WorldWideScience

Sample records for burundi

  1. Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    Burundi, with 1 of the highest population densities in sub-Saharan Africa, is a high, rolling country in the Nile-Congo crest. Of the 3 main ethnic groups, the Hutu, about 85% of the population, are primarily farmers. Burundi became independent in 1962. Ultimate political power is vested in the Central Committee of the sole political party, called the UPRONA. Its members are all those citizens of Burundi who profess allegiance to its principles. The Burundi government is dedicated to improving the living conditions of the rural poor and to ethnic reconciliation and national unity. Over 90% of the population are subsistence farmers; Burundi is 1 of the world's poorest countries. Over 80% of export earnings are provided by coffee but tea production continues to increase. Burundi seeks good relations with its neighbors Rwanda, Zaire, and Tanzania and has even entered into joint economic development projects with Rwanda and Tanzania. Its armed forces are well-trained and well-equipped and they work to keep law and order and to deter foreign interference by neighbors of Burundi. The US government keeps friendly relations with Burundi and has encouraged efforts to establish political stability and peaceful economic development. The US Agency for International Development program development strategy in Burundi focuses on promoting food availability, fuel production, and family health. Numerous other programs in effect are also mentioned. Principal US officials, travel notes, principal government officials, and other information are included.

  2. Burundi: country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsum, L

    1988-10-01

    One of Africa's most rural and densely populated countries, Burundi is a landlocked nation in Central Africa. The 4.9 million people are 85% Hutus, agricultural people of Bantu origin. However, the Hutus are excluded from power by the minority Tutsis, and the 2 groups have engaged in violent conflict. After a military coup in 1987, a new president, Major Pierre Buyoya, was installed, but restrictions on the Hutus continue. The major difference in Burundi has been a relaxation of restrictions on the Catholic church, which were severe under the former President Bagaza. Most Hutus are Catholic, with a minority of Muslims. For the peasant farmer, faced with diminishing arable land and reliance on 1 export crop (coffee), life is becoming more difficult. An expansion of sugar production was planned to reduce reliance on coffee, although the government has a rather ambivalent approach to development. While promoting private sector development with the help of the World Bank and the U.S. government, the Burundi government maintains a rigid 1-party system with strict control over the lives of the people. Infant mortality stands at 196/1,000 live births and life expectancy is low--43 years for women and 40 years for men. The literacy rate is low (39% for men, 15% for women), and the GNP per capita is low ($230). Most land is used for subsistence crops such as cassava, bananas, sweet potatoes, maize, pulses, and sorghum.

  3. Small hydro Power in Burundi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NTUNZWENIMANAGagarine; NIYONGINGONehemie

    2002-01-01

    BURUNDI has very good cooperation with CHINA especially in technique and Economy.From 1972, CHINA has promised to construct thefirst national SHP plant on the MUGERE river near Bujumbura (8 MW). In 1982, this SHP began to output electricity.Actually CHINA has accepted to finance the MPANDA SHP project (10.4MW).CHINA has also accepted to build a technical university at Bujumbura to increase technical engineer staff. There is manv other works: health, textile industry, roads construction. This good and effective cooperation has been especially confirmed through the two last regular complete revisions of the MUGERE SHP even if some times the security on the field was disturbed. The last one has been supported by the CHINA Government (more than 400,000 US $). Also, two Chinese staffs assisted by three Burundian operators are going on with preventive and curative maintenance of the equipments of this SHP plant. Burundi geographic in formations and economic situation informations are shown in table 1 and table 2.

  4. RETHINKING VIOLENCE, RECONCILIATION AND RECONSTRUCTION IN BURUNDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Ndimurwimo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Armed violence and genocide are among the on-going problems that are still facing contemporary Africa and the world. In the aftermath of the outrages, devastation and appalling carnage of the Second World War, member states of the United Nations (UN undertook radical steps, inter alia, "to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war and to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights". Subsequently, the International Bill of Human Rights was proclaimed in order to lay down international human rights norms and standards of conduct and to prevent the recurrence of mass killings. Although Burundi is a State Party to the UN and African Union and is a signatory to a number of international and regional human rights treaties, the post-colonial history of Burundi is an epic tale of indescribable human suffering and misery as a result of systematic mass killings. At least every family or household in Burundi has been negatively affected by the mass killings of the 1960s, 1972, 1988 and 1990s, which have created a significant number of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs.This article traces the root causes of Burundi's systemic armed violence and argues that despite several UN Security Council Resolutions and peace agreements aimed at national reconciliation and reconstruction, mass killings and other heinous crimes remain unaddressed. The article recommends that a comprehensive transitional justice model is required in post-conflict Burundi in order to bring about national reconciliation, healing and reconstruction.

  5. An Agricultural Expansion Strategy for Burundi

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-04

    Pierre Buyoya, President of the Republic of Burundi. This speech, labelled a " Discours Program," is the starting point for a wide-ranging effort to...entitled, " Politique Sectorielle." It explains the various policies of the ministry regarding the sectors under its responsibility. With respect to...has begun to move towards implementing the recommendations contained in both the " Discours Program" and the Sectorial Policies of the Ministry. To

  6. The Burundi Heart Centre: From concept to design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Julia; Yacoub, Lisa; Kambaris, Angelique; Wright, Gavin; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2015-01-01

    Burundi is one of the world's poorest nations, which is also reflected in its relative lack of cardiac facilities, particularly those catering to young children and adults. The authors discuss current efforts to build "The Burundi Heart Centre" to help address this challenge. In particular, they highlight how the project can act as a case study for a sustainable architecture that involves local people and uses locally available materials in a contemporary and innovative way.

  7. Schistosomiasis control and health education in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, D; Mpitabakana, P

    1989-06-01

    In Burundi, the intestinal parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, inhabits the waters of the Rusizi Plain (1 of the worst affected areas), the Capital Bujumbura, the Imbo-Sud, and around Lake Cohoha. It continues to cause illness in these regions. In 1985, the Lutte Contre la Schistosomiase project implemented a control program in these regions, chiefly involving chemotherapy. In addition, the European Development Fund had financed integration of safe water supply and environmental sanitation efforts into the program. To further reduce the incidence of schistosomiasis, the control program has introduced a training program for auxiliary health workers and health education campaigns. These efforts assist the program in decentralizing schistosomiasis control to health services and communities. Auxiliary health workers in primary schools, health centers, and subcommittees for sociosanitary development are responsible for educating the public about schistosomiasis. Program workers have developed educational material which allows the educators to address consistent messages to all audiences yet also allows for flexibility. The material consists of posters demonstrating how the disease is transmitted and other preventive measures, a film on schistosomiasis control, and a flip chart. Eventually health centers will be responsible for epidemiological surveillance of schistosomiasis. Communal subcommittees for sociosanitary development play an important role in informing local authorities of needed actions to control the disease and in setting priorities.

  8. Traditional justice in the reconciliation between Rwanda and Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Castel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the use of traditional justice in two post-conflicts in the Great Lakes region: those of Rwanda and Burundi. In Rwanda, the government, led by the Rwanda Patriotic Front (FPR, has modernised and shaped for its own interests the gacaca, who are responsible for seeking justice for the victims of the 1994 genocide. In Burundi, the government has yet not deployed all the transitional justice mechanisms as envisaged in the Arusha agreement. The bushingantahe (the rehabilitation of whom is also envisaged in the agreement have not yet been incorporated into transitional justice.

  9. Recovering from conflict: An analysis of food production in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haese, D' M.F.C.; Speelman, S.; Vandamme, E.; Nkunzimana, T.; Ndimubandi, J.; Haese, D' L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the devastating food insecurity in two densely populated provinces in the north of Burundi as a result of overpopulation and low production capacity in the aftermath of conflict. We compare data that was collected in the Ngozi and Muyinga Province in 2007 with data of household

  10. Lessons from Burundi’s Security Sector Reform Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    International Security Sector Advisory Team. 7 Mémorandum d’Entente entre le Gouvernement de la République du Burundi et les Ministres des Affaires...and Fabien Nsengimana, Evaluation du Volet Gouvernance du Programme DSS, October 28, 2013. Nicole Ball, Putting Governance at the Heart of Security

  11. Violent Conflict and Behavior: a Field Experiment in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, M.J.; Nillesen, E.E.M.; Bulte, E.H.; Lensink, B.W.; Verwimp, P.; Soest, van D.P.

    2012-01-01

    We use a series of field experiments in rural Burundi to examine the impact of exposure to conflict on social, risk, and time preferences. We find that conflict affects behavior: individuals exposed to violence display more altruistic behavior towards their neighbors, are more risk-seeking, and have

  12. Violent conflict and behavior : A field experiment in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, M.J.; Nillesen, E.E.M.; Verwimp, P.; Bulte, E.H.; Lensink, B.W.; van Soest, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    We use a series of field experiments in rural Burundi to examine the impact of exposure to conflict on social, risk, and time preferences. We find that conflict affects behavior: individuals exposed to violence display more altruistic behavior towards their neighbors, are more risk-seeking, and have

  13. An Integrated Approach to Counter Insurgency: A Burundi Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    opinions that a burning issue exists. Most journalists who spoke out have experienced jail. If the current strategic environment is not acted upon...Buzingo, Burundi, Les Chiffres –Cles de l’ Economies- Les Statistiques: un Outil pour le Pilotage des Politiques Publiques (Bujumbura: Institut des

  14. Ageism in Belgium and Burundi: a comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Manon; Missotten, Pierre; Schroyen, Sarah; Nindaba, Desiderate; Adam, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent cross-cultural comparisons between Asian and Western cultures have shown that ageism arises more from the lack of availability of social and economic resources for older adults than from the culture itself. We tested this assumption by conducting a survey among people living in a least developed country compared with those living in a developed country. Participants and methods Twenty-seven Belgians living in Belgium, 29 Burundians living in Belgium, and 32 Burundians living in Burundi were included in this study. Their attitudes toward older adults were assessed using several self-reported measures. Results Statistical analyses confirmed that older people are more negatively perceived by Burundians living in Burundi than by Burundians and Belgians living in Belgium, whose attitudes did not differ from each other. Conclusion Consistent with our hypothesis, our results suggest that the level of development of a country and more particularly the lack of government spending on older people (pension and health care systems) may contribute to their younger counterparts perceiving them more negatively. PMID:27601889

  15. Ageism in Belgium and Burundi: a comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquet M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Manon Marquet, Pierre Missotten, Sarah Schroyen, Desiderate Nindaba, Stéphane Adam Psychology of Aging Unit, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium Background: Recent cross-cultural comparisons between Asian and Western cultures have shown that ageism arises more from the lack of availability of social and economic resources for older adults than from the culture itself. We tested this assumption by conducting a survey among people living in a least developed country compared with those living in a developed country.Participants and methods: Twenty-seven Belgians living in Belgium, 29 Burundians living in Belgium, and 32 Burundians living in Burundi were included in this study. Their attitudes toward older adults were assessed using several self-reported measures.Results: Statistical analyses confirmed that older people are more negatively perceived by Burundians living in Burundi than by Burundians and Belgians living in Belgium, whose attitudes did not differ from each other.Conclusion: Consistent with our hypothesis, our results suggest that the level of development of a country and more particularly the lack of government spending on older people (pension and health care systems may contribute to their younger counterparts perceiving them more negatively. Keywords: attitudes toward older adults, cross-cultural differences, socioeconomic development, intergenerational relations

  16. CAPFA President Abdul’ahat Abdulrixit Leads Delegation to Burundi and Tanzania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang; Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    <正>Adelegation headed by Abdul’ahat Abdulrixit,President of the Chinese-African People’s Friendship Association(CAPFA),visited Burundi and Tanzania from May 5 to 14 at the invitation of Therence Sinunguruza,

  17. Obstetric Fistula in Burundi: a comprehensive approach to managing women with this neglected disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: In Burundi, the annual incidence of obstetric fistula is estimated to be 0.2-0.5% of all deliveries, with 1000-2000 new cases per year. Despite this relatively high incidence, national capacity for identifying and managing obstetric fistula is very limited. Thus, in July 2010, Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) set up a specialised Obstetric Fistula Centre in Gitega (Gitega Fistula Centre, GFC), the only permanent referral centre for obstetric fistula in Burundi. A comprehensive model...

  18. Appropriating the past: A comparative study of official memory practices in Rwanda and Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Chahal, Simran Kaur

    2012-01-01

    In the aftermath of mass violence, the political and social nature of memory becomes even more apparent. The way in which past abuses are remembered and represented significantly influences the ability of individuals and communities to reconstruct social relations. The cases of post-genocide Rwanda and Burundi reveal strongly the relationship between memory, identity and power in the aftermath of mass atrocity. Although contemporary Rwanda and Burundi are often contrasted due to their divergi...

  19. Burundi; Staff Report for the 2003 Article IV Consultation and Request for Three-Year Arrangement Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF)

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Burundi has made much progress since the signing of the Arusha peace and reconciliation agreement. The handling of the economy has been highly competent considering the inordinate difficulties faced by Burundi in recent years. The bank of the Republic of Burundi has made progress in the implementation of monetary policies and in the conduct of bank supervision. Progress in implementing structural reforms has been satisfactory overall. Burundi continues to face unsustainably heavy debt-service...

  20. Power-Sharing, Conflict and Transition in Burundi: Twenty Years of Trial and Error Machtteilung, Konflikt und Wandel in Burundi: Zwanzig Jahre Versuch und Irrtum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef Vandeginste

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past twenty years, Burundi has experimented with powersharing as an instrument of political liberalisation, democratisation and conflict resolution. This contribution analyses the different meanings the concept of power-sharing has had throughout Burundi’s recent and extremely violent political transition, in particular during the lengthy peace process. It shows how national and international actors have found inspiration in the toolbox of consociationalism to negotiate and design the Arusha Peace and Reconciliation Agreement for Burundi signed in August 2000 and its posttransition Constitution. Power-sharing has been instrumental in achieving the – short-term – objective of war termination. It has also de-ethnicised political competition and reduced the (potentially destabilising effect of elections. Measured against more ambitious state-building objectives (democracy, rule of law, accountable and effective governance, power-sharing has (so far not been able to make a difference. Several factors and developments threaten the “survival” of the power-sharing model in Burundi. In Burundi wird seit zwanzig Jahren mit Power-Sharing als Instrument politischer Liberalisierung, Demokratisierung und Konfliktlösung experimentiert. Der vorliegende Beitrag analysiert, welche unterschiedlichen Bedeutungen das Konzept der Machtteilung in der jüngsten und extrem gewalttätigen Entwicklungsphase Burundis angenommen hat, insbesondere während des langwierigen Friedensprozesses. Er zeigt auf, inwieweit nationale und internationale Akteure sich bei der Aushandlung und Planung des Arusha-Abkommens zu Frieden und Versöhnung in Burundi, das im August 2000 unterzeichnet wurde, sowie der anschließenden Verfassung am Instrumentarium der Konkordanzdemokratie bedient haben. Power-Sharing erwies sich als nützlich, das kurzfristige Ziel einer Beendigung des Krieges zu erreichen, und trug zur De-Ethnisierung des politischen Wettbewerbs und zur

  1. On the genus Pachygnatha (Araneae, Tetragnathidae in the Albertine Rift of Burundi, with the description of three new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Nzigidahera

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of Pachygnatha, P. bispiralis sp. nov., P. intermedia sp. nov. and P. ventricosa sp. nov., are described from forest areas in western Burundi. The presence of P. procincta Bosmans & Bosselaers, 1994 in Burundi confirms its very wide distribution spanning most of Africa. Pachygnatha appears to be an important element of the afromontane spider fauna.

  2. When uncommon uncovers: mucosal tuberculosis in a medical tourist from Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupper, Moti; Potasman, Israel

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis confined to the mucus membranes is a rare presentation in the era of effective chemotherapy. We describe a case of mucosal tuberculosis in a "medical tourist" from Burundi that went undiagnosed for 6 years. Starting as conjunctivitis, the disease has spread to involve the nose and larynx as well. The clinical, pathophysiological, and epidemiological aspects are discussed.

  3. Wages in the food chain in Burundi: WageIndicator survey 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Tijdens; J. Besamusca; R. Ndereyahaga

    2013-01-01

    This WageIndicator Data Report presents the results of the face-to-face WageIndicator survey of the labour force conducted between the 7th of April and the 29th of April 2013 in all provinces of Burundi. In total 1,679 persons were interviewed; 52% were men, 48% women and 43% were under 30 years of

  4. Seasonal and Geographic Variation of Pediatric Malaria in Burundi: 2011 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Imelda K; Sen Roy, Shouraseni; Nkengurutse, Delphin; Ndikubagenzi, Jacques

    2016-04-15

    We analyzed hospitalization records from 2011 to 2012 to examine the spatial patterns of pediatric malaria in Burundi. Malaria case data for those below the age of five years were categorized according to the four principal seasons of Burundi, which are two rainy seasons (February to May; September to November) and two dry seasons (June to August; December to January). The Getis-Ord Gi* statistic was used to examine seasonal spatial patterns of pediatric malaria, whereas geographically weighted regression (GWR) were used to examine the potential role of environmental variables on the spatial patterns of cases. There were a total of 19,890 pediatric malaria cases reported during the study period. The incidence among males was higher than that among females; and it was higher in rural districts. The seasonal incidence peaks occurred in the northern half of the country during the wet season while during the dry season, incidence was higher in southern Burundi. Elevation played a greater role in explaining variance in the prevalence of pediatric malaria during seasonal peaks than rainfall. The counterintuitive finding in northern Burundi confirms previous findings and suggests other factors (e.g., land cover/land use) facilitate the persistence of the mosquito population in the highlands of Africa.

