling process of the urban buses and exhaust after-treatment systems has also been evaluated. Main results shows that Life Cycle of SCR + Urea technology reduces environmental impact to a greater extent than its global Life Cycle increases it when gasoil is used resulting in a final balance more efficient than the other options, the same behavior is observed with the use of B20 and B100 but only when 0%dLUC is assumed since if the percentage of dLUC increases the effectiveness of the SCR + Urea technology in the reduction of environmental impact tend to decrease. -- Highlights: ► We examine the environmental impact caused by the Life Cycle of each technology, fossil fuel, biofuel and vehicle. ► Biodiesel environmental impact depends largely on land transformed for grow crops. ► Using SCR + Urea technology and gasoil as a fuel in the bus further reduces the environmental impact.

  9. Inventory evaluation and prognosis of NORM residues for the final disposal in a radioactive waste final repository. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report on the evaluation and prognosis of NORM residues for the final disposal covers the following issues: scope of the project; practice of release of NORM residues for utilization and disposal and its impact on the mass balance of NORM wastes; compilation of the amount of NORM residues with improbable clearance from radiation protection monitoring; identification of so far existing storage sites and interim storage possibilities and their capacities; NORM residues that are not released from radiation surveillance and need presumably the delivering to a radioactive waste repository; estimation of cost and evaluation of economic aspects for the options interim storage and final disposal; options for the final disposal of NORM wastes.

  10. Implications of the Final Procedures for Evaluating Specific Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senf, Gerald M., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Discussed are some negative implications of the final federal rules for evaluating specific learning disabilities (Federal Register, December 29, 1977), which conceptually redefined learning disabilities to mean an "underachievement." (DLS)

  11. New concept for the ground connection in Scania’s trucks and buses

    OpenAIRE

    LLORENTE, ANDRÉS

    2014-01-01

    Regarding the ground electrical connection in trucks and buses, the requirements of earthing in heavy-duty vehicles were gathered and evaluated. The most important problems in the state-of-the-art grounding devices are corrosion, electrical resistance and uncertainty in the mounting process, altogether with depreciation over time. The goal is to come up with new concepts that can give a more reliable and better ground connection into the frame with faster, easier and safer manufacturing opera...

  12. Final report : PATTON Alliance gazetteer evaluation project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleakly, Denise Rae

    2007-08-01

    In 2005 the National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC) proposed that the PATTON Alliance provide assistance in evaluating and obtaining the Integrated Gazetteer Database (IGDB), developed for the Naval Space Warfare Command Research group (SPAWAR) under Advance Research and Development Activity (ARDA) funds by MITRE Inc., fielded to the text-based search tool GeoLocator, currently in use by NGIC. We met with the developers of GeoLocator and identified their requirements for a better gazetteer. We then validated those requirements by reviewing the technical literature, meeting with other members of the intelligence community (IC), and talking with both the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) and the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA), the authoritative sources for official geographic name information. We thus identified 12 high-level requirements from users and the broader intelligence community. The IGDB satisfies many of these requirements. We identified gaps and proposed ways of closing these gaps. Three important needs have not been addressed but are critical future needs for the broader intelligence community. These needs include standardization of gazetteer data, a web feature service for gazetteer information that is maintained by NGA and USGS but accessible to users, and a common forum that brings together IC stakeholders and federal agency representatives to provide input to these activities over the next several years. Establishing a robust gazetteer web feature service that is available to all IC users may go a long way toward resolving the gazetteer needs within the IC. Without a common forum to provide input and feedback, community adoption may take significantly longer than anticipated with resulting risks to the war fighter.

  13. Prediction of Conducted Emissions in Satellite Power Buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Spadacini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports a modeling methodology for the prediction of conducted emissions (CE in a wide frequency range (up to 100 MHz, which are generated by dc/dc converters and propagate along the power buses of satellites. In particular, the dc/dc converter seen as a source of CE is represented by a behavioral model, whose parameters can be identified by two unit-level experimental procedures performed in controlled test setups. A simplified multiconductor transmission-line (MTL model is developed to account for the propagation of CE in shielded bundles of twisted-wire pairs used as power cables. The whole power system is represented by the interconnection of the circuit models of dc/dc converters, cables, and Power Conditioning and Distribution Unit (PCDU. By solving the obtained network, frequency spectra of CE can be predicted. Experimental results are reported to substantiate the accuracy of the proposed unit-level dc/dc converter model and the MTL model of cables. Finally, a system-level test setup composed of three dc/dc converters connected to a PCDU is considered, and predicted CE are compared versus experimental measurements.

  14. Final evaluation of the Msunduza Dry Sanitation Project

    OpenAIRE

    Leppänen, Silja

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation is a generic part of the project cycle, which gives critical information to the funder and different stakeholders of development projects, striving to improvement of the development aid, strategies and policies. Evaluation is a periodic, objective assessment of a planned, ongoing or already completed project. It answers specific questions related to project design, implementation and results. Final evaluation is summative and it typically focuses on the impacts of the program, demo...

  15. Particle and gaseous emissions from individual diesel and CNG buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Å. M.; Jerksjö, M.; Fallgren, H.; Westerlund, J.; Sjödin, Å.

    2013-05-01

    In this study size-resolved particle and gaseous emissions from 28 individual diesel-fuelled and 7 compressed natural gas (CNG)-fuelled buses, selected from an in-use bus fleet, were characterised for real-world dilution scenarios. The method used was based on using CO2 as a tracer of exhaust gas dilution. The particles were sampled by using an extractive sampling method and analysed with high time resolution instrumentation EEPS (10 Hz) and CO2 with a non-dispersive infrared gas analyser (LI-840, LI-COR Inc. 1 Hz). The gaseous constituents (CO, HC and NO) were measured by using a remote sensing device (AccuScan RSD 3000, Environmental System Products Inc.). Nitrogen oxides, NOx, were estimated from NO by using default NO2/NOx ratios from the road vehicle emission model HBEFA3.1. The buses studied were diesel-fuelled Euro III-V and CNG-fuelled Enhanced Environmentally Friendly Vehicles (EEVs) with different after-treatment, including selective catalytic reduction (SCR), exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and with and without diesel particulate filter (DPF). The primary driving mode applied in this study was accelerating mode. However, regarding the particle emissions also a constant speed mode was analysed. The investigated CNG buses emitted on average a higher number of particles but less mass compared to the diesel-fuelled buses. Emission factors for number of particles (EFPN) were EFPN, DPF = 4.4 ± 3.5 × 1014, EFPN, no DPF = 2.1 ± 1.0 × 1015 and EFPN, CNG = 7.8 ± 5.7 ×1015 kg fuel-1. In the accelerating mode, size-resolved emission factors (EFs) showed unimodal number size distributions with peak diameters of 70-90 nm and 10 nm for diesel and CNG buses, respectively. For the constant speed mode, bimodal average number size distributions were obtained for the diesel buses with peak modes of ~10 nm and ~60 nm. Emission factors for NOx expressed as NO2 equivalents for the diesel buses were on average 27 ± 7 g (kg fuel)-1 and for the CNG buses 41 ± 26 g (kg

  16. Particle and gaseous emissions from individual diesel and CNG buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Å. M. Hallquist

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study size-resolved particle and gaseous emissions from 28 individual diesel-fuelled and 7 compressed natural gas (CNG-fuelled buses, selected from an in-use bus fleet, were characterised for real-world dilution scenarios. The method used was based on using CO2 as a tracer of exhaust gas dilution. The particles were sampled by using an extractive sampling method and analysed with high time resolution instrumentation EEPS (10 Hz and CO2 with a non-dispersive infrared gas analyser (LI-840, LI-COR Inc. 1 Hz. The gaseous constituents (CO, HC and NO were measured by using a remote sensing device (AccuScan RSD 3000, Environmental System Products Inc.. Nitrogen oxides, NOx, were estimated from NO by using default NO2/NOx ratios from the road vehicle emission model HBEFA3.1. The buses studied were diesel-fuelled Euro III–V and CNG-fuelled Enhanced Environmentally Friendly Vehicles (EEVs with different after-treatment, including selective catalytic reduction (SCR, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR and with and without diesel particulate filter (DPF. The primary driving mode applied in this study was accelerating mode. However, regarding the particle emissions also a constant speed mode was analysed. The investigated CNG buses emitted on average a higher number of particles but less mass compared to the diesel-fuelled buses. Emission factors for number of particles (EFPN were EFPN, DPF = 4.4 ± 3.5 × 1014, EFPN, no DPF = 2.1 ± 1.0 × 1015 and EFPN, CNG = 7.8 ± 5.7 ×1015 kg fuel−1. In the accelerating mode, size-resolved emission factors (EFs showed unimodal number size distributions with peak diameters of 70–90 nm and 10 nm for diesel and CNG buses, respectively. For the constant speed mode, bimodal average number size distributions were obtained for the diesel buses with peak modes of ~10 nm and ~60 nm. Emission factors for NOx expressed as NO2 equivalents for the diesel buses were on average 27 ± 7 g (kg fuel−1 and for the CNG buses 41

  17. TADS Final Evaluation Report, 1980-81. Appendix S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Tanya M.; And Others

    The document contains the final report of the Technical Assistance Development System (TADS), a program which provided technical assistance (TA) services to 53 Handicapped Children's Early Education Program (HCEEP) demonstration projects and 13 State Implementation Grants (SIGs). The evaluation report is divided into five sections. Section 1…

  18. Entrepreneurship Education in the Arab States. Final Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamloumi, Jilani

    2013-01-01

    The report involves the findings of the final evaluation of the regional entrepreneurship education project in Arab States component II (2011-2012) (see ED560497), which is a joint activity between UNESCO and StratREAL Foundation. It aims to help the development of educational policies enabling the integration of entrepreneurship education within…

  19. Final postflight hardware evaluation report RSRM-28 (STS-53)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrett, William David, Jr.

    1993-11-01

    The final report for the Clearfield disassembly evaluation and a continuation of the KSC postflight assessment for the RSRM-28 (STS-53) RSRM flight set is presented. All observed hardware conditions were documented on PFOR's and are included in Appendices A through C. Appendices D and E contain the measurements and safety factor data for the nozzle and insulation components. This report, along with the KSC Ten-Day Postflight Hardware Evaluation Report (TWR-64215), represents a summary of the RSRM-28 hardware evaluation. The as-flown hardware configuration is documented in TWR-63638. Disassembly evaluation photograph numbers are logged in TWA-1989. The RSRM-28 flight set disassembly evaluations described were performed at the RSRM Refurbishment Facility in Clearfield, Utah. The final factory joint demate occurred on July 15, 1993. Additional time was required to perform the evaluation of the stiffener rings per special issue 4.1.5.2 because of the washout schedule. The release of this report was after completion of all special issues per program management direction. Detailed evaluations were performed in accordance with the Clearfield PEEP, TWR-50051, Revision A. All observations were compared against limits that are also defined in the PEEP. These limits outline the criteria for categorizing the observations as acceptable, reportable, or critical. Hardware conditions that were unexpected and/or determined to be reportable or critical were evaluated by the applicable team and tracked through the PFAR system.

  20. Towards sustainable urban transportation: Test, demonstration and development of fuel cell and hybrid-electric buses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects make today's transport system non-sustainable: - Production, transport and combustion of fossil fuels lead to global and local environmental problems. - Oil dependency in the transport sector may lead to economical and political instability. - Air pollution, noise, congestion and land-use may jeopardise public health and quality of life, especially in urban areas. In a sustainable urban transport system most trips are made with public transport because high convenience and comfort makes travelling with public transport attractive. In terms of emissions, including noise, the vehicles are environmentally sustainable, locally as well as globally. Vehicles are energy-efficient and the primary energy stems from renewable sources. Costs are reasonable for all involved, from passengers, bus operators and transport authorities to vehicle manufacturers. The system is thus commercially viable on its own merits. This thesis presents the results from three projects involving different concept buses, all with different powertrains. The first two projects included technical evaluations, including tests, of two different fuel cell buses. The third project focussed on development of a series hybrid-bus with internal combustion engine intended for production around 2010. The research on the fuel cell buses included evaluations of the energy efficiency improvement potential using energy mapping and vehicle simulations. Attitudes to hydrogen fuel cell buses among passengers, bus drivers and bus operators were investigated. Safety aspects of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel were analysed and the use of hydrogen compared to electrical energy storage were also investigated. One main conclusion is that a city bus should be considered as one energy system, because auxiliaries contribute largely to the energy use. Focussing only on the powertrain is not sufficient. The importance of mitigating losses far down an energy conversion chain is emphasised. The Scania hybrid fuel cell

  1. The economic and environmental feasibility of biogas buses in Liege

    OpenAIRE

    Mostert, Martine; Limbourg, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Everyday, many students at the University of Liège have to drive to the Sart-Tilman village to attend their courses. These journeys are responsible for the emission of harmful particles which have negative impacts on climate and human health. This paper analyzes the economic and environmental feasibility of using biogas buses for public transport in Liège. The idea of implementing biogas buses is based on the proposed recycling of organic waste by the company INTRADEL, which manages and treat...

  2. 78 FR 59729 - Final Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... COMMISSION Final Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive... the Final Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste Spent Ion Exchange Resins from Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors (Final Report). ADDRESSES:...

  3. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Quasi-In-Motion Wireless Power Transfer for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Transit Buses from Fleet Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijuan; Gonder, Jeff; Brooker, Aaron; Meintz, Andrew; Konan, Arnaud; Markel, Tony

    2016-05-16

    This study evaluated the costs and benefits associated with the use of stationary-wireless-power-transfer-enabled plug-in hybrid electric buses and determined the cost effectiveness relative to conventional buses and hybrid electric buses. A factorial design was performed over a number of different battery sizes, charging power levels, and f bus stop charging stations. The net present costs were calculated for each vehicle design and provided the basis for design evaluation. In all cases, given the assumed economic conditions, the conventional bus achieved the lowest net present cost while the optimal plug-in hybrid electric bus scenario beat out the hybrid electric comparison scenario. The parameter sensitivity was also investigated under favorable and unfavorable market penetration assumptions.

  4. Active screening of magnetic field near power stations generator buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.I. Kuznetsov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study technique for a prototyping system of active screening of power-frequency magnetic field distortions near power station generator buses via controllable magnetic field sources is presented. Results of experimental research on a proto-typing active screening system with different control algorithms are given.

  5. Final postflight hardware evaluation report RSRM-32 (STS-57)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Greg

    1993-11-01

    This document is the final report for the postflight assessment of the RSRM-32 (STS-57) flight set. This report presents the disassembly evaluations performed at the Thiokol facilities in Utah and is a continuation of the evaluations performed at KSC (TWR-64239). The PEEP for this assessment is outlined in TWR-50051, Revision B. The PEEP defines the requirements for evaluating RSRM hardware. Special hardware issues pertaining to this flight set requiring additional or modified assessment are outlined in TWR-64237. All observed hardware conditions were documented on PFOR's which are included in Appendix A. Observations were compared against limits defined in the PEEP. Any observation that was categorized as reportable or had no defined limits was documented on a preliminary PFAR by the assessment engineers. Preliminary PFAR's were reviewed by the Thiokol SPAT Executive Board to determine if elevation to PFAR's was required.

  6. Weatherization works: Final report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Kinney, L.F.

    1994-09-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation`s largest residential energy conservation program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five-part study. This document summarizes the findings of the evaluation. Its conclusions are based mainly on data from the 1989 program year (supplemented by data from 1991-92). The evaluation concludes that the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement. Specifically, it (1) saves energy, (2) lowers fuel bills, and (3) improves the health and safety of dwellings occupied by low-income people. In addition, the Program achieves its mission in a cost-effective manner based on each of three perspectives employed by the evaluators. Finally, the evaluation estimates that the investments made in 1989 will, over a 20-year lifetime, save the equivalent of 12 million barrels of oil, roughly the amount of oil added to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in each of the past several years.

  7. Comparative evaluation of radioactive waste management options. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive presentation of the various radioactive waste options under debate has not been made so far, let alone a comparative evaluation of the options with respect to their substantiated or assumed advantages or drawbacks. However, any appropriate discussion about the pros and cons of the specific options for final decision making has to be based on a comprehensive knowledge base drawn from profound comparative evaluation of essential options. Therefore, the study reported in this publication was to serve three major purposes: Presentation of the conditions and waste management policies and approaches in selected countries, in order to compile information about the various policy goals and the full scope of argumentation, as well as the range of individual arguments used for or against specific options. - Derivation of a methodology for evaluation, including development of criteria for a comparative and qualitative evaluation of options. - Identification of possible implications for a waste management strategy for Germany, derived from the results of the comparative evaluation and the examination of the reasonings and argumentation used in the various countries. (orig./CB)

  8. Particle and gaseous emissions from individual diesel and CNG buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Å. M. Hallquist

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study size-resolved particle and gaseous emissions from 28 individual diesel-fuelled and 7 compressed natural gas (CNG-fuelled buses, selected from an in-use bus fleet, were characterised for real-world dilution scenarios. The method used was based on using CO2 as a tracer of exhaust gas dilution. The particles were sampled by using an extractive sampling method and analysed with high time resolution instrumentation EEPS (10 Hz and CO2 with non-dispersive infrared gas analyser (LI-840, LI-COR Inc. 1 Hz. The gaseous constituents (CO, HC and NO were measured by using a remote sensing device (AccuScan RSD 3000, Environmental System Products Inc.. Nitrogen oxides, NOx, were estimated from NO by using default NO2/NOx ratios from the road vehicle emission model HBEFA 3.1. The buses studied were diesel-fuelled Euro II–V and CNG-fuelled Enhanced Environmental Friendly Vehicles (EEVs with different after-treatment, including selective catalytic reduction (SCR, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR and with and without diesel particulate filter (DPF. The primary driving mode applied in this study was accelerating mode. However, regarding the particle emissions also a constant speed mode was analysed. The investigated CNG buses emitted on average higher number of particles but less mass compared to the diesel-fuelled buses. Emission factors for number of particles (EFPN were EFPN, DPF = 8.0 ± 3.1 × 1014, EFPN, no DPF =2.8 ± 1.6 × 1015 and EFPN, CNG = 7.8 ± 5.7 × 1015 (kg fuel−1. In the accelerating mode size-resolved EFs showed unimodal number size distributions with peak diameters of 70–90 nm and 10 nm for diesel and CNG buses, respectively. For the constant speed mode bimodal average number size distributions were obtained for the diesel buses with peak modes of ~10 nm and ~60 nm.

    Emission

  9. The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles III : Trucks, Buses and Trains

    CERN Document Server

    Orellano, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International conference “The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles III: Trucks, Buses and Trains” held in Potsdam, Germany, September 12-17, 2010 by Engineering Conferences International (ECI). Leading scientists and engineers from industry, universities and research laboratories, including truck and high-speed train manufacturers and operators were brought together to discuss computer simulation and experimental techniques to be applied for the design of more efficient trucks, buses and high-speed trains in the future.   This conference was the third in the series after Monterey-Pacific Groove in 2002 and Lake Tahoe in 2007.  The presentations address different aspects of train aerodynamics (cross wind effects, underbody flow, tunnel aerodynamics and aeroacoustics, experimental techniques), truck aerodynamics (drag reduction, flow control, experimental and computational techniques) as well as computational fluid dynamics and bluff body, wake and jet flows.

  10. Weatherization Works: Final Report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.

    2001-02-01

    In 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation's largest residential energy conservation program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five-part study. This document summarizes the findings of the evaluation. Its conclusions are based mainly on data from the 1989 program year. The evaluation concludes that the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement. Specifically, it saves energy, lowers fuel bills, and improves the health and safety of dwellings occupied by low-income people. In addition, the Program achieves its mission in a cost-effective manner based on each of three perspectives employed by the evaluators. Finally, the evaluation estimates that the investments made in 1989 will, over a 20-year lifetime, save the equivalent of 12 million barrels of oil, roughly the amount of oil added to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in each of the past several years. The Program's mission is to reduce the heating and cooling costs for low-income families--particularly the elderly, persons with disabilities, and children by improving the energy efficiency of their homes and ensuring their health and safety. Substantial progress has been made, but the job is far from over. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reports that the average low-income family spends 12 percent of its income on residential energy, compared to only 3% for the average-income family. Homes where low-income families live also have a greater need for energy efficiency improvements, but less money to pay for them.

  11. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gikakis, Christina [Federal Transit Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-12-11

    This report, published annually, summarizes the progress of fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) development in the United States and discusses the achievements and challenges of introducing fuel cell propulsion in transit. Various stakeholders, including FCEB developers, transit agencies, and system integrators, have expressed the value of this annual status report, which provides a summary of results from evaluations performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The annual status report tracks the progress of the FCEB industry toward meeting technical targets, documents the lessons learned, and discusses the path forward for commercial viability of fuel cell technology for transit buses. The 2015 summary results primarily focus on the most recent year for each demonstration, from August 2014 through July 2015. The results for these buses account for more than 1,045,000 miles traveled and 83,000 hours of fuel cell power system operation. The primary results presented in the report are from two demonstrations of fuel-cell-dominant bus designs: the Zero Emission Bay Area Demonstration Group led by Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) in California and the American Fuel Cell Bus Project at SunLine Transit Agency in California.

  12. High Energy Batteries for Hybrid Buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Lu

    2010-12-31

    EnerDel batteries have already been employed successfully for electric vehicle (EV) applications. Compared to EV applications, hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) bus applications may be less stressful, but are still quite demanding, especially compared to battery applications for consumer products. This program evaluated EnerDel cell and pack system technologies with three different chemistries using real world HEV-Bus drive cycles recorded in three markets covering cold, hot, and mild climates. Cells were designed, developed, and fabricated using each of the following three chemistries: (1) Lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC) - hard carbon (HC); (2) Lithium manganese oxide (LMO) - HC; and (3) LMO - lithium titanium oxide (LTO) cells. For each cell chemistry, battery pack systems integrated with an EnerDel battery management system (BMS) were successfully constructed with the following features: real time current monitoring, cell and pack voltage monitoring, cell and pack temperature monitoring, pack state of charge (SOC) reporting, cell balancing, and over voltage protection. These features are all necessary functions for real-world HEV-Bus applications. Drive cycle test data was collected for each of the three cell chemistries using real world drive profiles under hot, mild, and cold climate conditions representing cities like Houston, Seattle, and Minneapolis, respectively. We successfully tested the battery packs using real-world HEV-Bus drive profiles under these various climate conditions. The NMC-HC and LMO-HC based packs successfully completed the drive cycles, while the LMO-LTO based pack did not finish the preliminary testing for the drive cycles. It was concluded that the LMO-HC chemistry is optimal for the hot or mild climates, while the NMC-HC chemistry is optimal for the cold climate. In summary, the objectives were successfully accomplished at the conclusion of the project. This program provided technical data to DOE and the public for assessing

  13. 10 CFR 709.17 - Final disposition of CI evaluation findings and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final disposition of CI evaluation findings and recommendations. 709.17 Section 709.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI Evaluation Protocols and Protection of National Security § 709.17 Final disposition of CI evaluation...

  14. Prediction of Conducted Emissions in Satellite Power Buses

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano Spadacini; Flavia Grassi; Diego Bellan; Pignari, Sergio A.; Filippo Marliani

    2015-01-01

    This work reports a modeling methodology for the prediction of conducted emissions (CE) in a wide frequency range (up to 100 MHz), which are generated by dc/dc converters and propagate along the power buses of satellites. In particular, the dc/dc converter seen as a source of CE is represented by a behavioral model, whose parameters can be identified by two unit-level experimental procedures performed in controlled test setups. A simplified multiconductor transmission-line (MTL) model is deve...

  15. 78 FR 44112 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Urban Buses; Request for Waiver of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... standards for diesel- fueled hybrid-electric urban bus engines for authorized transit agencies with NO X... clarified the optional standards for hybrid-electric buses that were allowed in the 2004 rulemaking. The... the compliance of 2004 and later model year hybrid electric buses (HEB) with the urban bus...

  16. 78 FR 719 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Urban Buses; Request for Waiver of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... certification procedure for hybrid electric buses. The 2002 rulemaking was formally adopted by CARB on September... added optional exhaust emission standards for diesel-fueled hybrid-electric urban bus engines for....\\7\\ The February 2005 rulemaking clarified the optional standards for hybrid-electric buses that...

  17. Bay Area Transit Agencies Propel Fuel Cell Buses Toward Commercialization (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration of the next generation of fuel cells buses. Several transit agencies in the San Francisco Bay Area are participating in demonstrating the largest single fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States.

  18. The Bus Stops Here: The Case for Biodiesel in School Buses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that diesel exhaust from most of the nation's school buses may be hazardous to children's health. Documents studies on the nature and potential magnitude of the risk to children and proposes replacing petroleum diesel with biodiesel as the fuel for school buses. Presents the merits and practicality of switching to biodiesel as a healthier…

  19. Technical and systems evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skolnik, E.G.; DiPietro, J.P. [Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    During FY 1998 Energetics performed a variety of technology-based evaluations for the Hydrogen Program. Three evaluations are summarized below: hydrogen bromine-based electricity storage, carbon-based hydrogen storage, and hydrogen-fueled buses.

  20. Using Task Clarification, Goal Setting, and Feedback to Decrease Table Busing Times in a Franchise Pizza Restaurant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigo, Seth; Smith, Andrew; Ludwig, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of task-clarification, and manager verbal and graphic feedback on employee busing times at a pizza restaurant. Using an ABC design, task-clarification was provided in a memo, which described the process, priority, and goal time of busing. The busing time decreased slightly, from an average of 315 seconds…

  1. The numerical benchmark CB2-S, final evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper are final results of numerical benchmark CB2-S compared (activity, gamma and neutron sources, concentration of important nuclides and decay heat). The participants are: Vladimir Chrapciak (SCALE), Ludmila Markova (SCALE), Svetlana Zabrodskaja (SCALA), Pavel Mikolas (WIMS). Eva Tinkova (HELIOS) and Maria Manolova (SCALE) (Authors)

  2. Project Recurso, 1989-1990. Final Evaluation Report. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Natasha

    This report presents final (fifth year) results of Project Recurso, a federally funded project which provided 147 Spanish-speaking special education students (grades 3-5) in 12 New York City schools with instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), Native Language Arts (NLA), and bilingual content area subjects. The project also provided…

  3. Parametric evaluation of intermediate SSI solutions on final response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of recent study on large-scale containment model Soil-structure interaction (SSI) experiment in Lotung, Taiwan are used to examine the intermediate responses in terms of free-field motion, foundation scattered motion and impedance functions and their effect on the final SSI responses. A discussion is presented to highlight the significant parameters affecting each response. (author)

  4. 76 FR 42762 - Final Written Re-Evaluation for Environmental Impact Statement: Sikorsky Memorial Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Final Written Re-Evaluation for Environmental Impact Statement: Sikorsky... Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) has been completed for Sikorsky Memorial Airport in... analysis contained in a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) that the FAA issued in May 1999....

  5. Solar array deployment qualification for the LMX of buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy

    2005-07-01

    The solar array deployment system for the LMX line of buses deploys rigid Solar Array Wing Assemblies (SAWAs). Each SAWA has a set of Solar Array Deployment Mechanisms (SADM), which consists of two hinges, a strut, and two Hold Down Release Mechanisms (HDRMs). To qualify the SADM for flight, each mechanism component was qualified individually, then assembled to a qualification SAWA on Special Test Equipment (STE) and deployed in a thermal vacuum chamber at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures. These mechanisms were designed, built, and tested by the Power and Mechanisms part of the Power, Thermal, Structures & Mechanisms Product Center, which develops products for both internal and external customers. This paper will discuss the qualification effort for the LMX Solar Array deployment, including qualification hardware and STE. It will focus on unique challenges presented by each aspect of the qualification, and lessons learned from the hardware integration and the qualification testing.

  6. Resistojet control and power for high frequency ac buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    Resistojets are operational on many geosynchronous communication satellites which all use dc power buses. Multipropellant resistojets were selected for the Initial Operating Capability (IOC) Space Station which will supply 208 V, 20 kHz power. This paper discusses resistojet heater temperature controllers and passive power regulation methods for ac power systems. A simple passive power regulation method suitable for use with regulated sinusoidal or square wave power was designed and tested using the Space Station multipropellant resistojet. The breadboard delivered 20 kHz power to the resistojet heater. Cold start surge current limiting, a power efficiency of 95 percent, and power regulation of better than 2 percent were demonstrated with a two component, 500 W breadboard power controller having a mass of 0.6 kg.

  7. Final Irondale Gulch storm water evaluation : Appendix E

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on the Irondale Gulch Storm Water Evaluation and effects of routing off-site storm water flows through Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Retention facilities for...

  8. Load demand profile for a large charging station of a fleet of all-electric plug-in buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Rios

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a general procedure to compute the load demand profile from a parking lot where a fleet of buses with electric propulsion mechanisms are charged. Such procedure is divided in three different stages, the first one models the daily energy utilisation of the batteries based on Monte Carlo simulations and route characteristics. The second one models the process in the charging station based on discrete event simulation of queues of buses served by a lot of available chargers. The third step computes the final demand profile in the parking lot because of the charging process based on the power consumption of batteries’ chargers and the utilisation of the available charges. The proposed procedure allows the computation of the number of required batteries’ chargers to be installed in a charging station placed at a parking lot in order to satisfy and ensure the operation of the fleet, the computation of the power demand profile and the peak load and the computation of the general characteristics of electrical infrastructure to supply the power to the station.

  9. Project Familia. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Candice

    Project Familia was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII funded project that, in the year covered by this evaluation, served 41 special education students of limited English proficiency (LEP) from 5 schools, with the participation of 54 parents and 33 siblings. Participating students received English language enrichment and…

  10. Project Aprendizaje. 1990-91 Final Evaluation Profile. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    An evaluation was done of New York City Public Schools' Project Aprendizaje, which served disadvantaged, immigrant, Spanish-speaking high school students at Seward Park High School in Manhattan. The Project enrolled 290 students in grades 9 through 12, 93.1 percent of whom were eligible for the Free Lunch Program. The Project provided students of…

  11. Project Aprendizaje. Final Evaluation Report 1992-93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew

    This report provides evaluative information regarding the effectiveness of Project Aprendizaje, a New York City program that served 269 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency (LEP). The project promoted parent and community involvement by sponsoring cultural events, such as a large Latin American festival. Students developed…

  12. Final evaluation of advanced and current leak detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the adequacy of leak detection systems in light water reactors. The sources of numerous reported leaks and methods of detection have been documented. Research to advance the state of the art of acoustic leak detection is presented, and procedures for implementation are discussed

  13. NNWSI project information management system concepts evaluation report. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is intended as a first step in developing detailed information management system specifications for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. The current state of information management at the NNWSI Project level is investigated and an information management system (IMS) is proposed. The IMS as it relates to aspects of Project and records management is discussed. Information management concepts and prospective IMS system components are investigated. Concepts and system components include: indexing, searching, retrieval, data base management system technology, computers, storage media, computer-assisted retrieval (CAR) of microfilm, electronic imaging-based systems, optical character recognition, and communications. Performance criteria and desirable system attributes applicable to the IMS are discussed. Six conceptual system approaches capable of satisfying the performance criteria are defined. System approaches include: fully centralized microfilm system based on CAR retrieval (Approach 1), partially distributed microfilm system based on CAR retrieval (Approach 2), fully distributed microfilm system based on CAR retrieval (Approach 3), fully centralized optical disk system based on electronic image and full-text retrieval (Approach 4), partially distributed optical system based on electron image and full-text retrieval (Approach 5), and fully distributed optical disk system based on electronic image and full-text retrieval (Approach 6). Technical and cost considerations associated with the six conceptual approaches are evaluated. Technical evaluation results indicate Approach 4 is the best conceptual approach, and cost evaluation results show no significant differences among approaches. On the basis of the evaluation, Approach 4 is recommended

  14. Project Closeout: Guidance for Final Evaluation of Building America Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, P.; Burch, J.; Hendron, B.

    2008-03-01

    This report presents guidelines for Project Closeout. It is used to determine whether the Building America program is successfully facilitating improved design and practices to achieve energy savings goals in production homes. Its objective is to use energy simulations, targeted utility bill analysis, and feedback from project stakeholders to evaluate the performance of occupied BA communities.

  15. Monitoring and evaluation : Yakima/Klickitat fisheries project, Final report 2000; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monitoring and evaluation objectives and tasks have been developed through a joint process between the co-managers, Yakama Nation (YN, Lead Agency) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC), which consists of core members from the co-managers, employs the services of a work committee of scientists, the Monitoring Implementation Planning Team (MIPT) to develop the Monitoring and Evaluation (M and E) Plan. The process employed by STAC to verify these designated activities and the timing of their implementation involved the utilization of the following principles: (1) YKFP monitoring should evaluate the success (or lack of it) of project supplementation efforts and its impacts, including juvenile post release survival, natural production and reproductive success, ecological interactions, and genetics; (2) YKFP monitoring should be comprehensive: and, (3) YKFP monitoring should be done in such a way that results are of use to salmon production efforts throughout and Columbia basin and the region. Utilizing these principles, STAC and MIPT developed this M and ;E action plan in three phases. The first phase was primarily conceptual. STAC and MIPT defined critical issues and problems and identified associated response variables. The second phase was quantitative, which determined the scale and size of an effective monitoring effort. A critical element of the quantitative phase was an assessment of the precision with which response variables can be measured, the probability of detecting real impacts and the sample sizes required for a given level of statistical precision and power. The third phase is logistical. The feasibility of monitoring measures was evaluated as to practicality and cost. The Policy Group has determined that the M and E activities covered by this agreement are necessary, effective and cost-efficient

  16. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2009-10-01

    This report documents progress in meeting the technological challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transportation based on current fuel cell transit bus demonstrations and plans for more fuel cell transit buses and hydrogen infrastructure.

  17. Evaluation of a committed fusion site. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is divided into five technical sections. Section 2 is a summary. In Section 3, which covers device and site analyses the major characteristics of devices that might be placed at the site, as envisioned by major fusion laboratories, are described; the characteristics of a site (baseline site) which would accommodate these devices are defined; and various approaches to a committed site meeting the baseline site requirements are discussed. Section 4 describes the scenarios selected to represent possible site development outcomes; these scenarios are evaluated with respect to comparative cost and schedule effects. Section 5 presents a brief evaluation of the effects fusion-fission hybrids might have on the committed site. Major conclusions and recommendations are discussed in Section 6

  18. Small Commercial Program DOE Project: Impact evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathgate, R.; Faust, S. [Energy and Solid Waste Consultants, Montpelier, VT (United States)

    1992-08-12

    In 1991, Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) implemented a Department of Energy grant to conduct a small commercial energy conservation project. The small commercial ``Mom, and Pop`` grocery stores within WEC`s service territory were selected as the target market for the project. Energy & Solid Waste Consultant`s (E&SWC) Impact Evaluation is documented here. The evaluation was based on data gathered from a variety of sources, including load profile metering, kWh submeters, elapsed time indicators, and billing histories. Five stores were selected to receive measures under this program: Waits River General Store, Joe`s Pond Store, Hastings Store, Walden General Store, and Adamant Cooperative. Specific measures installed in each store and description of each are included.

  19. Evaluation of Emissions Trading. Final Report; Evaluatie Emissiehandel. Eindrapportage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinkels, V. (and others)

    2007-08-15

    Evaluation of emission trading with recommendations for improving and simplifying the trading system. The research limits itself to the aspects that can be adjusted by the Dutch government or improvements that can be influenced in the European Union. [mk]. [Dutch] Evaluatie van de emissiehandel met aanbevelingen om het handelssysteem te verbeteren en te vereenvoudigen. Het onderzoek beperkt zich tot hetgeen de Nederlandse overheid aan het systeem kan aanpassen of verbeteringen die het in de Europese Unie kan beinvloeden.

  20. Evaluation of nuclear asphalt-content gauges. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study evaluated the accuracy and precision of the Troxler, Model 3241-C, and CPN, Model AC-2, Nuclear Asphalt Content Gauges. To achieve precisions at plus or minus 0.15% 95% of the time, it was necessary to establish special procedures for making test samples, controlling environment, and calibration. Both gauges provided acceptable results utilizing a 3-point calibration. Their use in the field would be acceptable when the proper procedures are followed

  1. Methodology for evaluating energy R&D. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, C.

    1997-04-23

    Recent budgetary shortfalls and hightened concern over balancing the federal budget have placed increasing demand on federal agencies to document the cost effectiveness of the programs they manage. In fact, the 1993 Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) requires that by 1997 each executive agency prepare a Strategic Plan that includes measurable performance goals. By the year 2000, the first round of Annual Reports will become due which describes actual program performance. Despite the growing emphasis on measuring performance of government programs, the technology policy literature offers little in terms of models that program managers can implement in order to assess the cost effectiveness of the programs they manage. While GPRA will pose a major challenge to all federal government agencies, that challenge is particularly difficult for research-oriented agencies such as the Department of Energy. Its basic research programs provide benefits that are difficult to quantify since their values are uncertain with respect to timing, but are usually reflected in the value assigned to applied programs. The difficulty with quantifying benefits of applied programs relates to the difficulties of obtaining complete information on industries that have used DOE`s supported technologies in their production processes and data on cost-savings relative to conventional technologies. Therefore, DOE is one of several research-oriented agencies that has a special need for methods by which program offices can evaluate the broad array of applied and basic energy research programs they administer. The general findings of this report are that few new methods are applicable for evaluation of R&D programs. It seems that peer review and bibliometrics are methods of choice for evaluating basic research programs while more quantitative approaches such as ROI, cost-benefits, etc. might be followed in evaluating applied programs.

  2. Evaluation of data gathered from unmineable coal seams. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) programs directed at gas recovery from unconventional sources INTERCOMP Resource Development and Engineering, Inc. (INTERCOMP) is under contract to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to provide for the reduction of uncertainties in critical parameters related to the methane recovery from unmineable coals in the United States. To accomplish this objective INTERCOMP has assisted in test site selection, planning, and monitoring when requested and evaluated the results of test in terms of methane production potential and economics for selected well sites, geologic settings, and geographical areas. This is a continuation of two earlier contracts in which an optimized test program was specified and in which the results of that program were partially implemented and evaluated. In this report INTERCOMP's effort in assisting the Bureau of Mines to understand the nature of a communication problem between the vertical dewatering hole and the three horizontal degasification legs in the Emerald Mines Horizontal Drilling project is described. Recommendations made by INTERCOMP on how to determine the amount of communication and the answers to several other questions asked are given in the section Assistance in Test Planning. The use of INTERCOMP's numerical simulation model was necessary in this effort. The section entitled Resource Assessment gives the evaluation of each specific well site tested for methane production that furnished to INTERCOMP by METC.

  3. On-road pollutant emission and fuel consumption characteristics of buses in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aijuan Wang; Yunshan Ge; Jianwei Tan; Mingliang Fu; Asad Naeem Shah; Yan Ding; Hong Zhao; Bin Liang

    2011-01-01

    On-road emission and fuel consumption (FC) levels for Euro Ⅲ and Ⅳ buses fueled on diesel and compressed natural gas (CNG)were compared, and emission and FC characteristics of buses were analyzed based on approximately 28,700 groups of instantaneous data obtained in Beijing using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS). The experimental results revealed that NOx and PM emissions from CNG buses were decreased by 72.0% and 82.3% respectively, compared with Euro Ⅳ diesel buses. Similarly,these emissions were reduced by 75.2% and 96.3% respectively, compared with Euro Ⅲ diesel buses. In addition, CO2, CO, HC,NOx, PM emissions and FC of Euro Ⅳ diesel buses were reduced by 26.4%, 75.2%, 73.6%, 11.4%, 79.1%, and 26.0%, respectively,relative to Euro Ⅲ diesel buses. The CO2, CO, HC, NOx, PM emissions and FC factors all decreased with bus speed increased, while increased as bus acceleration increased. At the same time, the emission/FC rates as well as the emission/FC factors exhibited a strong positive correlation with the vehicle specific power (VSP). They all were the lowest when VSP < 0, and then rapidly increased as VSP increased. Furthermore, both the emission/FC rates and emission/FC factors were the highest at accelerations, higher at cruise speeds,and the lowest at decelerations for non-idling buses. These results can provide a base reference to further estimate bus emission and FC inventories in Beijing.

  4. Safety evaluation of asphalt products for final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the present situation, the wastes concentrated according to the radioactivity level, the properties and the environmental conditions are usually solidified in view of limiting the escape of the radioactive substances to the environment as small as possible by containment. The materials used for the solidification are cement, asphalt, plastics, ceramics and so on, and the selection is made by taking the kinds and radioactivity level of wastes, final disposing method, economy and handling into consideration. Asphalt is more suitable than cement to the wastes coming from PWR power plants, which contain boric acid for controlling nuclear reaction, and the effect of reducing the volume of wastes is high. It is economical when a certain scale is reached, accordingly recently, the use of asphalt for the solidification of wastes is going to increase. For the solidification of low level wastes, straight-run asphalt is suitable, and for high level wastes, heat-resistant blown asphalt is suitable. Asphalt-solidified bodies can contain 40-60 wt.% of wastes without any problem. The present situation of asphalt solidification in foreign countries, the physical properties required for the disposal of asphalt-solidified bodies, and the leaching, combustibility, radiation resistance and form stability of asphalt-solidified bodies are described. (Kako, I.)

  5. Cool Science: K-12 Climate Change Art Displayed on Buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. F.; Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Cool science is an art contest where K12 students create placards (7" x 22") to educate the public about climate change. Students are prompted to create their artwork in response to questions such as: What is the evidence for climate change? How does climate change impact your local community? What can you do to reduce the impacts of climate change? In each of three years, 500-600 student entrees have been submitted from more than 12 school districts across Massachusetts. A panel of judges including scientists, artists, rapid transit representatives, and educators chooses elementary, middle, and high school winners. Winners (6), runners-up (6), and honorable mentions (12) and their families and teachers are invited to an annual Cool Science Award Ceremony to be recognized and view winning artwork. All winning artwork is posted on the Cool Science website. The winning artwork (2 per grade band) is converted into placards (11" x 28") and posters (2.5' x 12') that are placed on the inside (placards) and outside (posters) of buses. Posters are displayed for one month. So far, Cool Science was implemented in Lowell, MA where over 5000 public viewers see the posters daily on the sides of Lowell Rapid Transit Authority (LRTA) buses, making approximately 1,000,000 impressions per year. Cool Science acts to increase climate literacy in children as well as the public, and as such promotes intergenerational learning. Using art in conjunction with science learning about climate change appears to be effective at engaging not just traditionally high achieving science students, but also those interested in the creative arts. Hearing winners' stories about how they created their artwork and what this contest meant to them supports the idea that Cool Science attracts a wide diversity of students. Parents discuss climate change with their children. Multiple press releases announcing the winners further promotes the awareness of climate change throughout school districts and their

  6. THE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN EVALUATION MODEL FOR VOCATIONAL PILOT PROGRAMS. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUCKMAN, BRUCE W.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT WERE (1) TO DEVELOP AN EVALUATION MODEL IN THE FORM OF A HOW-TO-DO-IT MANUAL WHICH OUTLINES PROCEDURES FOR OBTAINING IMMEDIATE INFORMATION REGARDING THE DEGREE TO WHICH A PILOT PROGRAM ACHIEVES ITS STATED FINAL OBJECTIVES, (2) TO EVALUATE THIS MODEL BY USING IT TO EVALUATE TWO ONGOING PILOT PROGRAMS, AND (3) TO…

  7. Thermionic Technology Program: A, Insulator test and evaluation: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, J.C.; Witt, T.

