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Sample records for burundi

  1. Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    Background notes and statistics on Burundi are provided in the document. 27,834 sq. km. of hilly terrain are encompassed by the country, with a 1990 population of 5.5 million growing at the annual rate of 3.2%. The work force total 1.9 million. Burundi claims a population comprised of 3 ethnic groups, adhering to 4 religions, and speaking 3 different languages. 6 years of education are compulsory, with the country overall enjoying 40% literacy. The infant mortality rate is 111/1,000, while life expectancy is 51 years. 1988 GDP was $1 billion, and was shrinking at the rate of 0.18%. Per capita income was $203, while 1989 figures reported 7% inflation. Agriculture accounts for 60% of GNP, industry for 14%; 1988 international trade deficit totalled $72 million. Additional data are provided on Burundi's people, government, economy, international affiliations, history, political conditions, principal government officials, foreign relations, and bilateral relations with the United States. Per capita food production has stagnated or declined since the mid-1980s, and the country remains heavily dependent upon foreign aid. Coffee earnings typically provide up to 90% of Burundi's export earnings, 40% of which went toward external debt in 1989. Long-term economic strategy centers upon improving the quality of its coffee, while encouraging production of tea, cotton, and some manufactured goods.

  2. Burundi: country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsum, L

    1988-10-01

    One of Africa's most rural and densely populated countries, Burundi is a landlocked nation in Central Africa. The 4.9 million people are 85% Hutus, agricultural people of Bantu origin. However, the Hutus are excluded from power by the minority Tutsis, and the 2 groups have engaged in violent conflict. After a military coup in 1987, a new president, Major Pierre Buyoya, was installed, but restrictions on the Hutus continue. The major difference in Burundi has been a relaxation of restrictions on the Catholic church, which were severe under the former President Bagaza. Most Hutus are Catholic, with a minority of Muslims. For the peasant farmer, faced with diminishing arable land and reliance on 1 export crop (coffee), life is becoming more difficult. An expansion of sugar production was planned to reduce reliance on coffee, although the government has a rather ambivalent approach to development. While promoting private sector development with the help of the World Bank and the U.S. government, the Burundi government maintains a rigid 1-party system with strict control over the lives of the people. Infant mortality stands at 196/1,000 live births and life expectancy is low--43 years for women and 40 years for men. The literacy rate is low (39% for men, 15% for women), and the GNP per capita is low ($230). Most land is used for subsistence crops such as cassava, bananas, sweet potatoes, maize, pulses, and sorghum.

  3. An Agricultural Expansion Strategy for Burundi

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-04

    fruit production would be as follows: Pineapple 3,200 metric tons Shrub tomatoes 215 tons Papaya 1,600 tons Pomegranates 1,200 tons Oranges and Mandarins...7 Fruit Production and Marketing in Burundi . 9 Exterral Assistance ............... 11 Ways to Improve Agriculture in Burundi for Export Market...Even in some countries like Kenya, which has been successful by most standards, political impediments to research and to structural and operational

  4. BURUNDI

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diffusion of 02 from the atmosphere becomes ... pE/pH relationships calculated from Lindsay (1979) [activities of solid phases = 1, pN2 = 78 kPa, .... (Olson and Ellis, 1982), and measured by atomic ..... One possible mechanism of the action of.

  5. RETHINKING VIOLENCE, RECONCILIATION AND RECONSTRUCTION IN BURUNDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Ndimurwimo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Armed violence and genocide are among the on-going problems that are still facing contemporary Africa and the world. In the aftermath of the outrages, devastation and appalling carnage of the Second World War, member states of the United Nations (UN undertook radical steps, inter alia, "to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war and to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights". Subsequently, the International Bill of Human Rights was proclaimed in order to lay down international human rights norms and standards of conduct and to prevent the recurrence of mass killings. Although Burundi is a State Party to the UN and African Union and is a signatory to a number of international and regional human rights treaties, the post-colonial history of Burundi is an epic tale of indescribable human suffering and misery as a result of systematic mass killings. At least every family or household in Burundi has been negatively affected by the mass killings of the 1960s, 1972, 1988 and 1990s, which have created a significant number of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs.This article traces the root causes of Burundi's systemic armed violence and argues that despite several UN Security Council Resolutions and peace agreements aimed at national reconciliation and reconstruction, mass killings and other heinous crimes remain unaddressed. The article recommends that a comprehensive transitional justice model is required in post-conflict Burundi in order to bring about national reconciliation, healing and reconstruction.

  6. Health and Civil War in Rural Burundi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundervoet, Tom; Verwimp, Philip; Akresh, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We combine household survey data with event data on the timing and location of armed conflicts to examine the impact of Burundi's civil war on children's health status. The identification strategy exploits exogenous variation in the war's timing across provinces and the exposure of children's birth cohorts to the fighting. After controlling for…

  7. Rethinking violence, reconciliation and reconstruction in Burundi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subsequently, the International Bill of Human Rights was proclaimed in order to lay down international human rights norms and standards of conduct and to prevent the recurrence of mass killings. Although Burundi is a State Party to the UN and African Union and is a signatory to a number of international and regional ...

  8. An Integrated Approach to Counter Insurgency: A Burundi Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    Buzingo, Burundi, Les Chiffres –Cles de l’ Economies- Les Statistiques : un Outil pour le Pilotage des Politiques Publiques (Bujumbura: Institut des... Statistiques et d‟ Etude Economique du Burundi-ISTEEBU, 2007), p.4. 30John A. Nagl, Learning to Eat a Soup With a Knife: Counterinsurgency Lessons

  9. The Burundi Heart Centre: From concept to design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Julia; Yacoub, Lisa; Kambaris, Angelique; Wright, Gavin; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2015-01-01

    Burundi is one of the world's poorest nations, which is also reflected in its relative lack of cardiac facilities, particularly those catering to young children and adults. The authors discuss current efforts to build "The Burundi Heart Centre" to help address this challenge. In particular, they highlight how the project can act as a case study for a sustainable architecture that involves local people and uses locally available materials in a contemporary and innovative way.

  10. Recovering from conflict: An analysis of food production in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haese, D' M.F.C.; Speelman, S.; Vandamme, E.; Nkunzimana, T.; Ndimubandi, J.; Haese, D' L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the devastating food insecurity in two densely populated provinces in the north of Burundi as a result of overpopulation and low production capacity in the aftermath of conflict. We compare data that was collected in the Ngozi and Muyinga Province in 2007 with data of

  11. Lessons from Burundi’s Security Sector Reform Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    International Security Sector Advisory Team. 7 Mémorandum d’Entente entre le Gouvernement de la République du Burundi et les Ministres des Affaires...and Fabien Nsengimana, Evaluation du Volet Gouvernance du Programme DSS, October 28, 2013. Nicole Ball, Putting Governance at the Heart of Security

  12. Connecting Community Security and DDR: Experiences from Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/322376971; Kleingeld, J.; van Leeuwen, M.

    2010-01-01

    The report is based on 10 weeks of field research in Burundi between April and June 2010, and looks at the linkages between community security and DDR. It opens with a discussion of local experiences with DDR programmes, analyzing the impact of its different components, and analyzing the local

  13. Decision-making and small business growth in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijdenberg, E.L.; Masurel, E.; Paas, L.J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the effect of decision-making, in terms of the effectuation and causation orientation of small business owners, on the growth of their small businesses in an uncertain environment: Burundi. On the basis of primary data from a pre-study of 29 expert interviews, a

  14. Violent conflict and behavior : A field experiment in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, M.J.; Nillesen, E.E.M.; Verwimp, P.; Bulte, E.H.; Lensink, B.W.; van Soest, D.P.

    We use a series of field experiments in rural Burundi to examine the impact of exposure to conflict on social, risk, and time preferences. We find that conflict affects behavior: individuals exposed to violence display more altruistic behavior towards their neighbors, are more risk-seeking, and have

  15. Violent Conflict and Behavior: a Field Experiment in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, M.J.; Nillesen, E.E.M.; Bulte, E.H.; Lensink, B.W.; Verwimp, P.; Soest, van D.P.

    2012-01-01

    We use a series of field experiments in rural Burundi to examine the impact of exposure to conflict on social, risk, and time preferences. We find that conflict affects behavior: individuals exposed to violence display more altruistic behavior towards their neighbors, are more risk-seeking, and have

  16. [Good governance in the Burundi health sector financial reform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerenboom, Peter Bob; Basenya, Olivier; Bossuyt, Michel; Ndayishimiye, Juvénal; Ntakarutimana, Léonard; van de Weerd, Jennie

    2014-01-01

    Burundi introduced free healthcare for children under five and pregnant women in 2006. In 2010, this was linked to the Performance-Based Financing (PBF) approach. This article is designed to identify factors in these health financing reforms that have contributed to good governance in the health sector. Six criteria of good governance were used as an analytical framework. Results were derived from official reports and the international literature. The main contributions of these reforms to good governance in Burundi were the separation of functions, transparency in management and a meticulous description of administrative procedures. Scrupulous monitoring resulted in several corrective measures. Several unresolved questions remain, concerning the integration of vertical programmes and the sustainability of the system given the considerable costs, since funding is not yet fully ensured by the State and its partners.

  17. Burundi; Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper: Annual Progress Report

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses findings of the annual progress report on the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper for Burundi. The report reveals that a number of decisive steps have been taken to promote political governance. Training sessions organized for local elected officials and members of parliament have contributed to enhancing their management capacities. With regard to the land tenure issue, the government expects to address it in the context of social cohesion so as to impart sustainable soluti...

  18. Recovering from conflict: An analysis of food production in Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Haese, D', M.F.C.; S. Speelman; Vandamme, E; Nkunzimana, T.; Ndimubandi, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the devastating food insecurity in two densely populated provinces in the north of Burundi as a result of overpopulation and low production capacity in the aftermath of conflict. We compare data that was collected in the Ngozi and Muyinga Province in 2007 with data of households interviewed on the same hills in 1996. Households live from subsistence farming, erratic surplus sales, sales of coffee and banana and occasional off- and non-farm work. We find that not only did...

  19. 46 Ethnicité et Citoyenneté au Burundi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    m Le quatrième acte est celui de l'inversion: la veille de l'indépendance, le colonisateur s'appuie sur celui qu'il a exclu (les Bahutu). Le Cinquième acte est le modèle rwandais qui est le déploiement de l'idéologie avec toutes les conséquences d'extermination. Elle s'est effectivement traduit par le génocide au Burundi et ...

  20. Geo-additive modelling of malaria in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebhardt Albrecht

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major public health issue in Burundi in terms of both morbidity and mortality, with around 2.5 million clinical cases and more than 15,000 deaths each year. It is still the single main cause of mortality in pregnant women and children below five years of age. Because of the severe health and economic burden of malaria, there is still a growing need for methods that will help to understand the influencing factors. Several studies/researches have been done on the subject yielding different results as which factors are most responsible for the increase in malaria transmission. This paper considers the modelling of the dependence of malaria cases on spatial determinants and climatic covariates including rainfall, temperature and humidity in Burundi. Methods The analysis carried out in this work exploits real monthly data collected in the area of Burundi over 12 years (1996-2007. Semi-parametric regression models are used. The spatial analysis is based on a geo-additive model using provinces as the geographic units of study. The spatial effect is split into structured (correlated and unstructured (uncorrelated components. Inference is fully Bayesian and uses Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. The effects of the continuous covariates are modelled by cubic p-splines with 20 equidistant knots and second order random walk penalty. For the spatially correlated effect, Markov random field prior is chosen. The spatially uncorrelated effects are assumed to be i.i.d. Gaussian. The effects of climatic covariates and the effects of other spatial determinants are estimated simultaneously in a unified regression framework. Results The results obtained from the proposed model suggest that although malaria incidence in a given month is strongly positively associated with the minimum temperature of the previous months, regional patterns of malaria that are related to factors other than climatic variables have been identified

  1. Ageism in Belgium and Burundi: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Manon; Missotten, Pierre; Schroyen, Sarah; Nindaba, Desiderate; Adam, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Recent cross-cultural comparisons between Asian and Western cultures have shown that ageism arises more from the lack of availability of social and economic resources for older adults than from the culture itself. We tested this assumption by conducting a survey among people living in a least developed country compared with those living in a developed country. Twenty-seven Belgians living in Belgium, 29 Burundians living in Belgium, and 32 Burundians living in Burundi were included in this study. Their attitudes toward older adults were assessed using several self-reported measures. Statistical analyses confirmed that older people are more negatively perceived by Burundians living in Burundi than by Burundians and Belgians living in Belgium, whose attitudes did not differ from each other. Consistent with our hypothesis, our results suggest that the level of development of a country and more particularly the lack of government spending on older people (pension and health care systems) may contribute to their younger counterparts perceiving them more negatively.

  2. Ageism in Belgium and Burundi: a comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquet M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Manon Marquet, Pierre Missotten, Sarah Schroyen, Desiderate Nindaba, Stéphane Adam Psychology of Aging Unit, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium Background: Recent cross-cultural comparisons between Asian and Western cultures have shown that ageism arises more from the lack of availability of social and economic resources for older adults than from the culture itself. We tested this assumption by conducting a survey among people living in a least developed country compared with those living in a developed country.Participants and methods: Twenty-seven Belgians living in Belgium, 29 Burundians living in Belgium, and 32 Burundians living in Burundi were included in this study. Their attitudes toward older adults were assessed using several self-reported measures.Results: Statistical analyses confirmed that older people are more negatively perceived by Burundians living in Burundi than by Burundians and Belgians living in Belgium, whose attitudes did not differ from each other.Conclusion: Consistent with our hypothesis, our results suggest that the level of development of a country and more particularly the lack of government spending on older people (pension and health care systems may contribute to their younger counterparts perceiving them more negatively. Keywords: attitudes toward older adults, cross-cultural differences, socioeconomic development, intergenerational relations

  3. Reintegration of child soldiers in Burundi: a tracer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Substantial attention and resources are aimed at the reintegration of child soldiers, yet rigorous evaluations are rare. Methods This tracer study was conducted among former child soldiers (N=452) and never-recruited peers (N=191) who participated in an economic support program in Burundi. Socio-economic outcome indicators were measured retrospectively for the period before receiving support (T1; 2005–06); immediately afterwards (T2; 2006–07); and at present (T3; 2010). Participants also rated present functional impairment and mental health indicators. Results Participants reported improvement on all indicators, especially economic opportunity and social integration. At present no difference existed between both groups on any of the outcome indicators. Socio-economic functioning was negatively related with depression- and, health complaints and positively with intervention satisfaction. Conclusion The present study demonstrates promising reintegration trajectories of former child soldiers after participating in a support program. PMID:23095403

  4. Institutional Engineering, Management of Ethnicity, and Democratic Failure in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Reyntjens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that constitutional engineering along consociational lines in Burundi – explicitly accommodating ethnicity rather than attempting to suppress it – was instrumental in reducing the political role of ethnicity, but that other endogenous and exogenous factors also played a role. After surveying developments since 1988, this article focuses on the 2005 polls. The outcome of the parliamentary elections suggests that the “disappearance of the ethnic factor,” extolled by many at the time, was achieved by constitutional constraints rather than by social or political dynamics. Nevertheless, with regard to the country’s most important and lethal historical problem, the ethnic divide, constitutional engineering has proved hugely effective. Burundi’s main cleavage is now between (and within parties rather than ethnic groups, and when violence occurs it is political rather than ethnic. Burundi’s current crisis is therefore not a failure of consociationalism but of democracy.

  5. Reintegration of child soldiers in Burundi: a tracer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordans, Mark J D; Komproe, Ivan H; Tol, Wietse A; Ndayisaba, Aline; Nisabwe, Theodora; Kohrt, Brandon A

    2012-10-25

    Substantial attention and resources are aimed at the reintegration of child soldiers, yet rigorous evaluations are rare. This tracer study was conducted among former child soldiers (N=452) and never-recruited peers (N=191) who participated in an economic support program in Burundi. Socio-economic outcome indicators were measured retrospectively for the period before receiving support (T1; 2005-06); immediately afterwards (T2; 2006-07); and at present (T3; 2010). Participants also rated present functional impairment and mental health indicators. Participants reported improvement on all indicators, especially economic opportunity and social integration. At present no difference existed between both groups on any of the outcome indicators. Socio-economic functioning was negatively related with depression- and, health complaints and positively with intervention satisfaction. The present study demonstrates promising reintegration trajectories of former child soldiers after participating in a support program.

  6. Reintegration of child soldiers in Burundi: a tracer study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordans Mark JD

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substantial attention and resources are aimed at the reintegration of child soldiers, yet rigorous evaluations are rare. Methods This tracer study was conducted among former child soldiers (N=452 and never-recruited peers (N=191 who participated in an economic support program in Burundi. Socio-economic outcome indicators were measured retrospectively for the period before receiving support (T1; 2005–06; immediately afterwards (T2; 2006–07; and at present (T3; 2010. Participants also rated present functional impairment and mental health indicators. Results Participants reported improvement on all indicators, especially economic opportunity and social integration. At present no difference existed between both groups on any of the outcome indicators. Socio-economic functioning was negatively related with depression- and, health complaints and positively with intervention satisfaction. Conclusion The present study demonstrates promising reintegration trajectories of former child soldiers after participating in a support program.

  7. Power-Sharing, Conflict and Transition in Burundi: Twenty Years of Trial and Error Machtteilung, Konflikt und Wandel in Burundi: Zwanzig Jahre Versuch und Irrtum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef Vandeginste

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past twenty years, Burundi has experimented with powersharing as an instrument of political liberalisation, democratisation and conflict resolution. This contribution analyses the different meanings the concept of power-sharing has had throughout Burundi’s recent and extremely violent political transition, in particular during the lengthy peace process. It shows how national and international actors have found inspiration in the toolbox of consociationalism to negotiate and design the Arusha Peace and Reconciliation Agreement for Burundi signed in August 2000 and its posttransition Constitution. Power-sharing has been instrumental in achieving the – short-term – objective of war termination. It has also de-ethnicised political competition and reduced the (potentially destabilising effect of elections. Measured against more ambitious state-building objectives (democracy, rule of law, accountable and effective governance, power-sharing has (so far not been able to make a difference. Several factors and developments threaten the “survival” of the power-sharing model in Burundi. In Burundi wird seit zwanzig Jahren mit Power-Sharing als Instrument politischer Liberalisierung, Demokratisierung und Konfliktlösung experimentiert. Der vorliegende Beitrag analysiert, welche unterschiedlichen Bedeutungen das Konzept der Machtteilung in der jüngsten und extrem gewalttätigen Entwicklungsphase Burundis angenommen hat, insbesondere während des langwierigen Friedensprozesses. Er zeigt auf, inwieweit nationale und internationale Akteure sich bei der Aushandlung und Planung des Arusha-Abkommens zu Frieden und Versöhnung in Burundi, das im August 2000 unterzeichnet wurde, sowie der anschließenden Verfassung am Instrumentarium der Konkordanzdemokratie bedient haben. Power-Sharing erwies sich als nützlich, das kurzfristige Ziel einer Beendigung des Krieges zu erreichen, und trug zur De-Ethnisierung des politischen Wettbewerbs und zur

  8. Undernutrition, subsequent risk of mortality and civil war in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwimp, Philip

    2012-07-01

    The paper investigates the effect of child undernutrition on the risk of mortality in Burundi. Using anthropometric data from a longitudinal survey (1998-2007) we find that undernourished children, measured by the height-for-age z-scores (HAZ) in 1998 had a higher probability to die during subsequent years. In order to address the problem of omitted variables correlated with both nutritional status and the risk of mortality, we use the length of exposure to civil war prior to 1998 as a source of exogenous variation in a child's nutritional status. Children exposed to civil war in their area of residence have worse nutritional status. The results indicate that one year of exposure translates into a 0.15 decrease in the HAZ, resulting in a 10% increase in the probability to die. For boys, we find a 0.34 decrease in HAZ per year of exposure, resulting in 25% increase in the probability to die. For girls, the results are statistically not significant at the usual thresholds. We show the robustness of our results and we derive policy conclusion for a nutrition intervention in times of conflict. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. La riziculture d'altitude au Burundi : principales contraintes et diversification variétale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detry, JF.

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude rice cultivation in Burundi : major constraints and varietal diversification. Rice cultivation developed since 1980 in highland swamps of Burundi. The major constraints identified are low temperatures, resulting in an extension of the cultural cycle and a high sterility rate, and 2 diseases : bacterial sheath brown rot of rice and blast. The varietal diversification problem which was the most urgent to delimit seems to be well resolved now. The improvement programme has many types of different rices at his disposal ; their main characteristics are discussed in relation to the ecological zones for which they are recommended.

  10. Er Danmark virkelig dårligere til ligestilling end Burundi?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjørup, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Danmark ligger ifølge den årlige Gender Gap Report under Rwanda og Burundi I ligestiling. Men kan det nu have sin rigtighed, spørger Karen Sjørup? Nej svarer hun, men derfor kan regeringen godt tage sig sammen......Danmark ligger ifølge den årlige Gender Gap Report under Rwanda og Burundi I ligestiling. Men kan det nu have sin rigtighed, spørger Karen Sjørup? Nej svarer hun, men derfor kan regeringen godt tage sig sammen...

  11. Wages in the food chain in Burundi: WageIndicator survey 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; Besamusca, J.; Ndereyahaga, R.

    2013-01-01

    This WageIndicator Data Report presents the results of the face-to-face WageIndicator survey of the labour force conducted between the 7th of April and the 29th of April 2013 in all provinces of Burundi. In total 1,679 persons were interviewed; 52% were men, 48% women and 43% were under 30 years of

  12. Education en hygiène au Burundi : education par les pairs en pratique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, M; de Groot, F; Nahayo, C

    1994-01-01

    Because almost half of the patients diagnosed in health centers in Burundi suffered from illnesses related to impure water or inadequate sanitation, the Hygiene Education and Training Programme was created to assure the efficient use of water and sanitation infrastructures by the population of

  13. Reintegration of First- and Second-Generation Children Returned to Burundi : A Multidimensional Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, S.; Siegel, M.; Ensor, M.O.; Goździak, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes a study about the reintegration of child returnees in Burundi, a small conflict-affected country that received more than 600,000 former refugees after the conflict ended in 2000. Using unique, nationally representative data collected in 2011, the authors compare the living

  14. Potential treatment mechanisms of counseling for children in Burundi: a series of n = 1 studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordans, M.J.D.; Komproe, I.H.; Smallegange, E.; Ntamatumba, P.; Tol, W.A.; de Jong, J.T.V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the impact and treatment processes of psychosocial counseling in low-income countries. This study aimed to generate hypotheses on key working mechanisms of counseling in Burundi. The authors carried out 11 empirically grounded n = 1 studies with children (11-14 years) screened

  15. Grievance, Commodity Prices and Rainfall: A Village-level Analysis of Rebel Recruitment in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nillesen, E.E.M.; Verwimp, P.

    2009-01-01

    Grievance and reduced opportunity costs are two popular ideas within the civil war literature to explain participation in violent rebellion. We test both hypotheses at the village-level using data on recruitment activities during the civil war in Burundi. We use historical data on violent attacks in

  16. Main characteristics and review of mineral resources of the Kabanga-Musongati mafic-ultramafic alignment in Burundi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblond, A.; Tack, L.

    1999-08-01

    The first part of this paper gives the main characteristics of the Kabanga-Musongati (KM) mafic-ultramafic alignment in Burundi. This 350 km long alignment, with an emplacement age of 1275±11 Ma (UPb on zircon), extends from Burundi to Uganda. In Burundi, where the KM alignment consists of nine main massifs, a petrological study has defined stratigraphical units comparable to those identified in other layered igneous massifs, such as the Great Dyke of Zimbabwe and the Bushveld Complex in South Africa. The second part of this paper deals with the metallogeny of the KM alignment in Burundi. A review of the well-known deposits is given. Their stratigraphical position and likely origin are discussed in the light of petrological results. New data on platinum group elements (PGE) are provided. Finally, pathways for future mineral exploration are proposed, in particular for PGE-rich sulphides.

  17. Le mouvement pentecôtiste - une communauté alternative au sud du Burundi 1935-1960

    OpenAIRE

    Nyberg Oskarsson, Gunilla

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is a contribution to a hitherto neglected area of research: The African Pentecostal Churches, that do not belong to those called African Indigenous Churches (AICs). It is a case study from the perspective of southern Burundi, the periphery of the ancient kingdom. The Pentecostal Movement in Burundi was born in the encounter between Swedish Pentecostal missionaries and the population in the southern part of the country. This study highlights what happened in that encounter. The the...

  18. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuasi, John H; Diap, Graciela; Blay-Nguah, Samuel; Boakye, Isaac; Karikari, Patrick E; Dismas, Baza; Karenzo, Jeanne; Nsabiyumva, Lievin; Louie, Karly S; Kiechel, Jean-René

    2011-02-10

    Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO) retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO), a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO) medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment) of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9%) compared to public (4.2%) and NGO (0%) outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu) for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu). Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu), private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu). Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors, whereas, it was equivalent to 1.5 days worth

  19. Bacillus-based biocontrol of fusarium disease on tomato cultures in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihorimbere, V; Ongena, M; Cawoy, H; Henry, G; Brostaux, Y; Kakana, P; Thonart, Ph

    2009-01-01

    The biocontrol potential of a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium (PGPR) Bacillus subtilis S499 on tomato was studied in open field sites in low attitude area of the plain of Imbo in Burundi. Application of the PGPR strain on seed before sowing have significantly increased growth and fruit yield of tomato plants in addition to its remarkable control of a local important disease caused by a fungus type-Fusarium.. This pathogen causing large tosses in Burundi tomato plantings is closely related to Fusarium semitectum based on a preliminary identification. Results obtained in open field assays from two successive years on the same site demonstrate that treatment with B. subtilis S499 strain suspensions significantly increase growth and fruit-yield and provided a high level of protection of tomato plantings against the new fungal disease apparently uncontrolled by routine chemical pesticides.

  20. Dynamique et perspectives de la filière cotonnière du Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Gahungu, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Cotton cultivation was introduced in Burundi in 1919 under the Belgian mandate with the objective to monetize the rural economy and open the country to international trade. After independence (1962), the cotton crop continued to flourish as a vertically integrated chain from upstream to downstream in pursuing the objectives of job creation, import substitution and maximizing the added value generated by various cotton products. Since 1993, the cotton is in perpetual decline due to vari...

  1. Evaluation agronomique de l'association bananiers-caféiers : application au Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Nibasumba, Anaclet

    2013-01-01

    Banana and coffee play a key role in Burundian agricultural production. But, coffee growing in monocropping system is less profitable. This pushes small producers to increase the area occupied by banana by planting banana around coffee plots or by intercropping coffee with banana. The aim of this thesis is to analyse the agronomic performance of banana-coffee intercropping system in order to recommend good management practices to sustain coffee production in Burundi. Using data from 60 ad...

  2. Evaluation of a social marketing intervention promoting oral rehydration salts in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassegne, Sethson; Kays, Megan B; Nzohabonayo, Jerome

    2011-03-08

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death for children under five in Burundi; however, use of oral rehydration salts (ORS), the recommended first-line treatment, remains low. In 2004, PSI/Burundi launched a social marketing intervention to promote ORASEL among caregivers of children under five; the product was relaunched in 2006 with a new flavor. This study evaluates the intervention after the ORASEL relaunch, which included mass media and interpersonal communication activities. The study looks at trends in ORASEL use in Burundi and in behavioral determinants that may be related to its use. In 2006 and 2007, PSI conducted household surveys among Burundian females of reproductive age (15-49). Both surveys used a two-stage sampling process to select 30 households in each of 115 rural and urban collines throughout the nation. Survey respondents were asked about diarrhea treatment-related behavior; key behavioral determinants; and exposure to the ORASEL intervention. Data were analyzed to identify trends over time, characteristics of ORASEL users, and associations between exposure to the intervention and changes in ORASEL use and related behavioral determinants. ORASEL use among caregivers at their children's last diarrheal episode increased significantly from 20% in 2006 to 30% in 2007, and there were also desirable changes in several behavioral determinants associated with ORASEL use. Evaluation analysis showed that a higher level of exposure to the social marketing campaign was associated with greater use of ORASEL and with significant improvements in perceived availability, knowledge of the signs of diarrhea and dehydration, social support, and self-efficacy. ORS use can be improved through social marketing and educational campaigns that make the public aware of the availability of the product, encourage dialogue about its use, and increase skills and confidence relating to correct product preparation and administration. Further interventions in Burundi and

  3. “We Have No Influence”: International Discourse and the Instrumentalisation of Transitional Justice in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Taylor

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Burundi may soon reach yet another crossroads in its tumultuous history and on its path towards transitional justice. A contentious draft law for a Truth and Reconciliation Commission awaits approval by the country’s National Assembly, which has raised a number of concerns about the independence of the eventual commission, the likelihood of popular participation in the process and the prospects for criminal justice. But as this practice note seeks to demonstrate, the international community in Burundi may in fact be contributing to the instrumentalisation of the process. The note highlights how the discourse of the international community may partially facilitate a certain duplicity among influential figures within the current government, particularly with respect to compliance with stipulations under the 2000 Arusha Peace Agreement. Two common rationalisations in particular are explained that have seemingly emerged among the international community with respect to transitional justice and that are at the heart of this instrumentalisation: outside imposition and a lack of influence. The note argues that since transitional justice can no longer be regarded as an apolitical process, international actors must be more cognisant of their actions and discourse with a view to ensuring credible transitional justice processes in contexts like Burundi.

  4. Wild edible mushrooms, a valuable resource for food security and rural development in Burundi and Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degreef, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. This study is the first to compile the diversity of wild edible mushrooms gathered in the different ecosystems (savanna, woodland, montane forest, and exotic tree plantations of Burundi and Rwanda and to consider this resource in a developmental framework for the region. Objectives. The aim of this study is to update the inventory of wild edible mushrooms in Burundi and Rwanda focusing on their sustainable exploitation and their potential for cultivation. Method. The inventory is based on a literature survey completed with referenced specimens gathered during field trips between 2010 and 2015 that are deposited at the Botanic Garden Meise (BR. Results. Seventy-seven species of edible mushrooms have been listed together with their habitat and ecology. This includes 39 new records of species eaten in the region, 8 of which were not previously known to be edible. An attempt to combine the protection of natural ecosystems with the development of local populations is presented in relation to the availability of these mushrooms, their ecology and cultivation potential. Conclusions. Wild edible mushrooms constitute an interesting and under-exploited resource in Burundi and Rwanda. Sustainable gathering of ectomycorrhizal species in miombo woodlands and cultivation of saprotrophic species from montane forests suggest important food issues and interesting business perspectives.

  5. Morbidity and mortality surveillance in Rwandan refugees--Burundi and Zaire, 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-02-09

    In April 1994, resumption of a longstanding conflict between the Hutus and Tutsis--the two major ethnic groups in the central African countries of Burundi and Zaire--resulted in civil war and mass genocide in Rwanda. An estimated 63,000 (primarily Tutsi) refugees subsequently moved from Rwanda into northern Burundi, and 500,000 refugees fled to Tanzania (Figure 1). In early July 1994, as armed strife subsided, many Tutsis returned home to Rwanda, and an estimated 1 million Rwandan Hutus fled to Zaire, and 170,000 fled to Burundi. To monitor the health status of the refugees, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) working in refugee camps in both countries established systems for rapid surveillance of morbidity and mortality. This report presents the findings of these systems during May-September 1994 (the period of the most intensive population migration) and indicates that mortality was high among refugees in camps in both countries.

  6. Evaluation of a social marketing intervention promoting oral rehydration salts in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nzohabonayo Jerome

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death for children under five in Burundi; however, use of oral rehydration salts (ORS, the recommended first-line treatment, remains low. In 2004, PSI/Burundi launched a social marketing intervention to promote ORASEL among caregivers of children under five; the product was relaunched in 2006 with a new flavor. This study evaluates the intervention after the ORASEL relaunch, which included mass media and interpersonal communication activities. The study looks at trends in ORASEL use in Burundi and in behavioral determinants that may be related to its use. Methods In 2006 and 2007, PSI conducted household surveys among Burundian females of reproductive age (15-49. Both surveys used a two-stage sampling process to select 30 households in each of 115 rural and urban collines throughout the nation. Survey respondents were asked about diarrhea treatment-related behavior; key behavioral determinants; and exposure to the ORASEL intervention. Data were analyzed to identify trends over time, characteristics of ORASEL users, and associations between exposure to the intervention and changes in ORASEL use and related behavioral determinants. Results ORASEL use among caregivers at their children's last diarrheal episode increased significantly from 20% in 2006 to 30% in 2007, and there were also desirable changes in several behavioral determinants associated with ORASEL use. Evaluation analysis showed that a higher level of exposure to the social marketing campaign was associated with greater use of ORASEL and with significant improvements in perceived availability, knowledge of the signs of diarrhea and dehydration, social support, and self-efficacy. Conclusions ORS use can be improved through social marketing and educational campaigns that make the public aware of the availability of the product, encourage dialogue about its use, and increase skills and confidence relating to correct product

  7. Ending ethnic conflict : can power sharing contribute to sustained peace in Burundi?

    OpenAIRE

    Lothe, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Power sharing institutions are currently being established to end war and lay the foundations for peace and democracy in a number of states emerging from civil war, such as Burundi, Rwanda, Sudan and Côte d’Ivoire. While a number of authors have contributed to develop theory on power sharing and have drawn attention to the strengths and weaknesses of such systems of governance (Lijphart, 1990; Lake and Rotchild, 1996; Snyder and Jervis, 1999; Paris, 2004 etc.), little empirical evidence has b...

  8. Leadership and Innovation-Listening to and Learning From Young People in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nininahazwe, Cédric; Alesi, Jacquelyne; Caswell, Georgina; Lumumba, Musah; Mellin, Julie; Ndayizeye, Nicholas-Monalisa; Orza, Luisa; Rahimi, Michaela; Westerhof, Nienke

    2017-02-01

    This commentary describes young people's leadership from the perspective of a youth-led organization in the Link Up project in Burundi, Réseau National des Jeunes vivant avec le VIH. It describes processes that enable young people to guide, influence, deliver, and improve health service provision; the challenges faced by Réseau National des Jeunes vivant avec le VIH and how they are addressing these challenges. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential treatment mechanisms of counseling for children in Burundi: a series of n=1 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordans, Mark J D; Komproe, Ivan H; Smallegange, Eva; Ntamatumba, Prudence; Tol, Wietse A; De Jong, Joop T V M

    2012-07-01

    Little is known about the impact and treatment processes of psychosocial counseling in low-income countries. This study aimed to generate hypotheses on key working mechanisms of counseling in Burundi. The authors carried out 11 empirically grounded n=1 studies with children (11-14years) screened for depression and anxiety who received counseling. The authors used quantitative (symptom scales) and qualitative instruments (treatment content and perceptions). Weekly measurements were taken preintervention (4 time points), during the intervention period (8-10 time points), and postintervention (4 time points). Five treatment mechanisms continua appeared associated with outcome trajectories: client centeredness, therapeutic alliance, active problem solving, trauma-focused exposure, and family involvement. Higher levels appeared associated with better outcomes. Contrarily, cases that demonstrated no change were characterized by a heavy focus on counselors' norms, containment and self-control, unstructured retelling and explicit avoidance, advice-oriented problem solving, and noninclusion of family members, respectively. The authors found a distinct clustering of outcome trends per therapist. The findings suggest that integrative counseling, which combines universal therapist variables with active use of specific therapeutic techniques and a systemic perspective, may be an adequate strategy to treat mental health symptoms of children in Burundi. © 2012 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  10. Community perceptions of mental distress in a post-conflict setting: a qualitative study in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familiar, Itziar; Sharma, Sonali; Ndayisaba, Herman; Munyentwari, Norbert; Sibomana, Seleus; Bass, Judith K

    2013-01-01

    There is scant documentation of the mental health characteristics of low-income communities recovering from armed conflict. To prepare for quantitative health surveys and health service planning in Burundi, we implemented a qualitative study to explore concepts related to mental distress and coping among adults. Mental distress was defined as problems related to feelings, thinking, behaviour and physical stress. Using free listing and key informant interviews with a range of community members, we triangulated data to identify salient issues. Thirty-eight free list respondents and 23 key informants were interviewed in 5 rural communities in Burundi using 2 interview guides from the WHO Toolkit for Mental Health Assessment in Humanitarian Settings. Based on these interviews, we identified four locally defined idioms/terms relating to mental distress: ihahamuka (anxiety spectrum illnesses), ukutiyemera (a mix of depression and anxiety-like syndrome), akabonge (depression/grief-like syndrome) and kwamana ubwoba burengeje (anxiety-like syndrome). Mental distress terms were perceived as important problems impacting community development. Affected individuals sought help from several sources within the community, including community leaders and traditional healers. We discuss how local expressions of distress can be used to tailor health research and service integration from the bottom up.

  11. Conflict, Reconciliation and Peace Education: Moving Burundi toward a Sustainable Future. Routledge Research in International and Comparative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpson, William; Ndura, Elavie; Bangayimbaga, Apollinaire

    2014-01-01

    When the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States occurred--causing that nation to wage wars of revenge in Afghanistan and Iraq--the people of Burundi were recovering from nearly forty years of violence, genocide and civil wars that had killed nearly one million and produced another million refugees. Here in this small East African nation,…

  12. Comparison of disease patterns assessed by three independent surveys of cassava mosaic virus disease in Rwanda and Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, H.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Legg, J.P.; Stoorvogel, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) seriously affects cassava yields in Africa. This study compared the spatial distribution of CMD using three independent surveys in Rwanda and Burundi. Geostatistical techniques were used to interpolate the point-based surveys and predict the spatial distributions of

  13. Les Comités mixtes de sécurité humaine (CMSH) au Burundi : un ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of a socio-criminological approach, we illustrate the normative context of this security regime, highlight its political appropriation and propose ways to improve it based on the challenges identified. Keywords: Burundi, National Police, Joint Human Security Committees, Security Regime, Socio-criminological Approach ...

  14. Transparency in Revenues from Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining of Tin, Tantalum, Tungsten and Gold in Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2016-01-01

    Burundi has a wide range of mineral deposits of which tin, tantalum and tungsten ores, along with gold, are its primary mineral exports. Burundi’s geological endowment also includes nickel, rare earths, vanadium, and construction materials. The majority of mineral extraction is carried out by artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) which is officially structured through cooperatives. Tin, t...

  15. Borderlands of mental health: Explorations in medical anthropology, psychiatric epidemiology and health systems research in Afghanistan and Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ventevogel, P.