  5. Seasonal and Geographic Variation of Pediatric Malaria in Burundi: 2011 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imelda K. Moise

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed hospitalization records from 2011 to 2012 to examine the spatial patterns of pediatric malaria in Burundi. Malaria case data for those below the age of five years were categorized according to the four principal seasons of Burundi, which are two rainy seasons (February to May; September to November and two dry seasons (June to August; December to January. The Getis-Ord Gi* statistic was used to examine seasonal spatial patterns of pediatric malaria, whereas geographically weighted regression (GWR were used to examine the potential role of environmental variables on the spatial patterns of cases. There were a total of 19,890 pediatric malaria cases reported during the study period. The incidence among males was higher than that among females; and it was higher in rural districts. The seasonal incidence peaks occurred in the northern half of the country during the wet season while during the dry season, incidence was higher in southern Burundi. Elevation played a greater role in explaining variance in the prevalence of pediatric malaria during seasonal peaks than rainfall. The counterintuitive finding in northern Burundi confirms previous findings and suggests other factors (e.g., land cover/land use facilitate the persistence of the mosquito population in the highlands of Africa.

  6. Les Evolutions Macro-Economiques au Rwanda et au Burundi: Quelles Perspectives pour le Développement ?

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Both Rwanda and Burundi have suffered from an extremely violent crisis, of which the consequences, both economic and social, still largely determine today’s society. Rwanda and Burundi are moreover confronted with the same structural problems of overpopulation and natural resource scarcity that strongly limit the potential of economic diversification away from rural survival activities. The disappointingly low growth rates in 2003 illustrate once more the vulnerability of both economies to cl...

  7. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dismas Baza

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Methods Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO, a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Results Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9% compared to public (4.2% and NGO (0% outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu. Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu, private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu. Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors

  8. “We Have No Influence”: International Discourse and the Instrumentalisation of Transitional Justice in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Taylor

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Burundi may soon reach yet another crossroads in its tumultuous history and on its path towards transitional justice. A contentious draft law for a Truth and Reconciliation Commission awaits approval by the country’s National Assembly, which has raised a number of concerns about the independence of the eventual commission, the likelihood of popular participation in the process and the prospects for criminal justice. But as this practice note seeks to demonstrate, the international community in Burundi may in fact be contributing to the instrumentalisation of the process. The note highlights how the discourse of the international community may partially facilitate a certain duplicity among influential figures within the current government, particularly with respect to compliance with stipulations under the 2000 Arusha Peace Agreement. Two common rationalisations in particular are explained that have seemingly emerged among the international community with respect to transitional justice and that are at the heart of this instrumentalisation: outside imposition and a lack of influence. The note argues that since transitional justice can no longer be regarded as an apolitical process, international actors must be more cognisant of their actions and discourse with a view to ensuring credible transitional justice processes in contexts like Burundi.

  9. Evaluation of a social marketing intervention promoting oral rehydration salts in Burundi

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    Nzohabonayo Jerome

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death for children under five in Burundi; however, use of oral rehydration salts (ORS, the recommended first-line treatment, remains low. In 2004, PSI/Burundi launched a social marketing intervention to promote ORASEL among caregivers of children under five; the product was relaunched in 2006 with a new flavor. This study evaluates the intervention after the ORASEL relaunch, which included mass media and interpersonal communication activities. The study looks at trends in ORASEL use in Burundi and in behavioral determinants that may be related to its use. Methods In 2006 and 2007, PSI conducted household surveys among Burundian females of reproductive age (15-49. Both surveys used a two-stage sampling process to select 30 households in each of 115 rural and urban collines throughout the nation. Survey respondents were asked about diarrhea treatment-related behavior; key behavioral determinants; and exposure to the ORASEL intervention. Data were analyzed to identify trends over time, characteristics of ORASEL users, and associations between exposure to the intervention and changes in ORASEL use and related behavioral determinants. Results ORASEL use among caregivers at their children's last diarrheal episode increased significantly from 20% in 2006 to 30% in 2007, and there were also desirable changes in several behavioral determinants associated with ORASEL use. Evaluation analysis showed that a higher level of exposure to the social marketing campaign was associated with greater use of ORASEL and with significant improvements in perceived availability, knowledge of the signs of diarrhea and dehydration, social support, and self-efficacy. Conclusions ORS use can be improved through social marketing and educational campaigns that make the public aware of the availability of the product, encourage dialogue about its use, and increase skills and confidence relating to correct product

  10. Identification of a strain of maize dwarf mosaic virus, related to sugarcane mosaic virus isolated from maize in Burundi

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    Verhoyen, M.

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available A strain of maize dwarf mosaic virus related to sugarcane mosaic virus has been isolated from maize in Burundi. The properties (including electron microscopy and serology of the virus are described, and elements for a control strategy are reviewed.

  11. Borderlands of mental health: Explorations in medical anthropology, psychiatric epidemiology and health systems research in Afghanistan and Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ventevogel, P.

    2016-01-01

    Many areas of the globe today face continuous armed conflict, with more and more populations caught in the crossfire. This has been true in both Afghanistan and Burundi where populations have to cope with the psychological and social effects of ongoing collective violence. While living and working i

  12. Potential Natural Vegetation Map of Eastern Africa (Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia). Version 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Breugel, Paulo; Kindt, Roeland; Lillesø, Jens-Peter Barnekow;

    2015-01-01

    The potential natural vegetation (PNV) map of eastern and southern Africa covers the countries Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia. The first version of the map was developed by various partners in East Africa and Europe in 2010 and has now reached version 2. The map is...

  13. SOTER-based soil parameter estimates for Central Africa - DR of Congo, Burundi and Rwanda (ver. 1.0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    This harmonized set of soil parameter estimates for Central Africa, comprising Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda, was derived from the Soil and Terrain Database for Central Africa (SOTERCAF ver. 1.0) and the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database, using standardized taxonomy-based p

  14. Political Representation of Minorities as Collateral Damage or Gain: The Batwa in Burundi and Rwanda

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    Stef Vandeginste

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a remarkable discrepancy between the political representation of the Batwa ethnic minority group in Burundi compared to in Rwanda. Whereas Rwanda’s focus on citizenship prevents the Batwa from claiming recognition as a politically salient societal segment, Burundi’s governance model, characterized by ethnic, consociational power-sharing, guarantees the political representation of the Batwa in the legislative assemblies. The difference is mainly due to the various modalities of political transition that both countries have experienced. While in Rwanda, regime change came about through a military victory, Burundi’s transition from conflict to peace involved a long and complex peace-negotiations process, with international mediators viewing the armed conflict and its resolution in explicitly ethnic terms. The Arusha Peace and Reconciliation Agreement was a foundational moment for the recognition of the political participation rights of the Batwa in Burundi, despite the fact that they were not actively involved in Burundi’s armed conflict, or in the peace negotiations. The comparative analysis in this paper offers insights into the potential of peace processes with respect to improved minority-rights protection following violent conflict.

  15. Legal Loopholes and the Politics of Executive Term Limits: Insights from Burundi

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    Stef Vandeginste

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nomination of incumbent Pierre Nkurunziza to stand again for president in the 2015 national elections triggered a political and security crisis in Burundi. A crucial element in the controversy around his third term was the legality of his candidacy. This paper analyses how domestic and international actors responded to the legal loopholes that characterised Burundi’s term-limit legislation. Three responses are distinguished. First, quite paradoxically, an argument was put forward by third-term supporters that stressed constitutional legality, a value usually invoked by third-term opponents. Second, a peace agreement was referred to as a source of legitimacy and as a legal norm. Third, a Constitutional Court ruling was invoked to address the legal loophole. Despite the apparent irrelevance of legal norms in an increasingly authoritarian environment, law significantly shaped the dynamics of the third-term debate and of the wider crisis. The Burundi case also illustrates the limitations of constitutional engineering of democratic governance.

  16. Comportement de Stylosanthes guianensis (Aubl. Sw. dans la basse Ruzizi et le Mosso (Burundi

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    Vancoppenolle, R.

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Requirements of Stylosanthes guianensis (Aubl Sw in lower Ruzizi and Mosso (Burundi. This paper describes the requirements of Stylosanthes guianensis in two ecological regions : Mosso (1 280 m alt. and lower Ruzizi (800 m alt.. This legume was introduced in 1953 into the grasslands of the east and in 1970 into lower Ruzizi, with the aim of improving the value of the natural pastures using leguminous plants. At Mosso, soil and climatic conditions were favourable for Stylosanthes and it grew well. However, since 1981. Anthracnose has severely reduced its growth and until a solution is found its general introduction will not be possible. In lower Ruzizi plant development was limited by low rainfall (670, 4 mm per year and soils with a low water retention capacity (sand dunes. For this region, it is necessary to identify cultivars resistant to drought and devise a method of establishing these cultivars on sand dunes.

  17. Reconciling reintegration: the complexity of economic and social reintegration of ex-combatants in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Rens; van Leeuwen, Mathijs

    2015-04-01

    The extent to which disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration (DDR) programmes initiated by state or multilateral agencies can realise the reintegration of ex-combatants remains debated. While some consider that DDR should have the ambition to result in long-term reintegration, others argue that DDR should focus on short-term goals. This paper explores experiences with the reintegration of ex-combatants in Burundi. It shows the interconnectedness of economic and social reintegration processes, and demonstrates that the reintegration of ex-combatants cannot be seen in isolation from the wider recovery and development context in which DDR is taking place. Moreover, the case demonstrates that reconciliation and social reintegration are deeply interconnected, to the extent that social reintegration may fail if reconciliation is not taken into account. Rather than a debate between long- and short-term goals, the focus should therefore be on increasing the understanding of reintegration processes and finding ways in which programmes can contribute to those.

  18. Production de Pennisetum sp. et son utilisation pour la culture de Pleurotus ostreatus au Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyuku, Prosper; Bigawa, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Cette étude a porté sur la culture de trois cultivars de Pleurotus ostreatus (cultivars 2125, 2153 et 969) sur quatre souches de Pennisetum sp. (dénommées S1, S2, S3 et S4) produites sur un terrain de la Faculté d’Agronomie à l’Université du Burundi. Après incubation, les substrats ont été placés en tranchées pour fructification. L’objectif poursuivi était de déterminer les souches de Pennisetum sp. sur lesquelles Pleurotus ostreatus donnait un meilleur rendement. Les hypothèses posées étaien...

  19. The Eye of the Beholder: Service Provision and State Legitimacy in Burundi

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    Nora Stel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available State legitimacy – particularly its alleged potential to counter state fragility – has received increasing attention in academic and policy literature concerned with African development. Service provision can substantially influence such state legitimacy. Services, however, are mostly provided by a multiplicity of (state and non-state providers. This article therefore specifically explores how joint service delivery by multiple providers shapes the attribution of state legitimacy in Burundi by means of two qualitative case studies. Empirically, the article demonstrates, first, that the process of stakeholder interaction, rather than the output of this process, most distinctly shapes state legitimacy and, second, that there are substantial variations in legitimacy attribution by different stakeholders and for different state institutions. Epistemologically, the article suggests three specific challenges that merit attention in further empirical investigation of state legitimacy in fragile settings: the diversity of people’s expectations; the artificiality of state/non-state distinctions; and the personification and politicization of state institutions.

  20. Emergency obstetric care in a rural district of Burundi: What are the surgical needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, R.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Trelles, M.; Caluwaerts, S.; van den Boogaard, W.; Manirampa, J.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Manzi, M.; Nanan-N’zeth, K.; Duchenne, B.; Ndelema, B.; Etienne, W.; Alders, P.; Veerman, R.; Van den Bergh, R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In a rural district hospital in Burundi offering Emergency Obstetric care-(EmOC), we assessed the a) characteristics of women at risk of, or with an obstetric complication and their types b) the number and type of obstetric surgical procedures and anaesthesia performed c) human resource cadres who performed surgery and anaesthesia and d) hospital exit outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis of EmOC data (2011 and 2012). Results A total of 6084 women were referred for EmOC of whom 2534(42%) underwent a major surgical procedure while 1345(22%) required a minor procedure (36% women did not require any surgical procedure). All cases with uterine rupture(73) and extra-uterine pregnancy(10) and the majority with pre-uterine rupture and foetal distress required major surgery. The two most prevalent conditions requiring a minor surgical procedure were abortions (61%) and normal delivery (34%). A total of 2544 major procedures were performed on 2534 admitted individuals. Of these, 1650(65%) required spinal and 578(23%) required general anaesthesia; 2341(92%) procedures were performed by ‘general practitioners with surgical skills’ and in 2451(96%) cases, anaesthesia was provided by nurses. Of 2534 hospital admissions related to major procedures, 2467(97%) were discharged, 21(0.8%) were referred to tertiary care and 2(0.1%) died. Conclusion Overall, the obstetric surgical volume in rural Burundi is high with nearly six out of ten referrals requiring surgical intervention. Nonetheless, good quality care could be achieved by trained, non-specialist staff. The post-2015 development agenda needs to take this into consideration if it is to make progress towards reducing maternal mortality in Africa. PMID:28170398

  1. Le bois petrifies de la plaine de la haute Rusizi (Burundi

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    M. Reeksman

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available THE DISCOVERY OF PETRIFIED FOSSILS IN THE HIGH RUSIZI PLAIN (BURUNDIPalaeobotanical research in Central Africa is still very fragmentary. In Burundi, apart from the very classical and abundant stromatolites of the Mosso (in the south of the country, Sah (1967 has indicated the occurrence of vegetal debris in the fluviolacustrian sediments o f the mid-upper Rusizi plain. These fragments have never been identified, but a study of the pollen grains found in sedimentary layers of the same age has revealed some features of the vegetation and of the climate prevailing in the Upper Neogene period.In November 1978 we discovered in north-western Burundi a deposit of petrified trunks of exceptional size. These fossils had been exposed a short time previously when a small quarry was established. The deposit contained four trunks, two of which were large: length, 1 m; diameter, 90 cm; weight, more than 1 000 kg.Initial macro and submicrospic examination of fragments showed an anatomical structure similar to the structure of some fossils described in Kivu (Zaire and belonging to the family Caesalpiniaceae.Samples were sent to Tervuren (R. Dechamps and to Liêge (Mrs Demaret and their joint studies revealed that these trunks belong to the genus Julbernardia and probably to J. globiflora.  Their age would be about 1 200 000 years.Since then, other trunks have been found (at least ten. According to our study, it is concluded that they have a very different structure from those of the previous specimens. Samples were sent to Tervuren and to Liêge for further study and the conclusions from the specialists should be available very soon.

  2. La spécialisation régionale, moteur du cycle de développement au Burundi

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    Bergen, DW.

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional specialization, a face behind the development of Burundi. The isolation of Burundi, its lack of natural resources and its high demografic pressure force the country to maximise the output of the arable land available while considering regional potentials. A well-planned regional specialization seems therefore necessary. In this paper, the significance and the purpose of regional specialization was assessed. Possible conditions for the introduction of the system were analyzed and an attempt was made to assess the potential of different agricultural production schemes as subjects for regional agricultural specialization. As a consequence of regional specialization, increased complementary production among regions (Le. increased dissimilarity among them should stimulate exchange (i. e. commercial activity offering readier usage of money in the rural environment. In these circumstances regional specialization might induce development for which commercializing of agricultural products seems essential and mandatory. Regional specialization however should coincide with regional agricultural specialization at its tranformation level.

  3. Pépiniéristes privés au Burundi, vers une professionnalisation possible de la foresterie

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    Gasc, C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Private Sector Nursery Owners in Burundi, towards the Professionalization of Forestry. Burundi, a small country of the African Great Lakes Region, has a demographic increase which results in one of the highest population densities on the continent. Problems of deforestation and of firewood and timber scarcity are added to the well know degradation associated with soil erosion. Aware of this new problem, Burundi government stated a national forest project in 1979. During ten years, plants necessary for reforestation have been produced by state-owned nurseries controlled entirely by the forestry project. Currently in inter phase since 1990, the forestry project is faced with an important choice : what system of production to choose : private or project nurseries ? The analysis of each system has permitted to conclude in favour of the maintenance of a system of private production. To stimulate the development of the profession and to progressively decrease its dependence on the forest project, this analysis proposes answers to questions raised, insisting particularly on the significance of monitoring and on the choice of training methods.

  4. Fostering food security in areas of extreme poverty through Integrated Farm Management: the case of Burundi

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    Kessler, Aad; van Duivenbooden, Niek; van Beek, Christy

    2014-05-01

    Extreme poverty in Burundi's rural area and tensions between families with limited access to arable land hinder development towards a more stable and peaceful society. Due to these tensions and a rapid population growth, agricultural land is currently subject to increased degradation and low agricultural productivity. A whole range of other limiting factors contributes to this, such as: poor seed quality, poor nutrient management combined with low soil fertility, inadequate agronomic practices, pests and crop diseases, poorly developed supply chains, health problems, difficult access to credit, and insecurity. Solving one of these problems will not solve the chain that eventually leads to low food production; it will simply move the emphasis to the next constraining factor. An integrated rural development approach is therefore required to break this vicious circle. The project Fanning the Spark, a Public-Private-Partnership between Achmea Foundation, Alterra of Wageningen University and Research Centre, and HealthNet-TPO in Burundi started in September 2013 with an intervention in several rural villages in Gitega. The project's objective is to increase food production at village level, by means of investments in crop production, a family (income) insurance package that protects rural families against the financial consequences of catastrophic events (natural and health) and making micro-credits available. This will enhance farmers' workability and generate income from agricultural activities in order to break the poverty cycle and enhance food security. The insurance package comprises agricultural and health insurances, and will be jointly implemented with the sustainable agriculture component. The latter component focuses on Integrated Farm Management and the use of innovative soil management practices. Farmer-to-farmer training and scaling-up are crucial components, and in the first phase of the project "innovative farmer groups" have a central role in the

  5. Etude d'un système de désherbage de la culture cotonnière au Burundi

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    Carême, C.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton Weeds and Study of a Chemical Cotton Weeding System in Burundi. Cotton fields maintenance is a major constraint for farmers in Burundi. A chemical cotton herbicide system has studied and used to adjust an integrated weed management system especially against Cyperus esculentus L. during annual crop rotation. "Low volume spraying" herbicides provided efficient crop weeding during the six first weeks after sowing and increased the average productivity with 16 to 33 %. Herbicides had no negative effect on the bean crops following a cotton in the rotation.