    1987-11-30

    The Thermionic Technology Program (TTP) consisted of two major efforts, evaluation of insulators and evaluation of thermionic converters. This report details the work performed on the insulator phase of the program. Efforts were made to better understand the mechanisms involved in the electrochemistry of insulators at elevated temperatures by modelling the ionic transport through the various layers of the insulator package. Although rigorous analytic solutions could not be obtained owing to a lack of detailed data, a simplified model indicated that alumina should not fail by depletion of aluminum for thousands of years, whereas calculations for yttria revealed a far more rapid depletion of oxygen and consequently earlier failure. Methods for microscopic and electrical testing of cylindrical insulator samples were developed, and an improved test oven design was initiated. Testing of alumina/niobium cermet samples revealed rapid failure contrary to the theoretical predictions for alumina. Large discrepancies in the initial conduction activation energy among the various samples suggested that different mechanisms could have controlled the conduction and hence the failure in different samples, although all had undergone nominally identical processing. The short lifetimes reveal how rapidly ambient conditions in thermionic power conversion can degrade the performance of insulating oxides. It was concluded that minor dopants could have been responsible for the early breakdowns. Thus, high purity materials with precise quality control will be necessary for trilayer package development. 35 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelt, J.L. (comp.)

    1983-09-01

    The Liner Evaluation for Uranium Mill Tailings Program was conducted to evaluate the need for and performance of prospective lining materials for the long-term management of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. On the basis of program results, two materials have been identified: natural foundation soil amended with 10% sodium bentonite; catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The study showed that, for most situations, calcareous soils typical of Western US sites adequately buffer tailings leachates and prevent groundwater contamination without additional liner materials or amendments. Although mathematical modeling of disposal sites is recommended on a site-specific basis, there appears to be no reason to expect significant infiltration through the cover for most Western sites. The major water source through the tailings would be groundwater movement at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Even so column leaching studies showed that contaminant source terms were reduced to near maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water within one or two pore volumes; thus, a limited source term for groundwater contamination exists. At sites where significant groundwater movement or infiltration is expected and the tailings leachates are alkaline, however, the sodium bentonite or asphalt membrane may be necessary.

  9. Liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Liner Evaluation for Uranium Mill Tailings Program was conducted to evaluate the need for and performance of prospective lining materials for the long-term management of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. On the basis of program results, two materials have been identified: natural foundation soil amended with 10% sodium bentonite; catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The study showed that, for most situations, calcareous soils typical of Western US sites adequately buffer tailings leachates and prevent groundwater contamination without additional liner materials or amendments. Although mathematical modeling of disposal sites is recommended on a site-specific basis, there appears to be no reason to expect significant infiltration through the cover for most Western sites. The major water source through the tailings would be groundwater movement at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Even so column leaching studies showed that contaminant source terms were reduced to near maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water within one or two pore volumes; thus, a limited source term for groundwater contamination exists. At sites where significant groundwater movement or infiltration is expected and the tailings leachates are alkaline, however, the sodium bentonite or asphalt membrane may be necessary

  10. Electronic time switch evaluation study. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurber, L.R.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes a study which tested and evaluated the feasibility of using electronic time switches to reduce the electrical energy consumption of Army buildings which may not be suited to other energy-saving techniques like the Energy Monitoring and Control System. The study emphasized heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system controls in office and community support buildings. Electronic time switches were installed in 12 buildings at Fort Carson, CO, and Fort Knox, KY. Test results showed savings of between 12 kWh and 99 kWh per day fo the electrical energy consumed in the test buildings. Payback periods ranged from 5 months to 3-1/2 years. This report also includes guidance on selecting and installing electronic time switches on HVAC system controls.

  11. Hatchery evaluation report: Lyons Ferry Hatchery - fall chinook. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Fall Chinook). The audit is being conducted as a requirement of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) ''Strategy for Salmon'' and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Under the audit, the hatcheries are evaluated against policies and related performance measures developed by the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT). IHOT is a multi-agency group established by the NPPC to direct the development of new basinwide standards for managing and operating fish hatcheries. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

  12. Objective evaluation of pronunciation of standard Chinese final based on formant pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Bin; ZHAO Qingwei; YAN Yonghong

    2007-01-01

    A method used for objective evaluation of pronunciation of finals in standard Chinese is presented. The formant pattern of final is selected as the main feature and an improved evaluation algorithm based on Support Vector Machine is proposed. In this algorithm, two-level classification strategy is employed. A full-classification model and a sub-classification model are trained for each final. The pronunciation quality is evaluated based on the classification results of this two-level strategy with scoring model of each final. The new evaluation method is compared with traditional methods such as Hidden Markov Model (HMM) posterior probability scoring method and feature of Mel-Frequency Cepstrum Coefficients (MFCC), and the results show that the performance is effectively improved by the proposed method. The correlation of scores between human testers and machine has achieved 82%.

  13. Intermediate transport in Southeast Asia. [Carts, cycles, mini-buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, A.K.

    1977-06-01

    Traffic flows through the streets of Southeast Asian countries even though they are used for almost all aspects of human and animal existence. The carts, bicycles, tricycles, and motorcycles, motorized three-wheelers, mini-buses are the so-called intermediate-transport vehicles. It is upon this group of vehicles that a culture--constrained by its own unique economic, environmental, and technological factors--exerts its influence most directly toward the solution of the transport problem. Transportation fills more service roles in Southeast Asian cities than in Western cities. Communication facilities such as telephones and postal services are notoriously unreliable. The personal encounter is all important in social and business interactions in Southeast Asia. Each of the transport modes is examined in view of design and use in a number of specific cultural settings for the countries in Southeast Asia. Present use of intermediate transport in developed countries is discussed briefly, and its further development predicted--pointing out the health and conservation advantages. (MCW)

  14. D2.2.2 Final Version of the LinkedUp Evaluation Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Stoyanov, Slavi; Guy, Marieke; Scheffel, Maren

    2014-01-01

    This document (D2.2.2) describes the LinkedUp consortium’s experience in developing and on- going improvement of the LinkedUp Evaluation Framework throughout three web open educational data competitions: Veni, Vidi, Vici. D2.2.2 is the final report regarding the Evaluation Framework (EF). It synthes

  15. Evaluation of the Effects of RSTC Programs on Student Performance. Final Report and Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippines Univ., Quezon City.

    Presented is the final report of the University of the Philippines evaluation of the summer science institutes and the implementation of science courses in secondary schools as components of the Science Education Project of the Philippines (SEPP). This evaluation of the SEPP science curriculum improvement project sought to assess student learning…

  16. Vocational Needs, Occupational Reinforcers, Job Satisfaction, and Job Turnover Among Vocational Evaluators. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Dennis J.; And Others

    The project for which the document is the final report began with concern over rapid turnover among vocational evaluators in rehabilitation facilities. The job turnover problem was analyzed according to the Minnesota theory of work adjustment. Resulting data suggest that vocational evaluators who change jobs do so because of dissatisfaction with…

  17. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Quasi-Static Wireless Power Transfer for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Transit Buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijuan; Gonder, Jeff; Burton, Evan; Brooker, Aaron; Meintz, Andrew; Konan, Arnaud

    2015-10-19

    This study evaluates the costs and benefits associated with the use of a stationary-wireless- power-transfer-enabled plug-in hybrid electric bus and determines the cost effectiveness relative to a conventional bus and a hybrid electric bus. A sensitivity sweep was performed over many different battery sizes, charging power levels, and number/location of bus stop charging stations. The net present cost was calculated for each vehicle design and provided the basis for design evaluation. In all cases, given the assumed economic conditions, the conventional bus achieved the lowest net present cost while the optimal plug-in hybrid electric bus scenario beat out the hybrid electric comparison scenario. The study also performed parameter sensitivity analysis under favorable and high unfavorable market penetration assumptions. The analysis identifies fuel saving opportunities with plug-in hybrid electric bus scenarios at cumulative net present costs not too dissimilar from those for conventional buses.

  18. Influence of malfunctions of the maintenance activities on the urban buses fuel consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Crişan; Nicolae, Filip

    2014-06-01

    Optimization of activities with the aim to provide quality service in conditions of high profitability, is one of the main objectives chased by managers in transportation companies. As a consequence, directing the attention towards monitoring of maintenance activities of vehicles fleet, can achieve desired results. Two of the most important issues related to the maintenance activity, is the increase of reliability and reduction of fuel consumption of the vehicles fleet. Aforementioned actions represents a way forward for raising the quality and profitability of services offered. In this paper, the main ways of monitoring the fuel consumption, in order to reduce it and increase the reliability of transportation vehicles fleet, are presented. For the evaluation of the maintenance system and the degree of influence of malfunctions recorded on the fuel consumption, using the Pareto -ABC method, following case study on a fleet of buses for urban public transport has been conducted. Results obtained highlights the deficiencies of the maintenance process carried out and constitutes a solid base for the reorganization of the maintenance activity, involving preventive maintenance activities, in order to contribute decisively to the results targeted by the management of transport companies.

  19. Final Evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Workspace

    2003-01-01

    The challenges involved in designing appropriate and desirable hybrid spatial computing environments are considerable. Two aspects highlighted through our own  experience and in the communities’ literatures are particularly demanding: 1.  The situated and social nature of human activities. 2...

  20. Effectivness Of The Failure Rate On Maintenance Costs Of The City Buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignaciuk Piotr

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to present a failure rate and maintenance cost comparison for two types of city transport buses. The paper presents in detail a case study of well known bus brands used at Municipal Transport Company in Lublin. A failure index of all functional and constructional systems of the vehicles and their technical availability with regards to calendar time was determined. The paper also presents analysis of the factors related to maintenance costs of buses, including costs of fluids, repair costs and maintenance service. It has been demonstrated, that both analyzed buses generate similar maintenance costs, while their failures and technical availability differ significantly in operational practice. These differences are particularly evident in relation to the cumulative costs of repairs.

  1. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gigakis, C.

    2010-11-01

    This status report, fourth in a series of annual status reports from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, summarizes progress and accomplishments from demonstrations of fuel cell transit buses in the United States. This year's assessment report provides the results from the fifth year of operation of five Van Hool, ISE, and UTC Power fuel cell buses operating at AC Transit, SunLine, and CTTRANSIT. The achievements and challenges of this bus design, implementation, and operating are presented, with a focus on the next steps for implementing larger numbers and new and different designs of fuel cell buses. The major positive result from nearly five years of operation is the dramatic increase in reliability experienced for the fuel cell power system.

  2. Mathematics, Science, and Computer Science Evaluation Report 1984-85. OEA Evaluation Report. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    This evaluation report of the Staff Developmnent Program in Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science for 1984-85 contains four chapters. Chapter 1 describes program background and objectives, the scope of the evaluation, and evaluation procedures. These procedures included: (1) memoranda announcing programs; (2) project documents; (3) course…

  3. Exposures due to emissions from ethanol and diesel fuelled buses in Stockholm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otson, R. [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Westerholm, R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry; Fellin, P.; Davis, C. [BOVAR Environmental, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1997-12-01

    Personal exposure and ambient concentrations of 105 chemical species were determined during September in Stockholm, a northern urban area. This unique study provided personal exposure data equivalent to 8 person-days each on diesel and ethanol buses, and 12 person-days on streets in the urban area. If used judiciously, these data, and the ambient data, are useful for risk assessment, as well as for validation of dispersion models. The concentrations for many species were relatively low, when compared to results from other studies of outdoor concentrations in urban areas. This was probably due to the meteorological conditions during the study which favoured low concentrations. Personal exposures were generally higher than ambient concentrations, probably because of the proximity of subjects to sources of contaminants. As expected, alcohol compounds were found at greater levels in ethanol fueled buses and at bus stops on routes with predominantly ethanol fueled buses. No trends were evident for exposures of VOCs or PAC on diesel and ethanol buses. Exposures to particles at the bus stops were lower than exposures on buses, possibly due to the low traffic volumes at the bus stops, and the proximity of subjects on buses to other traffic. Upon factor analysis of the data, five factors explained the majority of the variance in the results, and showed associations between selected species and a few other parameters. These associations should be useful to design more efficient studies in the future. The chemical element mass balance results with measured profiles yielded uncertain results, but with literature profiles, the diesel and ethanol bus emissions accounted for a small fraction, i.e. < 5%, of the exposures 26 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  4. First final evaluation of the ecological comparison `rape seed-biodiesel versus ordinary diesel oil`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, G.A.; Zemanek, G. [IFEU - Inst. fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung Heidelberg GmbH (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    Since the beginning of the nineties methodology and content of LCAs on `Rape Seed Biodiesel versus Ordinary Diesel Oil` have continuously been developed. Based on this solid knowledge a final evaluation of the ecological advantages and disadvantages of rape seed biodiesel (RME) as a substitute for diesel oil is now possible. The present final evaluation includes a comparison of the `specific contributions` of selected environmental impact categories followed by a verbal, i.e. non-quantitative final evaluation that draws on their `ecological relevance`. The results show that an overall final assessment in favour of RME can be justified because this fuel obtains better results in two of the three most important environmental impact categories (`resource demand`, `greenhouse effect`). But since there is strong interpretational ambiguity concerning the third category `ozone depletion` this assessment is not inescapable. The results of this evaluation model cannot be completely scientifically objective because they depend on time, place, user and circumstance. Therefore the evaluation process, especially the system boundaries, have to be explicitely documented in order to allow a comprehensible review. (orig.)

  5. Optimal Memoryless Encoding for Low Power Off-Chip Data Buses

    CERN Document Server

    Chee, Yeow Meng; Ling, Alan C H

    2007-01-01

    Off-chip buses account for a significant portion of the total system power consumed in embedded systems. Bus encoding schemes have been proposed to minimize power dissipation, but none has been demonstrated to be optimal with respect to any measure. In this paper, we give the first provably optimal and explicit (polynomial-time constructible) families of memoryless codes for minimizing bit transitions in off-chip buses. Our results imply that having access to a clock does not make a memoryless encoding scheme that minimizes bit transitions more powerful.

  6. TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report Comparison Document and DOE Safety Evaluation Report Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Bond

    2001-04-01

    This document provides an overview of changes to the currently approved TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) that are included in the upgraded FSAR. The DOE Safety Evaluation Report (SER) requirements that are incorporated into the upgraded FSAR are briefly discussed to provide the starting point in the FSAR with respect to the SER requirements.

  7. The Final Year Project (FYP) in Social Sciences: Establishment of Its Associated Competences and Evaluation Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Joan; Escofet, Anna; Martinez, Francesc; Ventura, Javier; Vlachopoulos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the fundamental characteristics of the Final Year Project (FYP), its associated competences and some evaluation standards that derived from a research conducted by the regional government of Catalonia (Spain) and the Catalan University Quality Assurance Agency. More analytically, the paper begins with the definition of the…

  8. Technical and economical analyses of the use of fuel cell for urban buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Lucia Bollini; Souza, Antonio Carlos Caetano de; Silveira, Jose Luz [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: lucia@feg.unesp.br; caetanodesouza@yahoo.com.br; joseluz@feg.unesp.br; Zanzi, Rolando [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology]. E-mail: rolando@ket.kht.se

    2008-07-01

    The global warming is caused mainly by burning of fossil fuels (oil, diesel, gasoline, etc) that emit millions of tons of pollutants. Besides, the certainty that those fossil fuels are non-renewable resources allows more researches in cleaner energy, and particularly for vehicles. In this way, fuel cell (FC) has a special attention because it can be applied in urban transport and improves the actual environmental situation. The FC appears like a promising technology for energy generation. Among several technologies in the present, the PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) is the most appropriated for vehicles application, because it combines durability, high power density, high efficiency, good response and it works at relatively low temperatures. Besides that it is easy to turn it on and off and it is able to support present vibration in vehicles. A PEMFC's problem is that it needs noble catalyst, like platinum. Another problem is that CO, needs to be in low concentration, requiring a hydrogen more clean, because the cell deterioration. One part of this paper was developed in Stockholm, where there are some buses within the CUTE (Clean Urban Transport for Europe) project that have been in operation with FC since January 2004. Another part was developed in Guaratingueta, Brazil. Brazil intends to start up a program of FC buses. As conclusion, this paper show the economical analysis comparing buses moved by fuel cells and buses moved by internal combustion engine, as regarding the Brazilian conditions. (author)

  9. Leadership Thrust of Urban School Educators for Meeting the Challenge of Busing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Joseph C.

    Based on a nationwide survey of urban school administrators, personal experiences of the author, and a review of relevant desegregation literature, this paper explores the role of administrators in the achievement of the objectives of busing for school desegregation. Findings cited from the survey include: (1) peak periods of conflict occur in the…

  10. The Effect of Busing Black Ghetto Children into White Suburban Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Burleigh B.; And Others

    This study is an attempt to discover what happens to students' attitudes as a result of experience in desegregated schools. In particular, the students studied were involved in a special busing program called Operation Hospitality, which was carried out by the Chicago Catholic School Board. Through this program, black grade school students from…

  11. An introduction on the demonstration performance of fuel cell buses (FCB) in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1990’s, hydrogen has found broad use in the traffic segment. Compared with conventional ones, hydrogen fuelled vehicles, a new generation of clean vehicles, produce no pollutants, with higher energy efficiency. In today’s world where the pollution is tougher, the "Zero Pollution" fuel cell buses display a

  12. 40 CFR 52.263 - Priority treatment for buses and carpools-Los Angeles Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... agencies to which legal authority has been delegated, shall establish the following system of bus/carpool... agencies to which legal authority has been delegated, shall establish the following system of bus and bus... § 52.263 Priority treatment for buses and carpools—Los Angeles Region. (a) Definitions: (1)...

  13. Predicting self-pollution inside school buses using a CFD and multi-zone coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Lee, Eon S.; Liu, Junjie; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-04-01

    The in-cabin environment of a school bus is important for children's health. The pollutants from a bus's own exhaust contribute to children's overall exposure to air pollutants inside the school bus cabin. In this study, we adapted a coupled model originally developed for indoor environment to determine the relative contribution of the bus own exhaust to the in-cabin pollutant concentrations. The coupled model uses CFD (computational fluent dynamics) model to simulate outside concentration and CONTAM (a multi-zone model) for inside the school bus. The model was validated with experimental data in the literature. Using the validated model, we analyzed the effects of vehicle speed and tailpipe location on self-pollution inside the bus cabin. We confirmed that the pollution released from the tailpipe can penetrate into the bus cabin through gaps in the back emergency door. We found the pollution concentration inside school buses was the highest when buses were driven at a medium speed. In addition, locating the tailpipe on the side, behind the rear axle resulted in less self-pollution since there is less time for the suction effect to take place. The developed theoretical framework can be generalized to study other types of buses. These findings can be used in developing policy recommendations for reducing human exposure to air pollution inside buses.

  14. BIODIESEL AS A SUSTAINABLE ALTERNATIVE TO PETROLEUM DIESEL IN SCHOOL BUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesel exhaust is potentially harmful to human health and is a significant air pollutant due to its composition of harmful chemical substances and impact on climate. One of the many current uses of diesel fuel in rural environments is in school buses; however, few studies hav...

  15. Transportation of Wheelchair Seated Students in School Buses: A Review of State Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Britta; Fuhrman, Susan; Karg, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This study quantitatively reviews publicly available state policies as they relate to the transportation of wheelchair-seated students in school buses. Inclusion of best practices in specially equipped school bus and driver training policies was assessed. Key points of interest within state policies were identified based on site visits, common…

  16. Test results evaluation: Pilot evaluations Deliverable no D6.5. Final draft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaeker, D.M.; Dangelmaier, M.; Gelau, C.; Mattes, S.; Montanari, R.

    2003-01-01

    This deliverable describes the User Centred Design approach that has been adopted within the COMUNICAR project. In this design approach several iterative steps were taken to design and evaluate the multimedia Human Machine Interface that is able to manage all the information exchanges between the dr

  17. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6 % of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2 %), histology (12.4 %), and blood analysis (9.6 %). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6 %) and MRI (30.6 %). In 52.2 % of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Isabel; Scharf, Gregor; Platz, Natascha; Dendl, Lena M.; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G. [University Hospital Regensburg, Institute of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany); Pawlik, Michael T. [Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, Institute of Anaesthesiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6 % of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2 %), histology (12.4 %), and blood analysis (9.6 %). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6 %) and MRI (30.6 %). In 52.2 % of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Pros and cons. Final evaluation of the balance regulation. Air quality Decree 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to gain experience with the Dutch Air Quality Decree 2005 and the regulation on balancing, eleven pilot projects were started with the purpose to test the Decree and the regulation for different situations. The balance regulation implies that deteriorated air quality in one place must be compensated by improved air quality somewhere else. In this report the results of a final evaluation of the projects are presented and discussed

  20. Evaluation of Occupational Health Teaching Sessions for Final Year Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    YILDIZ, Ali Naci; Bilir, Nazmi; Camur, Derya; Caman, Ozge Karadag

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The study was conducted with the aim of evaluating applied occupational health teaching for final-year medical students at Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine. Methods The study included all sixth grade medical students (n=293) during one academic year. Pre- and post-training tests were used to assess the magnitude of change in knowledge and attitude of students on occupational health, whereas the opinion of students on several aspects of the quality of teaching sessions were...

  1. Continued evaluation of compact heat exchangers for OTEC evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGowan, J.G.

    1979-10-01

    The objectives of this work investigating the applicability of compact plate heat type heat exchangers to OTEC power systems were: (1) an analytical and experimental evaluation of the performance characteristics of compact heat exchangers using ammonia as the working fluid operating under the entire range of OTEC system conditions; and (2) an evaluation of the applicable manufacturing processes, maintenance requirements, and arrangement concepts for large-scale compact OTEC heat exchangers with specific emphasis on total economics. The work was carried out to establish the applicability of compact plate type heat exchangers to OTEC power systems and to provide: (1) experimental verification of predicted performance (heat transfer and fluid flow) under OTEC operating conditions (using NH/sub 3/); (2) provide initial performance data for several desirable plate type OTEC heat exchanger panels; (3) provide test apparatus for continued experimental testing of OTEC compact heat exchanger panels; and (4) provide design information on applicable manufacturing processes maintenance requirements and arrangement concepts for plate type heat exchangers.

  2. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 2, Participants program final summary evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process develpment, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  3. Clinical observed performance evaluation: a prospective study in final year students of surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Markey, G C

    2010-06-24

    We report a prospective study of clinical observed performance evaluation (COPE) for 197 medical students in the pre-qualification year of clinical education. Psychometric quality was the main endpoint. Students were assessed in groups of 5 in 40-min patient encounters, with each student the focus of evaluation for 8 min. Each student had a series of assessments in a 25-week teaching programme. Over time, several clinicians from a pool of 16 surgical consultants and registrars evaluated each student by direct observation. A structured rating form was used for assessment data. Variance component analysis (VCA), internal consistency and inter-rater agreement were used to estimate reliability. The predictive and convergent validity of COPE in relation to summative OSCE, long case, and overall final examination was estimated. Median number of COPE assessments per student was 7. Generalisability of a mean score over 7 COPE assessments was 0.66, equal to that of an 8 x 7.5 min station final OSCE. Internal consistency was 0.88-0.97 and inter-rater agreement 0.82. Significant correlations were observed with OSCE performance (R = 0.55 disattenuated) and long case (R = 0.47 disattenuated). Convergent validity was 0.81 by VCA. Overall final examination performance was linearly related to mean COPE score with standard error 3.7%. COPE permitted efficient serial assessment of a large cohort of final year students in a real world setting. Its psychometric quality compared well with conventional assessments and with other direct observation instruments as reported in the literature. Effect on learning, and translation to clinical care, are directions for future research.

  4. Constructing and evaluating a validity argument for the final-year ward simulation exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Hettie; Ker, Jean; Myford, Carol; Stirling, Kevin; Mires, Gary

    2015-12-01

    The authors report final-year ward simulation data from the University of Dundee Medical School. Faculty who designed this assessment intend for the final score to represent an individual senior medical student's level of clinical performance. The results are included in each student's portfolio as one source of evidence of the student's capability as a practitioner, professional, and scholar. Our purpose in conducting this study was to illustrate how assessment designers who are creating assessments to evaluate clinical performance might develop propositions and then collect and examine various sources of evidence to construct and evaluate a validity argument. The data were from all 154 medical students who were in their final year of study at the University of Dundee Medical School in the 2010-2011 academic year. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on an analysis of senior medical students' clinical performance while they were taking responsibility for the management of a simulated ward. Using multi-facet Rasch measurement and a generalizability theory approach, we examined various sources of validity evidence that the medical school faculty have gathered for a set of six propositions needed to support their use of scores as measures of students' clinical ability. Based on our analysis of the evidence, we would conclude that, by and large, the propositions appear to be sound, and the evidence seems to support their proposed score interpretation. Given the body of evidence collected thus far, their intended interpretation seems defensible. PMID:25808311

  5. Efficiency improvement of transport service by trolley buses based on the levels of their power demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Aulin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Use efficiency improvement of trolley buses in passenger traffic based on power levels of electric energy input and terms adjustment of their maintenance. Methodology. In order to achieve this goal conformance of electric energy input by trolleybus to the transported amount of passengers taking into account characteristics of the route is offered to establish. The major indicators of the trolleybus operation are: speed of a race on lines, number of tractive motor firing, voltage and amperage in the network that were taken with accountants from a dashboard. Research results were tabulated and recorded with DVR. Along with the study of power consumption of electric energy input by a trolleybus passenger count was carried out too. Findings. The directly proportional dependence between the level of energy consumption by a trolleybus and the number of passengers for constant performance route was determined. Originality. As the criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of the trolleybus operation on the route is proposed to use the ratio between electricity consumption and number of passengers for these characteristics of the route. This is confirmed experimentally. The obtained formulas give the possibility to balance the force work and consequently the volume of energy consumption during the trolleybus movement on the rise and the descent. Practical value. The proposed criterion can be used to adjust the terms of maintenance on the individual program, that means individual maintenance (IM. Type of work performed at the IM should be determined on the basis of diagnostic data of the vehicle (V. The principles of IM were formulated: 1 the primary task is planned and preventative strategy to identify and eliminate troubleshooting and technical actions; 2 operational control of the vehicle (V technical condition on the basis of prediction of its state using the proposed criteria, that takes into account the dependence of power consumption to

  6. Trolley buses in Milan. Zero emission rides through the city; Trolleybusse in Mailand. Voellig emissionsfrei durch die Stadt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Martin; Boehm, Martin [Vossloh Kiepe GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Since June 2009, 30 new hybrid trolley buses made by the Van Hool and Vossloh Kiepe consortium have been in service in Milan. Test rides in the Milan city network proved that much energy can be saved by using the energy-storing high-performance supercapacitors. The convincing vehicle concept, featuring a serial arrangement of the driving components, has recently made the city order 15 more trolley buses for Milan and another nine for Parma. (orig.)

  7. Performance of optimised SCR retrofit buses under urban driving and controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carslaw, David C.; Priestman, Max; Williams, Martin L.; Stewart, Gregor B.; Beevers, Sean D.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive real-world emissions results from urban buses retrofitted with an optimised low-NO2 selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The SCRT system combines a CRT (Continuously Regenerating Trap) to reduce particle emissions and SCR to reduce NOx emissions. The optimised low-NO2 SCRT was designed to work under urban conditions where the vehicle exhaust gas temperature is often too low for many SCR systems to work efficiently. The system was extensively tested through on-road and test track measurements using a vehicle emission remote sensing instrument capable of measuring both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Over 700 on-road measurements of the SCRT system were made in London. Compared with identical buses operating under the same conditions fitted with a CRT, NO2 emissions were reduced by 61% and total NOx by 45%. Under test track conditions reductions in NOx of 77% were observed. The test track results do reveal however that compared with an original Euro III bus without a CRT, the SCRT retrofit bus emissions of NO2 are 50% higher. Engine-out and tailpipe measurements of several important engine parameters under test track conditions showed the important effect of SCR inlet temperature on NOx conversion efficiency. Overall, we conclude that retrofitting urban buses to use low-NO2 SCRT systems is an effective method for delivering NOx and NO2 emissions reduction.

  8. TTA school-based research consortium initiative, the evaluation, final report

    OpenAIRE

    Kushner, S.; Simons, H.; James, D; Jones, K; Yee, W C

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report of the evaluation of th School-Based Research Consortium Initiative which ran in England from 1998 to 2001. The initiative was sponsored via a public/private partnership between the Teacher Training Agency (TTA), a UK Government agency, and the Centre for British Teachers (CfBT), a private not-for-profit company. The aim of the initiative was to create local infrastructures of support and action for teachers to engage ‘in and with’ research. Those infrastructures wer...

  9. Evaluating public involvement in the national low-level radioactive-waste-management program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive public involvement approach has been developed to obtain the views and assistance of state and local governments, citizen groups, industry, professional societies and other organizations in the preparation and review of a national strategy document on low-level radioactive wastes. Six evaluators who have a wide diversity of backgrounds were selected to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach. This final report presents findings discussed under the headings: Introduction to the Recent History of Low-level Waste Policy Development (LLWMP) and the Role of Public Participation; Public Participation Mechanisms Employed in Preparing the National Strategy Document; the Keystone's Evaluation Process; and Findings. The overall evaluation of the process was very positive. It was clear that the LLWMP staff was seriously committed to building a credible public participation process. The evaluation team was provided rough cost figures for the various components of the LLWMP effort and concluded that, in its opinion, the public participation process provided benefits to the federal government that exceeded its costs. Moreover, the costs of the individual components were not out of line with each one's usefulness and contribution to the overall effort

  10. Evaluation of the Northern Squawfish Management Program : Final Report of Research, 1990-1996.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, David L.

    1998-10-28

    This document is the final report of research conducted from 1990-96 by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) to evaluate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) project 90-077, the Northern Squawfish Management Program (NSMP). The Summary of Project summarizes and integrates the results, conclusions, and recommendations of the evaluation. The report contains research papers that describe how we addressed project objectives, how we reached our conclusions, and why we made our recommendations. The papers are listed and numbered consecutively in the Table of Contents and the numbers are used to reference each paper in the Summary of Project. It is the integration of these individual papers that provides the best picture of the current status of the NSMP.

  11. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-02-01

    This report evaluates a fuel cell electric bus demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This evaluation report covers two years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2013.

  12. Evaluation of techniques used to study vegetation and avifauna in National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska: 1976 NPRA final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The report covers the evaluation of techniques used to study vegetation and avifauna in National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska. This is the 1976 NPRA final report....

  13. Chemical and toxicological properties of emissions from CNG transit buses equipped with three-way catalysts compared to lean-burn engines and oxidation catalyst technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seungju; Hu, Shaohua; Kado, Norman Y.; Thiruvengadam, Arvind; Collins, John F.; Gautam, Mridul; Herner, Jorn D.; Ayala, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Chemical and toxicological properties of emissions from compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled transit buses with stoichiometric combustion engines and three-way catalyst (TWC) exhaust control systems were measured using a chassis dynamometer testing facility and compared to the data from earlier CNG engine and exhaust control technologies. Gaseous and particulate matter emissions from buses with stoichiometric engines and TWC were significantly lower than the emissions from buses with lean-burn engines. Carbonyls and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from buses with stoichiometric engines and TWC were lower by more than 99% compared to buses with lean-burn engines. Elemental and organic carbons (EC and OC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and trace elements from buses with stoichiometric engines and TWC were effectively controlled and significantly lower than the emissions from buses with lean-burn engines. Potential mutagenicity measured using a microsuspension modification of the Salmonella/microsome assay was lower by more than 99% for buses with stoichiometric engines and TWC, compared to buses with lean-burn engines and OxC.

  14. First-year evaluation of IMERG - Final Run in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe; Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-04-01

    For almost two years now, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission has provided worldwide satellite rainfall estimates at higher spatiotemporal resolutions than its predecessor TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission). Accurate rainfall estimates at higher resolutions are the main input in modeling physical processes relevant to society like floods, landslides, and weather extremes. Conversely to TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) products, the Netherlands is within the coverage of GPM Level-3 products, i.e., IMERG (Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM). The IMERG spatiotemporal resolution is 0.1° x 0.1° every 30 min (180°W to 180°E, and 60&Deg;N to 60°S), with latencies of 6, 18 hours and 4 months. Here we evaluate the first full year of the IMERG Day 1 Final Run over the land surface of the Netherlands. IMERG Final Run is considered the research product, and provides the longest public data set among IMERG products. We compare half-hourly and daily IMERG rainfall maps against Dutch gauge-adjusted radar rainfall maps. Radar rainfall maps are provided by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), and are considered as the ground truth given its accuracy, spatiotemporal resolution and availability. In general, there is a tendency of GPM to underestimate rainfall intensities over the land surface of the Netherlands. Nevertheless, this underestimation is relatively low, which suggests a potential applicability of IMERG Final Run as a reliable source of rainfall estimates in diverse hydrological and hydrometeorological applications. The robustness and data availability of IMERG is an important asset, especially in places where rain gauge networks are scarce or poorly maintained, or where weather radar networks are too expensive to acquire and/or maintain.

  15. Final technical evaluation report for the proposed revised reclamation plan for the Atlas Corporation Moab Mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final Technical Evaluation Report (TER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff's review of Atlas Corporation's proposed reclamation plan for its uranium mill tailings pile near Moab, Utah. The proposed reclamation would allow Atlas to (1) reclaim the tailings pile for permanent disposal and long-term custodial care by a government agency in its current location on the Moab site, (2) prepare the site for closure, and (3) relinquish responsibility of the site after having its NRC license terminated. The NRC staff concludes that, subject to license conditions identified in the TER, the proposed reclamation plan meets the requirements identified in NRC regulations, which appear primarily in 10 CFR Part 40. 112 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs

  16. Analysis of the cost of hydrogen infrastructure for buses in London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayegan, S.; Hart, D.; Pearson, P.; Joffe, D.

    The use of hydrogen (H 2) as transport fuel is often said to suffer from the 'chicken and egg' problem: vehicles that depend on H 2 cannot go on the roads due to the lack of an adequate infrastructure, and the almost non-existent fleet of H 2 vehicles on the roads makes it economically unsound to build a H 2 infrastructure. Although both hydrogen vehicles (fuel cell and internal combustion engine) and the related infrastructure have been (and are being) developed and some are commercially available, cost is seen as a major barrier. With today's technologies, H 2 only becomes competitive with petrol and diesel when produced at large quantities, suitable for supplying e.g. thousands of H 2 buses. The question is, how might this point be reached, and are there least cost infrastructural pathways to reach it. This paper tries to address the latter question, using the early development of a H 2 infrastructure for buses in London as a case study. The paper presents some of the analyses and results from a Ph.D. project (in progress) being undertaken at Imperial College London, funded by EPSRC (Grant GR/R50790/01). The results presented here illustrate that cost of hydrogen production and delivery vary mainly with levels of hydrogen demand and delivery distances, as well as other logistic criteria; least cost production-delivery pathways have been identified for various hydrogen demand scenarios and refuelling station set-ups. Another important conclusion is that the pattern of converting a group of refuelling stations to hydrogen (e.g. a group of refuelling stations for buses in London) has a significant effect on the unit cost of hydrogen.

  17. Characteristics of cabin air quality in school buses in Central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Donghyun; Siegel, Jeffrey; Spinhirne, Jarett; Webb, Alba; McDonald-Buller, Elena

    This study assessed in-cabin concentrations of diesel-associated air pollutants in six school buses with diesel engines during a typical route in suburban Austin, Texas. Air exchange rates measured by SF 6 decay were 2.60-4.55 h -1. In-cabin concentrations of all pollutants measured exhibited substantial variability across the range of tests even between buses of similar age, mileage, and engine type. In-cabin NO x concentrations ranged from 44.7 to 148 ppb and were 1.3-10 times higher than roadway NO x concentrations. Mean in-cabin PM 2.5 concentrations were 7-20 μg m -3 and were generally lower than roadway levels. In-cabin concentrations exhibited higher variability during cruising mode than frequent stops. Mean in-cabin ultrafine PM number concentrations were 6100-32,000 particles cm -3 and were generally lower than roadway levels. Comparison of median concentrations indicated that in-cabin ultrafine PM number concentrations were higher than or approximately the same as the roadway concentrations, which implied that, by excluding the bias caused by local traffic, ultrafine PM levels were higher in the bus cabin than outside of the bus. Cabin pollutant concentrations on three buses were measured prior to and following the phased installation of a Donaldson Spiracle Crankcase Filtration System and a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst. Following installation of the Spiracle, the Diesel Oxidation Catalyst provided negligible or small additional reductions of in-cabin pollutant levels. In-cabin concentration decreases with the Spiracle alone ranged from 24 to 37% for NO x and 26 to 62% and 6.6 to 43% for PM 2.5 and ultrafine PM, respectively. Comparison of the ranges of PM 2.5 and ultrafine PM variations between repetitive tests suggested that retrofit installation could not always be conclusively linked to the decrease of pollutant levels in the bus cabin.

  18. The Fuel Economy of Hybrid Buses: The Role of Ancillaries in Real Urban Driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bottiglione

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present context of the global economic crisis and environmental emergency, transport science is asked to find innovative solutions to turn traditional vehicles into fuel-saving and eco-friendly devices. In the last few years, hybrid vehicles have been shown to have potential benefits in this sense. In this paper, the fuel economy of series hybrid-electric and hybrid-mechanical buses is simulated in two real driving situations: cold and hot weather driving in the city of Taranto, in Southern Italy. The numerical analysis is carried out by an inverse dynamic approach, where the bus speed is given as a velocity pattern measured in the field tests performed on one of the city bus routes. The city of Taranto drive schedule is simulated in a typical tempered climate condition and with a hot temperature, when the air conditioning system must be switched on for passenger comfort. The fuel consumptions of hybrid-electric and hybrid-mechanical buses are compared to each other and with a traditional bus powered by a diesel engine. It is shown that the series hybrid-electric vehicle outperforms both the traditional and the mechanical hybrid vehicles in the cold weather driving simulation, reducing the fuel consumption by about 35% with respect to the traditional diesel bus. However, it is also shown that the performance of the hybrid-electric bus gets dramatically worse when the air-cooling system is continuously turned on. In this situation, the fuel consumption of the three different technologies for city buses under investigation is comparable.

  19. The Fuel Economy of Hybrid Buses: The Role of Ancillaries in Real Urban Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Bottiglione; Tommaso Contursi; Angelo Gentile; Giacomo Mantriota

    2014-01-01

    In the present context of the global economic crisis and environmental emergency, transport science is asked to find innovative solutions to turn traditional vehicles into fuel-saving and eco-friendly devices. In the last few years, hybrid vehicles have been shown to have potential benefits in this sense. In this paper, the fuel economy of series hybrid-electric and hybrid-mechanical buses is simulated in two real driving situations: cold and hot weather driving in the city of Taranto, in Sou...

  20. Operational integrity using field buses; Integridade operacional utilizando barramentos de campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, Carlos Henrique [Coester Automacao S.A., Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The device information is collected using standardized Filed Buses with high data transmission capacity, which allows the analysis of his operational status in real time. The quantity of information generated by the devices for the maintenance area is increasing and this data quantity transferred through the field bus should not interfere in the network performance to the point of degrade his control function. In this way, is presented a technique that can be used in different protocols, which allow sending of maintenance data using a small band of the communication channel. Operational integrity can be achieved using predictive maintenance techniques based on the collected data. (author)

  1. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Power Burst Facility (PER-620) Final End State and PBF Vessel Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. C. Culp

    2007-05-01

    Preparation of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, (DOE and EPA 1995) which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time critical removal action process as an approach for decommissioning. The scope of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is to evaluate alternatives and recommend a preferred alternative for the final end state of the PBF and the final disposal location for the PBF vessel.

  2. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Power Burst Facility (PER-620) Final End State and PBF Vessel Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, (DOE and EPA 1995) which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time critical removal action process as an approach for decommissioning. The scope of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is to evaluate alternatives and recommend a preferred alternative for the final end state of the PBF and the final disposal location for the PBF vessel

  3. Voltage Stability Evaluation Incorporating Wind Power Intermittency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libao SHI; Yang ZHAO; Yixin NI; Liangzhong YAO; Masoud BAZARGAN

    2013-01-01

    A simulation framework is proposed to evaluate the voltage stability of power systems incorporating wind power intermittency.Firstly,the power output modelings of three types of wind turbines are discussed.Secondly,the Jensen model is employed to simulate the wind farm with the wake effect.The Monte Carlo based technique is used to conduct the voltage stability evaluation incorporating the randomness of the wind speed based on the Weibull probability distribution.Thirdly,the relative sensitivity index (RSI) is calculated to identify weak buses during analysis.Finally,case studies with different simulation scenarios are carried out.Some statistical results involving weakness probability,expected value and variance of RSI as well as preliminary conclusions are drawn based on numerical simulation results.

  4. 26 CFR 48.4221-8 - Tax-free sales of tires, tubes, and tread rubber used on intercity, local, and school buses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used on intercity, local, and school buses. 48.4221-8 Section 48.4221-8 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Exemptions, Registration, Etc. § 48.4221-8 Tax-free sales of tires, tubes, and tread rubber used on intercity, local, and school buses. (a) In general. Under section 4221(e)(5), the...