    2016-01-01

    Many areas of the globe today face continuous armed conflict, with more and more populations caught in the crossfire. This has been true in both Afghanistan and Burundi where populations have to cope with the psychological and social effects of ongoing collective violence. While living and working

  16. Etat actuel des recherches sur la flore et la végétation du Rwanda et du Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reeksman

    1983-11-01

    Full Text Available THE PRESENT STATE OF RESEARCH ON THE FLORA AND VEGETATION OF RWANDA ANDBURUNDI At the end of the last century, many explorers, mainly Germans, travelled in Burundi searching for the famous sources of the Nile and the legendary ‘Mountains of the Moon. ’ Apart from the very often accurate descriptions of the vegetation and flora they encountered, one is indebted to them for the rich harvest of specimens collected, many of which were destroyed in the bombing of Berlin in 1944-1945. When, in 1919, Burundi was placed under Belgian mandate, Belgian botanists took over the work and collected numerous specimens in the country. Their expeditions were organized from Zaire and were often of short duration, with the result that in 1965 there was still no systematic exploration of the country and in 1964 AETFAT classified Burundi as one of the lesser known areas in Africa. Systematic exploration of the country began in 1965 with J. Lewalle. Apart from the publication of an excellent work on the stratification of the vegetation, he collected more than 6 500 numbers of herbarium specimens, several of which represented new species. He worked in Burundi until 1972. From 1970 to 1980, Reekmans collected more than 9 500 specimens for the herbarium, mainly in the areas that were not intensively explored previously. He has published several works in connection with the phenology o f species and vegetation association of western Burundi. Many botanists invited by Lewalle and Reekmans, have had the opportunity to explore the country and to collect specimens of special groups. At present, it can be said that, except for a very small area of the country (otherwise well known in Rwanda where several studies have been made the flora of Burundi is now well known. Phytogeographical limits are well established and the publication of a vegetation map is due in the near future. A catalogue of the country’s flora is also to be published shortly. Apart from these

  17. Etat actuel des recherches sur la flore et la végétation du Rwanda et du Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reeksman

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available THE PRESENT STATE OF RESEARCH ON THE FLORA AND VEGETATION OF RWANDA ANDBURUNDI At the end of the last century, many explorers, mainly Germans, travelled in Burundi searching for the famous sources of the Nile and the legendary ‘Mountains of the Moon. ’ Apart from the very often accurate descriptions of the vegetation and flora they encountered, one is indebted to them for the rich harvest of specimens collected, many of which were destroyed in the bombing of Berlin in 1944-1945. When, in 1919, Burundi was placed under Belgian mandate, Belgian botanists took over the work and collected numerous specimens in the country. Their expeditions were organized from Zaire and were often of short duration, with the result that in 1965 there was still no systematic exploration of the country and in 1964 AETFAT classified Burundi as one of the lesser known areas in Africa. Systematic exploration of the country began in 1965 with J. Lewalle. Apart from the publication of an excellent work on the stratification of the vegetation, he collected more than 6 500 numbers of herbarium specimens, several of which represented new species. He worked in Burundi until 1972. From 1970 to 1980, Reekmans collected more than 9 500 specimens for the herbarium, mainly in the areas that were not intensively explored previously. He has published several works in connection with the phenology o f species and vegetation association of western Burundi. Many botanists invited by Lewalle and Reekmans, have had the opportunity to explore the country and to collect specimens of special groups. At present, it can be said that, except for a very small area of the country (otherwise well known in Rwanda where several studies have been made the flora of Burundi is now well known. Phytogeographical limits are well established and the publication of a vegetation map is due in the near future. A catalogue of the country’s flora is also to be published shortly. Apart from these

  18. La dynamique spatiale de la forêt située dans la réserve naturelle forestière de Bururi, Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Havyarimana, F.; Masharabu, T.; Kouao, JK.; Bamba, I.; Nduwarugira, D.; Bigendako, MJ.; Hakizimana, P.; Mama, A.; Bangirinama, F.; Banyankimbona, G.; Bogaert, J.; De canniere, C.

    2017-01-01

    The Forest Spatial Dynamic in the Bururi Forest Nature Reserve, Burundi. The studied forest is a protected area located in Southern Burundi, close to Bururi city and to agricultural villages. The effective protection of this forest started in 1980 but the protected area delimitation occurred in 2000. The forest spatial dynamic is analyzed to assess the effectiveness of this protection status. The study combines six Landsat multispectral satellite images analysis with field observations. Fores...

  19. Etude d'un système de désherbage de la culture cotonnière au Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Carême, C.

    1996-01-01

    Cotton Weeds and Study of a Chemical Cotton Weeding System in Burundi. Cotton fields maintenance is a major constraint for farmers in Burundi. A chemical cotton herbicide system has studied and used to adjust an integrated weed management system especially against Cyperus esculentus L. during annual crop rotation. "Low volume spraying" herbicides provided efficient crop weeding during the six first weeks after sowing and increased the average productivity with 16 to 33 %. Herbicides had no ne...

  20. Sociopolitical analysis of the role of mediating of international organizations in conflicts at Burundi and Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Cesar Cunha Leite

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to discuss the effectiveness of the mediator role of the United Nations and the African Union on conflict resolution in the cases of Burundi and Uganda. The argument is that this mediating role influenced considerably in the negotiations since it realized a ceasefire in hostilities between the warring parties and the establishment of more significant agreements on pending issues. For this discussion, we attempted to describe the processes of successful mediation in recent decades in Africa, based on the cases as mentioned above, whose similar methods of resolution could achieve positive results. Finally, we evaluated the effectiveness of UN mediator in the field of maintenance and promotion of peace, emphasizing their strategies on reducing violence on the ground and in the protection of civilians.

  1. Exploring future agricultural development and biodiversity in Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Soesbergen, Arnout; Arnell, Andrew P.; Sassen, Marieke

    2017-01-01

    Competition for land is increasing as a consequence of the growing demands for food and other commodities and the need to conserve biodiversity and ecosystem services. Land conversion and the intensification of current agricultural systems continues to lead to a loss of biodiversity and trade...... and Burundi. We show that different future socio-economic scenarios are consistent in their projections of areas of high agricultural development leading to similar spatial patterns of habitat and biodiversity loss. Yet, we also show that without protected areas, biodiversity losses are higher...... and that expanding protected areas to include other important biodiversity areas can help reduce biodiversity losses in all three countries. These results highlight the need for effective protection and the potential benefits of expanding the protected area network while meeting agricultural production needs....

  2. The Eye of the Beholder: Service Provision and State Legitimacy in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Stel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available State legitimacy – particularly its alleged potential to counter state fragility – has received increasing attention in academic and policy literature concerned with African development. Service provision can substantially influence such state legitimacy. Services, however, are mostly provided by a multiplicity of (state and non-state providers. This article therefore specifically explores how joint service delivery by multiple providers shapes the attribution of state legitimacy in Burundi by means of two qualitative case studies. Empirically, the article demonstrates, first, that the process of stakeholder interaction, rather than the output of this process, most distinctly shapes state legitimacy and, second, that there are substantial variations in legitimacy attribution by different stakeholders and for different state institutions. Epistemologically, the article suggests three specific challenges that merit attention in further empirical investigation of state legitimacy in fragile settings: the diversity of people’s expectations; the artificiality of state/non-state distinctions; and the personification and politicization of state institutions.

  3. Les communautés indiennes au Burundi sous les colonisations allemande et belge

    OpenAIRE

    Chrétien, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Depuis le début du xxe siècle des commerçants indiens, venus de la côte swahilie, sont établis sur les rives du lac Tanganyika. Au Burundi, ils passent de vingt en 1914 sous l’administration allemande à près de cinq cents en 1946 sous la tutelle belge. Ces « Indiens », à majorité masculine, jeune et mobile, travaillent à leur compte ou pour des firmes installées dans l’Est africain britannique. Ils se regroupent en réseaux à la fois économiques, familiaux et religieux (hindous, musulmans chii...

  4. Obstetric Fistula in Burundi: a comprehensive approach to managing women with this neglected disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In Burundi, the annual incidence of obstetric fistula is estimated to be 0.2-0.5% of all deliveries, with 1000–2000 new cases per year. Despite this relatively high incidence, national capacity for identifying and managing obstetric fistula is very limited. Thus, in July 2010, Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) set up a specialised Obstetric Fistula Centre in Gitega (Gitega Fistula Centre, GFC), the only permanent referral centre for obstetric fistula in Burundi. A comprehensive model of care is offered including psychosocial support, conservative and surgical management, post-operative care and follow-up. We describe this model of care, patient outcomes and the operational challenges. Methods Descriptive study using routine programme data. Results Between July 2010 and December 2011, 470 women with obstetric fistula presented for the first time at GFC, of whom 458 (98%) received treatment. Early urinary catheterization (conservative management) was successful in four out of 35 (11%) women. Of 454 (99%) women requiring surgical management, 394 (87%) were discharged with a closed fistula, of whom 301 (76%) were continent of urine and/or faeces, while 93 (24%) remained incontinent of urine and/or faeces. In 59 (13%) cases, the fistula was complex and could not be closed. Outcome status was unknown for one woman. Median duration of stay at GFC was 39 days (Interquartile range IQR, 31–51 days). The main operational challenges included: i) early case finding and recruitment for conservative management, ii) national capacity building in obstetric fistula surgical repair, and iii) assessing the psychosocial impact of this model. Conclusion In a rural African setting, it is feasible to implement a comprehensive package of fistula care using a dedicated fistula facility, and satisfactory surgical repair outcomes can be achieved. Several operational challenges are discussed. PMID:23965150

  5. [The AIDS problem in Burundi and its prevention among young people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausser, D

    1993-01-01

    Since 1986, in Burundi, the operational budget for control of sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS is almost all financed by foreign aid. Effectuated expenses correspond to about 50% in 1989 and about 60% in 1990, indicating administrative delays and inadequate human resources to distribute the allocated budget. In 1992, the number of new cases of AIDS was 4000 for adults and 1500 for children. Estimated numbers for 1997 are 9000 and 3700, respectively. The estimated 1992 HIV prevalence rate was 15% for urban and semi-urban areas and 1-2% for rural areas. There are likely more HIV/AIDS cases than are reported. HIV prevalence is much higher in women than in men. Some uneducated youth think that condoms contain HIV so they do not consider condoms to be effective. Most students think primary schools must convey abstinence as the HIV prevention message. In Bujumbura, most parents would favor condom distribution to youth and to their own children. The number of condoms on the market and interventions targeted to adolescents have been rather limited. The national AIDS control program funded by UNICEF promotes sexual responsibility through health education campaigns and improving access to condoms. Approaches to reach the uneducated youth include mobilization and training of promoters. So far, no data on implementation of this project or on use of its education materials have been available. Messages spread by the Office of Rural Education and the Office of Studies and Programs of Secondary Education were confusing because one emphasized abstinence and the other condom use. The two partners must agree on the messages. The government of Burundi must become greatly involved in and reaffirm their commitment to the fight against AIDS. This will yield massive mobilization of the population to reduce HIV transmission and combat the epidemic.

  6. Le bois petrifies de la plaine de la haute Rusizi (Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reeksman

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available THE DISCOVERY OF PETRIFIED FOSSILS IN THE HIGH RUSIZI PLAIN (BURUNDIPalaeobotanical research in Central Africa is still very fragmentary. In Burundi, apart from the very classical and abundant stromatolites of the Mosso (in the south of the country, Sah (1967 has indicated the occurrence of vegetal debris in the fluviolacustrian sediments o f the mid-upper Rusizi plain. These fragments have never been identified, but a study of the pollen grains found in sedimentary layers of the same age has revealed some features of the vegetation and of the climate prevailing in the Upper Neogene period.In November 1978 we discovered in north-western Burundi a deposit of petrified trunks of exceptional size. These fossils had been exposed a short time previously when a small quarry was established. The deposit contained four trunks, two of which were large: length, 1 m; diameter, 90 cm; weight, more than 1 000 kg.Initial macro and submicrospic examination of fragments showed an anatomical structure similar to the structure of some fossils described in Kivu (Zaire and belonging to the family Caesalpiniaceae.Samples were sent to Tervuren (R. Dechamps and to Liêge (Mrs Demaret and their joint studies revealed that these trunks belong to the genus Julbernardia and probably to J. globiflora.  Their age would be about 1 200 000 years.Since then, other trunks have been found (at least ten. According to our study, it is concluded that they have a very different structure from those of the previous specimens. Samples were sent to Tervuren and to Liêge for further study and the conclusions from the specialists should be available very soon.

  7. Bilan du programme d'amélioration en riziculture d'altitude au Burundi (1300-1700 m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilquin, JP.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The Point of a Breeding Programme for High Altitude Rice Growing in Burundi (1, 300-1, 700m. The constraints of the rice growing of altitude between the tropics are specifie : a permanent cold temperature stress, a bacteriose caused by Pseudomonas fuscovaginae and a blast which is epidemie. The two first constraints can be solved by the bulk method with 3 rapid advanced generations al low altitude (800 m before to be submitted at the natural selection at 1550 m. The efficiency of natural selection is high against low temperature stress and against the bacterial sheath rot induced by the Pseudomonas. Actually the main problem is the pyriculariose. Which strategy to use ? Gene rotation is not practicable in Burundi. Only mixtures of varieties are recommended.

  8. La spécialisation régionale, moteur du cycle de développement au Burundi

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    Bergen, DW.

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional specialization, a face behind the development of Burundi. The isolation of Burundi, its lack of natural resources and its high demografic pressure force the country to maximise the output of the arable land available while considering regional potentials. A well-planned regional specialization seems therefore necessary. In this paper, the significance and the purpose of regional specialization was assessed. Possible conditions for the introduction of the system were analyzed and an attempt was made to assess the potential of different agricultural production schemes as subjects for regional agricultural specialization. As a consequence of regional specialization, increased complementary production among regions (Le. increased dissimilarity among them should stimulate exchange (i. e. commercial activity offering readier usage of money in the rural environment. In these circumstances regional specialization might induce development for which commercializing of agricultural products seems essential and mandatory. Regional specialization however should coincide with regional agricultural specialization at its tranformation level.

  9. Les Comités mixtes de sécurité humaine (CMSH) au Burundi : un ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    241. Nibigira : Les Comités mixtes de sécurité humaine (CMSH) au Burundi. En somme, si l'on reste dans ce que les linguistes appellent la capacité performative du discours, de telles dénominations appellent à l'action, à une action violente. Pierre Bourdieu, dans son ouvrage Ce que parler veut dire. (Bourdieu 1982) ou ...

  10. Understanding low uptake of contraceptives in resource-limited settings: a mixed-methods study in rural Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndayizigiye, M; Fawzi, M C Smith; Lively, C Thompson; Ware, N C

    2017-03-15

    Family planning can reduce deaths, improve health, and facilitate economic development in resource-limited settings. Yet, modern contraceptive methods are often underused. This mixed-methods study, conducted in rural Burundi, sought to explain low uptake of contraceptives by identifying utilization barriers. Results may inform development of family planning interventions in Burundi and elsewhere. We investigated uptake of contraceptives among women of reproductive age in two rural districts of Burundi, using an explanatory sequential, mixed-methods research design. We first assessed availability and utilization rates of modern contraceptives through a facility-based survey in 39 health clinics. Barriers to uptake of contraceptives were then explored through qualitative interviews (N = 10) and focus groups (N = 7). Contraceptives were generally available in the 39 clinics studied, yet uptake of family planning averaged only 2.96%. Greater uptake was positively associated with the number of health professionals engaged and trained in family planning service provision, and with the number of different types of contraceptives available. Four uptake barriers were identified: (1) lack of providers to administer contraception, (2) lack of fit between available and preferred contraceptive methods, (3) a climate of fear surrounding contraceptive use, and (4) provider refusal to offer family planning services. Where resources are scarce, availability of modern contraceptives alone will likely not ensure uptake. Interventions addressing multiple uptake barriers simultaneously have the greatest chance of success. In rural Burundi, examples are community distribution of contraceptive methods, public information campaigns, improved training for health professionals and community health workers, and strengthening of the health infrastructure.

  11. Intergenerational violence in Burundi: Experienced childhood maltreatment increases the risk of abusive child rearing and intimate partner violence

    OpenAIRE

    Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Experiencing abuse during childhood affects the psychological well-being of individuals throughout their lives and may even influence their offspring by enhancing the likelihood of an intergenerational transmission of violence. Understanding the effects of childhood maltreatment on child-rearing practices and intimate partner violence might be of particular importance to overcome the consequences of violent conflicts in African societies.Objective: Using Burundi as an example, we ...

  12. Pépiniéristes privés au Burundi, vers une professionnalisation possible de la foresterie

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    Gasc, C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Private Sector Nursery Owners in Burundi, towards the Professionalization of Forestry. Burundi, a small country of the African Great Lakes Region, has a demographic increase which results in one of the highest population densities on the continent. Problems of deforestation and of firewood and timber scarcity are added to the well know degradation associated with soil erosion. Aware of this new problem, Burundi government stated a national forest project in 1979. During ten years, plants necessary for reforestation have been produced by state-owned nurseries controlled entirely by the forestry project. Currently in inter phase since 1990, the forestry project is faced with an important choice : what system of production to choose : private or project nurseries ? The analysis of each system has permitted to conclude in favour of the maintenance of a system of private production. To stimulate the development of the profession and to progressively decrease its dependence on the forest project, this analysis proposes answers to questions raised, insisting particularly on the significance of monitoring and on the choice of training methods.

  13. [Government policies and actions in Burundi in the area of rural development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mworoha, E

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses policies and actions designed by the government of Burundi to assure food self-sufficiency and to improve living conditions in rural areas. Burundi has had a long history of food self-sufficiency due to good soils, adequate rainfall, and hard work by the rural population. In the past 3 decades, however, the food supply has been threatened by various factors including soil erosion and rapid population increase. The government has undertaken a reforestation program which covered 51,050 hectares in the past 7 years with plans to cover 20% of the national territory by the year 2000. Work has also been done to contain rivers within their courses and to popularize antierosion techniques such as terracing and proper use of pastures. Partly because the population is growing at a rate of 2.7% per year, the average plot available per household is estimated at only 1.3 hectare, rendering efforts to improve productivity imperative. The high cost of chemical fertilizers has forced reliance on compost, and some 6 million compost heaps are now in existence. Agropastoral integration projects are seeking to improve yields through better combinations of livestock and land use. Research to improve the seed supply has already resulted in improved strains of rice, maize, wheat, kidney beans, manioc, sweet potatoes, cotton, tea and coffee. Regional seed production centers are planned to facilitate distribution and adaptation of seeds to each ecological zone. Research is underway to identify appropriate new crops and to extend the ranges of existing crops. To encourage participation of the rural population in agricultural improvement efforts, the government is financing schools and institutions which will train local level agricultural promoters and extension agents. Local governments at all levels, regional development societies, cooperatives and other structures are also being organized to assist farmers. In order to restructure and modernize the rural

  14. Spatial analysis of HIV infection and associated individual characteristics in Burundi: indications for effective prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barankanira, Emmanuel; Molinari, Nicolas; Niyongabo, Théodore; Laurent, Christian

    2016-02-04

    Adequate resource allocation is critical in the battle against HIV/AIDS, especially in Africa. The determination of the location and nature of HIV services to implement must comply with the geographic, social and behavioral characteristics of patients. We therefore investigated the spatial heterogeneity of HIV prevalence in Burundi and then assessed the association of social and behavioral characteristics with HIV infection accounting for the spatial heterogeneity. We used data from the 2010 Demographic and Health Survey. We analyzed these data with a geostatistical approach (which takes into account spatial autocorrelation) by i) interpolating HIV data using the kernel density estimation, ii) identifying the spatial clusters with high and low HIV prevalence using the Kulldorff spatial scan statistics, and then iii) performing a multivariate spatial logistic regression. Overall HIV prevalence was 1.4 %. The interpolated data showed the great spatial heterogeneity of HIV prevalence (from 0 to 10 %), independently of administrative boundaries. A cluster with high HIV prevalence was found in the capital city and adjacent areas (3.9 %; relative risk 3.7, p analysis, HIV infection was significantly associated with the female sex (posterior odds ratio [POR] 1.36, 95 % credible interval [CrI] 1.13-1.64), an older age (POR 1.97, 95 % CrI 1.26-3.08), the level of education (POR 1.50, 95 % CrI 1.22-1.84), the marital status (POR 1.86, 95 % CrI 1.23-2.80), a higher wealth index (POR 2.11, 95 % CrI 1.77-2.51), the sexual activity (POR 1.76, 95 % CrI 1.04-2.96), and a history of sexually transmitted infection (POR 2.03, 95 % CrI 1.56-2.64). Our study, which shows where and towards which populations HIV resources should be allocated, could help national health policy makers develop an effective HIV intervention in Burundi. Our findings support the strategy of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) for country-specific, in-depth analyses of HIV epidemics to

  15. Fostering food security in areas of extreme poverty through Integrated Farm Management: the case of Burundi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Aad; van Duivenbooden, Niek; van Beek, Christy

    2014-05-01

    Extreme poverty in Burundi's rural area and tensions between families with limited access to arable land hinder development towards a more stable and peaceful society. Due to these tensions and a rapid population growth, agricultural land is currently subject to increased degradation and low agricultural productivity. A whole range of other limiting factors contributes to this, such as: poor seed quality, poor nutrient management combined with low soil fertility, inadequate agronomic practices, pests and crop diseases, poorly developed supply chains, health problems, difficult access to credit, and insecurity. Solving one of these problems will not solve the chain that eventually leads to low food production; it will simply move the emphasis to the next constraining factor. An integrated rural development approach is therefore required to break this vicious circle. The project Fanning the Spark, a Public-Private-Partnership between Achmea Foundation, Alterra of Wageningen University and Research Centre, and HealthNet-TPO in Burundi started in September 2013 with an intervention in several rural villages in Gitega. The project's objective is to increase food production at village level, by means of investments in crop production, a family (income) insurance package that protects rural families against the financial consequences of catastrophic events (natural and health) and making micro-credits available. This will enhance farmers' workability and generate income from agricultural activities in order to break the poverty cycle and enhance food security. The insurance package comprises agricultural and health insurances, and will be jointly implemented with the sustainable agriculture component. The latter component focuses on Integrated Farm Management and the use of innovative soil management practices. Farmer-to-farmer training and scaling-up are crucial components, and in the first phase of the project "innovative farmer groups" have a central role in the

  16. Reconciling reintegration: the complexity of economic and social reintegration of ex-combatants in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Rens; van Leeuwen, Mathijs

    2015-04-01

    The extent to which disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration (DDR) programmes initiated by state or multilateral agencies can realise the reintegration of ex-combatants remains debated. While some consider that DDR should have the ambition to result in long-term reintegration, others argue that DDR should focus on short-term goals. This paper explores experiences with the reintegration of ex-combatants in Burundi. It shows the interconnectedness of economic and social reintegration processes, and demonstrates that the reintegration of ex-combatants cannot be seen in isolation from the wider recovery and development context in which DDR is taking place. Moreover, the case demonstrates that reconciliation and social reintegration are deeply interconnected, to the extent that social reintegration may fail if reconciliation is not taken into account. Rather than a debate between long- and short-term goals, the focus should therefore be on increasing the understanding of reintegration processes and finding ways in which programmes can contribute to those. © 2015 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2015.

  17. Financial access to health care in Karuzi, Burundi: a household-survey based performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert-Evans, Sophie; Ponsar, Frederique; Reid, Tony; Bachy, Catherine; Van Herp, Michel; Philips, Mit

    2009-10-24

    In 2003, Médecins Sans Frontières, the provincial government, and the provincial health authority began a community project to guarantee financial access to primary health care in Karuzi province, Burundi. The project used a community-based assessment to provide exemption cards for indigent households and a reduced flat fee for consultations for all other households. An evaluation was carried out in 2005 to assess the impact of this project. Primary data collection was through a cross-sectional household survey of the catchment areas of 10 public health centres. A questionnaire was used to determine the accuracy of the community-identification method, households' access to health care, and costs of care. Household socioeconomic status was determined by reported expenditures and access to land. Financial access to care at the nearest health centre was ensured for 70% of the population. Of the remaining 30%, half experienced financial barriers to access and the other half chose alternative sites of care. The community-based assessment increased the number of people of the population who qualified for fee exemptions to 8.6% but many people who met the indigent criteria did not receive a card. Eighty-eight percent of the population lived under the poverty threshold. Referring to the last sickness episode, 87% of households reported having no money available and 25% risked further impoverishment because of healthcare costs even with the financial support system in place. The flat fee policy was found to reduce cost barriers for some households but, given the generalized poverty in the area, the fee still posed a significant financial burden. This report showed the limits of a programme of fee exemption for indigent households and a flat fee for others in a context of widespread poverty.

  18. Medicines informal market in Congo, Burundi and Angola: counterfeit and sub-standard antimalarials

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    Bertocchi Paola

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of counterfeits and sub-standards in African medicines market is a dramatic problem that causes many deaths each year. The increase of the phenomenon of pharmaceutical counterfeiting is due to the rise of the illegal market and to the impossibility to purchase branded high cost medicines. Methods In this paper the results of a quality control on antimalarial tablet samples purchased in the informal market in Congo, Burundi and Angola are reported. The quality control consisted in the assay of active substance by means of validated liquid chromatographic methods, uniformity of mass determination, disintegration and dissolution tests. Moreover, a general evaluation on label and packaging characteristics was performed. Results The results obtained on thirty antimalarial tablet samples containing chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine showed the presence of different kinds of problems: a general problem concerning the packaging (loose tablets, packaging without Producer name, Producer Country and sometimes without expiry date; low content of active substance (in one sample; different, non-declared, active substance (in one sample; sub-standard technological properties and very low dissolution profiles (in about 50% of samples. This last property could affect the bioavailability and bioequivalence in comparison with branded products and could be related to the use of different excipients in formulation or bad storage conditions. Conclusion This paper evidences that the most common quality problem in the analysed samples appears to be the low dissolution profile. Here it is remarked that the presence of the right active substance in the right quantity is not a sufficient condition for a good quality drug. Dissolution test is not less important in a quality control and often evidences in vitro possible differences in therapeutic efficacy among drugs with the same active content. Dissolution

  19. Understanding resilience in armed conflict: social resources and mental health of children in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J; Tol, Wietse A; Jordans, Mark J D; Bass, Judith; de Jong, Joop T V M

    2014-08-01

    Little is known about the role of cognitive social capital among war-affected youth in low- and middle-income countries. We examined the longitudinal association between cognitive social capital and mental health (depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms), functioning, and received social support of children in Burundi. Data were obtained from face-to-face interviews with 176 children over three measurement occasions over the span of 4-months. Cognitive social capital measured the degree to which children believed their community was trustworthy and cohesive. Mental health measures included the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS) (Birleson, 1981), the Child Posttraumatic Symptom Scale (Foa et al., 2001), and a locally constructed scale of functional impairment. Children reported received social support by listing whether they received different types of social support from self-selected key individuals. Cross-lagged path analytic modeling evaluated relationships between cognitive social capital, symptoms and received support separately over baseline (T1), 6-week follow-up (T2), and 4-month follow-up (T3). Each concept was treated and analyzed as a continuous score using manifest indicators. Significant associations between study variables were unidirectional. Cognitive social capital was associated with decreased depression between T1 and T2 (B = -.22, p social capital was associated with increased social support between T1 and T2 (β = .16, p = .002) and T2 and T3 (β = .16, p = .002). In this longitudinal study, cognitive social capital was related to a declining trajectory of children's mental health problems and increases in social support. Interventions that improve community relations in war-affected communities may alter the trajectories of resource loss and gain with conflict-affected children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intergenerational violence in Burundi: Experienced childhood maltreatment increases the risk of abusive child rearing and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé

    2015-01-01

    Experiencing abuse during childhood affects the psychological well-being of individuals throughout their lives and may even influence their offspring by enhancing the likelihood of an intergenerational transmission of violence. Understanding the effects of childhood maltreatment on child-rearing practices and intimate partner violence might be of particular importance to overcome the consequences of violent conflicts in African societies. Using Burundi as an example, we aimed to explore the associations between childhood maltreatment, intimate partner violence, perceived partner intimidation, gender and the probability of violently acting out against one's own children or romantic partner. Amongst a sample of 141 men and 141 women in the capital of Burundi, we identified those who had biological children and those who lived or had lived in relationships. Using culturally appropriate instruments, we enquired about their exposure to childhood maltreatment and partner violence as well as their inclinations to act out violently. We found that childhood maltreatment and perceived partner intimidation were strong predictors for the perpetration of violence against children. Moreover, we found that women were more likely to use violence against children if they experienced partner violence and less likely to resort to violence if they felt intimidated. Men were more likely to perpetrate violence against their partner. Childhood maltreatment was again a strong predictor. The more women experienced partner violence, the more they fought back. Childhood maltreatment is a strong predictor for domestic violence and has to be addressed to interrupt the cycle of violence in post-conflict countries.

  1. Equipping the poorest of the poor to become agents of community transformation: A case study of milk as a catalyst in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. van Aarde

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Community transformation has cultural, political and religious dimensions. In the case of Burundi, it is ranked 188/188 on the scale of the world’s poorest countries. The poor in Burundi have a fatalistic attitude towards poverty as a result of the unstable political climate, corruption and a climate of suspicion. The poor are cynical and have no hopeful future expectations. The resourcefulness of the poor having been muted. The Christian church of Burundi has developed a culture of dependency. The role of the church in the West has been limited to lifting the poor out of abject poverty. A creative use of available resources and the participation of the poor through the recognition of their own resourcefulness and stewardship is a sustainable approach to the alleviation of poverty. Newfrontiers churches have developed the approach of equipping the poor as a mission’s strategy to participate in the missio Dei. The majority of churches and non-governmental organisations who endeavour to alleviate poverty in Burundi have, what can be termed, a ‘dependency virus’ or ‘dependency crisis’ and are victims caught in the ‘dependency trap’, that is, they create a culture of dependency through their provision. The loss of dignity that follows, transform the community into a slave of the beneficiary system in which poverty is conceived as a lack of things rather than a mind-set born from help given by the beneficiary without the consent of the poor.

  2. Réflexions sur l'évolution des systèmes d'exploitation agricole au Burundi à partir d'une typologie des exploitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert, JP.

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerations regarding the evolution of farming Systems in Burundi based on a multivariate analysis of some of their characteristics. Multidimensional analysis of survey data on farming systems allows to think about their future evolution and deduce some implications for the medium and long term. Factorial analysis is a helpful tool to perform this exercice.

  3. Late Quaternary Biomass Changes from 13C Measurements in a Highland Peatbog from Equatorial Africa (Burundi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucour, Anne-Marie; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Bonnefille, Raymonde

    1994-03-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of total organic matter were measured in two cores collected from the Kashiru peatbog in Burundi, Equatorial Africa. The record, which spans at least the last 40,000 yr, documents the C 3-C 4 biomass balance in the organic sediment. Among the major modern peat formers, most plants are C 3 species and are characterized by δ 13C values of -25.5 ± 2.3% (vs PDB). The C 4 plants, which are characterized by higher δ 13C values (-11.3 ± 0.7%) belong to the Gramineae ( Miscanthidium sp.) and Cyperaceae families ( Cyperus latifolius, C. papyrus, Pycreus nigricans). In the fossil record, δ 13C values of total organic matter vary between -28 and -15% in response to the relative fluxes of C 3 and C 4 plants. Before 30,000 yr B.P., low δ 13C values (-23.5 ± 1.1%) match high arboreal pollen contents. From 30,000 to 15,000 yr B.P., higher δ 13C values (-17.6 ± 1.1%) correspond to a significant increase in percentages of grass pollen. During this episode, a short and sharp shift toward lighter carbon isotopic compositions at 21,000 yr B.P. is synchronous with higher input of arboreal pollen. From 15,000 to 12,000 yr B.P., the 13C content decreases (δ 13C = -22.9 ± 1.4%). This shift, which cannot be explained by an increase in the arboreal vegetation, could be explained by the spreading of C 3 Gramineae or C 3 Cyperaceae. The interval from 12,000 to 7000 yr B.P. is poorly documented in these cores due to much lower organic matter accumulation. Low δ 13C values (δ 13C = -25.2 ± 1.3%) are observed from 7000 to 5000 yr B.P., when the pollen data show development of C 3 mountain forest. The Late Holocene is characterized by a mixed C 3-C 4 organic matter accumulation (δ 13C = -20.9 ± 1.6%). This study depicts a change in the dominant photosynthetic pathway among the herbaceous components, notably at the glacial-interglacial transition, when C 3 plants were favored by increased water supply and/or higher atmospheric CO 2 concentration.

  4. Using organic matter to increase soil fertility in Burundi: potentials and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboneka, Salvator

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture production in Burundi is dominated by small scale farmers (0.5 ha/household) who have only very limited access to mineral inputs. In the past, farmers have relied on fallow practices combined with farm yard manures to maintain and improve soil fertility. However, due to the high population growth and high population density (370/km²), fallow practices are nowadays no longer feasible, animal manures cannot be produced in sufficient quantities to maintain soil productivity and food insecurity has become a quasi permanent reality. Most Burundian soils are characterized by 1:1 types of clay minerals (kaolinite) and are acidic in nature. Such soils are of very low cation exchange capacity (CEC). To compare the effect of % clays and % organic matter (% C), correlations tests have been conducted between the two parameters and the CEC. It was found that in high altitude kaolinitic and acidic soils, CEC was highly correlated to % C and less correlated to % clay, suggesting that organic matter could play an important role in improving fertility and productivity of these soils. Based on these findings, additional studies have been conducted to evaluate the fertilizer and soil amendment values of animal manures (cattle, goat, chicken), and leguminous (Calliandra calothyrsus, Gliricidia sepium, Senna simea, Senna spectabilis) and non-leguminous (Tithonia diversifolia) foliar biomass. It was observed that chicken manure significantly reduces Al3+ levels in acidic soils, while Tithonia diversifolia outperforms in nutrient releases compared to the commonly known leguminous agroforestry shrubs and trees indicated above. Although the above mentioned organic sources can contribute to the soil nutrients supply, the quantities potentially available on farm are generally small. The only solution is to supplement these organic sources with other organic sources (compost, organic household waste), chemical fertilizers and mineral amendments (lime) to achieve Integrated Soil

  5. Food for Survival: Diagnosing Crop Patterns to Secure Lower Threshold Food Security Levels in Farm Households of Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niragira, Sanctus; D'Haese, Marijke; D'Haese, Luc; Ndimubandi, Jean; Desiere, Sam; Buysse, Jeroen

    2015-06-01

    Burundi is one of the world's poorest countries, coming last in the Global Food Index (2013). Yet, a large majority of its population depends on agriculture. Most smallholder families do not produce enough to support their own families. To estimate the optimal crop mix and resources needed to provide the family with food containing sufficient energy, fat, and protein. This study uses mathematical programming to obtain the optimal crop mix that could maximize output given the constraints on production factor endowments and the need to feed the household. The model is calibrated with household-level data collected in 2010 in Ngozi Province in northern Burundi. Four models are developed, each representing a different farm type. The typology is based on 2007 data. Model predictions are compared with data collected during a revisit of the area in 2012. By producing a smaller number of crops and concentrating on those in which they have a comparative advantage, and trading produce and input with other farms, large and medium-sized farms can improve their productivity and hire extra workers to supplement family labor. Predictions of crops to be planted coincided to a high degree with those that farmers planted 2 years after our survey on newly acquired plots. Despite land scarcity, it is still possible for households that own land to find optimal crop combinations that can meet their minimal food security requirements while generating a certain level of income. Nearly landless households would benefit from the increased off-farm employment opportunities. With only 0.05 ha of land per capita, the annotation Nearly Landless is used to highlight the limited access to land observed in this farm category. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Intergenerational violence in Burundi: Experienced childhood maltreatment increases the risk of abusive child rearing and intimate partner violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Crombach

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Experiencing abuse during childhood affects the psychological well-being of individuals throughout their lives and may even influence their offspring by enhancing the likelihood of an intergenerational transmission of violence. Understanding the effects of childhood maltreatment on child-rearing practices and intimate partner violence might be of particular importance to overcome the consequences of violent conflicts in African societies. Objective: Using Burundi as an example, we aimed to explore the associations between childhood maltreatment, intimate partner violence, perceived partner intimidation, gender and the probability of violently acting out against one's own children or romantic partner. Methods: Amongst a sample of 141 men and 141 women in the capital of Burundi, we identified those who had biological children and those who lived or had lived in relationships. Using culturally appropriate instruments, we enquired about their exposure to childhood maltreatment and partner violence as well as their inclinations to act out violently. Results: We found that childhood maltreatment and perceived partner intimidation were strong predictors for the perpetration of violence against children. Moreover, we found that women were more likely to use violence against children if they experienced partner violence and less likely to resort to violence if they felt intimidated. Men were more likely to perpetrate violence against their partner. Childhood maltreatment was again a strong predictor. The more women experienced partner violence, the more they fought back. Conclusions: Childhood maltreatment is a strong predictor for domestic violence and has to be addressed to interrupt the cycle of violence in post-conflict countries.

  7. Comparaison des effets de différents types de traitement phytosani-taire des semences du cotonnier au Burundi et en Grèce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carême, C.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of Different Pesticide Treatments of Cotton Seed in Burundi and in Greece. The effects of several active ingredients and various cotton seed treatments have been compared in 7 trials realized in Burundi and Greece in 1993 and 1994. The trials led in Burundi show the very high significant efficacy of imidacloprid on Aphis gossypii Glover at 3 g a. i./kg associated with chlorothalonil at 08 g a. i./kg seeds, when applied by pelleting on delinted seeds. In Greece, the absence of parasitic pressure at the beginning of the growing season did not allow the classification of the applied treatments concerning their efficiency to control cotton pests. The ecophysiological observations realized during this experimentation show a significant improvement of the bail maturation precocity in plants issued from pelleted seeds with an average dose of 2.2 g imidacloprid and 2.4 g TMTD per kg of seeds. On average, plants issued from treated seeds matured 10 days earlier than the untreated one.

  8. Progrès de la connaissance du Congo, du Rwanda et du Burundi de 1993 à 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri Nicolaï

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cette chronique, la vingt et unième d’une série qui a commencé avec l’année 1949, couvre la période 1993-2008 et a pour objectif de faire le point sur les progrès réalisés sur la connaissance du Congo (République démocratique du Congo, du Rwanda et du Burundi, dans le domaine de la géographie mais aussi dans les domaines des sciences naturelles et des sciences humaines qui peuvent fournir des données utiles ou indispensables aux géographes. Chaque référence bibliographique, livre ou article, est accompagnée d’un bref commentaire qui en retient les éléments principaux et surtout les faits ou les idées qui intéressent particulièrement les géographes. L’article comporte onze chapitres dont les plus importants concernent le milieu naturel, la géographie de la santé, la démographie, l’histoire (y compris l’histoire récente, la vie sociale et économique des campagnes traditionnelles et modernes, le secteur informel, les aspects de la vie urbaine. Les événements dramatiques qui se sont produits dans ces territoires africains au cours des quinze dernières années ont rendu la recherche sur le terrain particulièrement difficile tant pour les chercheurs nationaux que pour les chercheurs étrangers, ce qui se traduit notamment par une part de plus en plus importante des recherches menées en milieu urbain.This paper, the 21st issue of an edition of books and paper reviews on the knowledge of three countries of former Belgian Africa (DR Congo, Rwanda, and Burundi, covers the period 1993-2008. A short text for each reference points out the facts or ideas that are useful for geographers. The paper is composed of eleven sections. The most important are coping with the natural environment, health geography, population geography, history (including recent events, social and economic life in traditional and modern rural areas, informal economy, and urban geography. During the last sixteen years, conditions for field

  9. AIDS awareness among women and its influence on attitude toward people living with HIV/AIDS in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngayimbesha, Adrien; Chen, Pei Jie

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate women's knowledge on HIV and their attitude toward AIDS infected people. Structured and oriented questionnaire on AIDS knowledge, behavior and attitude toward people with HIV/AIDS, sources of information was used in assessing women's level of AIDS awareness. 2042 women participated in this study. Living in urban area was associated with taking care without worry (OR: 0.59; CI: 0.37-0.95; P = 0.02) and eating on same plate (OR: 0.44; CI: 0.33-0.74; P = 0.07). Catholic religion (OR: 1.79; CI: 1.09-2.24; P = 0.03) and protestant (OR: 2.09; CI: 1.19-3.70; P = 0.06) were associated with taking care without worry. Good knowledge was associated with taking care without worry (OR: 1.08; CI: 1.09-2.94; P = 0.04) and with sharing same work office (OR: 0.87; CI: 2.49-3.61; P = 0.03). Sources of information were ranked from health care workers (97.5%), mass media (91.2%) and clerical leader (87.9%). This research revered discrepancies on HIV knowledge between urban and rural women. Misunderstanding on HIV/AIDS remains in Burundi women even having high level of awareness. Communication between parents/women and friend/friend women was less used in HIV sensitization. Knowledge alone cannot counter bad behavior and attitudes toward people with HIV.

  10. La théiculture au Burundi: Diagnostic d'une filière en mutation

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    Nkunzimana, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Tea Subsector in Burundi: Diagnosis of a Subsector in Transformation. The statistical analysis shows that the tea has represented 9% of the added value created by all the cash crops. During the same period, the share of the tea in gross domestic product at market prices has been approximately 0.4%. From 1990 to 1999, the tea has represented in average 13% of the annual exports revenues. It is a particularly significant product for the country and its population. However, the tea subsector presents a series of problems of a technical and economic nature that this article would like to point up. As an example, we can quote the going beyond of installed capacities in the factories, the aging of the equipment, the irregularity in the quality of the product, the non control of the costs and the increase in the service of debts due to the deterioration of the exchange rate. Some recommendations are proposed in order to face these various constraints, before passing to liberalization.