  6. CAN DECENTRALISATION CONTRIBUTE TO PROMOTING RULE-OF-LAW STRUCTURES? THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO, RWANDA AND BURUNDI AS EXAMPLES*

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    Hartmut Hamann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Decentralisation can enable a country's population to exercise political influence at regional and local level. This presupposes a willingness to assume responsibility. It also presupposes that those in power are willing to hand over some of the power. Together these two factors can foster rule-of-law structures. This paper describes the constitutional and administrative framework for decentralisation in DR Congo, Rwanda and Burundi. It also explores the actual situation in those countries with reference to legal literature from those countries.In addition, it raises questions regarding the effect of instruments of international law on the decentralisation processes (international organisations, regional integration and international cooperation.

  7. Financial access to health care in Karuzi, Burundi: a household-survey based performance evaluation

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    Van Herp Michel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, Médecins Sans Frontières, the provincial government, and the provincial health authority began a community project to guarantee financial access to primary health care in Karuzi province, Burundi. The project used a community-based assessment to provide exemption cards for indigent households and a reduced flat fee for consultations for all other households. Methods An evaluation was carried out in 2005 to assess the impact of this project. Primary data collection was through a cross-sectional household survey of the catchment areas of 10 public health centres. A questionnaire was used to determine the accuracy of the community-identification method, households' access to health care, and costs of care. Household socioeconomic status was determined by reported expenditures and access to land. Results Financial access to care at the nearest health centre was ensured for 70% of the population. Of the remaining 30%, half experienced financial barriers to access and the other half chose alternative sites of care. The community-based assessment increased the number of people of the population who qualified for fee exemptions to 8.6% but many people who met the indigent criteria did not receive a card. Eighty-eight percent of the population lived under the poverty threshold. Referring to the last sickness episode, 87% of households reported having no money available and 25% risked further impoverishment because of healthcare costs even with the financial support system in place. Conclusion The flat fee policy was found to reduce cost barriers for some households but, given the generalized poverty in the area, the fee still posed a significant financial burden. This report showed the limits of a programme of fee exemption for indigent households and a flat fee for others in a context of widespread poverty.

  8. Medicines informal market in Congo, Burundi and Angola: counterfeit and sub-standard antimalarials

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    Bertocchi Paola

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of counterfeits and sub-standards in African medicines market is a dramatic problem that causes many deaths each year. The increase of the phenomenon of pharmaceutical counterfeiting is due to the rise of the illegal market and to the impossibility to purchase branded high cost medicines. Methods In this paper the results of a quality control on antimalarial tablet samples purchased in the informal market in Congo, Burundi and Angola are reported. The quality control consisted in the assay of active substance by means of validated liquid chromatographic methods, uniformity of mass determination, disintegration and dissolution tests. Moreover, a general evaluation on label and packaging characteristics was performed. Results The results obtained on thirty antimalarial tablet samples containing chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine showed the presence of different kinds of problems: a general problem concerning the packaging (loose tablets, packaging without Producer name, Producer Country and sometimes without expiry date; low content of active substance (in one sample; different, non-declared, active substance (in one sample; sub-standard technological properties and very low dissolution profiles (in about 50% of samples. This last property could affect the bioavailability and bioequivalence in comparison with branded products and could be related to the use of different excipients in formulation or bad storage conditions. Conclusion This paper evidences that the most common quality problem in the analysed samples appears to be the low dissolution profile. Here it is remarked that the presence of the right active substance in the right quantity is not a sufficient condition for a good quality drug. Dissolution test is not less important in a quality control and often evidences in vitro possible differences in therapeutic efficacy among drugs with the same active content. Dissolution

  9. Recalibrating Baseline Evidence in Burundi, Malawi, Senegal and Uganda: Exploring the Potential of Multi-Site, National-Level Stakeholder Engagement in Participatory Evaluation

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    Edge, Karen; Marphatia, Akanksha A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper details our collaborative work on the Improving Learning Outcomes in Primary Schools (ILOPS) project in Burundi, Malawi, Uganda and Senegal. ILOPS set out to establish an innovative template for multi-stakeholder, multinational participatory evaluation (PE) and examine the fundamental roles, relationships and evidence that underpin the…

  10. Fluorapatite in carbonatite-related phosphate deposits: the case of the Matongo carbonatite (Burundi)

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    Decrée, Sophie; Boulvais, Philippe; Tack, Luc; André, Luc; Baele, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    The Matongo carbonatite intrusive body in the Neoproterozoic Upper Ruvubu alkaline plutonic complex (URAPC) in Burundi is overlain by an economic phosphate ore deposit that is present as breccia lenses. The ore exhibits evidence of supergene enrichment but also preserves textures related to the concentration of fluorapatite in the carbonatitic system. Magmatic fluorapatite is abundant in the ore and commonly occurs as millimeter-sized aggregates. It is enriched in light rare earth elements (LREE), which is especially apparent in the final generation of magmatic fluorapatite (up to 1.32 wt% LREE2O3). After an episode of metasomatism (fenitization), which led to the formation of K-feldspar and albite, the fluorapatite-rich rocks were partly brecciated. Oxygen and carbon isotope compositions obtained on the calcite forming the breccia matrix (δ18O = 22.1 ‰ and δ13C = -1.5 ‰) are consistent with the involvement of a fluid resulting from the mixing of magmatic-derived fluids with a metamorphic fluid originating from the country rocks. In a subsequent postmagmatic event, the carbonates hosting fluorapatite were dissolved, leading to intense brecciation of the fluorapatite-rich rocks. Secondary carbonate-fluorapatite (less enriched in LREE with 0.07-0.24 wt% LREE2O3 but locally associated with monazite) and coeval siderite constitute the matrix of these breccias. Siderite has δ18O values between 25.4 and 27.7 ‰ and very low δ13C values (from -12.4 to -9.2 ‰), which are consistent with the contribution of organic-derived low δ13C carbon from groundwater. These signatures emphasize supergene alteration. Finally, the remaining voids were filled with a LREE-poor fibrous fluorapatite (0.01 wt% LREE2O3), forming hardened phosphorite, still under supergene conditions. Pyrochlore and vanadiferous magnetite are other minerals accumulated in the eluvial horizons. As a consequence of the supergene processes and fluorapatite accumulation, the phosphate ore, which

  11. Using organic matter to increase soil fertility in Burundi: potentials and limitations

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    Kaboneka, Salvator

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture production in Burundi is dominated by small scale farmers (0.5 ha/household) who have only very limited access to mineral inputs. In the past, farmers have relied on fallow practices combined with farm yard manures to maintain and improve soil fertility. However, due to the high population growth and high population density (370/km²), fallow practices are nowadays no longer feasible, animal manures cannot be produced in sufficient quantities to maintain soil productivity and food insecurity has become a quasi permanent reality. Most Burundian soils are characterized by 1:1 types of clay minerals (kaolinite) and are acidic in nature. Such soils are of very low cation exchange capacity (CEC). To compare the effect of % clays and % organic matter (% C), correlations tests have been conducted between the two parameters and the CEC. It was found that in high altitude kaolinitic and acidic soils, CEC was highly correlated to % C and less correlated to % clay, suggesting that organic matter could play an important role in improving fertility and productivity of these soils. Based on these findings, additional studies have been conducted to evaluate the fertilizer and soil amendment values of animal manures (cattle, goat, chicken), and leguminous (Calliandra calothyrsus, Gliricidia sepium, Senna simea, Senna spectabilis) and non-leguminous (Tithonia diversifolia) foliar biomass. It was observed that chicken manure significantly reduces Al3+ levels in acidic soils, while Tithonia diversifolia outperforms in nutrient releases compared to the commonly known leguminous agroforestry shrubs and trees indicated above. Although the above mentioned organic sources can contribute to the soil nutrients supply, the quantities potentially available on farm are generally small. The only solution is to supplement these organic sources with other organic sources (compost, organic household waste), chemical fertilizers and mineral amendments (lime) to achieve Integrated Soil

  12. A ‘post-honeymoon’ measles epidemic in Burundi: mathematical model-based analysis and implications for vaccination timing

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    Corey, Katelyn C.

    2016-01-01

    Using a mathematical model with realistic demography, we analyze a large outbreak of measles in Muyinga sector in rural Burundi in 1988–1989. We generate simulated epidemic curves and age × time epidemic surfaces, which we qualitatively and quantitatively compare with the data. Our findings suggest that supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) should be used in places where routine vaccination cannot keep up with the increasing numbers of susceptible individuals resulting from population growth or from logistical problems such as cold chain maintenance. We use the model to characterize the relationship between SIA frequency and SIA age range necessary to suppress measles outbreaks. If SIAs are less frequent, they must expand their target age range. PMID:27672515

  13. A ‘post-honeymoon’ measles epidemic in Burundi: mathematical model-based analysis and implications for vaccination timing

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    Katelyn C. Corey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Using a mathematical model with realistic demography, we analyze a large outbreak of measles in Muyinga sector in rural Burundi in 1988–1989. We generate simulated epidemic curves and age × time epidemic surfaces, which we qualitatively and quantitatively compare with the data. Our findings suggest that supplementary immunization activities (SIAs should be used in places where routine vaccination cannot keep up with the increasing numbers of susceptible individuals resulting from population growth or from logistical problems such as cold chain maintenance. We use the model to characterize the relationship between SIA frequency and SIA age range necessary to suppress measles outbreaks. If SIAs are less frequent, they must expand their target age range.

  14. Livelihoods, power, and food insecurity: adaptation of social capital portfolios in protracted crises--case study Burundi.

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    Vervisch, Thomas G A; Vlassenroot, Koen; Braeckman, Johan

    2013-04-01

    The failure of food security and livelihood interventions to adapt to conflict settings remains a key challenge in humanitarian responses to protracted crises. This paper proposes a social capital analysis to address this policy gap, adding a political economy dimension on food security and conflict to the actor-based livelihood framework. A case study of three hillsides in north Burundi provides an ethnographic basis for this hypothesis. While relying on a theoretical framework in which different combinations of social capital (bonding, bridging, and linking) account for a diverse range of outcomes, the findings offer empirical insights into how social capital portfolios adapt to a protracted crisis. It is argued that these social capital adaptations have the effect of changing livelihood policies, institutions, and processes (PIPs), and clarify the impact of the distribution of power and powerlessness on food security issues. In addition, they represent a solid way of integrating political economy concerns into the livelihood framework.

  15. Intergenerational violence in Burundi: Experienced childhood maltreatment increases the risk of abusive child rearing and intimate partner violence

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    Anselm Crombach

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Experiencing abuse during childhood affects the psychological well-being of individuals throughout their lives and may even influence their offspring by enhancing the likelihood of an intergenerational transmission of violence. Understanding the effects of childhood maltreatment on child-rearing practices and intimate partner violence might be of particular importance to overcome the consequences of violent conflicts in African societies. Objective: Using Burundi as an example, we aimed to explore the associations between childhood maltreatment, intimate partner violence, perceived partner intimidation, gender and the probability of violently acting out against one's own children or romantic partner. Methods: Amongst a sample of 141 men and 141 women in the capital of Burundi, we identified those who had biological children and those who lived or had lived in relationships. Using culturally appropriate instruments, we enquired about their exposure to childhood maltreatment and partner violence as well as their inclinations to act out violently. Results: We found that childhood maltreatment and perceived partner intimidation were strong predictors for the perpetration of violence against children. Moreover, we found that women were more likely to use violence against children if they experienced partner violence and less likely to resort to violence if they felt intimidated. Men were more likely to perpetrate violence against their partner. Childhood maltreatment was again a strong predictor. The more women experienced partner violence, the more they fought back. Conclusions: Childhood maltreatment is a strong predictor for domestic violence and has to be addressed to interrupt the cycle of violence in post-conflict countries.

  16. Progrès de la connaissance du Congo, du Rwanda et du Burundi de 1993 à 2008

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    Henri Nicolaï

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cette chronique, la vingt et unième d’une série qui a commencé avec l’année 1949, couvre la période 1993-2008 et a pour objectif de faire le point sur les progrès réalisés sur la connaissance du Congo (République démocratique du Congo, du Rwanda et du Burundi, dans le domaine de la géographie mais aussi dans les domaines des sciences naturelles et des sciences humaines qui peuvent fournir des données utiles ou indispensables aux géographes. Chaque référence bibliographique, livre ou article, est accompagnée d’un bref commentaire qui en retient les éléments principaux et surtout les faits ou les idées qui intéressent particulièrement les géographes. L’article comporte onze chapitres dont les plus importants concernent le milieu naturel, la géographie de la santé, la démographie, l’histoire (y compris l’histoire récente, la vie sociale et économique des campagnes traditionnelles et modernes, le secteur informel, les aspects de la vie urbaine. Les événements dramatiques qui se sont produits dans ces territoires africains au cours des quinze dernières années ont rendu la recherche sur le terrain particulièrement difficile tant pour les chercheurs nationaux que pour les chercheurs étrangers, ce qui se traduit notamment par une part de plus en plus importante des recherches menées en milieu urbain.This paper, the 21st issue of an edition of books and paper reviews on the knowledge of three countries of former Belgian Africa (DR Congo, Rwanda, and Burundi, covers the period 1993-2008. A short text for each reference points out the facts or ideas that are useful for geographers. The paper is composed of eleven sections. The most important are coping with the natural environment, health geography, population geography, history (including recent events, social and economic life in traditional and modern rural areas, informal economy, and urban geography. During the last sixteen years, conditions for field

  17. Toward policies for climate change mitigation: "Barriers for family-sized biogas in the District of Gihanga, Burundi"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkunzimana, Leonard; Huart, Michel; Zaccai, Edwin

    2014-05-01

    In the context of climate change mitigation and poverty reduction, it has been argued that biogas energy is relevant, as it is economically and ecologically useful. In the 1980s, biogas use played an important role in the development of Burundi. Many schools and public institutions had implemented such installations. Unfortunately, many biogas infrastructures were destroyed in the civil war of the 1990s. This study analyzes what could be done, after a decade of crisis, to develop that sector. It aims to assess how and to what extent the inhabitants of villages are willing to contribute to the development of biogas technologies. We interviewed 150 farmers in order to assess their perception on the ecologic and economic features of biogas plants if implemented in their villages. The influence of socioeconomic, cultural, and demographic factors of households was assessed in this study. Results suggest that the maximum amount that a household is willing to pay each month for biogas use at a family level is positive for large-size households, households that are aware of climate change, consumers of candles, households with high income, households with an educated head, women, and breeders. However, the willingness decreases for households with older head of families. The study concludes that awareness campaigns on biogas benefits and financial and nonfinancial incentives are necessary. This policy should probably and primarily be oriented toward some more receptive categories of the population. Women should be fully involved, considering their positive motivation toward sustaining this sector.

  18. La théiculture au Burundi: Diagnostic d'une filière en mutation

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    Nkunzimana, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Tea Subsector in Burundi: Diagnosis of a Subsector in Transformation. The statistical analysis shows that the tea has represented 9% of the added value created by all the cash crops. During the same period, the share of the tea in gross domestic product at market prices has been approximately 0.4%. From 1990 to 1999, the tea has represented in average 13% of the annual exports revenues. It is a particularly significant product for the country and its population. However, the tea subsector presents a series of problems of a technical and economic nature that this article would like to point up. As an example, we can quote the going beyond of installed capacities in the factories, the aging of the equipment, the irregularity in the quality of the product, the non control of the costs and the increase in the service of debts due to the deterioration of the exchange rate. Some recommendations are proposed in order to face these various constraints, before passing to liberalization.

  19. The earliest cases of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group M in Congo-Kinshasa, Rwanda and Burundi and the origin of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

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    Vangroenweghe, D

    2001-06-29

    The early cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the 1960s and 1970s in Congo-Kinshasa (Zaire), Rwanda and Burundi are reviewed. These countries appear to be the source of the HIV-1 group M epidemic, which then spread outwards to neighbouring Tanzania and Uganda in the east, and Congo-Brazzaville in the west. Further spread to Haiti and onwards to the USA can be explained by the hundreds of single men from Haiti who participated in the UNESCO educational programme in the Congo between 1960 and 1975.

  20. Intégration de l'agriculture et de l'élevage en exploitations familiales dans le Bututsi (Burundi. Résultats zootechniques

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    Pozy, P.

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed crop-livestock farming system on small scale in the Bututsi (Burundi Animal production results. Mixed farming is the basis of a described processus to increase food productivity from small scale farming in the Bututsi region. Traditional cattle husbandry is going down and a more intensive system is expanding through the introduction of a superior animal genotype in the local herd. Sahiwal breeding involves a different form of cattle husbandry in rural area : animal feeding is increasing by forage cultivation and the cattle spent more time in stabulation. The results of the two first years are related.

  1. Physicians’ and nurses’ attitudes towards performance-based financial incentives in Burundi: a qualitative study in the province of Gitega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudasingwa, Martin; Uwizeye, Marie Rose

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Performance-based financing (PBF) was first implemented in Burundi in 2006 as a pilot programme in three provinces and was rolled out nationwide in 2010. PBF is a reform approach to improve the quality, quantity, and equity of health services and aims at achieving universal health coverage. It focuses on how to best motivate health practitioners. Objective: To elicit physicians’ and nurses’ experiences and views on how PBF influenced and helped them in healthcare delivery. Methods: A qualitative cross-sectional study was carried out among frontline health workers such as physicians and nurses. The data was gathered through individual face-to-face, in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 6 physicians and 30 nurses from February to March 2011 in three hospitals in Gitega Province. A simple framework approach and thematic analysis using a combination of manual technique and MAXQDA software guided the analysis of the interview data. Results: Overall, the interviewees felt that the PBF scheme had provided positive motivation to improve the quality of care, mainly in the structures and process of care. The utilization of health services and the relationship between health practitioners and patients also improved. The salary top-ups were recognized as the most significant impetus to increase effort in improving the quality of care. The small and sometimes delayed financial incentives paid to physicians and nurses were criticized. The findings of this study also indicate that the positive interaction between performance-based incentive schemes and other health policies is crucial in achieving comprehensive improvement in healthcare delivery. Conclusions: PBF has the potential to motivate medical staff to improve healthcare provision. The views of medical staff and the context of the area of implementation have to be taken into consideration when designing and implementing PBF schemes.