  5. Evaluation of duty cycles for heavy-duty urban vehicles : final report of IEA AMF Annex 29

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nylund, N.O.; Erkkila, K. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Clark, N. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Rideout, G. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Environmental Technology Centre, Emissions Research and Measurement Div

    2007-07-01

    Heavy-duty vehicles in Europe and North America will require incylinder measures or exhaust gas after-treatment technology to control emissions and meet ever stringent emission requirements. Alternatively, manufacturers can choose clean burning alternative fuels such as natural gas. Although there are no international standards for heavy-duty vehicle chassis dynamometer testing at present, the IEA Implementing Agreements offer excellent platforms for international collaborative research. Harmonization of test methods for vehicles and fuels is one important task. This paper reported on the work of 3 laboratories that have produced emission results for complete heavy-duty vehicles. VTT Technical Research of Finland, Environment Canada and West Virginia University measured standard size urban buses driving various duty cycles on chassis dynamometers. The number of transient test cycles per laboratory varied from 6 to 16. European and North American diesel and natural gas vehicles were included in the vehicle matrix. The objective was to demonstrate how the driving cycle affects the emission performance of conventional and advanced urban buses. Several driving cycles were run on urban buses to better understand the characteristics of different duty cycles; produce a key for cross-interpretation of emission results generated with different cycles; and study the interaction between vehicle, exhaust after-treatment and fuel technologies and test procedures. Fuel consumption and exhaust emissions were measured. The results varied significantly not only by test cycle, but also by vehicle technology. In general, vehicles emissions were directly proportioned to the amount of fuel consumed, with the exception of NOx-emissions from SCR-vehicles. There was a clear difference in the emission profiles of European and North American vehicles. In Europe, fuel efficiency was emphasized, while in North America, more focus was given to regulated exhaust emissions, especially low

  6. Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2005-09-29

    Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Report Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC) has performed a conceptual design study concerning aeroelastic tailoring of small wind turbine blades. The primary objectives were to evaluate ways that blade/rotor geometry could be used to enable cost-of-energy reductions by enhancing energy capture while constraining or mitigating blade costs, system loads, and related component costs. This work builds on insights developed in ongoing adaptive-blade programs but with a focus on application to small turbine systems with isotropic blade material properties and with combined blade sweep and pre-bending/pre-curving to achieve the desired twist coupling. Specific goals of this project are to: (A) Evaluate and quantify the extent to which rotor geometry can be used to realize load-mitigating small wind turbine rotors. Primary aspects of the load mitigation are: (1) Improved overspeed safety affected by blades twisting toward stall in response to speed increases. (2) Reduced fatigue loading affected by blade twisting toward feather in response to turbulent gusts. (B) Illustrate trade-offs and design sensitivities for this concept. (C) Provide the technical basis for small wind turbine manufacturers to evaluate this concept and commercialize if the technology appears favorable. The SolidWorks code was used to rapidly develop solid models of blade with varying shapes and material properties. Finite element analyses (FEA) were performed using the COSMOS code modeling with tip-loads and centripetal accelerations. This tool set was used to investigate the potential for aeroelastic tailoring with combined planform sweep and pre-curve. An extensive matrix of design variables was investigated, including aerodynamic design, magnitude and shape of planform sweep, magnitude and shape of blade pre-curve, material stiffness, and rotor diameter. The FEA simulations resulted in substantial insights into the structural

  7. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off

  8. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off

  9. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Matthew [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2015-08-20

    By combining the top performing commercial laser beam stabilization system with the most ideal optical imaging configuration, the beamline for the Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will deliver the highest quality and most stable beam to the cathode. To determine the optimal combination, LCLS-II beamline conditions were replicated and the systems tested with a He-Ne laser. The Guidestar-II and MRC active laser beam stabilization systems were evaluated for their ideal positioning and stability. Both a two and four lens optical imaging configuration was then evaluated for beam imaging quality, magnification properties, and natural stability. In their best performances when tested over fifteen hours, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable over approximately 70-110um while the MRC system kept it stable over approximately 90-100um. During short periods of time, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable between 10-20um, but was more susceptible to drift over time, while the MRC system maintained the beam between 30-50um with less overall drift. The best optical imaging configuration proved to be a four lens system that images to the iris located in the cathode room and from there, imaged to the cathode. The magnification from the iris to the cathode was 2:1, within an acceptable tolerance to the expected 2.1:1 magnification. The two lens configuration was slightly more stable in small periods of time (less than 10 minutes) without the assistance of a stability system, approximately 55um compared to approximately 70um, but the four lens configurations beam image had a significantly flatter intensity distribution compared to the two lens configuration which had a Gaussian distribution. A final test still needs to be run with both stability systems running at the same time through the four lens system. With this data, the optimal laser beam stabilization system can be determined for the beamline of LCLS-II.

  10. Demonstration, testing, ampersand evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,close quotes Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120 degrees to 130 degrees C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow

  11. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report and Appendices, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-01-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006 compared to similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. This evaluation report includes results from November 2007 through October 2008. Evaluation results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, fuel cell bus operations at Golden Gate Transit, and evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and roadcalls).

  12. First final evaluation of the ecological comparison 'rape seed-biodiesel versus ordinary diesel oil'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, G.A.; Zemanek, G. (IFEU - Inst. fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung Heidelberg GmbH (Germany))

    1999-01-01

    Since the beginning of the nineties methodology and content of LCAs on 'Rape Seed Biodiesel versus Ordinary Diesel Oil' have continuously been developed. Based on this solid knowledge a final evaluation of the ecological advantages and disadvantages of rape seed biodiesel (RME) as a substitute for diesel oil is now possible. The present final evaluation includes a comparison of the 'specific contributions' of selected environmental impact categories followed by a verbal, i.e. non-quantitative final evaluation that draws on their 'ecological relevance'. The results show that an overall final assessment in favour of RME can be justified because this fuel obtains better results in two of the three most important environmental impact categories ('resource demand', 'greenhouse effect'). But since there is strong interpretational ambiguity concerning the third category 'ozone depletion' this assessment is not inescapable. The results of this evaluation model cannot be completely scientifically objective because they depend on time, place, user and circumstance. Therefore the evaluation process, especially the system boundaries, have to be explicitely documented in order to allow a comprehensible review. (orig.)

  13. Avaliação dos fatores de risco laborais e físicos para doenças cardiovasculares em motoristas de transporte urbano de ônibus em Montes Claros (MG Evaluation of labor-related and physical risk factors for cardiovascular disease in drivers of urban transport buses in Montes Claros in the state of Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Farias Alquimim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo buscou avaliar os fatores de risco para doenças cardiovasculares em motoristas de ônibus em Montes Claros (MG. Foi empregado um questionário semiestruturado abordando dados pessoais, antropométricos, profissionais e laborais; e outro referente ao grau de estresse. Foram pesquisados 53 motoristas de ônibus e a média de idade foi de 30 a 39 anos, e dessa população, 81,1% diziam não ser fumantes, 58% não consumiam bebida alcoólica e 50% praticavam algum tipo de exercício. Na avaliação do IMC 40 motoristas (75,4% estavam com excesso de peso. A prevalência dos hábitos alimentares foi de excesso consumo de açúcar (66,0%, de gordura (64,2%, de café (69,8%, de sal (60,4%, de Coca Cola (64,2% e de refrigerante (54,7%. Dentre os relatos de doenças crônicas não foram observados motoristas diabéticos (98,1% e nem hipertensos (94,3%. A maioria da amostragem, 69,7% teve nível de estresse normal. Em relação aos dados laboratoriais, a grande maioria dos motoristas apresentou hipertrigliceridemia e hipercolesterolemia. Os níveis de HDL estavam satisfatórios, e o de LDL apresentou nível normal e desejável em mais da metade da amostra. A prevalência para doença cardiovascular mostrou-se baixa.The scope of this study was to evaluate risk factors for cardiovascular disease among bus drivers in Montes Claros in the state of Minas Gerais. A semi-structured questionnaire covering personal, anthropometric, professional and labor-related data was used, in addition to a questionnaire on the level of stress. 53 bus drivers were surveyed and the average age was 30 to 39 years of age. 81.1% were non-smokers; 58% of the sample were teetotalers; and 50% took regular exercise. In the assessment of BMI, 40 drivers (75.4% were overweight. The prevalence in eating habits revealed excess consumption of sugar (66.0%, fat (64.2%, coffee (69.8%, salt (60.4%, coca cola (64.2% and soft drinks (54.7%. Among reports of chronic diseases, no

  14. Is the public willing to pay for hydrogen buses? A comparative study of preferences in four cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Garra, Tanya [Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: tanya.ogarra@imperial.ac.uk; Mourato, Susana [Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Garrity, Lisa [Institute for Sustainability and Technology Policy, Murdoch University, Murdoch 6150, WA (Australia); Schmidt, Patrick [Ludwig-Boelkow-Systemtechnik GmbH, Daimlerstrasse 15, D 85521 Ottobrunn (Germany); Beerenwinkel, Anne [University of Wuppertal, Fachbereich G-Bildungswissenschaften, Lehrstuhl fuer Lehr-, Lern- und Unterrichtsforschung, Gaussstr. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Altmann, Matthias [Ludwig-Boelkow-Systemtechnik GmbH, Daimlerstrasse 15, D 85521 Ottobrunn (Germany); Hart, David [Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Graesel, Cornelia [University of Wuppertal, Fachbereich G-Bildungswissenschaften, Lehrstuhl fuer Lehr-, Lern- und Unterrichtsforschung, Gaussstr. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Whitehouse, Simon [Institute for Sustainability and Technology Policy, Murdoch University, Murdoch 6150, WA (Australia)

    2007-07-15

    This paper presents results from the international AcceptH2 study (http://www.accepth2.com) of acceptability and preferences for hydrogen fuel cell (FC) buses. Using the contingent valuation method, this paper compares public willingness to pay (WTP) for the air pollution reductions associated with a scenario of large-scale introduction of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) FC buses in four cities: Berlin, London, Luxembourg and Perth. Results indicate that bus users in all cities have a positive WTP for H{sub 2} buses, and that values (adjusted to the cost of living in each city) are very similar across geographical locations (ranging from WTP an extra Euro 0.29 to Euro 0.35 per single bus fare). Non-bus users were also interviewed in London and Perth, in order to capture values for the whole populations in these cities. Combined results for bus users and non-bus users confirm that overall residents in these cities are willing to pay extra (in taxes) to support the large-scale introduction of H{sub 2}-buses.

  15. Is the public willing to pay for hydrogen buses? A comparative study of preferences in four cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Garra, Tanya; Mourato, Susana; Hart, David [Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Garrity, Lisa; Whitehouse, Simon [Institute for Sustainability and Technology Policy, Murdoch University, Murdoch 6150, WA (Australia); Schmidt, Patrick; Altmann, Matthias [Ludwig-Boelkow-Systemtechnik GmbH, Daimlerstrasse 15, D 85521 Ottobrunn (Germany); Beerenwinkel, Anne; Graesel, Cornelia [University of Wuppertal, Fachbereich G - Bildungswissenschaften, Lehrstuhl fuer Lehr-, Lern- und Unterrichtsforschung,Gaussstr. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    This paper presents results from the international AcceptH2 study (http://www.accepth2.com) of acceptability and preferences for hydrogen fuel cell (FC) buses. Using the contingent valuation method, this paper compares public willingness to pay (WTP) for the air pollution reductions associated with a scenario of large-scale introduction of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) FC buses in four cities: Berlin, London, Luxembourg and Perth. Results indicate that bus users in all cities have a positive WTP for H{sub 2} buses, and that values (adjusted to the cost of living in each city) are very similar across geographical locations (ranging from WTP an extra EUR0.29 to EUR0.35 per single bus fare). Non-bus users were also interviewed in London and Perth, in order to capture values for the whole populations in these cities. Combined results for bus users and non-bus users confirm that overall residents in these cities are willing to pay extra (in taxes) to support the large-scale introduction of H{sub 2}-buses. (author)

  16. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining

  17. Final report of the project performance assessment and economic evaluation of nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication is the final report of project Performance Assessment and Economic Evaluation of Nuclear Waste Management (TOKA) at the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland), forming part of the Publicly Financed Nuclear Waste Management Research Programme (JYT). The project covers safety and cost aspects of all phases of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis has been on developing an integrated system of models for performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories. During the four years the project has so far been in progress, the total amount of work has been around 14 person-years. Computer codes are the main tools in the project, they are either developed by the project team or acquired from abroad. In-house model development has been especially active in groundwater flow, near-field and migration modelling. The quantitative interpretation of Finnish tracer experiments in the laboratory and natural analogue studies at Palmottu support performance assessments via increased confidence in the migration concepts used. The performance assessment philosophy adopted by the team consists of deterministic modelling and pragmatic scenario analysis. This is supported by the long-term experience in practical performance assessment of the team, and in theoretical probabilistic modelling exercises. The radiological risks of spent fuel transportation from the Loviisa nuclear power plant to Russia have been analysed using a probabilistic computer code and Finnish traffic accident statistics. The project assists the authorities in the annual assessment of utility estimates of funding needs for future nuclear waste management operations. The models and methods used within the project are tested in international verification/validation projects

  18. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to grout and glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT ampersand E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT ampersand E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the

  19. Constructing and Evaluating a Validity Argument for the Final-Year Ward Simulation Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Hettie; Ker, Jean; Myford, Carol; Stirling, Kevin; Mires, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The authors report final-year ward simulation data from the University of Dundee Medical School. Faculty who designed this assessment intend for the final score to represent an individual senior medical student's level of clinical performance. The results are included in each student's portfolio as one source of evidence of the student's…

  20. 78 FR 15358 - DOE's Preferred Alternative for Certain Tanks Evaluated in the Final Tank Closure and Waste...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ...). ACTION: Notice of DOE's preferred alternative. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE's Preferred Alternative for Certain Tanks Evaluated in the Final Tank Closure and Waste...

  1. Health Care and Satellite Radio Communication in Village Alaska. Final Report of the ATS-1 Biomedical Satellite: Experiment Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, Osvaldo; And Others

    The executive summary is the first section of this final report of the evaluation of the ATS-1 medical communication system in Alaska. The second section introduces the background of these studies and the sociogeographic setting and health situation of the Alaska natives. The third section presents the main research findings about both the…

  2. 76 FR 29021 - Written Re-Evaluation and Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for the Relocation of the Panama City-Bay County International Airport (2006... Federal Aviation Administration Written Re-Evaluation and Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Relocation of the Panama City- Bay County International Airport AGENCY: FAA,...

  3. Simulations of the Fuel Economy and Emissions of Hybrid Transit Buses over Planned Local Routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We present simulated fuel economy and emissions city transit buses powered by conventional diesel engines and diesel-hybrid electric powertrains of varying size. Six representative city drive cycles were included in the study. In addition, we included previously published aftertreatment device models for control of CO, HC, NOx, and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Our results reveal that bus hybridization can significantly enhance fuel economy by reducing engine idling time, reducing demands for accessory loads, exploiting regenerative braking, and shifting engine operation to speeds and loads with higher fuel efficiency. Increased hybridization also tends to monotonically reduce engine-out emissions, but trends in the tailpipe (post-aftertreatment) emissions involve more complex interactions that significantly depend on motor size and drive cycle details.

  4. EVALUATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF LOW-NOX BURNER SYSTEMS FOR TEOR (THERMALLY ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY) STEAM GENERATORS: FINAL REPORT - FIELD EVALUATION OF COMMERCIAL PROTOTYPE BURNER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of the final phase of a program to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate a low-NOx burner for crude-oil-fired steam generators used for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR). The burner designed and demonstrated under this program was developed from design ...

  5. Performance study about biodiesel impact on buses engines using dynamometer tests and fleet consumption data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Driving cycle affects the fuel impacts on engine emissions and performance. ► Incorporation of biodiesel can improve efficiency for some engine regimes. ► Biodiesel oxygen content probably increases combustion efficiency in engine. ► The consumption of the fleet agrees with the dynamometer results. ► NOx emissions are very sensitive to engine operating conditions. - Abstract: The problem of reducing harmful emissions, mainly particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOxs) originated in compression ignition combustion engines, and also the mandatory intention of lowering the CO2 impacts of road transportation define the need to improve our knowledge on biodiesel use in engines. A 6 in line cylinders Volvo engine was submitted to a 100 min cycle with 27 stabilized steps for seven different fuel blends from pure fossil diesel (B0) to pure biodiesel (B100), considering also B10, B15, B20, B30, B50 fuel blends. The cycle imposed tries to simulate a normal use of a bus in an urban and extra-urban circuit, considering different engine rotation and loads applied. An analysis on consumption data obtained of a fleet was made. The fleet had near 200 buses, used different fuel blends, and operated in the north of Portugal. Results reveal that the cycle imposed reflects very well the tendency of consumption, allowing to confirm the methodology and also to check influences on consumption, mainly associated with possibilities to decrease CO2 emissions by using some biodiesel blends on buses. This allows increasing the quality of data in vehicle real use and tightening the uncertainties on the actual effects of using biodiesel.

  6. Applied research and evaluation of process concepts for liquefaction and gasification of western coals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, W. H.

    1980-09-01

    Fourteen sections, including five subsections, of the final report covering work done between June 1, 1975 to July 31, 1980 on research programs in coal gasification and liquefaction have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  7. Reliable evaluation of acceptability of weld for final disposal based on the canister copper weld inspection using different NDT methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inspection of the sealing weld is an important phase for the evaluation of the acceptability of final disposal canister, but the weld is only a part of the 3D shielding of copper shell. The main tasks for reliable NDT evaluation requires an extensive evaluation of the parameters - which contains typical inspection related items like repeatability, S/N ratio, POD, setting up the equipment for inspection, and all practices for inspections. The other parameters are material parameters, their variation must be taken into account in the evaluation of NDT reliability. Further parameters include human factors, i. e. human inspectors and their interaction with technical systems; their effects were studied on an example of the evaluation of eddy current data. Final parameters are related to evaluation of detected defects, which means sizing and base for acceptance and this can be done in different ways. Some examples are given and results are compared with different methods for instance between radiographic testing and ultrasonic testing by raw data analysis and PA-SAFT results. Also, preliminary curves for the evaluation of metallographic results of 55 defects will be shown by EB weld measurements. Some practical items concerning copper inspections will be also discussed related to acceptability.

  8. Workplace Literacy Program (WPL) at Chinatown Manpower Project, Inc. Final Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenberg, Joan E.

    This document describes the procedures for and results of the external evaluation of the workplace literacy program for underemployed garment industry workers with low English skills at Chinatown Manpower Project, Inc. in Chinatown in New York City. The document describes the evaluation design and methodology as well as the evaluation results,…

  9. Evaluation, engineering and development of advanced cyclone processes. Final separating media evaluation and test report (FSMER). Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This report consists of appendices pertaining to the separating media evaluation (calcium nitrate solution) and testing for an advanced cyclone process. Appendices include: materials safety data, aqueous medium regeneration, pH control strategy, and other notes and data.

  10. Staff Helping Attain Relevant Education (Project SHARE): Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranadive, Jyoti

    Project SHARE (Staff Helping Attain Relevant Education), a project funded by Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, was in its third and final year of operation in 1992-93, in eight primary schools in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Manhattan (New York). The project served 141 limited English proficient students from low-income families…

  11. Navajo-ABLE: Replication Model Navajo Assistive Technology Loan Program. Final Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Katie Jebb

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of the Navajo Assistive Bank of Loanable Equipment (Navajo-ABLE), a federally funded program designed to provide assistive technology (AT) devices, services, technical information, funding information, and training for Navajo children and youth with disabilities. The program was operated and…

  12. Economic Studies and Out-of-School Education Program Evaluation for the Ivory Coast. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Stephen; And Others

    This report is a final one in a series of 17 reports concerned with costs analysis/projections of the instructional television program and the Out of School Television (OSTV) project in the Ivory Coast. It includes an introduction to the OSTV project after its first five years of existence, a description of the main elements of the in-school…

  13. Fast Charging Battery Buses for the Electrification of Urban Public Transport : A Feasibility Study Focusing on Charging Infrastructure and Energy Storage Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Rogge; Sebastian Wollny; Dirk Uwe Sauer

    2015-01-01

    The electrification of public transport bus networks can be carried out utilizing different technological solutions, like trolley, battery or fuel cell buses. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how and to what extent existing bus networks can be electrified with fast charging battery buses. The so called opportunity chargers use mainly the regular dwell time at the stops to charge their batteries. This results in a strong linkage between the vehicle scheduling and the infrastructure plan...

  14. Clinical Observed Performance Evaluation: A Prospective Study in Final Year Students of Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, G. C.; Browne, K.; Hunter, K.; Hill, A. D.

    2011-01-01

    We report a prospective study of clinical observed performance evaluation (COPE) for 197 medical students in the pre-qualification year of clinical education. Psychometric quality was the main endpoint. Students were assessed in groups of 5 in 40-min patient encounters, with each student the focus of evaluation for 8 min. Each student had a series…

  15. SIMPLIFIED METHOD FOR CALCULATING CLOSING IN OF SWITCH-GEAR FLEXIBLE BUSES AT SHORT CIRCUIT BY IMPULSE OF ELECTRODYNAMIC FORCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Sergey

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains description of a simplified method for calculating closing-in of switch-gear flexible buses at short circuit. The developed method is based on integral and energy principles of  mechanics. In order to increase accuracy of the calculation corrections factors are introduced in an explicit formula for calculation of maximum horizontal deviations. These factors have been obtained with the help of a computer program that realized numerical method for calculating closing-in of wires by flexible thread levels.Diagrams are constructed with the purpose to find ymax and criteria of electro-dynamic resistance of flexible buses (permissible impulse of electro-dynamic forces and current of electro-dynamic resistance is determined.

  16. Urban transportation system optimum: The effect of accounting for the interaction of buses and cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Angelo Guevara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se usa un método iterativo para calcular tarifas Pigouvianascuando las vías son compartidas por autos y buses. Se comparan escenarios en los cuales: 1 la tarifa es calculada considerando sólo la externalidad sobre otros vehículos; 2 la tarifa considera además la externalidad sobre los pasajeros de los vehículos; 3 no se aplican tarifas; y 4 no se aplican tarifas, pero algunas pistas son reservadas para el uso exclusivo de buses. El método es aplicado primero a un modelo idealizado que considera homogenidad de la demanda y cierto grado de heterogenidad en la oferta. Luego el método es aplicado en un experimento con datos reales basado en un modelo simultáneo de cuatro etapas calibrado para la ciudad de Santiago, Chile. Todos los experimentos muestran que cuando se considera la externalidad sobre los pasajeros de los vehículos, las tarifas Pigouvianas crecen sustancialmente en las vías de uso mixto, lo cual se traduce en un menor flujo de automóviles en dichas vías. Por otro lado, las simulaciones con el modelo idealizado muestran que el efecto de la reservación de pistas depende fuertemente del diseño considerado. Respecto de la tarificación Pigouviana, el experimento con datos reales muestra, sorprendentemente, que dicha política resultaría ser inferior a un escenario en el cual no se aplican tarifas. Este resultado podría atribuirse a: 1 que el modelo con datos reales representa una situación de equilibrio general y en cambio las tarifas Pigouvianas se calculan usando un enfoque de equilibrio parcial; 2 limitaciones de modelación en el experimento con datos reales; o 3 una manifestación del contraejemplo de Coase para los impuestos Pigouvianos. El artículo termina discutiendo el impacto de estos resultados en el análisis de políticas de transporte urbano.

  17. Itinerant vending of medicines inside buses in Nigeria: vending strategies, dominant themes and medicine-related information provided

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuff KB; Wassi Sanni A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine vending strategies and marketing themes employed by itinerant bus vendors, and assess the accuracy and completeness of information provided on medicines being sold in an urban setting in Nigeria. Methods Cross-sectional study and content analysis of itinerant vending of medicines inside buses recorded with a mobile telephone on purposively selected routes in a mega city with an estimated 18 million residents in southwestern Nigeria over a 2-month period. Two coders inde...

  18. SIMPLIFIED METHOD FOR CALCULATING CLOSING IN OF SWITCH-GEAR FLEXIBLE BUSES AT SHORT CIRCUIT BY IMPULSE OF ELECTRODYNAMIC FORCES

    OpenAIRE

    I. I. Sergey; E. G. Ponomarenko; W. M. Sammur; P. I. Klimkovich

    2005-01-01

    The paper contains description of a simplified method for calculating closing-in of switch-gear flexible buses at short circuit. The developed method is based on integral and energy principles of  mechanics. In order to increase accuracy of the calculation corrections factors are introduced in an explicit formula for calculation of maximum horizontal deviations. These factors have been obtained with the help of a computer program that realized numerical method for calculating closing-in of wi...

  19. Evaluation of the Institutional Conservation Program: results of on-site analyses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-30

    In October 1981, the US Department of Energy (DOE) contracted to evaluate Cycles I and II of the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP). The Program provides assistance and matching funds to help four types of non-profit institutions reduce their energy consumption. On the basis of analyses of institutional records, on-site assessments, and interviews with state and institution administrators, evaluators assessed the implementation of the program, the impacts of the ICP and estimated the energy savings participating institutions achieved using data collected from Cycles I and II participants. The findings and conclusions of the ICP evaluation are presented.

  20. Variability of particle number emissions from diesel and hybrid diesel-electric buses in real driving conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Darrell B; Gao, H Oliver; Holmén, Britt A

    2008-08-01

    A linear mixed model was developed to quantify the variability of particle number emissions from transit buses tested in real-world driving conditions. Two conventional diesel buses and two hybrid diesel-electric buses were tested throughout 2004 under different aftertreatments, fuels, drivers, and bus routes. The mixed model controlled the confounding influence of factors inherent to on-board testing. Statistical tests showed that particle number emissions varied significantly according to the after treatment, bus route, driver, bus type, and daily temperature, with only minor variability attributable to differences between fuel types. The daily setup and operation of the sampling equipment (electrical low pressure impactor) and mini-dilution system contributed to 30-84% of the total random variability of particle measurements among tests with diesel oxidation catalysts. By controlling for the sampling day variability, the model better defined the differences in particle emissions among bus routes. In contrast, the low particle number emissions measured with diesel particle filters (decreased by over 99%) did not vary according to operating conditions or bus type but did vary substantially with ambient temperature.

  1. Evaluation of the feasibility, economic impact, and effectiveness of underground nuclear power plants. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on underground nuclear power plants is presented concerning underground nuclear power plant concepts; public health impacts; technical feasibility of underground concepts; economic impacts of underground construction; and evaluation of related issues

  2. Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Waterfowl Management Evaluation: Final Report and Recommendations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A review of Parker River NWR's waterfowl management program was conducted during April 4-6, 1989. Ongoing and planned waterfowl management activities were evaluated...

  3. Evaluation of the feasibility, economic impact, and effectiveness of underground nuclear power plants. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-01

    Information on underground nuclear power plants is presented concerning underground nuclear power plant concepts; public health impacts; technical feasibility of underground concepts; economic impacts of underground construction; and evaluation of related issues.

  4. Grid-connected ICES: preliminary feasibility analysis and evaluation. Volume 3. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-30

    Maps, charts, and drawings of the Demonstration Community for the grid-connected ICES project composed of the medical complex in New Orleans (HEAL) are presented in Appendix A. The physical profile of the existing buildings and site plans is included. Demand profiles for steam, electric, gas, etc. are presented in Appendix B with extensive tables and graphs. Air quality and noise pollution data are presented in Appendix C. Data on financing in Appendix D are presented and also texts and information on revenue bonds are given. The final appendix gives qualifications for personnel for HEAL; NOSPI; de Laureal Engineers, Inc.; and Orr-Schelen-Mayeron and Associates, Inc.

  5. The life cycle assessment of alternative fuel chains for urban buses and trolleybuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliucininkas, L; Matulevicius, J; Martuzevicius, D

    2012-05-30

    This paper describes a comparative analysis of public transport alternatives in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania. An LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) inventory analysis of fuel chains was undertaken using the midi urban bus and a similar type of trolleybus. The inventory analysis of fuel chains followed the guidelines provided by the ISO 14040 and ISO 14044 standards. The ReCiPe Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) methodology was used to quantify weighted damage originating from five alternative fuel chains. The compressed biogas fuel chain had the lowest weighted damage value, namely 45.7 mPt/km, whereas weighted damage values of the fuel chains based on electricity generation for trolleybuses were 60.6 mPt/km (for natural gas) and 78.9 mPt/km (for heavy fuel oil). The diesel and compressed natural gas fuel chains exhibited considerably higher damage values of 114.2 mPt/km and 132.6 mPt/km, respectively. The comparative life cycle assessment of fuel chains suggested that biogas-powered buses and electric trolleybuses can be considered as the best alternatives to use when modernizing the public transport fleet in Kaunas.

  6. Evaluation of new pH control agents for PWR secondary water systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an account of work evaluating new organic pH control agents for PWR station secondary systems. A discussion of corrosion control with pH controlling amines is given together with some information on current utility practice with volatile amines. The report describes opportunities for improved corrosion control with new pH controlling amines and the selection of candidates for laboratory evaluation. Progress on EPRI program RP 1571-7, ''Spectroscopic Characterization Methods for New pH Control Agents'', is presented. Also presented is an outline of the second phase of the RP 1571-7 program which was directed toward ''Evaluation of pH Control Agents in Simulated Steam Generator Tubesheet Crevice Environments.'' Quinuclidine and diaminopropane were evaluated using laser Raman spectroscopy. Hydrothermal stability and pH properties at temperature were determined. Quinuclidine was superior to diaminopropane and presents advantages over ammonia, hydrazine and morpholine for plant use as a pH control agent. It was further evaluated in tests with a scaled PWR crevice simulator for corrosion compatibility as well as pH control. 17 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs

  7. Central heating plant economic evaluation program. Volume 4. Coalfield properties information data management program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C.; Moshage, R.; Schanche, G.; Blazek, C.; Biederman, R.

    1995-01-01

    Public law has directed the Department of Defense (DoD) to rehabilitate and convert its existing domestic power plants to burn more coal. Other Federal legislation requires DoD to use the most economic fuel for any new heating system. This five-volume report discusses the Central Heating Plant Economic Evaluation Program (CHPECON), a computer program for screening potential new and retrofit steam/power generation facilities. Volume 4 is the Coalfield Properties Information Data Management Program. CHPECON provides screening criteria to evaluate competing combustion technologies using coal, gas, or oil; detailed conceptual facility design information; budgetary facility costs; and economic measures of project acceptability including total life cycle costs and levelized cost of service. The program provides sufficient flexibility to vary critical design and operating parameters to determine project sensitivity and parametric evaluation.

  8. Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 5 - System Evaluations. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-06-01

    This project is aimed at decreasing the costs and increasing the efficiency of drilling gas wells in excess of 15,000 feet. This volume presents a summary of an evaluation of various drilling techniques. Drilling solutions were compared quantitatively against typical penetration rates derived from conventional systems. A qualitative analysis measured the impact of a proposed system on the drilling industry. The evaluations determined that the best candidates f o r improving the speed and efficiency of drilling deep gas wells include: PDC/TSD bits, slim-hole drilling, roller-cone bits, downhole motors, top-driven systems, and coiled-tubing drilling.

  9. Evaluation of on-line chelant addition dilute chemical cleaning. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The on-line addition of chelants (EDTA, HEDTA) was evaluated based on thermostability of the metal chelate at steam generator operating conditions and based upon material compatibility. Testing under prototypical operating conditions in a model steam generator demonstrated the feasibility of this process under various fouling conditions (seawater and freshwater). Application of dilute chemical cleaning to steam generators was also evaluated. Feasibility of this process was demonstrated by its ability to clean packed crevices. However, application times are long and corrosion rates, while acceptable, require additional development of non-sulfur containing inhibitors

  10. Evaluation of the Community Group Programme for Children & Young People: final report

    OpenAIRE

    Nolas, Sevasti-Melissa; Neville, Lucy; Sanders-McDonagh, Erin

    2012-01-01

    The report presents findings from the evaluation of the Community Group Programme (CGP). The CGP is a 12-week psycho-educational, group work programme for children and young people who have experienced domestic violence. The Programme was developed in Canada and is being rolled out in England for the first time across 32 London boroughs. The programme is unique in working with children and their mothers concurrently and in a child-focused way. The study takes a theory-driven approach to evalu...

  11. Demonstration and evaluation of solid state photomultiplier tube for uranium exploration instrumentation. National uranium resources evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polichar, R.M.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this program has been to evaluate the recently developed solid state photomultiplier tube (SSPMT) technology as a potential improvment to future uranium exploration instrumentation. To this end, six SSPMTs have been constructed and evaluated in a manner similar to that of conventional phototubes. Special regard has been placed on the measurement of pulse height resolution and the factors that affect it in tube design and manufacture. The tubes were subjected to a number of tests similar to those performed on conventional photomultiplier tubes. The results indicate that good, high-resolution spectra can be obtained from the tubes and that they behave generally in a predictable manner. They exhibited a linear gain increase with applied potential. They show only slight dependence of performance with applied potential. Their sensitivity is, for the most part, uniform and predictable. However, several characteristics were found that were not predictable. These include a general drop in measured quantum efficiency, a worsening resolution with operation, and a bump in the sensitivity curve corresponding to the shape of the projected dimension of the anode. The SSPMT remains an attractive new technology in gamma-ray spectroscopy, and promises to make significant improvements in the area of uranium exploration instrumentation. 16 figures, 5 tables.

  12. Intergrated plant safety assessment. Systematic evaluation program. Palisades plant, Consumers Power Company, Docket No. 50-255. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has published its Final Integrated Plant Safety Assessment Report (IPSAR) (NUREG-0820), under the scope of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP), for Consumers Power Company's Palisades Plant located in Covert, Van Buren County, Michigan. The SEP was initiated by the NRC to review the design of older operating nuclear reactor plants to reconfirm and document their safety. This report documents the review completed under the SEP for the Palisades Plant. The review has provided for (1) as assessment of the significance of differences between current technical positions on selected safety issues and those that existed when the Palisades Plant was licensed, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety when all supplements to the Final IPSAR and the Safety Evaluation Report for converting the license from a provisional to a full-term license have been issued. The report also addresses the comments and recommendations made by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in connection with its review of the Draft Report, issued in April 1982

  13. Project DATA-TECH. 1990-91 Final Evaluation Profile. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    An evaluation was done of New York City Public Schools' Project DATA-TECH, which served limited English proficient high school students interested in computer-aided drafting (CAD) and cosmetology programs. The program served 190 students at Sara J. Hale High School in Brooklyn, of whom 89.5 percent were eligible for the Free Lunch Program and most…

  14. Evaluation of the PLATO IV Computer-based Education System in the Community College. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Richard T.; Appel, Lola Rhea

    PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations) is the fourth generation of a computer assisted instructional system developed at the University of Illinois. The use of PLATO IV at five community colleges, and an evaluation of its educational impact on participating students, instructors, and colleges are described. The PLATO system…

  15. Measurement, calculation and evaluation of photon production data. Final report of a coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report summarizes results of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) devoted to photon preduction in neutron-induced reactions. The report presents 25 original contributions that reflect accomplishments achieved in measurement, calculation and evaluation of photon production under the project in 1994-1997. Major results are highlighted and a list of the CRP publications is given. (author)

  16. To Design and Evaluate a 12th Grade Course in the Principles of Economics; Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Suzanne E.; Sperling, John G.

    Reported is the design, development, and evaluation of a one-semester course on the principles of economics for twelfth grade students. The course is intended to develop students' capacity for economic reasoning through economic theory and empirical research. To do this, teaching materials and innovative techniques for teacher training were…

  17. "Keep on Truckin'" Literacy Program [for Adults]: Performance Report; Teacher's Handbook; Final External Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indian Hills Community Coll., Ottumwa, IA.

    This document is composed of a performance report, a teacher's handbook, and an evaluation report of a workplace literacy program to prepare drivers for the Commercial Drivers' License examination. The performance report addresses actual accomplishments of five objectives. It identifies the number and characteristics of project participants who…

  18. Basic Skills Learning Centers Evaluation. Appendices for the Final Report: 11 October 1976 - 30 September 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for the Study of Evaluation.

    Tabular data, computer printouts, survey forms, and field notes are included in these appendices to an independent evaluation of the Basic Skills Learning Centers (BSLC) Projects implemented by Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL) and Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL). The wide range of supporting data focus on project…

  19. Basic Skills Learning Centers Evaluation. Final Report 1 October 1976 - 30 September 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for the Study of Evaluation.

    Detailed program descriptions and discussion of research methodology are included in this independent evaluation of the Basic Skills Learning Centers (BSLC) Projects implemented by Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL) and Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) and designed to improve basic reading and math instruction in nonurban…

  20. Analysis and evaluation of interwell seismic logging techniques for hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, J.O.; Zook, B.J.; Sturdivant, V.R.

    1994-06-01

    The work reported herein represents the third year work in evaluating high-resolution interwell seismic logging techniques for hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. The objective of this project is to investigate interwell seismic logging techniques for indirectly interpreting oil and gas reservoir geology and rock physical properties. The work involves a balanced study of theoretical and numerical modeling of seismic waves transmitted between pairs of wells combined with experimental data acquisition and processing at controlled field conditions. The field applications of this reservoir probing concept are aimed at demonstrating high resolution measurements and detailed interpretation of heterogeneous hydrocarbon-bearing formations. The first part of this third year project efforts was devoted to thoroughly evaluating interwell seismic logging and reverse VSP in a hydrocarbon-bearing formation at the Buckhorn test site in Illinois. Specifically, the data from the experiments conducted in the second year of this project were analyzed to delineate geological structures and to extract rock physical parameters. The second part of this project is devoted to the evaluation of continuity logging techniques for hydrocarbon reservoir continuity. Specifically, this part of the project includes the evaluation of methods of measurements, modeling and data processing to delineate the reservoir architecture and relate dispersion and attenuation measurements to rock physical properties.

  1. Utilizing GIS to evaluate base schedules in paratransit operations. Final technical report, July 1997--February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalevanko, A.; McDonald, S.; Garrity, R.

    1999-02-02

    With ready access to street file names and inexpensive GIS software, paratransit systems can take advantage of GIS technology to evaluate base schedules on a regular basis in order to maintain system efficiency at consistently high levels. This project will develop a methodology to allow frequent analysis of base schedules to update paratransit routes on a semi-annual or annual basis.

  2. Formative Evaluation of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the report on the formative evaluation of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership (ASEP) program conducted by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC), covering the period from November 2003 to November 2006. The report is organized into four sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the ASEP program…

  3. Evaluation of Orr's Discretionary Grant Support for Enhanced Skills Training and Multiple Wage Earners. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Deborah; And Others

    An evaluation of the Multiple Wage Earner (MWE) discretionary grant program and Enhanced Skills Training (EST) program developed by the Department of Health and Human Services is reported. The EST program was intended to reach hard-to-employ refugees through improvement of the quality of jobs available to refugees experiencing difficulties…

  4. Process system evaluation: Consolidated letter reports. Volume 3: Formulation of final products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass discharged from the low-level waste (LLW) melter may be processed into a variety of different forms for storage and disposal. The purpose of the study reported here is to identify and evaluate processing options for forming the glass

  5. Evaluation of Lyse wind power station 1992-1995. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thor, S.E. [comp.] [National Defence Research Establishment (Sweden)

    1996-11-01

    The main aim of the project was to test and evaluate a new wind power technique, partly through detailed measurements of the NWP 400 and partly through comparisons with the Danish standard unit. At the same time, it was a demand that the two units of the Power Station could be run as a production plant once the evaluation was complete. The overall conclusion from operation, and from the various measurements and studies carried out, is that the new technique functions as intended and that the calculations and estimates made in connection with design work were largely correct. The evaluation confirms that the unit can meet expected production levels, that it can cope with different operation situations and that it can be expected to meet the demands set for loads and safety with regard to fatigue. The evaluation has also shown that the calculation tools used to design the unit and calculate the production capacity have given correct results and good estimates. Certain sub-systems did not, however, function as intended and modifications were required. Additional modifications may be required in a series production of NWP 400. In its present form the unit has difficulties at high wind speeds due to large teeter movements. According to calculations, it should be possible to further reduce these teeter movements and thus increase the availability. The comparison between the units shows that both of the units have largely achieved the expected production capacity. 83 figs, 17 tabs

  6. Development and Evaluation of a Programmed Text in Criminal Law. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Thomas A.

    Two pieces of literature by Thomas A. Wills are contained in this document: (1) A complete programed text in law, "A Programmed Text in Criminal Law," and (2) a study comparing instruction with versus instruction without the use of programed texts, "Development and Evaluation of a Programed Text in Criminal Law." In the latter, six control and six…

  7. An Evaluation of a New Approach in Dealing with High School Underachievement. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolor, Alexander

    A study was undertaken to determine the degree and nature of expectancy of reinforcement in high school underachievers, and to evaluate a method for modifying the internal versus external expectancies which relate to motivation for achievement and attainment of success. A computer instructional program was used to impart immediate reinforcement…

  8. Structuring the Classroom for Success; Production and Evaluation of a Mediated Teacher Training Package. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Charles A.; And Others

    The project was concerned with development and evaluation of an auto-instructional media package (six sound strips and a guidebook) intended to enable teachers to design an effective classroom environment, to manage learner behavior, and to sequence instructional materials. Four groups of preservice and inservice teachers (88 university education…

  9. Process system evaluation: Consolidated letter reports. Volume 3: Formulation of final products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, G.B.; Chapman, C.C.; Albertsen, K.H.

    1996-04-01

    Glass discharged from the low-level waste (LLW) melter may be processed into a variety of different forms for storage and disposal. The purpose of the study reported here is to identify and evaluate processing options for forming the glass.

  10. Testing and evaluation of an alcohol production facility utilizing potatoes as a feedstock. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuby, W.; Nackord, S.; Wyss, W.

    1984-05-01

    This study presents the sampling and analysis results for the characterization of liquid effluents and solid residuals from a culled potato feedstock process for the production of ethanol for use as fuel. The facility tested produces approximately 1 million gallons per year of ethanol and is located in eastern Idaho. Liquid and solid samples were taken throughout the process from the following locations: sluice/flume water, chopper product, makeup water, cooker product, fermenter product, beer tank, stillage, interim and final product, washwater, fuel oil, bath and 'Sparkle' bath. Analytical results for the ethanol plant effluents include: ethanol and sugar content, conventional parameters, metals, cyanide, phenols, nutrients, oil and grease, priority pollutant organics, and selected pesticides. The most significant characteristics of concern were the BOD and COD levels.

  11. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating

  12. Evaluation of final-year dental students concerning therapeutic decision making for proximal caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Bervian

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the radiographic criteria used by final-year dental students when defining the need for restorative treatment for proximal caries, as well as investigating potentially associated factors in this therapeutic decision. A questionnaire with two schematic diagrams presenting five levels of proximal lesion penetration was administered to students attending the six private and three public dental schools in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil. Absolute and relative frequencies were described and inferential statistics involving Chi-square and McNemar tests and simple logistic regression were carried out to assess variations in therapeutic decisions related to patient dentition (deciduous/permanent and gender, age and dental school (public/private. Of the 346 dental students assessed, 28.6% (99/346 indicated restorative treatment for lesions restricted to the enamel in deciduous teeth and 38.2% (132/346 indicated the same for permanent teeth, revealing a statistically significant difference (p = 0.001. Student gender and age were not associated with the therapeutic decision; however, a significant difference between dental schools was found when comparing restorative criteria in deciduous (p < 0.001 and permanent molars (p < 0.001. The odds of restorative decision in permanent teeth when the caries lesion was restricted to the enamel was 72% higher for students graduating from private schools compared to public schools (Odds Ratio: 1.72; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.03-2.90. These data demonstrate a large variation between the therapeutic decisions regarding proximal caries reported by final-year dental students and suggest that deep reflection is needed on the part of faculty in order to provide an evidence-based education.

  13. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  14. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  15. Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

    1994-10-01

    The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

  16. Final report of the accident phenomenology and consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation. Spills Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brereton, S.; Shinn, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hesse, D [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States); Kaninich, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Lazaro, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mubayi, V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The Spills Working Group was one of six working groups established under the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. The objectives of APAC were to assess methodologies available in the accident phenomenology and consequence analysis area and to evaluate their adequacy for use in preparing DOE facility safety basis documentation, such as Basis for Interim Operation (BIO), Justification for Continued Operation (JCO), Hazard Analysis Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). Additional objectives of APAC were to identify development needs and to define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The Spills Working Group focused on methodologies for estimating four types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills.

  17. Monitoring and Evaluation : Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Final Report 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, Melvin R.

    2000-01-01

    The monitoring and evaluation objectives and tasks have been developed through a joint process between the co-managers, Yakama Nation (YN, Lead Agency) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC), which consists of core members from the co-managers, employs the services of a work committee of scientists, the Monitoring Implementation Planning Team (MIPT) to develop the Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan. The process employed by STAC to verify these designated activities and the timing of their implementation involved the utilization of the following principles: (1) YKFP monitoring should evaluate the success (or lack of it) of project supplementation efforts and its impacts, including juvenile post release survival, natural production and reproductive success, ecological interactions, and genetics; (2) YKFP monitoring should be comprehensive: and, (3) YKFP monitoring should be done in such a way that results are of use to salmon production efforts throughout and Columbia basin and the region. Utilizing these principles, STAC and MIPT developed this M&E action plan in three phases. The first phase was primarily conceptual. STAC and MIPT defined critical issues and problems and identified associated response variables. The second phase was quantitative, which determined the scale and size of an effective monitoring effort. A critical element of the quantitative phase was an assessment of the precision with which response variables can be measured, the probability of detecting real impacts and the sample sizes required for a given level of statistical precision and power. The third phase is logistical. The feasibility of monitoring measures was evaluated as to practicality and cost. The Policy Group has determined that the M&E activities covered by this agreement are necessary, effective and cost-efficient.