  11. Toward policies for climate change mitigation: "Barriers for family-sized biogas in the District of Gihanga, Burundi"

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    Nkunzimana, Leonard; Huart, Michel; Zaccai, Edwin

    2014-05-01

    In the context of climate change mitigation and poverty reduction, it has been argued that biogas energy is relevant, as it is economically and ecologically useful. In the 1980s, biogas use played an important role in the development of Burundi. Many schools and public institutions had implemented such installations. Unfortunately, many biogas infrastructures were destroyed in the civil war of the 1990s. This study analyzes what could be done, after a decade of crisis, to develop that sector. It aims to assess how and to what extent the inhabitants of villages are willing to contribute to the development of biogas technologies. We interviewed 150 farmers in order to assess their perception on the ecologic and economic features of biogas plants if implemented in their villages. The influence of socioeconomic, cultural, and demographic factors of households was assessed in this study. Results suggest that the maximum amount that a household is willing to pay each month for biogas use at a family level is positive for large-size households, households that are aware of climate change, consumers of candles, households with high income, households with an educated head, women, and breeders. However, the willingness decreases for households with older head of families. The study concludes that awareness campaigns on biogas benefits and financial and nonfinancial incentives are necessary. This policy should probably and primarily be oriented toward some more receptive categories of the population. Women should be fully involved, considering their positive motivation toward sustaining this sector.

  12. Livelihoods, power, and food insecurity: adaptation of social capital portfolios in protracted crises--case study Burundi.

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    Vervisch, Thomas G A; Vlassenroot, Koen; Braeckman, Johan

    2013-04-01

    The failure of food security and livelihood interventions to adapt to conflict settings remains a key challenge in humanitarian responses to protracted crises. This paper proposes a social capital analysis to address this policy gap, adding a political economy dimension on food security and conflict to the actor-based livelihood framework. A case study of three hillsides in north Burundi provides an ethnographic basis for this hypothesis. While relying on a theoretical framework in which different combinations of social capital (bonding, bridging, and linking) account for a diverse range of outcomes, the findings offer empirical insights into how social capital portfolios adapt to a protracted crisis. It is argued that these social capital adaptations have the effect of changing livelihood policies, institutions, and processes (PIPs), and clarify the impact of the distribution of power and powerlessness on food security issues. In addition, they represent a solid way of integrating political economy concerns into the livelihood framework. © 2013 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2013.

  13. Assessing the factor structure of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and cumulative effect of abuse and neglect on mental health among adolescents in conflict-affected Burundi.

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    Charak, Ruby; de Jong, J T V M; Berckmoes, Lidewyde H; Ndayisaba, Herman; Reis, Ria

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to examine the factor structure of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ; Bernstein & Fink, 1998), highlight rates of abuse and neglect among Burundian adolescents, compare these rates with those found in high-income nations, and examine the cumulative effect of multiple types of abuse and neglect on depression and PTSD symptoms. Participants were 231 adolescents and youth (M=14.9, SD=1.99, 58.4% female) from five provinces of Burundi, a country in Central Africa affected by war and political violence. Translation and back-translation of the CTQ was carried out to obtain an adaptation of CTQ in Kirundi, the native language of Burundi. With the exception of one item on 'molestation' in the factor of sexual abuse, the five-factor structure of CTQ was obtained comprising latent factors, namely emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, and emotional and physical neglect. The rate of abuse and neglect ranged from 14.7-93.5% with more than 37% reporting 4 or more types of abuse and neglect experiences. Emotional abuse and neglect, and physical neglect were 2-3 times higher among Burundian adolescents when compared with studies from high-income countries using the CTQ. A cumulative effect of multiple types of abuse and neglect was found, such that, those with 4 or more types of maltreatment were higher on symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress. Findings highlight the need for culturally sensitive, standardized, and validated measures and norms for gauging childhood maltreatment in Burundi and related need for preventative interventions on childhood maltreatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. La dynamique spatiale de la forêt située dans la réserve naturelle forestière de Bururi, Burundi

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    Havyarimana, F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Forest Spatial Dynamic in the Bururi Forest Nature Reserve, Burundi. The studied forest is a protected area located in Southern Burundi, close to Bururi city and to agricultural villages. The effective protection of this forest started in 1980 but the protected area delimitation occurred in 2000. The forest spatial dynamic is analyzed to assess the effectiveness of this protection status. The study combines six Landsat multispectral satellite images analysis with field observations. Forest area and perimeter analysis highlights its dynamic in two phases: the first one is mainly characterised by deforestation and savannah development around agricultural lands but also by forest regrowth processes between 1986 and 2001. The second phase (2001-2011 of the forest dynamic is characterized by the increase of its surface and perimeter following the transformation of savannah zones. The anthropogenic effect limitation linked to the protected area delimitation, agricultural activities disturbance during socio-political instability period and to the increasing number of forest-rangers, would have influenced the surface and perimeter gain between 2001 and 2011. Local population implication in forest protection could further limit human pressure and promote degraded zones regeneration. Thus, agropastoral practices innovation in neighboring villages of the protected zone could contribute to limit these anthropogenic disturbances.

  15. Analyse du rôle de la biodiversité végétale des forêts de Kigwena et de Rumonge au Burundi

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    Hakizimana, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Role of Plant Resources Harvested from Kigwena and Rumonge Forests, Burundi. The main objective of this study was to inventory the natural plant resources harvested by local populations in the forests of Kigwena and Rumonge, both located in South-Western Burundi, relatively closer, but physionomically different. Eighty and 41 species of medicinal plants, 33 and 25 species used for their materials, 21 and 23 edible species, 14 and 19 species for energy use, and 5 and 12 species for cultural use were respectively noticed. Among the collected species, 42.7% and 55.4% respectively served for multiple uses. In the forest of Kigwena, the leaves (26.7% and stems (28% were the most collected plant parts whereas in the forest of Rumonge the stems (35.7% were the dominant category. Edible mushrooms, honey and termites are also collected in the two forests. Both forests play consequently a significant role by offering to the local populations the possibility to diversify their incomes (various products marketed along the roads and in the urban centres, their food, and, in particular, their popular medicine.

  16. Potential of household environmental resources and practices in eliminating residual malaria transmission: a case study of Tanzania, Burundi, Malawi and Liberia.

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    Semakula, Henry M; Song, Guobao; Zhang, Shushen; Achuu, Simon P

    2015-09-01

    The increasing protection gaps of insecticide-treated nets and indoor-residual spraying methods against malaria have led to an emergence of residual transmission in sub-Saharan Africa and thus, supplementary strategies to control mosquitoes are urgently required. To assess household environmental resources and practices that increase or reduce malaria risk among children under-five years of age in order to identify those aspects that can be adopted to control residual transmission. Household environmental resources, practices and malaria test results were extracted from Malaria Indicators Survey datasets for Tanzania, Burundi, Malawi and Liberia with 16,747 children from 11,469 households utilised in the analysis. Logistic regressions were performed to quantify the contribution of each factor to malaria occurrence. Cattle rearing reduced malaria risk between 26%-49% while rearing goats increased the risk between 26%-32%. All piped-water systems reduced malaria risk between 30%-87% (Tanzania), 48%-95% (Burundi), 67%-77% (Malawi) and 58%-73 (Liberia). Flush toilets reduced malaria risk between 47%-96%. Protected-wells increased malaria risk between 19%-44%. Interestingly, boreholes increased malaria risk between 19%-75%. Charcoal use reduced malaria risk between 11%-49%. Vector control options for tackling mosquitoes were revealed based on their risk levels. These included cattle rearing, installation of piped-water systems and flush toilets as well as use of smokeless fuels.

  17. Measuring and understanding the effects of a performance based financing scheme applied to nutrition services in Burundi-a mixed method impact evaluation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimpagaritse, Manassé; Korachais, Catherine; Roberfroid, Dominique; Kolsteren, Patrick; Zine Eddine El Idrissi, Moulay Driss; Meessen, Bruno

    2016-06-14

    Malnutrition is a huge problem in Burundi. In order to improve the provision of services at hospital, health centre and community levels, the Ministry of Health is piloting the introduction of malnutrition prevention and care indicators within its performance based financing (PBF) scheme. Paying for units of services and for qualitative indicators is expected to enhance provision and quality of these nutrition services, as PBF has done, in Burundi and elsewhere, for several other services. This paper presents the protocol for the impact evaluation of the PBF scheme applied to malnutrition. The research design consists in a mixed methods model adopting a sequential explanatory design. The quantitative component is a cluster-randomized controlled evaluation design: among the 90 health centres selected for the study, half receive payment related to their results in malnutrition activities, while the other half get a budget allocation. Qualitative research will be carried out both during the intervention period and at the end of the quantitative evaluation. Data are collected from 1) baseline and follow-up surveys of 90 health centres and 6,480 households with children aged 6 to 23 months, 2) logbooks filled in weekly in health centres, and 3) in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. The evaluation aims to provide the best estimate of the impact of the project on malnutrition outcomes in the community as well as outputs at the health centre level (malnutrition care outputs) and to describe quantitatively and qualitatively the changes that took place (or did not take place) within health centres as a result of the program. Although PBF schemes are blooming in low in-come countries, there is still a need for evidence, especially on the impact of revising the list of remunerated indicators. It is expected that this impact evaluation will be helpful for the national policy dialogue in Burundi, but it will also provide key evidence for countries with an existing PBF

  18. Spatiotemporal distribution and population at risk of soil-transmitted helminth infections following an eight-year school-based deworming programme in Burundi, 2007–2014

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    Mohamad Assoum

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigating the effect of successive annual deworming rounds on the spatiotemporal distribution of infection prevalence and numbers at risk for soil-transmitted helminths (STHs can help identify communities nearing elimination and those needing further interventions. In this study, we aim to quantify the impact of an 8-year mass drug administration (MDA programme (from 2007 to 2014 on the spatiotemporal distribution of prevalence of STH infections and to estimate the number of school-aged children infected with STHs in Burundi. Methods During annual longitudinal school-based surveys in Burundi between 2007 and 2011, STH infection and anthropometric data for a total of 40,656 children were collected; these data were supplemented with data from a national survey conducted in 2014. Bayesian model based geostatistics (MBG were used to generate predictive prevalence maps for each STH species and year. The numbers of children at-risk of infection per district between 2008 and 2014 were estimated as the product of the predictive prevalence maps and population density maps. Results Overall, the degree of spatial clustering of STH infections decreased between 2008 and 2011; in 2014 the geographical clusters of all STH infections reappeared. The reduction in prevalence was small for Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura in the centre and central north of the country. Our predictive prevalence maps for hookworm indicate a reduction in prevalence along the periphery of the country. The predicted number of children infected with any STH species decreased substantially between 2007 and 2011, but in 2014 there was an increase in the predicted number of children infected with A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura. In 2014, the districts with the highest predicted number of children infected with A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura and hookworms were Kibuye district (n = 128,903, Mabayi district (n = 35,302 and Kiremba (n = 87

  19. Etude économique du marché des produits vivriers au Burundi Analyse chronologique des prix de la pomme de terre

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    Degand, J.

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Market Economie Analysis of Food Crops in Burundi - Time Serie Analysis of Potato Prices. As compared with the study to the bean prices (see Tropicultura Vol. 1, n°3, pp. 86-98, the time serie of potato prices displays seasonal moves with larger amplitudes. These variations are due to differents factors : - specific rhythm of the crop cycle - low level of commercialization - storage difficulties during the harvest period. On the other hand it has been identified a long run move in potato prices, the frequence of which is badly known. This move keeps mainly being under business cycle influence. It seems anyway that income demand elasticity of potatoes looks very high in such a way that wages moving up entail a rise in potato prices on the market of Bujumbura.

  20. Peace-building and reconciliation dividends of integrated health services delivery in post-conflict Burundi: qualitative assessments of providers and community members.

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    Christensen, Cathryn; Edward, Anbrasi

    2015-01-01

    While demonstrating causality remains challenging, several 'health-peace' mechanisms have been proposed to describe how health systems contribute to peace-building and stability in post-conflict settings. A qualitative study was undertaken in southern Burundi to identify drivers of social tension and reconciliation in the catchment area of Village Health Works, a health services organisation. Key informant interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in early 2014 with a total of one hundred and twenty community members and staff representing a range of conflict and recovery experience. Themes emerging from these interviews indicated mechanisms at the individual, household, community, and regional levels through which health provision mitigates tensions and promotes social cohesion. This peace dividend was amplified by the clinic's integrated model, which facilitates further community interaction through economic, agricultural and education programmes. Land pressure and the marginalisation of repatriated refugees were cited as drivers of local tension.

  1. Tuberculose chez le personnel de santé du secteur public au Burundi: fréquence et facteurs de risque

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    Mukuku, Olivier; Ruhindiza, Bienvenu Mukuku; Mupepe, Alexis Kumba; Sawadogo, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Le but de cette étude était de déterminer la fréquence de la tuberculose (TB) chez le personnel de santé du secteur public en charge des patients tuberculeux et d’évaluer les facteurs de risque de contracter la tuberculose chez ce personnel au Burundi. Méthodes Il s’agit d’une étude transversale à visée analytique réalisée auprès de 300 travailleurs prestant dans 30 centres de dépistage et de traitement de la TB (CDT) au Burundi du 16 octobre au 15 novembre 2012. Les paramètres sociodémographiques et professionnels ainsi que l’antécédent de vaccination BCG de travailleurs ayant été touché par la TB ont été analysé et comparé à ceux de travailleurs qui ne l’ont pas été. Le seuil de signification a été fixé à p 0,05). Conclusion L’âge, l’antécédent de vaccination de BCG ainsi que la majorité de paramètres professionnels sont en association avec la maladie TB des travailleurs de CDT. D’où, la maîtrise de certains facteurs de risque s’avère important pour faire face au fardeau de la TB parmi le personnel hospitalier. PMID:24847402

  2. Interaction entre le fumier enrichi, le calcaire et les différentes sources de phosphore issues de la roche phosphatée de Matongo sur un ferralsol de la région du Bututsi (Burundi

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    Rwigema, JB.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between enriched farmyard manure with fertilizers, lime and different phosphorus sources obtained from the phosphatic rock from Matongo on a ferralitic soil from the region of Bututsi (Burundi. This study on maize growing in pots shows that (i in combination with other inputs (farmyard manure and lime, the most soluble phosphorus sources (triple and simple superphosphate can be replaced by partially acidulated rock phosphate (50 % obtained by mixing simple superphosphate and rock phosphate both originating from the rock phosphate deposits in Matongo (Burundi, (ii the exchangeable Al can be reduced by both the addition of farmyard manure and lime, but the action of the different phosphorus 'source leave the most Bray-1 extractable phosphorus in the soil, the largest quantifies correspond to the highest doses of farmyard manure.

  3. Interaction entre le fumier enrichi, le calcaire et les différentes sources de phosphore issues de la roche phosphatée de Matongo sur un ferralsol de la région du Bututsi (Burundi)

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    Rwigema, JB.; Van den Berghe, CH.; Mujawayezu, AM.; Sota, P.

    1993-01-01

    Interaction between enriched farmyard manure with fertilizers, lime and different phosphorus sources obtained from the phosphatic rock from Matongo on a ferralitic soil from the region of Bututsi (Burundi). This study on maize growing in pots shows that (i) in combination with other inputs (farmyard manure and lime), the most soluble phosphorus sources (triple and simple superphosphate) can be replaced by partially acidulated rock phosphate (50 %) obtained by mixing simple superphosphate and ...

  4. Barriers in the Delivery of Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care in Post-Conflict Africa: Qualitative Case Studies of Burundi and Northern Uganda.

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    Primus Che Chi

    Full Text Available Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity rates are particularly grim in conflict, post-conflict and other crisis settings, a situation partly blamed on non-availability and/or poor quality of emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC services. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers to effective delivery of EmONC services in post-conflict Burundi and Northern Uganda, in order to provide policy makers and other relevant stakeholders context-relevant data on improving the delivery of these lifesaving services.This was a qualitative comparative case study that used 42 face-to-face semi-structured in-depth interviews and 4 focus group discussions for data collection. Participants were 32 local health providers and 37 staff of NGOs working in the area of maternal health. Data was analysed using the framework approach.The availability, quality and distribution of EmONC services were major challenges across the sites. The barriers in the delivery of quality EmONC services were categorised into two major themes; human resources-related challenges, and systemic and institutional failures. While some of the barriers were similar, others were unique to specific sites. The common barriers included shortage of qualified staff; lack of essential installations, supplies and medications; increasing workload, burn-out and turnover; and poor data collection and monitoring systems. Barriers unique to Northern Uganda were demoralised personnel and lack of recognition; poor referral system; inefficient drug supply system; staff absenteeism in rural areas; and poor coordination among key personnel. In Burundi, weak curriculum; poor harmonisation and coordination of training; and inefficient allocation of resources were the unique challenges. To improve the situation across the sites, efforts are ongoing to improve the training and recruitment of more staff; harmonise and strengthen the curriculum and training; increase the number of EmONC facilities

  5. Contribution à l'étude de la fertilisation minérale du blé dans la région du Mugamba (Burundi

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    Schalbroeck, JJ.

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A contribution to the study of mineral fertilization of wheat in the Mugamba region (Burundi. Studies on the effect of fertilizer on wheat were carried out in 38 farmers' fields in the Mugamba area during the 1984 and 1985 second crop growing seasons using the cultivar Romany. Application of 30 units/ha of Kdid not give a significant difference in the yield. When 40-40 units/ha of N and P respectively were applied, there was a significant increase in the yield due to N in hygrokaolisols and brown soils and to P in humiferous kaolisols. This fertilizer gave better returns in hygrokaolisols and brown soils than in humiferous kaolisols. It increased the yield by increasing the number of kernels/spike. Its efficiency on plant growth (weight of straw/ha and plant height, on yield and on two yield components (number of kernels/spike and weight of 1000 kernels decreased as the soil fertility increased. In hygrokaolisols and brown soils, the yield increase due to application of the fertilizer 40-40 units NP/ha was estimated at 39 % and 16 % o where as the yield without fertilizer was 1300 kg/ha and 2000 kg/ha, respectively.

  6. SMS and Web-Based e-Government Model Case Study: Citizens Complaints Management System at District of Gihosha –Burundi

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    Mugenzi Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available E-Government basically comprises the use of electronic communications technologies such as the internet, in enhancing and advancing the citizens access to public services. In most developing countries including Burundi, citizens are facing many difficulties for accessing public services. One of the identified problems is the poor quality of service in managing citizens’ complaints. This study proposes an SMS and web based e-Government Model as a solution. In this study, a case study of a complaint management system at District of Gihosha has been used as a reference to prove that SMS and Web based e-Government Model can enhances the access of public services. The objective of this study is the development of an SMS and web-based system that can enhances the process and the management of citizens’ complaints at District of Gihosha. The system has been developed using PHP as front end, Apache as web server, MySQL as Database and Gammu as SMS gateway. The obtained results after testing the system shows that all the functionalities of the developed system worked properly. Thus, the SMS and web based complaint management system developed is considered to be effective.

  7. How do low-birthweight neonates fare 2 years after discharge from a low-technology neonatal care unit in a rural district hospital in Burundi?

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    van den Boogaard, W; Zuniga, I; Manzi, M; Van den Bergh, R; Lefevre, A; Nanan-N'zeth, K; Duchenne, B; Etienne, W; Juma, N; Ndelema, B; Zachariah, R; Reid, A

    2017-04-01

    As neonatal care is being scaled up in economically poor settings, there is a need to know more on post-hospital discharge and longer-term outcomes. Of particular interest are mortality, prevalence of developmental impairments and malnutrition, all known to be worse in low-birthweight neonates (LBW, <2500 g). Getting a better handle on these parameters might justify and guide support interventions. Two years after hospital discharge, we thus assessed: mortality, developmental impairments and nutritional status of LBW children. Household survey of LBW neonates discharged from a neonatal special care unit in Rural Burundi between January and December 2012. Of 146 LBW neonates, 23% could not be traced and 4% had died. Of the remaining 107 children (median age = 27 months), at least one developmental impairment was found in 27%, with 8% having at least five impairments. Main impairments included delays in motor development (17%) and in learning and speech (12%). Compared to LBW children (n = 100), very-low-birthweight (VLBW, <1500 g, n = 7) children had a significantly higher risk of impairments (intellectual - P = 0.001), needing constant supervision and creating a household burden (P = 0.009). Of all children (n-107), 18% were acutely malnourished, with a 3½ times higher risk in VLBWs (P = 0.02). Reassuringly, most children were thriving 2 years after discharge. However, malnutrition was prevalent and one in three manifested developmental impairments (particularly VLBWs) echoing the need for support programmes. A considerable proportion of children could not be traced, and this emphasises the need for follow-up systems post-discharge. © 2017 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. La production laitière et la croissance du chevreau pendant la période néonatale chez la chèvre locale au Burundi

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    Farina, L.

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Milk yield and kid's growth rate of local goats in Burundi during the first weeks after birth. A study on local goats in Burundi, specially the growth rate of the kid during the first weeks after birth, has been undertaken. Milk yield has been monitored to establish milking and suckling abilities of local goats. The results of daily controls have given a milk yield average of 511 g/day up to day 56 post partum. Lactation yield has been significantly affected by the doe's weight. During the first month, heavy goats have produced the equivalent of a glass of milk per day (about 200 ml for human consumption in addition to the quantity taken up by the kids. The daily weight gain of 54.05 g recorded from birth to 28 days of age in youngs is low, probably due to the limited quantity of milk available to them. Nevertheless local kids show an excellent conversion ratio of suckled milk, with a value of 3.93 kg of milk to produce 1 kg liveweight during the first 28 days, representing a very high food conversion.

  9. Appréciation et amélioration de la qualité bactériologique du poisson commercialisé au Burundi. Cas de Stolothrissa tanganicae et Luciolates stappersii

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    Sindayigaya, E.

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Appreciation and improvement of the bacteriological quality of fish commercialized in Burundi. Cases of Stolothrissa tanganicae and Luciolates stappersii. The bacteriological quality of Stolothrissa tanganicae and Luciolates stappersii has been estimated by determining the aerobic mesophilic flora, Staphylococcus aureus as pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis as fecal contamination indices. The freshness has been evaluated by the determination of the total volatile bases (T.V.B.. At the arrival of fresh fish on the market, the aerobic mesophilic flora was sometimes high due to inadequate handling and processing on board. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus can be found in fresh fish. The determination of the T.V.B. and the bacteriological analysis provided concordant informations. An improvement of bacteriological quality has been obtained by a combination of the traditional conservation methods : drying, salting and smoking.

  10. Efficacité de la roche phosphatée de Matongo au travers d'un compostage sur une culture de pomme de terre sur un sol acide de Rabiro (Burundi

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    Van den Berghe, C.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of phosphatic rock from Matongo applied in the composting process on potatoes on an acid soil of Rabiro. In the frame of the Cooperation between the CVHA (Cultures Vivrieres de Haute Altitute Project and the Program of Fertilisation of the Agro-systems on Altitude (FAVA of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences in Burundi, the local phosphatic rock from Matongo has been compared to diammonium-phosphate when added in the composting process. The field trials with potatoes have shown that both phosphate sources have the same fertilizing value when the enriched compost was applied at the dose of 20 t/ha. It is very interesting from agricultural and economical viewpoint to use this phosphatic rock in combination with compost.

  11. Contraintes techniques et sociales en conservation du sol et des eaux en zone à très forte densité de population : l'exemple des montagnes du Mumirwa au Burundi

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    Mathieu, C.

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of the influence of cutting and picking of leaves on the quality of cassava tuber (Manihot esculenta Crantz cv. "F46". The Burundi country located in mountainous tropical region of Central Africa, presents one of the highest density population among those overpopulated regions. The extreme soil occupation phenomenon at the greatest slope poses a serious problems of soil erosion. The author analyses the physical and social constraints of soil conservation and water management problems in a such context. It seems that the solutions to the technical problems of erosion control must undergo with a radical change in relation between rural community and administration in the way of more collaboration and comprehension of administrative services and more willingly participation from rural population.

  12. Diversité et distribution d'abondances des plantes d'un écosystème protégé dans un paysage anthropisé: cas de la Réserve Naturelle Forestière de Bururi, Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havyarimana, F.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant Diversity and Abundance Distribution of a Protected Ecosystem in an Anthropogenic Landscape: the Case of the Bururi Natural Forest Reserve of, Burundi. A study on plant species diversity and abundance distribution has been conducted in the Bururi Natural Forest Reserve (BNFR in Burundi in order to improve species conservation. The BNFR is an ecosystem embedded in an anthropogenic matrix, close to Bururi city and to agricultural lands. It is a forest patch resulting from the fragmentation of a larger forest that once occupied the entire Congo- Nile Crest. This study tested the hypothesis according to which the plant species abundance distribution in conserved forests corresponds to a log normal distribution, indicating that species are regularly distributed in the ecosystem. This distribution model is generally observed in stable ecosystems in which inter-specific competition is considered less important. The observed abundance distribution of the plant species was therefore compared to a log normal, a log series and a broken stick distribution model. Six of the plant species recorded in this study are considered threatened in Burundi. The observed plant species abundance distribution was found similar to the log series model which suggests the impact of disturbance on the abundance distribution despite the status of the BNFR of protected ecosystem in an anthropogenic landscape.

  13. Contribution á l’étude des lichens du Kivu (Zaire, du Rwanda et du Burundi. VII. Approche écogéographique de la flore et de la végétation lichéniques dans Pest de P Afrique centrale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lambinon

    1983-11-01

    Full Text Available A short historical record of the lichenological exploration of tropical Africa, especially Kivu (Zaire, Rwanda and Burundi is given, including an account of the material collected and of the present state of taxonomic knowledge of the lichens. Several phytogeographical categories can be recognized in this area; they are (some with significant variants: subcosmopolitan, temperate-tropical, pantropical, paleotropical, afro-neotropical, guineo-congolian, sudano-zambezian, zambezian-afrooriental and zambezian, central African lakes endemic, afromontane and afroalpine. The distributional types of the lichens within the studied area are briefly described, as well as their importance in the main vegetation types.

  14. Assets, Activity Choices, and Civil War: Evidence from Burundi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bundervoet, Tom

    2010-01-01

    .... Exploiting the differential degree in asset risk related to the spatial intensity of the civil war, we find that higher asset holdings do not induce households in the war regions to reduce investment...

  15. Local terms and understandings of mental health problems in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irankunda, Pacifique; Heatherington, Laurie; Fitts, Jessica

    2017-02-01

    A pilot study and two intensive studies were conducted to document the local vocabularies used by Burundians to describe mental health problems and their understandings about the causes. The pilot study-in which 14 different large groups of community members awaiting appointments at a village health clinic were engaged in open-ended discussions of the local terminology and causal beliefs about mental health problems-suggested three key syndromes: akabonge (a set of depression-like symptoms), guhahamuka (a set of trauma-related symptoms), and ibisigo (a set of psychosis-like symptoms). In Study 1 ( N = 542), individual interviews or surveys presented participants with the names of these syndromes and asked what they considered to be the symptoms and causes of them. Study 2 ( N = 143) cross-validated these terms with a different sample (also in individual interviews/surveys), by presenting the symptom clusters and asking what each would be called and about their causes. Findings of both studies validated this set of terms and yielded a rich body of data about causal beliefs. The influence of education level and gender on familiarity with these terms was also assessed. Implications for the development of mental health services and directions for future research are discussed.

  16. Preventing re-displacement through genuine reintegration in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Hovil

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Displacement is often part of a cyclical process of conflict anddisplacement. Preventing displacement, therefore, is not only aboutpreventing new displacement but about ensuring that people do notget re-displaced.

  17. Understanding resilience in armed conflict: Social resources and mental health of children in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, B.J.; Tol, W.A.; Jordans, M.J.D.; Bass, J.; de Jong, J.T.V.M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the role of cognitive social capital among war-affected youth in low- and middle-income countries. We examined the longitudinal association between cognitive social capital and mental health (depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms), functioning, and

  18. A Phoenix in Flames? Portfolio Choice and Violence in Civil War in Rural Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nillesen, E.E.M.; Verwimp, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper challenges the idea that farmers revert to subsistence farming when confronted with violence from civil war. Macro-economic evidence on economic legacies of civil war suggests that civil wars, while obviously disastrous in the short run, do not need to have persistent effects on long term

  19. Spatial analysis of HIV infection and associated individual characteristics in Burundi: indications for effective prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barankanira, Emmanuel; Molinari, Nicolas; Niyongabo, Théodore; Laurent, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ... for country-specific, in-depth analyses of HIV epidemic features to tailor national prevention responses to the people most at risk [3]. Because half HIV cases only are diagnosed in sub-Saharan Africa [4], most countries rely on Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to estimate HIV prevalence along with other data including social and behavio...

  20. The Political Economy of Post-Conflict Development: A Comparative Assessment of Burundi and Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    sectors of their economies, especially those that relied on highly skilled labor and export markets. After the end of the wars, both countries...discuss four theoretical aspects of elite dynamics: political settlement, dominant party governance, technocratic elite, and political leadership to...such instances, leadership can take long-term views of development and allocate resources effectively.23 Contrarily, conflict mediators view winner

  1. Reconciling reintegration: the complexity of economic and social reintegration of ex-combatants in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, M. van; Willems, Rens

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration (DDR) programmes initiated by state or multilateral agencies can realise the reintegration of ex-combatants remains debated. While some consider that DDR should have the ambition to result in long-term reintegration, others argue that

  2. In vitro Study of Five Herbs Used Against Microbial Infections in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngezahayo, Jérémie; Ribeiro, Sofia Oliveira; Fontaine, Véronique; Hari, Léonard; Stévigny, Caroline; Duez, Pierre

    2017-10-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistant infectious diseases remains a major threat to worldwide public health, in developed and in developing countries. Therefore, new antimicrobial agents acting by new mechanisms of action are urgently needed. As plants used in traditional medicine may help to overcome these problems, Justicia subsessilis, Platostoma rotundifolium, Pavetta ternifolia, Stomatanthes africanus, and Virectaria major (plants highly cited to be used against microbial infections in traditional Burundian medicine) were studied to assess their traditional use efficacy. We conducted a preliminary phytochemical screening of the extracts, as well as their direct and indirect (effect on antibiotic resistance) antibacterial activity on four bacterial strains (Staphylococcus sp. and Escherichia coli) by broth microdilution methods. All five medicinal plants investigated in this work were found to have direct antibacterial activity against all tested bacterial strains (minimum inhibitory concentration = 62.5-1000 μg/mL) that may support the use of these species in traditional Burundian medicine. Extracts (with no direct antibacterial activity), tested at 200 μg/mL, decreased the MIC values of β-lactams and aminoglycoside antibiotics by a factor of 2 to 64-fold. These interactions between plant extracts and antibiotics could open an avenue of research against antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Children of former child soldiers and never-conscripted civilians: a preliminary intergenerational study in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, S.; de Jong, J.; O'Hara, R.; Koopman, C.

    2013-01-01

    Studies around the world show that former child soldiers (FCSs) have mental health strengths and limitations, and highlight the important role of families and communities in reintegration to society. However, there are limited data that examine the mental health risks and protective factors of the

  4. School-based mental health intervention for children in war-affected Burundi: a cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, W.A.; Komproe, I.H.; Jordans, M.J.D.; Ndayisaba, A.; Ntamatumba, P.; Sipsma, H.; Smallegange, E.S.; Macy, R.D.; de Jong, J.T.V.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Armed conflicts are associated with a wide range of impacts on the mental health of children and adolescents. We evaluated the effectiveness of a school-based intervention aimed at reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety (treatment aim); and improving

  5. School-based mental health intervention for children in war-affected Burundi : A cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Wietse A.; Komproe, Ivan H.; Jordans, Mark J D; Ndayisaba, Aline; Ntamutumba, Prudence; Sipsma, Heather; Smallegange, Eva S.; Macy, Robert D.; de Jong, Joop T V M; Komproe, J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/142349321

    2014-01-01

    Background: Armed conflicts are associated with a wide range of impacts on the mental health of children and adolescents. We evaluated the effectiveness of a school-based intervention aimed at reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety (treatment aim); and improving

  6. Resurrection of the genus Botrydium Spach (Chenopodiaceae, with a description of four new species from China, Peru and Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingli Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on specimens from twenty-one herbaria from China and USA, as well as observations using SEM, the genus Botrydium is resurrected as Neobotrydium. It has a number of distinctive characters: the plants are covered with granular hairs and granulated globular gland-grains, strong smell, and dichasia. Neobotrydium is removed from Chenopodium. The differences between Neobotrydium and Chenopodium, as well as circumscriptions of five glandular genera, Neobotrydium, Cycloloma, Roubieva, Ambrina, and Dysphania are discussed. Neobotrydium comprises twenty species which occur in Asia, Europe, North Africa, North America to Northwest of South America and Australia. Four new species are described: Neobotrydium corniculatum and Neobotrydium ornithopodum from China, Neobotrydium peruensis from South America, and Neobotrydium burundiensis from Africa. A diagnostic key is presented.

  7. Validation of the Kirundi versions of brief self-rating scales for common mental disorders among children in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ventevogel, Peter; Komproe, Ivan H.; Jordans, Mark J.; Feo, Paolo; De Jong, Joop T V M

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Sub Saharan Africa, there has been limited research on instruments to identify specific mental disorders in children in conflict-affected settings. This study evaluates the psychometric properties of three self-report scales for child mental disorder in order to inform an emerging

  8. Developing and measuring healthcare capacity and quality in Burundi: LifeNet International’s horizontal conversion franchise model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Brooks

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a departure from traditional “vertical” healthcare interventions in low-resource settings that work to combat a single specific health issue, LifeNet International (LN uses a horizontal conversion franchise to develop and measure healthcare capacity and quality in primarily faith-based health centers in East Africa. Through a comprehensive franchise package of Medical Training, Management Training, Pharmaceutical Supply, and Growth Financing, LN is able to leverage existing resources and respond to a greater number of the obstacles preventing facilities from providing quality care. Through its Quality Score Card, LN measures improvements in quality of care within its network. This tool has measured consistent and significant improvements in quality of care following LN partnership. Together, these services improve quality of care at East African primary care facilities in ways that issue-specific, “vertical” interventions cannot.

  9. Microbiota network and mathematic microbe mutualism in colostrum and mature milk collected in two different geographic areas: Italy versus Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Lorenzo; Toscano, Marco; De Grandi, Roberta; Grossi, Enzo; Padovani, Ezio M; Peroni, Diego G

    2017-04-01

    Human milk is essential for the initial development of newborns, as it provides all nutrients and vitamins, such as vitamin D, and represents a great source of commensal bacteria. Here we explore the microbiota network of colostrum and mature milk of Italian and Burundian mothers using the auto contractive map (AutoCM), a new methodology based on artificial neural network (ANN) architecture. We were able to demonstrate the microbiota of human milk to be a dynamic, and complex, ecosystem with different bacterial networks among different populations containing diverse microbial hubs and central nodes, which change during the transition from colostrum to mature milk. Furthermore, a greater abundance of anaerobic intestinal bacteria in mature milk compared with colostrum samples has been observed. The association of complex mathematic systems such as ANN and AutoCM adopted to metagenomics analysis represents an innovative approach to investigate in detail specific bacterial interactions in biological samples.

  10. Vector control in a malaria epidemic occurring within a complex emergency situation in Burundi: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Alessandro Umberto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African highlands often suffer of devastating malaria epidemics, sometimes in conjunction with complex emergencies, making their control even more difficult. In 2000, Burundian highlands experienced a large malaria outbreak at a time of civil unrest, constant insecurity and nutritional emergency. Because of suspected high resistance to the first and second line treatments, the provincial health authority and Médecins Sans Frontières (Belgium decided to implement vector control activities in an attempt to curtail the epidemic. There are few reported interventions of this type to control malaria epidemics in complex emergency contexts. Here, decisions and actions taken to control this epidemic, their impact and the lessons learned from this experience are reported. Case description Twenty nine hills (administrative areas were selected in collaboration with the provincial health authorities for the vector control interventions combining indoor residual spraying with deltamethrin and insecticide-treated nets. Impact was evaluated by entomological and parasitological surveys. Almost all houses (99% were sprayed and nets use varied between 48% and 63%. Anopheles indoor resting density was significantly lower in treated as compared to untreated hills, the latter taken as controls. Despite this impact on the vector, malaria prevalence was not significantly lower in treated hills except for people sleeping under a net. Discussion Indoor spraying was feasible and resulted in high coverage despite being a logistically complex intervention in the Burundian context (scattered houses and emergency situation. However, it had little impact on the prevalence of malaria infection, possibly because it was implemented after the epidemic's peak. Nevertheless, after this outbreak the Ministry of Health improved the surveillance system, changed its policy with introduction of effective drugs and implementation of vector control to prevent new malaria epidemics. Conclusion In the absence of effective drugs and sufficient preparedness, present study failed to demonstrate any impact of vector control activities upon the course of a short-duration malaria epidemic. However, the experience gained lead to increased preparedness and demonstrated the feasibility of vector control measures in this specific context.

  11. A study on reintegration of street children in Burundi: Experienced violence and maltreatment are associated with mental health impairments and impeded educational progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm eCrombach

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Street children are exposed to violence, and subsist in poor and generally precarious conditions. In conflict regions, institutional care facilities are often the only well established way to care for vulnerable children. Providing access to school education is considered to be key to allow successful integration into society. However, adverse effects of psychological disorders may pose another serious obstacle. In semi-structured interviews in a sample of 112 Burundian male youths (mean age = 15.9 years, we assessed exposure to traumatic stressors, regularly and recently occurring violence as well as prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, depression, substance dependence, suicidal risk, and progress in school. Former street children (n = 32 and other vulnerable children (n = 50 in a residential center were compared to children living in the streets (n = 15 or with families (n = 15. While the children living in the center were less regularly exposed to violence and reported less substance dependence than street children, PTSD symptoms were common among the former street children. Furthermore, we provided empirical evidence that for the children living in the center, recently experienced violence – mostly minor physical conflicts, psychological violence and neglect – was associated with increased PTSD symptomatology and impeded progress in school. In a population of children who experienced many traumatic incidences and a lot of violence, even minor violent events may trigger and reinforce PTSD symptoms. Hence controlling exposure to violence and addressing mental ill-health in vulnerable children is mandatory for reintegration.

  12. Petrogenesis of the Kabanga-Musongati layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions in Burundi (Kibaran Belt): geochemical, Sr-Nd isotopic constraints and Cr-Ni behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Duchesne, Jean-Clair; Liégeois, Jean-Paul; Deblond, André; Tack, Luc

    2004-01-01

    A succession of mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions forms an alignment in the boundary zone between the Kibaran belt and the Tanzania craton. The intrusions represent a continuous series of cumulate rocks. For instance, in the Mukanda-Buhoro and Musongati (MBM) contiguous bodies, the series starts with dunite and passes to lherzolite, pyroxenite, norite, gabbronorite and anorthosite on top. Cumulate textures are conspicuous in all rock types and cryptic layering characterises cumulus mineral ...

  13. A study on reintegration of street children in Burundi: experienced violence and maltreatment are associated with mental health impairments and impeded educational progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Street children are exposed to violence, and subsist in poor and generally precarious conditions. In conflict regions, institutional care facilities are often the only well established way to care for vulnerable children. Providing access to school education is considered to be key to allow successful integration into society. However, adverse effects of psychological disorders may pose another serious obstacle. In semi-structured interviews in a sample of 112 Burundian male youths (mean age = 15.9 years), we assessed exposure to traumatic stressors, regularly and recently occurring violence as well as prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, substance dependence, suicidal risk, and progress in school. Former street children (n = 32) and other vulnerable children (n = 50) in a residential center were compared to children living in the streets (n = 15) or with families (n = 15). While the children living in the center were less regularly exposed to violence and reported less substance dependence than street children, PTSD symptoms were common among the former street children. Furthermore, we provided empirical evidence that for the children living in the center, recently experienced violence – mostly minor physical conflicts, psychological violence and neglect – was associated with increased PTSD symptomatology and impeded progress in school. In a population of children who experienced many traumatic incidences and a lot of violence, even minor violent events may trigger and reinforce PTSD symptoms. Hence controlling exposure to violence and addressing mental ill-health in vulnerable children is mandatory for reintegration. PMID:25566123

  14. A study on reintegration of street children in Burundi: experienced violence and maltreatment are associated with mental health impairments and impeded educational progress

    OpenAIRE

    Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Street children are exposed to violence, and subsist in poor and generally precarious conditions. In conflict regions, institutional care facilities are often the only well established way to care for vulnerable children. Providing access to school education is considered to be key to allow successful integration into society. However, adverse effects of psychological disorders may pose another serious obstacle. In semi-structured interviews in a sample of 112 Burundian male youths (mean age ...