  2. Characterisation of Central-African emissions based on MAX-DOAS measurements, satellite observations and model simulations over Bujumbura, Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Clio; Hendrick, Francois; Pinardi, Gaia; De Smedt, Isabelle; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Yu, Huan; Fayt, Caroline; Hermans, Christian; Bauwens, Maité; Ndenzako, Eugene; Nzohabonayo, Pierre; Akimana, Rachel; Niyonzima, Sébastien; Müller, Jean-Francois; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Central Africa is known for its strong biogenic, pyrogenic, and to a lesser extent anthropogenic emissions. Satellite observations of species like nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO), as well as inverse modelling results have shown that there are large uncertainties associated with the emissions in this region. There is thus a need for additional measurements, especially from the ground, in order to better characterise the biomass-burning and biogenic products emitted in this area. We present MAX-DOAS measurements of NO2, HCHO, and aerosols performed in Central Africa, in the city of Bujumbura, Burundi (3°S, 29°E, 850m). A MAX-DOAS instrument has been operating at this location by BIRA-IASB since late 2013. Aerosol-extinction and trace-gases vertical profiles are retrieved by applying the optimal-estimation-based profiling tool bePRO to the measured O4, NO2 and HCHO slant-column densities. The MAX-DOAS vertical columns and profiles are used for investigating the diurnal and seasonal cycles of NO2, HCHO, and aerosols. Regarding the aerosols, the retrieved AODs are compared to co-located AERONET sun photometer measurements for verification purpose, while in the case of NO2 and HCHO, the MAX-DOAS vertical columns and profiles are used for validating GOME-2 and OMI satellite observations. To characterise the biomass-burning and biogenic emissions in the Bujumbura region, the trace gases and aerosol MAX-DOAS retrievals are used in combination to MODIS fire counts/radiative-power and GOME-2/OMI NO2 and HCHO satellite data, as well as simulations from the NOAA backward trajectory model HYSPLIT. First results show that HCHO seasonal variation around local noon is driven by the alternation of rain and dry periods, the latter being associated with intense biomass-burning agricultural activities and forest fires in the south/south-east and transport from this region to Bujumbura. In contrast, NO2 is seen to depend mainly on local emissions close to the city, due

  3. Community coverage of an antimalarial combination of artesunate and amodiaquine in Makamba Province, Burundi, nine months after its introduction

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    Brasher Christopher

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, artesunate-amodiaquine (AS+AQ was introduced as the new first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Burundi. After confirmed diagnosis, treatment was delivered at subsidized prices in public health centres. Nine months after its implementation a study was carried out to assess whether children below five years of age with uncomplicated malaria were actually receiving AS+AQ. Methods A community-based study was conducted in Makamba province. Randomly selected households containing one or more children under five with reported fever onset within fourteen days before the study date were eligible. Case-management information was collected based on caregiver recall. A case definition of symptomatic malaria from observations of children presenting a confirmed malaria episode on the day of the survey was developed. Based on this definition, those children who had probable malaria among those with fever onset in the 14 days prior to the study were identified retrospectively. Treatment coverage with AS+AQ was then estimated among these probable malaria cases. Results Out of 195 children with fever on the day of the study, 92 were confirmed as true malaria cases and 103 tested negative. The combination of 'loss of appetite', 'sweating', 'shivering' and 'intermittent fever' yielded the highest possible positive predictive value, and was chosen as the case definition of malaria. Out of 526 children who had had fever 14 days prior to the survey, 165 (31.4% were defined as probable malaria cases using this definition. Among them, 20 (14.1% had been treated with AS+AQ, 10 with quinine (5%, 68 (41% received non-malaria treatments, and 67 got traditional treatment or nothing (39.9%. Most people sought treatment from public health centres (23/99 followed by private clinics (15/99, 14.1%. The median price paid for AS+AQ was 0.5 US$. Conclusion AS+AQ was the most common treatment for patients with probable malaria at public health

  4. Etude économique du marché des produits vivriers au Burundi Analyse chronologique des prix de la pomme de terre

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    Degand, J.

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Market Economie Analysis of Food Crops in Burundi - Time Serie Analysis of Potato Prices. As compared with the study to the bean prices (see Tropicultura Vol. 1, n°3, pp. 86-98, the time serie of potato prices displays seasonal moves with larger amplitudes. These variations are due to differents factors : - specific rhythm of the crop cycle - low level of commercialization - storage difficulties during the harvest period. On the other hand it has been identified a long run move in potato prices, the frequence of which is badly known. This move keeps mainly being under business cycle influence. It seems anyway that income demand elasticity of potatoes looks very high in such a way that wages moving up entail a rise in potato prices on the market of Bujumbura.

  5. Peace-building and reconciliation dividends of integrated health services delivery in post-conflict Burundi: qualitative assessments of providers and community members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Cathryn; Edward, Anbrasi

    2015-01-01

    While demonstrating causality remains challenging, several 'health-peace' mechanisms have been proposed to describe how health systems contribute to peace-building and stability in post-conflict settings. A qualitative study was undertaken in southern Burundi to identify drivers of social tension and reconciliation in the catchment area of Village Health Works, a health services organisation. Key informant interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in early 2014 with a total of one hundred and twenty community members and staff representing a range of conflict and recovery experience. Themes emerging from these interviews indicated mechanisms at the individual, household, community, and regional levels through which health provision mitigates tensions and promotes social cohesion. This peace dividend was amplified by the clinic's integrated model, which facilitates further community interaction through economic, agricultural and education programmes. Land pressure and the marginalisation of repatriated refugees were cited as drivers of local tension.

  6. Countrywide Reassessment of Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Burundi Using a Urine-Circulating Cathodic Antigen Rapid Test: Informing the National Control Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortu, Giuseppina; Ndayishimiye, Onésime; Clements, Michelle; Kayugi, Donatien; Campbell, Carl H; Lamine, Mariama Sani; Zivieri, Antonio; Magalhaes, Ricardo Soares; Binder, Sue; King, Charles H; Fenwick, Alan; Colley, Daniel G; Jourdan, Peter Mark

    2017-01-23

    Following implementation of the national control program, a reassessment of Schistosoma mansoni prevalence was conducted in Burundi to determine the feasibility of moving toward elimination. A countrywide cluster-randomized cross-sectional study was performed in May 2014. At least 25 schools were sampled from each of five eco-epidemiological risk zones for schistosomiasis. Fifty randomly selected children 13-14 years of age per school were included for a single urine-circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) rapid test and, in a subset of schools, for duplicate Kato-Katz slides preparation from a single stool sample. A total of 17,331 children from 347 schools were tested using CCA. The overall prevalence of S. mansoni infection, when CCA trace results were considered negative, was 13.5% (zone range [zr] = 4.6-17.8%), and when CCA trace results were considered positive, it was 42.8% (zr = 34.3-49.9%). In 170 schools, prevalence of this infection determined using Kato-Katz method was 1.5% (zr ==0-2.7%). The overall mean intensity of S. mansoni infection determined using Kato-Katz was 0.85 eggs per gram (standard deviation = 10.86). A majority of schools (84%) were classified as non-endemic (prevalence = 0) using Kato-Katz; however, a similar proportion of schools were classified as endemic when CCA trace results were considered negative (85%) and nearly all (98%) were endemic when CCA trace results were considered positive. The findings of this nationwide reassessment using CCA rapid test indicate that Schistosoma infection is still widespread in Burundi, although its average intensity is probably low. Further evidence is now needed to determine the association between CCA rapid test positivity and low-intensity disease transmission.

  7. Barriers in the Delivery of Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care in Post-Conflict Africa: Qualitative Case Studies of Burundi and Northern Uganda.

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    Primus Che Chi

    Full Text Available Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity rates are particularly grim in conflict, post-conflict and other crisis settings, a situation partly blamed on non-availability and/or poor quality of emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC services. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers to effective delivery of EmONC services in post-conflict Burundi and Northern Uganda, in order to provide policy makers and other relevant stakeholders context-relevant data on improving the delivery of these lifesaving services.This was a qualitative comparative case study that used 42 face-to-face semi-structured in-depth interviews and 4 focus group discussions for data collection. Participants were 32 local health providers and 37 staff of NGOs working in the area of maternal health. Data was analysed using the framework approach.The availability, quality and distribution of EmONC services were major challenges across the sites. The barriers in the delivery of quality EmONC services were categorised into two major themes; human resources-related challenges, and systemic and institutional failures. While some of the barriers were similar, others were unique to specific sites. The common barriers included shortage of qualified staff; lack of essential installations, supplies and medications; increasing workload, burn-out and turnover; and poor data collection and monitoring systems. Barriers unique to Northern Uganda were demoralised personnel and lack of recognition; poor referral system; inefficient drug supply system; staff absenteeism in rural areas; and poor coordination among key personnel. In Burundi, weak curriculum; poor harmonisation and coordination of training; and inefficient allocation of resources were the unique challenges. To improve the situation across the sites, efforts are ongoing to improve the training and recruitment of more staff; harmonise and strengthen the curriculum and training; increase the number of EmONC facilities

  8. Selected French Speaking Sub-Saharan African Countries: Burundi, Cameroon (Eastern), Chad, Congo (Brazzaville), Dahomey, Gabon, Ivory Coast, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Togo, Upper Volta, Zaire. A Guide to the Academic Placement of Students from These Countries in Academic Institutions of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Edouard J. C.

    The educational systems of 15 Sub-Saharan African countries are described, and guidelines concerning the academic placement of students who wish to study in U.S. institutions are provided. Tables indicate the grades covered by primary education and secondary education (academic and technical). Burundi, Rwanda, and Zaire have followed the Belgian…

  9. La production laitière et la croissance du chevreau pendant la période néonatale chez la chèvre locale au Burundi

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    Farina, L.

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Milk yield and kid's growth rate of local goats in Burundi during the first weeks after birth. A study on local goats in Burundi, specially the growth rate of the kid during the first weeks after birth, has been undertaken. Milk yield has been monitored to establish milking and suckling abilities of local goats. The results of daily controls have given a milk yield average of 511 g/day up to day 56 post partum. Lactation yield has been significantly affected by the doe's weight. During the first month, heavy goats have produced the equivalent of a glass of milk per day (about 200 ml for human consumption in addition to the quantity taken up by the kids. The daily weight gain of 54.05 g recorded from birth to 28 days of age in youngs is low, probably due to the limited quantity of milk available to them. Nevertheless local kids show an excellent conversion ratio of suckled milk, with a value of 3.93 kg of milk to produce 1 kg liveweight during the first 28 days, representing a very high food conversion.

  10. Pre-instrumental seismicity in Central Africa using felt seisms recorded mainly at the meteorological stations of DRC, Rwanda and Burundi during the colonial period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulumba, J.-L.; Delvaux, D.

    2012-04-01

    Seismic hazard assessment and mitigation of catastrophes are primarily based on the identification and characterization of seismically active zones. These tasks still rely heavily on the existing knowledge of the seismic activity over the longest possible time period. The first seismic network in Equatorial Africa (IRSAC network) was operated from the Lwiro scientific base on the western shores of Lake Kivu between 1953 and 1963. Before this installation, the historical record of seismic activity in Central Africa is sparse. Even for the relatively short period concerned, spanning only 50-60 years, the historical record is far from being complete. A first attempt has been made by Herrinckx (1959) who compiled a list 960 felt seisms recorded at the meteorological stations between 1915 and 1954 in Congo, Rwanda and Burundi. They were used to draw a density map of felt seisms per square degree. We completed this data base by exploiting the meteorological archives and any available historical report to enlarge the database which now reaches 1513 entries between 1900 and 1959. These entries have been exanimate in order to identify possible historical seismic events. Those are defined by 3 or more quasi-simultaneous records observed over a relatively short distance (a few degrees of latitude/longitude) within a short time difference (few hours). A preliminary list of 115 possible historical seisms has been obtained, identified by 3 to 15 different stations. The proposed location is taken as the average latitude and longitude of the stations where the felt seisms were recorded. Some of the most important ones are associated to aftershocks that have been felt at some stations after the main shocks. The most recent felt seisms have been also recorded instrumentally, which helps to validate the procedure followed. The main difficulties are the magnitude estimation and the possible spatial incompleteness of the recording of felt seism evidence at the margin of the observation

  11. Contraintes techniques et sociales en conservation du sol et des eaux en zone à très forte densité de population : l'exemple des montagnes du Mumirwa au Burundi

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    Mathieu, C.

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of the influence of cutting and picking of leaves on the quality of cassava tuber (Manihot esculenta Crantz cv. "F46". The Burundi country located in mountainous tropical region of Central Africa, presents one of the highest density population among those overpopulated regions. The extreme soil occupation phenomenon at the greatest slope poses a serious problems of soil erosion. The author analyses the physical and social constraints of soil conservation and water management problems in a such context. It seems that the solutions to the technical problems of erosion control must undergo with a radical change in relation between rural community and administration in the way of more collaboration and comprehension of administrative services and more willingly participation from rural population.

  12. Appréciation et amélioration de la qualité bactériologique du poisson commercialisé au Burundi. Cas de Stolothrissa tanganicae et Luciolates stappersii

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    Sindayigaya, E.

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Appreciation and improvement of the bacteriological quality of fish commercialized in Burundi. Cases of Stolothrissa tanganicae and Luciolates stappersii. The bacteriological quality of Stolothrissa tanganicae and Luciolates stappersii has been estimated by determining the aerobic mesophilic flora, Staphylococcus aureus as pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis as fecal contamination indices. The freshness has been evaluated by the determination of the total volatile bases (T.V.B.. At the arrival of fresh fish on the market, the aerobic mesophilic flora was sometimes high due to inadequate handling and processing on board. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus can be found in fresh fish. The determination of the T.V.B. and the bacteriological analysis provided concordant informations. An improvement of bacteriological quality has been obtained by a combination of the traditional conservation methods : drying, salting and smoking.

  13. Efficacité de la roche phosphatée de Matongo au travers d'un compostage sur une culture de pomme de terre sur un sol acide de Rabiro (Burundi

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    Van den Berghe, C.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of phosphatic rock from Matongo applied in the composting process on potatoes on an acid soil of Rabiro. In the frame of the Cooperation between the CVHA (Cultures Vivrieres de Haute Altitute Project and the Program of Fertilisation of the Agro-systems on Altitude (FAVA of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences in Burundi, the local phosphatic rock from Matongo has been compared to diammonium-phosphate when added in the composting process. The field trials with potatoes have shown that both phosphate sources have the same fertilizing value when the enriched compost was applied at the dose of 20 t/ha. It is very interesting from agricultural and economical viewpoint to use this phosphatic rock in combination with compost.

  14. Contribution á l’étude des lichens du Kivu (Zaire, du Rwanda et du Burundi. VII. Approche écogéographique de la flore et de la végétation lichéniques dans Pest de P Afrique centrale

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    J. Lambinon

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available A short historical record of the lichenological exploration of tropical Africa, especially Kivu (Zaire, Rwanda and Burundi is given, including an account of the material collected and of the present state of taxonomic knowledge of the lichens. Several phytogeographical categories can be recognized in this area; they are (some with significant variants: subcosmopolitan, temperate-tropical, pantropical, paleotropical, afro-neotropical, guineo-congolian, sudano-zambezian, zambezian-afrooriental and zambezian, central African lakes endemic, afromontane and afroalpine. The distributional types of the lichens within the studied area are briefly described, as well as their importance in the main vegetation types.

  15. Poor understanding of the hydrogeological structure is a main cause of hand-dug wells failure in developing countries: A case study of a Precambrian basement aquifer in Bugesera region (Burundi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakundukize, Charles; Mtoni, Yohana; Martens, Kristine; Van Camp, Marc; Walraevens, Kristine

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates a Precambrian basement aquifer in Bugesera region, a typical African rural area in northeastern Burundi. Domestic water supply relies on groundwater which is tapped through hand-dug wells. Despite several attempts to increase the number of water points in the area, the water demand is still far from being met as a result of the high rate of well failure. This paper seeks to understand whether the hydrogeological structure and the spatial distribution of hydraulic parameters can explain the low productivity and the high failure rate of hand-dug wells. The hydrogeological structure inferred from the interpretation of a large number of vertical electrical soundings (VES) reveals a typical sequence of geoelectrical layers, which is characterized by an overall upwards fining from the fresh basement, over the fractured/weathered basement, to the overburden or saprolite with a clay-rich layer on top. Whereas the overall aquifer potential mainly depends on the thickness of the weathered overburden, the aquifer potential for shallow hand-dug wells is determined by the hydraulic conductivity of the upper few meters of the saturated zone. This upper zone was investigated in the pumping tests. The spatial distribution of the specific capacity reveals a wide variation of hydraulic parameters, depending on the well's position in the depth profile of the aquifer's hydraulic conductivity. The thickness of the potential aquifer is highest in the central part of the study area (pegmatitic and granitic intrusions) which has the highest overall aquifer potential compared to the surrounding metasedimentary formations. However, a thick weathered overburden will increase the groundwater potential of an aquifer for deep boreholes, whereas for hand-dug wells, the productivity can only be high if the thickness of the weathered overburden is small enough, or the water table is deep enough, to allow to tap the coarse part at the base of the overburden and/or part of

  16. Gendered violence and HIV in Burundi

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    Hakan Seckinelgin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pre-existing gender relations changed for the worse during the conflict and interventions to promote disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration (DDR failed to address the dynamics which shape the spread of HIV.