  18. An Evaluation of the Individual Training Account/Eligible Training Provider Demonstration. Final Interim Report.

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald D'Amico; Alexandria Martinez; Jeffrey Salzman; Robin Wagner

    2001-01-01

    Presents interim findings from an evaluation of 13 grantees' efforts to deliver training services through the use of Individual Training Accounts, which participants can use to procure the training of their choice, as long as it is state-approved. Describes policies and practices at about the midpoint of the grant period. Discusses how eligible programs were selected and reviews the information available to participants for use in making training choices.

  19. TRICEPS: An ATMIS Field Implementation for Control and Evaluation: Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    McNally, M. G.; Rindt, C.; Logi, F.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes a comprehensive research project directed toward the development and implementation of an Advanced Transportation Management and Information System (ATMIS) as part of the Caltrans Advanced ATMIS Testbed Program at the Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Irvine. The primary goal of this project was to implement this prototype ATMIS, designated TRICEPS (Testbed Realtime Integrated Control and Evaluation Prototype System), in the Irvine sub-area ...

  20. Evaluation of control technology for the phosphate fertilizer industry. Final report July 1978-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscak, V.G.

    1979-08-01

    The report gives results of a phosphate fertilizer industry study to evaluate multimedia control technology, identify information gaps, and define needed RDandD projects. The following manufacturing processes were covered: wet process phosphoric acid, superphosphoric acid, diammonium phosphate, and normal and triple superphosphate. Air emission control technology, based largely on using wet scrubbers, is adequate for control of fluoride and particulate and is used throughout the industry. The cross-flow packed scrubber appears to be the best and applies to all processes. The gypsum pond appears to be the major environmental concern: main problems are fluoride emissions to the atmosphere and possible leaching of fluoride, phosphate, and radioactive substances. None of the several control alternatives are economically attractive. RDandD projects identified and defined in this study are: (1) an epidemiologic study of the industry; (2) studies of gypsum pond emissions and chemistry; (3) an evaluation and optimization of wet scrubbers; (4) a study of the atmospheric interaction and dispersion modeling of ammonia/sulfuric acid mist; (5) a demonstration of a dry system for fluoride removal; and (6) an evaluation of the Kimre mist eliminator.

  1. Coca-Cola Refreshments Class 8 Diesel Electric Hybrid Tractor Evaluation: 13-Month Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkowicz, K.; Lammert, M.; Curran, P.

    2012-08-01

    This 13-month evaluation used five Kenworth T370 hybrid tractors and five Freightliner M2106 standard diesel tractors at a Coca Cola Refreshments facility in Miami, Florida. The primary objective was to evaluate the fuel economy, emissions, and operational field performance of hybrid electric vehicles when compared to similar-use conventional diesel vehicles. A random dispatch system ensures the vehicles are used in a similar manner. GPS logging, fueling, and maintenance records and laboratory dynamometer testing are used to evaluate the performance of these hybrid tractors. Both groups drive similar duty cycles with similar kinetic intensity (0.95 vs. 0.69), average speed (20.6 vs. 24.3 mph), and stops per mile (1.9 vs. 1.5). The study demonstrated the hybrid group had a 13.7% fuel economy improvement over the diesel group. Laboratory fuel economy and field fuel economy study showed similar trends along the range of KI and stops per mile. Hybrid maintenance costs were 51% lower per mile; hybrid fuel costs per mile were 12% less than for the diesels; and hybrid vehicle total cost of operation per mile was 24% less than the cost of operation for the diesel group.

  2. Central heating plant economic evaluation program. Volume 2. User`s manual. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C.; Moshage, R.; Schanche, G.; Blazek, C.; Biederman, R.

    1995-01-01

    Public Law has directed the Department of Defense (DOD) to rehabilitate and convert its existing domestic power plants to burn more coal. Other Federal legislation requires DOD to use the most economic fuel for any new heating system. This five-volume report discusses the Central Heating Plant Economic Evaluation Program (CHPECON), a computer program for screening potential new and retrofit steam/power generation facilities. Volume 1 is the Technical Reference. Volume 2 is the User`s Manual. Volume 3 is the Military Base Weather Information Data Management Program. Volume 4 is the Coalfield Properties Information Data Management Program. Volume 5 is the Emission Regulations Data Management Program. CHPECON provides screening criteria to evaluate competing combustion technologies using coal, gas, or oil; detailed conceptual facility design information; budgetary facility costs; and economic measures of project acceptability including total life cycle costs and levelized cost of service. The program provides sufficient flexibility to vary critical design and operating parameters to determine project sensitivity and parametric evaluation.

  3. Central heating plant economic evaluation program. Volume 5. Emission regulations data management program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C.; Moshage, R.; Schanche, G.; Blazek, C.; Biederman, R.

    1995-01-01

    Public Law has directed the Department of Defense (DOD) to rehabilitate and convert its existing domestic power plants to burn more coal. Other Federal legislation requires DOD to use the most economic fuel for any new heating system. This five-volume report discusses the Central Heating Plant Economic Evaluation Program (CHPECON), a computer program for screening potential new and retrofit steam/power generation facilities. Volume 1 is the Technical Reference. Volume 2 is the User`s Manual. Volume 3 is the Military Base Weather Information Data Management Program. Volume 4 is the Coalfield Properties Information Data Management Program. Volume 5 is the Emission Regulations Data Management Program. CHPECON provides screening criteria to evaluate competing combustion technologies using coal, gas, or oil; detailed conceptual facility design information; budgetary facility costs; and economic measures of project acceptability including total life cycle costs and levelized cost of service. The program provides sufficient flexibility to vary critical design and operating parameters to determine project sensitivity and parametric evaluation.

  4. Lithium/Manganese Dioxide (Li/MnO(2)) Battery Performance Evaluation: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.; Clark, N.H.

    1999-04-01

    In February 1997, under the auspices of the Product Realization Program, an initiative to develop performance models for lithium/manganese dioxide-based batteries began. As a part of this initiative, the performance characteristics of the cells under a variety of conditions were determined, both for model development and for model validation. As a direct result of this work, it became apparent that possible Defense Program (DP) uses for batteries based on this cell chemistry existed. A larger effort aimed at mapping the performance envelope of this chemistry was initiated in order to assess the practicality of this cell chemistry, not only for DP applications, but also for other uses. The work performed included an evaluation of the cell performance as a function of a number of variables, including cell size, manufacturer, current, pulse loads, constant current loads, safety, etc. In addition, the development of new evaluation techniques that would apply to any battery system, such as those related to reliability assessments began. This report describes the results of these evaluations.

  5. Development and evaluation of coal/water mixture combustion technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffee, R.S.; Rossmeissl, N.P.; Skolnik, E.G.; McHale, E.T.

    1981-08-01

    The objective was to advance the technology for the preparation, storage, handling and combustion of highly-loaded coal/water mixtures. A systematic program to prepare and experimentally evaluate coal/water mixtures was conducted to develop mixtures which (1) burn efficiently using combustion chambers and burners designed for oil, (2) can be provided at a cost less than that of No. 6 oil, and (3) can be easily transported and stored. The program consisted of three principal tasks. The first was a literature survey relevant to coal/water mixture technology. The second involved slurry preparation and evaluation of rheological and stability properties, and processing techniques. The third consisted of combustion tests to characterize equipment and slurry parameters. The first task comprised a complete search of the literature, results of which are tabulated in Appendix A. Task 2 was involved with the evaluation of composition and process variables on slurry rheology and stability. Three bituminous coals, representing a range of values of volatile content, ash content, and hardness were used in the slurries. Task 3 was concerned with the combustion behavior of coal/water slurry. The studies involved first upgrading of an experimental furnace facility, which was used to burn slurry fuels, with emphasis on studying the effect on combustion of slurry properties such as viscosity and particle size, and the effect of equipment parameters such as secondary air preheat and atomization.

  6. Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between 11 U. S. industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprised 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system, a steam generation system, and steam-turbine power block. Molten nitrate salt was used as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powered a 10-MWe (megawatt electric), conventional Rankine cycle turbine. Solar Two operated from June 1996 to April 1999. The major objective of the test and evaluation phase of the project was to validate the technical characteristics of a molten salt power tower. This report describes the significant results from the test and evaluation activities, the operating experience of each major system, and overall plant performance. Tests were conducted to measure the power output (MW) of the each major system, the efficiencies of the heliostat, receiver, thermal storage, and electric power generation systems and the daily energy collected, daily thermal-to-electric conversion, and daily parasitic energy consumption. Also included are detailed test and evaluation reports

  7. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 2: Test Bed Performance Evaluation and Final AeroMACS Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Magner, James

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II (this document) describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  8. Risk Evaluation for CO2 Geosequestration in the Knox Supergroup, Illinois Basin Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnottavange-Telleen, Ken; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    This report describes a process and provides seed information for identifying and evaluating risks pertinent to a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and sequestration (CCS) project. In the envisioned project, the target sequestration reservoir rock is the Potosi Formation of the Knox Supergroup. The Potosi is identified as a potential target formation because (1) at least locally, it contains vuggy to cavernous layers that have very high porosity, and (2) it is present in areas where the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone (a known potential reservoir unit) is absent or nonporous. The key report content is discussed in Section 3.3, which describes two lists of Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that should be considered during the design stage of such a project. These lists primarily highlight risk elements particular to the establishment of the Potosi as the target formation in general. The lists are consciously incomplete with respect to risk elements that would be relevant for essentially all CCS projects regardless of location or geology. In addition, other risk elements specific to a particular future project site would have to be identified. Sources for the FEPs and scenarios listed here include the iconic Quintessa FEPs list developed for the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas (IEAGHG) Programme; previous risk evaluation projects executed by Schlumberger Carbon Services; and new input solicited from experts currently working on aspects of CCS in the Knox geology. The projects used as sources of risk information are primarily those that have targeted carbonate reservoir rocks similar in age, stratigraphy, and mineralogy to the Knox-Potosi. Risks of using the Potosi Formation as the target sequestration reservoir for a CCS project include uncertainties about the levels of porosity and permeability of that rock unit; the lateral consistency and continuity of those properties; and the ability of the project team to identify suitable (i.e., persistently

  9. Evaluative studies in nuclear medicine research: positron computed tomography assessment. Final report, January 1, 1982-December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported of the final phase of the study effort generally titled Evaluative Studies in Nuclear Medicine Research. The previous work is reviewed and extended to an assessment providing perspectives on medical applications of positron emission tomographic (PET) systems, their technological context, and the related economic and marketing environment. Methodologies developed and used in earlier phases of the study were continued, but specifically extended to include solicitation of opinion from commercial organizations deemed to be potential developers, manufacturers and marketers of PET systems. Several factors which influence the demand for clinical uses of PET are evaluated and discussed. The recent Federal funding of applied research with PET systems is found to be a necessary and encouraging event toward a determination that PET either is a powerful research tool limited to research, or whether it also presents major clinical utility. A comprehensive, updated bibliography of current literature related to the development, applications and economic considerations of PET technology is appended

  10. Evaluation and design of geophysical monitoring network for ground-water contamination. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground water contamination has emerged as one of the Nation's primary environmental concerns. Reliable, rapid and cost-effective detection and remedial action can contribute to minimizing the adverse environmental and economic impacts of ground water contamination. The report contributes to aquifer remediation by developing a set of planning tools for detection, mapping, monitoring and remediation of contaminated aquifers. The report is divided into three main sections that correspond to a typical sequence of actions resulting in a final remedial action plan for handling contamination at a particular site. The first section develops a methodology for detecting and mapping suspected contamination using multiple sources of data. A decision support system for observation network design is presented in the second section. Network design is approached from a multiple objective decision making perspective. The objective is to identify the preferred network design while considering the trade-off between performance and cost. A remedial action design support system is described in the third section. Three dimensional geostatistical simulation and analytical ground water modeling are used to assess the need for further remedial action planning. Each of the methods developed in the report have been demonstrated using data collected from the site of a low-level radioactive industrial waste reprocessing facility near Wood River Junction, Rhode Island

  11. Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voldrich, W. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Torrance, CA (United States). Garrett Ceramic Components Div.

    1992-04-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components` gas-pressure sinterable Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

  12. Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabilization/solidification technology is one of the most widely used techniques for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Cement-based products, commonly referred to as grouts, are the predominant materials of choice because of their low associated processing costs, compatibility with a wide variety of disposal scenarios, and ability to meet stringent processing and performance requirements. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. This blend is mixed with 106-AN at a mix ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents the final results of efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of WHC's Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula

  13. Sustainable biomass products development and evaluation, Hamakua project. Final draft report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The PICHTR Sustainable Biomass Energy Program was developed to evaluate the potential to cultivate crops for energy production as an alternative use of lands made available by the closing of large sugar plantations. In particular, the closing of the Hamakua Sugar Company on the island of Hawaii brought a great deal of attention to the future of agriculture in this region and in the state. Many options were proposed. Several promising alternatives had been proposed for cane lands. These included dedicated feedstock supply systems (DFSS) for electrical energy production, cultivation of sugarcane to produce ethanol and related by-products, and the production of feed and crops to support animal agriculture. Implementation of some of the options might require preservation of large tracts of land and maintenance of the sugar mills and sugar infrastructure. An analysis of the technical, financial, and other issues necessary to reach conclusions regarding the optimal use of these lands was required. At the request of the Office of State Planning and Senator Akaka`s office, the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR) established and coordinated a working group composed of state, county, federal, and private sector representatives to identify sustainable energy options for the use of idle sugar lands on the island of Hawaii. The Sustainable Biomass Energy Program`s Hamakua Project was established to complete a comprehensive evaluation of the most viable alternatives and assess the options to grow crops as a source of raw materials for the production of transportation fuel and/or electricity on the island of Hawaii. The motivation for evaluating biomass to energy conversion embraced the considerations that Hawaii`s energy security would be improved by diversifying the fuels used for transportation and reducing dependency on imported fossil fuels. The use of waste products as feedstocks could divert wastes from landfills.

  14. ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation final report and recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a formalized Systems Engineering approach, the Latched Idaho Technologies Company developed and evaluated numerous alternatives for treating, immobilizing, and disposing of radioactive liquid and calcine wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Based on technical analysis data as of March, 1995, it is recommended that the Department of Energy consider a phased processing approach -- utilizing Radionuclide Partitioning for radioactive liquid and calcine waste treatment, FUETAP Grout for low-activity waste immobilization, and Glass (Vitrification) for high-activity waste immobilization -- as the preferred treatment and immobilization alternative

  15. ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation final report and recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Using a formalized Systems Engineering approach, the Latched Idaho Technologies Company developed and evaluated numerous alternatives for treating, immobilizing, and disposing of radioactive liquid and calcine wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Based on technical analysis data as of March, 1995, it is recommended that the Department of Energy consider a phased processing approach -- utilizing Radionuclide Partitioning for radioactive liquid and calcine waste treatment, FUETAP Grout for low-activity waste immobilization, and Glass (Vitrification) for high-activity waste immobilization -- as the preferred treatment and immobilization alternative.

  16. TRUPACT insulation evaluation. Acurex final report FR-82-10/ATD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of a combined experimental and analytical study to define the best wall insulation for TRUPACT applications from among commercially available polyurethane foam materials. Screening tests were conducted for eleven candidate foam materials to evaluate their basic performance characteristics. From these results, three materials were selected for further investigation via mockup wall-fire simulation tests. On the basis of these data, Sandia selected General Plastics' FR-9606 as the primary insulation material for TRUPACT prototype design. Both charring and noncharring analytical thermal models were developed for FR-9606 to support TRUPACT design analysis. 13 references, 77 figures, 14 tables

  17. Developing an inventor support service which performs early stage market and manufacturing evaluations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    American businesses are learning the difficult high cost lesson of ignoring production and market factors (producibility, unit product cost (UPC), marketability, etc) during the engineering design phase of product development. Studies have shown that the Japanese spend three times as long as Americans in the design feasibility and decision process of new product introductions and one third the amount of time in the implementation of those products. There is a 20 to 1 cost benefit on effort applied in the design phase versus the production phase of the product life cycle. The number one goal of this project was to establish an organization that has, as one of its purposes, the providing of services responsive to the needs of independent inventors. The number two goal was to demonstrate the value of providing marketing and manufacturing counsel at an early stage in the product development process. The first study goal was met by providing the materials and information necessary to establish an evaluation team and an organization to handle such evaluations. The second study goal was met by demonstrating the impact of early market analysis and manufacturing considerations on product design and therefore on the description of the invention for four different inventions. These inventions were selected at various stages of development. Regardless of stage of development, the marketing and manufacturing reviews resulted in significant changes in design and/or market positioning.

  18. Developing an inventor support service which performs early stage market and manufacturing evaluations. [Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    American businesses are learning the difficult high cost lesson of ignoring production and market factors (producibility, unit product cost (UPC), marketability, etc) during the engineering design phase of product development. Studies have shown that the Japanese spend three times as long as Americans in the design feasibility and decision process of new product introductions and one third the amount of time in the implementation of those products. There is a 20 to 1 cost benefit on effort applied in the design phase versus the production phase of the product life cycle. The number one goal of this project was to establish an organization that has, as one of its purposes, the providing of services responsive to the needs of independent inventors. The number two goal was to demonstrate the value of providing marketing and manufacturing counsel at an early stage in the product development process. The first study goal was met by providing the materials and information necessary to establish an evaluation team and an organization to handle such evaluations. The second study goal was met by demonstrating the impact of early market analysis and manufacturing considerations on product design and therefore on the description of the invention for four different inventions. These inventions were selected at various stages of development. Regardless of stage of development, the marketing and manufacturing reviews resulted in significant changes in design and/or market positioning.

  19. Evaluation of selected drive components for a flywheel powered commuter vehicle. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-30

    The results of tests performed to evaluate the performance of selected high-speed flywheel bearings and shaft seals are reported, and work performed on the development of a high-speed composite flywheel rotor is described. The overall program objective is to develop a composite flywheel system for primary energy storage in a flywheel powered vehicle. These initial tests were intended to evaluate the performance of full-size composite rotor elements, high-speed bearings and shaft seals for that system under conditions simulating as closely as possible those anticipated in a finished vehicle. Performance of the angular contact ball bearings is reported to be satisfactory at all speeds; a simplified lubrication system is recommended for second generation hardware. Performance of the ferrofluidic shaft seals is reported to be marginal, as they failed to hold a hard vacuum at the maximum design speed. Several concepts for improved seals are offered for second generation hardware. The test objectives for the high-speed composite flywheel rotor were not achieved due to dynamic instability problems with the test hardware. Recommendations are offered for the design of second generation hardware, and a scope of activities is proposed for the second phase of this program.

  20. Development of a method for evaluating carbon dioxide miscible flooding prospects. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Swift, G.W.

    1985-03-01

    Research was undertaken to develop a method of evaluating reservoirs as prospects for carbon dioxide flooding. Evaluation was to be based on a determination of miscibility pressure and displacement efficiency under idealized conditions. To reach the objective, project work was divided into five areas: (1) conducting of phase-equilibrium studies of carbon dioxide with synthetic oils; (2) application of an equation of state to simulate the phase behavior of carbon dioxide - oil systems; (3) conducting of linear displacements of crude oils and synthetic oils by carbon dioxide in a slim-tube apparatus; (4) application of the equation of state, the phase-behavior data and slim-tube data to develop a method of screening reservoirs for carbon dioxide flooding based on determination of minimum miscibility pressure and displacement efficiency; (5) development of a one-dimensional mathematical model, based on the equation of state, for application in conjunction with the results of Parts 1 to 4. The accomplishments for these five areas are discussed in five chapters. 44 references, 90 figures, 42 tables.

  1. Evaluation of the ILRS network performance using the final ITRF2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, Erricos C.; Luceri, Vincenza; Kuzmicz-Cieslak, Magdalena; König, Daniel; Bianco, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The release of the new realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame - ITRF2014 was already evaluated in its preliminary form and found to be a significant improvement over previous TRFs. The International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) contributes unique information that only Satellite Laser Ranging - SLR is sensitive to: the definition of the origin, and in equal parts with VLBI, the scale of the model. For the development of ITRF2014, the ILRS analysts adopted a revision of the internal standards and procedures in generating our contribution from the eight ILRS Analysis Centers. The improved results for the ILRS components were reflected in the resulting new time series of the ITRF origin and scale, showing insignificant trends and tighter scatter. The reanalyzed SLR data on the basis of ITRF2014 are now used to evaluate the individual station performance for the entire ILRS network, focusing on improved estimates of persistent systematic errors over significant periods of time, in hopes of an improved a priori model to be used in the next realization of the ITRF. SLR data beyond what is included in the development of the ITRF and especially from lower altitude missions are used to validate the performance of the model (using e.g. STARLETTE, AJISAI and LARES data). This presentation will focus on the resulting model for persistent systematics and its effect on the ITRF development, using exclusively ILRS tracking data and other ILRS products.

  2. Evaluation of the State Energy Conservation Program from program initiation to September 1978. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, James N.; Grossmann, John R.; Shochet, Susan; Bresler, Joel; Duggan, Noreene

    1980-03-01

    The State Energy Conservation Program was established in 1975 to promote energy conservation and to help states develop and implement their own conservation programs. Base (5) and supplemental (3) programs required states to implement programs including: mandatory thermal-efficiency standards and insulation requirements for new and renovated buildings; mandatory lighting efficiency standards for public buildings; mandatory standards and policies affecting the procurement practices of the state and its political subdivisions; program measures to promote the availability and use of carpools, vanpools, and public transportation; a traffic law or regulation which permits a right turn-on-red; and procedures to carry out a continuing public education effort to increase awareness of energy conservation; procedures which promote effective coordination among local, state, and Federal energy conservation programs; and procedures for carrying out energy audits on buildings and industrial plants. All 50 states and Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the District of Columbia participated in the program. The total 1980 energy savings projected by the states is about 5.9 quadrillion Btu's or about 7% of the DOE projected 1980 baseline consumption of just under 83 quads. The detailed summary is presented on the following: information the SECP evaluation; DOE response to the SECP; DOE's role in the program management process; the effectiveness of the states in managing the SECP; the status of program measure implementation; innovative state energy conservation programs; and the evaluation methodology.

  3. St. Louis demonstration final report: refuse processing plant equipment, facilities, and environmental evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiscus, D.E.; Gorman, P.G.; Schrag, M.P.; Shannon, L.J.

    1977-09-01

    The results are presented of processing plant evaluations of the St. Louis-Union Electric Refuse Fuel Project, including equipment and facilities as well as assessment of environmental emissions at both the processing and the power plants. Data on plant material flows and operating parameters, plant operating costs, characteristics of plant material flows, and emissions from various processing operations were obtained during a testing program encompassing 53 calendar weeks. Refuse derived fuel (RDF) is the major product (80.6% by weight) of the refuse processing plant, the other being ferrous metal scrap, a marketable by-product. Average operating costs for the entire evaluation period were $8.26/Mg ($7.49/ton). The average overall processing rate for the period was 168 Mg/8-h day (185.5 tons/8-h day) at 31.0 Mg/h (34.2 tons/h). Future plants using an air classification system of the type used at the St. Louis demonstration plant will need an emissions control device for particulates from the large de-entrainment cyclone. Also in the air exhaust from the cyclone were total counts of bacteria and viruses several times higher than those of suburban ambient air. No water effluent or noise exposure problems were encountered, although landfill leachate mixed with ground water could result in contamination, given low dilution rates.

  4. Enhancement of central heating plant economic evaluation program for retrofit to coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinast, J.J.; Biederman, R.; Blazek, C.F.; Lin, M.C.; Moshagge, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    Public Law 99-190 requires the Department of Defense (DOD) to increase the use of coal for steam generation. However, DOD also has an obligation to use the most economical fuel. Supporting the coal conversion effort, the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) has developed a computer program for engineering personnel at Major Army Commands, installations, the Defense Logistics Agency, and other DOD facilities to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of specific coal-combustion technologies at central heating plant facilities on military bases. The program, Central Heating Plant Economic Evaluation (CHPECON), can model plants that have a capacity of 50,000 to 600,000 MBtu/hr of steam, with individual boiler sizes from 25,000 to 200,000 MBtu/hr. The technologies examined include coal-fired stoker and fluidized-bed boilers, oil/natural gas boilers, and coal-slurry boilers. This report documents enhancements to existing CHPECON procedures for analyzing the retrofit or reconversion of a central heating plant to coal firing. They include: improving the screening and scoring process for boiler facilities considered for retrofit; adding options for converting a facility back to coal firing; detailing retrofit costs; upgrading economic analysis of a retrofit from an operating cost evaluation to a life-cycle cost analysis; and expanding the economic analysis to include examination of the condition of existing equipment.

  5. Field evaluation of recycled plastic lumber (RPL) pallets. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnaswamy, P.; Miele, C.R.; Francini, R.B. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Yuracko, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yerace, P. [Dept. of Energy, Fernald, OH (United States)

    1997-10-01

    One significant component of the waste stream, discarded plastic products and packaging, continues to be a growing portion of the municipal solid waste (MSW). There has been considerable work done in characterizing the quantity and types of plastics in different waste streams, collection methods, separation, sorting as well as technologies for processing post-consumer mixed plastics. The focus in recent years has been the development of markets for recycled plastic products, which constitutes the second half of the material flow diagram cycle shown in Figure 1. One key product that holds significant promise for plastics recycling to be both technically feasible and economically viable is Recycled Plastic Lumber (RPL). The contents of this report forms the second phase of a two-phase pilot project on developing specifications and standards for a product fabricated from RPL. Such standards and specifications are needed to prepare procurement guidelines for state and federal agencies interested in purchasing products made from recycled materials. The first phase focused on establishing a procedure to evaluate RPL product,s such as pallets, in a laboratory setting while this phase focuses on field evaluation of RPL pallets in service. This effort is critical in the development of new markets for RPL products. A brief summary of the findings from Phase 1 of this effort is presented next.

  6. Evaluation of upland disposal of Oakland Harbor, California, sediment; Volume I: Turning basin sediments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.R.; Tatem, H.E.; Simmers, J.W.; Skogerboe, J.G.; Folsom, B.L.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes testing and evaluation performed by the Environmental Laboratory of the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station on sediment from the turning basin of Oakland Inner Harbor, Oakland, CA. Test protocols from the Corps' Management Strategy for Disposal of Dredged Material were used in the present evaluation to determine the potential for migration of contaminants into effluent, surface runoff, leachates, plants, and animals at an upland disposal site. Two sediments from the turning basin of Oakland Inner Harbor were tested: a composite sample of cores taken from the surface to 38-ft depth (upper sediment) and a composite sample of cores taken from 38- to 45-ft depth (lower sediment). In addition, two potential disposal site soils were tested: Twitchell Island and 7th Street disposal site. Sediment characterization indicated that the Oakland upper sediment contained higher concentrations of most contaminants than the lower sediment. Metal concentrations in the Oakland lower sediment were in the range of values found at the Twitchell Island disposal site. The Oakland upper sediment contained levels of cadmium and arsenic similar to those in Twitchell Island levee soils, but higher levels of zinc, nickel, lead, and copper.... Contaminant migration, Sediment testing, Contaminated sediments, Upland disposal, Dredged material.

  7. Evaluation procedure for simulation facilities certified under 10 CFR 55: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the procedure to be followed by the NRC for the inspection of simulation facilities certified by facility licensees under 10 CFR 55. Inspections are divided into four major areas based on the types of evaluations conducted: (1) performance testing; (2) physical fidelity/human factors; (3) control capabilities; and (4) design, updating, modification, and testing. NRC staff representing several disciplines including license examiners, operations specialists, and human factors experts, under the direction of a team leader, will perform these inspections. A simulation facility inspection may include off-site and on-site phases. The off-site phase will consist of an examination of the simulation facility documentation and an identification of those operations and procedures which may be considered for use in performance testing during the on-site phase. In the on-site review, the staff will work closely with the facility licensee to conduct a sound and fair inspection and to evaluate the results of tests that are conducted. Inspection findings will be based upon the staff's judgment of the simulation facility's compliance with 10 CFR 55.45. Findings may range from one of ''no adverse impact on the conduct of operating tests'' through degrees of ''adverse impact requiring correction'' to ''adverse impacts so serious that the simulation facility may not be used in the conduct of operating tests until the discrepancies are corrected and the simulation facility is recertified to the NRC.''

  8. Prediction of Emissions from Biodiesel Fueled Transit Buses Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisek Mudgal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand of freight transportation and passenger cars has led to air pollution, green house gas emissions (especially CO2 and fuel supply concerns. Research has been carried out on biodiesel which is shown to generate lower emissions. However, the amount of emissions generated is not well understood which entails more vigorous data collection and development of emissions models. A comprehensive data collection plan was developed and emissions (NOx, HC, CO, CO2 and PM10 from biodiesel fueled transit buses were collected using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS. Linear models were developed and tested for each emission. However, the models could not capture the emissions spikes well resulting in very low R2 values. Artificial neural networks (ANNs based models were then employed on this data because of their ability to handle nonlinearity and not requiring assumptions on the input data as needed by statistical models. Sensitivity analysis was performed on the input parameters, number of hidden layers, learning rate and learning algorithm to arrive at an optimum ANN architecture. The optimal architecture for this study was found to be two hidden layers with 50 hidden nodes for each of NOx, HC, CO, and PM and one hidden layer for CO2. The emissions were predicted using best-performance ANN models for each emission. Scatter-plots of observed versus predicted values showed R2 of 0.96, 0.94, 0.82, 0.98 and 0.78 for NOx, HC, CO, CO2 and PM emissions, respectively. Histogram on prediction error showed low frequency for large errors.

  9. An analysis of accident data for franchised public buses in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W A; Courtney, A J

    1985-10-01

    This paper analyses data on accidents involving franchised public buses operating in Hong Kong. The data were obtained from the Royal Hong Kong Police, the Hong Kong Government Transport Department, the two major franchised bus operators and international sources. The analysis includes an international comparison of accidents with emphasis on the situation in Hong Kong compared to urban areas in the United Kingdom. An attempt has been made to identify the characteristics of bus accidents; accident incidence has been related to time of day, day of the week, time of year, weather conditions, driver's age and experience, hours on duty and policy-reported cause. The results indicate that Hong Kong has a high accident rate compared to Japan, the U.K. and the U.S.A., with particularly high pedestrian involvement rates. Bus accidents peak at around 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM but the accident rate is high throughout the day. Monday and Saturday appear to have a higher than average accident rate. The variability of accident rate throughout the year does not seem to be significant and the accident rate does not appear to be influenced by weather conditions. Older, more experienced drivers generally have a safer driving record than their younger, less experienced colleagues. Accident occurrence is related to the time the driver has been on duty. The paper questions the reliability of police-reported accident causation data and suggests improvements in the design of the accident report form and in the training of police investigators. The relevance of the Hong Kong study for accident research in general is also discussed. PMID:4096796

  10. Evaluation of anthropogenic urban soils. Final report; Bewertung anthropogener Stadtboeden. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blume, H.P.; Schleuss, U. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The research project `Evaluation of Anthropogenic Urban Soils` was subsidized by the German Federal Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Technology and adviced by the working group `Stadtboeden` of the German Society of Soil Science. It was realized as a cooperation between the universities of Berlin (TU), Halle-Wittenberg, Hohenheim, Kiel and Rostock and had three objectives: - to characterize soils developed from anthropogenic substratums (`urban soils`), - to figure out distribution patterns of such soils and - to verify whether urban soils could be evaluated according to their filtering and habitat function in the same way as soils developed from natural parent material. Evaluation methods based on easily obtainable field data had to be adapted to `urban soils` respectively developed anew. For that reason some typical soils of anthropogenic lithogenesis had to be examined between 1993 and 1996 both on their importance as habitats for plants and soil organisms and on their filtering, buffering and transforming capacities for organic and inorganic pollutants. Accordingly representative `urban soils` were gathered in the towns of Berlin, Eckernfoerde, Essen, Halle, Kiel, Rostock and Stuttgart; these soils had developed from technogenic substratums (brick and mortar debris, municipal waste, ashes, slag, sludge) and redeposited alkaline resp. acidic natural substratums (mud, coal mine and coking plant deposits). Some of the soils were influenced by ground water, and all soils developed from the same kind of parent material belonged to different stages of development. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Ziele des vom BMBF gefoerderten und vom Arbeitskreis Stadtboeden der Deutschen Bodenkundlichen Gesellschaft beratenen Verbundprojektes `Bewertung anthropogener Stadtboeden` waren die Charakterisierung von Boeden anthropogener Substrate, die exemplarische Ermittlung des Verteilungsmusters derartiger Boeden und die Pruefung, inwieweit sie sich aehnlich den Boeden natuerlicher

  11. Carbon black dispersion pre-plating technology for printed wire board manufacturing. Final technology evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folsom, D.W.; Gavaskar, A.R.; Jones, J.A.; Olfenbuttel, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    The project compared chemical use, waste generation, cost, and product quality between electroless copper and carbon-black-based preplating technologies at the printed wire board (PWB) manufacturing facility of McCurdy Circuits in Orange, CA. The carbon-black based preplating technology evaluated is used as an alternative process for electroless copper (EC) plating of through-holes before electrolytic copper plating. The specific process used at McCurdy is the BlackHole (BH) technology process, which uses a dispersion of carbon black in an aqueous solution to provide a conductive surface for subsequent electrolytic copper plating. The carbon-black dispersion technology provided effective waste reduction and long-term cost savings. The economic analysis determined that the new process was cost efficient because chemical use was reduced and the process proved more efficient; the payback period was less than 4 yrs.

  12. Committee to evaluate Sandia`s risk expertise: Final report. Volume 1: Presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, E.C.

    1998-05-01

    On July 1--2, 1997, Sandia National Laboratories hosted the External Committee to Evaluate Sandia`s Risk Expertise. Under the auspices of SIISRS (Sandia`s International Institute for Systematic Risk Studies), Sandia assembled a blue-ribbon panel of experts in the field of risk management to assess their risk programs labs-wide. Panelists were chosen not only for their own expertise, but also for their ability to add balance to the panel as a whole. Presentations were made to the committee on the risk activities at Sandia. In addition, a tour of Sandia`s research and development programs in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was arranged. The panel attended a poster session featuring eight presentations and demonstrations for selected projects. Overviews and viewgraphs from the presentations are included in Volume 1 of this report. Presentations are related to weapons, nuclear power plants, transportation systems, architectural surety, environmental programs, and information systems.

  13. Evaluation of aftermarket LPG conversion kits in light-duty vehicle applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, E A [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (US)

    1993-06-01

    SwRI was contracted by NREL to evaluate three LPG conversion kits on a Chevrolet Lumina. The objective of the project was to measure the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions and fuel economy of these kits, and compare their performance to gasoline-fueled operation and to each other. Varying LPG fuel blends allowed a preliminary look at the potential for fuel system disturbance. The project required kit installation and adjustment according to manufacturer`s instructions. A limited amount of trouble diagnosis was also performed on the fuel systems. A simultaneous contract from the Texas Railroad Commission, in cooperation with NREL, provided funds for additional testing with market fuels (HD5 propane and industry average gasoline) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions speciation to determine the ozone-forming potential of LPG HC emissions. This report documents the procurement, installation, and testing of these LPG conversion kits.

  14. Soil liquefaction testing and evaluation for Kozloduy nuclear power plant units 5 and 6. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of seismic evaluation of the Kozloduy nuclear power plant units 5 and 6, the region of the spray ponds was investigated because they are of great importance for proper functioning of the NPP in case of an accident. Spray pond is a water containing structure designed for creating a temperature drop of the circulating cooling water in case of an accident in the technical water supply. The region of the spray ponds is well studied in regard to geology and this enabled full-size investigation of the on the liquefaction potential of water saturated sands. In this In this study, three kinds of procedures were applied for estimating the liquefaction potential of water saturated sands. The results obtained were compared, analyzed and conclusions concerning liquefaction potential of water saturated sands drawn

  15. Testing and evaluation of on-farm alcohol production facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuby, W.; Markoja, R.; Nackord, S.

    1984-07-01

    Ethanol is the most important of biomass derived fuels in the short term. The bulk of the production will come from large (20 to 600M gallons/year) units with the remainder being produced on-farm in small (less than 6,000 gallons/year) units. The on-farm production of alcohol presents a unique problem in that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had no data available by which it could evaluate the possible impacts of a very large number of these facilities. This report gives the results of a sampling and analysis program conducted to characterize the air emissions, water effluents, and solid residuals from two on-farm ethanol production processes sampled in June 1980. Several recommendations, including acid neutralization and effluent ponding, are recommended to minimize the impacts.

  16. Feasibility evaluation: solar heated textile process water. Volume I. Program results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hester, J. C.; Beard, J. N.; Robinson, G. F.; Harnett, R. M.

    1977-02-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the technical and economic constraints associated with the use of solar heating to produce process water for the textile industry. The study developed energy-use data based upon actual plant processes to (1) determine current water needs for the industry by temperature level, and (2) to assess the probable future impact of conservation schemes upon possible solar concepts. A realistic weather and solar-flux-environment definition was made based upon analysis of actual weather data for the southeast Piedmont region, where most of the textile-finishing plants are located. Collector-area requirements to meet textile water demands of varying amounts and temperatures were generated, using assembled test data for six collector types ranging from simple flat-plate areas to tracking-concentrator configurations. Energy-collection densities for various types of collectors operating in a representative Southeast environment and producing process water of varying temperatures were generated. Using the assembled test data and performance predictions for various collector types and for various textile-process water-temperature levels, an after-taxes, rate-of-return economic analysis was performed, envisioning possible future energy-price scenarios, to determine allowable installed-collector costs per square foot. These ROR calculations indicate the cost levels at which collector configurations would provide incentive to industry to heat by solar processes as opposed to fossil fuels. Additionally, studies were conducted to determine the effects of possible Federal inducements to solar conversion in the form of investment-tax-credit changes. Lastly, the effect upon economic viability of solar concepts due to the establishment of a leasing industry was evaluated.

  17. Environmental screening and evaluation of energy-using products (EuP). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesnaes, M. (2.-0 LCA consultants ApS, Aalborg, (Denmark)); Thestrup, J. (In-JeT ApS, Birkeroed (Denmark)); Remmen, A. (Aalborg Univ., Aalborg (Denmark))

    2009-07-01

    , existing Ecolabelling and related regulations, market access and growth, technology trends, etc. The memorandum is structured so that overall conclusions and comments are provided first followed by a detailed description of each product group or cluster of product groups. Following this structure, chapter 2 provides an executive summary with the main conclusions and findings from the work performed up till now. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the methodology used in the environmental screening. Hereafter, chapters 4 through 19 provides the background data and individual conclusions for each product group or cluster of product groups. Finally, chapter 20 through 22 provides references to all the Preparatory Studies and other literature references. (LN)

  18. Development and application of a probabilistic evaluation method for advanced process technologies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H.C.; Rubin, E.S.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and apply a method for research planning for advanced process technologies. To satisfy requirements for research planning, it is necessary to: (1) identify robust solutions to process design questions in the face of uncertainty to eliminate inferior design options; (2) identify key problem areas in a technology that should be the focus of further research to reduce the risk of technology failure; (3) compare competing technologies on a consistent basis to determine the risks associated with adopting a new technology; and (4) evaluate the effects that additional research might have on comparisons with conventional technology. An important class of process technologies are electric power plants. In particular, advanced clean coal technologies are expected to play a key role in the energy and environmental future of the US, as well as in other countries. Research planning for advanced clean coal technology development is an important part of energy and environmental policy. Thus, the research planning method developed here is applied to case studies focusing on a specific clean coal technology. The purpose of the case studies is both to demonstrate the research planning method and to obtain technology-specific conclusions regarding research strategies.

  19. Design, engineering and evaluation of refractory liners for slagging gasifiers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deTineo, B J; Booth, G; Firestone, R F; Greaves, M J; Hales, C; Lamoureux, J P; Ledford, R R

    1982-08-01

    The contract for this program was awarded at the end of September 1978. Work was started on 1 October 1978, on Tasks A, B, and E. Task A, Conceptual Liner Designs, and Task B, Test System Design and Construction, were completed. Task C, Liner Tests, and Task D, Liner Design Evaluation, were to begin upon completion of Task B. Task E, Liner Model Development, is inactive after an initial data compilation and theoretical model development effort. It was to be activated as soon as data were available from Task D. Task F, Liner Design Handbook, was active along with Task A since the reports of both tasks were to use the same format. At this time, Tasks C, D, and F are not to be completed since funding of this project was phased out by DOE directive. The refractory text facility, which was constructed, was tested and found to perform satisfactorily. It is described in detail, including a hazard analysis which was performed. (LTN)

  20. Eighteen-Month Final Evaluation of UPS Second Generation Diesel Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, M.; Walkowicz, K.

    2012-09-01

    A parallel hybrid-electric diesel delivery van propulsion system was evaluated at a UPS facility in Minneapolis using on-vehicle data logging, fueling, and maintenance records. Route and drive cycle analysis showed different duty cycles for hybrid vs. conventional delivery vans; routes were switched between the study groups to provide a valid comparison. The hybrids demonstrated greater advantage on the more urban routes; the initial conventional vans' routes had less dense delivery zones. The fuel economy of the hybrids on the original conventional group?s routes was 10.4 mpg vs. 9.2 mpg for the conventional group on those routes a year earlier. The hybrid group's fuel economy on the original hybrid route assignments was 9.4 mpg vs. 7.9 mpg for the conventional group on those routes a year later. There was no statistically significant difference in total maintenance cost per mile or for the vehicle total cost of operation per mile. Propulsion-related maintenance cost per mile was 77% higher for the hybrids, but only 52% more on a cost-per-delivery-day basis. Laboratory dynamometer testing demonstrated 13%-36% hybrid fuel economy improvement, depending on duty cycle, and up to a 45% improvement in ton-mi/gal. NOx emissions increased 21%-49% for the hybrids in laboratory testing.