  15. A study on reintegration of street children in Burundi: Experienced violence and maltreatment are associated with mental health impairments and impeded educational progress

    OpenAIRE

    Anselm eCrombach; Manassé eBambonyé; Thomas eElbert

    2014-01-01

    Street children are exposed to violence, and subsist in poor and generally precarious conditions. In conflict regions, institutional care facilities are often the only well established way to care for vulnerable children. Providing access to school education is considered to be key to allow successful integration into society. However, adverse effects of psychological disorders may pose another serious obstacle. In semi-structured interviews in a sample of 112 Burundian male youths (mean age ...

  16. Imagining the Great Lakes Region: discourses and practices of civil society regional approaches for peacebuilding in Rwanda, Burundi and DR Congo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van M.

    2008-01-01

    The idea has gained ground in recent years that, as conflicts in the countries of the Great Lakes Region are strongly interlinked, regional approaches are necessary to resolve them. This interest in regional dimensions of conflict and peacebuilding also gains currency in other parts of the world.

  17. Mécanisme pour un Développement Propre (MDP) du Protocole de Kyoto :barrières et opportunités pour les pays moins avancés d’Afrique. Cas du Burundi/Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol: barriers and opportunities for the least developed countries in Africa. Case study of Burundi.

    OpenAIRE

    Bisore, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Du Protocole de Kyoto est née une série d’objectifs de réduction des émissions de GES. Le respect de ces objectifs peut entraîner des coûts très lourds pour les économies des pays développés engagés dans la lutte contre les changements climatiques. Pour minimiser les coûts imposés par ces objectifs, des instruments économiques ont été développés, avec notamment la création de marchés du carbone. Y participent les trois mécanismes de flexibilité du Protocole de Kyoto parmi lesquels figure le M...

  18. Contribution à l’étude de l’accompagnement psychosocial de la femme enceinte dans les services de Prévention de la Transmission Mère-Enfant du VIH au Burundi/Contribution to the study of psychosocial support to pregnant women in the services of Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV in Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Irambona, Rénovate

    2012-01-01

    L’annonce des résultats du diagnostic d’une maladie grave est toujours un moment difficile à vivre pour le patient et, dans une moindre mesure, pour le médecin. Lorsqu’il s’agit du VIH/SIDA, la difficulté est d’autant plus importante que bien souvent, cette maladie véhicule honte et culpabilité avec risque de stigmatisation de la personne séropositive. Chez les femmes enceintes burundaises, cette situation est encore plus préoccupante. Des barrières liées au contexte socio-culturel les pousse...

  19. 9 CFR 93.505 - Certificate for swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF... Angola, Argentina, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi...

  20. Extraction de l'Huile Essentielle Complète des Fleurs de Cananga Odorata de la Plaine de l'Imbo: Vers la Vulgarisation d'une Nouvelle Filière de Plante Industrielle au Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    De Cliff, Steve; Harerimana, Pierre Claver

    2013-01-01

    The Cananga odorata, commonly known as "ylang-ylang", is a very fragrant plant now growing in the Imbo plain. The extraction of essential oils from flowers of that plant, performed by hydrodistillation few days after flowering, and only under non optimal experimental conditions, has yet to give oil with physico-chemical properties very consistent with international standards. In effect, with a density of 0.940, a refractive index of 1.502, an acidic index of 0.421, and a particularly high est...

  1. Mécanisme pour un développement propre (MDP) du protocole de Kyoto: barrières et opportunités pour les pays moins avancés d'Afrique :cas du Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Bisore, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Du Protocole de Kyoto est née une série d’objectifs de réduction des émissions de GES. Le respect de ces objectifs peut entraîner des coûts très lourds pour les économies des pays développés engagés dans la lutte contre les changements climatiques. Pour minimiser les coûts imposés par ces objectifs, des instruments économiques ont été développés, avec notamment la création de marchés du carbone. Y participent les trois mécanismes de flexibilité du Protocole de Kyoto parmi lesquels figure le M...

  2. Incidencia del renacimiento Africano en la cooperación para el desarrollo socioeconómico regional. Estudio de caso Sudáfrica-Burundi periodo 2007-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Kathirgamu Gaviria, Kamaladevy

    2012-01-01

    En el sistema internacional África es un continente que todavía se encuentra jalonando en su proceso de desarrollo socioeconómico. Esquemas de cooperación norte-sur no han logrado los resultados esperados en el continente y por esta razón es necesario mirar hacía otras alternativas. Este trabajo de grado presenta un modelo de cooperación regional y de cooperación sur-sur que surge del Renacimiento Africano para responder a este dilema de la cooperación tradicional. Presenta los aspectos princ...

  3. Effets des matières organiques et minérales sur la réhabilitation des sols acides de montagne du Burundi : résumé

    OpenAIRE

    Rishirumuhirwa, T.; Roose, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Les tropiques humides d'altitude sont caractérisés par des sols ferrallitiques, acides, très désaturés, carencés en phosphore et à très faible productivité. On les observe notamment dans les régions bananières des plateaux d'Afrique Orientale où les densités de population sont très élevées (500 à plus de 1000 habitants au km2), sur des collines aux pentes fortes. Les agriculteurs de ces régions ont développé des systèmes de production basés sur la concentration et le recyclage des matières or...

  4. Sustainable restitution/recultivation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RECHERCHE02

    ... River at the Nyanza Salt. Mine, 6=Malagarasi River at the Uvinza-Nguruka Bridge,. 7=Malagarasi River at the Kasulu-Kibondo Bridge and 8=Malagarasi. River at the Burundi-Tanzania Border. The Malagarasi River is about. 450 km long from the Burundi-Tanzania Border at Manyovu area in. Buhigwe District to the Lake ...

  5. relative performance of staking techniques on yield of climbing bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    such as banana and sisal fibres has been identified to be a potential alternative. In Burundi, for instance, where banana fibre is sufficiently available, fibres can offer the benefit of reduced utilisation of stakes. The objective of this study was to identify the most suitable staking option of climbing beans in Burundi, targeting ...

  6. Conflict prevention as pragmatic response to a twofold crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Katja Lindskov; Engell, Troels Gauslå

    2018-01-01

    conflict prevention as an interventionary practice. Through an analysis of the international community's preventive diplomacy vis-à-vis Burundi (2015–2016) we highlight three unintended power effects: privileging the UN's knowledge production created resistance to international involvement from...... the Government of Burundi, it led to a change in patterns of violence and to a backlash against the institutionalization of international monitoring beyond Burundi, and it enabled arguments for further, more forceful, intervention possibilities. This framing enables us to understand the recent return to conflict...

  7. On the suitability of group lending model in South Sudan's small and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the suitability of group lending model in South Sudan's small and medium ... The effectiveness of SMEs as key economic drivers is amongst other things ... Angola, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burundi, and Colombia underscores such a position.

  8. Variability of the recent climate of eastern Africa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schreck, Carl J; Semazzi, Fredrick H. M

    2004-01-01

    .... The region of interest is also known as the Greater Horn of Africa (GHA), and comprises the countries of Burundi, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda, and Tanzania...

  9. Encouraging participatory post-war transitions | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-21

    -state armed groups in security transitions in Colombia, South Africa, El Salvador, Northern Ireland, Kosovo, Burundi, Southern Sudan, Aceh, and Nepal. The researchers analyzed the successes and limits of peace ...

  10. Nutritional Recovery Outcome among Moderately Malnourished ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional Recovery Outcome among Moderately Malnourished Under-five Children in Communities Implementing Positive Deviance - Hearth or Community Health Workers' Nutrition Promotion Approaches in Karusi and Kirundo Provinces, Burundi.

  11. All projects related to | Page 238 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-03-31

    End Date: March 31, 2015. Topic: CONFLICTS, CAPITAL MOVEMENTS, STATE, Economic and social development, MILITARY ACTIVITY. Region: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda, North of Sahara, South of Sahara. Program: Governance and Justice.

  12. Responding to crises in the African Great Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glynne Evans

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available A published Adelphi Paper examines the international responses to the ethnic conflict in Burundi and Rwanda from 1993-97 and its overspill into neighbouring Zaire. This extract provides details of four concrete proposals.

  13. All projects related to | Page 149 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: VIOLENCE, ETHNIC CONFLICTS, SOCIAL INEQUALITY, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, POLITICAL CONFLICTS. Region: Burundi, Kenya, Mozambique, ... Topic: DIVISION OF LABOUR, WOMEN WORKERS, WORK AT HOME, GENDER ANALYSIS, WOMEN'S PARTICIPATION. Region: Central Asia, Far East Asia, ...

  14. Kliimamuutuste mõju laboratoorium / Andres Tarand

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tarand, Andres, 1940-

    2001-01-01

    Segadused Ida-Aafrika riikides, nende põhjused. Tabel: Ida-Aafrika riikide mõned arengunäitajad: Etioopia, Sudaan, Somaali, Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania, Keenia. Autor: Rahvaerakond Mõõdukad. Parlamendisaadik

  15. Understanding and Responding to Conflict in Africa: Crisis Response versus Conflict Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Sciences Research Council Press, 2005). 61 Khadiagalia, “Burundi.” 33 There are indications that both the decision to focus on technical...G-7 17. The Ralliement pour la Démocratie et le Développement Economique et Social (RADDES), G-10 18. The Rassemblement du Peuple Burundais (RPB...Town, South Africa: Human Sciences Research Council Press, 2005. Boshoff, Henri and Jean Marie Gasana. “Mapping the Road to Peace in Burundi: The

  16. World Small Hydropower Development Report 2013 - Eastern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jonker Klunne, W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available cent) in electricity generation in Burundi, Ethiopia, Zambia, Mozambique and Malawi and it produces a significant amount of electricity in Uganda, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Madagascar and Kenya. The island topography of Seychelles is not suitable... Energy Information Portal – Reegle3 d. Burundi information: International Renewable Energy Agency. Renewable Energy Profiles4 e. The International Journal on Hydropower & Dams5 f. Kenya, Ministry of Energy6 g. Madagascar, Agence de Développement de l...

  17. Implications of ecological and social characteristics to community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Latitude 1° and 12° south and it is boarded with Uganda,. Burundi, Rwanda, Kenya, Malawi, Zambia and. Mozambique. ... attracts tourism activities. Physiographic feature and landforms allows for different social ..... pasture land and this has pushed wildlife animal further into protected areas. On the other hand there is large.

  18. 7804 PERFORMANCE OF IMPROVED BEAN VARIETIES IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Win7Ent

    2013-06-03

    Jun 3, 2013 ... available P and between Selian 97 and soil total nitrogen in the first season. In. Kasulu, average yields ..... neighboring countries, particularly in Burundi, has a higher demand for the non- yellow varieties like .... Graham PH Some problems in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation in. Phaseolus vulgaris.

  19. Mapping soil carbon stocks of Central Africa using SOTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the soil carbon stocks of Central Africa although such baseline data are needed for research and policy development on soil carbon changes. Estimates are presented based on a 1:2 million scale soil and terrain (SOTER) database for Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and

  20. African Union approaches to peacebuilding: Efforts at shifting the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article argues that the African Union (AU) approach to peacebuilding, ... of Pretoria, South Africa and acts as the head of the Department's Institute for Strategic ... global South agency, decolonisation and African decolonial political thought. .... EAC in bringing peace back to Burundi in 2015 (ICG 2016) and the IGAD.

  1. Going to Scale : Sustainable Land Management in the Highlands of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    technologies, institutional options, tools) tested on pilot sites in Ethiopia and Uganda. ... Les récents conflits armés dans l'est de la République démocratique du Congo et au Burundi ont causé une dégradation sans précédente des ressources ...

  2. : tous les projets | Page 475 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... FOREST MANAGEMENT, DISADVANTAGED GROUPS. Région: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, North of Sahara, South of Sahara. Programme: Agriculture et sécurité alimentaire. Financement total : CA$ 749,800.00. Promouvoir la bonne gouvernance des ressources naturelles dans les sociétés post conflits.

  3. : tous les projets | Page 474 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... FOREST MANAGEMENT, DISADVANTAGED GROUPS. Région: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, North of Sahara, South of Sahara. Programme: Agriculture et sécurité alimentaire. Financement total : CA$ 749,800.00. Promouvoir la bonne gouvernance des ressources naturelles dans les sociétés post conflits.

  4. Constitutional Reform and Violent Conflict: Lessons from Africa, for Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Demographic shocks include sudden migration flows and epidemics. Environmental shocks include floods, droughts, famine , and rapid environmental degradation...Mauritius Angola (-1) DRC (+1) Kenya Burundi (Somalia)* Burkina Faso (-1) Djibouti (-2) Nigeria Cape Verde South Africa Cameroon Ethiopia (+1) Lesotho

  5. Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) Collected from Hydrilla Verticillata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alpha- and ß-diversity values indicated that the chironomid communities on aquatic plants from Lake Bisina and Lake Tanganyika (Burundi) were markedly different. Studies of chironomids and other invertebrates associated with macrophytes in other African lakes will add significantly to knowledge of the natural history of ...

  6. AIDS awareness among women and its influence on attitude toward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sources of information were ranked from health care workers (97.5%), mass media (91.2%) and clerical leader (87.9%). Conclusion: This research revered discrepancies on HIV knowledge between urban and rural women. Misunderstanding on HIV/AIDS remains in Burundi women even having high level of awareness.

  7. Relative susceptibility of banana cultivars to Xanthomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Mwangi M, Valentine G, Aritua V, Ivey ML, Miller SA, Smith JJ. (2009). Confirmation of Xanthomonas vasicola causative organism of. Banana Xanthomonas Wilt in Tanzania, Burundi and Kenya. Plant. Pathol. 57: 170-177. Denman S, Kirk SA, Brasier CM, Webber JF (2005). In vitro leaf inoculation studies as ...

  8. Improved processing methods to reduce the total cyanide content of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PierGuido

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... The identification of highly effective procedures that reduce the cyanogens contained in cassava roots which require no sophisticated equipment, and can readily be adopted by subsistence farmers is of tremendous importance. This study, which used cassava root samples collected in Burundi, included.

  9. Chart context menu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Algeria, 85. Australia, 7. Azerbaijan, 1. Bangladesh, 1. Belgium, 2. Benin, 3. Brazil, 6. Burundi, 2. Canada, 4. Chile, 1. China, 16. Côte d'Ivoire, 4. Czech Republic, 2. Denmark, 1. Dominican Republic, 2. Egypt, Arab Rep. 4. Estonia, 1. Ethiopia, 2. France, 10. Georgia, 1. Germany, 6. Ghana, 8. Hong Kong SAR, China, 7.

  10. working towards an african peacekeeping capability: key issues

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arianne

    deployment was organised on the basis of 'coalitions of the willing'. This said, it seems that the ASF .... to send a special mission to Burundi, the OAU organised a mission on its own. It was able to negotiate, ... consensus of all OAU member states or should a smaller body be responsible for such decision-making?).16 Thus ...

  11. Publications | Page 205 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Within an exceptionally uncertain and dynamic vulnerability context this thesis advances proposals from the findings towards revising and developing the livelihoods inquiry. ''Resiliency perspective'' comprises people''s ability to mitigate the effects of adversity; their ability to thrive in a... CNDD-FDD in Burundi : the path from ...

  12. Publications | Page 217 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Within an exceptionally uncertain and dynamic vulnerability context this thesis advances proposals from the findings towards revising and developing the livelihoods inquiry. ''Resiliency perspective'' comprises people''s ability to mitigate the effects of adversity; their ability to thrive in a... CNDD-FDD in Burundi : the path from ...

  13. Identity and Cultural Diversity in Conflict Resolution and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since its independence in 1962, Burundi has witnessed conflicts and vio- lence. A multitude of factors help explain these tragedies, which include the creation of a negative image of the 'other'; an ever-strengthened fear of the 'other'; the blood feud between the Hutus and the Tutsis; and an illusion of the dominance of a ...

  14. East African Rarities Committee report and change of remit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    other countries within the Scopus region (Sudan, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Somalia,. Rwanda, Burundi, Zambia, Malawi and the Indian Ocean islands) can be submitted to the editor of Scopus. The committee has recently been expanded and now comprises: Neil Baker, Brian Finch, David Fisher, Colin Jackson,. Jeremy Lindsell ...

  15. The Media and the Rwanda Genocide

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    11 Journalism in a Time of Hate Media Thomas ...... Partly in reaction to this reporting failure in Rwanda, Western media have suffered from exactly the opposite problem ever since. They now ...... He goes on to describe the reaction of the Tutsis in Burundi when they saw the issue: 'They fell sick, they had liver crisis.

  16. AJER VOLUME II-JULY 2014

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    pegged to any major international currency. The countries are thus advised to peg their currency to avoid future fluctuations. Keywords: Exchange rate volatility, East Africa, EGARCH, GARCH, Burundi, Kenya,. Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda. 23 Department of Management Science, Makerere University Business School, ...

  17. East African Rarities Committee (EARC) Rarities Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The East African Rarities Committee assesses records of new and very rare birds occurring in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi. This includes up to the fifth record of any species from each of the five countries. Sightings of species for which there are fewer than five records for a country should be submitted to.

  18. Musa germplasm diversity status across a wide range of agro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    org on 31st January 2014. .... data in this study. Across all sites, 118 farmers were sampled along the transect using a random systematic method. Sampling was done on farms that had at least ..... marketing in Rwanda, Burundi and South. Kivu.

  19. Making peace, failing women during the peace negotiation process

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to document women's experiences of the armed conflict in Uganda and women's peace initiatives in Burundi, Liberia ... crimes such as the exposure of women to anti-personnel mines during the execution of their daily ... peace process that included: Creating voice, space and resources for grassroots participation: Through.

  20. Sustainable Peace and Development in the Great Lakes Region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus for this paper is to recall some of possible areas of socio-economic areas that can be reinforced under cooperation between Rwanda, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) for sustainable peace; leading to sustainable development in the Great Lakes region, Africa. It has been revealed that ...

  1. factors influencing smallholder farmers' bean production and supply

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    In order to meet this growing demand, adoption of better production technologies focusing on improving production and marketing of beans is necessary. In an effort to improve bean production in. Burundi, the bean improvement programme by. Pan-African Bean Research Alliance (PABRA) in collaboration with Institut des ...

  2. Dietary Diversity and Nutritional Status of Pre-School Children from

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJFAND

    2011-07-04

    Jul 4, 2011 ... nutrition indices and results classified according to World Health Organization 2006 cut-off points. Findings showed that 48% and 42% of the children from Butembo. (DRC) and Gitega (Burundi) respectively had consumed food items from less than 3 food groups. Only 7% and 29% of children from Butembo ...

  3. Livelihoods strategies of urban refugees in Kampala

    OpenAIRE

    Michela Macchiavello

    2004-01-01

    Some 15,000 refugees – escapees from wars in Sudan, Rwanda, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia – live in the Ugandan capital, Kampala, without UNHCR assistance.Rejecting residence in rural camps, they have chosen an environment in which they can use their skills to achieve self-sufficiency and dignity.

  4. Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Eudora I.

    1991-01-01

    Includes annotations for 19 government publications from 17 countries: Bolivia, Botswana, Burundi, Chile, Costa Rica, Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Niue, Peru, Rwanda, and the Soviet Union. Topics covered include pornography, poverty, food, and hunger. The effect of library budget pressures on…

  5. On the Afrotropical genus Holmelgonia (Araneae, Linyphiidae, with the description of three new species from the Albertine Rift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Nzigidahera

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of Holmelgonia were found in the mountain forest of Kibira National Park in Burundi: H. afromontana sp. nov. (♂♀, H. bosnasutus sp. nov. (♂♀ and H. disconveniens sp. nov. (♂. A key to the males in the genus, now containing 17 species, is provided.

  6. Tendon transfers in radial nerve palsy with fractures of the humerus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case 1: A 25 year old right handed male soldier who was referred to Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) in February 2008, from Burundi, with non-union of the left humerus and wrist drop. He sustained a compound fracture of the humerus and wrist drop following a gunshot injury a year earlier. Open reduction, plating of the ...

  7. Mainstreaming road safety in the regional integration of the East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The East African Community (EAC) comprising of five states: Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda bear a disproportionate burden of the global public health burden for road traffic injuries (RTIs). In response to this, each state has devised its own road safety measures, but not at the EAC level. This paper aims to ...

  8. louse-borne relapsing fever profile at jimma hospital, ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    ABSTRACT. Background: Louse-borne relapsing fever has been restricted to countries with poor socio economic status, the most important foci being Burundi, Rwanda and Ethiopia. Borrelia recurrentis is the etiologic agent for louse-borne relapsing fever and occurs as epidemic under conditions of overcrowding, poverty, ...

  9. Louse-Borne Relapsing Fever Profile at Jimma Hospital, Ethiopia: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Louse-borne relapsing fever has been restricted to countries with poor socio economic status, the most important foci being Burundi, Rwanda and Ethiopia. Borrelia recurrentis is the etiologic agent for louse-borne relapsing fever and occurs as epidemic under conditions of overcrowding, poverty, draught and ...

  10. GREAT LAKES RÉGION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    96, 93, 88, 60, 40 and 60 percent of the. PBPAs of Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Kenya,. Tanzania and the region respectively is home to at least 50 persons/Km? The banana sy stem in this region is associated. With intensively cultivated land use systems. Average percent agricultural land area Within a 5 x 5 km2 grid stands ...

  11. : tous les projets | Page 338 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: Social Policy, SOCIAL SERVICES, CHILD WELFARE, Poverty alleviation, Economic and social development. Région: Burundi, Kenya, Uganda, North of Sahara, South of Sahara. Programme: Emploi et croissance. Financement total : CA$ 427,500.00. La protection sociale et les collectivités vulnérables en Afrique de ...

  12. Swords into ploughshares: IDRC supports a new kind of peace ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-19

    Oct 19, 2010 ... The PBC anchors a “peacebuilding architecture” that includes a dedicated trust fund and a supporting secretariat. The commission's substantive work is carried out by committees that deal with issues in specific countries: currently the agenda includes Burundi, Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone, and the Central ...

  13. Uganda : tous les projets | Page 4 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    End Date: 31 mars 2015. Sujet: CONFLICTS, CAPITAL MOVEMENTS, STATE, Economic and social development, MILITARY ACTIVITY. Région: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda, North of Sahara, South of Sahara. Programme: Gouvernance et justice.

  14. Pulmonary co-morbidity in HIV-infected sputum AFB smear-negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coulaud JP, Larouze B, Aubry P. Pulmonary complications of human immunodeficiency virus infection in Bujumbura, Burundi. American Review of Respiratory Disease. 1993;147:658-663. 14. Fordham RC, Arbeit RD, Tosteson AN,. Ristola MA, Barber TW, Waddell R, Sox CH,. Brindle RJ, Gilks CF, Ranki A, Bartholomew.

  15. Mirror Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Simon

    Since the massive violence in the 1990s, Rwanda and Burundi have moved in two very different directions in terms of peace and state building. Rwanda is following a path of social engineering, creating a radically new national identity with a new citizenry in order to break with what is perceived ...

  16. Quality Is Culture-Bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbeck, Fred

    Presenting a case study of the African nation of Burundi to illustrate the great variation in the environment in which children are raised in developing and developed nations, this paper focuses on the importance of considering the context of a particular culture and society when educators talk about the quality of early childhood services.…

  17. SOMALIA: Background Information for Operation Restore Hope. 1992-1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-31

    at diplomatic posts at Abidjan, Ivory Coast; Bogota , Colombia; Bujumbura, Burundi; Douala, Cameroon; Lagos, Nigeria; and San Jos6, Costa Rica. He has...came into direct conflict with British authorities in 1899, when he was accused of complicity in the theft of a rifle. After declaring ajihad against all

  18. All projects related to | Page 137 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Program: Agriculture and Food Security. Total Funding: CA$ 1,673,245.00. Cultivate Africa's Future. Project. Africa has the highest proportion of undernourished people in the world. Topic: AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, SMALL FARMS, AGRICULTURE, WOMEN, Food security. Region: Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, ...

  19. Ensuring a food secure Africa: Cultivate Africa's Future Fund 2 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This call is open to applicant organizations that will work in partnership with others to carry out research in one (or more) of the eligible countries: Burundi;; Ethiopia;; Kenya;; Malawi;; Mozambique;; Rwanda;; Tanzania;; Uganda;; Zambia; and; Zimbabwe. Applicant organizations must be developing country organizations ...

  20. Dietary diversity and nutritional status of pre-school children from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional survey was carried out in Gitega health zone (Burundi) and Butembo health zone (Democratic Republic of Congo.DRC) with the objective of establishing dietary diversity and nutritional status of pre-school children fromrural-banana dependent households. The two health zones were selected based on ...

  1. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burundi, Rosemary N. Vol 12, No 1 (2014) - Articles Usimulizi katika Utenzi wa Swifa ya Nguvumali Abstract. ISSN: 0856-552X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News.

  2. In their own words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC and Sierra Leone, the end of armed fighting has not brought with it the longed-for peace. Today, an epidemic of gender-based violence continues to undermine efforts to bring stability.

  3. All projects related to | Page 595 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: PEACE RESEARCH, CONFLICT RESOLUTION. Region: North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Burundi, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Republic of Congo, Sudan. Program: Governance and Justice. Total Funding: CA$ 357,500.00. Understanding Obstacles to Peace in the Great Lakes Region : Actors, Interests and ...

  4. An International Criminal Court of Public Opinion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwknegt, Thijs Bastiaan

    2012-01-01

    In recent months, South Africa, Burundi and the Gambia have terminated their membership of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Observers and academics alike have narrowly portrayed this walkout as an ‘African’ exodus and an ‘African’ problem. But what about Vladimir Putin’s ‘unsigning’ of the

  5. Evolution of the Peace and Security Council of the African Union ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is the ability of the AU to mount properly constituted peace operations such as the AU Missions in Burundi and Sudan. However, even at this early stage, the author cautions that serious challenges, such as a lack of adequate manpower and funding for African peace operations, already plague the PSC. African Insight Vol.

  6. Improving academic literacy by teaching collocations | Nizonkiza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explores the effect of teaching collocations on building academic vocabulary and hence improving academic writing abilities. A pre-/post-test experimental design was used to analyse collocations produced in two tasks completed by the study's participants, English majors at a university in Burundi. They were ...

  7. Why land rights for women are critical | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-05-16

    May 16, 2017 ... Photo credit: UN Women Burundi. “Why waste land on them?' This is what the county official told my father, when he decided to divide the land equally among his eight children-his two sons and six daughters. The new Kenya constitution had just been passed in 2010, and with it, a provision for equal rights ...

  8. How Social Media Affects the Dynamics of Protest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    landline telephones has forced many users to shift to mobile technology and the cell phone market is skyrocketing. In addition, the use of...used as data sources for this study: 1. Algeria 2. Angola 3. Benin 4. Botswana 5. Burkina Faso 6. Burundi 7. Cameroon 8. Cape Verde 9. Central

  9. Use of the shared frailty model to identify the determinants of child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Tobago (in Americas) ; Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia(in North Africa) ;. Botswana, Burundi .... This type of missing information is referred to as unobserved heterogeneity which generates an unexplained heterogeneity in observed time to event data. ..... through the national policy for medical insurance schemes that cover 85% of.

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 401 - 446 of 446 ... Vol 12, No 1-2 (2009), The Role Of African Women In Peace Building And Conflict Resolution: The Case Of Burundi, Abstract. DT Agbalajobi. Vol 9, No 2 ... Vol 16, No 2 (2013), The Storm and Stress of Adolescents with Reading Disabilities: Implications for Teachers and Parents, Abstract. KU Lazarus.

  11. Livelihoods strategies of urban refugees in Kampala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Macchiavello

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Some 15,000 refugees – escapees from wars in Sudan, Rwanda, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia – live in the Ugandan capital, Kampala, without UNHCR assistance.Rejecting residence in rural camps, they have chosen an environment in which they can use their skills to achieve self-sufficiency and dignity.

  12. Robbers or Rebels?: Understanding the Role of Greed and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... it may be explained by opportunities such as resource predation and geography of the area. Drawing largely from fi eld research on social entrepreneurship and reconciliation in Burundi, as well as from extensive fi eld knowledge and a review of academic literature, this article addresses theoretical analysis of rebellion in ...

  13. An Examination of Chinese Foreign Direct Investment into the Economies of Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    all investments, aggregate 2000-2012 investments into industry, mining , construction, and energy were sorted by their proportion to total financial...Data to the UN Reported 2012 Trade Angola No No Benin No Botswana No Burkina Faso No Burundi Cameroon Cape Verde No No Central African Rep. No Chad No

  14. Assessing the Impact of and Needs for Navy Language, Regional Expertise, and Culture Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    personnel into one of three tiers to deter- mine what level of language and cultural training they need. Most airmen are in tier 1 and receive general...LATEST DEPLOYMENT): Algeria Angola Benin Botswana Burkina Burundi Cameroon Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad Comoros Congo

  15. International Military Practice Amidst Ethical Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    posits that we can mine our own creed, cultivate our work, and perhaps change how we cope with it so that we can deal with the minoritization of the...Austria Azerbaijan Bahrain Bangladesh Belgium Belize Bosnia-Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Canada

  16. Potential of household environmental resources and practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cite as: Semakula HM, Song G, Zhang S, Achuu SP. Potential of household environmental resources and practices in eliminating residual malaria transmission: a case study of Tanzania, Burundi, Malawi and Liberia. Afri Health Sci. 2015;15(3):819-27. doi: http://dx.doi. org/10.4314/ahs.v15i3.16. Introduction. Malaria is one ...

  17. Practice-driven evaluation of a multi-layered psychosocial care package for children in areas of armed conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordans, M.J.D.; Komproe, I.H.; Tol, W.A.; Susanty, D.; Vallipuram, A.; Ntamatumba, P.; Lasuba, A.C.; de Jong, J.T.V.M.

    2010-01-01

    Psychosocial and mental health service delivery frameworks for children in low-income countries are scarce. This paper presents a practice-driven evaluation of a multi-layered community-based care package in Burundi, Indonesia, Sri Lanka and Sudan, through a set of indicators; (a) perceived

  18. List of Higher Risk Countries and Territories (IDRC, April 2012 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Afghanistan. Belarus. Burundi. Central African Republic. Congo, Democratic Republic of. Chad. Cuba. Eastern Europe, countries of. Eritrea. Former Soviet Union, countries of. Iran. Iraq. Korea, Democratic People's Republic of. Liberia. Libya. Mali. Myanmar (Burma). Papua New Guinea. Some small island states. Somalia.

  19. List of Higher Risk Countries and Territories (IDRC, September 2012 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Afghanistan. Belarus. Burundi. Central African Republic. Congo, Democratic Republic of. Chad. Cuba. Eastern Europe, countries of. Eritrea. Former Soviet Union, countries of. Iran. Iraq. Korea, Democratic People's Republic of. Liberia. Libya. Mali. Myanmar (Burma). Papua New Guinea. Some small island states. Somalia.

  20. On the suitability of group lending model in South Sudan's small and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The success of this mode of SME funding in selected jurisdictions, namely Angola, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burundi, and Colombia underscores such a position. The socio-economic, legal and political environment of the three jurisdictions studied in this paper where group lending has been successful closely mirror that of ...

  1. Chart context menu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bolivia, 1. Bosnia and Herzegovina, 1. Botswana, 52. Brazil, 13. Bulgaria, 1. Burundi, 2. Cambodia, 2. Cameroon, 11. Canada, 54. Chile, 1. China, 102. Colombia, 10. Côte d'Ivoire, 1. Croatia, 1. Czech Republic, 7. Ecuador, 1. Egypt, Arab Rep. 8. Eritrea, 1. Ethiopia, 84. Finland, 1. France, 53. Gambia, The, 1. Georgia, 1.

  2. West Europe Report, No. 2202

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-13

    few " prophets " who described them as a mere "flash in the pan" that would quickly be extinguished. What a lack of discernment! On the’contrary...34the Church preach in behalf of a mutual, progressive and controlled disarmament," saying that to this end it would be necessary to "negotiate...out by the exhibitors next to Oceanexpo, are to be found. They will come from Saudi Arabia, Bahrein, Benin, Burundi, Cameroon , Congo, Ivory Coast

  3. Analyse de la distribution spatiale des Acanthaceae en Afrique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sci-Nat

    choix des Acanthaceae se justifie par le fait que c'est une famille qui a été largement étudiée de. 1888 à 2001 par environ 427 collecteurs au cours des missions organisées en R.D. Congo, au. Rwanda et au Burundi. La plupart des échantillons de ces différentes récoltes sont conservés dans l'herbier du Jardin Botanique.

  4. Review and three new species of the flat bug genus Neochelonoderus Hoberlandt, 1967 from East Africa (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Aradidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Ernst; Grebennikov, Vasily

    2015-04-17

    The apterous East African Mezirinae flat bug genus Neochelonoderus Hoberlandt 1967 is revised. In addition to known species from Burundi (N. basilewskyi) and Democratic Republic of the Congo (N. straeleni), two new species from Tanzania (N. talaus n. sp. and N. areius n. sp.) and one from Zambia (N. hoberlandti n. sp.) are described and illustrated. A key to the species of Neochelonoderus is presented.

  5. Counseling the traumatised adolescents of the Burundian war : a pastoral study / Ruben Safari

    OpenAIRE

    Safari, Ruben

    2004-01-01

    This research was prompted by the tremendous need for pastoral counselling among the adolescents of Burundi since the civil war ten years ago. Many of them have been traumatised through among others rape, abuse, the murdering of their parents, and the burning down of their houses. Because of the serious lack of pastoral counsellors, these young people have had to survive on their own. Some of them have been involved as soldiers in the fighting among opposing factions, some h...

  6. Impact of Land Reform Migration on Natural Resource Management ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will test the hypothesis that forest resources are an important pull factor for migration into resettlement areas; and that management of forest resources in ... Les récents conflits armés dans l'est de la République démocratique du Congo et au Burundi ont causé une dégradation sans précédente des ressources ...

  7. Special Operations Forces Interagency Counterterrorism Reference Manual. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    CVE. Member countries include Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, Ethiopia , Kenya, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, South Sudan, Tan- zania, and Uganda... Ethiopia . Among the AU goals are to bring about political, social, and economic integration; develop common African positions on issues; achieve...building respect for the law. Oxford Committee for Famine Relief (OXFAM) www.oxfam.org OXFAM represents an alliance of 17 “like-minded orga- nizations

  8. Promouvoir la bonne gouvernance des ressources naturelles dans ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Les récents conflits armés dans l'est de la République démocratique du Congo et au Burundi ont causé une dégradation sans précédente des ressources naturelles, des déplacements massifs des populations vers les écosystèmes fragiles et une défaillance des institutions locales de gouvernance des ressources ...

  9. Au-delà de la justice pénale - vers un nouveau paradigme pour les ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ce projet remet en question ce point de vue dominant en soutenant que ce n'est pas la faiblesse de l'État qui a mené à cette série de cycles de violence de masse en Afrique, mais plutôt la nature même de la relation entre l'État et la société. En d'autres termes, ... Dossiers. Politics of indigeneity : land restitution in Burundi.

  10. The Impact of Violent Conflict on Child Health: What Are the Channels?

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Verwimp; Tom Bundervoet; Richard Akresh

    2010-01-01

    Child health during and after violent conflicts has been a priority for both policymakers and academics, as ill-health in early life can be impossible to make up for in later life, and has important effects on education and adult wages. In order for policy interventions to mitigate health impacts, it is essential to understand the channels through which conflict impacts on child health. This briefing uses empirical results of research in Burundi and Rwanda to identify these channels. It outli...

  11. 2233-IJBCS-Article-Mouamfaon Mama

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Hall P, Bawa K. 1993. Methods to assess the impact of extraction of non timber tropical forest products on plant population. Economic Botany, 47(3): 234-. 247. Havyarimana F. 2009. Impact de la distribution spatiale des espèces arborescentes sur la diversité végétale dans la réserve naturelle forestière de. Bururi (Burundi).

  12. Poverty reduction in a refugee-hosting economy: A natural experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Maystadt, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    The role of migration in reducing poverty in developing countries has been investigated mainly from the perspective of migrants and their relatives. This paper exploits the time and spatial variations in the way households in the region of Kagera (Tanzania) traced between 1991 and 2004 have been affected by massive refugee inflows to assess how migration may affect poverty in the hosting communities. Large population inflows from Burundi and Rwanda have improved the welfare of the hosting pop...

  13. Commanding Coalitions: The Diplomat-at-Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-20

    streets of Rome and Berlin. He was a curious mixture of American, Indo- European, and everything in between. 27 When interviewed by the Academy of...first half, explaining how a kid from west Texas – a college dropout –makes it to four-star general. The second half of American Soldier deals with...Australia, Bahrain, Belgium, Burundi, Canada, China, Congo , India, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Morocco, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Poland, Qatar, Romania

  14. Le rôle des milices, des autorités malveillantes et du capital voyou ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Elle documentera les rapports entre les milices, l'extraction illégale de minéraux du conflit tels que le coltan, et les éléments voyous au sein de l'État qui permettent qu'on utilise les ... Burundi, Congo, République démocratique du, Éthiopie, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalie, South Sudan, Ouganda, Nord du Sahara, Sud du Sahara ...

  15. IDRA 2016 Call for Applications Word doc_FR

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Carole Labrie

    18 mai 2016 ... au Burundi, en (République populaire démocratique de) Corée, à Cuba, en Érythrée, à Gaza, en Iran, en. Iraq, en Libye, au Mali, au Niger, au Nigeria, ... Guinée, petits États insulaires [Comores, Maurice, Sao Tomé-et-Principe, Seychelles, Suriname, Tunisie,. Timor-Leste et Océanie (Fidji, Îles Cook, Îles ...

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    13 sept. 2012 ... spécifiquement drépanocytaire sur le profil radio-clinique associé à la recherche biologique du Bacille de Koch. Sa conclusion de la faible prévalence de la tuberculose pulmonaire du nourrisson (3,7%) à l'ère du VIH-SIDA est identique à la celle de notre étude (6%). Il en est de même au Burundi.

  17. Defense Institution Building in Africa: An Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    nationals living in Africa. Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire, Gabon, Madagascar , and Réunion Island each host more than 10,000 French nationals.2 Mali, the...cannot be an island of probity in a sea of misconduct.”32 Similarly, the defense sector is unlikely to be efficient and accountable if the rest of...Zambia Burkina Faso Burundi Cameroon Djibouti Ghana Madagascar Niger Rwanda South Africa Tanzania Number of countries 7 8 10 SOURCE: Department of

  18. Cyber Infrastructure Protection. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    time communications via email, or instant messaging, or asynchronous methods like blogs and texts.12 As a con- sequence, researchers can mine these...Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana , Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burma, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chad...Political Rights. science research may benefit from data mining online forums and websites to develop data sets.63 Such ef- forts may prove

  19. Perception des prestataires de soins sur l'utilisation du partogramme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'objectif de cette étude avait pour objectif de documenter la perception des prestataires de soins à l'utilisation du partogramme et les barrières à son utilisation dans les formations sanitaires du Burundi. Méthodes: Des interviews et focus groups ont été réalisés avec des prestataires, en français et en langue locale le ...

  20. False positive HIV diagnoses in resource limited settings: operational lessons learned for HIV programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Leslie; Klarkowski, Derryck; O'Brien, Daniel P

    2013-01-01

    Access to HIV diagnosis is life-saving; however the use of rapid diagnostic tests in combination is vulnerable to wrongly diagnosing HIV infection when both screening tests give a false positive result. Misclassification of HIV patients can also occur due to poor quality control, administrative errors and lack of supervision and training of staff. Médecins Sans Frontières discovered in 2004 that HIV negative individuals were enrolled in some HIV programmes. This paper describes the result of an audit of three sites to review testing practices, implement improved testing algorithms and offer re-testing to clients enrolled in the HIV clinic. In the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Burundi and Ethiopia patients were identified for HIV retesting. In total, 44 false-positive patients were identified in HIV programmes in DRC, two in Burundi and seven in Ethiopia. Some of those identified had been abandoned by partners or started on anti-retroviral therapy or prophylaxis. Despite potential damage to programme reputations, no impact in terms of testing uptake occurred with mean monthly testing volumes stable after introduction of re-testing. In order to prevent the problem, training, supervision and quality control of testing procedures were strengthened. A simple and feasible confirmation test was added to the test algorithm. Prevalence of false positives after introducing the changes varied from zero percent (95% CI 0%-8.2%) to 10.3 percent (95% CI: 7.2%-14.1%) in Burundi and DRC respectively. False HIV diagnoses were found in a variety of programme settings and had devastating individual consequences. We re-tested individuals in our programmes while instituting improved testing procedures without a negative impact on test uptake. Considering the importance of correct diagnosis to the individual, as well as the resources needed to care for someone with HIV, it is critical to ensure that all patients registered in HIV programmes are accurately diagnosed.