  17. Le Musalac : farine de sevrage du Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Nsavyimana, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    La diffusion de la farine Musalac est basée sur une politique commerciale qui vise à ce que toute la population y ait accès. Pour ce faire, il a été décidé de mettre l'accent sur les différents paramètres qui conditionnent son accessibilité : l'accessibilité géographique par la mise en place d'un système de distribution (grossistes, boutiquiers) et la multiplication des unités de production dans les différentes régions du pays ; l'accessibilité financière par une politique sociale qui vise à ...

  18. HIV and the internally displaced: Burundi in focus

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    Raquel Wexler

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available "Special attention should also be given to the prevention of contagious and infectious diseases, including AIDS, among internally displaced persons." (Guiding Principles on InternalDisplacement, 19.3

  19. Preventing re-displacement through genuine reintegration in Burundi

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    Lucy Hovil

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Displacement is often part of a cyclical process of conflict anddisplacement. Preventing displacement, therefore, is not only aboutpreventing new displacement but about ensuring that people do notget re-displaced.

  20. The benefits of aggressive traits : a study with current and former street children in Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior in children and youths is commonly associated with exposure to violence and maltreatment. Consequently, aggressive behavior has often been explained as a form of reactive behavior in response to violence-inflicted mental suffering. However, perpetrating violence can become appealing, fascinating and exciting, i.e., may acquire appetitive, self-rewarding aspects. We postulated that this appetitive form of aggression reduces the vulnerability for developing Posttraumatic Str...

  1. Reconciling reintegration: the complexity of economic and social reintegration of ex-combatants in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R; Leeuwen, M. van

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration (DDR) programmes initiated by state or multilateral agencies can realise the reintegration of ex-combatants remains debated. While some consider that DDR should have the ambition to result in long-term reintegration, others argue that

  2. Children of former child soldiers and never-conscripted civilians: a preliminary intergenerational study in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, S.; de Jong, J.; O'Hara, R.; Koopman, C.

    2013-01-01

    Studies around the world show that former child soldiers (FCSs) have mental health strengths and limitations, and highlight the important role of families and communities in reintegration to society. However, there are limited data that examine the mental health risks and protective factors of the o

  3. Bringing ISFM to scale through an integrated farm planning approach: a case study from Burundi

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    Kessler, A.; Duivenbooden, van N.; Nsabimana, F.; Beek, van C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) is generally accepted as the most relevant paradigm for soil fertility improvement in the tropics. Successes however are mainly reported at plot level, while real impact at farm level and beyond remains scattered. As a consequence, many Sub-Saharan African

  4. A Phoenix in Flames? Portfolio Choice and Violence in Civil War in Rural Burundi

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    Nillesen, E.E.M.; Verwimp, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper challenges the idea that farmers revert to subsistence farming when confronted with violence from civil war. Macro-economic evidence on economic legacies of civil war suggests that civil wars, while obviously disastrous in the short run, do not need to have persistent effects on long term

  5. School-based mental health intervention for children in war-affected Burundi : A cluster randomized trial

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    Tol, Wietse A.; Komproe, Ivan H.; Jordans, Mark J D; Ndayisaba, Aline; Ntamutumba, Prudence; Sipsma, Heather; Smallegange, Eva S.; Macy, Robert D.; de Jong, Joop T V M; Komproe, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Armed conflicts are associated with a wide range of impacts on the mental health of children and adolescents. We evaluated the effectiveness of a school-based intervention aimed at reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety (treatment aim); and improving

  6. Developing and measuring healthcare capacity and quality in Burundi: LifeNet International’s horizontal conversion franchise model

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    Michael F Brooks

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a departure from traditional “vertical” healthcare interventions in low-resource settings that work to combat a single specific health issue, LifeNet International (LN uses a horizontal conversion franchise to develop and measure healthcare capacity and quality in primarily faith-based health centers in East Africa. Through a comprehensive franchise package of Medical Training, Management Training, Pharmaceutical Supply, and Growth Financing, LN is able to leverage existing resources and respond to a greater number of the obstacles preventing facilities from providing quality care. Through its Quality Score Card, LN measures improvements in quality of care within its network. This tool has measured consistent and significant improvements in quality of care following LN partnership. Together, these services improve quality of care at East African primary care facilities in ways that issue-specific, “vertical” interventions cannot.

  7. Vector control in a malaria epidemic occurring within a complex emergency situation in Burundi: a case study

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    D'Alessandro Umberto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African highlands often suffer of devastating malaria epidemics, sometimes in conjunction with complex emergencies, making their control even more difficult. In 2000, Burundian highlands experienced a large malaria outbreak at a time of civil unrest, constant insecurity and nutritional emergency. Because of suspected high resistance to the first and second line treatments, the provincial health authority and Médecins Sans Frontières (Belgium decided to implement vector control activities in an attempt to curtail the epidemic. There are few reported interventions of this type to control malaria epidemics in complex emergency contexts. Here, decisions and actions taken to control this epidemic, their impact and the lessons learned from this experience are reported. Case description Twenty nine hills (administrative areas were selected in collaboration with the provincial health authorities for the vector control interventions combining indoor residual spraying with deltamethrin and insecticide-treated nets. Impact was evaluated by entomological and parasitological surveys. Almost all houses (99% were sprayed and nets use varied between 48% and 63%. Anopheles indoor resting density was significantly lower in treated as compared to untreated hills, the latter taken as controls. Despite this impact on the vector, malaria prevalence was not significantly lower in treated hills except for people sleeping under a net. Discussion Indoor spraying was feasible and resulted in high coverage despite being a logistically complex intervention in the Burundian context (scattered houses and emergency situation. However, it had little impact on the prevalence of malaria infection, possibly because it was implemented after the epidemic's peak. Nevertheless, after this outbreak the Ministry of Health improved the surveillance system, changed its policy with introduction of effective drugs and implementation of vector control to prevent new malaria epidemics. Conclusion In the absence of effective drugs and sufficient preparedness, present study failed to demonstrate any impact of vector control activities upon the course of a short-duration malaria epidemic. However, the experience gained lead to increased preparedness and demonstrated the feasibility of vector control measures in this specific context.

  8. A study on reintegration of street children in Burundi: experienced violence and maltreatment are associated with mental health impairments and impeded educational progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Street children are exposed to violence, and subsist in poor and generally precarious conditions. In conflict regions, institutional care facilities are often the only well established way to care for vulnerable children. Providing access to school education is considered to be key to allow successful integration into society. However, adverse effects of psychological disorders may pose another serious obstacle. In semi-structured interviews in a sample of 112 Burundian male youths (mean age = 15.9 years), we assessed exposure to traumatic stressors, regularly and recently occurring violence as well as prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, substance dependence, suicidal risk, and progress in school. Former street children (n = 32) and other vulnerable children (n = 50) in a residential center were compared to children living in the streets (n = 15) or with families (n = 15). While the children living in the center were less regularly exposed to violence and reported less substance dependence than street children, PTSD symptoms were common among the former street children. Furthermore, we provided empirical evidence that for the children living in the center, recently experienced violence - mostly minor physical conflicts, psychological violence and neglect - was associated with increased PTSD symptomatology and impeded progress in school. In a population of children who experienced many traumatic incidences and a lot of violence, even minor violent events may trigger and reinforce PTSD symptoms. Hence controlling exposure to violence and addressing mental ill-health in vulnerable children is mandatory for reintegration.

  9. Imagining the Great Lakes Region: discourses and practices of civil society regional approaches for peacebuilding in Rwanda, Burundi and DR Congo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van M.

    2008-01-01

    The idea has gained ground in recent years that, as conflicts in the countries of the Great Lakes Region are strongly interlinked, regional approaches are necessary to resolve them. This interest in regional dimensions of conflict and peacebuilding also gains currency in other parts of the world. At

  10. A study on reintegration of street children in Burundi: Experienced violence and maltreatment are associated with mental health impairments and impeded educational progress

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    Anselm eCrombach

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Street children are exposed to violence, and subsist in poor and generally precarious conditions. In conflict regions, institutional care facilities are often the only well established way to care for vulnerable children. Providing access to school education is considered to be key to allow successful integration into society. However, adverse effects of psychological disorders may pose another serious obstacle. In semi-structured interviews in a sample of 112 Burundian male youths (mean age = 15.9 years, we assessed exposure to traumatic stressors, regularly and recently occurring violence as well as prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, depression, substance dependence, suicidal risk, and progress in school. Former street children (n = 32 and other vulnerable children (n = 50 in a residential center were compared to children living in the streets (n = 15 or with families (n = 15. While the children living in the center were less regularly exposed to violence and reported less substance dependence than street children, PTSD symptoms were common among the former street children. Furthermore, we provided empirical evidence that for the children living in the center, recently experienced violence – mostly minor physical conflicts, psychological violence and neglect – was associated with increased PTSD symptomatology and impeded progress in school. In a population of children who experienced many traumatic incidences and a lot of violence, even minor violent events may trigger and reinforce PTSD symptoms. Hence controlling exposure to violence and addressing mental ill-health in vulnerable children is mandatory for reintegration.

  11. A study on reintegration of street children in Burundi: experienced violence and maltreatment are associated with mental health impairments and impeded educational progress

    OpenAIRE

    Anselm eCrombach; Manassé eBambonyé; Thomas eElbert

    2014-01-01

    Street children are exposed to violence, and subsist in poor and generally precarious conditions. In conflict regions, institutional care facilities are often the only well established way to care for vulnerable children. Providing access to school education is considered to be key to allow successful integration into society. However, adverse effects of psychological disorders may pose another serious obstacle. In semi-structured interviews in a sample of 112 Burundian male youths (mean age ...

  12. First insights into the diversity of gill monogeneans of ‘Gnathochromis’ and Limnochromis (Teleostei, Cichlidae in Burundi: do the parasites mirror host ecology and phylogenetic history?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikol Kmentová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monogenea is one of the most species-rich groups of parasitic flatworms worldwide, with many species described only recently, which is particularly true for African monogeneans. For example, Cichlidogyrus, a genus mostly occurring on African cichlids, comprises more than 100 nominal species. Twenty-two of these have been described from Lake Tanganyika, a famous biodiversity hotspot in which many vertebrate and invertebrate taxa, including monogeneans, underwent unique and spectacular radiations. Given their often high degrees of host specificity, parasitic monogeneans were also used as a potential tool to uncover host species relationships. This study presents the first investigation of the monogenean fauna occurring on the gills of endemic ‘Gnathochromis’ species along the Burundese coastline of Lake Tanganyika. We test whether their monogenean fauna reflects the different phylogenetic position and ecological niche of ‘Gnathochromis’ pfefferi and Gnathochromis permaxillaris. Worms collected from specimens of Limnochromis auritus, a cichlid belonging to the same cichlid tribe as G. permaxillaris, were used for comparison. Morphological as well as genetic characterisation was used for parasite identification. In total, all 73 Cichlidogyrus individuals collected from ‘G.’ pfefferi were identified as C. irenae. This is the only representative of Cichlidogyrus previously described from ‘G.’ pfefferi, its type host. Gnathochromis permaxillaris is infected by a species of Cichlidogyrus morphologically very similar to C. gillardinae. The monogenean species collected from L. auritus is considered as new for science, but sample size was insufficient for a formal description. Our results confirm previous suggestions that ‘G.’ pfefferi as a good disperser is infected by a single monogenean species across the entire Lake Tanganyika. Although G. permaxillaris and L. auritus are placed in the same tribe, Cichlidogyrus sp. occurring on G. permaxillaris is morphologically more similar to C. irenae from ‘G.’ pfefferi, than to the Cichlidogyrus species found on L. auritus. Various evolutionary processes, such as host-switching or duplication events, might underlie the pattern observed in this particular parasite-host system. Additional samples for the Cichlidogyrus species occuring on G. permaxillaris and L. auritus are needed to unravel their evolutionary history by means of (co-phylogenetic analyses.

  13. Contribution à l’étude de l’accompagnement psychosocial de la femme enceinte dans les services de Prévention de la Transmission Mère-Enfant du VIH au Burundi/Contribution to the study of psychosocial support to pregnant women in the services of Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV in Burundi

    OpenAIRE

    Irambona, Rénovate

    2012-01-01

    L’annonce des résultats du diagnostic d’une maladie grave est toujours un moment difficile à vivre pour le patient et, dans une moindre mesure, pour le médecin. Lorsqu’il s’agit du VIH/SIDA, la difficulté est d’autant plus importante que bien souvent, cette maladie véhicule honte et culpabilité avec risque de stigmatisation de la personne séropositive. Chez les femmes enceintes burundaises, cette situation est encore plus préoccupante. Des barrières liées au contexte socio-culturel les pousse...

  14. 9 CFR 93.600 - Importation of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS..., Argentina, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi,...

  15. Défis du financement agricole et rural, rôle pour la microfinance et implications pour les politiques publiques en Afrique subsaharienne. Pistes de recherche basées sur le cas du Burundi.

    OpenAIRE

    Niyongazabo, Ephrem

    2008-01-01

    En Afrique subsaharienne, les zones agricoles et rurales abritent plus de trois quarts de la population et contribuent pour la grande part à l’emploi, au PIB, aux recettes d’exportations et à l’offre alimentaire. Dès lors, le financement des activités qui se développent dans ces zones constitue un facteur déterminant dans la réduction de la pauvreté. Le recul du financement bancaire, suite à la libéralisation financière (de par la restructuration des banques agricoles et de développement), a ...

  16. Hutud ja tutsid osaliselt leppinud / Allan Espenberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Espenberg, Allan

    2005-01-01

    ÜRO nõudmisel luuakse Burundis tõe- ja lepituskomisjon, mille peaeesmärk on vägivaldse etnilise konflikti põhjuste uurimine ja sõjakurjategijate kohtu ette toomine. Burundis toimunud kodusõjast hutude ja tutside vahel. Lisa: Aasta 2005: riigivõimu taastamine

  17. Reshaping Economic Geography of East Africa : From Regional to Global Integration, Volume 2. Technical Annexes

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    Five East African countries Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda have made solid progress on integrating regionally in the East African Community (EAC) since 1999. Such advances are crucial, as integration in East Africa has the potential for higher than usual benefits: Burundi, Rwanda, and Uganda are landlocked, with very high costs to their economies. Successful integration will ...

  18. Reshaping Economic Geography of East Africa : From Regional to Global Integration (Vol. 1 of 2)

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    Five East African countries Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda have made solid progress on integrating regionally in the East African Community (EAC) since 1999. Such advances are crucial, as integration in East Africa has the potential for higher than usual benefits: Burundi, Rwanda, and Uganda are landlocked, with very high costs to their economies. Successful integration will ...

  19. Kliimamuutuste mõju laboratoorium / Andres Tarand

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tarand, Andres, 1940-

    2001-01-01

    Segadused Ida-Aafrika riikides, nende põhjused. Tabel: Ida-Aafrika riikide mõned arengunäitajad: Etioopia, Sudaan, Somaali, Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania, Keenia. Autor: Rahvaerakond Mõõdukad. Parlamendisaadik

  20. Responding to crises in the African Great Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glynne Evans

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available A published Adelphi Paper examines the international responses to the ethnic conflict in Burundi and Rwanda from 1993-97 and its overspill into neighbouring Zaire. This extract provides details of four concrete proposals.

  1. Visit to Three East African Countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>In early December 2008, CPAFFC President Chen Haosu led a delegation to visit Rwanda, a "country of thousands of hills", Burundi, a "countryof drum dance"and Tanzania with ever changing scenery. In a friendly and

  2. The 1994 Rwanda Genocide: U.S. Responses to a Similar Situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    US United States 1 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION On his goodwill visit to Africa in 1998, President Clinton stopped in Rwanda to apologize to the Rwandan...neighboring Burundi are two countries located in Central Africa between the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DROC, formerly Zaire and the Belgian Congo...countries became a UN trust territory. Both received independence from Belgium 1 July 1962. In Rwanda and Burundi, precolonial indigenous society

  3. Tradition, globalisation and language dilemma in education: African options for the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwantabagu, Hermenegilde

    2011-08-01

    This paper addresses the dilemma of language in education in African countries with particular reference to Burundi. African languages are still marginalised by colonial languages such as French and English. Looking at other African countries in general and at the case of Burundi in detail, an analysis is made of the adopted policies aimed at promoting the use of the mother tongue as a basis for knowledge acquisition and cultural integration. Burundi has gone through a series of educational reforms both before and after gaining independence in 1962, with French and Kirundi competing as curricular teaching languages. After the integration of Burundi into the East African Community in July 2007, English and Kiswahili were added to the curriculum, complicating education policies. This article places particular emphasis on the contextual challenges that tend to impair the full implementation of the adopted policy reforms. The paper concludes by advocating for a multilingual approach in which the indigenous mother tongue serves as the basis for the acquisition of other languages in the curriculum.

  4. African 2, a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis epidemiologically important in East Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, S.; Garcia-Pelayo, M.C.; Muller, B.; Hailu, E.; Asiimwe, B.; Kremer, K.; Dale, J.; Boniotti, M.B.; Rodriguez, S.; Hilty, M.; Rigouts, L.; Firdessa, R.; Machado, A.; Mucavele, C.; Ngandolo, B.N.; Bruchfeld, J.; Boschiroli, L.; Muller, A.; Sahraoui, N.; Pacciarini, M.; Cadmus, S.; Joloba, M.; Soolingen, D. van; Michel, A.L.; Djonne, B.; Aranaz, A.; Zinsstag, J.; Helden, P. van; Portaels, F.; Kazwala, R.; Kallenius, G.; Hewinson, R.G.; Aseffa, A.; Gordon, S.V.; Smith, N.H.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis isolated at high frequency from cattle in Uganda, Burundi, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. We have named this related group of M. bovis strains the African 2 (Af2) clonal complex of M. bovis. Af2 strains are defined by a specific chromosomal deletio

  5. 10 CFR 810.8 - Activities requiring specific authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (Myanmar) Burundi* Cambodia* Cameroon* Cape Verde* Central African Republic* Chad* China, People's Republic...-Bissau* Haiti* India* Iran Iraq* Israel* Kazakhstan Kenya* Korea, People's Democratic Republic of* Kuwait... Mozambique* Niger* Oman* Pakistan* Palau* Qatar* Russia Rwanda* Sao Tome and Principe* Saudi...