  1. Evaluation of new nuclear density gauges on asphalt concrete. Final report, Oct 87-Jun 90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report documents an evaluation of the state-of-the-art capabilities of nuclear density gauges to monitor the density of asphalt concrete. In particular, providing immediate information on compaction by the use of roller-mounted gauges and measuring the densities of thin layers were addressed. The study included three phases: literature search, laboratory tests, and field trials. The first phase included a review of current literature on the theory and operating characteristics of commercially available equipment and a review of State highway agency procedures and specifications for monitoring asphalt concrete density. The second phase included a series of laboratory tests to verify factory calibrations and to determine the depth sensitivity, chemical composition errors, and thin-lift capabilities of the various gauges under laboratory conditions. The third phase consisted of five sets of field trials. The data show that, within limitations, static nuclear gauges can be used for acceptance testing of thin-lifts, but only when all parameters affecting the measurements are precisely known. The dynamic gauges can be effectively used to monitor relative density growth

  2. Safety evaluation report related to Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group Plant Reassessment Program: [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the accident of Three Mile Island, Unit 2, nuclear power plant owners made a number of improvements to their nuclear facilities. Despite these improvements, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff is concerned that the number and complexity of events at Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) nuclear plants have not decreased as expected. This concern was reinforced by the June 9, 1985 total-loss-of-feedwater event at Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station and the December 26, 1985 overcooling transient at Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station. By letter dated January 24, 1986, the Executive Director for Operations (EDO) informed the Chairman of the B and W Owners Group (BWOG) that a number of recent events at B and W-designed reactors have led the NRC staff to conclude that the basic requirements for B and W reactors need to be reexamined. In its February 13, 1986 response to the EDO's letter, the BWOG committed to lead an effort to define concerns relative to reducing the frequency of reactor trips and the complexity of post-trip response in B and W plants. The BWOG submitted a description of the B and W program entitled ''Safety and Performance Improvement Program'' (BAW-1919) on May 15, 1986. Five revisions to BAW-1919 have also been submitted. The NRC staff has reviewed BAW-1919 and its revisions and presents its evaluation in this report. 2 figs., 34 tabs

  3. Industrial applications study. Volume III. Technology data base evaluation of waste recovery systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Harry L.; Hamel, Bernard B.; Karamchetty, Som; Steigelmann, William H.; Gajanana, Birur C.; Agarwal, Anil P.; Klock, Lawrence W.; Henderson, James M.; Calobrisi, Gary; Hedman, Bruce A.; Koluch, Michael; Biancardi, Frank; Bass, Robert; Landerman, Abraham; Peters, George; Limaye, Dilip; Price, Jeffrey; Farr, Janet

    1977-01-01

    An analytical study was undertaken to estimate the present and potential technical and economic characteristics of a wide range of components and complete systems capable of converting industrial and commercial waste heat into mechanical or electrical power and/or building and process heating and cooling. The component and system technologies evaluated include: Rankine-, Stirling-, and Brayton-cycle power systems; reciprocating-, rotary-, and turbo-expanders; heat exchangers and heat pumps; thermally driven cooling and dehumidification systems; and integrated systems capable of providing multiple outputs. Extensive analyses were conducted of Rankine-cycle systems using steam, halogenated hydrocarbons, and other organic compounds as working fluids. Performance characteristics, recoverable output power, and installed costs were estimated and are presented herein for Rankine-cycle systems utilizing selected working fluids over a range of waste heat source temperatures between approximately 200 and 1000/sup 0/F. Data describing the performance capabilities, technology and installed costs of heat exchangers, expanders and thermally driven absorption, vapor compression, steam-jet cooling and refrigeration systems are presented herein together with limited performance and cost estimates for Stirling-cycle power recovery systems. The component and system data were used to provide a preliminary assessment of the recoverable energy and associated system costs when integrated with generalized waste heat sources identified by Drexel University from their two-digit SIC industrial energy survey.

  4. Evaluation of uncertainties in irradiated hardware characterization: Final report, September 30, 1986-March 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste Management Group, Inc. has evaluated the techniques used by industry to characterize and classify irradiated hardware components for disposal. This report describes the current practices used to characterize the radionuclide content of hardware components, identifies the uncertainties associated with the techniques and practices considered, and recommends areas for improvement which could reduce uncertainty. Industry uses two different characterization methods. The first uses a combination of gamma scanning, direct sampling, underwater radiation profiling and radiochemical analysis to determine radionuclide content, while the second uses a form of activation analysis in conjunction with underwater radiation profiling. Both methods employ the determination of Cobalt 60 content, and the determination of scaling factors for hard-to-detect Part 61 radionuclides. The accurate determination of Cobalt-60 is critical since the Part 61 activation product radionuclides which affect Part 61 classification are scaled from Cobalt-60. Current uncertainties in Cobalt-60 determination can be reduced by improving underwater radiation profiling equipment and techniques. The calculational techniques used for activation analysis can also be refined to reduce the uncertainties with Cobalt-60 determination. 33 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs

  5. Evaluation of uncertainties in irradiated hardware characterization: Final report, September 30, 1986-March 31, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedore, N.; Levin, A.; Tuite, P.

    1987-10-01

    Waste Management Group, Inc. has evaluated the techniques used by industry to characterize and classify irradiated hardware components for disposal. This report describes the current practices used to characterize the radionuclide content of hardware components, identifies the uncertainties associated with the techniques and practices considered, and recommends areas for improvement which could reduce uncertainty. Industry uses two different characterization methods. The first uses a combination of gamma scanning, direct sampling, underwater radiation profiling and radiochemical analysis to determine radionuclide content, while the second uses a form of activation analysis in conjunction with underwater radiation profiling. Both methods employ the determination of Cobalt 60 content, and the determination of scaling factors for hard-to-detect Part 61 radionuclides. The accurate determination of Cobalt-60 is critical since the Part 61 activation product radionuclides which affect Part 61 classification are scaled from Cobalt-60. Current uncertainties in Cobalt-60 determination can be reduced by improving underwater radiation profiling equipment and techniques. The calculational techniques used for activation analysis can also be refined to reduce the uncertainties with Cobalt-60 determination. 33 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2

  7. Evaluation of E/EV/SE aptitude to very long duration. Final report of working groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint COGEMA/CEA action aims at evaluating the conditions allowing the extension beyond 50 years of the exploitation of the E/EV/SE vitrified wastes storage facility of the UP3 factory of La Hague (France). The approach considered consists in analysing the technical and administrative aspects of the facility in order to determine the changes to be implemented for its qualification as very long storage facility. Three target characteristics have been identified as priorities for this analysis: safety, civil engineering, and cooling ventilation of wells, and thus three working groups have been created. According to works carried out, facilities like the E/EV/SE one are designed in such a way that their durability can reach the century scale: the robustness of the cooling process, the passiveness of most equipments and the limitation of components functions are the main strong points. Service life limitations come mainly from the thermal evolution of waste packages and the aging of components under the climate conditions: risk of atmospheric corrosion of the bottom part of wells under the effect of water condensation, and risk of corrosion of concrete reinforcements. Suggestions of improvement of the quantification and understanding of phenomena influencing the lifetime limitation are made, and some possible technical solutions are proposed. (J.S.)

  8. Evaluating United States and world consumption of neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium in final products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Matthew

    -term (2015) and mid-term (2020) scenarios could be between: 1,984 to 6,475 tons (2015) and 3,487 to 13,763 tons (2020) of neodymium; 331 to 864 tons (2015) and 587 to 1,834 tons (2020) of dysprosium; 123 to 325 tons (2015) and 219 to 687 tons (2020) of terbium; finally, zero to 871 tons (2015) and zero to 1,493 tons (2020) of praseodymium. Hybrid vehicle sales in non-U.S. countries could account for a large portion of magnetic rare earth consumption. Wind turbine and related rare earth consumption growth will also be driven by non-U.S. countries, especially developing nations like China. Despite wind turbines using bigger magnets, the sheer volume of hybrids sold and non-U.S. consumers could account for most future consumption of permanent magnets and their rare earths.

  9. Evaluation of selected drive components for a flywheel-powered commuter vehicle, Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-30

    The Phase I tasks of a project for the development of an energy storing flywheel powerplant for a short-range commuter vehicle were directed towards evaluating and characterizing specific technologies associated with the flywheel propulsion system that were considered to be critical to the successful development of the proposed commuter car. The vehicle flywheel would be designed to operate between 20,000 and 41,000 rpm, storing a total of 16 kw-hrs at the maximum speed of 41,000 rpm. Vertical spin axes were selected so that normal vehicle cornering would not induce gyroscopic forces on the flywheel bearings. Two rotors would turn in opposite directions so that any gyroscopic forces produced by vehicle pitch or roll motions would be balanced within the flywheel assembly and not reflected to the chassis. Each rotor would be assembled from six identical modules stacked on a common shaft, each module being of multi-rim construction. In Phase I, the rotor testing was limited to the outer (most highly stressed) rims from a single module. The bearings and seals were tested under load conditions simulating those expected from a complete six module rotor. The flywheel system failed to achieve target speed and exhibited whip-like instability of the shaft/hub/spoke combination. The bearings and lubricant performed satisfactorily. The ferrofluidic centrifugal seals lacked the ability to withstand adequate pressure differentials. It is recommended that the project concentrate on the development of smaller, composite material flywheels suitable for use in hybrid vehicles. (LCL)

  10. Program to monitor and evaluate a passive solar greenhouse/aquaculture system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    A temperature monitoring program of Amity's solar greenhouse demonstrated that air, soil, and water temperatures can be maintained at optimal levels without supplemental heat. A foil reflector placed in front of the greenhouse glazing at an angle of between 0 and 5/sup 0/ above horizontal enhanced direct light entering the greenhouse by as much as 22%. Aquaculture in the water heat storage of a solar greenhouse has been a success. Fish reached harvest size in about seven months. The two species that were received the best by the public were African perch (Tilapia mossambica) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Although carp (Cyprinus carpio) were the fastest growers they were not well received by the public. Linking hydroponics to greenhouse aquaculture shows a lot of promise. Different support medias were examined and tomatoes and European cucumbers were raised successfully. A savonius windmill was successfully linked to an aquaculture aeration system but because of the wind pattern in the Willamette valley the windmill system did not provide air in the evening when it was needed most. Alternate designs are discussed. Locally grown fish diets were evaluated for their ability to promote fish growth. Diets such as water hyacinth, duckweed, earthworms, beans, and comfrey were raised on the Amity site, pelleted with a hand grinder and solar dried. Duckweed and earthworms appear to hold promise for a nutritous, easy to grow and pelletize, food source. Amity's solar greenhouse, three coldframe designs and a PVC tunnel cloche were compared in a vegetable growing trial. Most impressive was the cloche design because it provided adequate protection, was inexpensive and very easy to build.

  11. The evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents an independent evaluation of an energy retrofit of 4,003 family housing units at Fort Polk, Louisiana, under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Replacement of the heating, cooling, and water heating systems in these housing units with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) anchored the retrofit; low-flow shower heads and compact fluorescent lighting were also installed, as well as attic insulation where needed. Statistically valid findings indicate that the project will save 25.8 million kWh, or 32.5% of the pre-retrofit whole-community electrical consumption, and 100% of the whole-community natural gas previously used for space conditioning and water heating (260,000 therms) in a typical meteorological year. At the end-use level, the GHPs were found to save about 42% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption for heating, cooling, and water heating in housing units that were all-electric in the pre-retrofit period. This report also demonstrates an improved method of predicting energy savings. Using an engineering model calibrated to pre-retrofit energy use data collected in the field, the method predicted actual energy savings on one of the electric feeders at Fort Polk with a very high degree of accuracy. The accuracy of this model was in turn dependent on data-calibrated models of the geothermal heat pump and ground heat exchanger that are described in this report. In addition this report documents the status of vertical borehole ground heat exchanger (BHEx) design methods at the time this project was designed, and demonstrates methods of using data collected from operating GHP systems to benchmark BHEx design methods against a detailed engineering model calibrated to date. The authors also discuss the ESPC`s structure and implementation and how the experience gained here can contribute to the success of future ESPCs.

  12. ORNL Evaluation of Electrabel Safety Cases for Doel 3 / Tihange 2: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL; Dickson, Terry L [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC

    2015-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a detailed technical review of the 2015 Electrabel (EBL) Safety Cases prepared for the Belgium reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) at Doel 3 and Tihange 2 (D3/T2). The Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (FANC) in Belgium commissioned ORNL to provide a thorough assessment of the existing safety margins against cracking of the RPVs due to the presence of almost laminar flaws found in each RPV. Initial efforts focused on surveying relevant literature that provided necessary background knowledge on the issues related to the quasilaminar flaws observed in D3/T2 reactors. Next, ORNL proceeded to develop an independent quantitative assessment of the entire flaw population in the two Belgian reactors according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Criteria for Protection Against Failure, New York (1992 and 2004). That screening assessment of all EBL-characterized flaws in D3/T2 used ORNL tools, methodologies, and the ASME Code Case N-848, Alternative Characterization Rules for QuasiLaminar Flaws . Results and conclusions from the ORNL flaw acceptance assessments of D3/T2 were compared with those from the 2015 EBL Safety Cases. Specific findings of the ORNL evaluation of that part of the EBL structural integrity assessment focusing on stability of the flaw population subjected to primary design transients include the following: ORNL s analysis results were similar to those of EBL in that very few characterized flaws were found not compliant with the ASME (1992) acceptance criterion. ORNL s application of the more recent ASME Section XI (2004) produced only four noncompliant flaws, all due to LOCAs. The finding of a greater number of non-compliant flaws in the EBL screening assessment is due principally to a significantly more restrictive (conservative) criterion for flaw size acceptance used by EBL. ORNL s screening assessment results

  13. ORNL Evaluation of Electrabel Safety Cases for Doel 3 / Tihange 2: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL; Dickson, Terry L [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC

    2015-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a detailed technical review of the 2015 Electrabel (EBL) Safety Cases prepared for the Belgium reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) at Doel 3 and Tihange 2 (D3/T2). The Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (FANC) in Belgium commissioned ORNL to provide a thorough assessment of the existing safety margins against cracking of the RPVs due to the presence of almost laminar flaws found in each RPV. Initial efforts focused on surveying relevant literature that provided necessary background knowledge on the issues related to the quasilaminar flaws observed in D3/T2 reactors. Next, ORNL proceeded to develop an independent quantitative assessment of the entire flaw population in the two Belgian reactors according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Criteria for Protection Against Failure, New York (1992 and 2004). That screening assessment of all EBL-characterized flaws in D3/T2 used ORNL tools, methodologies, and the ASME Code Case N-848, Alternative Characterization Rules for QuasiLaminar Flaws . Results and conclusions from the ORNL flaw acceptance assessments of D3/T2 were compared with those from the 2015 EBL Safety Cases. Specific findings of the ORNL evaluation of that part of the EBL structural integrity assessment focusing on stability of the flaw population subjected to primary design transients include the following: ORNL s analysis results were similar to those of EBL in that very few characterized flaws were found not compliant with the ASME (1992) acceptance criterion. ORNL s application of the more recent ASME Section XI (2004) produced only four noncompliant flaws, all due to LOCAs. The finding of a greater number of non-compliant flaws in the EBL screening assessment is due principally to a significantly more restrictive (conservative) criterion for flaw size acceptance used by EBL. ORNL s screening assessment results

  14. A Very Different Non-Stressful Comprehensive Final Exam that Achieve Our Goals for Student Evaluation and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Suketu

    2015-08-01

    I will introduce the radical concept of a final exam where the questions are given beforehand, a method I first encountered as a graduate student at Princeton University from an outstanding and well known astrophysicist and exceptional teacher, Lyman Spitzer.Every Instructor aspires for students to master all the material covered. A comprehensive final can assess the breadth and depth of their learning. Students are required to review early material in light of later topics, create connections and integrate understanding, thus retaining knowledge for the long term. Comprehensive finals can therefore be a significant basis for student learning and evaluation, but are especially daunting for non-STEM majors in required GE synthesis STEM classes. The exam format proposed here calmed student fears and encouraged thorough review.Ten days before the exam students received 20-30 challenging, well-crafted, numbered questions that interconnected and spanned the entire range of topics. The key is crafting questions that lead to deeply understanding the subject matter and mastering skills to solve problems. At the final, each student was required to pick a number out of a hat and answer that numbered question in a 5-minute presentation. They also had to critically comment on 10 other presentations of their peers. They are graded equally on both.The exam sets up definite goals for a student. Equally important, it enhances collaborative learning and peer mentoring. The conceptual questions and problems that students are required to answer can be studied together in study groups. The final presentation is theirs and they are not only encouraged but required to be constructively critical of their peer presentations.I will provide examples of some of the conceptual and problem solving questions I used. These were crafted to interconnect and span the entire range of topics. This method requires students to be prepared for all of the multitude of crafted question encouraging

  15. EVALUATION OF SULFATE ATTACK ON SALTSTONE VAULT CONCRETE AND SALTSTONESIMCO TECHNOLOGIES, INC. PART1 FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C

    2008-08-19

    underway to validate the predicted results. Samples of saltstone were also prepared and will be evaluated for durability using the STADIUM{reg_sign} code and SIMCO methodology. Results available as of August 15 are included in this draft report. A complete set of results for saltstone will be available by December 31, 2008.

  16. New energy-saving and environmentally friendly technologies for buses and trucks; Nieuwe energiezuinige en milieuvriendelijke technologien voor bussen en vracthtwagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, R.; De Keukeleere, D.; Lenaers, G.

    1998-09-01

    The point of departure was the statement that people find public transport buses highly polluting. A lot of attention went to the advantages and the disadvantages of buses and trucks on liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and natural gas. These fuels don`t cause any particle emissions from the combustion process. To quantify the other environmental advantages of gas technology, the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO) carried out measurements of different bus technologies. Fuel consumption, emission of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxides and hydrocarbons of 8 buses were measured in the Brussels traffic. 3 technologies of the early nineties were taken as a reference: the Euro-1 diesel, the current Brussels public transport company natural gas bus and a LPG bus. Comparisons were made with the modern diesel bus (Euro-2) and the newest buses on natural gas and LPG. To achieve minimal emissions, the best available technology for buses on natural gas or LPG is multipoint injection, the constructors of engines for heavy-duty traffic are changing from carburetor to fuel injection. The best available gas technologies has emissions that can be 50 to 95 per cent lower than the most modern diesel bus. Users mentioned problems at the introduction of vehicles on gas, such as lower reliability and availability. The cost price continues to be a disadvantage of buses and trucks on gas. The extra consumption of fuel doesn`t necessarily imply higher costs. Often fuel suppliers and distributors offer a favourable unit price, which includes the cost for the infrastructure. The purchase price of the vehicle remains higher and the workplaces must be adjusted for maintenance and repairs of vehicles on gas. The bus or truck on diesel is very reliable and cheaper to use than a similar vehicle on gas. The environmental perspectives are much less marked. Heavy-duty traffic emits nitrogen oxides and particles. With respect to these harmful substances in particular, constructors must

  17. Evaluation of harmonic distortions using small scale computers; Avaliacao de distorcoes harmonicas utilizando-se computadores de pequeno porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschoareli Junior, Dionizio

    1991-12-01

    The emergence more and more constant of non-linear loads in the power systems, with the consequent distortion in the voltage wave forms and of current, turns necessary complementary analyses in the planning of the systems, in way the if understands and to minimize the effects caused by the harmonic distortions. Among the methods used in this analysis are the computational programs that determine the flow of harmonic current and the voltages distorted in the buses. The objective of this work is the optimization of a program developed for large computers, turning possible its utilization in microcomputers. Besides, several models of components and two electric systems have its answers to the presence of multiple frequencies of the fundamental (harmonic frequency) evaluated and the results of the simulations will be presented. It also accomplishes simulations that make possible the visualization of the distortions in the voltage wave forms of the buses. Finally, the work offers a global and qualitative vision of this phenomenon that has been reason increasing preoccupation for mainly among the responsible for the quality of the supplied energy.

  18. Program of internal training of the ININ personnel participating in the PERE of the CLV (1998). II. Development and final evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the results of the initial evaluation, he/she was carried out the program of the personnel's of the participant ININ internal training in the PERE of the CLV (1998). The purpose of this report is to describe the development of the one it programs and the results of the final evaluation. (Author)

  19. Primera Reunion de la Comision Nacional de Analisis y Evaluacion del Sistema Educativo: Informe Final (The First Meeting of the National Committee for Analysis and Evaluation of the Educational System: Final Report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministerio de Cultura y Educacion, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro National de Documentacion e Informacion Educativa.

    This document contains the legislation creating the National Committee for Analysis and Evaluation of the Educational System and the final report of that committee's first meeting. The report deals with each level from elementary to higher education. For each level it describes and considers curriculum, school buildings, human resources, current…

  20. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff's review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff's review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design

  1. Integrated plant safety assessment. Systematic evaluation program, Big Rock Point Plant (Docket No. 50-155). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to reconfirm and document their safety. The review provides (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety when the supplement to the Final Integrated Plant Safety Assessment Report has been issued. This report documents the review of the Big Rock Point Plant, which is one of ten plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. It also addresses a majority of the pending licensing actions for Big Rock Point, which include TMI Action Plan requirements and implementation criteria for resolved generic issues. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  2. Key outcomes and addressing remaining challenges--perspectives from a final evaluation of the China GAVI project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weizhong; Liang, Xiaofeng; Cui, Fuqiang; Li, Li; Hadler, Stephen C; Hutin, Yvan J; Kane, Mark; Wang, Yu

    2013-12-27

    During the China GAVI project, implemented between 2002 and 2010, more than 25 million children received hepatitis B vaccine with the support of project, and the vaccine proved to be safe and effective. With careful consideration for project savings, China and GAVI continually adjusted the budget, additionally allowing the project to spend operational funds to support demonstration projects to improve timely birth dose (TBD), conduct training of EPI staff, and to monitor the project impact. Results from the final evaluation indicated the achievement of key outcomes. As a result of government co-investment, human resources at county level engaged in hepatitis B vaccination increased from 29 per county on average in 2002 to 66 in 2009. All project counties funded by the GAVI project use auto-disable syringes for hepatitis B vaccination and other vaccines. Surveyed hepatitis B vaccine coverage increased from 71% in 2002 to 93% in 2009 among infants. The HBsAg prevalence declined from 9.67% in 1992 to 0.96% in 2006 among children under 5 years of age. However, several important issues remain: (1) China still accounts for the largest annual number of perinatal HBV infections (estimated 84,121) in the WHO WPR region; (2) China still lacks a clear national policy for safe injection of vaccines; (3) vaccination of high risk adults and protection of health care workers are still not implemented; (4) hepatitis B surveillance needs to be refined to more accurately monitor acute hepatitis B; and (5) a program for treatment of persons with chronic HBV infection is needed. Recommendations for future hepatitis B control include: using the lessons learned from the China GAVI project for future introductions of new vaccines; addressing unmet needs with a second generation hepatitis B program to reach every infant, including screening mothers, and providing HBIG for infants born to HBsAg positive mothers; expanding vaccination to high risk adults; addressing remaining unsafe

  3. Evaluation of NANDA nursing diagnoses of healthcare college final year students during the clinical application of the mental health and disease nursing course

    OpenAIRE

    Gülay Taşdemir; Mehtap Kızılkaya

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive study was to evaluate the NANDA nursing diagnoses of Pamukkale University Denizli Healthcare College final year students for the patients they undertook the care of and to determine the aims and interventions relevant to these diagnoses.The study universe consisted of all Pamukkale University Denizli Healthcare College final year students who were continuing their education during the 2009-2010 educational year and took the Mental Health and Disease Nursing course ...

  4. Review and evaluation of immobilized algae systems for the production of fuels from microalgae. Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the use of immobilized algae systems. It was the finding that commercial immobilized algae systems are not in operation at this time but, with research, could certainly become so. The use of immobilized algae will depend on, as in all commercial systems, the economic value of the product. This paper reviews the technical feasibility of immobilization as it applies to algae. Finally, the economics of possible immobilized algal systems that would produce liquid fuels were investigated. It was calculated that an immobilized system would have 8.5 times the capital costs of a conventional microalgae culture system. Operational costs would be about equal, although there would be substantial savings of water with the immobilized system. A major problem with immobilizing algae is the fact that sunlight drives the system. At present, an immobilized algal system to mass produce lipids for use as a liquid fuel does not appear to be economically feasible. The major drawback is developing a low-cost system that obtains the same amount of solar energy as provided to a shallow 3 square mile pond while increasing the culture density by an order of magnitude. R and D to increase light availability and to develop low cost transparent tanks could increase the competitiveness of immobilized algal systems. 44 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Childs, Phillip W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article presents some miscellaneous data from two low-slope and two steep-slope experimental roofs. The low-slope roofs were designed to compare the performance of various roof coatings exposed to natural weatherization. The steep-slope roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. The steep-slope roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. This article describes phase three (3) of a study that began in 2009 to evaluate the energy benefits of a sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing standing-seam metal roofing panels combined with energy efficient features like above-sheathing-ventilation (ASV), phase change material (PCM) and rigid insulation board. The data from phases 1 and 2 have been previously published and reported [Kosny et al., 2011; Biswas et al., 2011; Biswas and Childs, 2012; Kosny et al., 2012]. Based on previous data analyses and discussions within the research group, additional test roofs were installed in May 2012, to test new configurations and further investigate different components of the dynamic insulation systems. Some experimental data from phase 3 testing from May 2012 to December 2013 and some EnergyPlus modeling results have been reported in volumes 1 and 3, respectively, of the final report [Biswas et al., 2014; Biswas and Bhandari, 2014].

  6. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees}to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  7. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80+ design: Docket Number 52-002. Supplement 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the System 80+ standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1462 in August 1994 to document the NRC staff`s review of the System 80+ design. The System 80+ design was submitted by Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE), in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff`s review of the changes to the System 80+ design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. ABB-CE made these changes as a result of its review of the System 80+ design details. The NRC staff concludes that the changes to the System 80+ design documentation are acceptable, and that ABB-CE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ design.

  8. Evaluation of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.H.; Myers, O.B.; Bestgen, H.T.; Jenkins, D.G. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1995-01-01

    This report represents an evaluation of depleted uranium (DU) introduced into the environment at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) Arizona. This was a cooperative project between the Environmental Sciences and Statistical Analyses Groups at LANL and with the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. The project represents a unique approach to assessing the environmental impact of DU in two dissimilar ecosystems. Ecological exposure models were created for each ecosystem and sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were conducted to identify exposure pathways which were most influential in the fate and transport of DU in the environment. Research included field sampling, field exposure experiment, and laboratory experiments. The first section addresses DU at the APG site. Chapter topics include bioenergetics-based food web model; field exposure experiments; bioconcentration by phytoplankton and the toxicity of U to zooplankton; physical processes governing the desorption of uranium from sediment to water; transfer of uranium from sediment to benthic invertebrates; spead of adsorpion by benthic invertebrates; uptake of uranium by fish. The final section of the report addresses DU at the YPG site. Chapters include the following information: Du transport processes and pathway model; field studies of performance of exposure model; uptake and elimination rates for kangaroo rates; chemical toxicity in kangaroo rat kidneys.

  9. Evaluation of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report represents an evaluation of depleted uranium (DU) introduced into the environment at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) Arizona. This was a cooperative project between the Environmental Sciences and Statistical Analyses Groups at LANL and with the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. The project represents a unique approach to assessing the environmental impact of DU in two dissimilar ecosystems. Ecological exposure models were created for each ecosystem and sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were conducted to identify exposure pathways which were most influential in the fate and transport of DU in the environment. Research included field sampling, field exposure experiment, and laboratory experiments. The first section addresses DU at the APG site. Chapter topics include bioenergetics-based food web model; field exposure experiments; bioconcentration by phytoplankton and the toxicity of U to zooplankton; physical processes governing the desorption of uranium from sediment to water; transfer of uranium from sediment to benthic invertebrates; spead of adsorpion by benthic invertebrates; uptake of uranium by fish. The final section of the report addresses DU at the YPG site. Chapters include the following information: Du transport processes and pathway model; field studies of performance of exposure model; uptake and elimination rates for kangaroo rates; chemical toxicity in kangaroo rat kidneys

  10. American Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation. Second Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents results of the American Fuel Cell Bus (AFCB) Project, a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses operating in the Coachella Valley area of California. The prototype AFCB was developed as part of the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA's) National Fuel Cell Bus Program. Through the non-profit consortia CALSTART, a team led by SunLine Transit Agency and BAE Systems developed a new fuel cell electric bus for demonstration. SunLine added two more AFCBs to its fleet in 2014 and another in 2015. FTA and the AFCB project team are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This report summarizes the performance results for the buses through June 2015.

  11. Evaluation and performance based mix design of rubber modified mixtures: Laboratory evaluation of asphalt concrete mixtures using waste tires. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulias, D.G.; Ali, A.H.M.

    1997-02-01

    New Jersey Department of Transportation has been investigating the use of rubber modified materials over the last few years with the design and use of dense and gap graded mixtures, and in some cases the incorporation of RAP materials, in selected projects. While the short term field performance of these materials is satisfactory, their long term performance is unknown. These mixtures were designed with the traditional Marshall mixture design method, and thus is was not considered design criteria related to mixture behavior and performance into mixture selection. The main objective of this study is the development of a mixture design methodology for rubber modified materials that considers mixture behavior and performance. In order to achieve this objective researchers conducted a laboratory investigation which was able to evaluate mixture properties that can be related to mixture performance, (in terms of rutting, low temperature cracking, and fatigue), and simulating the actual field loading conditions that the material is being exposed to. The possibility of coupling the traditional Marshall mix design method with parameters related to mixture behavior and performance was investigated since this technique has been used over the years by the agency, and the necessary testing apparatus is available to both the agency and material laboratories. The SHRP SUPERPAVE mix design methodology was reviewed and considered in this study for the development of an integrated performance based design procedure. However, its applicability and use on routine bases was not considered at this time since it requires specific equipment with ongoing evaluation for its repeatability and precision. Finally, for the conduct of this investigation materials and mixtures used by NJDOT in rubber modified paving projects were used.

  12. Real-world emissions and fuel consumption of diesel buses and trucks in Macao: From on-road measurement to policy implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Li, Zhenhua; Zhou, Yu; Fu, Lixin; Hao, Jiming

    2015-11-01

    A total of 13 diesel buses and 12 diesel trucks in Macao were tested using portable emission measurement systems (PEMS) including a SEMTECH-DS for gaseous emissions and a SEMTECH-PPMD for PM2.5. The average emission rates of gaseous pollutants and CO2 are developed with the operating mode defined by the instantaneous vehicle specific power (VSP) and vehicle speed. Both distance-based and fuel mass-based emission factors for gaseous pollutants (e.g., CO, THC and NOX) are further estimated under typical driving conditions. The average distance-based NOX emission of heavy-duty buses (HDBs) is higher than 13 g km-1. Considering the unfavorable conditions for selective reductions catalyst (SCR) systems, such as low-speed driving conditions, more effective technology options (e.g., dedicated natural gas buses and electric buses) should be considered by policy makers in Macao. We identified strong effects of the vehicle size, engine displacement and driving conditions on real-world CO2 emission factors and fuel consumption for diesel vehicles. Therefore, detailed profiles regarding vehicle specifications can reduce the uncertainty in their fleet-average on-road fuel consumption. In addition, strong correlations between relative emission factors and driving conditions indicated by the average speed of generated micro-trips are identified based on a micro-trip method. For example, distance-based emission factors of HDBs will increase by 39% for CO, 29% for THC, 43% for NOX and 26% for CO2 when the average speed decreases from 30 km h-1 to 20 km h-1. The mitigation of on-road emissions from diesel buses and trucks by improving traffic conditions through effective traffic and economic management measures is therefore required. This study demonstrates the important role of PEMS in understanding vehicle emissions and mitigation strategies from science to policy perspectives.

  13. Evaluation of interim and final waste forms for the newly generated liquid low-level waste flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate the final forms that have been proposed for radioactive-containing solid wastes and to determine their application to the solid wastes that will result from the treatment of newly generated liquid low-level waste (NGLLLW) and Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Since cesium and strontium are the predominant radionuclides in NGLLLW and MVST supernate, this review is focused on the stabilization and solidification of solid wastes containing these radionuclides in cement, glass, and polymeric materials-the principal waste forms that have been tested with these types of wastes. Several studies have shown that both cesium and strontium are leached by distilled water from solidified cement, although the leachabilities of cesium are generally higher than those of strontium under similar conditions. The situation is exacerbated by the presence of sulfates in the solution, as manifested by cracking of the grout. Additives such as bentonite, blast-furnace slag, fly ash, montmorillonite, pottery clay, silica, and zeolites generally decrease the cesium and strontium release rates. Longer cement curing times (>28 d) and high ionic strengths of the leachates, such as those that occur in seawater, also decrease the leach rates of these radionuclides. Lower cesium leach rates are observed from vitrified wastes than from grout waste forms. However, significant quantities of cesium are volatilized due to the elevated temperatures required to vitrify the waste. Hence, vitrification will generally require the use of cleanup systems for the off-gases to prevent their release into the atmosphere

  14. FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS. Task 45. Final topical report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TASK 45 FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/ EVAPORATION (FTE ) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS coupling evaporation with freezing. This offers operators a year- round method for treating produced water. Treating water with the FTE process reduces the volume of water to be disposed of as well as purifying the water to a level acceptable for watering livestock and agricultural lands. This process is currently used at two evaporation facilities, one in the San Juan Basin in New Mexico and one in the Green River Basin in Wyoming. the freezing point below that of pure water. When such a solution is cooled below 32EF, relatively pure ice crystals form, along with an unfrozen brine solution that contains elevated concentrations of salts. Because of the brine's high concentration of these constituents, its density is greater than that of the ice, and the purified ice and brine are easily separated. Coupling the natural processes of freezing and evaporation makes the FTE process a more cost- effective and efficient method for the treatment and disposal of produced water and allows for year-round operation of an FTE facility. drops below 32 F, produced water is automatically pumped from a holding pond and sprayed onto a freezing pad. The freezing pad consists of an elevated framework of piping with regularly placed, upright, extendable spray heads similar to those used to irrigate lawns. As the spray freezes, an ice pile forms over the elevated framework of pipes, and the brine, with an elevated constituent concentration, drains from the ice pile. The high-salinity brine, identified by its high electrical conductivity, is separated using automatic valves and pumped to a pond where it can subsequently be disposed of by conventional methods. As the ice pile increases in height, the sprayers are extended. When the ice on the freezing pad melts, the relatively pure water is pumped from the freezing pad and discharged or stored for later use . No new

  15. Preliminary study on field buses for the control system of the high voltage of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter; Etude preliminaire d`un reseau de terrain pour le systeme de controle des hautes tensions du calorimetre hadronique d`Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevet, F.; Chadelas, R.; Montarou, G.

    1996-12-31

    We present here after a preliminary study on field buses for the control system of the high voltage of the photomultipliers of the TILECAL calorimeter. After some generalities, different commercial buses are reviewed (CAN, ARCET, WorldFIP, Profibus and LonWorks). The Profibus and LonWorks solution are more extensively studies as a possible solution for the high voltage system of the TILE hadronic calorimeter. (authors).

  16. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2009-08-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

  17. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fourth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from April 2008 through October 2008. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous three evaluation reports.

  18. Fast Charging Battery Buses for the Electrification of Urban Public Transport—A Feasibility Study Focusing on Charging Infrastructure and Energy Storage Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Rogge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The electrification of public transport bus networks can be carried out utilizing different technological solutions, like trolley, battery or fuel cell buses. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how and to what extent existing bus networks can be electrified with fast charging battery buses. The so called opportunity chargers use mainly the regular dwell time at the stops to charge their batteries. This results in a strong linkage between the vehicle scheduling and the infrastructure planning. The analysis is based on real-world data of the bus network in Muenster, a mid-sized city in Germany. The outcomes underline the necessity to focus on entire vehicle schedules instead on individual trips. The tradeoff between required battery capacity and charging power is explained in detail. Furthermore, the impact on the electricity grid is discussed based on the load profiles of a selected charging station and a combined load profile of the entire network.

  19. 佛山市发展公交车尾气削减潜力分析%Emission Reduction Potentiality by Developing Buses in Foshan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包艳萍; 刘永红; 黄建彰; 徐伟嘉

    2013-01-01

    Emission factors of buses, motorcycles and passenger cars of Foshan City, Guangdong Province were calculated with COPERT Ⅳ model integrated with information regarding amounts and annual mileages, case analysis was done for their emission, environmental effects and emissions reduction potentiality of buses.Results indicated that buses emission in Foshan in 2011 was 804.57 t CO,283.85 t VOC,3 365.32 t NOx and 73.00 t PM.Emissions of CO and VOC of buses were less than that of motorcycles and passenger cars, but emission of NOx was more.Emission of buses for one person travelling one kilometer would decrease by 32.00%,51.43% and 57.50% by increasing the number of passengers from 17 to 25,35 and 45.Annual emissions could be reduced by 611.66 t CO, 151.6 t VOC, 1,231.18 t NOx and 58.39 t PM respectively by changing all the emission standard of diesel buses from lower to Euro Ⅳ.Annual emissions could be reduced by 293.71 t CO, 2 086.87 t NOx and 70.34 t PM by changing diesel buses to environmentally-friendly vehicle (EEV) CNG buses, but annual emissions of VOC increased by 228.01 t.%采用COPERTⅣ模型计算佛山市公交车、摩托车和小型客车排放因子,结合保有量、年平均行驶里程计算其排放量,对佛山市公交车出行环境效果及尾气削减潜力进行情景分析.结果表明:2011年佛山市公交车CO 、VOC 、NOx和PM的排放量为804.57、283.85、3 365.32和73.00 t.单人单次公交车出行CO和VOC的排放量较摩托车和小型客车低,但NOx则较高.公交车载客人数从17人上升至25、35、45人,单人单次出行每公里排放量分别下降32.00%、51.43%和57.50%.佛山市低排放标准的柴油公交车全部更换成国Ⅳ排放标准柴油车、CO、VOC、NOx和PM的年排放量分别削减611.66、151.6、1 231.18和58.39 t.EEV标准天然气公交车替代柴油公交车可减少NOx和PM的排放,但对VOC的削减并无优势.佛山市现有柴油公交车更换

  20. Evaluation of the participation process in the proceedings concerning the decommissioning of the Schachtanlage Asse II. Final report on 28-02-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final report on the participation process in the proceedings concerning the decommissioning of the Schachtanlage Asse II includes the following chapters: (1) Introduction. (2) Structure of the participation process: bodies and interaction of participants, financing. (3) Actual development of the proceeding: change of the operator, evaluation criteria, feasibility studies, comparison of options, environmental monitoring, health monitoring, tumor incidence, inventory, emergency plans, time schedule, fact finding, and enquiry commission. (4) Functioning of the support group (Asse II) and the working group. (5) Evaluation of the participation process for the reference date February 28, 2011.

  1. Safety Evaluation Report related to the final design approval of the GESSAR II BWR/6 Nuclear Island design, Docket No. 50-447

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by General Electric Company for the Final Design Approval for the General Electric Standard Safety Analysis Report (GESSAR II FSAR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the results of the staff's safety review of the GESSAR II BWR/6 Nuclear Island Design. Subject to favorable resolution of items discussed in the Safety Evaluation Report, the staff concludes that the facilities referencing GESSAR II, subject to approval of the balance-of-plant design, can conform with the provisions of the Act and the regulations of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  2. Solar Technology Test, Evaluation, and Data Collection: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-279

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albin, David S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-08

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Abengoa Solar Inc. on the testing, evaluation, and collection of data related to Abengoa Solar Inc. solar technologies and systems. This work includes, but is not limited to, testing and evaluation of solar component and system technologies, data collection and monitoring, performance evaluation, reliability testing, thermal energy storage integration, solar resource measurement and forecasting, grid impact testing, and analysis. This work will be conducted at NREL, SolarTAC (Aurora), and other field test locations.

  3. Final evaluation & test report for the standard waste box (docket 01-53-7A) type A packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KELLY, D L

    2001-10-15

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A compliance test and evaluation results of the Standard Waste Box. Testing and evaluation activities documented herein are on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Safety, Health and Security (EM-5), Germantown, Maryland. Duratek Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations performed an evaluation of the changes as documented herein under Docket 01-53-7A.

  4. Technological capability assessment of suppliers to support product development: case study on a buses and coaches manufacturer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Comerlato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Supply chain management has become a critical issue in the global collaboration scenario. Suppliers are not expected to provide just commodities or pre-defined components, but also collaborative engineering design solutions within the product development cycle. Thus, the selection criteria for defining supply partner go beyond the production and logistic capabilities, but must also include technical and engineering competence. This, in some sense, can be considered a common scenario of big companies, but is still challenging when dealing with SME´s. This work discusses how SME´s can be included in a supply chains taking in consideration a set of parameters to assess their technical competence related to product development collaboration. A set of eight parameters has been proposed to assess the engineering team competence, physical and technological structure and further legal responsibility. For each parameter values and weights were defined also. The assessment was applied to three companies that are suppliers of a buses and coaches manufacturer from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The results show that even when dealing with objective parameters, the suppliers and costumer can have different perceptions about same issues.

  5. Final Report of the Evaluation of the Benjamin Franklin Urban League Street Academy, ESEA Title I 1969-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching and Learning Research Corp., New York, NY.

    The purpose of the Benjamin Franklin Urban League Street Academy Program is to help students stay in school, help dropouts to return to school, or help students enter the job market. The program was evaluated in three categories: East Side Cluster Service, summer enrichment, and educational programs. The major evaluation objectives were to…

  6. An Evaluation of the Bilingual Mini-School, J.H.S. 45, Community School District 4. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Judith; Zach, Lillian

    The major instrument employed in the evaluation of the functioning of the bilingual mini-school was an observation schema developed by the evaluators over a two year period. The major purpose of the observation scale was to develop a dynamic feedback system or process. Second, it was felt that it was important to obtain a direct measure of the…

  7. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA TREATED WOOD; FINAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA conducted a study to evaluate the effect of coatings on dislodgeable arsenic, chromium, and copper residues on the surfaces of chromated copper arsenate (CAA) treated wood. Dislodgeable CCA, determined by wipe sampling the wood surfaces, was the primary evaluation criterion f...

  8. School Choice in New York City after Three Years: An Evaluation of the School Choice Scholarships Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Daniel P.; Peterson, Paul E.; Myers, David E.; Tuttle, Christina Clark; Howell, William G.

    This report presents third-year findings from an evaluation of the School Choice Scholarships Foundation Program. In 1997, this program provided scholarships via a lottery to low-income, New York City children in grades 1 through 4 that allowed them to transfer to private schools. The evaluation compared scholarship to control students, using test…

  9. Evaluation of safety assessment methodologies in Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide (1985) and Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report (1987)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, B.; Fisher, C.; Zigler, G.; Clark, R.A. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1990-11-09

    FSARs. Rockwell International, as operating contractor at the Rocky Flats plant, conducted a safety analysis program during the 1980s. That effort resulted in Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs) for several buildings, one of them being the Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report, June 87 (707FSAR) and a Plant Safety Analysis Report. Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide, March 1985 (RFRAG85) documents the methodologies that were used for those FSARs. Resources available for preparation of those Rocky Flats FSARs were very limited. After addressing the more pressing safety issues, some of which are described below, the present contractor (EG&G) intends to conduct a program of upgrading the FSARs. This report presents the results of a review of the methodologies described in RFRAG85 and 707FSAR and contains suggestions that might be incorporated into the methodology for the FSAR upgrade effort.

  10. Demonstration, testing and evaluation of nonintrusive characterization technologies at operable Unit 2 of Rocky Flats Plant. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional (3-D), high-resolution (HR) seismic reflection evaluation was conducted at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), near Golden, Colorado, to demonstrate the applicability of nonintrusive characterization techniques to detect buried objects, contamination, and geological/hydrological features at RFP. The evaluation was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) request for demonstration, testing and evaluation (DT ampersand E) of nonintrusive techniques, under DOE Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) No. DE-RA05-09OR22000

  11. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Flow Augmentation in the Snake River, 1991-1995 : Phase I: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorgi, Albert E.; Schlecte, J.Warren [Bio Analysts, Inc., Redmond, WA (United States)]|[HDR Engineering, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to estimate the volume and shape of flow augmentation water delivered in the Snake Basin during the years 1991 through 1995, and to assess the biological consequences to ESA-listed salmon stocks in that drainage. HDR Engineering, Inc. calculated flow augmentation estimates and compared their values to those reported by agencies in the Northwest. BioAnalysts, Inc. conducted the biological evaluation.