  1. 760-IJBCS-Article-Tatien Masharabu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR GATSING

    La présente étude des phytocénoses du Parc National de la Ruvubu. (PNR), la plus grande aire protégée du. Burundi, a été réalisée afin de fournir aux différents partenaires de sa gestion un outil de référence sur la variabilité structurale des communautés végétales de cette aire protégée où les travaux relatifs à la flore et à ...

  2. To Walk the Earth in Safety: The United States’ Commitment to Humanitarian Mine Action and Conventional Weapons Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    San Bernabé, waiting for medical attention. During Halloween, they can play on the streets just like other kids . Chile In FY 2006, the Office of...COunTRy PROfILES 10 AfRICA 12 Angola 13 Benin 14 Burundi 14 Central African Republic 14 Chad 15 The Democratic Republic of the Congo 16 Eritrea 16...Guinea-Bissau 17 Kenya 18 Mauritania 18 Mozambique 19 Namibia 20 Republic of Congo 20 Rwanda 20 Senegal 21 Sudan 22 Togo 23 Uganda 23 ASIA 24

  3. Kenya | Page 60 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    En décrivant et en analysant les conflits prolongés dans la région des Grands Lacs, en Afrique, cet ouvrage met en évidence les obstacles à la paix plutôt que les causes profondes des litiges. Il comprend également des études de cas qui ont été réalisées au Burundi, en République démocratique du Congo, dans le nord ...

  4. Amenaza Interdependiente en la Región de los Grandes Lagos

    OpenAIRE

    Amaya Rojas, Estefanía

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo de esta monografía es analizar los alcances de la presencia de grupos armados ilegales como elementos determinantes en el origen de un subcomplejo de seguridad regional entre la República Democrática del Congo, Ruanda y Burundi. Se busca explicar cómo un conflicto étnico se traduce en la presencia de grupos insurgentes, y a su vez, establece una amenaza interdependiente entre los líderes políticos de dichos países, que permite hablar del subcomplejo de seguridad....

  5. Understanding Obstacles to Peace : Actors, Interests, and Strategies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    24 févr. 2011 ... En décrivant et en analysant les conflits prolongés dans la région des Grands Lacs, en Afrique, cet ouvrage met en évidence les obstacles à la paix plutôt que les causes profondes des litiges. Il comprend également des études de cas qui ont été réalisées au Burundi, en République démocratique du ...

  6. Hope in Africa?: social representations of world history and the future in six African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabecinhas, Rosa; Liu, James H; Licata, Laurent; Klein, Olivier; Mendes, Júlio; Feijó, João; Niyubahwe, Aline

    2011-10-01

    Data on social representations of world history have been collected everywhere in the world except sub-Saharan Africa. Two studies using open-ended data involving university students from six African countries fill this gap. In Study 1, nominations from Cape Verde and Mozambique for the most important events in world history in the past 1000 years were dominated by war and politics, recency effects, and Western-centrism tempered by African sociocentrism on colonization and independence. The first three findings replicated previous research conducted in other parts of the world, but the last pattern contrasted sharply with European data. Study 2 employed a novel method asking participants how they would begin the narration of world history, and then to describe a major transition to the present. Participants most frequently wrote about the evolution of humanity out of Africa, followed by war and then colonization as a beginning, and then replicated previous findings with war, colonization, and technology as major transitions to the present. Finally, when asked about how they foresaw the future, many participants expressed hope for peace and cooperation, especially those facing more risk of collective violence (Burundi and Congo). A colonial/liberation narrative was more predominant in the data from former Portuguese colonies (Angola, Cape Verde, and Guinea-Bissau) than from former Belgian colonies (Burundi and Congo).

  7. Ranking malaria risk factors to guide malaria control efforts in African highlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Protopopoff

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Malaria is re-emerging in most of the African highlands exposing the non immune population to deadly epidemics. A better understanding of the factors impacting transmission in the highlands is crucial to improve well targeted malaria control strategies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A conceptual model of potential malaria risk factors in the highlands was built based on the available literature. Furthermore, the relative importance of these factors on malaria can be estimated through "classification and regression trees", an unexploited statistical method in the malaria field. This CART method was used to analyse the malaria risk factors in the Burundi highlands. The results showed that Anopheles density was the best predictor for high malaria prevalence. Then lower rainfall, no vector control, higher minimum temperature and houses near breeding sites were associated by order of importance to higher Anopheles density. CONCLUSIONS: In Burundi highlands monitoring Anopheles densities when rainfall is low may be able to predict epidemics. The conceptual model combined with the CART analysis is a decision support tool that could provide an important contribution toward the prevention and control of malaria by identifying major risk factors.

  8. Non-specific beneficial effect of measles immunisation: analysis of mortality studies from developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaby, P.; Samb, B.; Simondon, F.; Seck, A. M.; Knudsen, K.; Whittle, H.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine whether the reduction in mortality after standard titre measles immunisation in developing countries can be explained simply by the prevention of acute measles and its long term consequences. DESIGN--An analysis of all studies comparing mortality of unimmunised children and children immunised with standard titre measles vaccine in developing countries. STUDIES--10 cohort and two case-control studies from Bangladesh, Benin, Burundi, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Senegal, and Zaire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Protective efficacy of standard titre measles immunisation against all cause mortality. Extent to which difference in mortality between immunised and unimmunised children could be explained by prevention of measles disease. RESULTS--Protective efficacy against death after measles immunisation ranged from 30% to 86%. Efficacy was highest in the studies with short follow up and when children were immunised in infancy (range 44-100%). Vaccine efficacy against death was much greater than the proportion of deaths attributed to acute measles disease. In four studies from Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, and Burundi vaccine efficacy against death remained almost unchanged when cases of measles were excluded from the analysis. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis and polio vaccinations were not associated with reduction in mortality. CONCLUSION--These observations suggest that standard titre measles vaccine may confer a beneficial effect which is unrelated to the specific protection against measles disease. PMID:7647643

  9. Sequence variability in the coat protein gene of two groups of banana bunchy top isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanitchakorn, R; Harding, R M; Dale, J L

    2000-01-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences of the coat protein gene (DNA-3) of banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) were obtained from five geographical isolates by PCR. Analysis of these sequences revealed two distinct groups of BBTV isolates with those from the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam forming the Asian group while the South Pacific/African group consisted of isolates from Australia, Burundi and Fiji. At the nucleotide level, the sequences of DNA-3 were more similar between isolates from the same group (maximum 5.86%) than between members of the two different groups (maximum 13.05%). At the amino acid level, the BBTV coat protein remained highly conserved, with a maximum of bananas. The high level of conservation in the BBTV coat protein suggests that any of the DNA-3 sequences presented in this study would probably be equally effective as transgene in attempts to generate transgenic banana plants with resistance to both groups of BBTV isolates.

  10. Stemming the tide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rweyemamu, C

    1994-09-01

    The Ngara district of Tanzania has a per capita annual income of less than 1500 Tanzanian shillings (US$3). Burundians and Rwandans have fled to the Ngara and Karagwe districts of Tanzania to escape ethnic violence in their home countries. The entire region of Kagera as well as Burundi and Rwanda are among the hardest hit by AIDS. Local observers have noted a high degree of unprotected sexual intercourse in the Burundian camp and in surrounding villages. Refugees outnumber locals three to one, with members of both groups coming together for sex. Men are even beginning to trade much needed food for sex. The prevalence of unprotected, frequent sex is also expected to rise as Rwandan refugees get settled into their surroundings, but most remain for now too preoccupied with thoughts of lost relatives to think about sex. AIDS along with unprecedented environmental destruction will seriously affect both these host districts in Tanzania and refugees. Safer sex education is urgently needed.

  11. Exploring the Legacies of Armed Rebellion in Burundi’s Maquis par Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Van Acker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution explores the legacies of armed rebellion in post-war Burundi, where two of the main political parties, the ruling CNDD-FDD and the FNL, are former rebel movements. It aims to add a micro-political perspective to the discussion on the transformation of rebel groups into political parties, and bring some nuance to the normative underpinnings of this debate. Based on observations of the role of local leaders with an FNL past, and of retrospective popular appreciation for wartime governance by the FNL in its stronghold of Bujumbura Rural, the paper argues that beyond the symptoms of a violent political culture, this legacy should also be understood as a complex source of post-war power and legitimacy.

  12. Seroprevalence of antibodies against Taenia solium cysticerci among refugees resettled in United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Seth E; Townes, John M; Wilkins, Patricia P; Noh, John C; Lee, Deborah; Rodriguez, Silvia; Garcia, Hector H; Stauffer, William M

    2012-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a disease caused by central nervous system infection by the larval stage of the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium. In developing countries, NCC is a leading cause of adult-onset epilepsy. Case reports of NCC are increasing among refugees resettled to the United States and other nations, but the underlying prevalence among refugee groups is unknown. We tested stored serum samples from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Migrant Serum Bank for antibodies against T. solium cysts by using the enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot. Seroprevalence was high among all 4 populations tested: refugees from Burma (23.2%), Lao People's Democratic Republic (18.3%), Bhutan (22.8%), and Burundi (25.8%). Clinicians caring for refugee populations should suspect NCC in patients with seizure, chronic headache, or unexplained neurologic manifestations. Improved understanding of the prevalence of epilepsy and other associated diseases among refugees could guide recommendations for their evaluation and treatment before, during, and after resettlement.

  13. Appetitive Aggression in Women: Comparing Male and Female War Combatants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danie eMeyer-Parlapanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Appetitive aggression refers to positive feelings being associated with the perpetration of violent behavior and has been shown to provide resilience against the development of PTSD in combatants returning from the battlefield. Until this point, appetitive aggression has been primarily researched in males. This study investigates appetitive aggression in females. Female and male combatants and civilians from Burundi were assessed for levels of appetitive aggression. In contrast to non-combatants, no sex difference in appetitive aggression could be detected for combatants. Furthermore, each of the female and male combatant groups displayed substantially higher levels of appetitive aggression than each of the male and female civilian control groups. This study demonstrates that in violent contexts, such as armed conflict, in which individuals perpetrate numerous aggressive acts against others, the likelihood for an experience of appetitive aggression increases- regardless of whether the individuals are male or female.

  14. Découverte d’une culture africaine et fantasmes d’un missionnaire. Le Dictionnaire français-kirundi du Père Van der Burgt (1903 entre ethnographie, exégèse biblique et orientalisme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Chrétien

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Un des premiers regards extérieurs portés sur l’Afrique des Grands Lacs nous vient du Père blanc hollandais Van der Burgt, missionnaire au Burundi. En 1903 il publie un dictionnaire encyclopédique français‑kirundi, dont l’influence sera durable auprès des lettrés de ce pays. Or cet ouvrage est autant nourri d’une érudition ethnographique, historique et biblique mal contrôlée que d’enquêtes sur le terrain. Il exprime une obsession raciale, celle de la quête des origines orientales des populations noires et, en particulier, de l’assimilation de la catégorie tutsi à une souche hamito‑sémitique. Il est même tenté par des formes ésotériques de l’orientalisme qui le mènent jusqu’en Inde, en Polynésie ou aux révélations de la mystique allemande Catherine Emmerich. La culture burundaise se retrouve capturée par cet imaginaire venu des bibliothèques européennes et elle est décrite comme le fruit d’une dégénérescence, prolongeant le mythe de la malédiction de Cham.One of the first exogenous looks on the Great Lakes region of Africa came from a missionary in Burundi, the Dutch White Father Van der Burgt. He published in 1903 a French‑Kirundi encyclopaedic dictionary, which left a lasting influence on that countries scholarship. This book was both based on fieldwork and poorly‑controlled ethnographic, historical and biblical scholarship. It expressed a peculiar racial obsession : the quest for the Oriental origins of African populations and particularly the inclusion of the Tutsi category into a Hamito‑Semitic stock. Van der Burgt was even influenced by esoteric forms of orientalism, which drove his thoughts as far as India, Polynesia, or the revelations of the German mystic Catherine Emmerich. The Burundese culture was thus trapped by this imagination born out of the European libraries and it was described as the result of degeneration, based on the myth of the curse of Ham.

  15. Cost of epilepsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelczyk, Adam; Reese, Jens Peter; Dodel, Richard; Hamer, Hajo M

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this review was to overview published cost-of-illness (COI) studies of epilepsy and their methodological approaches. Epilepsy imposes a substantial burden on individuals and society as a whole. The mean prevalence of epilepsy is estimated at 0.52% in Europe, 0.68% in the US, and peaks up to 1.5% in developing countries. Estimation of the economic burden of epilepsy is of pivotal relevance to enable a rational distribution of healthcare resources. This is especially so with the introduction of the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the marketing of vagal-nerve stimulators and the resurgence of new surgical treatment options, which have the potential to considerably increase the costs of treating epilepsy.A systematic literature review was performed to identify studies that evaluated direct and indirect costs of epilepsy. Using a standardized assessment form, information on the study design, methodological framework and data sources were extracted from each publication and systematically reported. We identified 22 studies worldwide on costs of epilepsy. The majority of the studies reflected the costs of epilepsy in Europe (three studies each for the UK and Italy, one study each for Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, France and the EU) and the US (four studies), but studies were also available from India (two), Hong Kong, Oman, Burundi, Chile and Mexico. The studies utilized different frameworks to evaluate costs. All used a bottom-up approach; however, only 12 studies (55%) evaluated direct as well as indirect costs. The range for the mean annual direct costs lay between 40 International Dollar purchasing power parities (PPP-$) in rural Burundi and PPP-$4748 (adjusted to 2006 values) in a German epilepsy centre. Recent studies suggest AEDs are becoming the main contributor to direct costs. The mean indirect costs ranged between 12% and 85% of the total annual costs. Epilepsy is a cost-intensive disorder. A reliable comparison of the different COI

  16. Extent and drainage status of organic soils in the Lake Victoria catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmes, Reni; Barthelmes, Alexandra; Joosten, Hans

    2016-04-01

    When considering peatlands and organic soils in the tropics, the huge areas in SE Asia prevail in public and scientific perception, whereas Africa has largely been out of focus. However, East Africa contains large areas of organic soils as well. They basically occur in the high altitudes of the uplifted flanks of the East African Rift System, isolated volcanoes and the Ethiopian highlands, in the Zambezian floodplains (e.g. Zambia), and in coastal environments (e.g. Mozambique and Madagascar). We used a mapping approach that integrates old field data and maps, specialized landscape and peatland-related knowledge, and modern RS and GIS techniques to elaborate a comprehensive and rather reliable overview of organic soils (incl. peatlands) in the Lake Victoria catchment. Maps at a scale of 1:25,000 have been prepared for Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The land use intensity has been estimated for all organic soil areas based on satellite and aerial imagery. Feeding the Nile River, sustaining a fast growing and widely poor population and already facing climatic changes, organic soils of the Lake Victoria neighbouring countries are partially under heavy threat. We mapped 10,645 km2 of organic soils for the entire area of which 8,860 km2 (83.2%) seem to be in near natural condition. We assume slightly drainage and low degradation for 564 km2 (5.3%) and intensive drainage and heavy degradation for 1,222 km2 (11.5%). Degradation hotspot is Burundi with 522 km2 (79.5%) of heavily drained and degrading organic soils. This area assessment has been quite conservative to not overestimate the extent of organic soils. A reserve of 5-7,000 km2 of wetlands in the Lake Victoria catchment may include peatlands too, which needs to be confirmed in field surveys. Considering the key role of peatlands and organic soils for water provision and regulation and their rapid degradation due to drainage and inappropriate use, this inventory might be a step towards organic soil

  17. Assessment of the vulnerability and the resilience of the population at risk of multi-hazard: a support to geo-risk management in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michellier, Caroline; Kervyn, François; Tréfon, Théodore; Wolff, Eléonore

    2013-04-01

    GeoRisCA is a project which aims at studying the geo-risk in the Kivu region (DRC, Rwanda, Burundi), in order to support risk management. The approach developed in GeoRisCA combines methodologies from various disciplines, which will allow the analyses of seismic, volcanic and mass-movement hazards and the vulnerability assessment of the threatened elements. Vulnerability is a complex concept which is commonly defined as the susceptibility of the population, the infrastructures and the natural ecosystems to suffer from damages if a hazard occurs. The densely populated area extended from the North Kivu province in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) to North Burundi and East Rwanda is vulnerable to several geohazards, such as landslides triggered by geodynamical processes (climate, seismicity, volcanism) and possibly worsen by anthropic actions. Located in the East African rift valley, the region is also characterized by a strong seismicity, with increasing people and infrastructure exposed. In addition, east DRC hosts the two most active African volcanoes: Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira. Their activity can have serious impacts, as in 2002 when Nyiragongo directly endangers the ~800.000 inhabitants of Goma city, located ~15 km to the south. Linked to passive volcanic degassing, SO2 and CO2 discharge may also increase the population vulnerability(morbidity, mortality). Focusing specifically on this region, the vulnerability assessment methodology developed in GeoRisCA takes into account "exposure to perturbations" and "adaptive capacity or resilience" of the vulnerable systems. On one hand, the exposure is identified as the potential degree of loss of a given element or set of elements at risk; i.e., the susceptibility of people, infrastructures and buildings with respect to a hazard (social vulnerability). It focuses mainly on land use, and on demographic and socio-economic factors that increase or attenuate the impacts of hazards events on local populations. On the

  18. Child malnutrition in sub-Saharan Africa: A meta-analysis of demographic and health surveys (2006-2016.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessing J Akombi

    Full Text Available Sub-Saharan Africa has one of the highest levels of child malnutrition globally. Therefore, a critical look at the distribution of malnutrition within its sub-regions is required to identify the worst affected areas. This study provides a meta-analysis of the prevalence of malnutrition indicators (stunting, wasting and underweight within four sub-regions of sub-Saharan Africa.Cross-sectional data from the most recent Demographic and Health Surveys (2006-2016 of 32 countries in sub-Saharan Africa were used. The countries were grouped into four sub-regions (East Africa, West Africa, Southern Africa and Central Africa, and a meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the prevalence of each malnutrition indicator within each of the sub-regions. Significant heterogeneity was detected among the various surveys (I2 >50%, hence a random effect model was used, and sensitivity analysis was performed, to examine the effects of outliers. Stunting was defined as HAZ<-2; wasting as WHZ<-2 and underweight as WAZ<-2.Stunting was highest in Burundi (57.7% and Malawi (47.1% in East Africa; Niger (43.9%, Mali (38.3%, Sierra Leone (37.9% and Nigeria (36.8% in West Africa; Democratic Republic of Congo (42.7% and Chad (39.9% in Central Africa. Wasting was highest in Niger (18.0%, Burkina Faso (15.50% and Mali (12.7% in West Africa; Comoros (11.1% and Ethiopia (8.70% in East Africa; Namibia (6.2% in Southern Africa; Chad (13.0% and Sao Tome & Principle (10.5% in Central Africa. Underweight was highest in Burundi (28.8% and Ethiopia (25.2% in East Africa; Niger (36.4%, Nigeria (28.7%, Burkina Faso (25.7%, Mali (25.0% in West Africa; and Chad (28.8% in Central Africa.The prevalence of malnutrition was highest within countries in East Africa and West Africa compared to the WHO Millennium development goals target for 2015. Appropriate nutrition interventions need to be prioritised in East Africa and West Africa if sub-Saharan Africa is to meet the WHO global nutrition target

  19. Women's empowerment and male involvement in antenatal care: analyses of Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in selected African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Larissa; Na, Muzi; Cherewick, Megan; Hindin, Michelle; Mullany, Britta; Ahmed, Saifuddin

    2014-08-30

    Increasing women's status and male involvement are important strategies in reducing preventable maternal morbidity and mortality. While efforts to both empower women and engage men in maternal health care-seeking can work synergistically, in practice they may result in opposing processes and outcomes. This study examines whether a woman's empowerment status, in sum and across economic, socio-familial, and legal dimensions, is associated with male partner accompaniment to antenatal care (ANC). Women's empowerment was measured based on the sum of nine empowerment items in the 2010-2011 Demographic and Health Surveys in eight sub-Saharan African countries: Burkina Faso (n = 2,490), Burundi (n = 1,042), Malawi (n = 1,353), Mozambique (n = 414), Rwanda (n = 1,211), Senegal (n = 505), Uganda (n = 428) and Zimbabwe (n = 459). In cross-sectional analyses, bivariate and multivariable logistic regressions models were used to examine the odds of male partner accompaniment to ANC between women with above-average versus below-average composite and dimensional empowerment scores. In the majority of countries, male accompaniment to ANC was not uncommon. However, findings were mixed. Positive associations in women's composite empowerment and male involvement were observed in Burkina Faso (OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.50) and Uganda (OR = 1.53, 95% CI: 1.00-2.35), and in the economic empowerment dimension in Burkina Faso (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.05-1.47). In Malawi, significant negative associations were observed in the odds of male accompaniment to ANC and women's composite (OR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.62-0.97) and economic empowerment scores (OR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.59-0.94). No significant differences were observed in Burundi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, or Zimbabwe. Women's empowerment can be positively or negatively associated with male antenatal accompaniment. Male involvement efforts may benefit from empowerment initiatives that promote women's participation in social and economic spheres

  20. Development of a multi-layered psychosocial care system for children in areas of political violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordans, Mark Jd; Tol, Wietse A; Komproe, Ivan H; Susanty, Dessy; Vallipuram, Anavarathan; Ntamatumba, Prudence; Lasuba, Amin C; de Jong, Joop Tvm

    2010-06-16

    Few psychosocial and mental health care systems have been reported for children affected by political violence in low- and middle income settings and there is a paucity of research-supported recommendations. This paper describes a field tested multi-layered psychosocial care system for children (focus age between 8-14 years), aiming to translate common principles and guidelines into a comprehensive support package. This community-based approach includes different overlapping levels of interventions to address varying needs for support. These levels provide assessment and management of problems that range from the social-pedagogic domain to the psychosocial, the psychological and the psychiatric domains. Specific intervention methodologies and their rationale are described within the context of a four-country program (Burundi, Sri Lanka, Indonesia and Sudan). The paper aims to contribute to bridge the divide in the literature between guidelines, consensus & research and clinical practice in the field of psychosocial and mental health care in low- and middle-income countries.

  1. JOURNALISTIC IDENTITY AND AUDIENCE PERCEPTIONS: Paradigm and models under construction in the African Great Lakes region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  2. Journalistic identity and audience perceptions: paradigm and models under construction in the African Great Lakes region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  3. Contrôle des glossines dans le Bassin de la Kagéra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geerts, S.

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of the tsetse flies in the Kagera basin. The climate of the African region around the "Great Lakes" induces a strong process of soil weathering which eventually leads to a strong aluminium saturation of the absorption complex, as expressed by the "m" index of Kamprath. The response to aluminium toxicity of the common bean cv. Diacol Calima, a widely grown variety in Burundi, has been studied in pot trials in two ways : (1 Using superficial soil samples of "humiferous high elevation kaolisols" whose "m" index varied between 4 and 92 ; (2 On culture condition consisting of an inert substrate complemented with a nutritional solution to which a serie of soluble aluminium concentrations were added. Under soil condition, biomass produced after a period of 25 days of growth, decreased as from "m" = 33. The number of Rhizobium nodules decreased drastically with aluminium toxicity becoming negligible at "m" - 33. On culture media, rising concentration of aluminium affected growth adversely as well, although root growth inhibition was less pronounced than under soil condition.

  4. Renewable Energy Zones for the Africa Clean Energy Corridor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Grace C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Deshmukh, Ranjit [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ndhlukula, Kudakwashe [International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Radojicic, Tijana [International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Reilly, Jessica [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Multi-criteria Analysis for Planning Renewable Energy (MapRE) is a study approach developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with the support of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The approach combines geospatial, statistical, energy engineering, and economic methods to comprehensively identify and value high-quality wind, solar PV, and solar CSP resources for grid integration based on techno-economic criteria, generation profiles (for wind), and socio-environmental impacts. The Renewable Energy Zones for the Africa Clean Energy Corridor study sought to identify and comprehensively value high-quality wind, solar photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) resources in 21 countries in the East and Southern Africa Power Pools to support the prioritization of areas for development through a multi-criteria planning process. These countries include Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The study includes the methodology and the key results including renewable energy potential for each region.

  5. Health Informatics: Developing a Masters Programme in Rwanda based on the IMIA Educational Recommendations and the IMIA Knowledge Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Graham; Verbeke, Frank; Nyssen, Marc; Betts, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Since 2011, the Regional e-Health Center of Excellence in Rwanda (REHCE) has run an MSc in Health Informatics programme (MSc HI). A programme review was commissioned in February 2014 after 2 cohorts of students completed the post-graduate certificate and diploma courses and most students had started preparatory activity for their master dissertation. The review developed a method for mapping course content on health informatics competences and knowledge units. Also the review identified and measured knowledge gaps and content redundancy. Using this method, we analyzed regulatory and programme documents combined with stakeholder interviews, and demonstrated that the existing MSc HI curriculum did not completely address the needs of the Rwandan health sector. Teaching strategies did not always match students' expectations. Based on a detailed Rwandan health informatics needs assessment, International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA)'s Recommendations on Education in Biomedical and Health Informatics and the IMIA Health Informatics Knowledge Base, a new curriculum was developed and provided a better competences match for the specifics of healthcare in the Central African region. The new approved curriculum will be implemented in the 2014/2015 academic year and options for regional extension of the programme to Eastern DRC (Bukavu) and Burundi (Bujumbura) are being investigated.

  6. Social marketing of condoms: selling protection and changing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, S

    1991-06-01

    Social marketing of condoms in Zaire began in 1987 and sales rose to 8 million in 1990, a notable change from the previous situation where about half a million condoms were distributed by government health clinics only. Social marketing is the use of for-profit sales and marketing techniques for public health problem.s When the Zaire National AIDS Committee initiated social marketing of condoms, with the assistance of Population Services International, they had the experience of successful Asian programs of the 1970s, and the political sanction resulting from the AIDS threat to back them up. Efforts were made to find just the right product name, "Prudence," logo, package, color and slogan by consumer research. Prudence implies responsible behavior, capturing both the AIDS and STD prevention and the family planning markets. Consumers like the package and associate it with quality, since most condoms sold before in Zaire had no special packaging. Distribution outlets include 7000 retail shops, groceries, pharmacies, hotel, social clubs, 300 bars and even Congo River barges which sex workers frequent. The price was set close to that of a pack of gum for 3, or that of a bottle of beer for a dozen. Promotion is limited by a government ban of advertising in mass media, so point of purchase materials, special offers and promotional items are being used. Prudence condoms are now being marketed in Cameroon and Burundi.

  7. Quelle place pour les TIC en formation initiale d’enseignants de français? Le cas de l’Afrique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Karsenti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cet article présente les résultats d’une étude menée dans le cadre de l’Initiative francophone pour la formation à distance des maîtres (IFADEM. Ce projet, copiloté par l’Organisation internationale de la Francophonie (OIF et l’Agence universitaire de la Francophonie (AUF, a pour objectif le développement d’un dispositif hybride qui associe formation traditionnelle, utilisation des technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC et méthodes de formation à distance pour l’enseignement du français. La première expérimentation a pris place dans quatre pays, dont trois d’Afrique : le Burundi, le Bénin et Madagascar. Dans le prolongement du projet IFADEM, cette étude a pour but de dresser un portrait de la place des TIC dans la formation initiale des enseignants de français en Afrique. Nous en concluons que l’intégration des TIC dans la formation initiale des enseignants de français est en cours, ce qui nous amène à recommander des pistes pour une utilisation pertinente des TIC.

  8. Appetitive aggression and adverse childhood experiences shape violent behavior in females formerly associated with combat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike eAugsburger

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the impact of violent experiences during childhood, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and appetitive aggression on everyday violent behavior in Burundian females with varying participation in war. Moreover, group differences in trauma-related and aggression variables were expected. Appetitive aggression describes the perception of violence perpetration as fascinating and appealing and is a common phenomenon in former combatants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 157 females, either former combatants, supporters of armed forces or civilians during the civil war in Burundi. The PTSD Symptom Scale Interview was used to assess PTSD symptom severity, the Appetitive Aggression Scale to measure appetitive aggression and the Domestic and Community Violence Checklist to assess both childhood maltreatment and recent aggressive behavior. Former combatants had experienced more traumatic events, perpetrated more violence and reported higher levels of appetitive aggression than supporters and civilians. They also suffered more severely from PTSD symptoms than civilians but not than supporters. The groups did not differ regarding childhood maltreatment. Both appetitive aggression and childhood violence predicted ongoing aggressive behavior, whereas the latter outperformed PTSD symptom severity. These findings support current research showing that adverse childhood experiences and a positive attitude towards aggression serve as the basis for aggressive behavior and promote an ongoing cycle of violence in post-conflict regions. Female members of armed groups are in need of demobilization procedures including trauma-related care and interventions addressing appetitive aggression.

  9. The Need to Help. The Domestic Arts of International Humanitarism, de Liisa H. Malkki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Fradejas-García

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available La literatura crítica con el humanitarismo ha emergido en el ámbito político internacional para quedarse. Renombrados científicos sociales como Didier Fassin (2012 o Thomas G. Weiss (2016, entre otros, han trabajado sobre los efectos de las intervenciones humanitarias desde diferentes ángulos. Cambiando el clásico enfoque en los beneficiarios, las políticas y los programas para pasar a indagar sobre las organizaciones y los trabajadores humanitarios, Liisa Malkki ha hecho una gran contribución a esta literatura profundizando en el porqué y el cómo de las acciones humanitarias. La autora es conocida por sus reflexiones etnográficas sobre las situaciones de exilio y refugio causadas por las sucesivas guerras y genocidios que asolaron en el último cuarto del siglo XX la zona de los grandes lagos africanos. Durante el genocidio ruandés de 1994, Malkki estaba finalizando un libro sobre un conflicto previo y olvidado en Burundi que provocó la llegada de refugiados hutus a Tanzania. La etnografía resultante, Purity and Exile (1995, explora cómo la violencia política y la cotidianeidad del exilio transforman la identidad y la conciencia histórica de los refugiados.

  10. 13C/Palynological evidence of differential residence times of organic carbon prior to its sedimentation in East African Rift Lakes and peat bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Aucour, Anne-Marie; Bonnefille, Raymonde; Riollet, Guy; Vincens, Annie; Williamson, David

    Most terrestrial plants producing large amounts of organic matter in the East African Rift follow the Calvin (C3) photosynthetic pathway. Their end products have δ13C values of ca. -27 ± 2‰ (vs. PDB). On the contrary, most Cyperaceae (notably Cyperus papyrus and C. latifolius) are characterized by higher 13C contents ° 13C = -10.5 ± 1‰ ) in relation to their Hatch and Slack (C4) photosynthetic cycle. In consequence, δ13C values in total organic matter (TOM) from peat bog or lake cores essentially responded to the proportion of detritus from C4-Cyperaceae. Immediate evidence of the development or disappearance of Cyperaceae around lake margins or in peat bogs can be found in pollen assemblages. Lag times between pollen signals and correlative ° 13C shifts in TOM from cores are therefore indicative of the residence time of organic matter prior to its sedimentation. Delayed sedimentation of TOM will result in 14C anomalies which depend on several parameters, most of them being site specific as shown by examples from a peat bog in Burundi and from southern Lake Tanganyika. An independent assessment of the chronology by high resolution paleomagnetic correlations indicates a ca. 1.5 ka apparent 14C age of TOM in Lake Tanganyika at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition.

  11. Poverty and eosinophilia are risk factors for endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutakingirwa, M; Ziegler, J L; Newton, R; Freers, J

    1999-03-01

    To determine the relative risks of socio-demographic, dietary, and environmental factors for endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) in Uganda. Unmatched case control study in Mulago Hospital, Kampala. Cases (n = 61) were sequential patients hospitalized with an echocardiographic diagnosis of EMF from June 1995 to March 1996. Controls (n = 120) were concurrent patients with other forms of heart disease (heart controls, n = 59) and subjects admitted for trauma or elective surgery (hospital controls, n = 61). All consenting subjects answered a structured questionnaire administered by trained interviewers. Complete blood counts, malaria films and stool examination for ova and parasites were performed. Questionnaires elicited information on home address, economic circumstances, variables concerned with environmental exposures and usual diet before becoming ill. After adjustment for age and sex, cases were significantly more likely than controls to have Rwanda/Burundi ethnic origins (P = 0.008). Compared with controls, cases had a lower level of education (P risk for EMF. Absolute eosinophilia is a putative cause of EMF, a finding not explained by parasitism. Data indicate that relative poverty and environmental factors triggering eosinophilia appear to act in a geographically restricted region of Uganda in the aetiology of EMF.

  12. Breastfeeding beliefs and practices of African women living in Brisbane and Perth, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Danielle; Vicca, Natalie; Streiner, Samantha

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of breastfeeding among refugee women from Liberia, Sierra Leone, Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo living in two major capital cities in Australia. Participants were recruited from their relevant community associations and via a snowballing technique. Thirty-one women took part in either individual interviews or facilitated group discussions to explore their experiences of breastfeeding in their home country and in Australia. Thematic analysis revealed four main themes: cultural breastfeeding beliefs and practices; stigma and shame around breastfeeding in public; ambivalence towards breastfeeding and breastfeeding support. Women who originated from these four African countries highlighted a significant desire for breastfeeding and an understanding that it was the best method for feeding their infants. Their breastfeeding practices in Australia were a combination of practices maintained from their countries of origin and those adopted according to Australian cultural norms. They exemplified the complexity of breastfeeding behaviour and the relationship between infant feeding with economic status and the perceived social norms of the host country. The results illustrate the need for policy makers and health professionals to take into consideration the environmental, social and cultural contexts of the women who are purportedly targeted for the promotion of breastfeeding. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Secondary migration and relocation among African refugee families in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weine, Stevan Merrill; Hoffman, Yael; Ware, Norma; Tugenberg, Toni; Hakizimana, Leonce; Dahnweigh, Gonwo; Currie, Madeleine; Wagner, Maureen

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the secondary migration and relocation of African refugees resettled in the United States. Secondary migration refers to moves out of state, while relocation refers to moves within state. Of 73 recently resettled refugee families from Burundi and Liberia followed for 1 year through ethnographic interviews and observations, 13 instances of secondary migration and 9 instances of relocation were identified. A family ecodevelopmental framework was applied to address: Who moved again, why, and with what consequences? How did moving again impact family risk and protective factors? How might policies, researchers, and practitioners better manage refugees moving again? Findings indicated that families undertook secondary migration principally for employment, affordable housing, family reunification, and to feel more at home. Families relocated primarily for affordable housing. Parents reported that secondary migration and relocation enhanced family stability. Youth reported disruption to both schooling and attachments with peers and community. In conclusion, secondary migration and relocation were family efforts to enhance family and community protective resources and to mitigate shortcomings in resettlement conditions. Policymakers could provide newly resettled refugees jobs, better housing and family reunification. Practitioners could devise ways to better engage and support those families who consider moving. 2011 © FPI, Inc.

  14. Trichosporon asahii infection presenting as chronic meningo-ventriculitis and intra ventricular fungal ball: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Udayakumaran, Suhas; Babu, Rachana; Rajamma, Bindhu M; Prakash, Anupam; Panikar, Dilip; Karim, Shamsul; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2015-02-01

    Central nervous system trichosporonosis is a rare clinical entity and so far only six cases including three each of brain abscess and meningitis has been on record. We report a rare case of chronic meningo-ventriculitis and intraventricular fungal ball due to Trichosporon asahii in an 18-year-old immunocompetent male from Burundi, east Africa. Neuroendoscopy showed multiple nodules and a fungal ball within the ventricle, which on culture grew T. asahii. He was initially empirically treated with liposomal amphotericin B. However, the antifungal susceptibility testing of T. asahii isolate revealed high minimum inhibitory concentration for amphotericin B (2 μg ml⁻¹), flucytosine (16 μg ml⁻¹) and caspofungin (2 μg ml⁻¹) but exhibited potent activity for voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole. The patient rapidly succumbed to cardiac arrest before antifungal therapy could be changed. Although disseminated trichosporonosis has been increasingly reported the diagnosis represents a challenge especially in rare clinical settings such as intraventricular fungal ball in the present case, which has not been described previously. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. First report of Rhabdias (Nematoda: Rhabdiasoidea from lungs of montane chameleons in Cameroon: description of two new species and notes on biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lhermitte-Vallarino N.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The lung nematodes of the genus Rhabdias parasitic in chameleons were previously only known from east Africa and Madagascar. Two new species are described from Cameroon: i Rhabdias okuensis n. sp., type-host Chamaeleo (Trioceros quadricornis gracilior, from Mont Oku, is frequent; it resembles R. jarki from Burundi, with a short buccal capsule and a long, thin oesophagus, and is distinguished by its large cervical vesicle and cephalic characters (mouth aperture, papillae. The female parasites are hermaphroditic (spermatozoa identified and they pierce the lung wall and induce lesions, as R. jarki. In the same locality, another chameleon, C. (T. w. wiedersheimi also harbours R. okuensis, as demonstrated with the 12S rDNA and coxI gene sequences. ii R. cristati n. sp., type-host C. (T. cristatus, from Mount Cameroon, is described from one heavily infected specimen; it resembles R. chamaeleonis from East Africa, and is distinguished by the large buccal capsule and the thick apex of the intestine. The free-living phase, studied in R. okuensis, presents characters of other Rhabdias from chameleons: heterogony, development of larvae through matricidal endotoky, infective larval stages with a thick, rounded caudal extremity, exuvium transformed into a thick cuticular sheeth. Each free-living female produces one larva, as in other African Rhabdias, whereas the female of R. gemellipara, a parasite of a Malagasy chameleon, produces two larvae.

  16. Sustainable manufacture of insect repellents derived from Nepeta cataria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patience, Gregory S; Karirekinyana, Ginette; Galli, Federico; Patience, Nicolas A; Kubwabo, Cariton; Collin, Guy; Bizimana, Jean Claude; Boffito, Daria C

    2018-02-02

    Malaria devastates sub-Saharan Africa; the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 212 million people contract malaria annually and that the plasmodium virus will kill 419 000 in 2017. The disease affects rural populations who have the least economic means to fight it. Impregnated mosquito nets have reduced the mortality rate but the Anopheles mosquitoes are changing their feeding patterns and have become more active at dusk and early morning rather than after 22h00 as an adaptation to the nets. Everyone is susceptible to the Anopheles at these times but infants and pregnant women are the most vulnerable to the disease. Plant-based mosquito repellents are as effective as synthetic repellents that protect people from bites. They are sustainable preventative measures against malaria not only because of their efficacy but because the local population can produce and distribute them, which represents a source of economic growth for rural areas. Here, we extract and test the essential oil nepetalactone from Nepeta cataria via steam distillation. Families in endemic areas of Burundi found them effective against bites but commented that the odor was pungent. An epidemiological study is required to establish its clinical efficacy.

  17. Sensibilité du haricot Phaseolus vulgaris à la concentration en aluminium des sols de la région des grands lacs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouters, JFR.

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensibility to soil aluminium concentration of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris in the African "Great Lakes" region. The climate of the African region around the "Great Lakes" induces a strong process of soil weathering which eventually leads to a strong aluminium saturation of the absorption complex, as expressed by the "m" index of Kamprath. The response to aluminium toxicity of the common bean cv. Diacol Calima, a widely grown variety in Burundi, has been studied in pot trials in two ways : (1 Using superficial soil samples of "humiferous high elevation kaolisols" whose "m" index varied between 4 and 92 ; (2 On culture condition consisting of an inert substrate complemented with a nutritional solution to which a serie of soluble aluminium concentrations were added. Under soil condition, biomass produced after a period of 25 days of growth, decreased as from "m" = 33. The number of Rhizobium nodules decreased drastically with aluminium toxicity becoming negligible at "m" - 33. On culture media, rising concentration of aluminium affected growth adversely as well, although root growth inhibition was less pronounced than under soil condition.