  6. Good Governance and Foreign Direct Investment : A Legal Contribution to a Balanced Economic Development in the East African Community (EAC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mbembe, Binda

    2015-01-01

    One of the objectives of the East African Community (EAC) is the promotion of a balanced economic development between its Partner States: Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. And one of the ways to reach this economic development is the attraction of investment, especially Foreign Direct In

  7. Arican Friends Happily Gather Together in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>In the summer of 2009,the CPAFFC held the first training course for leading members of the African friendship-with-China organizations. A total of 36 trainees came from 19 countries,namely Djibouti,Togo, Benin,Democratic Republic of Congo, Mauritania,Mali,Algeria, Guinea-Bissau,Guinea,Senegal,Burundi, Cote d’Ivoire,Morocco,

  8. Ten years experience with 497 cases of neuroinfections in tropic: in limited laboratory infrastructure initially treat both, cerebral malaria and meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benca, J; Ondrusova, A; Adamcova, J; Takacova, M; Polonova, J; Taziarova, M

    2007-06-01

    Review of 497 cases of neuroinfections in 7 tropical clinics in Ethiopia, Uganda, Burundi, Kenya, Sudan within 2000-2007 was performed. 97.5% of all cases was cerebral malaria (40.1%) and bacterial meningitis (56.4%). TB meningitis, cerebral cryptococcosis and sleeping sickness were very rare.

  9. Rural Development and Labour-Intensive Schemes. Impact Studies of Some Pilot Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaude, J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines case studies of special public works programs in five countries (Burkina Faso, Burundi, Rwanda, Nepal, and United Republic of Tanzania) that included afforestation projects, anti-erosion works, and the building of reservoirs. Discusses program design, implementation, and impact. (CH)

  10. The ’In Lieu Of’ Myth. Airmen in Joint Ground Operations (Walker Paper, Number 13)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    deaths in the other 14 conflicts totaled 5,400, as follows: Burundi (100), Sudan (100), Uganda (200), Colombia (500), Peru (25), India (700...Contingencies. Santa Monica, CA: RAND, 1995. ———. Army Forces for Operations Other than War. Santa Mon- ica , CA: RAND, 1997. Stockholm International Peace

  11. A potato model intercomparison across varying climates and productivity levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H. Fleisher, David; Condori, Bruno; Quiroz, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A potato crop multi-model assessment was conducted to quantify variation among models and evaluate responses to climate change. Nine modeling groups simulated agronomic and climatic responses at low- (Chinoli, Bolivia and Gisozi, Burundi) and high- (Jyndevad, Denmark and Washington, United States...

  12. A potato model intercomparison across varying climates and productivity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleisher, David H.; Condori, Bruno; Quiroz, Roberto; Alva, Ashok; Asseng, Senthold; Barreda, Carolina; Bindi, Marco; Boote, Kenneth J.; Ferrise, Roberto; Franke, Angelinus C.; Govindakrishnan, Panamanna M.; Harahagazwe, Dieudonne; Hoogenboom, Gerrit; Naresh Kumar, Soora; Merante, Paolo; Nendel, Claas; Olesen, Jorgen E.; Parker, Phillip S.; Raes, Dirk; Raymundo, Rubi; Ruane, Alex C.; Stockle, Claudio; Supit, Iwan; Vanuytrecht, Eline; Wolf, Joost; Woli, Prem

    2016-01-01

    A potato crop multimodel assessment was conducted to quantify variation among models and evaluate responses to climate change. Nine modeling groups simulated agronomic and climatic responses at low-input (Chinoli, Bolivia and Gisozi, Burundi)- and high-input (Jyndevad, Denmark and Washington, United

  13. In their own words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC and Sierra Leone, the end of armed fighting has not brought with it the longed-for peace. Today, an epidemic of gender-based violence continues to undermine efforts to bring stability.

  14. Livelihoods strategies of urban refugees in Kampala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Macchiavello

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Some 15,000 refugees – escapees from wars in Sudan, Rwanda, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia – live in the Ugandan capital, Kampala, without UNHCR assistance.Rejecting residence in rural camps, they have chosen an environment in which they can use their skills to achieve self-sufficiency and dignity.

  15. Soil and Terrain Database of Central Africa (ver. 1.0) SOTERCAF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, van V.W.P.; Verdoodt, A.; Dijkshoorn, J.A.; Batjes, N.H.

    2013-01-01

    The Soil and Terrrain database of Central Africa (SOTERCAF, version 1.0) was compiled at scale 1:2 million for the Democratic Republic of Congo and at scale 1:1 million for Rwanda and Burundi. The SOTERCAF compilation has been a joint collaboration of the Soil Science Laboratory of the University of

  16. Note on the genus Barteria Hook. f. (Flacourtiaceae or Passifloraceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleumer, H.

    1974-01-01

    The discrimination of species in the genus Barteria has become more and more difficult with the increasing number of collections in recent years. To explain his treatment of the genus in the forthcoming 2nd part of the Flacourtiaceae in the ‘Flore d’Afrique Central (Zaire-Rwanda-Burundi)’, the autho

  17. Mapping soil carbon stocks of Central Africa using SOTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the soil carbon stocks of Central Africa although such baseline data are needed for research and policy development on soil carbon changes. Estimates are presented based on a 1:2 million scale soil and terrain (SOTER) database for Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and

  18. Potato model uncertainty across common datasets and varying climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    A potato crop multi-model assessment was conducted to quantify variation among models and evaluate responses to climate change. Nine modeling groups simulated agronomic and climatic responses at low- (Chinoli, Bolivia and Gisozi, Burundi) and high- (Jyndevad, Denmark and Washington, United States) ...

  19. An International Criminal Court of Public Opinion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwknegt, Thijs Bastiaan

    2012-01-01

    In recent months, South Africa, Burundi and the Gambia have terminated their membership of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Observers and academics alike have narrowly portrayed this walkout as an ‘African’ exodus and an ‘African’ problem. But what about Vladimir Putin’s ‘unsigning’ of the Ro

  20. On the Afrotropical genus Holmelgonia (Araneae, Linyphiidae, with the description of three new species from the Albertine Rift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Nzigidahera

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of Holmelgonia were found in the mountain forest of Kibira National Park in Burundi: H. afromontana sp. nov. (♂♀, H. bosnasutus sp. nov. (♂♀ and H. disconveniens sp. nov. (♂. A key to the males in the genus, now containing 17 species, is provided.

  1. Doomed to passivity? An exploration of origins of intra-state violence and possibilities for constructive intervention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    1997-01-01

    Following the death of several hundred people during 'ethnic' rioting in Burundi, a repetition of previous genocides seemed imminent. Belgium and France, not surprisingly, contemplated the evacuation of their citizens from that country. One of the oldest responsibilities of a government is, after al

  2. 2002 Sino-African SHP Training Workshop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Sino-African SHP Training Workshop was held from 10 May to 18 June 2002 at Hangzhou Regional Center for Small Hydro Power(HRC). Attended altogether 9 participants from 5 African countries, i.e. Burundi, Nigeria, South African, Tanzania and Tunisia. This is the second training workshop on SHP that HRC conducted for African countries.

  3. Korean Affairs Report, No. 298.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    zero percent rise in wholesale prices and the nation’s improving international payments position. The original 5-year plan envisions an annual 10...of the Bolivian paper ULTIMA HORA ; the delegation of the Ministry of Information of the Republic of Burundi headed by Maceri Francois, director of

  4. Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program (DHAPP), 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    an attempt to increase tax revenues, reform customs, and improve the business environment. The GDP per capita is $2,300. HIV/AIDS Statistics The...Guyana 182 Honduras 184 Jamaica 187 Nicaragua 190 Peru 193 Saint Kitts and Nevis 195 Suriname 198 Trinidad and Tobago 201 Appendix A...economic reforms . Almost half of Burundi’s national income comes from foreign aid. After joining the East African Community, Burundi received $700

  5. Security Assistance Reform: Section 1206 Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-04

    of Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice , and the enthusiastic endorsement of geographic Combatant...all but the first year. In the past few years, programs in Africa have increased substantially. Kenya , Mauritania, Niger, Uganda, and Burundi have...Advanced Infantry Development 12.1 Chad Logistic Company (CT Support) 7.3 Kenya Special Operations Regiment CT Capability Enhancement 7.0

  6. No Substitute for Experience: Chinese Antipiracy Operations in the Gulf of Aden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    permanent representative of China to the United Nations, Wang Min, em- phasized in 2011 his nation’s view on that point: “Military action can only...of Burundi and Uganda for supplies to be used in the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM).41 Wang Min, as deputy permanent representative to the...Aden, political worker Tong Zhe stated that 90 percent of China’s trade relied on secure passage through SLOCs.68 Similarly re- ferring to strategic

  7. ENGINEERING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF EQUITABLE RESOURCE DISTRIBUTION IN NILE BASIN

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Uganda, Tanzania, the Sudan, South Sudan, Rwanda, Kenya, Ethiopia, Egypt, DR Congo, and Burundi all make entitlement claims to the ecological system of the Nile Basin.  This region is rich in resources, yet prone to interstate conflict, drought, and other vulnerabilities.  Water resource conservation systems, alternative purification systems, and rainfall stimulation systems programmed by artificial intelligence can facilitate the establishment of transboundary partnerships that red...

  8. Covering Post-Conflict Elections: Challenges for the Media in Central Africa Wahlberichterstattung in Post-Konflikt-Phasen: Herausforderungen für die Medien in Zentralafrika

    OpenAIRE

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2011-01-01

    In the past ten years, elections were held in six countries of Central Africa experiencing “post-conflict” situations. The polls that took place in Burundi (2005), the Central African Republic (2005), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (2006), Congo-Brazzaville (2002, 2007), Chad (1996, 2001, 2006) and Rwanda (2003) were crucial for peace-building. In some cases, they were widely supported and supervised by the international community, being considered the last step of a peace process and t...

  9. Covering post-conflict elections: challenges for the media in central Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Frère, Marie-Soleil

    2011-01-01

    In the past ten years, elections were held in six countries of Central Africa experiencing "post-conflict" situations. The polls that took place in Burundi (2005), the Central African Republic (2005), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (2006), Congo-Brazzaville (2002, 2007), Chad (1996, 2001, 2006) and Rwanda (2003) were crucial for peace-building. In some cases, they were widely supported and supervised by the international community, being considered the last step of a peace process and t...

  10. Sino-Burundian Friendship Association Delegation’s First Visit to China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Burundi, an inland African country, has an area of 27,834 square kilometres. Agriculture is the mainstay of its national economy, with 93 percent of its population engaged in agriculture and animal husbandry and over 50 percent of its national income generated from agriculture. In March this year, a Sino-Burundian Friendship Association Delegation headed by Ferdinand Nderagakura, minister of agriculture and livestock, visited China at the invitation of the CPAFFC.

  11. Diplomatic Envoys of Four African Countries Visit Hunan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>With Spring warmth awakening the flowers, ambassadors of Madagascar, Mali, Cameroon and Burundi went to Changsha, Hunan Province, for the 8th Lecture Tour of African Diplomatic Envoys. More than 100 people from the Commerce Bureau, the Development and Reform Commission and the Academy of Social Sciences of Hunan Province, Hunan Normal University as well as SOEs and private enterprises took part in the activity.

  12. Understanding growth of East Africa highland banana: experiments and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Key words: leaf area; radiation interception; QUEFTS model; fertilizer recovery fractions; nutrient mass fractions; crop growth; calibration; validation; radiation use efficiency; sensitivity analysis East Africa Highland banana yields on smallholder farms in the Great Lakes region are small (11−26 Mg ha−1 cycle−1 in Uganda, 21−43 Mg ha−1 cycle−1 in Burundi and 25−53 Mg ha−1 cycle−1 in Rwanda). The major causes of poor yields are declining soil fertility and soil moisture stress. In order to ...

  13. A vegetation map for eastern Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillesø, Jens-Peter Barnekow; van Breugel, Paulo; Graudal, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    The potential natural vegetation (PNV) map of eastern and southern Africa covers the countries Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia. The first version of the map was developed by various partners in East Africa and Europe in 2010 and has now reached version 2. The map...... for the right place' and potential distribution maps of the useful woody species that occur in eastern Africa. To navigate this site, please use the menu on the left. For the latest news and updates, check out our Google+ page. And if you want to contact us for questions, comments or any other reason, please...

  14. Phytothérapie traditionnelle des bovins dans les élevages de la plaine de la Ruzizi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaisse F.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional horned cattle phytotherapy in the Rusizi plain breedings [Rwanda, Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo]. After presenting the ecological characteristics of the Rusizi plain and reminding of the socio-economical importance of horned cattle for the local populations, the authors deal with the traditional phytotherapy knowledge in this area. The study lists the plants used, the organs concerned (leaves, bark, root, fruit, etc., as well as the formula and doses recommended regarding the recognized diseases. Finally this ethnobotanical knowledge is placed and discussed regarding the East African one.

  15. HIV-1 Sequence Data Coverage in Central East Africa from 1959 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Susanna L; Barbier, Andrew E; Ratmann, Oliver; Fraser, Christophe; Rose, Rebecca; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Grabowski, Mary K

    2016-09-01

    Central and Eastern African HIV sequence data have been most critical in understanding the establishment and evolution of the global HIV pandemic. Here we report on the extent of publicly available HIV genetic sequence data in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Sequence Database sampled from 1959 to 2013 from six African countries: Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Rwanda. We have summarized these data, including HIV subtypes, the years sampled, and the genomic regions sequenced. We also provide curated alignments for this important geographic area in five HIV genomic regions with substantial coverage.

  16. Hope in Africa?: social representations of world history and the future in six African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabecinhas, Rosa; Liu, James H; Licata, Laurent; Klein, Olivier; Mendes, Júlio; Feijó, João; Niyubahwe, Aline

    2011-10-01

    Data on social representations of world history have been collected everywhere in the world except sub-Saharan Africa. Two studies using open-ended data involving university students from six African countries fill this gap. In Study 1, nominations from Cape Verde and Mozambique for the most important events in world history in the past 1000 years were dominated by war and politics, recency effects, and Western-centrism tempered by African sociocentrism on colonization and independence. The first three findings replicated previous research conducted in other parts of the world, but the last pattern contrasted sharply with European data. Study 2 employed a novel method asking participants how they would begin the narration of world history, and then to describe a major transition to the present. Participants most frequently wrote about the evolution of humanity out of Africa, followed by war and then colonization as a beginning, and then replicated previous findings with war, colonization, and technology as major transitions to the present. Finally, when asked about how they foresaw the future, many participants expressed hope for peace and cooperation, especially those facing more risk of collective violence (Burundi and Congo). A colonial/liberation narrative was more predominant in the data from former Portuguese colonies (Angola, Cape Verde, and Guinea-Bissau) than from former Belgian colonies (Burundi and Congo).

  17. Ethnicised Politics: Patterns of Interpretation of Rwandans and Burundians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Schraml

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Following Peter Berger and Thomas Luckmann (1991 this study focuses on taken-for-granted notions, i.e. knowledge (defining ethnicised politics asexclusion
    interpreted with reference to ethnic categories. This represents a departure from the conventional academic discussion of ethnicised politics, which focuses
    on exclusion inherent to the structures of political systems when seeking to explain violent conflict aligned along ethnic cleavages. The study compares two
    neighbouring countries, Rwanda and Burundi, where different institutional models have been introduced to overcome ethnicised politics following comparable
    episodes of ethnic violence. Whereas the Rwandan system avoids political representation based on ethnic categories, the Burundian system prescribes ethnic
    quotas. Semi-standardised interviews with twenty-two Rwandans and twenty Burundians conducted between September 2007 and May 2008 investigated ethnicised
    politics as patterns of interpretation (i.e. knowledge. The study found that notwithstanding the different political institutional systems in Rwanda and
    Burundi (both aiming to overcome ethnicised politics, exclusion in both systems is interpreted with reference to ethnic categories, i.e. politics are ethnicised
    in both countries. This result points to the importance of conceiving ethnicised politics as historically produced knowledge, i.e. patterns of interpretation.

  18. Sismotectonics in the western branch of the East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, Damien; Kervyn, François; Mulumba, Jean-Luc; Kipata, Louis; Sebagenzi, Stanislas; Mavonga, Georges; Macheyeki, Athanas; Temu, Elly Bryan

    2013-04-01

    The western branch of the East African rift system is known of its particular seismic activity with larger magnitude (up to Ms 7.3) and more frequent destructive earthquakes than in the eastern branch. As a contribution to the IGCP 601 project Seismotectonic Map of Africa, we compiled the known active faults, thermal springs and historical seismicity in Central Africa. Using the rich archives of the Royal Museum for Central Africa, publications and own field observations, we present a compilation of available data relative to the current seismotectonic activity along the western branch of the East African rift system, in DRC, Rwanda, Burundi and Tanzania. Neotectonic activity related to the western rift branch is in general well expressed and relatively well studied in the eastern flank of this rift branch, in Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Tanzania. In contrast, the western flank of this rift branch, largely exposed in the DRC, has attracted less attention. However, data collected during the colonial times show significant sismotectonic activity in East DRC, not only in the western flank of the western rift branch, but extending far westwards up to the margin of the Congo basin. In particular, our predecessors paid a special attention to the mapping and description of thermal springs, noticing that they are often controlled by active faults. In addition, the operators of the relatively dense network of meteorological stations installed in the DRC, Rwanda and Burundi also recorded were with variable level of completeness and detail the earthquakes that they could felt. This provides a rich database that is used to complete the existing knowledge on historical seismicity. An important effort has still to be paid to identify and map potentially active fault due to poor field accessibility, tropical climate weathering and vegetation coverage. The main problem in the compilation of active fault data is that very few of them have been investigated by paleoseismic trenching

  19. Devenir socio-économique des enfants et familles touchés par l'infection à VIH/sida dans les pays en développement : l'exemple de la Côte d'Ivoire

    OpenAIRE

    Bechu, N.; Guillaume, Agnès; Delcroix, S.; N'Guessan, B.T.