  12. An evaluation of the effectiveness of flow augmentation in the Snake River, 1991-1995. Phase 1: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this evaluation was to estimate the volume and shape of flow augmentation water delivered in the Snake Basin during the years 1991 through 1995, and to assess the biological consequences to ESA-listed salmon stocks in that drainage. HDR Engineering, Inc. calculated flow augmentation estimates and compared their values to those reported by agencies in the Northwest. BioAnalysts, Inc. conducted the biological evaluation

  13. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) platform configuration and integration. Final report. Volume I. Systems requirements and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    Studies leading to the development of two 400 MW Offshore Thermal Energy Conversion Commercial Plants are presented. This volume includes a summary of three tasks: task IIA--systems evaluation and requirements; task IIB--evaluation plan; task III--technology review; and task IV--systems integration evaluation. Task IIA includes the definition of top level requirements and an assessment of factors critical to the selection of hull configuration and size, quantification of payload requirements and characteristics, and sensitivity of system characteristics to site selection. Task IIB includes development of a methodology for systematically evaluating the candidate hullforms, based on interrelationships and priorities developed during task IIA. Task III includes the assessment of current technology and identification of deficiencies in relation to OTEC requirements and the development of plans to correct such deficiencies. Task IV involves the formal evaluation of the six candidate hullforms in relation to sit and plant capacity to quantify cost/size/capability relationships, leading to selection of an optimum commercial plant. (WHK)

  14. Acciona Solar Technology Performance Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-384

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehos, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Under this agreement, NREL will work with Acciona to conduct joint testing, evaluation, and data collection related to Acciona's solar technologies and systems. This work includes, but is not limited to, testing and evaluation of solar component and system technologies, data collection and monitoring, performance evaluation, reliability testing, and analysis. This work will be conducted at Acciona's Nevada Solar One (NSO) power plant and NREL test facilities. Specific projects will be developed on a task order basis. Each task order will identify the name of the project and deliverables to be produced under the task order. Each task order will delineate an estimated completion date based on a project's schedule. Any reports developed under this CRADA must be reviewed by both NREL and Acciona and approved by each organization prior to publication of results or documents.

  15. Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) as a summative evaluation tool in a ruminant health management rotation for final-year DVM students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Ken; Menzies, Paula; Sandals, David; Duffield, Todd; LeBlanc, Stephen; Leslie, Ken; Lissemore, Kerry; Swackhammer, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) has been used for 10 years at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, to evaluate the clinical competencies in ruminant health management of final-year DVM students. The performance of these students in the summative assessment, which includes the use of OSCEs, was compared to their formative assessment, given at the end of the rotation. Specifically, classification of students' performance as poor (bottom 10% of the grade range versus "serious deficits") or superior ("A grade" versus "exceeds expectations") was compared. Agreement between the two types of assessment is slight, regardless of whether assessing diagnostic process skills or technical skills--and regardless of whether all students were assessed or only those enrolled in food-animal or mixed streams in their final year--which suggests that the two assess different types of skills. OSCEs are a useful and viable tool for objectively assessing clinical skills in ruminant health management.

  16. EVALUATING THE EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR SELECTED AREAS OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    COFFEY, JOHN L.; AND OTHERS

    THE TWO MAJOR PHASES OF THIS RESEARCH WERE (1) ANALYZING TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION TO IDENTIFY AND DESCRIBE PRIMARY VOCATIONAL SKILLS, AND (2) DEVELOPING AND EVALUATING NINE SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL UNITS. THREE INSTRUMENTS WERE USED IN ANALYZING VOCATIONAL CONTENT SOURCES TO IDENTIFY AND DESCRIBE GENERAL BEHAVIORS AS WELL AS TRADE-SPECIFIC…

  17. Final Report of the Evaluation of the 1970-71 Benjamin Franklin Urban League Street Academy. ESEA Title I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Edsel; Wortham, James

    The objective of the Benjamin Franklin Urban League Street Academy, funded under Title I of the Elementary Secondary Education Act of 1965, is to help students to stay in school or to help dropouts to return to school, or enter the world of work prepared and motivated to adjust and achieve satisfactorily. The major evaluation objectives of this…

  18. History and Recommendations Resulting from Evaluation Planning for the Federation of Rocky Mountain States' Educational Technology Demonstration. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle, Nancy H.; And Others

    A summary of the first 18 months of operation of the Federation of Rocky Mountain States' Educational Technology Demonstration (renamed Satellite Technology Demonstration after May 1973) details the history of the demonstration and explains the rationale for the demonstration's evaluation planning and historical analysis. The report concludes with…

  19. Evaluation of the National Science Foundation's Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) Program, Volume 2: Supplementary Materials. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alina; Epstein, Carter; Parsad, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The National Science Foundation contracted with Abt Associates to conduct an evaluation of its Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) program, which supports intellectually substantive collaborations between U.S. and foreign researchers in which the international partnership is essential to the research effort. The evaluation…

  20. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Institute of Education Sciences in Carrying Out Its Priorities and Mission. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Stephen E.; Muller, Patricia A.; Akey, Theresa M.; McManus, John; Phillips, MacDonald; Plucker, Jonathan; Sharp, Sean

    2008-01-01

    The report evaluates the effectiveness of the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) in carrying out its priorities and mission using primarily pre-existing data sources. The study focused on three central questions: (1) Rigor (To what extent, and in which ways, has IES been successful in advancing the rigor of education research); (2) Relevance…

  1. The Three-Year (1995-1997) Workplace Literacy Program at Chinatown Manpower Project, Inc. Final Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenberg, Joan E.

    An external evaluation was conducted of the Workplace Literacy Program at Chinatown Manpower Project, Inc., which provided oral and written job-specific instruction in English as a second language to Chinese garment workers. The program was designed for underemployed garment industry workers with low English proficiency, including seamstresses,…

  2. 77 FR 43405 - Final Standard Review Plan, Branch Technical Position 7-19 on Guidance for Evaluation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... and Defense-in-Depth in Digital Computer-Based Instrumentation and Control Systems AGENCY: Nuclear... ``Guidance for Evaluation of Diversity and Defense-in-Depth in Digital Computer-Based Instrumentation and Control Systems.'' This BTP is to be cited as the acceptance criteria for Diversity and...

  3. Bilingual Enrichment Services and Training (Project BEST): Community School District 2, Manhattan. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Patricia

    This report presents an evaluation of Bilingual Enrichment Services and Training (Project BEST), an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its third year of operation at four schools in Manhattan. The project served 266 Cantonese-, Fukienese, and Mandarin-speaking gifted students of limited English proficiency.…

  4. Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This technical paper recommends several types of screening assessments to evaluate site conditions for the potential to enhance transport of HOCs, as well as site artifacts that result from inadequate well installation and sampling procedures within a ground-water monitoring netw...

  5. Evaluation of the National Science Foundation's Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) Program, Volume 1: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alina; Epstein, Carter; Parsad, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The National Science Foundation contracted with Abt Associates to conduct an evaluation of its Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) program, which supports intellectually substantive collaborations between U.S. and foreign researchers in which the international partnership is essential to the research effort. The evaluation…

  6. R&D for computational cognitive and social models : foundations for model evaluation through verification and validation (final LDRD report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepoy, Alexander; Mitchell, Scott A.; Backus, George A.; McNamara, Laura A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2008-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investing in projects that aim to develop computational modeling and simulation applications that explore human cognitive and social phenomena. While some of these modeling and simulation projects are explicitly research oriented, others are intended to support or provide insight for people involved in high consequence decision-making. This raises the issue of how to evaluate computational modeling and simulation applications in both research and applied settings where human behavior is the focus of the model: when is a simulation 'good enough' for the goals its designers want to achieve? In this report, we discuss two years' worth of review and assessment of the ASC program's approach to computational model verification and validation, uncertainty quantification, and decision making. We present a framework that extends the principles of the ASC approach into the area of computational social and cognitive modeling and simulation. In doing so, we argue that the potential for evaluation is a function of how the modeling and simulation software will be used in a particular setting. In making this argument, we move from strict, engineering and physics oriented approaches to V&V to a broader project of model evaluation, which asserts that the systematic, rigorous, and transparent accumulation of evidence about a model's performance under conditions of uncertainty is a reasonable and necessary goal for model evaluation, regardless of discipline. How to achieve the accumulation of evidence in areas outside physics and engineering is a significant research challenge, but one that requires addressing as modeling and simulation tools move out of research laboratories and into the hands of decision makers. This report provides an assessment of our thinking on ASC Verification and Validation, and argues for further extending V&V research in the physical and engineering sciences toward a broader program of model

  7. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-05-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The evaluation period in this report (January 2008 through February 2009) has been chosen to coincide with a UTC Power propulsion system changeout that occurred on January 15, 2008.

  8. Evaluation Tools in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA): An Assessment for Evaluating the Competences of the Final Year Project in the Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Joan; Escofet, Anna; Martinez-Olmo, Francesc; Ventura, Javier; Vlachopoulos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    The guidelines of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) imply the rethinking of many of the current evaluation systems, since the new pedagogical models now focus on the learning acquired through the students' personal work and on the establishment of the ideal conditions for them to achieve the learning outcomes of the proposed educational…

  9. Gas-fired desiccant dehumidification system field evaluation in a quick-service restaurant. Final report, October 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, R.N.; Marciniak, T.J.

    1989-10-01

    This report describes the results of a field evaluation of state-of-art desiccant dehumidification equipment in Houston, TX. The evaluation demonstrated that comfort control in a quick-service restaurant could be improved dramatically. However, available gas-fired desiccant dehumidification equipment is too expensive, inefficient, and unreliable to be considered for wide application in the restaurant industry. Results of a technical and economic analysis of four HVAC options in four U.S. cities indicated that improved comfort control could be achieved with only a modest increase in operating costs with an advanced system. This, coupled with the economic benefits achieved through lower indoor humidity such as improved crew performance and reduced maintenance costs, could justify the introduction of an advanced, integrated, HVAC system using desiccant technology which has an installed cost similar to current equipment.

  10. Screening study for evaluation of the potential for system 80+ to consume excess plutonium - Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-30

    As part of the U.S. effort to evaluate technologies offering solutions for the safe disposal or utilization of surplus nuclear materials, the fiscal year 1993 Energy and Water Appropriations legislation provided the Department of Energy (DOE) the necessary funds to conduct multi-phased studies to determine the technical feasibility of using reactor technologies for the triple mission of burning weapons grade plutonium, producing tritium for the existing smaller weapons stockpile, and generating commercial electricity. DOE limited the studies to five advanced reactor designs. Among the technologies selected is the ABB-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) System 80+. The DOE study, currently in Phase ID, is proceeding with a more detailed evaluation of the design`s capability for plutonium disposition.

  11. Evaluation of the appropriate land-surface resolution for climate models. Final report, August 1, 1992--July 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avissar, R.

    1998-07-17

    The land surface interacts strongly with the atmosphere at all spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, land-surface processes must be represented as accurately as possible in climate models. The investigation conducted under this project was aimed at answering two major questions related to land-surface processes: (1) What are the land-surface characteristics and processes that need to be represented in a climate model? (2) How does one average, in a nonlinear form, land-surface energy fluxes over heterogeneous domain at the scale that is not represented explicitly in the model? Correspondingly, two major tasks were conducted: (1) an evaluation of the relative importance of the various land-surface characteristics based on their impact on the redistribution of energy into turbulent sensible heat flux and turbulent latent heat flux at the ground surface; and (2) an evaluation of the impact of the heterogeneity of these characteristics on land-surface energy and mass fluxes into the atmosphere.

  12. Screening study for evaluation of the potential for system 80+ to consume excess plutonium - Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-30

    As part of the U.S. effort to evaluate technologies offering solutions for the safe disposal or utilization of surplus nuclear materials, the fiscal year 1993 Energy and Water Appropriations legislation provided the Department of Energy (DOE) the necessary funds to conduct multi-phased studies to determine the technical feasibility of using reactor technologies for the triple mission of burning weapons grade plutonium, producing tritium for the existing smaller weapons stockpile, and generating commercial electricity. DOE limited the studies to five advanced reactor designs. Among the technologies selected is the ABB-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) System 80+. The DOE study, currently in Phase ID, is proceeding with a more detailed evaluation of the design`s capability for plutonium disposition.

  13. Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction-path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Earl [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fujita, Yoshiko [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McLing, Travis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Neupane, Ghanashyam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Palmer, Carl [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reed, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Vicki [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The project was aimed at demonstrating that the geothermometric predictions can be improved through the application of multi-element reaction path modeling that accounts for lithologic and tectonic settings, while also accounting for biological influences on geochemical temperature indicators. The limited utilization of chemical signatures by individual traditional geothermometer in the development of reservoir temperature estimates may have been constraining their reliability for evaluation of potential geothermal resources. This project, however, was intended to build a geothermometry tool which can integrate multi-component reaction path modeling with process-optimization capability that can be applied to dilute, low-temperature water samples to consistently predict reservoir temperature within ±30 °C. The project was also intended to evaluate the extent to which microbiological processes can modulate the geochemical signals in some thermal waters and influence the geothermometric predictions.

  14. Deterring off-trail hiking in protected natural areas: Evaluating options with surveys and unobtrusive observation: Final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockett, K.A.; Clark, Y.F.; Leung, J.L.; ,; Park, L.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of research conducted on the 96-acre Bear Island along the Billy Goat Trail, Section A (BGT) that evaluated visitor motivations for off-trail hiking and the efficacy of four treatments designed to reduce this activity. This research was prompted by concerns about the impact of an extensive informal (visitor-created) trail network on Bear Island, because it provides habitat for more than 50 species of rare, threatened or endangered plant and animal species.

  15. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of fractured reservoirs; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howrie, I.; Dauben, D.

    1994-03-01

    A three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions for which fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. The evaluations of reservoir performance were made by a modern dual porosity simulator, TETRAD. This simulator treats both porosity and permeability as functions of pore pressure. The Austin Chalk in the Pearsall Field in of South Texas was selected as the prototype fractured reservoir for this work. During the first year, simulations of vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicated that the simulator was predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. In the second year, the performance of the same vertical and horizontal wells was reevaluated with fracture permeability treated as a function of reservoir pressure. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, differing loading conditions were assumed. Simulated natural depletions confirm that pressure sensitive fractures degrade well performance. The severity of degradation worsens when the initial reservoir pressure approaches the average stress condition of the reservoir, such as occurs in over pressured reservoirs. Simulations with water injection indicate that degradation of permeability can be counteracted when reservoir pressure is maintained and oil recovery can be increased when reservoir properties are favorable.

  16. Review and evaluation of literature on testing of chemical additives for scale control in geothermal fluids. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    A selected group of reported tests of chemical additives in actual geothermal fluids are reviewed and evaluated to summarize the status of chemical scale-control testing and identify information and testing needs. The task distinguishes between scale control in the cooling system of a flash plant and elsewhere in the utilization system due to the essentially different operating environments involved. Additives for non-cooling geothermal fluids are discussed by scale type: silica, carbonate, and sulfide.

  17. Evaluation of Mental Effectiveness Training for People with Experience of Using Mental Health Services:Final Report for Comic Relief

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, Martin Paul; Scott, C; Carr, Sarah; Coldham, Tina

    2015-01-01

    There is some pilot evidence that mental effectiveness training provided by the social enterprise Mindapples helps people to learn about their own minds and self-manage their stress (Webber et al., 2015). It is possible that it could similarly help people who have experience of using mental health services. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of adapting and delivering the Mindapples training programme to people with experience of mental health service use; its effectiveness in impro...

  18. Need for and evaluation of hail protection devices for solar flat plate collectors. Final report, June 1978-March 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P R; Cox, M; de Winter, F

    1980-03-01

    A brief summary of the hail risk work previously done under this contract is given, and a summary evaluation of hail impact resistance standards currently being developed is presented. Simulated hail impact test data, field data, and the impact resistance of commercially available glazings are discussed. The use of screens for protection against hail and the threat of vandalism to solar flat plate collectors are discussed. (WHK)

  19. Willingness to Pay and Public Acceptance for Hydrogen Buses: A Case Study of Perugia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Bigerna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability transportation is characterized by a positive externality on the environment, health, social security, land use and social inclusion. The increasing interest in global warming has caused attention to be paid to the introduction of the hydrogen bus (H2B. When introducing new environmental technologies, such as H2B, it is often necessary to assess the environmental benefits related to this new technology. However, such benefits are typically non-priced due to their public good nature. Therefore, we have to address this problem using the contingent valuation (CV method. This method has been developed within environmental economics as a means to economically assess environmental changes, which are typically not traded in the market. So far, several big cities have been analyzed to evaluate the perceived benefit related to H2B introduction, but to the best of our knowledge, no one has performed a CV analysis of a historical city where smog also damages historical buildings. This paper presents the results obtained using a multi-wave survey. We have investigated user preferences to elicit their willingness to pay for H2B introduction in Perugia, taking into account all types of negative externalities due to the traffic pollution. The results confirm that residents in Perugia are willing to pay extra to support the introduction of H2B.

  20. Central heating plant economic evaluation program. Volume 3. Military base weather information data management program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C.; Moshage, R.; Schanche, G.; Blazek, C.; Biederman, R.

    1995-01-01

    Public Law has directed the Department of Defense (DOD) to rehabilitate and convert its existing domestic power plants to burn more coal. Other Federal legislation requires DOD to use the most economic fuel for any new heating system. This five-volume report discusses the Central Heating Plant Economic Evaluation Program (CHPECON), a computer program for screening potential new and retrofit steam/power generation facilities. Volume 1 is the Technical Reference. Volume 2 is the User`s Manual. Volume 3 is the Military Base Weather Information Data Management Program. Volume 4 is the Coalfield Properties Information Data Management Program. Volume 5 is the Emission Regulations Data Management Program. CHPECON provides screening criteria to evaluate competing combustion technologies using coal, gas, or oil; detailed conceptual facility design information; budgetary facility costs; and economic measures of project acceptability including total life cycle costs and levelized cost of service. The program provides sufficient flexibility to vary critical design and operating parameters to determine project sensitivity and parametric evaluation.

  1. Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 4. Appendices. Final report. [Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

    1978-07-01

    A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. This volume contains the appendices. Topics include deterministic insolation model computer code; building energy usage data; computer simulation programs for building energy demand analysis; model buildings for STES evaluation; Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) computer code; transient simulation of STES concept; solar data tape analysis; program listings and sample output for use with TRNSYS; transient simulation, and financial parameters sensitivities. (WHK)

  2. Report on FS survey for project of introduction of highly energy-efficient trolley buses into the Mexico Metropolitan Area in FY 1997; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (Mexico city eno sho energy gata trolley bus donyu project FS chosa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Traffic jam and air pollution by automobiles are currently getting severe in the Mexico Metropolitan Area. Trolley buses were introduced for improving the environment more than ten years ago. Vehicles become too old for use, and their energy efficiency is low. In this project, 200 highly energy-efficient trolley buses are introduced to replace old inefficient trolley buses, which results in the improved traffic convenience in the City and enhanced energy efficiency. The new energy-efficient trolley buses are made of energy-efficient control VVVF inverters produced and exported by MELCO (Mitsubishi Electric Corporation), energy-efficient motors by MELMEX (Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Mexico), and bodies by MASA which is a major manufacturer of bus bodies. The objective of this research is to analyze the background of introduction of new energy-efficient trolley buses and the effects of the present project. The results of analysis are going to be utilized for future promotion of the Joint Implementation and Clean Development Mechanism. 30 refs., 30 figs., 24 tabs.

  3. Design and Evaluation of a Clock Multiplexing Circuit for the SSRL Booster Accelerator Timing System - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, Million

    2015-08-21

    SPEAR3 is a 234 m circular storage ring at SLAC’s synchrotron radiation facility (SSRL) in which a 3 GeV electron beam is stored for user access. Typically the electron beam decays with a time constant of approximately 10hr due to electron lose. In order to replenish the lost electrons, a booster synchrotron is used to accelerate fresh electrons up to 3GeV for injection into SPEAR3. In order to maintain a constant electron beam current of 500mA, the injection process occurs at 5 minute intervals. At these times the booster synchrotron accelerates electrons for injection at a 10Hz rate. A 10Hz 'injection ready' clock pulse train is generated when the booster synchrotron is operating. Between injection intervals-where the booster is not running and hence the 10 Hz ‘injection ready’ signal is not present-a 10Hz clock is derived from the power line supplied by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) to keep track of the injection timing. For this project I constructed a multiplexing circuit to 'switch' between the booster synchrotron 'injection ready' clock signal and PG&E based clock signal. The circuit uses digital IC components and is capable of making glitch-free transitions between the two clocks. This report details construction of a prototype multiplexing circuit including test results and suggests improvement opportunities for the final design.

  4. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Final report, Volume 2, Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-04-05

    This is a final report presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOC`s and other organic chemicals. Although it may be applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by air flow.

  5. Reprocessing input tank calibration exercise (RITCEX). V.1 : final report. V.2 : detailed statistical evaluation of the measured data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reprocessing Input Tank Calibration Exercise (RITCEX) was intended to evaluate current instrumentation and study possible improvements for the input volume measurement in a reprocessing plant. For that purpose, a recalibration of the input tank of Eurochemic has been performed. The data have been analyzed by all the participants and the results are reproduced in the document. The experience obtained allowed to propose some basic principles, recommendations and guidelines for the design and calibration of an accountancy input tank, from the safeguards point of view. (Author)

  6. Evaluation of the sealing ability of two sealers after using chlorhexidine as a final irrigant: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the precipitate formed by using sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine as a root canal irrigant on the sealing ability of different root canal sealers, using a push-out bond strength test. Materials and Methods: Twenty single rooted premolars were used for this study. The teeth were divided into two groups (Groups I and II of ten teeth each, according to the obturation done with AH Plus with GuttaPercha and Resilon with epiphany, respectively. The groups were in turn divided into two subgroups of five teeth each (Subgroups A and B according to the irrigation protocol, and were evaluated using a micro push-out bond strength, with the help of a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was done using the paired t test. Results: The mean value of the AH Plus GuttaPercha group with precipitate formation (17.66 ± 0.56 showed the highest mean value for the bond strength, which was statistically higher (P < 0.05 than the rest of the groups. In the Resilon Epiphany group, the samples with precipitate formation showed (13.28 ± 1.35 the least bond strength, which was statistically lower than all the groups, except the Resilon samples without precipitate (13.99 ± 0.48. Conclusion: The precipitate formed by a combination of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine tends to affect the bond strength of the sealers used for obturation.

  7. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design

  8. Evaluation of Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc.`s competitive bidding program for demand-side resources. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, J.S.; Stucky, L.; Seratt, P.; Darden-Butler, D. [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1993-02-01

    The process evaluation reports on the implementation of Orange and Rockland Utilities demand-side bidding program in New York State during 1991 and 1992. The program is implemented by two energy service companies in Orange and rockland`s New York State service territory. The process evaluation methodology included interviews with utility staff (3), energy service company staff (2), and participating (6) and nonparticipating (7) utility customers. The two energy service companies had enrolled 14 customers in the program by summer 1992. One company had achieved 90% of their 2.75 MW bid and the other had achieved less than 90% of their 6.9 MW bid. Critical factors in success were determination of a reasonable bid amount for the market and marketing to the appropriate customers. Customers most interested in the program included those with limited access to capital and medium-sized firms with poor cash flows, particularly schools and hospitals. The findings also show that due to the incentive structure and associated need for substantial customer contributions, lighting measures dominate all installations. Customers, however, were interested in the potential savings and six of the nonparticipants chose to either install measures on their own or enroll in the utility`s rebate program.

  9. Development of biological indices for identifying and evaluating impacts of pollutants on freshwater ecosystems. Final report, June 1975-October 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, J. Jr.; Cherry, D.S.

    1980-09-30

    The ten Research Areas reported included: (1) the development of functional indices for identifying and evaluating impacts of pollutants on Aufwuchs communities, (2) relationship of protozoan colonization rates to the eutrophication process, (3) testing of methods to determine the functioning of zooplankton communities subjected to entrainment stress, (4) the use of the first steps of detritus processing (microbial decomposition) as a technique for assessing pollutional stress on aquatic communities in a river system, (5) relationship of protozoan invasion and extinction rate to the eutrophication process, (6) extension of present early colonization studies to the simultaneous evaluation of natural environmental parameters and power plant effluents and application of the early colonization approach to microbial communities in streams of the New River drainage, (7) testing of single species-community responses of protozoans from selected heavy metals, (8) the effects of selected power plant pollutants on grazer utilization of Aufwuchs, (9) investigation of bioconcentration and bioaccumulation mechanisms of the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) populations in field artificial streams and laboratory microcosms with reference to physical chemistry and diet alterations, and (10) investigation of the homeostatic regulation in bluegill sunfish following acute hypothermal shock and to other power plant related effluents.

  10. Field Evaluation of Real-time Cloud OD Sensor TWST during the DOE ARM TCAP Campaign 2013 Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niple, N. [Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA (United States); Conant, J. [Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA (United States); Jones, S. [Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA (United States); Scott, H. [Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA (United States); Lannarilli, F. [Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this internal research and development (IRAD)-funded campaign by Aerodyne Research, Inc. was to demonstrate the field-worthiness and assess the performance of a real-time cloud optical depth (COD) sensor (dubbed three-waveband spectrally-agile technique [TWST]) through a side-by-side comparison with proven, ground-based operational sensors currently deployed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mobile Facility (AMF) site on the Cape Cod National Seashore for the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). We anticipated direct comparisons with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET; when in cloud mode) and SAS instruments and expected ancillary data from other sensors such as the Total Sky Imager, the Scanning Cloud Radar, and the Microwave Radiometer to facilitate and validate these comparisons. Because the cloud optical depth retrieval algorithms used by AERONET, solar array spectrometer (SAS), and TWST are totally independent, this deployment provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the field performance of TWST. If the effort proves successful, it may qualify TWST for operational service or additional evaluation effort.

  11. Field Evaluation of Real-time Cloud OD Sensor TWST during the DOE ARM TCAP Campaign 2013 Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niple, E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Conant, J. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Jones, S. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Scott, H. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Iannarilli, F. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)

    2016-02-02

    The objective of this internal research and development (IRAD)-funded campaign by Aerodyne Research, Inc. was to demonstrate the field-worthiness and assess the performance of a real-time cloud optical depth (COD) sensor (dubbed three-waveband spectrally-agile technique [TWST]) through a side-by-side comparison with proven, ground-based operational sensors currently deployed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mobile Facility (AMF) site on the Cape Cod National Seashore for the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). We anticipated direct comparisons with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET; when in cloud mode) and SAS instruments and expected ancillary data from other sensors such as the Total Sky Imager, the Scanning Cloud Radar, and the Microwave Radiometer to facilitate and validate these comparisons. Because the cloud optical depth retrieval algorithms used by AERONET, solar array spectrometer (SAS), and TWST are totally independent, this deployment provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the field performance of TWST. If the effort proves successful, it may qualify TWST for operational service or additional evaluation effort.

  12. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design

  13. Evaluation of upland disposal of Oakland Harbor, California, sediment. Volume 2: Inner and outer harbor sediments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.R.; Brandon, D.L.; Tatem, H.E.; Simmers, J.W.; Skogerboe, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes testing and evaluation performed by the Environmental Laboratory of the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station on sediment from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbor, California. Test protocols from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Technical Framework for the Management of Dredged Material were used in the present evaluation to determine the potential for migration of contaminants into effluent, surface runoff, leachate, plants, and animals at an undetermined upland disposal site. One composite sediment each from Oakland Inner Harbor and Oakland Outer Harbor was tested. The composite sample consisted of sediment cores taken from the mud line to 44-ft depth. Both Oakland Harbor sediments had clayey sand textures. Total organic carbon concentrations in sediment from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors were 3,364 and 6,042 mg/kg, respectively. Based on test results, Oakland Harbor sediments will require management of suspended solids in effluent and surface runoff and a mixing zone of at least 20 to 1 to meet the strictest assumed water quality criteria or standards. Management controls should be considered at the upland site, since plants grew poorly and contained elevated cadmium, lead, and selenium and earthworms accumulated arsenic, cadmium, and nickel. Contaminant migration, Sediment testing, Contaminated sediments, Upland disposal, Dredged material.

  14. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  15. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  16. Evaluation of potential surface rupture and review of current seismic hazards program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-09

    This report summarizes the authors review and evaluation of the existing seismic hazards program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The report recommends that the original program be augmented with a probabilistic analysis of seismic hazards involving assignment of weighted probabilities of occurrence to all potential sources. This approach yields a more realistic evaluation of the likelihood of large earthquake occurrence particularly in regions where seismic sources may have recurrent intervals of several thousand years or more. The report reviews the locations and geomorphic expressions of identified fault lines along with the known displacements of these faults and last know occurrence of seismic activity. Faults are mapped and categorized into by their potential for actual movement. Based on geologic site characterization, recommendations are made for increased seismic monitoring; age-dating studies of faults and geomorphic features; increased use of remote sensing and aerial photography for surface mapping of faults; the development of a landslide susceptibility map; and to develop seismic design standards for all existing and proposed facilities at LANL.

  17. XOQDOQ: computer program for the meteorological evaluation of routine effluent releases at nuclear power stations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provided is a user's guide for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) computer program X0QDOQ which implements Regulatory Guide 1.111. This NUREG supercedes NUREG-0324 which was published as a draft in September 1977. This program is used by the NRC meteorology staff in their independent meteorological evaluation of routine or anticipated intermittent releases at nuclear power stations. It operates in a batch input mode and has various options a user may select. Relative atmospheric dispersion and deposition factors are computed for 22 specific distances out to 50 miles from the site for each directional sector. From these results, values for 10 distance segments are computed. The user may also select other locations for which atmospheric dispersion deposition factors are computed. Program features, including required input data and output results, are described. A program listing and test case data input and resulting output are provided

  18. XOQDOQ: computer program for the meteorological evaluation of routine effluent releases at nuclear power stations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagendorf, J.F.; Goll, J.T.; Sandusky, W.F.

    1982-09-01

    Provided is a user's guide for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) computer program X0QDOQ which implements Regulatory Guide 1.111. This NUREG supercedes NUREG-0324 which was published as a draft in September 1977. This program is used by the NRC meteorology staff in their independent meteorological evaluation of routine or anticipated intermittent releases at nuclear power stations. It operates in a batch input mode and has various options a user may select. Relative atmospheric dispersion and deposition factors are computed for 22 specific distances out to 50 miles from the site for each directional sector. From these results, values for 10 distance segments are computed. The user may also select other locations for which atmospheric dispersion deposition factors are computed. Program features, including required input data and output results, are described. A program listing and test case data input and resulting output are provided.

  19. Solar energy system economic evaluation final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Economic analysis of the solar energy system installed at Loxahatchee, was developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis was accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables was also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  20. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Application of scenario development method in evaluation of the Koongarra Analogue. Final Report - Volume 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skagius, K. [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Wingefors, S. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1992-12-31

    The study of natural analogues has been established as one of the most important methods for validation of concepts and models applied for the assessment of long-term performance of repositories for nuclear waste. The objectives of such studies range from detailed investigations of processes and features on a small scale to attempts of explaining the evolution of whole sites. For studies of specific processes it may well be as important to consider the larger scale settings as boundary conditions. This appreciation of context and an integrated view may be as important for evaluation of most natural analogues as for performance assessments. This is more evident the more the evaluation depends on a knowledge about the evolution of the natural analogue. The attempted formulation of scenarios of the Koongarra Analogue has been based on the external conditions and external features. A rapid weathering of the host rock, i.e. the chlorite schist, is assumed to have started around the onset of the Pleistocene Ice Age (ca 1.6 Ma BP). The eventual oxidation and mobilization of the uranium ore could then have occurred under unsaturated or saturated conditions. This leads to the following major scenarios: (1) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions, with a periodical evolution of the dispersion fan in conjunction with alternating dry (glacial) and wet (interglacial) periods during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (2) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions as a single event, taking place either early or late during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (3)Uranyl Phosphates formed under saturated conditions, in conjunction with periods of higher and lower flow due to the climatic cycling. Although the original objectives may not have been fully achieved, this work is believed to contribute to a better understanding of the Koongarra Analogue as well as to give a basis for further scenario work

  1. Evaluation of battery converters based on 4. 8-MW fuel cell demonstrator inverter. Final report. [Contains brief glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    Electrical power conditioning is a critical element in the development of advanced electrochemical energy storage systems. This program evaluates the use of existing self-commutated converter technology (as developed by the Power Systems Division of United Technologies for the 4.8-MW Fuel Cell Demonstrator) with modification for use in battery energy storage systems. The program consists of three parts: evaluation of the cost and performance of a self-commutated converter modified to maintain production commonality between battery and fuel cell power conditioners, demonstration of the principal characteristics required for the battery application in MW-scale hardware, and investigation of the technical requirements of operation isolated from the utility system. A power-conditioning system consisting of a self-commutated converter augmented with a phase-controlled rectifier was selected and a preliminary design, prepared. A principal factor in this selection was production commonality with the fuel cell inverter system. Additional types of augmentation, and the use of a self-commutated converter system without augmentation, were also considered. A survey of advanced battery manufacturers was used to establish the dc interface characteristics. The principal characteristics of self-commutated converter operation required for battery application were demonstrated with the aid of an available 0.5-MW development system. A survey of five REA and municipal utilities and three A and E firms was conducted to determine technical requirements for operation in a mode isolated from the utility. Definitive requirements for this application were not established because of the limited scope of this study. 63 figures, 37 tables.

  2. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-metal reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, J.E.; Donohew, J.N.; Golub, G.R.; Kenneally, R.M.; Moore, P.B.; Sands, S.P.; Throm, E.D.; Wetzel, B.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Associate Directorate for Advanced Reactors and License Renewal

    1994-02-01

    This preapplication safety evaluation report (PSER) presents the results of the preapplication desip review for die Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Project No. 674. The PRISM conceptual desip was submitted by the US Department of Energy in accordance with the NRC`s ``Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants`` (51 Federal Register 24643). This policy provides for the early Commission review and interaction with designers and licensees. The PRISM reactor desip is a small, modular, pool-type, liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor. The standard plant design consists of dim identical power blocks with a total electrical output rating of 1395 MWe- Each power block comprises three reactor modules, each with a thermal rating of 471 MWt. Each module is located in its own below-grade silo and is co to its own intermediate heat transport system and steam generator system. The reactors utilize a metallic-type fuel, a ternary alloy of U-Pu-Zr. The design includes passive reactor shutdown and passive decay heat removal features. The PSER is the NRC`s preliminary evaluation of the safety features in the PRISM design, including the projected research and development programs required to support the design and the proposed testing needs. Because the NRC review was based on a conceptual design, the PSER did not result in an approval of the design. Instead it identified certain key safety issues, provided some guidance on applicable licensing criteria, assessed the adequacy of the preapplicant`s research and development programs, and concluded that no obvious impediments to licensing the PRISM design had been identified.

  3. Noninvasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system. Final progress report, December 24, 1993--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-31

    During the first year of funding, C-11 hydroxyephedrine has been introduced as the first clinically usable norepinephrine analogue. Studies in normal volunteers and patients with various cardiac disorders indicated the feasibility of this tracer for further evaluation. Simultaneously, animal studies have been used to assess the use of these radiopharmaceuticals in ischemic injury in order to define neuronal damage. Current research focuses on the comparison of C-11 hydroxyephedrine with other neurotransmitters such as C-11 epinephrine and C-11 threo-hydroxyephedrine. Epinephrine is primarily stored in vesicles of the nerve terminal, while threo-hydroxyephedrine is only substrate to uptake I mechanism. Such a combination of radiotracers may allow the dissection of uptake I mechanism as well as vesicular storage. In parallel to the refinement of presynaptic tracers for the sympathetic nervous system, the authors are developing radiopharmaceuticals to delineate the adrenergic receptors in the heart. The combined evaluation of pre- and postsynaptic nerve function will improve their ability to identify abnormalities. They are currently developing a new radiosynthesis of the hydrophilic adrenergic receptor antagonist C-11 CGP-12177 which has been used by others for the visualization of adrenergic receptors in the heart. In addition, they are participating in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for the delineation of presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals. Derivatives of benzovesamicol have been labeled in their institution and are currently under investigation. The most promising agent is F-18 benzovesamicol (FEBOBV) which allows the visualization of parasympathetic nerve terminals in the canine heart as demonstrated by preliminary PET data. A compilation of all publications funded by this grant is presented in this report.

  4. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Application of scenario development method in evaluation of the Koongarra Analogue. Final Report - Volume 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of natural analogues has been established as one of the most important methods for validation of concepts and models applied for the assessment of long-term performance of repositories for nuclear waste. The objectives of such studies range from detailed investigations of processes and features on a small scale to attempts of explaining the evolution of whole sites. For studies of specific processes it may well be as important to consider the larger scale settings as boundary conditions. This appreciation of context and an integrated view may be as important for evaluation of most natural analogues as for performance assessments. This is more evident the more the evaluation depends on a knowledge about the evolution of the natural analogue. The attempted formulation of scenarios of the Koongarra Analogue has been based on the external conditions and external features. A rapid weathering of the host rock, i.e. the chlorite schist, is assumed to have started around the onset of the Pleistocene Ice Age (ca 1.6 Ma BP). The eventual oxidation and mobilization of the uranium ore could then have occurred under unsaturated or saturated conditions. This leads to the following major scenarios: (1) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions, with a periodical evolution of the dispersion fan in conjunction with alternating dry (glacial) and wet (interglacial) periods during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (2) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions as a single event, taking place either early or late during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (3)Uranyl Phosphates formed under saturated conditions, in conjunction with periods of higher and lower flow due to the climatic cycling. Although the original objectives may not have been fully achieved, this work is believed to contribute to a better understanding of the Koongarra Analogue as well as to give a basis for further scenario work

  5. Surry steam generator program - final results - evaluation of NDE performance and technical basis for improved ISI and plugging criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , detailed examination of the removed tube segments and correlation with the NDE data was completed. The examinations included post removal NDE with bobbin-coil EC. These EC inspections were performed both before and after tenacious copper rich OD surface deposits had been removed by chemical cleaning. Visual inspection of the clean tube surfaces with the aid of an optical microscope was the primary means for identifying tube defects. The OD surfaces of all specimens were inspected, while detailed examination of the ID surfaces was limited to those specimen locations where an ID defect had been reported or where ID cracking was expected. Metallography was performed on selected specimens to determine the nature and extent of tube degradation. Specimens removed from the hot leg top of tube sheet level of the generator with pitting/wastage type defects, along with tubes containing laboratory produced axial stress corrosion cracks, were burst tested to validate empirical models of remaining tube integrity. In addition, an evaluation of the publicly available leak rate data was conducted to determine if the leak rate could be correlated with crack length and fluid pressure differential across the tube wall. A mini-round robin using tube specimens with laboratory produced stress corrosion cracking was conducted. The objective of this activity was to acquire information to supplement the Surry data base. This was important since limited information regarding the EC inspection performance on crack type defects was obtained from the round robin examinations on the Surry generator. A tube bundle consisting of 18 tubes was sent to various firms that perform actual inservice inspections. Standard bobbin-coil and alternate NDE methods were evaluated. Analyses and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to compare and evaluate candidate ISI sampling plans. The measured EC performance from the round robin inspections was used to guide the selection of input parameters for this work

  6. Quantification of the reliability of personnel actions from the evaluation of actual German operational experience. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results and their uncertainty bounds of PSA studies are considerably impacted by the assessment of human reliability. But the amount of available, generic data is not sufficient to evaluate all human actions considered in a modern PSA study adequately. Further the data are not sufficiently validated and rely as well as the proposed uncertainty bounds on expert judgement. This research project as well as the preceding project /GRS 10/ validated data recommended by the German PSA Guidelines and enlarged the amount of available data. The findings may contribute to an update of the German PSA Guidelines. In a first step of the project information about reportable events in German nuclear power plants with observed human errors (event reports, expert statements, technical documents, interviews and plant walk downs with subject matter experts from the plants) were analysed. The investigation resulted in 67 samples describing personal activities, performance conditions, the number of observed errors and the number of action performance. In a second step a new methodology was developed and applied in a pilot plant. The objective was to identify undoubtedly error free safety relevant actions, their performance conditions, and frequency as well as to prove and demonstrate that probabilistic data can be derived from that operational experience (OE). The application in the pilot plant resulted in 18 ''error free'' samples characterizing human reliability. All available samples were evaluated by use of the method of Bayes. That commonly accepted methodology was applied in order to derive probabilistic data based on samples taken from operational experience. A thorough analysis of the obtained results shows that both data sources (OE reportable events, OE with undoubtedly error free action performance) provide data with comparable quality and validity. At the end of the research project the following products are available. - Methods to select samples

  7. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products technical evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ness, R.O. Jr.; Runge, B.; Sharp, L.

    1992-11-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the AMAX Research and Development Center are cooperating in the development of a Mild Gasification process that will rapidly devolatilize coals of all ranks at relatively low temperatures between 930{degree} and 1470{degree}F (500{degree}and 800{degree}C) and near atmospheric pressure to produce primary products that include a reactive char, a hydrocarbon condensate, and a low-Btu gas. These will be upgraded in a ``coal refinery`` system having the flexibility to optimize products based on market demand. Task 2 of the four-task development sequence primarily covered bench-scale testing on a 10-gram thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a 1 to 4-lb/hr continuous fluidized-bed reactor (CFBR). Tests were performed to determine product yields and qualities for the two major test coals-one a high-sulfur bituminous coal from the Illinois Basin (Indiana No. 3) and the other a low-sulfur subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin (Wyodak). Results from Task 3, on product upgrading tests performed by AMAX Research and Development (R&D), are also reported. Task 4 included the construction, operation of a Process Research Unit (PRU), and the upgrading of the products. An economic evaluation of a commercial facility was made, based on the data produced in the PRU, CFBR, and the physical cleaning steps.

  8. Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Final report, August 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banken, M.K.

    1998-11-01

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma have engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program included a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in Oklahoma and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. The execution of this project was approached in phases. The first phase began in January, 1993 and consisted of planning, play identification and analysis, data acquisition, database development, and computer systems design. By the middle of 1994, many of these tasks were completed or nearly finished including the identification of all FDD reservoirs in Oklahoma, data collection, and defining play boundaries. By early 1995, a preliminary workshop schedule had been developed for project implementation and technology transfer activities. Later in 1995, the play workshop and publication series was initiated with the Morrow and the Booch plays. Concurrent with the initiation of the workshop series was the opening of a computer user lab that was developed for use by the petroleum industry. Industry response to the facility initially was slow, but after the first year lab usage began to increase and is sustaining. The remaining six play workshops were completed through 1996 and 1997, with the project ending on December 31, 1997.

  9. Performance of Transuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Final Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou

    2011-09-01

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranics (TRU) in light-water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles are pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell and assembly calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code to assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells and assemblies containing typical UO2 and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Then, assembly calculations were performed evaluating the performance of heterogeneous arrangements of TRU-only FCM fuel pins along with UO2 pins.