  18. Girls and war: an extra vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, M

    1998-01-01

    It is no longer possible to consider the raping of girls as an isolated atrocity of war. In Uganda, guerrilla forces have kidnapped 6000-10,000 children and have forced the "most desirable" girls to become "wives" of warlords. Girls who manage to escape are deeply traumatized and suffer ill health as well as possible social ostracism. In refugee camps, recognition that adolescent girls face special risks of rape and of engaging in the informal prostitution that may expose them to HIV/AIDS has led to the introduction of new measures to increase female security. Families in refugee camps in Burundi and Somalia protect female honor by submitting their daughters to very early marriage, which also abuses the girls' rights. Girls conscripted to military groups are forced to transport materials, cook, or help loot villages. In conditions of war, even girls who remain at home protected by their families must assume extra responsibilities, especially if men go off to fight leaving women with the agricultural and livestock burdens. Girls will be the first children withdrawn from school to help keep the household afloat. Girls and women are also expected to tend those wounded by the very war that destroys the health care services that are vital to meet women's reproductive needs. Efforts are being made to identify rape as a specific war crime, and these efforts should be extended to the kidnapping and forced recruitment of children into combat roles. Moral codes must be reestablished, even if they are only nominal at present.

  19. Eastern and Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdler-brown, B

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on migration and the spread of HIV/AIDS in Eastern and Southern Africa. It includes Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The literature focuses separately on AIDS or migration. HIV/AIDS is widespread and prevalent in these regions. The major concern is that migrants are at risk due to their migration and HIV infection is spread after a return to their home countries. Populations at risk include rural-to-urban migrants, displaced persons in the Sudan and in the Horn of Africa, refugees crossing borders, and pastoralists moving within rural areas. In 1997, there were an estimated 1.3 million refugees in east African countries and 5 million internally displaced due to conflicts in Angola, Mozambique, and South Africa. Risk factors among migrant groups include high rates of partner change, unprotected sexual intercourse, nonuse of condoms, prior sexually transmitted diseases, IV drug use, and residence in a high HIV-prevalence community. Confounding factors may be age, gender, occupation, and mobility. Health services for migrants vary between countries. There are successful models for prevention of HIV. 13 targeted interventions are identified.

  20. Contribution à la promotion de la culture du blé (Triticum aestivum L. au Sud-Kivu, République Démocratique du Congo: Evaluation du potentiel de rendement de deux génotypes d'origine burundaise dans différentes zones agro-écologiques locales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munyuli Bin Mushambanyi, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Contribution on Wheat Culture Development in South-Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo.Yield-performance of Two Genotypes, from Burundi, in Various Local Agroecological Zones. In four sites (Lemera, Bugobe, Mulungu & Cifunzi, two genotypes (Romany & Kenya Nyangumi were evaluated in contrasting agroecological conditions for their yield adaptibility, during two cropping seasons, from 1998 to 1999. Multilocational trials were set up, in different sites, following a split-plot experimental design, with repeated measurements during two cropping seasons. Genotypes were the main plots and the manures, the subplots. The subplots were randomized with main plots and replicated four times. Differences between environments, genotypes and cropping seasons were significant for the grain yield. The effects of genotypes by environment (G X E interaction, for grain yield was significant. The general mean yield obtained when genotypes are combined or not with organic fertilizers is of 1.46 t/ha. The best yields were recorded at Mulungu (1.83 t/ha and Lemera (1.61 t/ha sites with Kenya Nyangumi genotype. The high yields were recorded at Bugobe (1.51 t/ha and Lemera (1.88 t/ha sites with Romany genotype. The application of organic fertilizers increase the yield of genotypes up to 10- 36%.

  1. Multispacer Typing Technique for Sequence-Based Typing of Bartonella quintana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, C.; La Scola, B.; Lindroos, H.; Andersson, S. G. E.; Raoult, D.

    2005-01-01

    Bartonella quintana is a worldwide fastidious bacterium of the Alphaproteobacteria responsible for bacillary angiomatosis, trench fever, chronic lymphadenopathy, and culture-negative endocarditis. The recent genome sequencing of a B. quintana isolate allowed us to propose a genome-wide sequence-based typing method. To ensure sequence discrimination based on highly polymorphic areas, we amplified and sequenced 34 spacers in a large collection of B. quintana isolates. Six of these exhibited polymorphisms and allowed the characterization of 4 genotypes. However, the strain variants suggested by the noncoding sequences did not correlate with the results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), which suggested a higher degree of variability. Modification of the PFGE profile of one isolate after nine subcultures confirmed that rearrangement frequencies are high in this species, making PFGE unreliable for epidemiological purposes. The low extent of sequence heterogeneity in the species suggests a recent emergence of this bacterium as a human pathogen. Direct typing of natural samples allowed the identification of a fifth genotype in the DNA extracted from a human body louse collected in Burundi. We have named the typing technique herein described multispacer typing. PMID:15634949

  2. Understanding Mass Atrocity Prevention during Periods of Democratic Transition

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    Stephen McLoughlin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding of why some countries experience mass atrocities during periods of democratic transition, while others do not. Scholars have long regarded democracy as an important source of stability and protection from mass atrocities such as genocide, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing. But democratic transition itself is fraught with the heightened risk of violent conflict and even mass atrocities. Indeed, a number of studies have identified regimes in transition as containing the highest risk of political instability and mass atrocities. What is overlooked is the question of how and why some regimes undergo such transitions without experiencing mass atrocities, despite the presence of a number of salient risk factors, including state-based discrimination, inter-group tension and horizontal inequality. Utilizing a new analytical framework, this article investigates this lacuna by conducting a comparative analysis of two countries—one that experienced atrocities (Burundi during transition, and one that did not (Guyana. How countries avoid such violence during transition has the potential to yield insights for the mitigation of risk associated with mass atrocity crimes.

  3. Parker's sneak-guard model revisited: why do reproductively parasitic males heavily invest in testes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Kazutaka; Kohda, Masanori; Hori, Michio; Sato, Tetsu

    2011-10-01

    Alternative reproductive tactics are widespread in males and may cause intraspecific differences in testes investment. Parker's sneak-guard model predicts that sneaker males, who mate under sperm competition risk, invest in testes relatively more than bourgeois conspecifics that have lower risk. Given that sneakers are much smaller than bourgeois males, sneakers may increase testes investment to overcome their limited sperm productivity because of their small body sizes. In this study, we examined the mechanism that mediates differential testes investment across tactics in the Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish Lamprologus callipterus. In the Rumonge population of Burundi, bourgeois males are small compared with those in other populations and have a body size close to sneaky dwarf males. Therefore, if differences in relative testis investment depend on sperm competition, the rank order of relative testis investment should be dwarf males > bourgeois males in Rumonge = bourgeois males in the other populations. If differences in relative testis investment depend on body size, the rank order of relative testes investment should be dwarf males > bourgeois males in Rumonge > bourgeois males in the other populations. Comparisons of relative testis investment among the three male groups supported the role of sperm competition, as predicted by the sneak-guard model. Nevertheless, the effects of absolute body size on testes investment should be considered to understand the mechanisms underlying intraspecific variation in testes investment caused by alternative reproductive tactics.

  4. Journalistic identity and audience perceptions: paradigm and models under construction in the African Great Lakes region

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    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  5. Albinism in Africa: stigma, slaughter and awareness campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Inigo, Andres E; Ladizinski, Barry; Sethi, Aisha

    2011-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a lack of pigment in the hair, skin, and eyes. Albinism is caused by defective or absent tyrosinase, an enzyme necessary for melanogenesis. Although rare in the western world, albinism is quite common in sub-Saharan Africa, likely as a result of consanguinity. Albinism has long been associated with stigma and superstitions, such as the belief that a white man impregnated the mother or that the child is the ghost of a European colonist. Recently, a notion has emerged that albino body parts are good-luck charms or possess magical powers. These body parts may be sold for as much as $75,000 on the black market. As a result there have been over 100 albino murders in Tanzania, Burundi, and other parts of Africa in the past decade, which is now beginning to garner international attention and thus prompting novel legislation. To ameliorate the plight of individuals with albinism in Africa, a coordinated effort must be organized, involving medical professionals (dermatologists, ophthalmologists, oncologists), public health advocates and educators, social workers, human rights and antidiscrimination activists, law-enforcement agencies, and governmental support groups. The main issues that should be addressed include skin cancer prevention education, stigma and discrimination denouncement, and swift prosecution of albino hunters and their sponsors. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. [Illiteracy and reproductiveness in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowaleski, J T

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between illiteracy and fertility in countries of the 3rd World, primarily those of Africa and Asia, is examined. In African countries with a large number of adult illiterates (from 50 to 90%), total fertility rates have increased, e.g. Malawi, Nigeria, Rwanda, Burundi, Guinea Bissau, Benin, Mali, and Somalia. On the other hand, rates have decreased in Algeria, Egypt, Cape Verde, Togo, and Morocco. It should be noted that illiteracy in the latter group is mostly in the 50-60% bracket. In all other African countries, rates have changed only slightly, up or down, or stabilized. It was found that these changes could be the result of increased literacy only to a minor degree. Any effects which improved education might have on the reproduction rate are manifested only with a certain time lag. It was observed that illiteracy as a large scale phenomenon leads to stabilization of the birth rate. It is in Asia that the link between birth rate and number of illiterates is most pronounced, while in Africa the birth rate is dictated more by moral and cultural factors, including religion. Most governments in both regions consider birth rates too high and unsatisfactory from the standpoint of their effect on the future demographic situation and economically in terms of an excessive increase in the size of the labor force relative to employment opportunity and limitation on economic growth.

  7. A gender-based approach to developing a healthy lifestyle and healthy weight intervention for diverse Utah women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Sara E; Digre, Kathleen B; Ralls, Brenda; Mukundente, Valentine; Davis, France A; Rickard, Sylvia; Tavake-Pasi, Fahina; Napia, Eru Ed; Aiono, Heather; Chirpich, Meghan; Stark, Louisa A; Sunada, Grant; Keen, Kassy; Johnston, Leanne; Frost, Caren J; Varner, Michael W; Alder, Stephen C

    2015-08-01

    Utah women from some cultural minority groups have higher overweight/obesity rates than the overall population. We utilized a gender-based mixed methods approach to learn about the underlying social, cultural and gender issues that contribute to the increased obesity risk among these women and to inform intervention development. A literature review and analysis of Utah's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data informed the development of a focus group guide. Focus groups were conducted with five groups of women: African immigrants from Burundi and Rwanda, African Americans, American Indians/Alaskan Natives, Hispanics/Latinas, and Pacific Islanders. Six common themes emerged: (1) health is multidimensional and interventions must address health in this manner; (2) limited resources and time influence health behaviors; (3) norms about healthy weight vary, with certain communities showing more preference to heavier women; (4) women and men have important but different influences on healthy lifestyle practices within households; (5) women have an influential role on the health of families; and (6) opportunities exist within each group to improve health. Seeking insights from these five groups of women helped to identify common and distinct cultural and gender themes related to obesity, which can be used to help elucidate core obesity determinants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictors of posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression in active soldiers and former combatants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Corina; Crombach, Anselm; Bambonye, Manassé; Elbert, Thomas; Weierstall, Roland

    2015-01-01

    During the period between 1993 and 2005, the people of Burundi were trapped within a violent civil war. In post-conflict regions, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were found to be widespread. At the same time, combatants often reported having perceived committing violence as exciting and appealing, an experience referred to as appetitive aggression. Both of these phenomena hamper the building of a functional and peaceful society. This study aims to investigate the factors that are associated with the level of PTSD and appetitive aggression in former and still active combatants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 948 male Burundians: 556 active soldiers and 392 ex-combatants. PTSD symptom severity was assessed using the PTSD Symptom Scale Interview, while appetitive aggression was assessed using the Appetitive Aggression Scale. Linear regression analyses revealed that the number of traumatic events, childhood maltreatment, and their interaction predicted PTSD symptom severity, whereas self-committed violence did not. The number of traumatic events and self-committed violence were associated with appetitive aggression. Childhood maltreatment alone was not associated with appetitive aggression; however, its interaction with self-committed violence did predict appetitive aggression. When controlling for predictors, ex-combatants reported a higher degree of PTSD symptomatology, whereas active soldiers reported a higher degree of appetitive aggression. We conclude that childhood maltreatment is an additional, significant risk factor that exacerbates the psychological consequences of violent conflicts. Self-committed violence may not necessarily engender trauma-related disorders, but is highly related to appetitive aggression.

  9. Productivity effects of higher education human capital in selected countries of Sub-Saharan Africa

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    Koye Gerry Bokana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyse the productivity effects of higher education enrolment (HEE, higher education output (HEO and the associated productivity gap (GP on selected countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA over the period between 1981 and 2014. It was hypothesized in the study that HEE and HEO had statistically significant positive impact on productivity in the selected sub-Saharan Africa countries over the stated period. Fixed effect Least Square Dummy Variable (LSDV and a robust version of System Generalized Methods of Moment (SYSGMM were adopted as model estimating techniques. Results from the LSDV model indicated that HEE had no statistically significant positive impact on productivity growth in the twenty-one SSA countries. This non-significance was corrected in the dynamic model, but with negative effects on the growth rate of total factor productivity (TFP. The study further compared the worldwide technological frontier with those of the SSA countries under investigation and discovered that countries like Gabon, Mauritius and Swaziland ranked high, while Burundi needs to improve on its productivity determinants. The major conclusion of this study is therefore that higher education human capital should be supported with strong policy implementation, as this can have a positive impact on productivity growth.

  10. Development of a multi-layered psychosocial care system for children in areas of political violence

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    Susanty Dessy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Few psychosocial and mental health care systems have been reported for children affected by political violence in low- and middle income settings and there is a paucity of research-supported recommendations. This paper describes a field tested multi-layered psychosocial care system for children (focus age between 8-14 years, aiming to translate common principles and guidelines into a comprehensive support package. This community-based approach includes different overlapping levels of interventions to address varying needs for support. These levels provide assessment and management of problems that range from the social-pedagogic domain to the psychosocial, the psychological and the psychiatric domains. Specific intervention methodologies and their rationale are described within the context of a four-country program (Burundi, Sri Lanka, Indonesia and Sudan. The paper aims to contribute to bridge the divide in the literature between guidelines, consensus & research and clinical practice in the field of psychosocial and mental health care in low- and middle-income countries.

  11. JOURNALISTIC IDENTITY AND AUDIENCE PERCEPTIONS: PARADIGM AND MODELS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN THE AFRICAN GREAT LAKES REGIÓN

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    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  12. Cohort profile: mental health following extreme trauma in a northern Ugandan cohort of War-Affected Youth Study (The WAYS Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amone-P'olak, Kennedy; Jones, Peter B; Abbott, Rosemary; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Ovuga, Emilio; Croudace, Tim J

    2013-12-01

    War experiences are associated with the risk of long-term mental health problems. The War-affected Youths (WAYS) Study comprises a cohort of 539 youths (61% female) aged between 18 to 25 (at baseline) randomly sampled from the population of war-affected youths in northern Uganda. The study aims to chart the trajectory of long-term mental health consequences of war and the roles of individual, family, and community contextual risk and protective factors in influencing the course of mental health using Social Ecology Model, thus, addressing both the individual and its social ecology. Knowledge of postwar contexts may inform policy and guide interventions on postwar psychosocial adjustment and reintegration in conflict-prone Great Lakes region of Africa (Rwanda, Burundi, DR Congo, Uganda, Central African Republic, and South Sudan). Two waves of data collection have been conducted and more data collection is planned. At baseline, information on demographic characteristics, pre-war experiences, psychosocial outcomes, coping, stigma/discrimination, family and community acceptance and relationship, family functioning, and post-war experiences were obtained. At follow-up, information on general health, gender-based violence, PTSD, social skills, trauma memory quality, rumination, self-esteem, and psychosocial outcomes were collected. Approval to access the data can be obtained on application to the Principal Investigator upon submission of a research proposal with ethical approval from the applicant's institution. This research is funded by Wellcome Trust and Gulu University.

  13. The Tree Project enlists youth to plant trees

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    Jacobson, J.

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available The climate of the African region around the "Great Lakes" induces a strong process of soil weathering which eventually leads to a strong aluminium saturation of the absorption complex, as expressed by the "m" index of Kamprath. The response to aluminium toxicity of the common bean cv. Diacol Calima, a widely grown variety in Burundi, has been studied in pot trials in two ways : (1 Using superficial soil samples of "humiferous high elevation kaolisols" whose "m" index varied between 4 and 92 ; (2 On culture condition consisting of an inert substrate complemented with a nutritional solution to which a serie of soluble aluminium concentrations were added. Under soil condition, biomass produced after a period of 25 days of growth, decreased as from "m" = 33. The number of Rhizobium nodules decreased drastically with aluminium toxicity becoming negligible at "m" - 33. On culture media, rising concentration of aluminium affected growth adversely as well, although root growth inhibition was less pronounced than under soil condition.

  14. Food technologies and developing countries: a processing method for making edible the highly toxic cassava roots

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    Milena Lambri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In addition to be a possible solution to the food crisis becoming a productive model to follow, the development of a process and/or a technique of food production in a developing country could create advantages from an industrial point of view due to the use of alternative raw materials, which have a potentially high competitiveness. In developing countries, agriculture is able to offer a variety of products making up the daily diet and provide products with potential that could make up for many nutritional deficiencies to which resident populations are subject. Food technology applications on cereals, tubers, roots, fruits, and by-products from related processes are reported at aiming to obtain finished and semi-finished foods and/or basic ingredients meeting the food safety criteria. In detail, this study aims to generate a processing method for the white bitter roots collected in a rural area of Burundi with a cyanogenic glycoside content >400 mg cyanide equivalent/kg dry weight. A standardised procedure consisting of peeling, grating, and oven drying at 60°C, with or without fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was successfully tested.

  15. Older Adults Accessing HIV Care and Treatment and Adherence in the IeDEA Central Africa Cohort

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    Jamie Newman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Very little is known about older adults accessing HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa. Materials and Methods. Data were obtained from 18,839 HIV-positive adults at 10 treatment programs in Burundi, Cameroon, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. We compared characteristics of those aged 50+ with those aged 18–49 using chi-square tests. Logistic regression was used to determine if age was associated with medication adherence. Results. 15% of adults were 50+ years. Those aged 50+ were more evenly distributed between women and men (56% versus 44% as compared to those aged 18–49 (71% versus 29% and were more likely to be hypertensive (8% versus 3% (P<0.05. Those aged 50+ were more likely to be adherent to their medications than those aged 18–49 (P<0.001. Adults who were not heavy drinkers reported better adherence as compared to those who reported drinking three or more alcoholic beverages per day (P<0.001. Conclusions. Older adults differed from their younger counterparts in terms of medication adherence, sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics.

  16. Thriving, Managing, and Struggling: A Mixed Methods Study of Adolescent African Refugees' Psychosocial Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weine, Stevan Merrill; Ware, Norma; Tugenberg, Toni; Hakizimana, Leonce; Dahnweih, Gonwo; Currie, Madeleine; Wagner, Maureen; Levin, Elise

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this mixed method study was to characterize the patterns of psychosocial adjustment among adolescent African refugees in U.S. resettlement. A purposive sample of 73 recently resettled refugee adolescents from Burundi and Liberia were followed for two years and qualitative and quantitative data was analyzed using a mixed methods exploratory design. Protective resources identified were the family and community capacities that can promote youth psychosocial adjustment through: 1) Finances for necessities; 2) English proficiency; 3) Social support networks; 4) Engaged parenting; 5) Family cohesion; 6) Cultural adherence and guidance; 7) Educational support; and, 8) Faith and religious involvement. The researchers first inductively identified 19 thriving, 29 managing, and 25 struggling youths based on review of cases. Univariate analyses then indicated significant associations with country of origin, parental education, and parental employment. Multiple regressions indicated that better psychosocial adjustment was associated with Liberians and living with both parents. Logistic regressions showed that thriving was associated with Liberians and higher parental education, managing with more parental education, and struggling with Burundians and living parents. Qualitative analysis identified how these factors were proxy indicators for protective resources in families and communities. These three trajectories of psychosocial adjustment and six domains of protective resources could assist in developing targeted prevention programs and policies for refugee youth. Further rigorous longitudinal mixed-methods study of adolescent refugees in U.S. resettlement are needed.

  17. Thriving, Managing, and Struggling: A Mixed Methods Study of Adolescent African Refugees’ Psychosocial Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weine, Stevan Merrill; Ware, Norma; Tugenberg, Toni; Hakizimana, Leonce; Dahnweih, Gonwo; Currie, Madeleine; Wagner, Maureen; Levin, Elise

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this mixed method study was to characterize the patterns of psychosocial adjustment among adolescent African refugees in U.S. resettlement. Methods A purposive sample of 73 recently resettled refugee adolescents from Burundi and Liberia were followed for two years and qualitative and quantitative data was analyzed using a mixed methods exploratory design. Results Protective resources identified were the family and community capacities that can promote youth psychosocial adjustment through: 1) Finances for necessities; 2) English proficiency; 3) Social support networks; 4) Engaged parenting; 5) Family cohesion; 6) Cultural adherence and guidance; 7) Educational support; and, 8) Faith and religious involvement. The researchers first inductively identified 19 thriving, 29 managing, and 25 struggling youths based on review of cases. Univariate analyses then indicated significant associations with country of origin, parental education, and parental employment. Multiple regressions indicated that better psychosocial adjustment was associated with Liberians and living with both parents. Logistic regressions showed that thriving was associated with Liberians and higher parental education, managing with more parental education, and struggling with Burundians and living parents. Qualitative analysis identified how these factors were proxy indicators for protective resources in families and communities. Conclusion These three trajectories of psychosocial adjustment and six domains of protective resources could assist in developing targeted prevention programs and policies for refugee youth. Further rigorous longitudinal mixed-methods study of adolescent refugees in U.S. resettlement are needed. PMID:24205467

  18. Measuring receptive collocational competence across proficiency levels

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    Déogratias Nizonkiza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates, (i English as Foreign Language (EFL learners’ receptive collocational knowledge growth in relation to their linguistic proficiency level; (ii how much receptive collocational knowledge is acquired as proficiency develops; and (iii the extent to which receptive knowledge of collocations of EFL learners varies across word frequency bands. A proficiency measure and a collocation test were administered to English majors at the University of Burundi. Results of the study suggest that receptive collocational competence develops alongside EFL learners’ linguistic proficiency; which lends empirical support to Gyllstad (2007, 2009 and Author (2011 among others, who reported similar findings. Furthermore, EFL learners’ collocations growth seems to be quantifiable wherein both linguistic proficiency level and word frequency occupy a crucial role. While more gains in terms of collocations that EFL learners could potentially add as a result of change in proficiency are found at lower levels of proficiency; collocations of words from more frequent word bands seem to be mastered first, and more gains are found at more frequent word bands. These results confirm earlier findings on the non-linearity nature of vocabulary growth (cf. Meara 1996 and the fundamental role played by frequency in word knowledge for vocabulary in general (Nation 1983, 1990, Nation and Beglar 2007, which are extended here to collocations knowledge.

  19. Appetitive Aggression and Adverse Childhood Experiences Shape Violent Behavior in Females Formerly Associated with Combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augsburger, Mareike; Meyer-Parlapanis, Danie; Bambonye, Manassé; Elbert, Thomas; Crombach, Anselm

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of violent experiences during childhood, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and appetitive aggression on everyday violent behavior in Burundian females with varying participation in war. Moreover, group differences in trauma-related and aggression variables were expected. Appetitive aggression describes the perception of violence perpetration as fascinating and appealing and is a common phenomenon in former combatants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 158 females, either former combatants, supporters of armed forces or civilians during the civil war in Burundi. The PTSD Symptom Scale Interview was used to assess PTSD symptom severity, the Appetitive Aggression Scale to measure appetitive aggression and the Domestic and Community Violence Checklist to assess both childhood maltreatment and recent aggressive behavior. Former combatants had experienced more traumatic events, perpetrated more violence and reported higher levels of appetitive aggression than supporters and civilians. They also suffered more severely from PTSD symptoms than civilians but not than supporters. The groups did not differ regarding childhood maltreatment. Both appetitive aggression and childhood violence predicted ongoing aggressive behavior, whereas the latter outperformed PTSD symptom severity. These findings support current research showing that adverse childhood experiences and a positive attitude toward aggression serve as the basis for aggressive behavior and promote an ongoing cycle of violence in post-conflict regions. Female members of armed groups are in need of demobilization procedures including trauma-related care and interventions addressing appetitive aggression.

  20. Health and health care of African refugees: an underrecognized minority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Fern R; Corr, Kelly E; Lewis, Sarah H; Oliver, M Norman

    2012-01-01

    The United States is home to 300000 refugees from around the world, with 69000 from 51 African countries. Refugees face significant challenges in accessing quality health care and present challenges to clinicians and medical institutions in providing care. There is limited published literature on health disparities experienced by African refugees who settle in the United States. The University of Virginia International Family Medicine Clinic (IFMC) was started in 2002 to serve the growing local refugee population. Residents, attending physicians, social workers, and community agencies collaboratively care for refugee patients. A database is kept with information about all patient encounters. The IFMC serves 300 African patients; their mean age is 26.1 years. Countries of origin include Somalia (24%); Liberia (16%); the Democratic Republic of the Congo (15%); Sudan (7%); Togo, Kenya, and Burundi (each 6%); and others. Patients present with communicable diseases, nutrition-related diseases, and problems related to physical and emotional trauma. In this paper, we: (1) describe the health screenings that African refugees receive overseas and upon entry to the United States; (2) describe the medical and psychological conditions of African refugees; (3) identify the challenges that refugees face in obtaining care and those that clinicians face in providing this care; (4) discuss the health disparities that African refugees experience; and (5) describe the IFMC as a model of collaborative, multidisciplinary care. Additional research is needed to further our understanding of the unique cultural, medical, and psychological needs of the diverse African refugee community.

  1. East Africa: AIDS orphans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutayuga, J B

    1995-01-01

    The number of orphans in East Africa is growing rapidly due to the combined effects of the atrocities in Rwanda and Burundi and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic. To meet their needs, Ukimwi Orphans Assistance (UOA), a nonprofit nongovernmental organization (NGO), was founded by East Africans in 1990; it has built "secondary family structures" of NGOs in Tanzania, Uganda, and Kenya. Needs assessment studies showed that food producing and income generating projects had highest priority, but communities have made strides in housing, education, and health. Communal food plots, repair and building of shelters, using traditional crafts to earn money for school fees, developing remedial schools, and organizing traditional medical practitioners into clinics have all been undertaken in the effort to stop disease, restore normal living, and forestall socioeconomic collapse. UOA has found that culture-based programs succeed because they offer guarantees of sustainability and cost effectiveness. African principles of kinship and extended family are used to develop resources for providing minimum assistance and to rebuild caring and supporting communities for the children. Determined community efforts should be an incentive for increased external aid.

  2. Violent offending promotes appetitive aggression rather than posttraumatic stress - a replication study with Burundian ex-combatants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke eKöbach

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Research has identified appetitive aggression, i.e., the perception of committed, violent acts as appealing, exciting and fascinating, as a common phenomenon within populations living in precarious and violent circumstances. Investigating demobilized soldiers in the Democratic Republic of Congo demonstrated that violent offending is associated with appetitive aggression but not necessarily with symptoms of posttraumatic stress. In the present study we sought to replicate these results in an independent and larger sample of demobilized soldiers from Burundi. As with the Congolese ex-combatants, random forest regression revealed that the number of lifetime perpetrated violent acts is the most important predictor of appetitive aggression and the number of lifetime experienced traumatic events is the main predictor for posttraumatic stress. Perpetrated violent acts with salient cues of hunting (pursuing the victim, the sight of blood, etc. were most predictive for perceiving violent cues appealingly after demobilization. Moreover, the association of violent acts and appetitive aggression as well as traumatic events and posttraumatic stress remains strong even years after demobilization. Patterns of traumatic events and perpetrated acts as predictors for posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression seem to be robust among different samples of ex-combatants who fought in civil wars. Psychotherapeutic interventions that address these complementary facets of combat-related disorders -- namely, posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression -- are indispensable for a successful reintegration of those who fought in armed conflicts and to achieve a successful transition to peace.

  3. Ring complexes and related rocks in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, J. R.

    Over 625 igneous complexes throughout Africa and Arabia have been selected and classified on the basis of petrographic association and chronology into six broad age groups forming 29 provinces. The groups range from Mid-Proterozoic to Tertiary and include gabbro, granite, syenite, foid syenite and carbonatite plutonic rocks, the majority in the form of ring-dykes, cone-sheets, plugs, circular intrusions, and their associated extrusive phases. Pan-African late or post-orogenic complexes (720-490 Ma) are common in the Arabian-Nubian and Tuareg shields of north Africa originating from subduction zone derived magmatism. Anorogenic complexes in Egypt, NE and central Sudan, Niger, Nigeria, Cameroon, Zaïre-Burundi, Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Namibia and Angola span 550 to 50 Ma and are dominantly alkali granites and foid syenites. Many groups occur as en-echelon bands within linear arrays, and show migrating centres of intrusion in variable directions. In W. Africa there was a progressive shift of emplacement southwards during early Ordovician to Mid-Cretaceous times. Distribution patterns suggest thatdeep seated features, such as shear zones associated with lithospheric plate movements,controlled melting, and the resultant location of the complexes. Economic mineralization is not widespread in the rocks of the African ring complexes and is mainly restricted to small deposits of Sn, W, F, U and Nb.

  4. Violent Offending Promotes Appetitive Aggression Rather than Posttraumatic Stress—A Replication Study with Burundian Ex-Combatants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbach, Anke; Nandi, Corina; Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé; Westner, Britta; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified appetitive aggression, i.e., the perception of committed, violent acts as appealing, exciting and fascinating, as a common phenomenon within populations living in precarious and violent circumstances. Investigating demobilized soldiers in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) demonstrated that violent offending is associated with appetitive aggression and not necessarily with symptoms of posttraumatic stress. In the present study, we sought to replicate these results in an independent and larger sample of demobilized soldiers from Burundi. As with the Congolese ex-combatants, random forest regression revealed that the number of lifetime perpetrated violent acts is the most important predictor of appetitive aggression and the number of lifetime experienced traumatic events is the main predictor for posttraumatic stress. Perpetrated violent acts with salient cues of hunting (pursuing the victim, the sight of blood, etc.) were most predictive for perceiving violent cues appealingly after demobilization. Moreover, the association of violent acts and appetitive aggression as well as traumatic events and posttraumatic stress remains strong even years after demobilization. Patterns of traumatic events and perpetrated acts as predictors for posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression seem to be robust among different samples of ex-combatants who fought in civil wars. Psychotherapeutic interventions that address these complementary facets of combat-related disorders—namely, posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression—are indispensable for a successful reintegration of those who fought in armed conflicts and to achieve a successful transition to peace. PMID:26696913

  5. Violent Offending Promotes Appetitive Aggression Rather than Posttraumatic Stress-A Replication Study with Burundian Ex-Combatants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbach, Anke; Nandi, Corina; Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé; Westner, Britta; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified appetitive aggression, i.e., the perception of committed, violent acts as appealing, exciting and fascinating, as a common phenomenon within populations living in precarious and violent circumstances. Investigating demobilized soldiers in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) demonstrated that violent offending is associated with appetitive aggression and not necessarily with symptoms of posttraumatic stress. In the present study, we sought to replicate these results in an independent and larger sample of demobilized soldiers from Burundi. As with the Congolese ex-combatants, random forest regression revealed that the number of lifetime perpetrated violent acts is the most important predictor of appetitive aggression and the number of lifetime experienced traumatic events is the main predictor for posttraumatic stress. Perpetrated violent acts with salient cues of hunting (pursuing the victim, the sight of blood, etc.) were most predictive for perceiving violent cues appealingly after demobilization. Moreover, the association of violent acts and appetitive aggression as well as traumatic events and posttraumatic stress remains strong even years after demobilization. Patterns of traumatic events and perpetrated acts as predictors for posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression seem to be robust among different samples of ex-combatants who fought in civil wars. Psychotherapeutic interventions that address these complementary facets of combat-related disorders-namely, posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression-are indispensable for a successful reintegration of those who fought in armed conflicts and to achieve a successful transition to peace.

  6. Covering Post-Conflict Elections: Challenges for the Media in Central Africa Wahlberichterstattung in Post-Konflikt-Phasen: Herausforderungen für die Medien in Zentralafrika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past ten years, elections were held in six countries of Central Africa experiencing “post-conflict” situations. The polls that took place in Burundi (2005, the Central African Republic (2005, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (2006, Congo-Brazzaville (2002, 2007, Chad (1996, 2001, 2006 and Rwanda (2003 were crucial for peace-building. In some cases, they were widely supported and supervised by the international community, being considered the last step of a peace process and the first step toward establishing a truly representative “post-conflict” regime. The media were expected to play a large part in supporting these elections, both to inform the citizens, so they could make an educated choice, and to supervise the way the electoral administration was organizing the polls. This paper attempts to show the many challenges faced by the media while covering these post-conflict electoral processes. In a context of great political tension, in which candidates are often former belligerents who have just put down their guns to go to the polls, the media operate in an unsafe and economically damaged environment, suffering from a lack of infrastructure, inadequate equipment and untrained staff. Given those constraints, one might wonder if the media should be considered actual democratic tools in Central Africa or just gimmicks in a “peace-building kit” (including “free and fair” elections, multipartism and freedom of the press with no real impact on the democratic commitment of the elite or the political participation of the population.In den letzten zehn Jahren wurden in sechs zentralafrikanischen Ländern, die sich in einer Post-Konflikt-Phase befanden, Wahlen abgehalten. Die Wahlgänge in Burundi (2005, der Zentralafrikanischen Republik (2005, der Demokratischen Republik Kongo (2006, Kongo-Brazzaville (2002, 2007, dem Tschad (1996, 2001, 2006 und Ruanda (2003 waren entscheidend für die Friedenskonsolidierung. Einige dieser

  7. Power, policy and the Prunus africana bark trade, 1972-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, A; Anoncho, V F; Sunderland, T

    2016-02-03

    After almost 50 years of international trade in wild harvested medicinal bark from Africa and Madagascar, the example of Prunus africana holds several lessons for both policy and practice in the fields of forestry, conservation and rural development. Due to recent CITES restrictions on P. africana exports from Burundi, Kenya and Madagascar, coupled with the lifting of the 2007 European Union (EU) ban in 2011, Cameroon's share of the global P. africana bark trade has risen from an average of 38% between 1995 and 2004, to 72.6% (658.6 metric tons) in 2012. Cameroon is therefore at the center of this international policy arena. This paper draws upon several approaches, combining knowledge in working with P. africana over a 30-year period with a thorough literature review and updated trade data with "ground-truthing" in the field in 2013 and 2014. This enabled the construction of a good perspective on trade volumes (1991-2012), bark prices (and value-chain data) and the gaps between research reports and practice. Two approaches provided excellent lenses for a deeper understanding of policy failure and the "knowing-doing gap" in the P. africana case. A similar approach to Médard's (1992) analyses of power, politics and African development was taken and secondly, studies of commodity chains that assess the power relations that coalesce around different commodities (Ribot, 1998; Ribot and Peluso, 2003). Despite the need to conserve genetically and chemically diverse P. africana, wild populations are vulnerable, even in several "protected areas" in Burundi, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo and in the forest reserves of Madagascar. Secondly, hopes of decentralized governance of this forest product are misplaced due to elite capture, market monopolies and subsidized management regimes. At the current European price, for P. africana bark (US$6 per kg) for example, the 2012 bark quota (658.675t) from Cameroon alone was worth over US$3.9 million, with the majority of

  8. Terpenoids from Platostoma rotundifolium (Briq.) A. J. Paton Alter the Expression of Quorum Sensing-Related Virulence Factors and the Formation of Biofilm in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Ngezahayo, Jérémie; Pottier, Laurent; Oliveira Ribeiro, Sofia; Souard, Florence; Hari, Léonard; Stévigny, Caroline; El Jaziri, Mondher; Duez, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Platostoma rotundifolium (Briq.) A. J. Paton aerial parts are widely used in Burundi traditional medicine to treat infectious diseases. In order to investigate their probable antibacterial activities, crude extracts from P. rotundifolium were assessed for their bactericidal and anti-virulence properties against an opportunistic bacterial model, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Whereas none of the tested extracts exert bacteriostatic and/or bactericidal proprieties, the ethyl acetate and dichloromethane extracts exhibit anti-virulence properties against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 characterized by an alteration in quorum sensing gene expression and biofilm formation without affecting bacterial viability. Bioguided fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract led to the isolation of major anti-virulence compounds that were identified from nuclear magnetic resonance and high-resolution molecular spectroscopy spectra as cassipourol, β-sitosterol and α-amyrin. Globally, cassipourol and β-sitosterol inhibit quorum sensing-regulated and -regulatory genes expression in las and rhl systems without affecting the global regulators gacA and vfr, whereas α-amyrin had no effect on the expression of these genes. These terpenoids disrupt the formation of biofilms at concentrations down to 12.5, 50 and 50 µM for cassipourol, β-sitosterol and α-amyrin, respectively. Moreover, these terpenoids reduce the production of total exopolysaccharides and promote flagella-dependent motilities (swimming and swarming). The isolated terpenoids exert a wide range of inhibition processes, suggesting a complex mechanism of action targeting P. aeruginosa virulence mechanisms which support the wide anti-infectious use of this plant species in traditional Burundian medicine. PMID:28613253

  9. HIV, HBV, delta-agent and Treponema pallidum infections in two rural African areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lalla, F; Rizzardini, G; Rinaldi, E; Santoro, D; Zeli, P L; Verga, G

    1990-01-01

    In order to compare the seroepidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, delta agent and Treponema pallidum infections in two rural populations living in north Uganda (Kitgum district) and in central Burundi (Butezi, Ruyigi region), 448 sera were tested for HBS-Ag, HBS-Ab, and anti-HIV antibodies and screened for syphilis using the T. pallidum haemagglutination (TPHA) test. HBS-Ag positive sera were also tested for anti-delta antibodies. Overall seropositivity rates in healthy subjects, outpatients and inpatients (non-AIDS) were 14.2% and 9.5% in Kitgum district and Butezi, respectively. The prevalence of HBS-Ag and HBS-Ab ranged from 10.0% to 15.6% and from 66.2% to 68.9%, respectively. In north Uganda the rates of anti-delta positivity were 3.1% in the overall population and 30.6% in the HBS-Ag positive subjects. No serum obtained in Butezi was anti-delta positive. In Ugandan people, 64.0% of anti-HIV positive and 25.8% of anti-HIV negative patients were also TPHA-positive (P less than 0.01). For Butezi the corresponding figures were 21.4% and 1.6% respectively (P less than 0.04). On the contrary, no correlation was found between either anti-HIV or TPHA positives and seropositivity for B and delta hepatitis serological markers. The study demonstrated an association between seropositivities for HIV and T. pallidum (TPHA), suggesting common patterns of transmission. On the contrary, no association seemed to exist between HBV and HIV infections.