    1997-01-01

    Cet article présente les grands principes méthodologiques d'une étude portant sur le devenir socio-économique de familles touchées par le sida dans trois pays en développement (Burundi, Haïti et Côte d'Ivoire), et les problèmes éthiques posés par sa réalisation. Les évolutions des conditions de vie des ménages et de leur structure familiale, notamment en cas de décès du malade, sont analysées à la lumière des résultats de l'enquête menée en Côte d'Ivoire. Une attention particulière est portée...

  20. 贝壳守望者——坦干依克湖的卷贝鱼

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振宇

    2005-01-01

    地质运动,造就了当今世界第二深的湖泊——坦干依克湖(Tanganyika)坦湖全长650公里,湖中最深处为1470米,周围接壤四个国家,即布隆迪(Burundi)、赞比亚(Zambia)、坦桑尼亚(Tanzama)和刚果民主共和国(Congo)。湖中生活着超过50个属的慈鲷种类,并且有很多为坦湖特有物种。本文主要详细介绍其中锦丽鱼属Lamprologus 的卷贝鱼。国外对锦丽鱼属 Lamprologus 和新锦丽鱼属

  1. [Malignant pustule in province of Milan, Italy (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelosa, L

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary the statistical data are reported about human malignant pustule denounced in Italy in different Districts, in Lombardia and in Province of Milan. Correlatively the outbreaks and cases of haematic anthrax in animals declared in Italy, in different Districts, in Lombardia and in Province of Milan. Then the outbreaks of malignant pustule in Province of Milan are related in 1975-1977 period in the resident population where is considerable concentration of the leather manufactures. The epidemiological and microbiological researches have determined the relation among the outbreak of malignant pustule and the working of the hides imported from African Countries (Nigeria, Tanzania, Ethiopia, South Africa, Burundi-Kenya, Uganda) containing the spores of b. anthrax. The spores besides to cause infections of the workmen employed in the hide manufacture (industrial anthrax) through the effluents and solid refuses from the tanneries, are dispended upon the tiled ground and determine outbreak the haematic anthrax in the animals and agricultural coutaneus anthrax in the men.

  2. Appetitive Aggression in Women: Comparing Male and Female War Combatants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danie eMeyer-Parlapanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Appetitive aggression refers to positive feelings being associated with the perpetration of violent behavior and has been shown to provide resilience against the development of PTSD in combatants returning from the battlefield. Until this point, appetitive aggression has been primarily researched in males. This study investigates appetitive aggression in females. Female and male combatants and civilians from Burundi were assessed for levels of appetitive aggression. In contrast to non-combatants, no sex difference in appetitive aggression could be detected for combatants. Furthermore, each of the female and male combatant groups displayed substantially higher levels of appetitive aggression than each of the male and female civilian control groups. This study demonstrates that in violent contexts, such as armed conflict, in which individuals perpetrate numerous aggressive acts against others, the likelihood for an experience of appetitive aggression increases- regardless of whether the individuals are male or female.

  3. Exploring the Legacies of Armed Rebellion in Burundi’s Maquis par Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Van Acker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution explores the legacies of armed rebellion in post-war Burundi, where two of the main political parties, the ruling CNDD-FDD and the FNL, are former rebel movements. It aims to add a micro-political perspective to the discussion on the transformation of rebel groups into political parties, and bring some nuance to the normative underpinnings of this debate. Based on observations of the role of local leaders with an FNL past, and of retrospective popular appreciation for wartime governance by the FNL in its stronghold of Bujumbura Rural, the paper argues that beyond the symptoms of a violent political culture, this legacy should also be understood as a complex source of post-war power and legitimacy.

  4. Indicators of State Failure: Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    greater political utility. One trait that appears unfailingly in all of the definitions is that failed and fragile states are qualitatively different...7.46 7.34 6.53 4.40 6.26 7.20 Cote d’Ivoire 6.55 6.81 6.17 6.19 7.62 5.73 6.92 8.36 7.14 4.29 Nepal 6.55 7.02 6.50 6.20 7.11 6.36 7.59 6.23 6.59 5.46...and Gaza 6.62 Haiti 6.83 Togo 6.62 Niger 6.59 Myanmar (Burma) 6.82 Congo, Dem. Rep. 6.56 Benin 6.55 Nigeria 6.82 Liberia 6.55 Burundi 6.54 Cote d’Ivoire

  5. China Offers Import Tax Exemption to Some African Countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>According to information from China’s Ministry of Commerce, China will offer some import tax exemption from January 1st this year to 25 African countries for a total of 190 commodities in the Customs taxable list. These commodities include 14 items of metals commodities such as ferro-silicon, steel structures and fabricated steel products, screw nails and their accessories, blister copper, unwrought copper cathode, fabricated copper, copper scrap and other copper products, unwrought nickel alloys, unwrought aluminium, aluminium scrap, intermediate cobalt products and fabricated cobalt products. These African countries include Benin, Burundi, Cape Verde, Central Africa, Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Liberia, Mozambique, Niger, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia etc. More details on these will be provided by the Customs.

  6. Role of polymorphisms of toll-like receptor (TLR 4, TLR9, toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP and FCGR2A genes in malaria susceptibility and severity in Burundian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Susanna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is one of the leading causes of human morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases, predominantly in tropical and sub-tropical countries. As genetic variations in the toll-like receptors (TLRs-signalling pathway have been associated with either susceptibility or resistance to several infectious and inflammatory diseases, the supposition is that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of TLR2, TLR4, TLR9, Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP and FCGR2A could modulate malaria susceptibility and severity. Methods This study was planned to make a further contribution to solving the problem of the real role of the most common polymorphisms of TLR4, TLR9, TIRAP and FCGR2A genes in modulating the risk of malaria and disease severity in children from Burundi, Central Africa. All the paediatric patients aged six months to 10 years admitted to the hospital of Kiremba, Burundi, between February 2011 and September 2011, for fever and suspicion of acute malaria were screened for malaria parasitaemia by light microscopy of thick and thin blood smears. In children with malaria and in uninfected controls enrolled during the study period in the same hospital, blood samples were obtained on filter paper and TLR4 Asp299Gly rs4986790, TLR9 G1174A rs352139, T-1486 C rs187084 TLR9 T-1237 C rs5743836, TIRAP Ser180Leu rs8177374 and the FCGR2A His131Arg rs1801274 polymorphisms were studied using an ABI PRISM 7900 HT Fast Real-time instrument. Results A total of 602 patients and 337 controls were enrolled. Among the malaria cases, 553 (91.9 % were considered as suffering from uncomplicated and 49 (8.1 % from severe malaria. TLR9 T1237C rs5743836CC was associated with an increased risk of developing malaria (p = 0.03, although it was found with the same frequency in uncomplicated and severe malaria cases. No other differences were found in all alleles studied and in

  7. Découverte d’une culture africaine et fantasmes d’un missionnaire. Le Dictionnaire français-kirundi du Père Van der Burgt (1903 entre ethnographie, exégèse biblique et orientalisme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Chrétien

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Un des premiers regards extérieurs portés sur l’Afrique des Grands Lacs nous vient du Père blanc hollandais Van der Burgt, missionnaire au Burundi. En 1903 il publie un dictionnaire encyclopédique français‑kirundi, dont l’influence sera durable auprès des lettrés de ce pays. Or cet ouvrage est autant nourri d’une érudition ethnographique, historique et biblique mal contrôlée que d’enquêtes sur le terrain. Il exprime une obsession raciale, celle de la quête des origines orientales des populations noires et, en particulier, de l’assimilation de la catégorie tutsi à une souche hamito‑sémitique. Il est même tenté par des formes ésotériques de l’orientalisme qui le mènent jusqu’en Inde, en Polynésie ou aux révélations de la mystique allemande Catherine Emmerich. La culture burundaise se retrouve capturée par cet imaginaire venu des bibliothèques européennes et elle est décrite comme le fruit d’une dégénérescence, prolongeant le mythe de la malédiction de Cham.One of the first exogenous looks on the Great Lakes region of Africa came from a missionary in Burundi, the Dutch White Father Van der Burgt. He published in 1903 a French‑Kirundi encyclopaedic dictionary, which left a lasting influence on that countries scholarship. This book was both based on fieldwork and poorly‑controlled ethnographic, historical and biblical scholarship. It expressed a peculiar racial obsession : the quest for the Oriental origins of African populations and particularly the inclusion of the Tutsi category into a Hamito‑Semitic stock. Van der Burgt was even influenced by esoteric forms of orientalism, which drove his thoughts as far as India, Polynesia, or the revelations of the German mystic Catherine Emmerich. The Burundese culture was thus trapped by this imagination born out of the European libraries and it was described as the result of degeneration, based on the myth of the curse of Ham.

  8. Extent and drainage status of organic soils in the Lake Victoria catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmes, Reni; Barthelmes, Alexandra; Joosten, Hans

    2016-04-01

    When considering peatlands and organic soils in the tropics, the huge areas in SE Asia prevail in public and scientific perception, whereas Africa has largely been out of focus. However, East Africa contains large areas of organic soils as well. They basically occur in the high altitudes of the uplifted flanks of the East African Rift System, isolated volcanoes and the Ethiopian highlands, in the Zambezian floodplains (e.g. Zambia), and in coastal environments (e.g. Mozambique and Madagascar). We used a mapping approach that integrates old field data and maps, specialized landscape and peatland-related knowledge, and modern RS and GIS techniques to elaborate a comprehensive and rather reliable overview of organic soils (incl. peatlands) in the Lake Victoria catchment. Maps at a scale of 1:25,000 have been prepared for Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The land use intensity has been estimated for all organic soil areas based on satellite and aerial imagery. Feeding the Nile River, sustaining a fast growing and widely poor population and already facing climatic changes, organic soils of the Lake Victoria neighbouring countries are partially under heavy threat. We mapped 10,645 km2 of organic soils for the entire area of which 8,860 km2 (83.2%) seem to be in near natural condition. We assume slightly drainage and low degradation for 564 km2 (5.3%) and intensive drainage and heavy degradation for 1,222 km2 (11.5%). Degradation hotspot is Burundi with 522 km2 (79.5%) of heavily drained and degrading organic soils. This area assessment has been quite conservative to not overestimate the extent of organic soils. A reserve of 5-7,000 km2 of wetlands in the Lake Victoria catchment may include peatlands too, which needs to be confirmed in field surveys. Considering the key role of peatlands and organic soils for water provision and regulation and their rapid degradation due to drainage and inappropriate use, this inventory might be a step towards organic soil

  9. Cost of epilepsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelczyk, Adam; Reese, Jens Peter; Dodel, Richard; Hamer, Hajo M

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this review was to overview published cost-of-illness (COI) studies of epilepsy and their methodological approaches. Epilepsy imposes a substantial burden on individuals and society as a whole. The mean prevalence of epilepsy is estimated at 0.52% in Europe, 0.68% in the US, and peaks up to 1.5% in developing countries. Estimation of the economic burden of epilepsy is of pivotal relevance to enable a rational distribution of healthcare resources. This is especially so with the introduction of the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the marketing of vagal-nerve stimulators and the resurgence of new surgical treatment options, which have the potential to considerably increase the costs of treating epilepsy.A systematic literature review was performed to identify studies that evaluated direct and indirect costs of epilepsy. Using a standardized assessment form, information on the study design, methodological framework and data sources were extracted from each publication and systematically reported. We identified 22 studies worldwide on costs of epilepsy. The majority of the studies reflected the costs of epilepsy in Europe (three studies each for the UK and Italy, one study each for Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, France and the EU) and the US (four studies), but studies were also available from India (two), Hong Kong, Oman, Burundi, Chile and Mexico. The studies utilized different frameworks to evaluate costs. All used a bottom-up approach; however, only 12 studies (55%) evaluated direct as well as indirect costs. The range for the mean annual direct costs lay between 40 International Dollar purchasing power parities (PPP-$) in rural Burundi and PPP-$4748 (adjusted to 2006 values) in a German epilepsy centre. Recent studies suggest AEDs are becoming the main contributor to direct costs. The mean indirect costs ranged between 12% and 85% of the total annual costs. Epilepsy is a cost-intensive disorder. A reliable comparison of the different COI

  10. Girls and war: an extra vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, M

    1998-01-01

    It is no longer possible to consider the raping of girls as an isolated atrocity of war. In Uganda, guerrilla forces have kidnapped 6000-10,000 children and have forced the "most desirable" girls to become "wives" of warlords. Girls who manage to escape are deeply traumatized and suffer ill health as well as possible social ostracism. In refugee camps, recognition that adolescent girls face special risks of rape and of engaging in the informal prostitution that may expose them to HIV/AIDS has led to the introduction of new measures to increase female security. Families in refugee camps in Burundi and Somalia protect female honor by submitting their daughters to very early marriage, which also abuses the girls' rights. Girls conscripted to military groups are forced to transport materials, cook, or help loot villages. In conditions of war, even girls who remain at home protected by their families must assume extra responsibilities, especially if men go off to fight leaving women with the agricultural and livestock burdens. Girls will be the first children withdrawn from school to help keep the household afloat. Girls and women are also expected to tend those wounded by the very war that destroys the health care services that are vital to meet women's reproductive needs. Efforts are being made to identify rape as a specific war crime, and these efforts should be extended to the kidnapping and forced recruitment of children into combat roles. Moral codes must be reestablished, even if they are only nominal at present.

  11. African 2, a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis epidemiologically important in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Stefan; Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Müller, Borna; Hailu, Elena; Asiimwe, Benon; Kremer, Kristin; Dale, James; Boniotti, M Beatrice; Rodriguez, Sabrina; Hilty, Markus; Rigouts, Leen; Firdessa, Rebuma; Machado, Adelina; Mucavele, Custodia; Ngandolo, Bongo Nare Richard; Bruchfeld, Judith; Boschiroli, Laura; Müller, Annélle; Sahraoui, Naima; Pacciarini, Maria; Cadmus, Simeon; Joloba, Moses; van Soolingen, Dick; Michel, Anita L; Djønne, Berit; Aranaz, Alicia; Zinsstag, Jakob; van Helden, Paul; Portaels, Françoise; Kazwala, Rudovick; Källenius, Gunilla; Hewinson, R Glyn; Aseffa, Abraham; Gordon, Stephen V; Smith, Noel H

    2011-02-01

    We have identified a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis isolated at high frequency from cattle in Uganda, Burundi, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. We have named this related group of M. bovis strains the African 2 (Af2) clonal complex of M. bovis. Af2 strains are defined by a specific chromosomal deletion (RDAf2) and can be identified by the absence of spacers 3 to 7 in their spoligotype patterns. Deletion analysis of M. bovis isolates from Algeria, Mali, Chad, Nigeria, Cameroon, South Africa, and Mozambique did not identify any strains of the Af2 clonal complex, suggesting that this clonal complex of M. bovis is localized in East Africa. The specific spoligotype pattern of the Af2 clonal complex was rarely identified among isolates from outside Africa, and the few isolates that were found and tested were intact at the RDAf2 locus. We conclude that the Af2 clonal complex is localized to cattle in East Africa. We found that strains of the Af2 clonal complex of M. bovis have, in general, four or more copies of the insertion sequence IS6110, in contrast to the majority of M. bovis strains isolated from cattle, which are thought to carry only one or a few copies.

  12. Parker's sneak-guard model revisited: why do reproductively parasitic males heavily invest in testes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Kazutaka; Kohda, Masanori; Hori, Michio; Sato, Tetsu

    2011-10-01

    Alternative reproductive tactics are widespread in males and may cause intraspecific differences in testes investment. Parker's sneak-guard model predicts that sneaker males, who mate under sperm competition risk, invest in testes relatively more than bourgeois conspecifics that have lower risk. Given that sneakers are much smaller than bourgeois males, sneakers may increase testes investment to overcome their limited sperm productivity because of their small body sizes. In this study, we examined the mechanism that mediates differential testes investment across tactics in the Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish Lamprologus callipterus. In the Rumonge population of Burundi, bourgeois males are small compared with those in other populations and have a body size close to sneaky dwarf males. Therefore, if differences in relative testis investment depend on sperm competition, the rank order of relative testis investment should be dwarf males > bourgeois males in Rumonge = bourgeois males in the other populations. If differences in relative testis investment depend on body size, the rank order of relative testes investment should be dwarf males > bourgeois males in Rumonge > bourgeois males in the other populations. Comparisons of relative testis investment among the three male groups supported the role of sperm competition, as predicted by the sneak-guard model. Nevertheless, the effects of absolute body size on testes investment should be considered to understand the mechanisms underlying intraspecific variation in testes investment caused by alternative reproductive tactics.

  13. Capacity building for sustainable energy development and poverty alleviation in sub-saharan Africa - the contribution of AFREPREN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karekezi, S.; Kithyoma, W. [AFREPREN/FWD, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2004-09-01

    African Energy Policy Research Network and Foundation for Woodstoves (AFREPREN /FWD) is an African initiative on energy, environment and sustainable development. AFREPREN/FWD brings together 97 African energy researchers and policy makers who have a long-term interest in energy research and the attendant policy-making process. AFREPREN/FWD has initiated policy research studies in 19 African countries, namely: Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. AFREPREN/FWD's ultimate goal is to promote the greater use of cleaner energy options such as renewables for poverty alleviation in Africa. The near-term objective of AFREPREN /FWD is to strengthen local research capacity and to harness it in the service of energy policy making and planning. Initiated in 1987, AFREPREN is a collective regional response to the widespread concern over the weak link between energy research and the formulation and implementation of energy policy in Africa. (orig.)