  10. Identification, definition and evaluation of potential impacts facing the US electric utility industry over the next decade. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grainger, J.J.; Lee, S.S.H.

    1993-11-26

    There are numerous conditions of the generation system that may ultimately develop into system states affecting system reliability and security. Such generation system conditions should also be considered when evaluating the potential impacts on system operations. The following five issues have been identified to impact system reliability and security to the greatest extent: transmission access/retail wheeling; non-utility generators and independent power producers; integration of dispersed storage and generation into utility distribution systems; EMF and right-of-way limitations; Clean Air Act Amendments. Strictly speaking, some issues are interrelated and one issue cannot be completely dissociated from the others. However, this report addresses individual issues separately in order to determine all major aspects of bulk power system operations affected by each issue. The impacts of the five issues on power system reliability and security are summarized. This report examines the five critical issues that the US electric utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility system reliability and security is limited to the system operation viewpoint. Those five issues will undoubtedly influence various planning aspects of the bulk transmission system. However, those subjects are beyond the scope of this report. While the issues will also influence the restructure and business of the utility industry politically, sociologically, environmentally, and economically, all discussion included in the report are focused only on technical ramifications.

  11. Analysis of airborne radiometric data. Volume 1. Evaluation of the DELPHI/MAZAS computer code. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing and evaluation of the code MAZAS/DELPHI led to the following conclusions: its precision is better than the Window method for the analysis of uranium, comparable for the analysis of potassium, and worse for the analysis of thorium. Its accuracy of MAZAS is consistently better than the Window method when used on simulated data. The accuracy of the average values of the individual gamma-ray intensities obtained with MAZAS is good over the entire energy spectrum for the uranium and thorium spectra. The precision of the intensities of the low energy lines is poor unless 15 to 20 s integration times are used. Results of the analysis of actual flight data for potassium and thorium are very similar for MAZAS and the Window method. Results for uranium using MAZAS and the Window method appear to be different. MAZAS, which measures an average of several discrete gamma-ray components, seems to indicate considerably more airborne radon than the Window method. It is suspected that the Window method is measuring a combination of discrete and continuum components and that this is resulting in analyses that are inconsistent with MAZAS. The DELPHI time filter appears to work exceedingly well on simulated data. The accuracy of the method on actual flight data is uncertain

  12. Evaluation of shale hosted low-level waste disposal sites in semi-arid environments: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the findings of a multidisciplinary investigation intended to delineate critical factors and concerns associated with shale hosted, low-level radioactive waste disposal sites located in semiarid environments. The investigations focus primarily upon concerns regarding the hydrology, geochemistry, and meteorology of such an environment. The studies described within this report specifically do not constitute an evaluation of any one particular site nor even a particular class of sites. Rather, it is the intention of the report to present data and insights that would assist private concerns and governmental agencies in the efficient and prudent development of such disposal areas. This report assumes that the hypothetical waste site in question would be developed as a trench type operation similar to that used at Barnwell, South Carolina, with variations upon the techniques used at Beatty Flat, Nevada, and Hanford, Washington. The trench design (Figures 1 and 2) is assumed to be similar to that generic design described in ''Procedures and Technology for Shallow Land Burial, DOE/LLw-13Td, 1983) although it is also assumed that improvements and adaptations will be made upon this basic design to meet the individual needs of a particular site. During the preparation of this report it became apparent that new types of trench design are being studied. Discussions of these trench design proposals are not central to this report. The examples of trench design in Figures 1 and 2 are presented only to give an idea as to the general philosophy of construction of shallow burial facilities

  13. Evaluation of juvenile salmonid bypass facilities and passage at water diversions on the lower Umatilla River. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outdated juvenile and adult fish passage facilities were recently reconstructed at the five major irrigation dams on the lower Umatilla River, Oregon to meet National marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design standards. Changes in design at juvenile fish bypass facilities included reduced mesh size on the rotating drum screens, larger screening area, a more oblique orientation of the drum screens to canal flow, improved screen seals, replacement of bypass portals with vertical slot bypass channels, and increased bypass pipe diameters. Weir-and-pool adult fish ladders and jump pools were replaced with vertical-slot ladders. From 1991--1995, they investigated injury and travel rate of juvenile fish moving through the facilities, and efficiency of screens in preventing fish entry into the canals. Water velocities in front of canal screens, at bypass channel entrances, and at ladder diffusers were measured to assess adherence to NMFS criteria and identify hydraulic patterns. Biological evaluations were conducted by releasing and recapturing marked yearling summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), yearling spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and subyearling fall chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in varying locations within the fish passage facilities

  14. Compilation and evaluation of the available data on relevant mineral oil additives and their combustion products. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, D.; Boehncke, A.; Mangelsdorf, I.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this study is to collect and evaluate environmentally relevant data on mineral oil additives and their combustion products. In addition, their concentration ranges, chemistry and functions in the mineral oils are described. Lubricant and fuel additives belong to the quantitatively most important chemicals with a total quantity of 84600 tons estimated for Germany 1997/98 (57400 tons of lubricant additives, 27200 tons of fuel additives). They determine substantially the characteristic profile of engine oils, gasoline and diesel. Main lubricant additive families are detergents, dispersants, antioxidant/antiwear agents (ZDTP), inhibitors, and viscosity modifiers. Examples for fuel additives are detergents, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, cetane improvers (diesel), and wax crystal modifiers (diesel). Based on the information available in the literature and provided by the manufacturers the environmental fate of the additives is explored, and inventories (calculations of the input and output) are presented. Data for emission volumes and additional 'reasonable worst case' assumptions were calculated on this basis. But as measurement data in this area is very limited, the calculated emissions are uncertain. Comparison of the emitted additive combustion products (CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub 2}, NMVOC, particulate matter) with exhaust limit values for tail pipe emissions and total traffic emissions in Germany showed that the contribution of additive combustion products to particles is more significant than to other fractions. The results of the calculations indicate that the portion of mineral oil additives of the traffic-dependent particle emissions in Germany is approximately 7% (ca. 3/5 from lubricant additives and ca. 2/5 from fuel additives). (orig.)

  15. Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

    2008-04-23

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. • The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPP’s scientific objective of improving climate models. • We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. • We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Niño in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. • Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. • We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

  16. Feasibility study for evaluating cumulative exposure of downstream migrant juvenile salmonids to total dissolved gas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A feasibility study was initiated to determine if downstream migrant salmonids could be monitored to determine potential relationships between total dissolved gas (TDG) exposure and signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT). The primary objectives were to: (1) establish logistical requirements for in-river monitoring of TDG exposure, including net pen design, deployment, and navigation constraints; (2) resolve uncertainties associated with effects of the net pen on fish behavior; (3) test the accuracy and precision of in-river monitoring equipment used to measure fish distribution and water quality; and (4) determine the application of hydrologic/flow models to predictions of TDG exposure. In-river measurements included water velocity, boat position, and selected water quality parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, depth, conductivity). Fish distribution within the net pen was monitored using scanning sonar, and a split-beam echo sounder was used to evaluate vertical distribution of fish m in the river adjacent to the net pen. Three test drifts were conducted from late July through late August. The studies demonstrated that it was feasible to assemble and deploy a large net pen for mobile monitoring of TDG exposure. Accurate monitoring of vertical and lateral distribution of smolts was performed, and diel differences in behavior were documented. Further, the fish sounded in response to researcher activity on the perimeter platform. Thus, in-transit monitoring for GBT or mortality would affect fish depth distribution and exposure to TDG. Principal recommendations for future studies are directed at improving maneuverability of the net pen in adverse weather conditions and applying new acoustics technology to simultaneously collect fish distribution data from within and outside of the pen. 6 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Feasibility Study for Evaluating Cumulative Exposure of Downstream Migrant Juvenile Salmonids to Total Dissolved Gas. Final Report 1996.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, C.Scott; Dauble, Dennis D.; Johnson, Robert L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-11-01

    A feasibility study was initiated to determine if downstream migrant salmonids could be monitored to determine potential relationships between total dissolved gas (TDG) exposure and signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT). The primary objectives were to: (1) establish logistical requirements for in-river monitoring of TDG exposure, including net pen design, deployment, and navigation constraints; (2) resolve uncertainties associated with effects of the net pen on fish behavior; (3) test the accuracy and precision of in-river monitoring equipment used to measure fish distribution and water quality; and (4) determine the application of hydrologic/flow models to predictions of TDG exposure. In-river measurements included water velocity, boat position, and selected water quality parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, depth, conductivity). Fish distribution within the net pen was monitored using scanning sonar, and a split-beam echo sounder was used to evaluate vertical distribution of fish m in the river adjacent to the net pen. Three test drifts were conducted from late July through late August. The studies demonstrated that it was feasible to assemble and deploy a large net pen for mobile monitoring of TDG exposure. Accurate monitoring of vertical and lateral distribution of smolts was performed, and diel differences in behavior were documented. Further, the fish sounded in response to researcher activity on the perimeter platform. Thus, in-transit monitoring for GBT or mortality would affect fish depth distribution and exposure to TDG. Principal recommendations for future studies are directed at improving maneuverability of the net pen in adverse weather conditions and applying new acoustics technology to simultaneously collect fish distribution data from within and outside of the pen. 6 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Short communication: genomic evaluations of final score for US Holsteins benefit from the inclusion of genotypes on cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, S; Misztal, I; Lawlor, T J

    2013-05-01

    Currently, the US Department of Agriculture Animal Improvement Programs Laboratory utilizes a multi-step procedure in genomic evaluations for US Holstein bulls and cows, with adjustments for cows. We used a single-step procedure to investigate whether adding cows' genotypes could increase reliability in genomic breeding values for bulls while minimizing bias. The first data set to 2007 was used to calculate genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) for animals, including young genotyped bulls with no daughters and young cows (heifers) with no records in 2007. The second data set to 2011 was used to calculate GEBV for the same animals, including those young bulls with daughters and young cows with records in 2011. Genotypes (42,503 single nucleotide polymorphism markers) for 34,506 bulls and 5,235 cows from 356,413 bulls and 9,245,619 cows in pedigree were used to calculate single-step GEBV (ssGEBV) and multi-step GEBV (msGEBV). Regression coefficients of 2007 GEBV on 2011 progeny deviations and coefficients of determination were used as indicators of bias and reliability in 2007 GEBV for bulls with no daughters and for cows with no records in 2007, using bull genotypes only and using bull and cow genotypes. Parent averages were also calculated from estimated breeding values of parents to compare with GEBV. For genotyped bulls, inflation was larger for ssGEBV than for msGEBV, whereas reliability was higher for ssGEBV. Using all genotyped bulls and cows, reliabilities were increased by 2 to 3%. Use of genotypes of high-profile cows improves reliability in ssGEBV and msGEBV for bulls. PMID:23477821

  19. Evaluation of emergency medical technicians intermediate prediction about their transported patients final disposition in emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzalimoghadam, Mohammad; Mozafari, Javad; Talebian, Mohammad Taghi; Mohammadnejad, Esmaeil; Kasaeian, Amir

    2013-08-07

    This was a prospective cross-sectional study of consecutive transported patients by emergency medical service (EMS) to a referral hospital. The goal of this study was the evaluation of emergency medical technician intermediate prediction about their transported patients disposition in Emergency Department of Imam Khomeini Hospital. 2950 patients were transported to this hospital, Questionnaires were submitted in 300 of consecutive patient transports and completed data were obtained and available upon arrival at hospital for 267 of these cases. Emergency medical technicians intermediate (EMT-I) were asked to predict whether the transported patient would require admission to the hospital, and if so, what will be their prediction of patient actual disposition. Their predictions were compared with emergency specialist physicians. EMT-I predicted that 208 (78%) transports would lead to admission to the hospital, after actual disposition, 232 (%87) patients became admitted. The sensitivity of predicting any admission was 65%, with positive predictive value (PPV) of 39% and specificity of 86% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 94%. The sensitivity of predicting trauma patients (56.2% of total patients) was 55% with PPV of 38%, specificity of 86% and for Non-trauma patients' sensitivity was 80% with PPV of 40% and specificity of 82%. EMT-I in our emergency medical system have very limited ability in prediction of admission and disposition in transported patients and their prediction were better in Non-trauma patients. So in our EMS, the pre-hospital diversion and necessity of transporting policies should not be based on EMS personnel disposition.

  20. Evaluation of emergency medical technicians intermediate prediction about their transported patients final disposition in emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Afzalimoghadam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This was a prospective cross-sectional study of consecutive transported patients by emergency medical service (EMS to a referral hospital. The goal of this study was the evaluation of emergency medical technician intermediate prediction about their transported patients disposition in Emergency Department of Imam Khomeini Hospital. 2950 patients were transported to this hospital, Questionnaires were submitted in 300 of consecutive patient transports and completed data were obtained and available upon arrival at hospital for 267 of these cases. Emergency medical technicians intermediate (EMT-I were asked to predict whether the transported patient would require admission to the hospital, and if so, what will be their prediction of patient actual disposition. Their predictions were compared with emergency specialist physicians. EMT-I predicted that 208 (78% transports would lead to admission to the hospital, after actual disposition, 232 (%87 patients became admitted. The sensitivity of predicting any admission was 65%, with positive predictive value (PPV of 39% and specificity of 86% with negative predictive value (NPV of 94%. The sensitivity of predicting trauma patients (56.2% of total patients was 55% with PPV of 38%, specificity of 86% and for Non-trauma patients' sensitivity was 80% with PPV of 40% and specificity of 82%. EMT-I in our emergency medical system have very limited ability in prediction of admission and disposition in transported patients and their prediction were better in Non-trauma patients. So in our EMS, the pre-hospital diversion and necessity of transporting policies should not be based on EMS personnel disposition.

  1. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammack, R. W. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States). Geosciences Div.

    2006-12-28

    Decades of underground coal mining has left about 5,000 square miles of abandoned mine workings that are rapidly filling with water. The water quality of mine pools is often poor; environmental regulatory agencies are concerned because water from mine pools could contaminate diminishing surface and groundwater supplies. Mine pools are also a threat to the safety of current mining operations. Conversely, mine pools are a large, untapped water resource that, with treatment, could be used for a variety of industrial purposes. Others have proposed using mine pools in conjunction with heat pumps as a source of heating and cooling for large industrial facilities. The management or use of mine pool water requires accurate maps of mine pools. West Virginia University has predicted the likely location and volume of mine pools in the Pittsburgh Coalbed using existing mine maps, structure contour maps, and measured mine pool elevations. Unfortunately, mine maps only reflect conditions at the time of mining, are not available for all mines, and do not always denote the maximum extent of mining. Since 1999, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been evaluating helicopter-borne, electromagnetic sensing technologies for the detection and mapping of mine pools. Frequency domain electromagnetic sensors are able to detect shallow mine pools (depth < 50 m) if there is sufficient contrast between the conductance of the mine pool and the conductance of the overburden. The mine pools (conductors) most confidently detected by this technology are overlain by thick, resistive sandstone layers. In 2003, a helicopter time domain electromagnetic sensor was applied to mined areas in southwestern Virginia in an attempt to increase the depth of mine pool detection. This study failed because the mine pool targets were thin and not very conductive. Also, large areas of the surveys were degraded or made unusable by excessive amounts of cultural electromagnetic noise that obscured the

  2. Evaluation of Lepidoptera population suppression by radiation induced sterility. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication results from the second FAO/IAEA Research Co-ordination Project (CRP) on Inherited Sterility in Lepidoptera (caterpillars of moths). The present CRP and a previous one entitled 'Radiation Induced F1 Sterility in Lepidoptera for Area-Wide Control' were initiated in response to requests from Member States for the development of environment friendly alternatives to current control of moth pests. The first five-year CRP (1987-1991) dealt primarily with aspects such as determining the effects of various radiation dose levels on the resulting sterility in the treated parents and their F1 progeny in different Lepidoptera species. In addition, models were developed on the suppressive effects of F1 sterility on field populations, and some studies were conducted in laboratory or field cages to assess the impact of inherited sterility on pest suppression. The research results were published in 1993 in the IAEA Panel Proceedings Series. This follow-up CRP (1994-1998) has built on the results of the first CRP and has focused on addressing a more challenging phase, consisting of rearing key pest moths and evaluating their application for pest control purposes. The specific objective of the CRP was therefore to assess the potential of suppressing populations of caterpillar pests in the field by inherited sterility methods, i.e. by rearing and releasing irradiated moths and/or their progeny in combination with other biological control methods. The ultimate goal is to have alternative environment-friendly control methods available to be able to reduce the vast quantities of insecticide that are used in agriculture to combat Lepidoptera pests and that adversely affect the trade balance of developing countries because they must use hard currency to import them. The two FAO/IAEA sponsored Lepidoptera CRPs have resulted in expanded research and implementation programmes on F1 sterility in combination with natural enemies. Such programmes are under way in Tunisia for

  3. Buses, Bikes or Boots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL O'NEAL

    2010-01-01

    @@ If you have been in Beijing for any length of time, you will have come to realize that there are several modes of trans-portation available to commuters, all of them relatively inexpensive, especially when compared to fares in the Western world. The choice is not only a matter of frugality, but also of convenience, comfort and speed.

  4. Alternative Energy Busing

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFee, Scott

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, school districts have converted portions of their bus fleets to cleaner-burning, sometimes cheaper, alternative fossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas or propane. Others have adopted biodiesel, which combines regular diesel with fuel derived from organic sources, usually vegetable oils or animal fats. The number of biodiesel…

  5. Evaluation of dose due to the liberation of the radioactive content present in systems of final disposal of radioactive residues; Evaluacion de la dosis debida a la liberacion del contenido radiactivo presente en sistemas de disposicion final de residuos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado, V.; Lopez, F. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (C1429BNP) (Argentina)]. e-mail: vamado@cae.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    The disposal systems of radioactive residuals well-known as repositories near to the surface, are used to dispose residuals that can contain high concentrations of radionuclides of period of short semi disintegration, which they would decay at levels radiologically insignificant in some few decades or in some centuries: and acceptably low concentrations of radionuclides of period of long semi disintegration. The dose that would receive the critic group due to these systems it could be increased by cause of discreet events that affect the foreseen retard time, or by the gradual degradation of the barriers. To this last case it contributes the presence of water, because it implies leaching and dissolution that can give place to radionuclide concentrations in the underground water greater to the prospective ones. The dosimetric evaluation is important because it offers useful objective information to decide if a given repository is adjusted to the purposes of its design and it fulfills the regulatory requirements. In this work a simplified evaluation of the dose that would receive the critic group due to the liberation of contained radionuclides in a hypothetical system of final disposition of radioactive residuals is presented. For it, they are considered representative values of the usually contained activities in this type of systems and they are carried out some approaches of the source term. The study is developed in two stages. In the first one, by means of the Radionuclide pollutant scattering pattern in phreatic aquifers (DRAF) it is considered the scattering of the pollutants in the phreatic aquifer, until the discharge point in the course of the nearest surface water. This model, developed originally in the regulatory branch of the National Commission of Argentine Atomic Energy (CNEA); it solves the transport equation of solutes in porous means in three dimensions, by the finite differences method having in account the soil retention and the radioactive

  6. Spent-Fuel Test - Climax: An evaluation of the technical feasibility of geologic storage of spent nuclear fuel in granite: Executive summary of final results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summary volume outlines results that are covered in more detail in the final report of the Spent-Fuel Test - Climate project. The project was conducted between 1978 and 1983 in the granitic Climax stock at the Nevada Test Site. Results indicate that spent fuel can be safely stored for periods of years in this host medium and that nuclear waste so emplaced can be safely retrieved. We also evaluated the effects of heat and radiation (alone and in combination) on emplacement canisters and the surrounding rock mass. Storage of the spent-fuel affected the surrounding rock mass in measurable ways, but did not threaten the stability or safety of the facility at any time

  7. Hy-NOW. Evaluation of methods and technologies for the production of hydrogen based on biomass. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of biomass is considered an important option for supplying the future mobility sector with sustainable hydrogen. In this study, various processes and technologies are evaluated that are suitable for a biomass-based production of hydrogen. This includes thermochemical processes such as the gasification of biomass in fixed bed, fluidized bed and entrained-flow gasification and the reforming of secondary bioenergy carriers (e.g. biogas), as well as biochemical processes such as the fermentation of biomass to hydrogen, and the photolysis of water. Following a fundamental prescreening of the processes, three of them are identified as the most promising options for a short or medium-term realization within a demonstration plant. Plant and supply concepts for these processes are defined and analyzed in detail. Two of the concepts are based on allothermal fluidized bed gasification (concepts 1 and 2) and the third one on steam reforming of biogas (concept 3). The hydrogen production capacity amounts to 9 MWH2 (270 kgH2/h) with concept 1, 3 MWH2 (90 kgH2/h) with concept 2 and 6 MWH2 (180 kgH2/h) with concept 3. The hydrogen production and supply concepts are analyzed based on their technical, economic and environmental performance as well as on the availability of the raw materials (biomass) required. For each of the concepts assessed, the availability of feedstock is sufficient to allow for the realization of demonstration plants. Significant parts of the existing biomass potentials, however, are used for other applications already. Hence, thorough examination of potential demonstration sites is crucial, giving due consideration to regional or local raw material availabilities Overall, there are advantages for gasification-based concepts as far as feedstocks are concerned. The technical assessment shows disadvantages for the fermentation-based plant concept in the net efficiency of the hydrogen production, i.e. the conversion efficiency from biomass to

  8. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program -12184

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Christopher [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey [SM Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2012-02-26

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) program: Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns. DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk. DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships with the U

  9. Korea-Japan Joint Research on Development of Seismic Capacity Evaluation and Enhancement Technology Considering Near-Fault Effect (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choun, Young Sun; Choi, In Kil; Kim, Min Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ohtori, Yasuki; Shiba, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Masato [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    We compiled the results of the source analysis obtained under the collaboration research. Recent construction scheme for source modeling adopted in Japan is described, and strong-motion prediction is performed assuming the scenario earthquakes occurring in the Ulsan fault system, Korea. Finally Qs values beneath the Korean inland crust are estimated using strong-motion records in Korea from the 2005 Off West Fukuoka earthquake (M7.0). Probabilistic seismic hazard for four NPP sites in Korea are evaluated, in which the site specific attenuation equations with Index SA developed for NPP sites are adopted. Furthermore, the uniform hazard spectra for the four NPP sites in Korea are obtained by conducting the PSHA by using the attenuation equations with the index of response spectra and seismic source model cases with maximum weights. The supporting tools for seismic response analysis, the evaluation tool for evaluating annual probability of failure, and system analysis program were developed for the collaboration. The tools were verified with theoretical results, the results written in the reference document of EQESRA, and so forth. The system analysis program was applied for the investigation of the effect of improving the seismic capacity of equipment. We evaluated the annual probability of failure of isolated and non-isolated EDG at Younggwang NPP site as the results of the collaboration. The input ground motion for generating the seismic fragility curve was determined based on the seismic hazard analysis. It was found that the annual probability of failure of isolated EDG is lower than that of non-isolated EDG.

  10. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of AH26 sealer using MTAD and combination of NaOCl and EDTA as final irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Mozayeni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: During endodontic procedures, the smear layer is formed as a result of mechanical instrumentation of the canal. Combination of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl is widely used for removal of the smear layer. Application of Mixture of tetracycline, acid, and detergent (MTAD as final irrigant subsequent to initial irrigation of 1.35% NaOCl has been proposed to increase clinical efficiency, biocompatibility and prolonged intra-canal antibacterial activity. Considering the importance of adhesion of endodontic sealers to the dentin walls of a prepared root canal, the present study evaluated push-out bond strength of AH26 sealer using final irrigation of MTAD and EDTA + NaOCl. Materials and Methods: Sixty five single-rooted teeth were prepared endodontically with the same chemomechanical technique and were randomly divided into three groups based on their final irrigation regimen: 17% EDTA + 5.25% NaOCl group (n = 30, MTAD group (n = 30 and control group (n = 5. Obturation of the canals was performed with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. All teeth were sectioned in order that two specimens of 1 mm thickness were obtained from the coronal and the middle one third of each root resulting in 60 specimens for each experimental group and 10 specimens for control group. For push-out test, universal-testing machine was used to exert a constant compressive apico-coronal load at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Minimum amount of compressive load caused dislodgement was measured and converted into megapascal (MPa scale. One-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test were used for statistical analysis of the data (α = 0.05. Results: In MTAD group, mean micro-push-out bond strength of AH26 sealer to dentin walls was obtained 2.23 MPa compared to 2.0 MPa for EDTA + NaOCl group. The mean bond strength of AH26 sealer to dentin walls was significantly greater using MTAD compared with combination of EDTA and NaOCl or saline

  11. Program of internal training of the ININ personnel participating in the PERE of the CLV (1998). II. Development and final evaluation; Programa de capacitacion interna del personal del ININ participante en el PERE de la CLV (1998). II. Desarrollo y evaluacion final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1999-04-15

    According to the results of the initial evaluation, he/she was carried out the program of the personnel's of the participant ININ internal training in the PERE of the CLV (1998). The purpose of this report is to describe the development of the one it programs and the results of the final evaluation. (Author)

  12. Interim progress report on the Vancouver Island Biodiesel Evaluation Study (VIBES) project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlow, W. [City of Victoria, BC (Canada). Engineering Dept.

    2005-04-05

    The Vancouver Island Biodiesel Evaluation Study (VIBES) was launched in December 2004 by fleet operators and local political and community leaders to increase the public interest in biodiesel. The study provided a trial period to better understand the viability of using biodiesel in fleets, including school buses. The test involves a total of 17 test vehicles and 12 baseline vehicles. Nearly 200,000 litres of pre-blended B20 will be used by the vehicles during the field test in which vehicle performance, mileage and fuel consumption will be monitored over several industry sectors and vehicle types. This report reflects the progress of the VIBES project through the first 4 months and includes the experiences and findings of participants as well as the progress on the development of an emissions tracking and trading framework. This evaluation represents the largest cross-sector biodiesel evaluation study to date in Canada. The focus for the final 2 months of the project has shifted to expanding community participation through a One Tank Challenge, developing a User's Guide, and sharing the VIBES experience with other jurisdictions. The long-term objective of VIBES is to build a sufficient market base to support the development of a local biodiesel plant to ensure fleets have access to a cost competitive and efficient supply of quality biodiesel. The feedback thus far has been very positive and the City of Victoria is challenging other fleets to try biodiesel. tabs., figs.

  13. Gaseous and particulate composition of fresh and aged emissions of diesel, RME and CNG buses using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psichoudaki, Magda; Le Breton, Michael; Hallquist, Mattias; Watne, Ågot; Hallquist, Asa

    2016-04-01

    Urban air pollution is becoming a significant global problem, especially for large cities around the world. Traffic emissions contribute significantly to both elevated particle concentrations and to gaseous pollutants in cities. The latter also have the potential of forming more particulate mass via their photochemical oxidation in the atmosphere. The International Agency for Research on Cancer and the US EPA have characterised diesel exhausts as a likely human carcinogen that can also contribute to other health problems. In order to meet the challenges with increased transportation and enhanced greenhouse gas emissions, the European Union have decided on a 10% substitution of traditional fuels in the road transport sector by alternative fuels (e.g. biodiesel, CNG) before the year 2020. However, it is also important to study the influence of fuel switches on other primary pollutants as well as the potential to form secondary aerosol mass. This work focuses on the characterisation of the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase of fresh bus emissions during acceleration, in order to mimic the exhaust plume that humans would inhale under realistic conditions. In addition, photochemical aging of the exhaust emissions was achieved by employing a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor, allowing the characterization of the composition of the corresponding aged emissions. The PAM reactor uses UV lamps and high concentrations of oxidants (OH radicals and O3) to oxidize the organic species present in the chamber. The oxidation that takes place within the reactor can be equivalent to up to one week of atmospheric oxidation. Preliminary tests showed that the oxidation employed in these measurements corresponded to a range from 4 to 8 days in the atmosphere. During June and July 2015, a total of 29 buses, 5 diesel, 13 CNG and 11 RME (rapeseed methyl ester), were tested in two different locations with limited influence from other types of emissions and traffic

  14. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80+ design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 1, Chapters 1--14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the System 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of Abb-CE's System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design included: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors, and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 1, contains Chapters 1 through 14 of this report

  15. Total System Performance Assessment - Analyses for Disposal of Commercial and DOE Waste Inventories at Yucca Mountain - Input to Final Environmental Impact Statement and Site Suitability Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Letter Report presents the results of calculations to assess long-term performance of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), high-level radioactive waste (HLW), and Greater Than Class C (GTCC) radioactive waste and DOE Special Performance Assessment Required (SPAR) radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in Nye County Nevada with respect to the 10,000-year performance period specified in 40 CFR Part 197.30 (66 FR 32074 [DIRS 155216], p. 32134) with regard to radiation-protection standards. The EPA Final Rule 40 CFR Part 197 has three separate standards, individual-protection, human-intrusion, and groundwater-protection standards, all with a compliance timeframe of 10,000 years. These calculations evaluate the dose to receptors for each of these standards. Further, this Letter Report includes the results of simulations to the 1,000,000-year performance period described in 40 CFR Part 197.35 (66 FR 32074 [DIRS 155216], p. 32135) which calls for the calculation of the peak dose to the Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual (RMEI) that would occur after 10,000 years and within the period of geological stability. In accordance with TSPA-SR the ''period of geologic stability'' is from zero to 1,000,000 years after repository closure. The calculations also present the 5th and 95th percentiles, and the mean and median of the set of probabilistic simulations used to evaluate various disposal scenarios

  16. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80{sup +} design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 1, Chapters 1--14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the System 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of Abb-CE`s System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design included: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors, and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 1, contains Chapters 1 through 14 of this report.

  17. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80{sup +} design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 2, Chapters 15--22 and appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the system 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of ABB-CE`s System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design include: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 2, contains Chapters 15 through 22 and Appendices A through E.

  18. Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnany, Emile G.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Two lead articles set the theme for this issue devoted to evaluation as Emile G. McAnany examines the usefulness of evaluation and Robert C. Hornik addresses four widely accepted myths about evaluation. Additional articles include a report of a field evaluation done by the Accion Cultural Popular (ACPO); a study of the impact of that evaluation by…

  19. The new final Clinical Skills examination in human medicine in Switzerland: Essential steps of exam development, implementation and evaluation, and central insights from the perspective of the national Working Group

    OpenAIRE

    Berendonk, Christoph; Schirlo, Christian; Balestra, Gianmarco; Bonvin, Raphael; Feller, Sabine; Huber, Philippe; Jünger, Ernst; Monti, Matteo; Schnabel, Kai; Beyeler, Christine; Guttormsen, Sissel; Huwendiek, Sören

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Since 2011, the new national final examination in human medicine has been implemented in Switzerland, with a structured clinical-practical part in the OSCE format. From the perspective of the national Working Group, the current article describes the essential steps in the development, implementation and evaluation of the Federal Licensing Examination Clinical Skills (FLE CS) as well as the applied quality assurance measures. Finally, central insights gained from the last years are ...

  20. Evaluation of NANDA nursing diagnoses of healthcare college final year students during the clinical application of the mental health and disease nursing course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Taşdemir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this descriptive study was to evaluate the NANDA nursing diagnoses of Pamukkale University Denizli Healthcare College final year students for the patients they undertook the care of and to determine the aims and interventions relevant to these diagnoses.The study universe consisted of all Pamukkale University Denizli Healthcare College final year students who were continuing their education during the 2009-2010 educational year and took the Mental Health and Disease Nursing course (84. The universe was studied before selecting a sample. The internal medicine, surgery, cardiovascular surgery, chest disease, orthopedics-urology, and physical treatment and rehabilitation clinics were chosen for the consultation liaison psychiatry (CLP while the AMATEM Center of the Denizli State Hospital and the Pamukkale University Psychiatry clinics were chosen as the student clinical application areas. The data were collected by evaluating the 136 nursing care plans prepared by the students and the data collection forms the students had used for nursing care during the 2009-2010 autumn semester. The nursing care was evaluated according to the symptom, etiology and problem (SEP format, using the diagnostic list containing the NANDA diagnoses that had previously been provided to the students, and the number and percentage distributions were determined.The patients cared for at the CLP clinics by the students included in the study had been admitted for surgical interventions at a rate of 29.8% and cancer at 28.6% while those in the psychiatry clinics had been admitted for psychosis or alcohol-substance abuse at a rate of 16.7%. The students included in the study had determined 36 nursing diagnoses in 136 cases. The 6 most common diagnoses were infection risk at 34.5%, disturbance of sleep pattern at 33.3%, anxiety at 25.0%, activity intolerance at 20.2%, inadequate personal coping at 16.7% and trauma risk at 13.1% at the CLP clinics, and disturbed sleep

  1. Fuel-Cycle energy and emission impacts of ethanol-diesel blends in urban buses and farming tractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 2.1 billion gallons of fuel ethanol was used in the United States in 2002, mainly in the form of gasoline blends containing up to 10% ethanol (E10). Ethanol use has the potential to increase in the U.S. blended gasoline market because methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), formerly the most popular oxygenate blendstock, may be phased out owing to concerns about MTBE contamination of the water supply. Ethanol would remain the only viable near-term option as an oxygenate in reformulated gasoline production and to meet a potential federal renewable fuels standard (RFS) for transportation fuels. Ethanol may also be blended with additives (co-solvents) into diesel fuels for applications in which oxygenation may improve diesel engine emission performance. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the fuel-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission effects of ethanol-gasoline blends relative to those of gasoline for applications in spark-ignition engine vehicles (see Wang (and others) 1997; Wang (and others) 1999; Levelton Engineering (and others) 1999; Shapouri (and others) 2002; Graboski 2002). Those studies did not address the energy and emission effects of ethanol-diesel (E-diesel or ED) blends relative to those of petroleum diesel fuel in diesel engine vehicles. The energy and emission effects of E-diesel could be very different from those of ethanol-gasoline blends because (1) the energy use and emissions generated during diesel production (so-called ''upstream'' effects) are different from those generated during gasoline production; and (2) the energy and emission performance of E-diesel and petroleum diesel fuel in diesel compression-ignition engines differs from that of ethanol-gasoline blends in spark-ignition (Otto-cycle-type) engine vehicles. The Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs (DCCA) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory to conduct a full fuel-cycle analysis of the energy and emission effects of E-diesel blends relative

  2. Development and demonstration of use of methane/hydrogen blends as fuel in existing methane-driven buses; Utveckling och demonstration av anvaendning av metan/vaetgasblandningar som braensle i befintliga metangasdrivna bussar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, Owe

    2006-10-15

    Two natural gas buses in Malmoe have in a project been converted to run on mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas. The buses have been in operation from September 2003 to December 2005 and have during the whole extent of the project been in commercial operation with passengers. One bus has been refuelled with a mixture containing 8% hydrogen and another with 25% hydrogen. One of the buses has during limited periods been refuelled with natural gas in order to establish differences in fuel consumption between the different fuels. A number of different supporting activities have been performed in conjunction to the project: Tests at the Lund Univ. with hydrogen addition to natural gas in a one cylinder test engine and in a 6 cylinder natural gas engine. Safety analysis for handling of hydrogen/natural gas blends. Hydrogen compatibility study of material and components in bus fuel system. Test of leak detection systems for hydrogen and hydrogen/natural gas blends. Development of safety routines for operation and maintenance staff. Emission measurement during road operation with mobile equipment. Follow up of filling station for hydrogen/natural gas blends. The results from the projects are: The buses did not need to be modified in any way in order to run on mixtures with up to 8 vol-% hydrogen. The buses could, in less than 4 h, be modified to run on mixtures with 25 vol-% hydrogen. The conversion was accomplished by changing one computer chip in the engine control system, thus altering the air/fuel ratio and adjusting the ignition angle. The fuel consumption of the buses was reduced by 20-30% by hydrogen addition. The largest relative influence was achieved with 8% hydrogen addition. The reduced fuel consumption in combination with reduced carbon content in the fuel resulted in a total reduction in CO{sub 2}-emission by approximately 35% using 8% hydrogen (by volume). Addition of hydrogen to natural gas has thus proved to be a more efficient way of reducing CO{sub 2

  3. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01

    measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

  4. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  5. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  6. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications, Phase 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Wilkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The program goals were to develop and demonstrate significant improvements in processing methods, process controls and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1,370{degrees}C. The program focused on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} high temperature ceramic composition and hot-isostatic-pressing as the method of densification. Stage I had as major objectives: (1) comparing injection molding and colloidal consolidation process routes, and selecting one route for subsequent optimization, (2) comparing the performance of water milled and alcohol milled powder and selecting one on the basis of performance data, and (3) adapting several NDE methods to the needs of ceramic processing. The NDE methods considered were microfocus X-ray radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent liquid dye penetrant and X-ray diffraction residual stress analysis. The colloidal consolidation process route was selected and approved as the forming technique for the remainder of the program. The material produced by the final Stage II optimized process has been given the designation NCX 5102 silicon nitride. According to plan, a large number of specimens were produced and tested during Stage III to establish a statistically robust room temperature tensile strength database for this material. Highlights of the Stage III process demonstration and resultant database are included in the main text of the report, along with a synopsis of the NCX-5102 aqueous based colloidal process. The R and D accomplishments for Stage I are discussed in Appendices 1--4, while the tensile strength-fractography database for the Stage III NCX-5102 process demonstration is provided in Appendix 5. 4 refs., 108 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. Development and field evaluation of animal feed supplementation packages. Proceedings of the final review meeting of an IAEA Technical Co-operation Regional AFRA Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    evaluate reproductive performance in animals that are subjected to different feed supplementation strategies. It was, however, realised that this technique has potential to monitor and improve existing support services to livestock farmers such as artificial insemination and to introduce new services such as early diagnosis of non-pregnancy and infertility. In order to ensure future sustainability of the RIA for use in such applications, the work on the second component has now been taken under a new project (RAF/5/046). This publication contains the results presented by the scientists of National Agricultural Research Systems of African countries who participated in the Final Review meeting held in Cairo, Egypt from 25 to 29 November 2000, which dealt with only the nutrition component, Development and Field Evaluation of Feed Supplementation Strategies. This publication also contains some selected papers presented at the National Training Workshop on Field Evaluation and Development of the Dry Season Feed Supplementation Packages for Ruminant Animals in the Traditional Smallholder Farms organized with financial assistance from the IAEA, from 25 to 29 July 1999, in Lusaka, Zambia

  8. 新能源客车的全生命周期评价优势分析%Analysis on Advantages of New Energy Buses on Life Cycle Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王心宏

    2015-01-01

    从全生命周期角度对比分析新能源城市客车、传统城市客车及乘用车的人均单公里能耗及碳排放,突出新能源客车在新能源汽车发展中在节能及碳排放方面的优势。%From the point of life cycle analysis of new energy buses, the traditional buses and passenger cars per person energy consumption and carbon emission per kilometer, the new energy bus great advantages for the develop-ment of new energy vehicles in the aspects of saving energy and carbon emissions are outstanded.

  9. 循环球式电动助力转向器在纯电动客车上的应用%Application of Circulating Ball Type Electric Power Steering Gear to Pure Electric Buses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶成友

    2015-01-01

    In view of the problems of the traditional circulating ball type steering gear now used in pure electric bus-es, such as difficult arrangement, high cost and great electric power consumption,the author introduces a circulating ball type electric power steering gear on pure electric buses.%针对目前纯电动客车上采用的传统循环球式转向器存在布置难度大、成本高、耗电量大等问题,介绍一种循环球式电动助力转向器在纯电动客车上的解决方案。

  10. Research/Evaluate Restoration of NE Oregon Streams: Effects of Livestock Exclosures (Corridor Fencing) on Riparian Vegetation, Stream Geomorphic Features and Fish Populations; Final Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, J. Boone

    2002-09-17

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 indicated ''The council shall properly develop and adopt a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries.'' As a result, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has spent millions of dollars on various instream projects throughout the Columbia Basin with the goal of increasing system-wide production of anadromous fisheries through a combination of habitat restoration and enhancement measures. For two decades, numerous BPA-funded projects have been initiated in the upper Columbia River Basin for the express intent of improving the aquatic habitats of anadromous salmonids. Largely missing from most of these projects has been any rigorous evaluation of project success or failure. Some field reviews of some habitat projects have been undertaken (e.g., Beschta et al. 1991, Kauffman et al. 1993) and provide an overview of major problems and opportunities associated with selected projects. However, there continues to be a lack of quantifiable information, collected in a systematic manner that could be used as the basis for scientifically assessing the effects of individual projects on riparian/aquatic habitats, functions, or processes. Recent publications (e.g., NRC 1992, ISG 1996, NRC 1996, Beschta 1997, and Kauffman et al. 1997) have identified and summarized important concepts associated with the restoration and improvement of aquatic ecosystems. While such conceptual approaches provide an important structure for those undertaking restoration efforts, there remains a paucity of basic information throughout the upper Columbia Basin on the hydrologic, geomorphic, and biologic responses that occur from various enhancement approaches. Basic data on the spatial and temporal responses of restoration approaches would provide: (1) a better understanding of project effects upon

  11. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12184

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Christopher [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Kothari, Vijendra [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States); Starr, Ken [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado (United States); Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey [SM Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) program: - Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns. - DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk. - DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships with

  12. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  13. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estep, Donald [Colorado State University

    2015-11-30

    This is the final report for the project titled "Enabling Predictive Simulation and UQ of complex Multiphysics PDE systems by the Development of Goal-Oriented Variational Sensitivity Analysis and a-Posteriori Error Estimation Methods" that ran from 9/1/2010 through 8/31/2015. The report describes the scientific progress, all manuscripts, and records project-related activities.

  14. Evaluation of the geologic relations and seismotectonic stability of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI); Final report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-10-01

    This report provides a summary of progress for the project ``Evaluation of the Geologic Relations and Seismotectonic Stability of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI)`` for the eighteen month period of January 1, 1987 to June 10, 1988. This final report was preceded by the final report for the initial six month period, July 1, 1986 to December 31, 1986 (submitted on January 25, 1987, and revised in June 1987.) Quaternary Tectonics, Geochemical, Mineral Deposits, Vulcanic Geology, Seismology, Tectonics, Neotectonics, Remote Sensing, Geotechnical Assessments, Geotechnical Rock Mass Assessments, Basinal Studies, and Strong Ground Motion.

  15. Natural gas engines; An eco-friendly alternative for buses, communal and distribution vehicles. Erdgasmotoren; Eine umweltfreundliche Alternative fuer Busse, Kommunal- und Verteilerfahrzeuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signer, M. (Iveco Motorenforschung AG, Arbon (Switzerland))

    1994-01-01

    Natural gas engines for buses, communal and distribution vehicles are an eco-friendly alternative. The exhaust emission values are distinctly lower than the Euro 2-Limit Values for 1995/1996 and lower than the discussed Euro 3 limits. As a result of the change to spark ignition and the reduced engine efficiency obtained, the natural gas engines consume 20 and more per cent energy. The CO[sub 2] emission are, however, comparable with those of a diesel engine. The vehicle fuel tanks are voluminous and heavy. Compromises must be made for the installation in vehicles which results in a reduction of the payload. Cost-favourable and lighter tanks would increase the attractivity of such vehicles. The natural gas vehicle is, at least today, dependent on a central refueling system (compressor station) at the vehicle operator or in his nearer neighbourhood. For the general and flexible operation of any type of utility vehicle, the diesel engine is and remains the optimum solution in view of ecology and economy. (orig.)