  10. Social network analysis of multi-stakeholder platforms in agricultural research for development: Opportunities and constraints for innovation and scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Frans; Sartas, Murat; van Schagen, Boudy; van Asten, Piet

    2017-01-01

    Multi-stakeholder platforms (MSPs) are seen as a promising vehicle to achieve agricultural development impacts. By increasing collaboration, exchange of knowledge and influence mediation among farmers, researchers and other stakeholders, MSPs supposedly enhance their ‘capacity to innovate’ and contribute to the ‘scaling of innovations’. The objective of this paper is to explore the capacity to innovate and scaling potential of three MSPs in Burundi, Rwanda and the South Kivu province located in the eastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In order to do this, we apply Social Network Analysis and Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM) to investigate the structural properties of the collaborative, knowledge exchange and influence networks of these MSPs and compared them against value propositions derived from the innovation network literature. Results demonstrate a number of mismatches between collaboration, knowledge exchange and influence networks for effective innovation and scaling processes in all three countries: NGOs and private sector are respectively over- and under-represented in the MSP networks. Linkages between local and higher levels are weak, and influential organisations (e.g., high-level government actors) are often not part of the MSP or are not actively linked to by other organisations. Organisations with a central position in the knowledge network are more sought out for collaboration. The scaling of innovations is primarily between the same type of organisations across different administrative levels, but not between different types of organisations. The results illustrate the potential of Social Network Analysis and ERGMs to identify the strengths and limitations of MSPs in terms of achieving development impacts. PMID:28166226

  11. Correlates of complete childhood vaccination in East African countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen E Canavan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the benefits of childhood vaccinations, vaccination rates in low-income countries (LICs vary widely. Increasing coverage of vaccines to 90% in the poorest countries over the next 10 years has been estimated to prevent 426 million cases of illness and avert nearly 6.4 million childhood deaths worldwide. Consequently, we sought to provide a comprehensive examination of contemporary vaccination patterns in East Africa and to identify common and country-specific barriers to complete childhood vaccination. METHODS: Using data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS for Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda, we looked at the prevalence of complete vaccination for polio, measles, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG and DTwPHibHep (DTP as recommended by the WHO among children ages 12 to 23 months. We conducted multivariable logistic regression within each country to estimate associations between complete vaccination status and health care access and sociodemographic variables using backwards stepwise regression. RESULTS: Vaccination varied significantly by country. In all countries, the majority of children received at least one dose of a WHO recommended vaccine; however, in Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Uganda less than 50% of children received a complete schedule of recommended vaccines. Being delivered in a public or private institution compared with being delivered at home was associated with increased odds of complete vaccination status. Sociodemographic covariates were not consistently associated with complete vaccination status across countries. CONCLUSIONS: Although no consistent set of predictors accounted for complete vaccination status, we observed differences based on region and the location of delivery. These differences point to the need to examine the historical, political, and economic context of each country in order to maximize vaccination coverage. Vaccination against these childhood diseases is a

  12. Social network analysis of multi-stakeholder platforms in agricultural research for development: Opportunities and constraints for innovation and scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Frans; Sartas, Murat; van Schagen, Boudy; van Asten, Piet; Schut, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Multi-stakeholder platforms (MSPs) are seen as a promising vehicle to achieve agricultural development impacts. By increasing collaboration, exchange of knowledge and influence mediation among farmers, researchers and other stakeholders, MSPs supposedly enhance their 'capacity to innovate' and contribute to the 'scaling of innovations'. The objective of this paper is to explore the capacity to innovate and scaling potential of three MSPs in Burundi, Rwanda and the South Kivu province located in the eastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In order to do this, we apply Social Network Analysis and Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM) to investigate the structural properties of the collaborative, knowledge exchange and influence networks of these MSPs and compared them against value propositions derived from the innovation network literature. Results demonstrate a number of mismatches between collaboration, knowledge exchange and influence networks for effective innovation and scaling processes in all three countries: NGOs and private sector are respectively over- and under-represented in the MSP networks. Linkages between local and higher levels are weak, and influential organisations (e.g., high-level government actors) are often not part of the MSP or are not actively linked to by other organisations. Organisations with a central position in the knowledge network are more sought out for collaboration. The scaling of innovations is primarily between the same type of organisations across different administrative levels, but not between different types of organisations. The results illustrate the potential of Social Network Analysis and ERGMs to identify the strengths and limitations of MSPs in terms of achieving development impacts.

  13. Prioritising prevention strategies for patients in antiretroviral treatment programmes in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaar, A; Graber, C; Dabis, F; Coutsoudis, A; Bachmann, L; McIntyre, J; Schechter, M; Prozesky, H W; Tuboi, S; Dickinson, D; Kumarasamy, N; Pujdades-Rodriquez, M; Sprinz, E; Schilthuis, H J; Cahn, P; Low, N; Egger, M

    2010-06-01

    Expanded access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) offers opportunities to strengthen HIV prevention in resource-limited settings. We invited 27 ART programmes from urban settings in Africa, Asia and South America to participate in a survey, with the aim to examine what preventive services had been integrated in ART programmes. Twenty-two programmes participated; eight (36%) from South Africa, two from Brazil, two from Zambia and one each from Argentina, India, Thailand, Botswana, Ivory Coast, Malawi, Morocco, Uganda and Zimbabwe and one occupational programme of a brewery company included five countries (Nigeria, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Burundi). Twenty-one sites (96%) provided health education and social support, and 18 (82%) provided HIV testing and counselling. All sites encouraged disclosure of HIV infection to spouses and partners, but only 11 (50%) had a protocol for partner notification. Twenty-one sites (96%) supplied male condoms, seven (32%) female condoms and 20 (91%) provided prophylactic ART for the prevention of mother-to child transmission. Seven sites (33%) regularly screened for sexually transmitted infections (STI). Twelve sites (55%) were involved in activities aimed at women or adolescents, and 10 sites (46%) in activities aimed at serodiscordant couples. Stigma and discrimination, gender roles and funding constraints were perceived as the main obstacles to effective prevention in ART programmes. We conclude that preventive services in ART programmes in lower income countries focus on health education and the provision of social support and male condoms. Strategies that might be equally or more important in this setting, including partner notification, prompt diagnosis and treatment of STI and reduction of stigma in the community, have not been implemented widely.

  14. Spatially explicit Schistosoma infection risk in eastern Africa using Bayesian geostatistical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Nadine; Hürlimann, Eveline; Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Chimfwembe, Kingford; Mushinge, Gabriel; Simoonga, Christopher; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Kristensen, Thomas K; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2013-11-01

    Schistosomiasis remains one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the tropics and subtropics, but current statistics are outdated due to demographic and ecological transformations and ongoing control efforts. Reliable risk estimates are important to plan and evaluate interventions in a spatially explicit and cost-effective manner. We analysed a large ensemble of georeferenced survey data derived from an open-access neglected tropical diseases database to create smooth empirical prevalence maps for Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium for a total of 13 countries of eastern Africa. Bayesian geostatistical models based on climatic and other environmental data were used to account for potential spatial clustering in spatially structured exposures. Geostatistical variable selection was employed to reduce the set of covariates. Alignment factors were implemented to combine surveys on different age-groups and to acquire separate estimates for individuals aged ≤20 years and entire communities. Prevalence estimates were combined with population statistics to obtain country-specific numbers of Schistosoma infections. We estimate that 122 million individuals in eastern Africa are currently infected with either S. mansoni, or S. haematobium, or both species concurrently. Country-specific population-adjusted prevalence estimates range between 12.9% (Uganda) and 34.5% (Mozambique) for S. mansoni and between 11.9% (Djibouti) and 40.9% (Mozambique) for S. haematobium. Our models revealed that infection risk in Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia and Sudan might be considerably higher than previously reported, while in Mozambique and Tanzania, the risk might be lower than current estimates suggest. Our empirical, large-scale, high-resolution infection risk estimates for S. mansoni and S. haematobium in eastern Africa can guide future control interventions and provide a benchmark for subsequent monitoring and evaluation activities. Copyright © 2011

  15. Perspectives of resettled African refugees on accessing medicines and pharmacy services in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Kim; Ostini, Remo; Martini, Nataly; Kairuz, Therese

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the barriers to accessing medicines and pharmacy services among refugees in Queensland, Australia, from the perspectives of resettled African refugees. A generic qualitative approach was used in this study. Resettled African refugees were recruited via a purposive snowball sampling method. The researcher collected data from different African refugee communities, specifically those from Sudanese, Congolese and Somalian communities. Participants were invited by a community health leader to participate in the study; a community health leader is a trained member of the refugee community who acts as a 'health information conduit' between refugees and the health system. Invitations were done either face-to-face, telephonically or by email. The focus groups were digitally recorded in English and transcribed verbatim by the researcher. Transcripts were entered into NVIVO© 11 and the data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Four focus groups were conducted between October and November 2014 in the city of Brisbane with African refugees, one with five Somali refugees, one with five Congolese refugees, one with three refugee community health leaders from South Sudan, Liberia and Eritrea and one with three refugee community health leaders from Uganda, Burundi and South Sudan. Eleven sub-themes emerged through the coding process, which resulted in four overarching themes: health system differences, navigating the Australian health system, communication barriers and health care-seeking behaviour. With regard to accessing medicines and pharmacy services, this study has shown that there is a gap between resettled refugees' expectations of health services and the reality of the Australian health system. Access barriers identified included language barriers, issues with the Translating and Interpreter Service, a lack of professional communication and cultural beliefs affecting health care-seeking behaviour. This exploratory study has

  16. Experiences with the control of schistosomiasis mansoni in two foci in Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gryseels

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiences with population-based chemotherapy and other methods for the control of schistosomiasis mansoni in two subsaharan foci are described. In the forest area of Maniema (Zaire, intense transmission of Schistosoma mansoni, high prevalences and intensities of infection, and important morbidity have been documental. Taking into account the limited financial means and the poor logistic conditions, the control strategy has been based mainly on targeted chemotherapy of heavily infected people (>600 epg. After ten years of intervention, prevalences and intensities have hardly been affected, but the initial severe hepatosplenic morbidity has almost disappeared. In Burundi, a national research and control programme has been initiated in 1982. Prevalences, intensities and morbidity were moderate, transmission was focal and erratic in time and space. A more structural control strategy was developed, based on screening and selective therapy, health education, sanitation and domestic water supply. Prevalences and intensities have been considerably reduced, though the results show focal and unpredicatable variations. Transmission and reinfection were not signifcantly affected by chemotherapy alone, and eventual outcome of repeated selective treatment appears to be limited by the sensitivity of the screening method. Intestinal morbidity was strongly reduced by community-based selective treatment, but hepatosplenic enlargement was hardly affected; this is possibly due to the confounding impact of increasing malaria morbidity. The experiences show the importance of local structures and conditions for the development of an adapted control strategy. It is further concluded that population-based chemotherapy is a highly valid tool for the rapid control of morbidity, but should in most operational conditions not be considered as a tool for transmission control. Integration of planning, execution and surveillance in regular health services...

  17. Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum: a major constraint to banana, plantain and enset production in central and east Africa over the past decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakato, Valentine; Mahuku, George; Coutinho, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    Bacteria; Phylum Proteobacteria; Class Gammaproteobacteria; Order Xanthomonadales; Family Xanthomonadaceae; Genus Xanthomonas; currently classified as X. campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm). However, fatty acid methyl ester analysis and genetic and genomic evidence suggest that this pathogen is X. vasicola and resides in a separate pathovar. Xcm can be isolated on yeast extract peptone glucose agar (YPGA), cellobiose cephalexin agar and yeast extract tryptone sucrose agar (YTSA) complemented with 5-fluorouracil, cephalexin and cycloheximide to confer semi-selectivity. Xcm can also be identified using direct antigen coating enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAC-ELISA), species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using GspDm primers and lateral flow devices that detect latent infections. Causes Xanthomonas wilt on plants belonging to the Musaceae, primarily banana (Musa acuminata), plantain (M. acuminata × balbisiana) and enset (Ensete ventricosum). There is a high level of genetic homogeneity within Xcm, although genome sequencing has revealed two major sublineages. Yellowing and wilting of leaves, premature fruit ripening and dry rot, bacterial exudate from cut stems. Xcm has only been found in African countries, namely Burundi, Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. Xcm is transmitted by insects, bats, birds and farming implements. Long-distance dispersal of the pathogen is by the transportation of latently infected plants into new areas. The management of Xcm has relied on cultural practices that keep the pathogen population at tolerable levels. Biotechnology programmes have been successful in producing resistant banana plants. However, the deployment of such genetic material has not as yet been achieved in farmers' fields, and the sustainability of transgenic resistance remains to be addressed. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  18. A review of existing trauma and musculoskeletal impairment (TMSI) care capacity in East, Central, and Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokotho, Linda; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Burgess, David; Labib, Mohamed; Le, Grace; Peter, Noel; Lavy, Christopher B D; Pandit, Hemant

    2016-09-01

    We conducted an assessment of orthopaedic surgical capacity in the following countries in East, Central, and Southern Africa: Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. We adapted the WHO Tool for Situational Analysis to Assess Emergency and Essential Surgical Care with questions specific to trauma and orthopaedic care. In May 2013-May 2014, surgeons from the College of Surgeons of East, Central and Southern Africa (COSECSA) based at district (secondary) and referral (tertiary) hospitals in the region completed a web-based survey. COSECSA members contacted other eligible hospitals in their country to collect further data. Data were collected from 267 out of 992 (27%) hospitals, including 185 district hospitals and 82 referral hospitals. Formal accident and emergency departments were present in 31% of hospitals. Most hospitals had no general or orthopaedic surgeons or medically-qualified anaesthetists on staff. Functioning mobile C-arm X-ray machines were available in only 4% of district and 27% of referral hospitals; CT scanning was available in only 3% and 26%, respectively. Closed fracture treatment was offered in 72% of the hospitals. While 20% of district and 49% of referral hospitals reported adequate instruments for the surgical treatment of fractures, only 4% and 10%, respectively, had a sustainable supply of fracture implants. Elective orthopaedic surgery was offered in 29% and Ponseti treatment of clubfoot was available at 42% of the hospitals. The current capacity of hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa to manage traumatic injuries and orthopaedic conditions is significantly limited. In light of the growing burden of trauma and musculoskeletal impairment within this region, concerted efforts should be made to improve hospital capacity with equipment, trained personnel, and specialist clinical services. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence of multiple introductions of HIV-1 subtype C in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Joana Morais; Morgado, Mariza G; Bello, Gonzalo

    2012-10-01

    HIV-1 subtype C is the most prevalent group M clade in southern Africa and some eastern African countries. Subtype C is also the most frequent subtype in Angola (southwestern Africa), with an estimated prevalence of 10-20%. In order to better understand the origin of the HIV-1 subtype C strains circulating in Angola, 31 subtype C pol sequences of Angolan origin were compared with 1950 subtype C pol sequences sampled in other African countries. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the Angolan subtype C sequences were distributed in 16 different lineages that were widely dispersed among other African strains. Ten subtype C Angolan lineages were composed by only one sequence, while the remaining six clades contain between two and seven sequences. Bayesian phylogeographic analysis indicates that most Angolan clades probably originated in different southern African countries with the exception of one lineage that most likely originated in Burundi. Evolutionary analysis suggests that those Angolan subtype C clades composed by ≥ 2 sequences were introduced into the country between the late 1970s and the mid 2000s. The median estimated time frame for the origin of those Angolan lineages coincides with periods of positive migration influx in Angola that were preceded by phases of negative migratory outflow. These results demonstrate that the Angolan subtype C epidemic resulted from multiple introductions of subtype C viruses mainly imported from southern African countries over the last 30years, some of which have been locally disseminated establishing several autochthonous transmission networks. This study also suggests that population mobility between Angola and southern African countries during civil war (1974-2002) may have played a key role in the emergence of the Angolan subtype C epidemic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The importance and significance of peace studies with special reference to South Africa’s political-security role in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neethling

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The origins of peace studies as an academic field of inquiry could be traced to the late 1940s and the field has been developing considerably since then. Currently, scholars at various tertiary institutions over the world are involved in using their academic skills to educate students about the causes of wars and violent conflict while pointing out various alternatives to these phenomena. Peace studies in the South African and broader African context are certainly of great significance and importance. After all, the gripping and devastating violence that manifested in African countries such as Liberia, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Burundi, Rwanda, the DRC, Somalia, Angola, the Comoros and many other conflict-stricken areas warrant scholarly attention with a view to better understanding the causes, dynamics and effects of such conflict. By means of this understanding the conflict could be addressed through mechanisms of conflict resolution and peace building could be promoted. Furthermore, the South African Government’s progressive military involvement in international peace missions in recent years is far more than an issue of mere military concern. It is a matter of great political interest and significance. Being supportive of the need for peace studies in the curricula of South African universities (and African universities in general, this article argues that South African students should be exposed to a rich and comprehensive literature on the search for international peace and security; of how to understand and deal with the causes of large-scale conflict and violence; and how these could be curtailed and resolved − literature which informs scholarly discussions and research in many centres and places of education, training and peace building.

  1. Tracing the Origin and Northward Dissemination Dynamics of HIV-1 Subtype C in Brazil

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    Delatorre, Edson; Couto-Fernandez, José C.; Guimarães, Monick Lindenmayer; Vaz Cardoso, Ludimila Paula; de Alcantara, Keila Correia; Martins de Araújo Stefani, Mariane; Romero, Hector; Freire, Caio C. M.; Iamarino, Atila; de A Zanotto, Paolo M.; Morgado, Mariza G.; Bello, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the HIV-1 subtype C epidemic in southern Brazil was initiated by the introduction of a single founder strain probably originating from east Africa. However, the exact country of origin of such a founder strain as well as the origin of the subtype C viruses detected outside the Brazilian southern region remains unknown. HIV-1 subtype C pol sequences isolated in the southern, southeastern and central-western Brazilian regions (n = 209) were compared with a large number (n ~ 2,000) of subtype C pol sequences of African origin. Maximum-likelihood analyses revealed that most HIV-1 subtype C Brazilian sequences branched in a single monophyletic clade (CBR-I), nested within a larger monophyletic lineage characteristic of east Africa. Bayesian analyses indicate that the CBR-I clade most probably originated in Burundi and was introduced into the Paraná state (southern region) around the middle 1970s, after which it rapidly disseminated to neighboring regions. The states of Paraná and Santa Catarina have been the most important hubs of subtype C dissemination, and routine travel and spatial accessibility seems to have been the major driving forces of this process. Five additional introductions of HIV-1 subtype C strains probably originated in eastern (n = 2), southern (n = 2) and central (n = 1) African countries were detected in the Rio de Janeiro state (southeastern region). These results indicate a continuous influx of HIV-1 subtype C strains of African origin into Brazil and also unveil the existence of unrecognized transmission networks linking this country to east Africa. PMID:24069269

  2. Predictors of posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression in active soldiers and former combatants

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    Corina Nandi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: During the period between 1993 and 2005, the people of Burundi were trapped within a violent civil war. In post-conflict regions, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD were found to be widespread. At the same time, combatants often reported having perceived committing violence as exciting and appealing, an experience referred to as appetitive aggression. Both of these phenomena hamper the building of a functional and peaceful society. Objective: This study aims to investigate the factors that are associated with the level of PTSD and appetitive aggression in former and still active combatants. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 948 male Burundians: 556 active soldiers and 392 ex-combatants. PTSD symptom severity was assessed using the PTSD Symptom Scale Interview, while appetitive aggression was assessed using the Appetitive Aggression Scale. Results: Linear regression analyses revealed that the number of traumatic events, childhood maltreatment, and their interaction predicted PTSD symptom severity, whereas self-committed violence did not. The number of traumatic events and self-committed violence were associated with appetitive aggression. Childhood maltreatment alone was not associated with appetitive aggression; however, its interaction with self-committed violence did predict appetitive aggression. When controlling for predictors, ex-combatants reported a higher degree of PTSD symptomatology, whereas active soldiers reported a higher degree of appetitive aggression. Conclusion: We conclude that childhood maltreatment is an additional, significant risk factor that exacerbates the psychological consequences of violent conflicts. Self-committed violence may not necessarily engender trauma-related disorders, but is highly related to appetitive aggression.

  3. Simulated effects of a seasonal precipitation change on the vegetation in tropical Africa

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    E. S. Gritti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pollen data collected in Africa at high (Kuruyange, valley swamp, Burundi and low altitude (Victoria, lake, Uganda; Ngamakala, pond, Congo showed that after 6 ky before present (BP, pollen of deciduous trees increase their relative percentage, suggesting thus the reduction of the annual amount of precipitation and/or an increase of in the length of the dry season. Until now, pollen-climate transfer functions only investigated mean annual precipitation, due to the absence of modern pollen-assemblage analogs under diversified precipitation regimes. Hence these functions omit the potential effect of a change in precipitation seasonality modifying thus the length of the dry season. In the present study, we use an equilibrium biosphere model (i.e. BIOME3.5 to estimate the sensitivity of equatorial African vegetation, at specific sites, to such changes. Climatic scenarios, differing only in the monthly distribution of the current annual amount of precipitation, are examined at the above three locations in equatorial Africa. Soil characteristics, monthly temperatures and cloudiness are kept constant at their present-day values. Good agreement is shown between model simulations and current biomes assemblages, as inferred from pollen data. To date, the increase of the deciduous forest component in the palaeodata around 6 ky BP has been interpreted as the beginning of a drier climate period. However, our results demonstrate that a change in the seasonal distribution of precipitation could also induce the observed changes in vegetation types. This study confirms the importance of taking into account seasonal changes in the hydrological balance. Palaeoecologists can greatly benefit from the use of dynamic process based vegetation models to acccount for modification of the length of the dry season when they wish to reconstruct vegetation composition or to infer quantitative climate parameters, such as temperature and precipitation, from pollen or vegetation

  4. Some like it hot: the influence and implications of climate change on coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei and coffee production in East Africa.

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    Juliana Jaramillo

    Full Text Available The negative effects of climate change are already evident for many of the 25 million coffee farmers across the tropics and the 90 billion dollar (US coffee industry. The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei, the most important pest of coffee worldwide, has already benefited from the temperature rise in East Africa: increased damage to coffee crops and expansion in its distribution range have been reported. In order to anticipate threats and prioritize management actions for H. hampei we present here, maps on future distributions of H. hampei in coffee producing areas of East Africa. Using the CLIMEX model we relate present-day insect distributions to current climate and then project the fitted climatic envelopes under future scenarios A2A and B2B (for HADCM3 model. In both scenarios, the situation with H. hampei is forecasted to worsen in the current Coffea arabica producing areas of Ethiopia, the Ugandan part of the Lake Victoria and Mt. Elgon regions, Mt. Kenya and the Kenyan side of Mt. Elgon, and most of Rwanda and Burundi. The calculated hypothetical number of generations per year of H. hampei is predicted to increase in all C. arabica-producing areas from five to ten. These outcomes will have serious implications for C. arabica production and livelihoods in East Africa. We suggest that the best way to adapt to a rise of temperatures in coffee plantations could be via the introduction of shade trees in sun grown plantations. The aims of this study are to fill knowledge gaps existing in the coffee industry, and to draft an outline for the development of an adaptation strategy package for climate change on coffee production. An abstract in Spanish is provided as Abstract S1.

  5. Some like it hot: the influence and implications of climate change on coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) and coffee production in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Juliana; Muchugu, Eric; Vega, Fernando E; Davis, Aaron; Borgemeister, Christian; Chabi-Olaye, Adenirin

    2011-01-01

    The negative effects of climate change are already evident for many of the 25 million coffee farmers across the tropics and the 90 billion dollar (US) coffee industry. The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei), the most important pest of coffee worldwide, has already benefited from the temperature rise in East Africa: increased damage to coffee crops and expansion in its distribution range have been reported. In order to anticipate threats and prioritize management actions for H. hampei we present here, maps on future distributions of H. hampei in coffee producing areas of East Africa. Using the CLIMEX model we relate present-day insect distributions to current climate and then project the fitted climatic envelopes under future scenarios A2A and B2B (for HADCM3 model). In both scenarios, the situation with H. hampei is forecasted to worsen in the current Coffea arabica producing areas of Ethiopia, the Ugandan part of the Lake Victoria and Mt. Elgon regions, Mt. Kenya and the Kenyan side of Mt. Elgon, and most of Rwanda and Burundi. The calculated hypothetical number of generations per year of H. hampei is predicted to increase in all C. arabica-producing areas from five to ten. These outcomes will have serious implications for C. arabica production and livelihoods in East Africa. We suggest that the best way to adapt to a rise of temperatures in coffee plantations could be via the introduction of shade trees in sun grown plantations. The aims of this study are to fill knowledge gaps existing in the coffee industry, and to draft an outline for the development of an adaptation strategy package for climate change on coffee production. An abstract in Spanish is provided as Abstract S1.

  6. Predicting the effects of climate change on Schistosoma mansoni transmission in eastern Africa.

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    McCreesh, Nicky; Nikulin, Grigory; Booth, Mark

    2015-01-06

    Survival and fitness attributes of free-living and sporocyst schistosome life-stages and their intermediate host snails are sensitive to water temperature. Climate change may alter the geographical distribution of schistosomiasis by affecting the suitability of freshwater bodies for hosting parasite and snail populations. We have developed an agent-based model of the temperature-sensitive stages of the Schistosoma mansoni and intermediate host snail lifecycles. The model was run using low, moderate and high warming climate projections over eastern Africa. For each climate projection, eight model scenarios were used to determine the sensitivity of predictions to different relationships between air and water temperature, and different snail mortality rates. Maps were produced showing predicted changes in risk as a result of increasing temperatures over the next 20 and 50 years. Baseline model output compared to prevalence data indicates suitable temperatures are necessary but not sufficient for both S. mansoni transmission and high infection prevalences. All else being equal, infection risk may increase by up to 20% over most of eastern Africa over the next 20 and 50 years. Increases may be higher in Rwanda, Burundi, south-west Kenya and eastern Zambia, and S. mansoni may become newly endemic in some areas. Results for 20-year projections are robust to changes in simulated intermediate host snail habitat conditions. There is greater uncertainty about the effects of different habitats on changes in risk in 50 years' time. Temperatures are likely to become suitable for increased S. mansoni transmission over much of eastern Africa. This may reduce the impact of control and elimination programmes. S. mansoni may also spread to new areas outside existing control programmes. We call for increased surveillance in areas defined as potentially suitable for emergent transmission.

  7. Social network analysis of multi-stakeholder platforms in agricultural research for development: Opportunities and constraints for innovation and scaling.

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    Frans Hermans

    Full Text Available Multi-stakeholder platforms (MSPs are seen as a promising vehicle to achieve agricultural development impacts. By increasing collaboration, exchange of knowledge and influence mediation among farmers, researchers and other stakeholders, MSPs supposedly enhance their 'capacity to innovate' and contribute to the 'scaling of innovations'. The objective of this paper is to explore the capacity to innovate and scaling potential of three MSPs in Burundi, Rwanda and the South Kivu province located in the eastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC. In order to do this, we apply Social Network Analysis and Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM to investigate the structural properties of the collaborative, knowledge exchange and influence networks of these MSPs and compared them against value propositions derived from the innovation network literature. Results demonstrate a number of mismatches between collaboration, knowledge exchange and influence networks for effective innovation and scaling processes in all three countries: NGOs and private sector are respectively over- and under-represented in the MSP networks. Linkages between local and higher levels are weak, and influential organisations (e.g., high-level government actors are often not part of the MSP or are not actively linked to by other organisations. Organisations with a central position in the knowledge network are more sought out for collaboration. The scaling of innovations is primarily between the same type of organisations across different administrative levels, but not between different types of organisations. The results illustrate the potential of Social Network Analysis and ERGMs to identify the strengths and limitations of MSPs in terms of achieving development impacts.

  8. Epilepsy in onchocerciasis endemic areas: systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based surveys.

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    Sébastien D S Pion

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate the relationship between onchocerciasis prevalence and that of epilepsy using available data collected at community level. DESIGN: We conducted a systematic review and meta-regression of available data. DATA SOURCES: Electronic and paper records on subject area ever produced up to February 2008. REVIEW METHODS: We searched for population-based studies reporting on the prevalence of epilepsy in communities for which onchocerciasis prevalence was available or could be estimated. Two authors independently assessed eligibility and study quality and extracted data. The estimation of point prevalence of onchocerciasis was standardized across studies using appropriate correction factors. Variation in epilepsy prevalence was then analyzed as a function of onchocerciasis endemicity using random-effect logistic models. RESULTS: Eight studies from west (Benin and Nigeria, central (Cameroon and Central African Republic and east Africa (Uganda, Tanzania and Burundi met the criteria for inclusion and analysis. Ninety-one communities with a total population of 79,270 individuals screened for epilepsy were included in the analysis. The prevalence of epilepsy ranged from 0 to 8.7% whereas that of onchocerciasis ranged from 5.2 to 100%. Variation in epilepsy prevalence was consistent with a logistic function of onchocerciasis prevalence, with epilepsy prevalence being increased, on average, by 0.4% for each 10% increase in onchocerciasis prevalence. CONCLUSION: These results give further evidence that onchocerciasis is associated with epilepsy and that the disease burden of onchocerciasis might have to be re-estimated by taking into account this relationship.

  9. The present-day epidemiological situation in the Horn of Africa on the example of Somalia.

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    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    This article presents information on the environmental hazards prevailing in Somalia and recommends a health prophylaxis in connection with a potential deployment of Polish Military Contingent to this part of the world. Somalia is a country located in the eastern part of Africa, in the so-called Horn of Africa. The country has been continuously at war for over two decades. Because of its much-devastated municipal and industrial infrastructure, widespread famine and limited access of the local people to healthcare it is considered one of the countries where living conditions are extremely difficult. Epidemiological indexes in Somalia are the worst in the world, and the Somali citizens are entirely dependent on foreign humanitarian assistance. At present, three different military operations, under the auspices of international organizations, have been carried out on the soil and the territorial waters: the European Union Naval Force Somalia--Operation Atlanta, the NATO Operation Ocean Shield, and the biggest of the three--the UN peacekeeping mission AMISOM with 9,5 thousand African troops, mainly from Uganda and Burundi). Despite their presence, the situation of the civilian population is critical. If the number ofpeacekeeping and stabilization troops deployed to the Horn of Africa is increased, it is very likely that Polish soldiers will also get involved in the military operations in Somalia. because of a strong possibility that following European military contingents are going to be relocated to East Africa to carry out the mandatory tasks, in relation to the occurrence of difficult climatic conditions and low sanitary standards, it is necessary to undertake appropriate preventive measures before the departure (compulsory/recommended vaccinations, antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, stocks of medicines to be taken by soldiers for an extended period of time, prevention and treatment kits), throughout the deployment (acclimatization, avoiding alcohol, water and

  10. Exploring drought vulnerability in Africa: an indicator based analysis to be used in early warning systems

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    Naumann, G.; Barbosa, P.; Garrote, L.; Iglesias, A.; Vogt, J.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a composite drought vulnerability indicator (DVI) that reflects different aspects of drought vulnerability evaluated at Pan-African level for four components: the renewable natural capital, the economic capacity, the human and civic resources, and the infrastructure and technology. The selection of variables and weights reflects the assumption that a society with institutional capacity and coordination, as well as with mechanisms for public participation, is less vulnerable to drought; furthermore, we consider that agriculture is only one of the many sectors affected by drought. The quality and accuracy of a composite indicator depends on the theoretical framework, on the data collection and quality, and on how the different components are aggregated. This kind of approach can lead to some degree of scepticism; to overcome this problem a sensitivity analysis was done in order to measure the degree of uncertainty associated with the construction of the composite indicator. Although the proposed drought vulnerability indicator relies on a number of theoretical assumptions and some degree of subjectivity, the sensitivity analysis showed that it is a robust indicator and hence able of representing the complex processes that lead to drought vulnerability. According to the DVI computed at country level, the African countries classified with higher relative vulnerability are Somalia, Burundi, Niger, Ethiopia, Mali and Chad. The analysis of the renewable natural capital component at sub-basin level shows that the basins with high to moderate drought vulnerability can be subdivided into the following geographical regions: the Mediterranean coast of Africa; the Sahel region and the Horn of Africa; the Serengeti and the Eastern Miombo woodlands in eastern Africa; the western part of the Zambezi Basin, the southeastern border of the Congo Basin, and the belt of Fynbos in the Western Cape province of South Africa. The results of the DVI at the country level were

  11. Condoms hitch lift with truckers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilimwiko, L

    1991-09-01

    This article reports on the efforts being made in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania and other road stops in central Tanzania to provide condoms to long-haul drivers and the women who serve on-the-road-companionship. The Truck Driver's AIDS Intervention Project (TDAIP) in collaboration with the African Medical Research Foundation (AMREF) and Tanzania's National AIDS Control Program (NACP) are working to protect these 2 at risk populations. Along the 1000 km Tanzania/Zambia highway, gasoline pump attendants offer drivers condoms. Prostitutes at these stops also offer condoms. There are meter long stickers with "condoms prevent AIDs" available. The message from the NACP regional office is that those at risk, such as truck drivers, are unlikely to attend rallies, or hear radio message when behind the wheel. Research has shown that men are more receptive to messages given in a work setting. Barmaids at 5 of the most frequented truckstops have been trained as peer health educators. Their job is to sensitize the men to the dangers of AIDs. An operating example is given of the barmaid serving drinks, and when approached, replies with the messages of how protection can be accomplished. One partner only is recommended, and if this is not possible, then one should avoid assuming "labda huyu hana ukimwi" (hopefully this one is AIDs free). There is no safe sex. The peer educators are trained in AIDs prevention and communication skills, and are paid a monthly wage. 725,000 condoms and 250,000 pieces of educational literature were distributed by TDAIP at these 5 truckstops in the 1st 6 months of 1990. Several drawbacks to this effort have occurred. It is difficult to sustain the distribution system outside a medical setting, and it is difficult to effectively monitor and support peer educators spread out across the country. One barmaid observed that those seeking condoms were primarily from outside Tanzania: Zambia, Malawi, Zaire, Rwanda, and Burundi, where better information about the

  12. Widespread rape does not directly appear to increase the overall HIV prevalence in conflict-affected countries: so now what?

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    Mills Edward

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA is severely affected by HIV/AIDS and conflict. Sexual violence as a weapon of war has been associated with concerns about heightened HIV incidence among women. Widespread rape by combatants has been documented in Burundi, Sierra Leone, Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Sudan and Uganda. To examine the assertion that widespread rape may not directly increase HIV prevalence at the population level, we built a model to determine the potential impact of varying scenarios of widespread rape on HIV prevalence in the above seven African countries. Discussion Our findings show that even in the most extreme situations, where 15% of the female population was raped, where HIV prevalence among assailants was 8 times the country population prevalence, and where the HIV transmission rate was highest at 4 times the average high rate, widespread rape increased the absolute HIV prevalence of these countries by only 0.023%. These projections support the finding that widespread rape in conflict-affected countries in SSA has not incurred a major direct population-level change in HIV prevalence. However, this must not be interpreted to say that widespread rape does not pose serious problems to women's acquisition of HIV on an individual basis or in specific settings. Furthermore, direct and indirect consequences of sexual violence, such as physical and psychosocial trauma, unwanted pregnancies, and stigma and discrimination cannot be understated. Summary The conclusions of this article do not significantly change current practices in the field from an operational perspective. Proper care and treatment must be provided to every survivor of rape regardless of the epidemiological effects of HIV transmission at the population level. Sexual violence must be treated as a protection issue and not solely a reproductive health and psychosocial issue. It is worth publishing data and conclusions that could be

  13. Education the only defence.

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    Parry, J

    1986-01-01

    In Africa Aquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a serious public health problem, but its scale is masked by a lack of adequate infromation, particularly statistics. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened 9 Central African Countries--Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo, Gabon, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania, and Zaire--in an effort to extend its campaign against the killer disease into the continent. The objective of the Bangui workshop was to review available information on the spread of the disease in Africa, identify the clinical and epidemiological features of the disease, and make recommendations for its control. The workshop was attended by experts from the 9 countries and WHO specialists in clinical medicine, microbiology, epidemiology, and public health. Meeting participants agreed that there was not enough clear information available to reach sound conclusions about the extent of the spread of the disease in Africa. This was because of problems in collecting general health data in many countries. To help define the scale of the problem, the workshop agreed on a provisional case definition of AIDS which could be applied to suspected sufferers, without stringent laboratory tests. Once patients have been diagnosed according to this definition, their cases will be verified later in countries equipped with laboratory facilities. It was agreed that the case definition should provide a clear provisional figure for the disease's extent in Africa. Additionally, the participating countries agreed to establish their own surveillance systems to assess the AIDS risk in their own countries. These national systems would then file information to WHO headquarters in Geneva, where a worldwide data bank on the disease is being compiled. In a final report, the workshop concluded that since there was no cure for the disease, it could be controlled only through an effective information campaign coupled with a responsible attitude among those at risk. To cut

  14. Adult HIV care resources, management practices and patient characteristics in the Phase 1 IeDEA Central Africa cohort

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    Jules Mushingantahe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite recent advances in the management of HIV infection and increased access to treatment, prevention, care and support, the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a major global health problem, with sub-Saharan Africa suffering by far the greatest humanitarian, demographic and socio-economic burden of the epidemic. Information on HIV/AIDS clinical care and established cohorts’ characteristics in the Central Africa region are sparse. Methods: A survey of clinical care resources, management practices and patient characteristics was undertaken among 12 adult HIV care sites in four countries of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS Central Africa (IeDEA-CA Phase 1 regional network in October 2009. These facilities served predominantly urban populations and offered primary care in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC; six sites, secondary care in Rwanda (two sites and tertiary care in Cameroon (three sites and Burundi (one site. Results: Despite some variation in facility characteristics, sites reported high levels of monitoring resources, including electronic databases, as well as linkages to prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programs. At the time of the survey, there were 21,599 HIV-positive adults (median age=37 years enrolled in the clinical cohort. Though two-thirds were women, few adults (6.5% entered HIV care through prevention of mother-to-child transmission services, whereas 55% of the cohort entered care through voluntary counselling and testing. Two-thirds of patients at sites in Cameroon and DRC were in WHO Stage III and IV at baseline, whereas nearly all patients in the Rwanda facilities with clinical stage information available were in Stage I and II. WHO criteria were used for antiretroviral therapy initiation. The most common treatment regimen was stavudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (64%, followed by zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (19%. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate the

  15. Identidade jornalística e percepções do público: paradigma e modelos em construção nos países dos Grandes Lagos (África

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    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo se baseia em uma pesquisa conduzida em três países africanos (Burundi, Ruanda e República Democrática do Congo, sobre a evolução recente da profissão de jornalista e sobre a maneira como ela é, hoje, percebida e representada por membros da audiência, entrevistados em cinco localidades da região. Após duas décadas, o jornalismo se transformou, por um lado, com a liberalização do setor de mídias e, por outro, com as guerras civis sangrentas que marcaram os três países. Surgiram novos formatos e novos papéis para as mídias, assim como novos referenciais profissionais (códigos deontológicos, instâncias de autorregulação, cursos de formação, associações profissionais, por vezes incentivados por doadores de fundos e ONGs internacionais. O artigo pretende mostrar que, por trás dessas mudanças, um novo “paradigma jornalístico” foi elaborado, fruto de dinâmicas internas da profissão e de imposições externas (do Estado e da evolução do mercado, mas também das novas exigências do público. Em um contexto político, econômico e de segurança instável, as mutações do paradigma jornalístico têm transformado o conteúdo midiático, bem como a percepção do público sobre o papel do jornalismo na sociedade e sobre o que os cidadãos podem dele esperar, em uma região na qual grande parte da democracia ainda está em construção.

  16. Identidade jornalística e percepções do público: paradigma e modelos em construção nos países dos Grandes Lagos (África

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    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Esse artigo se baseia em uma pesquisa conduzida em três países africanos (Burundi, Ruanda e República Democrática do Congo, sobre a evolução recente da profissão de jornalista e sobre a maneira como ela é, hoje, percebida e representada por ouvintes, entrevistados em cinco localidades da região. Após duas décadas, o jornalismo se transformou, por um lado, com a liberalização do setor de mídias e, por outro, com as guerras civis sangrentas que marcaram os três países. Os novos formatos e os novos papéis reinvindicados pelas mídias apareceram, assim como os novos referenciais profissionais (códigos deontológicos, instâncias de autorregulação, cursos de formação, associações profissionais, por vezes incentivados por doadores de fundos e ONGs internacionais. O artigo mostra que, por trás dessas mudanças, é um novo paradigma jornalístico que realmente foi elaborado, fruto de dinâmicas internas da profissão e de assignações externas (pelo Estado e a evolução do mercado, mas também das novas exigências do público. Em um contexto político, econômico e de segurança problemático, as mutações do jornalismo têm transformado o discurso midiático, mas igualmente transformado a percepção que o público tem do lugar do jornalismo na sociedade, e de que os cidadãos estão suscetíveis a esperar dele, em uma região na qual grande parte da democracia ainda está em construção.