  16. Detection of fires in the toilet compartment and driver sleeping compartment of buses and coaches—Installation considerations based on full scale tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Willstrand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective fire detection systems properly installed in bus and coach toilet compartments and driver sleeping compartments may save human lives and property loss. Rapid detection allows for early evacuation and extinguishment of a small fire, while late or no detection may allow the fire to spread. The purpose of the work presented in this paper is to provide recommendations on how to install fire detection systems in toilet compartments and driver sleeping compartments. The recommendations also cover what type of detection system is most suited. As a basis for the recommendations, full scale fire tests were performed with different detection systems. The fire tests were conducted in realistic mockups of a toilet compartment and a sleeping compartment. Different heat and smoke detection systems were analyzed at different positions for different fire scenarios to provide information on how to best install detection systems in these compartments. Five different scenarios were run and the most interesting finding was that two realistic fire scenarios in the toilet compartment did not activate fire detectors in the ceiling at realistic air flow rates. It is very rare that fire detectors are placed anywhere else than on the ceiling in toilet compartments on buses and the fire would then be very large upon detection.

  17. Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fred Genesee

    2005-01-01

    @@ Introduction Evaluation in TESOL settings is a process of collecting,analysing and interpreting information about teaching and learning in order to make informed decisions that enhance student achievement and the success of educational programmes (Rea-Dickins and Germaine 1993; Genesee and Upshur 1996;O'Malley and Valdez-Pierce 1996).Three simple examples help explicate the varied forms evaluation can take in TESOL settings:

  18. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program final report. Volume 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles in typical applications in New York State. During 3 years of collecting data, 7.3 million miles of driving were accumulated, 1,003 chassis-dynamometer emissions tests were performed, 862,000 gallons of conventional fuel were saved, and unique information was developed about garage safety recommendations, vehicle performance, and other topics. Findings are organized by vehicle and fuel type. For light-duty compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, technology has evolved rapidly and closed-loop, electronically-controlled fuel systems provide performance and emissions advantages over open-loop, mechanical systems. The best CNG technology produces consistently low tailpipe emissions versus gasoline, and can eliminate evaporative emissions. Reduced driving range remains the largest physical drawback. Fuel cost is low ($/Btu) but capital costs are high, indicating that economics are best with vehicles that are used intensively. Propane produces impacts similar to CNG and is less expensive to implement, but fuel cost is higher than gasoline and safety codes limit use in urban areas. Light-duty methanol/ethanol vehicles provide performance and emissions benefits over gasoline with little impact on capital costs, but fuel costs are high. Heavy-duty CNG engines are evolving rapidly and provide large reductions in emissions versus diesel. Capital costs are high for CNG buses and fuel efficiency is reduced, but the fuel is less expensive and overall operating costs are about equal to those of diesel buses. Methanol buses provide performance and emissions benefits versus diesel, but fuel costs are high. Other emerging technologies were also evaluated, including electric vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles, and fuel cells.

  19. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Quasi-Static Wireless Power Transfer for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Transit Buses: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijuan; Gonder, Jeff; Burton, Evan; Brooker, Aaron; Meintz, Andrew; Konan, Arnaud

    2015-11-11

    This study evaluates the costs and benefits associated with the use of a plug-in hybrid electric bus and determines the cost effectiveness relative to a conventional bus and a hybrid electric bus. A sensitivity sweep analysis was performed over a number of a different battery sizes, charging powers, and charging stations. The net present value was calculated for each vehicle design and provided the basis for the design evaluation. In all cases, given present day economic assumptions, the conventional bus achieved the lowest net present value while the optimal plug-in hybrid electric bus scenario reached lower lifetime costs than the hybrid electric bus. The study also performed parameter sensitivity analysis under low market potential assumptions and high market potential assumptions. The net present value of plug-in hybrid electric bus is close to that of conventional bus.

  20. Variations in the rates of passenger usage of portable Technology on intercity buses, trains and planes: Implications for transportation planning

    OpenAIRE

    Schwieterman, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several years, the use of portable electronic devices by passengers on intercity transportation services has risen markedly. To support the use of such devices, carriers have installed Wi-Fi systems, power outlets, and cell-phone signal boosters for passenger use. To fill a void in research about the effects of portable electronic technology on intercity travel behavior, this study evaluates newly collected data for 7,028 passengers on bus, train, and air trips. It explores how ...

  1. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  2. Evaluation of the TSC Dolphin Computer Assisted Instructional System in the Chapter 1 Program of the District of Columbia Public Schools. Final Report 85-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Carolyn DeMeyer; And Others

    Dolphin is a computer-assisted instruction system used to teach and reinforce skills in reading, language arts, and mathematics. An evaluation of this system was conducted to provide information to TSC Division of Houghton Mifflin regarding its effectiveness and possible modifications to the system. The general design of the evaluation was to…

  3. Arsenic and Uranium Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Upper Bodfish in Lake Isabella, CA -Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the performance evaluation of an arsenic (As) and uranium (U) removal technology demonstrated at Upper Bodfish in Lake Isabella, CA. The objectives of the project are to evaluate: (1) the effecti...

  4. Development and evaluation of dosimeters from locally available perspex for high dose measurement in industrial radiation processing. Final report for the period December 1985 - December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study was to find, develop and evaluate suitable low cost perspex materials to be used as routine dosemeters for high dose measurements, particularly in industrial radiation processing. Red, amber and white perspex materials of local origin were investigated for their dosimetric properties and evaluated against Harwell red perspex, Fricke and ethanol-monochlorobenzene dosemeters. 5 refs, 13 figs, 5 tabs

  5. Evaluation of Education Programs Developed by the Public and Private Alliance between the Coffee Growers Committee of Caldas and the State Government of Caldas, Colombia. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Audrey-Marie Schuh; Florez, Ana; Grajeda, Eva

    2010-01-01

    This evaluation of progress in tackling the problems of access, quality, equity and completion of primary and secondary education examines the results of an alliance between the Coffee Growers Committee of Caldas (CGC) and the Department of Caldas, Colombia. The evaluation team employed a retrospective approach to understanding the social,…

  6. Computer Science and Technology: Modeling and Measurement Techniques for Evaluation of Design Alternatives in the Implementation of Database Management Software. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Donald R.

    This report describes a research effort that was carried out over a period of several years to develop and demonstrate a methodology for evaluating proposed Database Management System designs. The major proposition addressed by this study is embodied in the thesis statement: Proposed database management system designs can be evaluated best through…

  7. SmartBRT: A Set of Planning, Analysis and Evaluation Tools for Bus Rapid Transit: Final Report Year 1 of 2

    OpenAIRE

    Balvanyos, Tunde; Bethel, Wes; Gardes, Yonnel; Kourjanskaia, Natalia; Liu, Hongchao; Misener, Jim; Sousa, Joao; Vander Werf, Joel; Wei, Wenbin

    2003-01-01

    We report Year 1 results from a two-year project to develop a computer simulation, evaluation and visualization "toolbox", SmartBRT, to describe and evaluate operational aspects of bus rapid transit (BRT) concepts in order to aid decision-making. In conceiving and developing SmartBRT, we have maintained two objectives: 1. To provide FTA, Caltrans and local decision-makers with a rigorous and defensible, yet intuitive BRT operation evaluation method along with a general purpose BRT simulator/c...

  8. 基于贝叶斯分类的主题爬虫%Fcoused crawler bused on Bayesian classifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾海军; 陈海光

    2013-01-01

    随着网络的高速发展,其信息资源越来越庞大,面对巨量的信息库,搜索引擎起着重要的作用。主题爬虫技术作为搜索引擎的主要核心部分,计算搜索结果与搜索主题的关系,该关系被称为相关性。一般主题爬虫方法只计算网页内容与搜索主题的相关性,作者所提主题爬虫,通过链接内容和锚文本内容计算链接的重要性,然后利用贝叶斯分类器对链接进行分类,最后利用余弦相似函数计算网页的相关性,如果相关值大于阀值,则认为该网页与预定主题相关,否则不相关。实验结果证明:所提出主题爬虫方法可以获得很高的精确度。%With the rapid development of the network,its information resources are increasingly large and faced a huge amount of information database, search engine plays an important role. Focused crawling technique, as the main core portion of search engine,is used to calculate the relationship between search results and search topics,which is called correlation. Normally,focused crawling method is used only to calculate the correlation between web content and search related topics. In this paper, focused crawling method is used to compute the importance of links through link content and anchor text,then Bayesian classifier is used to classify the links,and finally cosine similarity function is used to calculate the relevance of web pages. If the correlation value is greater than the threshold the page is considered to be associated with the predetermined topics, otherwise not relevant. Experimental results show that a high accuracy can be obtained by using the proposed crawling approach.

  9. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Richmond Elementary School in Susanville, CA Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Richmond Elementary School in Susanville, CA. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of an Aquatic Treatme...

  10. An independent evaluation of the effectiveness of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System : Summary overview : Final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This evaluation report reviews the Refuge System’s twelve strategic outcome goals and provides an assessment as to how well the system is doing in accomplishing...

  11. Exhaust emissions evaluation of Colombian commercial diesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecopetrol, based on the results obtained in the study, The effect of diesel properties on the emissions of particulate matter (Bello et al 2000), reformulated the diesel fuel distributed in Bogota, becoming it lighter and with lower sulfur content. In order to evaluate the environmental benefits that the reformulation of diesel fuel generate in Bogota, Instituto Colombiano del Petroleo (ICP), with the assistance of emissions research and measurement division (ERMD) from environment Canada, arranged a research project to determine the changes in CO, THC, NOx, CO2 and particulate matter emissions. The research program was developed in two steps. First one, developed in Bogota, involved a fleet test with 15 public service buses that normally operate in Bogota's savannah, using a portable emissions sampling technology developed for ERMD (DOES2) and following a representative transient driving cycle. Second step, carried out in ERMD's Heavy-Duty engine emissions laboratory in Ottawa, tested a 1995 caterpillar 3406E 324/5 KW (435 HP) diesel truck engine on the same samples of Colombian diesel fuels used in the fleet tests performed in Bogota, baselining the tests with a Canadian commercial low sulfur diesel fuel. The two commercial Colombian diesel fuels used had the following properties: High Sulfur Diesel (HSD), with 3000 ppm (0,3 wt %) of sulfur and a final boiling point (FBP) of 633 K and the new reformulated diesel fuel, with 1000 ppm (0,1 wt %) of sulfur and FBP of 613 K, which is currently been distributed in Bogota. Fleet test show small reduction on CO, THC and TPM, and small increments on CO2 and NOx but with not statistically significant results, while engine testing shows a strong reduction of 40/8% in TPM when you use the new reformulated diesel fuel (0,1 wt % of sulfur) instead of high sulfur diesel

  12. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  13. Fatigue-related crashes involving express buses in Malaysia: will the proposed policy of banning the early-hour operation reduce fatigue-related crashes and benefit overall road safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Norlen; Mohd-Yusoff, Mohammad-Fadhli; Othman, Ilhamah; Zulkipli, Zarir-Hafiz; Osman, Mohd Rasid; Voon, Wong Shaw

    2012-03-01

    Fatigue-related crashes have long been the topic of discussion and study worldwide. The relationship between fatigue-related crashes and time of day is well documented. In Malaysia, the possibility of banning express buses from operating during the early-hours of the morning has emerged as an important consideration for passenger safety. This paper highlights the findings of an impact assessment study. The study was conducted to determine all possible impacts prior to the government making any decision on the proposed banning. This study is an example of a simple and inexpensive approach that may influence future policy-making process. The impact assessment comprised two major steps. The first step involved profiling existing operation scenarios, gathering information on crashes involving public express buses and stakeholders' views. The second step involved a qualitative impact assessment analysis using all information gathered during the profiling stage to describe the possible impacts. Based on the assessment, the move to ban early-hour operations could possibly result in further negative impacts on the overall road safety agenda. These negative impacts may occur if the fundamental issues, such as driving and working hours, and the need for rest and sleep facilities for drivers, are not addressed. In addition, a safer and more accessible public transportation system as an alternative for those who choose to travel at night would be required. The proposed banning of early-hour operations is also not a feasible solution for sustainability of express bus operations in Malaysia, especially for those operating long journeys. The paper concludes by highlighting the need to design a more holistic approach for preventing fatigue-related crashes involving express buses in Malaysia. PMID:22239931

  14. Fatigue-related crashes involving express buses in Malaysia: will the proposed policy of banning the early-hour operation reduce fatigue-related crashes and benefit overall road safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Norlen; Mohd-Yusoff, Mohammad-Fadhli; Othman, Ilhamah; Zulkipli, Zarir-Hafiz; Osman, Mohd Rasid; Voon, Wong Shaw

    2012-03-01

    Fatigue-related crashes have long been the topic of discussion and study worldwide. The relationship between fatigue-related crashes and time of day is well documented. In Malaysia, the possibility of banning express buses from operating during the early-hours of the morning has emerged as an important consideration for passenger safety. This paper highlights the findings of an impact assessment study. The study was conducted to determine all possible impacts prior to the government making any decision on the proposed banning. This study is an example of a simple and inexpensive approach that may influence future policy-making process. The impact assessment comprised two major steps. The first step involved profiling existing operation scenarios, gathering information on crashes involving public express buses and stakeholders' views. The second step involved a qualitative impact assessment analysis using all information gathered during the profiling stage to describe the possible impacts. Based on the assessment, the move to ban early-hour operations could possibly result in further negative impacts on the overall road safety agenda. These negative impacts may occur if the fundamental issues, such as driving and working hours, and the need for rest and sleep facilities for drivers, are not addressed. In addition, a safer and more accessible public transportation system as an alternative for those who choose to travel at night would be required. The proposed banning of early-hour operations is also not a feasible solution for sustainability of express bus operations in Malaysia, especially for those operating long journeys. The paper concludes by highlighting the need to design a more holistic approach for preventing fatigue-related crashes involving express buses in Malaysia.

  15. Evaluation of Carrying Capacity : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 1 of 4, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    1996-05-01

    This report is one of four that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared to address Measure 7.1A in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (Council) Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) dated december 1994 (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.1A calls for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund an evaluation of salmon survival, ecology, carrying capacity, and limiting factors in freshwater, estuarine, and marine habitats. Additionally, the Measure asks for development of a study plan based on critical uncertainties and research needs identified during the evaluation. This report deals with the evaluation of carrying capacity. It describes the analysis of different views of capacity as it relates to salmon survival and abundance. The report ends with conclusions and recommendations for studying carrying capacity.

  16. Evaluation of carrying capacity: Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program. Report 1 of 4, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is one of four that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared to address Measure 7.1A in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (Council) Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) dated december 1994 (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.1A calls for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund an evaluation of salmon survival, ecology, carrying capacity, and limiting factors in freshwater, estuarine, and marine habitats. Additionally, the Measure asks for development of a study plan based on critical uncertainties and research needs identified during the evaluation. This report deals with the evaluation of carrying capacity. It describes the analysis of different views of capacity as it relates to salmon survival and abundance. The report ends with conclusions and recommendations for studying carrying capacity

  17. Itinerant vending of medicines inside buses in Nigeria: vending strategies, dominant themes and medicine-related information provided

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuff KB

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine if a pharmacist assisted psychiatric clinic would improve adherence to medications and quality of life over 6 months. The primary study endpoints were the change from baseline in Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS, Brief Evaluation of Medication Influences and Beliefs (BEMIB, World Health Organization Quality of Life - BREF (WHOQOL-BREF scales as well as hospitalizations and emergency room visits. Secondary endpoints included metabolic and physiologic parameters.Methods: A prospective, single-center study conducted at an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Subjects were required to attend 3 clinic visits (baseline, 3 and 6 months with the pharmacist. Subject and medication histories were obtained at each visit. Subjects’ records within the local health system were reviewed for emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Metabolic parameters were assessed at each visit.Results: Twenty-seven subjects enrolled and twenty subjects completed. Total MARS score at baseline and study end were 7.90 and 8.65, respectively. At baseline, 10 (50% were nonadherent based on the BEMIB and 9 (45% were nonadherent at 6 months. Statistically significant improvements were seen in 2 domains of the WHOQOL-BREF. Reductions in both ER visits and hospitalizations were achieved. There were significant improvements in total cholesterol and LDL.Conclusions: Improvements were seen in two domains of the WHOQOL-BREF – physical capacity and psychological well-being over the 6 month period. While improvements were seen in various rating scales, due to small sample sizes, these were insignificant improvements. Reductions in hospitalizations and ER visits were also seen during the study and up to 6 months post study. Statistically significant improvements were also seen in both total cholesterol and LDL. The lack of improvement in many of the study outcomes reflects the difficulty of the mental health population to adhere to treatment recommendations

  18. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of Field Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute

    1997-08-01

    This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic fields sectio~ and field reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic field reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic field shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic field plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.

  19. FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis [University of Washsington

    2012-05-26

    the same spatial resolution as WRF in NARCCAP, with a slightly different domain designed to cover the Colorado River basin. We also compared the sensitivity of standard WRF simulations to different spatial resolutions (50 km, 25 km and 16 km). We proposed to implement the WRF-VIC version, and to evaluate differences between the “standard” WRF version (with CLM as the land scheme) and WRF-VIC. As part of a companion project (Regional Arctic Climate Model; RACM), we have linked the macroscale hydrologic model VIC (Variable Infiltration Capacity) with WRF through the CCSM coupling architecture CPL7. We decided to defer making new model runs with VIC over the Colorado basin and rather to focus on analysis of NARCCAP results. Our preliminary results from analysis of NARCCAP current and future climate results (reported in Gao et al., 2011) indicate that CRCM has a cold bias; HRM3 has a warm bias; and ECPC and CRCM have a wet bias over the Colorado River basin. Task 3: Retrospective coupled model simulations We proposed to compare the climatology of key land surface and atmospheric variables from the retrospective RCM and GCM runs, as well as 1/8-degree as the historical North American Land Data Assimilation System dataset (Maurer et al., 2002) to evaluate the ability of each of the RCMs and GCMs to reproduce characteristics of observed climate. In addition to the NARCCAP runs analyzed under Task 2, we also evaluated an ECHAM5/WRF run performed by Eric Salathe and HadCM3/WRF run performed by Francina Dominguez (University of Arizona). Results of the retrospective RCM runs indicate that they capture the primary features of the observed land–surface water budget and surface temperature better than their host GCMs. Although the RCMs do not have significantly improved simulations of precipitation relative to the GCMs, their ability to better represent surface temperature in mountainous regions has important effects on simulations of evapotranspiration, snowpack, and runoff

  20. Evaluation of the MOST (Making the Most of Out-of-School Time) Initiative: Final Report. Summary of Findings. Discussion Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Robert; Spielberger, Julie; Robb, Sylvan

    The University of Chicago's Chapin Hall Center for Children conducted an evaluation of the first phase (1995-1998) of the MOST (Making the Most of Out-of-School Time) Initiative of the Wallace-Reader's Digest Funds. The objectives of this initiative were to contribute to the supply, accessibility, affordability, and quality of after-school…

  1. Job Sharing Pilot Project in the Department of Education: Final Evaluation. A Report to the Legislature of the State of Hawaii. No. 81-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Clinton T.

    Evaluation of a three-year pilot project in the Hawaii Department of Education focused on the extent to which it demonstrated the feasibility of job sharing as an employment alternative for classroom teachers. It also assessed project effectiveness, examined costs incurred by the project, and analyzed job sharing as a permanent employment option…

  2. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Vintage on the Ponds in Delavan, WI Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Vintage on the Ponds in Delavan, WI. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of a Kinetico Macrolite® press...

  3. The Development, Pilot-Testing, and Dissemination of a Comprehensive Evaluation Model for Assessing the Effectiveness of a Two-Way Interactive Distance Learning System. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Ellen J.; Friedel, Janice Nahra

    Both formative and summative evaluations of the operation of the Eastern Iowa Community College District's (EICCD) Televised Interactive Education (TIE) System were conducted. The TIE system links three Iowa community colleges and local public and private universities via two-way microwave connections, allowing the production and transmittal of…

  4. Bilingual Academic and Career Education Services for Hispanic High School Students (Project BACES). Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Candice

    This report presents an evaluation of the Bilingual Academic and Career Education Services for Hispanic High School Students (Project BACES), an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its third year of operation at DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx and George Washington High School in Manhattan. The project served…

  5. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Northeastern Elementary School in Fountain City, IN - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Northeastern Elementary School in Fountain City, IN. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of US Water Sys...

  6. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Woodstock Middle School in Woodstock, CT - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Woodstock Middle School in Woodstock, CT. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the effectiveness of Adsorbsia™ GTO™ me...

  7. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Webb Consolidated Independent School District in Bruni, TX - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Webb Consolidated Independent School District (Webb CISD) in Bruni, TX. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effect...

  8. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal and Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Stewart, MN, Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the one-year U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Stewart, MN facility. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness ...

  9. The Development and Evaluation of a Teleprocessed Computer-Assisted Instruction Course in the Recognition of Malarial Parasites. Final Report; May 1, 1967 - June 30, 1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzel, Harold E.

    A computer-assisted instruction course in the recognition of malarial parasites was developed and evaluated. The course includes stage discrimination, species discrimination, and case histories. Segments developed use COURSEWRITER as an author language and are presented via a display terminal that permits two-way communication with an IBM computer…

  10. Quality assurance plan for Final Waste Forms project in support of the development, demonstration, testing and evaluation efforts associated with the Oak Ridge reservation's LDR/FFCA compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This quality assurance project plan specifies the data quality objectives for Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project and defines specific measurements and processes required to achieve those objectives. Although the project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the ultimate recipient of the results is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Consequently, relevant quality assurance requirements from both organizations must be met. DOE emphasizes administrative structure to ensure quality; EPA's primary focus is the reproducibility of the generated data. The ten criteria of DOE Order 5700.6C are addressed in sections of this report, while the format used is that prescribed by EPA for quality assurance project plans

  11. Integrated Plant Safety Assessment: Systematic Evaluation Program. Haddam Neck Plant, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, Docket No. 50-213. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systematic Evaluation Progam was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with curent licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of Haddam Neck Plant, operated by Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company. The Haddam Neck Plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  12. Final report for the 1st ex-vessel neutron dosimetry installations and evaluations for Kori unit 2 reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Chang, Kee Ok; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa; Lim, Nam Jin; Hong, Joon Wha; Cheon, Byeong Jin

    2006-11-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori unit 2 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in regulatory guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. During cycle 20 of reactor operation, an ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program was instituted at Kori unit 2 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-vessel neutron dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of cycle 20.

  13. Final report for the 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installations and Evaluations for Yonggwang Unit 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chung, Kyoung Ki; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Chang, Jong Hwa; Ha, Jea Ju

    2008-01-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Yonggwang Unit 2 pressure vessel beltline region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the beltline region of the pressure vessel. During Cycle 16 of reactor operation, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Yonggwang Unit 2 to provide continuous monitoring of the beltline region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 16.

  14. Final Report of the 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installation And Evaluations for Kori Unit 1 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Chang, Kee Ok; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Hong, Joon Wha

    2007-02-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 1 pressure vessel beltline region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the beltline region of the pressure vessel. After Cycle 22 of reactor operation, 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 1 to provide continuous monitoring of the beltline region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 23.

  15. Final report for the 1st ex-vessel neutron dosimetry installation and evaluations for Kori unit 4 reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Chang, Kee Ok; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa; Lim, Nam Jin; Hong, Joon Wha; Cheon, Byeong Jin

    2006-11-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori unit 4 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in regulatory guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. During cycle 16 of reactor operation, an ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program was instituted at Kori unit 4 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-vessel neutron dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of cycle 16.

  16. Final Report of the 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installation And Evaluations for Yonggwang Unit 1 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chung, Kyoung Ki; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Chang, Jong Hwa; Ha, Jea Ju

    2008-01-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 2 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. During Cycle 21 of reactor operation, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 2 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 21.

  17. Integrated plant safety assessment. Systematic Evaluation Program. La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor. Dairyland Power Cooperative, Docket No. 50-409. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of the La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor, operated by Dairyland Power Cooperative. The La Crosse plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  18. Integrated Plant Safety Assessment: Systematic Evaluation Program. Yankee Nuclear Power Station, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Docket No. 50-29. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systematic Evaluation program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, operated by Yankee Atomic Electric Company. The Yankee plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  19. Final Report of the 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installation And Evaluations for Kori Unit 3 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 3 pressure vessel beltline region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the beltline region of the pressure vessel. After Cycle 16 of reactor operation, 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 3 to provide continuous monitoring of the beltline region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 17

  20. Final Report of the 3rd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installation And Evaluations for Kori Unit 3 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 3 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. After Cycle 17 of reactor operation, 3rd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 3 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 18

  1. Final Report of the 3rd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installation And Evaluations for Kori Unit 4 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 4 pressure vessel beltline region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the beltline region of the pressure vessel. During Cycle 18 of reactor operation, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 4 to provide continuous monitoring of the beltline region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 18

  2. Evaluation of an aerial spray strategy against the spruce budworm (choristoneura fumiferana clem.) using fenitrothion and B.t., (bacillus thuringiensis): Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettela, E.G.

    1993-12-31

    This report presents results from a series of trials to evaluate replicate test sites, two treated with fenitrothion followed by an application of Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) and two treated with two applications of B.t. A team of Cessna 188 aircraft equipped with Micronair AU4000 rotary atomizers applied all spray treatments; there were also unsprayed control plots for comparison. The investigators conducted biological evaluations of 60 selected balsam fir trees at each treatment site to record such information as number of buds and shoots, defoliation category for each bud/shoot, number of spruce budworms, and state of development of each bud/shoot. They also determined spray deposition. The report concludes with an assessment of the comparative efficacy of the treatments studied on spruce budworm mortality.

  3. Criteria for the development and use of the methodology for environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, L.; Northrop, G.; Scott, R.

    1980-02-01

    This report serves as a companion document to the report, Volume 1: Environmentally-Acceptable Fossil Energy Site Evaluation and Selection: Methodology and Users Guide, in which a methodology was developed which allows the siting of fossil fuel conversion facilities in areas with the least environmental impact. The methodology, known as SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) does not replace a site specific environmental assessment, or an environmental impact statement (EIS), but does enhance the value of an EIS by thinning down the number of options to a manageable level, by doing this in an objective, open and selective manner, and by providing preliminary assessment and procedures which can be utilized during the research and writing of the actual impact statement.

  4. Cultivated strains of Agaricus bisporus and A. brasiliensis: chemical characterization and evaluation of antioxidant and antimicrobial properties for final healthy product - natural preservatives in yoghurt

    OpenAIRE

    Stojković, Dejan; Reis, Filipa S.; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Barros, Lillian; Van Griensven, Leo J. L. D.; Isabel C. F. R. Ferreira; Soković, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Agaricus bisporus (J. E. Lange) Emil J. Imbach and Agaricus brasiliensis Wasser, M. Didukh, Amazonas & Stamets are edible mushrooms. We chemically characterized these mushrooms for nutritional value, hydrophilic and lipophilic compounds. The antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of methanolic and ethanolic extracts were assessed. Hepatotoxicity was also evaluated. The ethanolic extract of both species was tested for inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes growth in yoghurt. Both s...

  5. Evaluation of average neutron resonance parameters of actinides with the account of experimental resolution and discrimination threshold. Final report for the period 15 December 1996 - 14 December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New evaluation of average resonance parameters for 32 isotopes of the actinide region (229Th-252Cf) was completed. Obtained values of average level spacings produce a smooth systematics of the main level density parameter. The results were included into the Starter File of the Reference Input Parameter Library (segment Average Neutron Resonances) and officially released on 15 May 1998. The numerical results are available from the Internet (http://iaeand.iaea.or.at/ripl) and on CD-ROM. (author)

  6. Addiction and Lifestyles in Contemporary Europe: Reframing Addictions Project (ALICE RAP). Final Evaluation Report Deliverable 21.1, Work Package 21

    OpenAIRE

    Mittelmark, Maurice B.

    2016-01-01

    At the onset of the ALICE RAP project, the following objectives, description of work, and main tasks were agreed for Work Package 21: 1. To evaluate the overall functioning of the collaborative research project, using a state-of-art systems model of partnership functioning. 2. To document the interactions and linkages between project inputs, throughputs and outputs as the project unfolds over five years. 3. To facilitate structured discussions involving all pa...

  7. Final Report for "Improved Representations of Cloud Microphysics for Model and Remote Sensing Evaluation using Data Collected during ISDAC, TWP-ICE and RACORO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarquhar, Greg M. [University of Illinois

    2003-06-11

    We were funded by ASR to use data collected during ISDAC and TWP-ICE to evaluate models with a variety of temporal and spatial scales, to evaluate ground-based remote sensing retrievals and to develop cloud parameterizations with the end goal of improving the modeling of cloud processes and properties and their impact on atmospheric radiation. In particular, we proposed to: 1) Calculate distributions of microphysical properties observed in arctic stratus during ISDAC for initializing and evaluating LES and GCMs, and for developing parameterizations of effective particle sizes, mean fall velocities, and mean single-scattering properties for such models; 2) Improve representations of particle sizes, fall velocities and scattering properties for tropical and arctic cirrus using TWP-ICE, ISDAC and M-PACE data, and to determine the contributions that small ice crystals, with maximum dimensions D less than 50 μm, make to mass and radiative properties; 3) Study fundamental interactions between clouds and radiation by improving representations of small quasi-spherical particles and their scattering properties. We were additionally funded 1-year by ASR to use RACORO data to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties. We accomplished all of our goals.

  8. Evaluation of the technological feasibility, and cost of selected control alternatives necessary to meet the proposed Ohio SO/sub 2/ regulations for industrial boilers and processes. Volume VI. Mead Corporation, Chillicothe Mill. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahagian, J.; Hall, R.R.

    1976-08-01

    This report presents an evaluation by the GCA Corporation, GCA/Technology Division, of technological feasibility and cost of complying with the proposed Ohio sulfur dioxide regulation (40 FR 52410, November 10, 1975) at the Mead Corporation's Chillicothe Mill. The final USEPA Sulfur Dioxide Control Strategy for the State of Ohio Technical Support Documents, Vol. I and II, (EPA 905/2-76-002) may be obtained from NTIS. This facility operates three coal-fired boilers to provide process steam for the production of paper. After collecting necessary site and process specific data by means of a plant visit, the technical feasibility and cost of a lime-based desulfurization system were evaluated.

  9. Development of a Turnkey Hydrogen Fueling Station Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Guro; Edward Kiczek; Kendral Gill; Othniel Brown

    2010-07-29

    The transition to hydrogen as a fuel source presents several challenges. One of the major hurdles is the cost-effective production of hydrogen in small quantities (less than 1MMscf/month). In the early demonstration phase, hydrogen can be provided by bulk distribution of liquid or compressed gas from central production plants; however, the next phase to fostering the hydrogen economy will likely include onsite generation and extensive pipeline networks to help effect a pervasive infrastructure. Providing inexpensive hydrogen at a fleet operator’s garage or local fueling station is a key enabling technology for direct hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs). The objective of this project was to develop a comprehensive, turnkey, stand-alone, commercial hydrogen fueling station for FCVs with state-of-the-art technology that is cost-competitive with current hydrocarbon fuels. Such a station would promote the advent of the hydrogen fuel economy for buses, fleet vehicles, and ultimately personal vehicles. Air Products, partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Pennsylvania State University, Harvest Energy Technology, and QuestAir, developed a turnkey hydrogen fueling station on the Penn State campus. Air Products aimed at designing a station that would have 65% overall station efficiency, 82% PSA (pressure swing adsorption) efficiency, and the capability of producing hydrogen at $3.00/kg (gge) H2 at mass production rates. Air Products designed a fueling station at Penn State from the ground up. This project was implemented in three phases. The first phase evaluated the various technologies available in hydrogen generation, compression, storage, and gas dispensing. In the second phase, Air Products designed the components chosen from the technologies examined. Finally, phase three entailed a several-month period of data collection, full-scale operation, maintenance of the station, and optimization of system reliability and performance. Based on field data

  10. Development and testing of redundant optical fiber sensing systems with self-control, for underground nuclear waste disposal site monitoring. Vol. 1: Summary and evaluation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiber optic sensors have been developed or further developed, for specific tasks of the research project reported, as for instance detecting and signalling changes of geophysical or geochemical parameters in underground waste storage sites which are of relevance to operating safety. Such changes include e.g. materials dislocations, extensions, temperatures, humidity, pH value and presence of gaseous carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The measuring principle chosen is the fiber Bragg Grating method, as a particularly versatile method easy to integrate into fiber optic networks. After development and successful lab-scale testing of all sensors, except for the gas sensors, field test systems have been made for underground applications and have been tested in situ in the experimental Konrad mine of DBE. Most of the problems discovered with these tests could be resolved within the given project period, so that finally field-test proven sensing systems are available for further activities. The report explains the system performance with a concrete example which shows inter alia beneficial aspects of the system with respect to on-site operation, and the potentials offered in establishing more direct connections between numerical safety analyses and measured results. (orig./CB)

  11. Phase 0: goal study for the technical and economic evaluation of the Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) concept applied to solar thermal and photovoltaic collectors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1975-06-01

    This report presents the results of a quick, six-week technical and economic evaluation of the compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) solar collector. The purpose of this effort was to provide an initial phase of a goals study that is directed toward recommending relative priorities for development of the compound parabolic concentrator concept. The findings of this study are of a very preliminary nature. Conclusions based on study findings at this depth should be considered preliminary and subject to revision and review in later phases.

  12. Wetland Biomass Production: emergent aquatic management options and evaluations. A final subcontract report. [Includes a bibliography containing 686 references on Typha from biological abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, D.C.; Dubbe, D.R.; Garver, E.G.; Linton, P.J.

    1984-07-01

    The high yield potential and attractive chemical composition of Typha make it a particularly viable energy crop. The Minnesota research effort has demonstrated that total annual biomass yields equivalent to 30 dry tonnes/ha (13 tons/acre) are possible in planted stands. This compares with yields of total plant material between 9 and 16 dry tonnes/ha (4 to 7 tons/acre) in a typical Minnesota corn field. At least 50% of the Typha plant is comprised of a belowground rhizome system containing 40% starch and sugar. This high level of easily fermentable carbohydrate makes rhizomes an attractive feedstock for alcohol production. The aboveground portion of the plant is largely cellulose, and although it is not easily fermentable, it can be gasified or burned. This report is organized in a manner that focuses on the evaluation of the management options task. Results from stand management research performed at the University of Minnesota during 1982 and 1983 are integrated with findings from an extensive survey of relevant emergent aquatic plant research and utilization. These results and findings are then arranged in sections dealing with key steps and issues that need to be dealt with in the development of a managed emergent aquatic bio-energy system. A brief section evaluating the current status of rhizome harvesting is also included along with an indexed bibliography of the biology, ecology, and utilization of Typha which was completed with support from this SERI subcontract. 686 references, 11 figures, 17 tables.

  13. State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential effects of erosion and deposition on a radioactive waste repository. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential impact of future geologic processes on the integrity of a deep, high-level radioactive-waste repository is evaluated. The following study identifies the potential consequences of surface erosion and deposition on sub-surface repository containment characteristics and assesses the ability to measure and predict quantitatively the rates and corresponding extent of these processes in the long term. Numerous studies of the magnitudes and rates of surficial erosion and deposition that have been used to determine the minimum allowable depth for a geologic repository (300 m - NRC Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60.122, Draft 10) are cited in this report. Measurement and interpretation of potential rates and extent of surficial processes in these studies involved considerable uncertainty, and the implications of this uncertainty on presently proposed repository siting criteria are addressed herein. Important concepts that should be considered when developing siting criteria to protect against deleterious effects arising from future erosion or deposition are highlighted. Erosion agents that could affect deep repositories are distinguished in this report so that their individual and combined impacts may be examined. This approach is recommended when evaluating potential repository sites in diverse environments that are susceptible to different agents of erosion. In contrast, agents of sedimentation are not differentiated in this report because of their relatively minor impact on a deep repository

  14. Integrated plant safety assessment: Systematic Evaluation Program, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-206): Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to reconfirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues; (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review; and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1, operated by Southern California Edison Company. The San Onofre plant is one of ten plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review. This report will be one of the bases in considering the issuance of a full-term operating license in place of the existing provisional operating license. This report also addresses the comments and recommendations made by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in connection with its review of the draft report issued in April 1985

  15. Final report of the group research. Studies on the comparative evaluation on the environmental toxicants released from advanced technology and industry. (Research Group of NIRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report concerns investigations on the title conducted by 4 subgroups of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period of April 1996-March 2001. The report involves summary reports from the subgroups for Model for risk estimation of environmental and biological impacts of radiation and toxic agents, Analysis of the distribution and behavior of toxic and tracer elements in the environment, Studies on construction of controlled experimental ecosystems for ecotoxicity evaluation, and Metabolism and effect of environmental toxicants and new risk assessment. Significant results are as follows: Development of the model HESANS for health risk assessment (already published and used for actual practice through the internet) and of SIM-COSM in future for computer toxicity test; Development and improvement of the methods to measure more than 50 elements by means of high-technology analytical equipment; Introduction of Microcosm (an aquatic microbial ecosystem) for evaluation of the effects and risks of environmental toxicants in comparison with radiation (γ-ray); and Metabolic interaction of Gd (a neutron absorber in nuclear fuel processing) and Pu. The research groups thus have a number of important findings with respect to the kinetics and effects of radioactive substances and environmental toxicants. (N.I.)

  16. Early lung cancer detection project: Evaluation of 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphine (H{sub 2}TCPP). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tockman, M.S.

    1998-10-01

    The author evaluated a synthetic porphyrin, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP) as a marker of carcinogenesis. H{sub 2}TCPP was compared with two other carcinogenesis markers evaluated in the laboratory for their ability to detect exfoliated sputum cells undergoing transformation to lung cancer. In the present project the authors first established optimal conditions for cultured neoplastic and non-neoplastic (sputum) cells to take up H{sub 2}TCPP. This was accomplished using spectrofluorimetry and video-enhanced fluorescent microscopy to maximize H{sub 2}TCPP auto-fluorescence across a matrix of substrate conditions, including; reagent concentration, incubation time, temperature, and pH. The second aim was to validate H{sub 2}TCPP on clinical material obtained from subjects monitored in advance of clinical cancer and link those marker results with subsequent histologic confirmation of disease. This was accomplished by applying H{sub 2}TCPP to sputum specimens archived by the Frost Center at Johns Hopkins which maintains a record of the clinical course and long-term follow-up for the patients from whom the specimens were obtained. The authors have used fluorescent immunostaining and flow cytometry to compare uptake of these cytoplasmic Mabs to that of a potential new marker of carcinogenesis, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4 carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP). The nuclear uptake of H{sub 2}TCPP was compared to a standard quantitative fluorescent DNA marker (7-AAD).

  17. Evaluation concerning the implementation of the EnVKV, the German energy consumption labeling ordinance. Final report; Evaluierung zur Umsetzung der Energieverbrauchskennzeichnungsverordnung (EnVKV). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlomann, B.; Eichhammer, W.; Gruber, E.; Kling, N.; Mannsbart, W.; Stoeckle, F.

    2001-03-01

    The project was to investigate the present status of implementation of the German EnVKV ordinance, effective since 30 October 1997 and issued in the context of the Directive 92/75/EEC, and the level of compliance with the regulations on the part of the retail trade in Germany. Points of main effort for this task have been: evaluation of empirical sales data, an empirical analysis based on a market investigation, a survey among the retail traders, and an evaluation of the large electric household appliances offered by the mail order business. Another important task was to assess the energy efficiency and eco-efficiency achievements of energy consumption labeling in terms of energy savings and carbon dioxide mitigation. Information about this aspect was derived from sales data and the energy consumption information on the labels of the large electric household appliances sold in the period under review. (orig./CB) [German] Die vorliegende Studie sollte empirisch den derzeitigen Stand der Umsetzung der deutschen Energieverbrauchskennzeichnungsverordnung (EnVKV) durch die Haendler in Deutschland, in Verbindung mit der Richtlinie 92/75/EWG, untersuchen. Schwerpunkte der Untersuchung waren Auswertungen von empirischen Verkaufsdaten und Erhebungen zur Umsetzung der Verordnung, die aus einer Marktbeobachtung und Haendlerbefragung, sowie aus einer Auswertung der Angebote des Versandhandels bestanden. Auf der Basis von Verkaufs- und Verbrauchsdaten fuer elektrische Haushaltsgrossgeraete in Deutschland wurden ausserdem die durch die Energieverbrauchskennzeichnung bewirkten Energieeinsparungen und CO{sub 2}-Minderungen abgeschaetzt. (orig./CB)

  18. Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured - Geothermal Wells, Final Report; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 Well, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana; Volume 1; Narrative Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohse, Alan; Willits, M.H.

    1978-12-01

    Gruy Federal, Inc. (Gruy) operates under Contract No. EG-77-C-08-1528 to the Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy, to evaluate potential alternate energy sources occurring within geopressured-geothermal (Geo) aquifers in Miocene, Oligocene, Tuscaloosa, Wilcox, and Frio formations along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast. The project is entitled ''Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells''. The original period of performance was from September 26, 1977, through September 30, 1978; the contract was later extended through September 30, 1979. The first well on which testing was attempted under this contract was the Alice C. Plantation No. 2 Well, located in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Originally drilled by the Sun Oil Company to a total depth of 19,000 feet, this well was abandoned as a dry hole in January 1964. Gruy's reentry attempt ended with plugging and abandonment after a saltwater flow on September 17, 1978. This report is a comprehensive document detailing all events and costs relating to the Alice C. plantation well, from its initial selection as a reentry well through the plugging and abandonment operations.

  19. Buses,Bikes or Boots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL; O’NEAL

    2010-01-01

    If you have been in Beijing for any length of time, you will have come to realize that there are several modes of transportation available to commuters, all ofthem relatively in expensive, especially when

  20. The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory: Final evaluation of the hydrogeochemical pre-investigations in relation to existing geologic and hydraulic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Management Company (SKB) is currently excavating the access tunnel to an underground experimental laboratory, the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, planned to be located some 500 m below the island of Aespoe which is located in the Simpevarp area, southeast Sweden. The construction of an underground laboratory forms part of the overall SKB strategy to test, not only the construction techniques for deep excavation, but also the various methods and protocols required to obtain a three-dimensional model of the geology and groundwater flow and chemistry, within a fractured crystalline bedrock similar to that envisaged for the final disposal of spent fuel. Aespoe was chosen because it geologically represents a variety of typical crystalline bedrock environments. The hydrogeochemical activities described and interpreted in this report form part of the initial pre-investigation phase (from the surface to around 1000 metres depth) aimed at siting the laboratory, describing the natural hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical conditions in the bedrock and predicting the changes that will occur during excavation and construction of the laboratory. Hydrogeochemical interpretation has therefore been closely integrated with the hydrogeological investigations and other disciplines of major influence, in particular, bedrock geology and geochemistry and fracture mineralogy and chemistry. A large section of this report has been devoted to the detailed investigation of each individual zone hydraulically selected, tested and sampled for hydrogeochemical characterization. The data have been used to describe the chemistry and origin of the Aespoe groundwaters, models have been developed to illustrate groundwater mixing and standard geochemical modelling approaches have been employed to understand rock/water interaction processes. An attempt has been made to integrate the hydrogeochemical information with known geological and hydrogeological parameters to construct a