  17. Prevalence of malnutrition among HIV-infected children in Central and West-African HIV-care programmes supported by the Growing Up Programme in 2011: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesson, Julie; Masson, David; Adonon, Arsène; Tran, Caroline; Habarugira, Capitoline; Zio, Réjane; Nicimpaye, Léoncie; Desmonde, Sophie; Serurakuba, Goreth; Kwayep, Rosine; Sare, Edith; Konate, Tiefing; Nimaga, Abdoulaye; Saina, Philemon; Kpade, Akossiwa; Bassuka, Andrée; Gougouyor, Gustave; Leroy, Valériane

    2015-05-26

    The burden of malnutrition among HIV-infected children is not well described in sub-Saharan Africa, even though it is an important problem to take into account to guarantee appropriate healthcare for these children. We assessed the prevalence of malnutrition and its associated factors among HIV-infected children in HIV care programmes in Central and West-Africa. A cross-sectional study was conducted from September to December 2011 among the active files of HIV-infected children aged 2-19 years old, enrolled in HIV-care programmes supported by the Sidaction Growing Up Programme in Benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Chad and Togo. Socio-demographics characteristics, anthropometric, clinical data, and nutritional support were collected. Anthropometric indicators, expressed in Z-scores, were used to define malnutrition: Height-for-age (HAZ), Weight-for-Height (WHZ) for children malnutrition were defined: acute malnutrition (WHZ/BAZ malnutrition (HAZ malnutrition (WHZ/BAZ malnutrition. Overall, 1350 HIV-infected children were included; their median age was 10 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 7-13 years), 49 % were girls. 80 % were on antiretroviral treatment (ART), for a median time of 36 months. The prevalence of malnutrition was 42 % (95 % confidence interval [95% CI]: 40-44 %) with acute, chronic and mixed malnutrition at 9 % (95% CI: 6-12 %), 26 % (95% CI: 23-28 %), and 7 % (95% CI: 5-10 %), respectively. Among those malnourished, more than half of children didn't receive any nutritional support at the time of the survey. Acute malnutrition was associated with male gender, severe immunodeficiency, and the absence of ART; chronic malnutrition with male gender and age (malnutrition with male gender, age (malnutrition. The prevalence of malnutrition in HIV-infected children even on ART remains high in HIV care programmes. Anthropometric measurements and appropriate nutritional care of malnourished HIV-infected children remain insufficient and a

  18. Revisiting sub-Saharan African countries' drug problems: health, social, economic costs, and drug control policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affinnih, Yahya H

    2002-02-01

    This article takes an international perspective on the drug problem in sub-Saharan Africa. This analysis borrows ideas from physical and economic geography as a heuristic device to conceptualize the global narcoscapes in which drug trafficking occurs. Both the legitimate and the illegal drug trade operate within the same global capitalist system and draw on the same technological innovations and business processes. Central to the paper's argument is evidence that sub-Saharan African countries are now integrated into the political economy of drug consumption due to the spill-over effect. These countries are now minor markets for "hard drugs" as the result of the activities of organizations and individual traffickers that use Africa as a staging point in their trade with Europe and the United States. As a result, sub-Saharan African countries have drug consumption problems that were essentially absent prior to 1980, along with associated health, social, and economic costs. The emerging drug problem has forced African countries to develop their own drug control policy. The sub-Saharan African countries mentioned below vary to some extent in the level of drug use and misuse problems: Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Reunion, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Congo (Zaire), Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Sao Tome and Principe, Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Cote d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Togo. As part of this effort, African countries are assessing the health, social, and economic costs of drug-use-related problems to pinpoint methods which are both effective and inexpensive, since their budgets for social programs are severely constrained. Many have progressed to the point of adopting anti

  19. Seismic hazard of the Kivu rift (western branch, East African Rift system): new neotectonic map and seismotectonic zonation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, Damien; Mulumba, Jean-Luc; Sebagenzi Mwene Ntabwoba, Stanislas; Fiama Bondo, Silvanos; Kervyn, François; Havenith, Hans-Balder

    2017-04-01

    The first detailed probabilistic seismic hazard assessment has been performed for the Kivu and northern Tanganyika rift region in Central Africa. This region, which forms the central part of the Western Rift Branch, is one of the most seismically active part of the East African rift system. It was already integrated in large scale seismic hazard assessments, but here we defined a finer zonation model with 7 different zones representing the lateral variation of the geological and geophysical setting across the region. In order to build the new zonation model, we compiled homogeneous cross-border geological, neotectonic and sismotectonic maps over the central part of East D.R. Congo, SW Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and NW Tanzania and defined a new neotectonic sheme. The seismic risk assessment is based on a new earthquake catalogue, compiled on the basis of various local and global earthquake catalogues. The use of macroseismic epicenters determined from felt earthquakes allowed to extend the time-range back to the beginning of the 20th century, spanning 126 years, with 1068 events. The magnitudes have been homogenized to Mw and aftershocks removed. From this initial catalogue, a catalogue of 359 events from 1956 to 2015 and with M > 4.4 has been extracted for the seismic hazard assessment. The seismotectonic zonation includes 7 seismic source areas that have been defined on the basis of the regional geological structure, neotectonic fault systems, basin architecture and distribution of thermal springs and earthquake epicenters. The Gutenberg-Richter seismic hazard parameters were determined using both the least square linear fit and the maximum likelihood method (Kijko & Smit aue program). Seismic hazard maps have been computed with the Crisis 2012 software using 3 different attenuation laws. We obtained higher PGA values (475 years return period) for the Kivu rift region than the previous estimates (Delvaux et al., 2016). They vary laterally in function of the tectonic

  20. Who is Responsible for Instability in the Democratic Republic of Congo?

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    G. M. Sidorova

    2014-01-01

    relations with neighbouring countries - Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi which for tens of years exploit illegally natural resources of the DRC and try to lay hold of frontier Congolese territories.

  1. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Kibuye-Gitarama-Gatumba area (Rwanda): using petrochronology to unravel the geodynamic framework of the Karagwe-Ankole Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Daele, Johanna; Jacques, Dominique; Hulsbosch, Niels; Dewaele, Stijn; Muchez, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Karagwe-Ankole Belt (KAB) extends from Burundi over Rwanda and NW-Tanzania to S-Uganda (Central Africa). The integration of the metamorphic and magmatic evolution of this orogenic belt in a consistent geodynamic framework is still controversial. Additionally, geochronological information on the deformation phases is limited. This tectono-metamorphic model is, however, a crucial component in the understanding of the Meso- to Early Neoproterozoic mineralization processes. A detailed structural mapping of road and river transects was performed in the Kibuye-Gitarama-Gatumba area (West Rwanda) to determine the deformation history of the KAB. Structural analyses and petrographic studies identified two main compressive deformation phases. A locally observed foliation with a N45W-N50W orientation is interpreted as the consequence of a first compressional phase (D1, shortening direction N40E-N45E). Additionally, a well-developed crenulation cleavage and a regionally pervasive foliation were found. The cleavage and foliation have an orientation of N20W-N30W (exceptionally N20E) and are indicative of a second compressional phase (D2) with an EW shortening direction. Final extension (D3) along a N30W-N10E direction resulted in boudinage and joint development. Fieldwork observations combined with known ages of the granites in the KAB indicate that D1 and D2 took place prior to 986 Ma while D3 is younger than 986 Ma. Based on thin section petrography, a petrochronological strategy was outlined to fill in the gaps of the currently broadly defined timeframe. The regional metamorphic grade of the study area is upper greenschist, with the formation of muscovite, biotite, chlorite, garnet, staurolite and cordierite. The main penetrative tectonic foliations (D1 and D2) are expressed by the preferential orientation of muscovite or biotite. In some cases, muscovite growing along the crenulation cleavage (syn-D2) was observed. Furthermore, pre- and syn-D2 garnets

  2. Petrology, geochronology and emplacement model of the giant 1.37 Ga arcuate Lake Victoria Dyke Swarm on the margin of a large igneous province in eastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkitie, Hannu; Data, Gabriel; Isabirye, Edward; Mänttäri, Irmeli; Huhma, Hannu; Klausen, Martin B.; Pakkanen, Lassi; Virransalo, Petri

    2014-09-01

    A comprehensive description of the petrography, geochemical composition, Sm-Nd data and intrinsic field relationships of a giant arcuate Mesoproterozoic mafic dyke swarm in SW Uganda is presented for the first time. The swarm is ∼100 km wide and mainly hosted in the Palaeoproterozoic Rwenzori Belt between the Mesoproterozoic Karagwe-Ankole Belt and the Archaean Uganda Block. The dykes trend NW-SE across Uganda, but can be correlated across Lake Victoria to another set of arcuate aeromagnetic anomalies that continue southwards into Tanzania, resulting in a remarkably large semi-circular swarm with an outer diameter of ∼500 km. We propose that this unique giant dyke structure be named the Lake Victoria Dyke Swarm (LVDS). The dykes are tholeiites with Mg numbers between 0.69 and 0.44, and with inherited marked negative Nb and P anomalies in spider diagrams. Two dykes provide Sm-Nd mineral ages of 1368 ± 41 Ma and 1374 ± 42 Ma, with initial εNd values of -2.3 and -3.2, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ∼0.706-0.709. Geotectonic discrimination diagrams for the swarm exhibit more arc type than within-plate tectonic signatures, but this is in accordance with systematic enrichments in LREE, U and Th in the dolerites, more likely due to the involvement of the continental lithosphere during their petrogenesis. The LVDS is coeval with a regional ∼1375 Ma bimodal magmatic event across nearby Burundi, Rwanda and NW Tanzania, which can collectively be viewed as a large igneous province (LIP). It also indicates that the nearby Karagwe-Ankole Belt sequences - bracketed between 1.78 and 1.37 Ga and assumed by some to have been deposited within intracratonic basins - were capped by flood basalts that have subsequently been removed by erosion. Different geochemical signatures (e.g. LaN/SmN) suggest that most of the arcuate swarm was derived from an enriched SCLM, whereas related intrusions in the centre of this semi-circular segment have more or less enriched asthenospheric mantle

  3. Geological setting and timing of the cassiterite vein type mineralization of the Kalima area (Maniema, Democratic Republic of Congo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewaele, S.; Muchez, Ph; Burgess, R.; Boyce, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Central African Mesoproterozoic Karagwe-Ankole belt in the Great Lakes area (DRCongo, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda and Tanzania) forms a metallogenic province that hosts a variety of granite-related mineralization, which contains cassiterite, columbite-tantalite, wolframite/ferberite, spodumene and beryl. The Kalima area in the Maniema province of the DRCongo forms one of the most important areas for cassiterite mineralization in the eastern part of the DRCongo, even after many decades of exploitation. The mineralization dominantly consists of quartz veins that are hosted in Mesoproterozoic metasediments at the contact with granitic rocks of the Kalima granite (Avuanga and Yubuli) or directly crosscutting these granitic rocks (Atondo). Only limited - and mainly unmineralized pegmatites - have been described in the Lutshurukuru area. Mineralized quartz veins - and some granite bodies - intruded following the regional tectonic foliation or existing fracture zones, confirming the late-to post-tectonic origin of the fertile granite system. The emplacement of the quartz veins resulted in an alteration of the metasedimentary and granitic host-rocks, mainly resulting in muscovitization, tourmalinization and silicification. Cassiterite itself formed relatively late during vein formation and is associated with muscovite in fractures in or along the margins of the quartz veins. 40Ar-39Ar age dating of muscovite of an unmineralized pegmatite from the Lutshurukuru area gave an excellent plateau age of 1024 ± 5.5 Ma, while the muscovite associated with mineralization gave plateau ages of 986 ± 5.3 Ma for the Atondo deposit and 992.4 ± 5.4 Ma for the Yubuli deposit. The rather large spread in ages between the supposed parental granite/pegmatite and quartz veins is interpreted to reflect different magmatic events in the evolution of a composite granite system, starting at ∼1020 Ma and ending with mineralized quartz vein formation at ∼990 Ma. The latter age corresponds with

  4. Analysis of human resources for health strategies and policies in 5 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, in response to GFATM and PEPFAR-funded HIV-activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailhol, Johann; Craveiro, Isabel; Madede, Tavares; Makoa, Elsie; Mathole, Thubelihle; Parsons, Ann Neo; Van Leemput, Luc; Biesma, Regien; Brugha, Ruairi; Chilundo, Baltazar; Lehmann, Uta; Dussault, Gilles; Van Damme, Wim; Sanders, David

    2013-10-25

    Global Health Initiatives (GHIs), aiming at reducing the impact of specific diseases such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), have flourished since 2000. Amongst these, PEPFAR and GFATM have provided a substantial amount of funding to countries affected by HIV, predominantly for delivery of antiretroviral therapy (ARV) and prevention strategies. Since the need for additional human resources for health (HRH) was not initially considered by GHIs, countries, to allow ARV scale-up, implemented short-term HRH strategies, adapted to GHI-funding conditionality. Such strategies differed from one country to another and slowly evolved to long-term HRH policies. The processes and content of HRH policy shifts in 5 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa were examined. A multi-country study was conducted from 2007 to 2011 in 5 countries (Angola, Burundi, Lesotho, Mozambique and South Africa), to assess the impact of GHIs on the health system, using a mixed methods design. This paper focuses on the impact of GFATM and PEPFAR on HRH policies. Qualitative data consisted of semi-structured interviews undertaken at national and sub-national levels and analysis of secondary data from national reports. Data were analysed in order to extract countries' responses to HRH challenges posed by implementation of HIV-related activities. Common themes across the 5 countries were selected and compared in light of each country context. In all countries successful ARV roll-out was observed, despite HRH shortages. This was a result of mostly short-term emergency response by GHI-funded Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and to a lesser extent by governments, consisting of using and increasing available HRH for HIV tasks. As challenges and limits of short-term HRH strategies were revealed and HIV became a chronic disease, the 5 countries slowly implemented mid to long-term HRH strategies, such as formalisation of pilot initiatives, increase in HRH production and mitigation of internal migration of HRH

  5. Equality in Maternal and Newborn Health: Modelling Geographic Disparities in Utilisation of Care in Five East African Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrine W Ruktanonchai

    Full Text Available Geographic accessibility to health facilities represents a fundamental barrier to utilisation of maternal and newborn health (MNH services, driving historically hidden spatial pockets of localized inequalities. Here, we examine utilisation of MNH care as an emergent property of accessibility, highlighting high-resolution spatial heterogeneity and sub-national inequalities in receiving care before, during, and after delivery throughout five East African countries.We calculated a geographic inaccessibility score to the nearest health facility at 300 x 300 m using a dataset of 9,314 facilities throughout Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. Using Demographic and Health Surveys data, we utilised hierarchical mixed effects logistic regression to examine the odds of: 1 skilled birth attendance, 2 receiving 4+ antenatal care visits at time of delivery, and 3 receiving a postnatal health check-up within 48 hours of delivery. We applied model results onto the accessibility surface to visualise the probabilities of obtaining MNH care at both high-resolution and sub-national levels after adjusting for live births in 2015.Across all outcomes, decreasing wealth and education levels were associated with lower odds of obtaining MNH care. Increasing geographic inaccessibility scores were associated with the strongest effect in lowering odds of obtaining care observed across outcomes, with the widest disparities observed among skilled birth attendance. Specifically, for each increase in the inaccessibility score to the nearest health facility, the odds of having skilled birth attendance at delivery was reduced by over 75% (0.24; CI: 0.19-0.3, while the odds of receiving antenatal care decreased by nearly 25% (0.74; CI: 0.61-0.89 and 40% for obtaining postnatal care (0.58; CI: 0.45-0.75.Overall, these results suggest decreasing accessibility to the nearest health facility significantly deterred utilisation of all maternal health care services. These

  6. An updated atlas of human helminth infections: the example of East Africa

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    Karanja Peris

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reliable and updated maps of helminth (worm infection distributions are essential to target control strategies to those populations in greatest need. Although many surveys have been conducted in endemic countries, the data are rarely available in a form that is accessible to policy makers and the managers of public health programmes. This is especially true in sub-Saharan Africa, where empirical data are seldom in the public domain. In an attempt to address the paucity of geographical information on helminth risk, this article describes the development of an updated global atlas of human helminth infection, showing the example of East Africa. Methods Empirical, cross-sectional estimates of infection prevalence conducted since 1980 were identified using electronic and manual search strategies of published and unpublished sources. A number of inclusion criteria were imposed for identified information, which was extracted into a standardized database. Details of survey population, diagnostic methods, sample size and numbers infected with schistosomes and soil-transmitted helminths were recorded. A unique identifier linked each record to an electronic copy of the source document, in portable document format. An attempt was made to identify the geographical location of each record using standardized geolocation procedures and the assembled data were incorporated into a geographical information system. Results At the time of writing, over 2,748 prevalence surveys were identified through multiple search strategies. Of these, 2,612 were able to be geolocated and mapped. More than half (58% of included surveys were from grey literature or unpublished sources, underlining the importance of reviewing in-country sources. 66% of all surveys were conducted since 2000. Comprehensive, countrywide data are available for Burundi, Rwanda and Uganda. In contrast, information for Kenya and Tanzania is typically clustered in specific regions of

  7. Identification of impacts on the Egyptian Nile using remote sensing and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nahry, A. H.

    2013-10-01

    Nile River, the longest river in the world, 6,695 km long from its remotest headstream, the Luvironza River in Burundi, central Africa, to its delta on the Mediterranean Sea, NE Egypt. The Nile River islands form an attractive agricultural area characterized with its nightly fertile soils, easy source, and its suitability to a wide range of land use. The present use of these Nile islands does not reach the maximum capability of these resources due to improper land use of these areas.The current study aims at identifying the changes of the Nile course and its islands during the last three decades using remote sensing and GIS techniques in order to provide the scientific bases, which help in planning the most suitable programs of land use, soil management and conservation. Six MSS, eight TM and Eight ETM+ satellite images dated to 1972,1984 and 2002 respectively were used to study the changes occurred during the above-mentioned periods. The study area was divided into five sectors along the Nile River course i.e. Aswan - Qena, Qena - Assiut , Assiut - Qalubia , Qalubia - Damietta and Qalubia - Rosetta . The changes in Nile course from early seventieth to middle eighteenth were decreased by 51.34 Km2, from middle eighteenth to the millennium were decreased by 40.30 Km2. The overall change in Nile course area decreased by 91.64 Km2 in the investigation period. Belonging to the islands number and their areas in the investigation period, the changes in islands number from early seventieth to middle eighteenth were increased by 171 islands, from middle eighteenth to the millennium were decreased by 86 islands. Meanwhile, the islands areas from early seventieth to middle eighteenth were decreased by 4512.39 Feddan., from middle eighteenth to the millennium were decreased by 5446.97 Feddan. The overall change in the investigation period for the total number of the islands was increased by 85 islands, meanwhile the islands areas were decreased by 9959.36 Feddan. Changes of

  8. Imaging in the Land of 1000 Hills: Rwanda Radiology Country Report

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    David A. Rosman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rwanda is an equatorial country in central Africa (Figure 1, and part of the East African Community of Burundi, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. It is a small country, just over 10,000 square miles. Its population of nearly 12,000,000 makes it the most densely populated state in continental Africa. Rwanda’s capital, Kigali, is a mile-high city. Its elevation makes the climate much cooler and more comfortable than a typical equatorial climate. The average annual temperature is 20.5 degrees Celsius with a narrow range – April, the coldest month has an average temperature of 20 degrees, whereas August, the warmest month has an average temperature of 21.5 degrees. Economically, Rwanda functions as a subsistence agricultural country but has been actively striving to emerge as a middle-income country. Its primary exports are coffee and tea. In 1994, the majority Hutu population carried out mass genocide of the ethnic Tutsi minority In a coordinated slaughter committed by neighbors against each other, and with low-technology weapons like machetes, nearly 1,000,000 people were killed in 100 days (1. The country was devastated. Immediately post-genocide, Rwanda was one of the poorest countries in the world with nearly 70% of the population living below the poverty line (2. Until 1997, Rwanda had the lowest life expectancy of any country in the world (3. The physician work force was depleted due to the direct and indirect consequences of the Rwandan Genocide. Since this time there has been a steady economic recovery (4, along with remarkable medical recovery. Average life expectancy nationwide, only 27 years in the early 1990s, has now reached 63 years (3.Since the 2012 publication (5 highlighting its advances, radiology in Rwanda has benefitted from the capital infusion that has helped to propel the overall growth in the economic and health sectors. As of 2012, there are five national referral hospitals, 41 district hospitals, one military hospital and

  9. The burden of malaria in post-emergency refugee sites: A retrospective study

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    Spiegel Paul

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost two-thirds of refugees, internally displaced persons, returnees and other persons affected by humanitarian emergencies live in malaria endemic regions. Malaria remains a significant threat to the health of these populations. Methods Data on malaria incidence and mortality were analyzed from January 2006 to December 2009 from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Health Information System database collected at sites in Burundi, Chad, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Uganda. Data from three countries during 2006 and 2007, and all nine countries from 2008 to 2009, were used to describe trends in malaria incidence and mortality. Monthly counts of malaria morbidity and mortality were aggregated into an annual country rate averaged over the study period. Results An average of 1.18 million refugees resided in 60 refugee sites within nine countries with at least 50 cases of malaria per 1000 refugees during the study period 2008-2009. The highest incidence of malaria was in refugee sites in Tanzania, where the annual incidence of malaria was 399 confirmed cases per 1,000 refugees and 728 confirmed cases per 1,000 refugee children younger than five years. Malaria incidence in children younger than five years of age, based on the sum of confirmed and suspected cases, declined substantially at sites in two countries between 2006 and 2009, but a slight increase was reported at sites within four of seven countries between 2008 and 2009. Annual malaria mortality rates were highest in sites in Sudan (0.9 deaths per 1,000 refugees, Uganda and Tanzania (0.7 deaths per 1000 refugees each. Malaria was the cause of 16% of deaths in refugee children younger than five years of age in all study sites. Conclusions These findings represent one of the most extensive reports on malaria among refugees in post-emergency sites. Despite declines in malaria incidence among refugees in several countries, malaria

  10. Holocene Millennial Time Scale Hydrological Changes In Central-east Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, D.; Bonnefille, R.; Beaufort, L.

    The Holocene hydrological changes of a tropical swamp is reconstructed using a high resolution pollen record (ca 50 yrs) from the Kuruyange valley (Burundi, Africa, 3°35'S, 29°41'E), at 2000 m elevation. The sequence was dated by 10 radiocarbon dates, allowing reconstruction between ca 12 500 and 1000 cal yr B.P. In the Kuruyange swamp, peat accumulated rapidly at a sedimentation rate varying from 0.73 (prior to 6200 cal yr B.P.) to 1.51 mm/yr (during the late Holocene). A pollen index of water table, based on a ratio of aquatic versus non-aquatic plants has been used in order to test the hypothesis of hydrological constraints on the swampy ecosystem. Eight arid phases are evidenced by the index minima at 12 200, 11 200, 9900, 8600, 6500, 5000, 3400, 1600 cal yr B.P. The good agreement existing between this index and independent data such as (i) low-resolution East-African lake level reconstruct ions (Gillespie et al., 1983) and (ii) ?18O analyses from Arabian Sea (Sirocko et al., 1993) suggests the water table level responds to the monsoon dynamic. The Index varies periodically with a combination of 1/1515, 1/880 and 1/431 years-1 frequencies, revealed by time series analyses (Blackman-Tukey and Maximum Entropy). The extrapolation of the composite curve based on these 3 periodicities show that two major climatic events defined in the high latitudes between 1000 and 660 cal yr B.P. (Medieval Warm Period) and between 500 and 100 cal yr B.P. (Little Ice Age) are recorded in our data and show respectively high and low stands of the water table. Our results support some previous pollen-derived climate estimates in Ethiopia done by Bonnefille and Umer (1994). Moreover, the "1500 year" cycle registered in our data from the tropics, already evidenced in higher latitudes (Wijmstra et al., 1984; Bondet al., 1997; Schulz et al., 1999; Bond et al., 2001) support the hypothesis of strong teleconnections between tropical/subtropical and polar climates during the deglaciation

  11. Could there have been substantial declines in sexual risk behavior across sub-Saharan Africa in the mid-1990s?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Susanne F; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2014-09-01

    HIV prevalence is decreasing in much of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the drivers of the decline are subject to much dispute. Using mathematical modeling as a tool for hypothesis generation, we demonstrate how the hypothesis that the drop in prevalence reflects declines in sexual risk behavior is self-consistent. We characterize these potential declines in terms of their scale, duration, and timing, and theorize on how small changes in sexual behavior at the individual-level could have driven large declines in HIV prevalence. A population-level deterministic compartmental model was constructed to describe the HIV epidemics in 24 countries in SSA with sufficient trend data. The model was parameterized by national HIV prevalence and HIV natural history and transmission data. The temporal evolution of sexual risk behavior was characterized using established tools and uncertainty and sensitivity analyses on the results were conducted. Declines in the scale of sexual risk behavior between 31.8% (Botswana) and 89.3% (Liberia) can explain the declining HIV prevalence across countries. The average decline across countries was 68.9%. The transition in sexual risk behavior lasted between 2.7 (Botswana) and 16.6 (Gabon) years with an average of 8.2 years. The turning point year of the transition occurred between 1993 (Burundi) and 2001 (Namibia), but clustered around 1995 for most countries. The uncertainty and sensitivity analyses affirmed our model predictions. The hypothesis that HIV prevalence declines in SSA have been driven by declines in sexual risk behavior is self-consistent and provides a convincing narrative for an evolving HIV epidemiology in this region. The hypothesized declines must have been remarkable in their intensity, rapidity, and synchronicity to explain the temporal trends in HIV prevalence. These findings provide contextual support for the hypothesis that changes in sexual behavior that materialized in the 1990s are a dominant driver of the recent

  12. State-building and human resources for health in fragile and conflict-affected states: exploring the linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Sophie; Falisse, Jean-Benoit; Bertone, Maria Paola; Alonso-Garbayo, Alvaro; Martins, João S; Salehi, Ahmad Shah; Pavignani, Enrico; Martineau, Tim

    2015-05-15

    Human resources for health are self-evidently critical to running a health service and system. There is, however, a wider set of social issues which is more rarely considered. One area which is hinted at in literature, particularly on fragile and conflict-affected states, but rarely examined in detail, is the contribution which health staff may or do play in relation to the wider state-building processes. This article aims to explore that relationship, developing a conceptual framework to understand what linkages might exist and looking for empirical evidence in the literature to support, refute or adapt those linkages. An open call for contributions to the article was launched through an online community. The group then developed a conceptual framework and explored a variety of literatures (political, economic, historical, public administration, conflict and health-related) to find theoretical and empirical evidence related to the linkages outlined in the framework. Three country case reports were also developed for Afghanistan, Burundi and Timor-Leste, using secondary sources and the knowledge of the group. We find that the empirical evidence for most of the linkages is not strong, which is not surprising, given the complexity of the relationships. Nevertheless, some of the posited relationships are plausible, especially between development of health cadres and a strengthened public administration, which in the long run underlies a number of state-building features. The reintegration of factional health staff post-conflict is also plausibly linked to reconciliation and peace-building. The role of medical staff as part of national elites may also be important. The concept of state-building itself is highly contested, with a rich vein of scepticism about the wisdom or feasibility of this as an external project. While recognizing the inherently political nature of these processes, systems and sub-systems, it remains the case that state-building does occur over time

  13. Religious and cultural traits in HIV/AIDS epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayati, Ali-Akbar; Bakayev, Valerii; Bahadori, Moslem; Tabatabaei, Seyed-Javad; Alaei, Arash; Farahbood, Amir; Masjedi, Mohammad-Reza

    2007-10-01

    The pandemic of HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa and the rise of epidemics in Asia to the previously unforeseen level are likely to have global social, economic, and political impacts. In this emergency, it is vital to reappraise the weight of powerful religious and cultural factors in spreading the disease. The role of Islam in shaping values, norms, and public policies in North African states is to be appreciated for the lowest HIV prevalence in their populations. Yet, the place of religion in prevention of the disease diffusion is not fully understood nor worldwide acknowledged by the primary decision makers. Another topic, which has received little attention to date, despite the abundance of literature concerning the unfortunate Africa's anti-AIDS campaign, is an issue of colonial past. To better comprehend the share of both traits in diverse spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, we studied the correlation between Muslim and Christian proportions in the state's population and HIV rate. By this method, Muslim percentage came out as a potential predictor of HIV prevalence in a given state. In another approach, most subcontinental countries were clustered by colocalization and similarity in their leading religion, colonial past, and HIV seroprevalence starting from barely noticeable (0.6 - 1.2%, for Mauritania, Senegal, Somalia, and Niger) and low levels (1.9 - 4.8%, for Mali, Eritrea, Djibouti, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Burkina-Faso, and Chad) for Muslim populated past possessions of France and Italy, in the northern part of the subcontinent. Former territories of France, Belgium, Portugal, and the UK formed two other groups of the countries nearing the equator with Catholic prevailing (Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Gabon, and Burundi) or mixed populations comprising Christian, Muslim, and indigenous believers (Benin, Ghana, Uganda, Togo, Angola, Nigeria, Liberia, Kenya, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, and Sierra-Leone), which covered the HIV

  14. Access to emergency hospital care provided by the public sector in sub-Saharan Africa in 2015: a geocoded inventory and spatial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouma, Paul O; Maina, Joseph; Thuranira, Pamela N; Macharia, Peter M; Alegana, Victor A; English, Mike; Okiro, Emelda A; Snow, Robert W

    2018-01-25

    %) women of child bearing age are located more than 2-h travel time from the nearest hospital. Marked differences were observed within and between countries, ranging from less than 25% of the population within 2-h travel time of a public hospital in South Sudan to more than 90% in Nigeria, Kenya, Cape Verde, Swaziland, South Africa, Burundi, Comoros, São Tomé and Príncipe, and Zanzibar. Only 16 countries reached the international benchmark of more than 80% of their populations living within a 2-h travel time of the nearest hospital. Physical access to emergency hospital care provided by the public sector in Africa remains poor and varies substantially within and between countries. Innovative targeting of emergency care services is necessary to reduce these inequities. This study provides the first spatial census of public hospital services in Africa. Wellcome Trust and the UK Department for International Development. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. [Demography: can growth be slowed down?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The UN Fund for Population Activities report on the status of world population in 1990 is particularly unsettling because it indicates that fertility is not declining as rapidly as had been predicted. The world population of some 5.3 billion is growing by 90-100 million per year. 6 years ago the growth rate appeared to be declining everywhere except in Africa and some regions of South Asia. Hopes that the world population would stabilize at around 10.2 billion by the end of the 21st century now appear unrealistic. Some countries such as the Philippines, India, and Morocco which had some success in slowing growth in the 1960s and 70s have seen a significant deceleration in the decline. Growth rates in several African countries are already 2.7% per year and increasing. It is projected that Africa's population will reach 1.581 billion by 2025. Already there are severe shortages of arable land in some overwhelmingly agricultural countries like Rwanda and Burundi, and malnutrition is widespread on the continent. Between 1979-81 and 1986- 87, cereal production declined in 25 African countries out of 43 for which the Food and Agriculture Organization has data. The urban population of developing countries is increasing at 3.6%/year. It grew from 285 million in 1950 to 1.384 billion today and is projected at 4.050 billion in 2050. Provision of water, electricity, and sanitary services will be very difficult. From 1970-88 the number of urban households without portable water increased from 138 million to 215 million. It is not merely the quality of life that is menaced by constant population growth, but also the very future of the earth as a habitat, because of the degradation of soils and forests and resulting global warming. 6-7 million hectares of agricultural land are believed to be lost to erosion each year. Deforestation is a principal cause of soil erosion. Each year more than 11 million hectares of tropical forest and forested zones are stripped, in addition to some

  16. An Integrated Hydrological and Water Management Study of the Entire Nile River System - Lake Victoria to Nile Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid; Zaitchik, Benjamin; Alo, Clement; Ozdogan, Mutlu; Anderson, Martha; Policelli, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    The Nile basin River system spans 3 million km(exp 2) distributed over ten nations. The eight upstream riparian nations, Ethiopia, Eretria, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Congo, Tanzania and Kenya are the source of approximately 86% of the water inputs to the Nile, while the two downstream riparian countries Sudan and Egypt, presently rely on the river's flow for most of the their needs. Both climate and agriculture contribute to the complicated nature of Nile River management: precipitation in the headwaters regions of Ethiopia and Lake Victoria is variable on a seasonal and inter-annual basis, while demand for irrigation water in the arid downstream region is consistently high. The Nile is, perhaps, one of the most difficult trans-boundary water issue in the world, and this study would be the first initiative to combine NASA satellite observations with the hydrologic models study the overall water balance in a to comprehensive manner. The cornerstone application of NASA's Earth Science Research Results under this project are the NASA Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) and the USDA Atmosphere-land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) model. These two complementary research results are methodologically independent methods for using NASA observations to support water resource analysis in data poor regions. Where an LDAS uses multiple sources of satellite data to inform prognostic simulations of hydrological process, ALEXI diagnoses evapotranspiration and water stress on the basis of thermal infrared satellite imagery. Specifically, this work integrates NASA Land Data Assimilation systems into the water management decision support systems that member countries of the Nile Basin Initiative (NBI) and Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD, located in Nairobi, Kenya) use in water resource analysis, agricultural planning, and acute drought response to support sustainable development of Nile Basin water resources. The project is motivated by the recognition that

  17. An adjusted bed net coverage indicator with estimations for 23 African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Speybroeck, Niko

    2013-12-20

    different populations than the level of bed net coverage by itself. Data from the following countries was used: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo Democratic Republic, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The priority order given by the ABC and the bed net coverage are compared at the countries' level, the first level administrative divisions and for five different wealth quintiles. Both at national level and at the level of the administrative divisions the ABC suggests a different priority order for selecting countries and divisions for future interventions. When taking into account malaria endemicity, measures assessing equality in access to bed nets across wealth quintiles, such as slopes of inequality, are prone to change. This suggests that when assessing inequality in access to bed nets one should take into account the local malaria endemicity for populations from different wealth quintiles. Accounting for malaria endemicity highlights different countries, regions and socio-economic strata for future intervention than the bed net coverage by itself. Therefore, care should be taken to factor out any effects of local malaria endemicity in assessing bed net coverage and in prioritizing populations for further scale-up of bed net coverage. The ABC is proposed as a simple means to do this that is derived from an existing model of malaria epidemiology.

  18. Paying for performance to improve the delivery of health interventions in low- and middle-income countries .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Sophie; Fretheim, Atle; Kessy, Flora L; Lindahl, Anne Karin

    2012-02-15

    also needed to use one of the following study designs: randomised trial, non-randomised trial, controlled before-after study or interrupted time series study, and had to have been conducted in low- or middle-income countries (as defined by the World Bank). We aimed to present a meta-analysis of results. However, due to the limited number of studies in each category, the diversity of intervention designs and study methods, as well as important contextual differences, we present a narrative synthesis with separate results from each study. Nine studies were included in the review: one randomised trial, six controlled before-after studies and two interrupted time series studies (or studies which could be re-analysed as such). The interventions were varied: one used target payments linked to quality of care (in the Philippines). Two used target payments linked to coverage indicators (in Tanzania and Zambia). Three used conditional cash transfers, modified by quality measurements (in Rwanda, Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo). Two used conditional cash transfers without quality measures (in Rwanda and Vietnam). One used a mix of conditional cash transfers and target payments (China). Targeted services also varied. Most of the interventions used a wide range of targets covering inpatient, outpatient and preventive care, including a strong emphasis on services for women and children. However, one focused specifically on tuberculosis (the main outcome measure was cases detected); one on hospital revenues; and one on improved treatment of common illnesses in under-sixes. Participants were in most cases in a mix of public and faith-based facilities (dispensaries, health posts, health centres and hospitals), though districts were also involved and in one case payments were made direct to individual private practitioners.One study was considered to have low risk of bias and one a moderate risk of bias. The other seven studies had a high risk of bias. Only one study

  19. Niobium and tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Papp, John F.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    mineral tantalite ((Fe,Mn)(Ta,Nb)2O6), which is found as an accessory mineral in rare-metal granites and pegmatites that are also enriched in lithium and cesium (termed lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT)-type pegmatites).Brazil and Canada are the leading nations that produce niobium mineral concentrates, but Brazil is by far the leading producer, accounting for about 90 percent of production, which comes mostly from weathered material derived from carbonatites. Brazil and Canada also have the largest identified niobium resources; additional resources, although they are less well reported, occur in Angola, Australia, China, Greenland, Malawi, Russia, and South Africa. Australia and Brazil have been the leading producers of tantalum mineral concentrates, although recently Ethiopia and Mozambique have also been significant suppliers of tantalum. Artisanal mining of columbite-tantalite (also called coltan) is practiced in many countries, particularly Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Congo [Kinshasa]), Nigeria, Rwanda, and Uganda. Brazil has about 40 percent of the identified tantalum resources; other countries and regions with identified tantalum resources include, in decreasing order of resources, Australia, Asia, Russia and the Middle East, Africa, North America, and Europe. Identified niobium and tantalum resources in the United States are small, low grade, and difficult to recover and process, and are thus not commercially recoverable at current prices. Consequently, the United States meets its current and expected future needs for niobium and tantalum through imports of primary mineral concentrates and alloys and through recovery from foreign and domestic alloy scrap that contain the metals.Environmentally, the main issues related to niobium and tantalum mining are land disruptions, the volume of waste materials and their disposal, and the radioactivity of some tailings and waste materials that contain thorium and uranium. Because of the relative biological

  20. Impact of Air Temperature and SST Variability on Cholera Incidence in Southeastern Africa, 1971-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Shlomit

    2010-05-01

    The most important climatic parameter related to cholera outbreaks is the temperature, especially of the water bodies and the aquatic environment. This factor governs the survival and growth of V. cholerae, since it has a direct influence on its abundance in the environment, or alternatively, through its indirect influence on other aquatic organisms to which the pathogen is found to attach. Thus, the potential for cholera outbreaks may rise, parallel to the increase in ocean surface temperature. Indeed, recent studies indicate that global warming might create a favorable environment for V. cholerae and increase its incidence in vulnerable areas. Africa is vulnerable to climate variability. According to the recent IPCC report on Africa, the air temperature has indicated a significant warming trend since the 1960s. In recent years, most of the research into disease vectors in Africa related to climate variability has focused on malaria. The IPCC indicated that the need exists to examine the vulnerabilities and impacts of climatic factors on cholera in Africa. In light of this, the study uses a Poisson Regression Model to analyze the possible association between the cholera rates in southeastern Africa and the annual variability of air temperature and sea surface temperature (SST) at regional and hemispheric scales, for the period 1971-2006. Data description is as follows: Number of cholera cases per year in Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia and Mozambique. Source: WHO Global Health Atlas - cholera. Seasonal and annual temperature time series: Regional scale: a) Air temperature for southeastern Africa (30° E-36° E, 5° S-17° S), source: NOAA NCEP-NCAR; b) Sea surface temperature, for the western Indian Ocean (0-20° S, 40° E-45° E), source: NOAA, Kaplan SST dataset. Hemispheric scale (for the whole Southern Hemisphere): a) Air temperature anomaly; b) Sea surface temperature anomaly. Source: CRU, University of East Anglia. The following

  1. Payment methods for outpatient care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Beibei; He, Li; Meng, Qingyue; Jia, Liying

    2017-03-03

    -after studies, interrupted time series, and repeated measures studies that compared different payment methods for outpatient health facilities. We defined outpatient care facilities in this review as facilities that provide health services to individuals who do not require hospitalisation or institutionalisation. We only included methods used to transfer funds from the purchaser of healthcare services to health facilities (including groups of individual professionals). These include global budgets, line-item budgets, capitation, fee-for-service (fixed and unconstrained), pay for performance, and mixed payment. The primary outcomes were service provision outcomes, patient outcomes, healthcare provider outcomes, costs for providers, and any adverse effects. At least two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. We conducted a structured synthesis. We first categorised the comparisons and outcomes and then described the effects of different types of payment methods on different categories of outcomes. We used a fixed-effect model for meta-analysis within a study if a study included more than one indicator in the same category of outcomes. We used a random-effects model for meta-analysis across studies. If the data for meta-analysis were not available in some studies, we calculated the median and interquartile range. We reported the risk ratio (RR) for dichotomous outcomes and the relative change for continuous outcomes. We included 21 studies from Afghanistan, Burundi, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, the United Kingdom, and the United States of health facilities providing primary health care and mental health care. There were three kinds of payment comparisons. 1) Pay for performance (P4P) combined with some existing payment method (capitation or different kinds of input-based payment) compared to the existing payment methodWe included 18 studies in this comparison, however we did not include five studies in the effects