  14. Renewable Energy Zones for the Africa Clean Energy Corridor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Grace C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Deshmukh, Ranjit [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ndhlukula, Kudakwashe [International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Radojicic, Tijana [International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Reilly, Jessica [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Multi-criteria Analysis for Planning Renewable Energy (MapRE) is a study approach developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with the support of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The approach combines geospatial, statistical, energy engineering, and economic methods to comprehensively identify and value high-quality wind, solar PV, and solar CSP resources for grid integration based on techno-economic criteria, generation profiles (for wind), and socio-environmental impacts. The Renewable Energy Zones for the Africa Clean Energy Corridor study sought to identify and comprehensively value high-quality wind, solar photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) resources in 21 countries in the East and Southern Africa Power Pools to support the prioritization of areas for development through a multi-criteria planning process. These countries include Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The study includes the methodology and the key results including renewable energy potential for each region.

  15. Breastfeeding beliefs and practices of African women living in Brisbane and Perth, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Danielle; Vicca, Natalie; Streiner, Samantha

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of breastfeeding among refugee women from Liberia, Sierra Leone, Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo living in two major capital cities in Australia. Participants were recruited from their relevant community associations and via a snowballing technique. Thirty-one women took part in either individual interviews or facilitated group discussions to explore their experiences of breastfeeding in their home country and in Australia. Thematic analysis revealed four main themes: cultural breastfeeding beliefs and practices; stigma and shame around breastfeeding in public; ambivalence towards breastfeeding and breastfeeding support. Women who originated from these four African countries highlighted a significant desire for breastfeeding and an understanding that it was the best method for feeding their infants. Their breastfeeding practices in Australia were a combination of practices maintained from their countries of origin and those adopted according to Australian cultural norms. They exemplified the complexity of breastfeeding behaviour and the relationship between infant feeding with economic status and the perceived social norms of the host country. The results illustrate the need for policy makers and health professionals to take into consideration the environmental, social and cultural contexts of the women who are purportedly targeted for the promotion of breastfeeding.

  16. Epidemiology and genetic diversity of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidenya, Benson R; Webster, Lauren E; Behan, Sehan; Kabangila, Rodrick; Peck, Robert N; Mshana, Stephen E; Ocheretina, Oksana; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is an emerging problem in many parts of the world, and levels of MDR-TB among new TB patients are increasing in sub-Saharan Africa. We reviewed the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of MDR-TB in East Africa, including Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. In 16 epidemiologic surveys, the prevalence of MDR among new cases ranges from 0.4% in Tanzania to 4.4% in Uganda, and among recurrent cases ranges from 3.9% in Tanzania to 17.7% in Uganda. There is a gap of 5948 cases between the estimated number of MDR-TB cases in East Africa and the number actually diagnosed. The only confirmed risk factors for MDR-TB are prior treatment for TB and refugee status. HIV has not been reported as a risk factor, and there are no reports of statistical association between spoligotype and drug resistance pattern. Increased capacity for diagnosis and treatment of MDR-TB is needed, with an emphasis on recurrent TB cases and refugees.

  17. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  18. Modelling the spatial distribution of endemic Caesalpinioideae in Central Africa, a contribution to the evaluation of actual protected areas in the region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndayishimiye, Joël; Greve, Michelle; Stoffelen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding why some regions have higher levels of diversity and which factors are driving the occurrence of species in a particular area is crucial for environmental management and for the development of species conservation strategies. In this study, we studied seven species of the Caesalpini......Understanding why some regions have higher levels of diversity and which factors are driving the occurrence of species in a particular area is crucial for environmental management and for the development of species conservation strategies. In this study, we studied seven species...... of the Caesalpinioideae that are endemic in Central Africa (Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi and Rwanda). The objectives of this study were to identify the environmental factors that constrain their distribution, to determine the potential areas where each species could be present, to assess the current...... conservation status of each species and to evaluate how well the species are protected by the protected areas in the region. Distributions were analyzed and potential distributions predicted using the Maxent species distribution algorithm with climatic (precipitation and temperature) and non-climatic predictor...

  19. Social marketing of condoms: selling protection and changing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, S

    1991-06-01

    Social marketing of condoms in Zaire began in 1987 and sales rose to 8 million in 1990, a notable change from the previous situation where about half a million condoms were distributed by government health clinics only. Social marketing is the use of for-profit sales and marketing techniques for public health problem.s When the Zaire National AIDS Committee initiated social marketing of condoms, with the assistance of Population Services International, they had the experience of successful Asian programs of the 1970s, and the political sanction resulting from the AIDS threat to back them up. Efforts were made to find just the right product name, "Prudence," logo, package, color and slogan by consumer research. Prudence implies responsible behavior, capturing both the AIDS and STD prevention and the family planning markets. Consumers like the package and associate it with quality, since most condoms sold before in Zaire had no special packaging. Distribution outlets include 7000 retail shops, groceries, pharmacies, hotel, social clubs, 300 bars and even Congo River barges which sex workers frequent. The price was set close to that of a pack of gum for 3, or that of a bottle of beer for a dozen. Promotion is limited by a government ban of advertising in mass media, so point of purchase materials, special offers and promotional items are being used. Prudence condoms are now being marketed in Cameroon and Burundi.

  20. Diversity of malaria in rice growing areas of the Afrotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, P; Guillet, P; Robert, V; Fontenille, D; Doannio, J; Coosemans, M; Mouchet, J

    1999-09-01

    It is well known that 'in many instances the rice agrosystem perfectly fits the ecological requirements of pathogens or vectors' and in fact 'malaria, schistosomiasis and Japanese encephalitis are important vector-borne diseases associated with rice production in developing countries' (IRRI, 1987). In spite of these fears, rice cultivation has been on the increase in the African region in response to demographic and economic pressures. However, although rice fields provide suitable breeding places for Anopheles mosquitoes and rice cultivation leads to an increase in the biting rates, the species which are adapted to these sites are not the same in all parts of Africa. Several examples illustrate this phenomenon: An. funestus in the rice fields of Madagascar, An. pharoensis in saline water rice fields in the delta of the Senegal river, An. arabiensis in northern Cameroon and Burundi, An. gambiae Mopti form in the Kou Valley (Burkina Faso) and An. gambiae Savanna form in the rice fields of Kafine near Bouaké (Côte d'Ivoire). The vectorial capacities of these species are not the same and malaria inoculation rates are not necessarily increased in the riceland agroecosystem. The consequences for malaria of introducing rice cultivation depend on the situation before its introduction: it could be worsened in unstable malaria areas but not in stable malaria areas. Therefore, sound epidemiological and entomological knowledge are needed before causing any environmental modifications for agricultural purposes and there should be regular monitoring to avoid any outbreak.

  1. Albinism in Africa: stigma, slaughter and awareness campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Inigo, Andres E; Ladizinski, Barry; Sethi, Aisha

    2011-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a lack of pigment in the hair, skin, and eyes. Albinism is caused by defective or absent tyrosinase, an enzyme necessary for melanogenesis. Although rare in the western world, albinism is quite common in sub-Saharan Africa, likely as a result of consanguinity. Albinism has long been associated with stigma and superstitions, such as the belief that a white man impregnated the mother or that the child is the ghost of a European colonist. Recently, a notion has emerged that albino body parts are good-luck charms or possess magical powers. These body parts may be sold for as much as $75,000 on the black market. As a result there have been over 100 albino murders in Tanzania, Burundi, and other parts of Africa in the past decade, which is now beginning to garner international attention and thus prompting novel legislation. To ameliorate the plight of individuals with albinism in Africa, a coordinated effort must be organized, involving medical professionals (dermatologists, ophthalmologists, oncologists), public health advocates and educators, social workers, human rights and antidiscrimination activists, law-enforcement agencies, and governmental support groups. The main issues that should be addressed include skin cancer prevention education, stigma and discrimination denouncement, and swift prosecution of albino hunters and their sponsors.

  2. 'Excuse me, do any of you ladies speak English?' Perspectives of refugee women living in South Australia: barriers to accessing primary health care and achieving the Quality Use of Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alice; Gilbert, Andrew; Rao, Deepa; Kerr, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Reforms to the Australian health system aim to ensure that services are accessible, clinically and culturally appropriate, timely and affordable. During the reform consultation process there were urgent calls from stakeholders to specifically consider the health needs of the thousands of refugees who settle here each year, but little is known about what is needed from the refugee perspective. Access to health services is a basic requirement of achieving the quality use of medicines, as outlined in Australia's National Medicines Policy. This study aimed to identify the barriers to accessing primary health care services and explore medicine-related issues as experienced by refugee women in South Australia. Thirty-six women participated in focus groups with accredited and community interpreters and participants were from Sudan, Burundi, Congo, Burma, Afghanistan and Bhutan who spoke English (as a second language), Chin, Matu, Dari and Nepali. The main barrier to accessing primary health care and understanding GPs and pharmacists was not being able to speak or comprehend English. Interpreter services were used inconsistently or not at all. To implement the health reforms and achieve the quality use of medicines, refugees, support organisations, GPs, pharmacists and their staff require education, training and support.

  3. Appetitive Aggression and Adverse Childhood Experiences Shape Violent Behavior in Females Formerly Associated with Combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augsburger, Mareike; Meyer-Parlapanis, Danie; Bambonye, Manassé; Elbert, Thomas; Crombach, Anselm

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of violent experiences during childhood, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and appetitive aggression on everyday violent behavior in Burundian females with varying participation in war. Moreover, group differences in trauma-related and aggression variables were expected. Appetitive aggression describes the perception of violence perpetration as fascinating and appealing and is a common phenomenon in former combatants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 158 females, either former combatants, supporters of armed forces or civilians during the civil war in Burundi. The PTSD Symptom Scale Interview was used to assess PTSD symptom severity, the Appetitive Aggression Scale to measure appetitive aggression and the Domestic and Community Violence Checklist to assess both childhood maltreatment and recent aggressive behavior. Former combatants had experienced more traumatic events, perpetrated more violence and reported higher levels of appetitive aggression than supporters and civilians. They also suffered more severely from PTSD symptoms than civilians but not than supporters. The groups did not differ regarding childhood maltreatment. Both appetitive aggression and childhood violence predicted ongoing aggressive behavior, whereas the latter outperformed PTSD symptom severity. These findings support current research showing that adverse childhood experiences and a positive attitude toward aggression serve as the basis for aggressive behavior and promote an ongoing cycle of violence in post-conflict regions. Female members of armed groups are in need of demobilization procedures including trauma-related care and interventions addressing appetitive aggression.

  4. Measuring receptive collocational competence across proficiency levels

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    Déogratias Nizonkiza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates, (i English as Foreign Language (EFL learners’ receptive collocational knowledge growth in relation to their linguistic proficiency level; (ii how much receptive collocational knowledge is acquired as proficiency develops; and (iii the extent to which receptive knowledge of collocations of EFL learners varies across word frequency bands. A proficiency measure and a collocation test were administered to English majors at the University of Burundi. Results of the study suggest that receptive collocational competence develops alongside EFL learners’ linguistic proficiency; which lends empirical support to Gyllstad (2007, 2009 and Author (2011 among others, who reported similar findings. Furthermore, EFL learners’ collocations growth seems to be quantifiable wherein both linguistic proficiency level and word frequency occupy a crucial role. While more gains in terms of collocations that EFL learners could potentially add as a result of change in proficiency are found at lower levels of proficiency; collocations of words from more frequent word bands seem to be mastered first, and more gains are found at more frequent word bands. These results confirm earlier findings on the non-linearity nature of vocabulary growth (cf. Meara 1996 and the fundamental role played by frequency in word knowledge for vocabulary in general (Nation 1983, 1990, Nation and Beglar 2007, which are extended here to collocations knowledge.

  5. Volatile Compounds and Capsaicinoid Content of Fresh Hot Peppers (Capsicum Chinense Scotch Bonnet Variety at Red Stage

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    Arthur Gahungu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the capsaicinoids content and the volatile compounds of fresh hot pepper from Burundi at red stage. The Capsaicinoids were extracted in acetone and separated using column chromatography on silica gel, then evaluated quantitatively using a reverse phase High performance liquid chromatography/Photodiode array detection (RP-HPLC/PAD. The volatile compounds were extracted by hydrodistillation and then re-extracted and concentrated by SPME fiber at 55ºC for 30 min and analyzed using Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Seventy volatile compounds were identified, of which aliphatic esters, alcohols, terpenoids and acids were the main classes. Hexyl pentanoate, hexyl isopentanoate, Pentyl 3- methylbutanoate, 10- undecenol, 3, 3- dimethyl cyclohexanol, β-chamigrene, Pentadecanoic acid, (E- 9- tetradecenoic acid and Hexadecanoic acid were found to be the major volatile constituents. Capsaicin (CAPS 47.632 mg/g and dihydrocapsaicin (DHCAPS 23.096 mg/g were the major capsaicinoids and their contents converted in Scoville heat value (142931 show that the Scotch Bonnet variety is a high hot chili pepper according to the Scoville scale.

  6. The Congo Clawless Otter: State of Knowledge and Needs for Further Research

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    Helene Jacques

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the 4 African otter species, the Congo clawless otter (Aonyx congicus is the least known because of the remoteness of its Central African equatorial rainforest range. Its distribution, status, and biology in the field are now being investigated and preliminary results are introduced. Two missions in Gabon, followed by one in Congo, allowed us to gather local information, to find tracks and to identify otters in their habitat. Further, we were able to start developing a network to gather more information about the 2 otter species present in this region. The current distribution of the Congo clawless otter (Gabon, Congo, Republic Democratic of Congo, south of Cameroon and RCA, north of Angola, and probably west of Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi was mapped from this information network as well as from the locality data of museum specimens. Data about its biology and current status were gathered from local sources and from field biologists working in Gabon and Congo. Threats seem mainly to be deforestation, hunting for bush meat and use for witchcraft materials. Four visits to the collections of natural history museums of London, New York, Paris, and Tervueren (Belgium, provided useful criteria to differentiate Congo clawless otter from Cape clawless otter (Aonyx. capensis. A possible sympatric overlap zone may occur between these species and might imply hybridization. However, this needs to be studied further.

  7. The state, refugees and migration in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akokpari, J K

    1998-01-01

    Migration and refugee movements could significantly decline in sub-Saharan African countries. However, countries must redistribute meager resources equitably and engage in environmental protection. Refugee and migrant populations have increased in sub-Saharan Africa during 1969-95, from 700,000 to 6.8 million. This study examined the causes of migration and the implications for host countries. Doornbos (1990) identifies the root problem as the partisan nature of African politics and the incapacity to manage ecological degradation. The African state is wholly or partially responsible for the creation of conflicts. Examples abound in Zaire, South Africa, Sudan, Rwanda, Burundi, Somalia, Ethiopia, Liberia, Congo, and Chad. State partisanship is also evident in Angola, Mozambique, Uganda, and Sierra Leone. An estimated 10 million Africans, in 1985, left their homes due to wars, government repression, or the inability of land to support them. In 1994, USAID estimated that 11.6 million Africans in 10 countries were threatened by famine from drought. Environmental degradation has generated conflicts. Africa's marginalized economy results in recession, unemployment, inflation, and distributional conflicts. Democratization has brought conflicts between the state, civil society, and exiles. Refugees face homelessness, poverty, emotional distress, inadequate food, and disease. Host countries face security threats, pressure on limited resources, rebellions from refugees and their involvement with foreign mercenaries, local conflicts between native and refugee populations, and environmental degradation from refugees.

  8. The Tree Project enlists youth to plant trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobson, J.

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available The climate of the African region around the "Great Lakes" induces a strong process of soil weathering which eventually leads to a strong aluminium saturation of the absorption complex, as expressed by the "m" index of Kamprath. The response to aluminium toxicity of the common bean cv. Diacol Calima, a widely grown variety in Burundi, has been studied in pot trials in two ways : (1 Using superficial soil samples of "humiferous high elevation kaolisols" whose "m" index varied between 4 and 92 ; (2 On culture condition consisting of an inert substrate complemented with a nutritional solution to which a serie of soluble aluminium concentrations were added. Under soil condition, biomass produced after a period of 25 days of growth, decreased as from "m" = 33. The number of Rhizobium nodules decreased drastically with aluminium toxicity becoming negligible at "m" - 33. On culture media, rising concentration of aluminium affected growth adversely as well, although root growth inhibition was less pronounced than under soil condition.

  9. Sensibilité du haricot Phaseolus vulgaris à la concentration en aluminium des sols de la région des grands lacs

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    Wouters, JFR.

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensibility to soil aluminium concentration of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris in the African "Great Lakes" region. The climate of the African region around the "Great Lakes" induces a strong process of soil weathering which eventually leads to a strong aluminium saturation of the absorption complex, as expressed by the "m" index of Kamprath. The response to aluminium toxicity of the common bean cv. Diacol Calima, a widely grown variety in Burundi, has been studied in pot trials in two ways : (1 Using superficial soil samples of "humiferous high elevation kaolisols" whose "m" index varied between 4 and 92 ; (2 On culture condition consisting of an inert substrate complemented with a nutritional solution to which a serie of soluble aluminium concentrations were added. Under soil condition, biomass produced after a period of 25 days of growth, decreased as from "m" = 33. The number of Rhizobium nodules decreased drastically with aluminium toxicity becoming negligible at "m" - 33. On culture media, rising concentration of aluminium affected growth adversely as well, although root growth inhibition was less pronounced than under soil condition.

  10. Chikungunya - a serious threat for public health

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    Hrnjaković-Cvjetković Ivana B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chikungunya is a contagious disease caused by Chikungunya virus, an arbovirus from the Togaviridae family. This infection is mostly spread by mosquitoes from the genus Aedes, especially Aedes albopictus, which have spread from Asia to America and Europe including some countries surrounding Serbia. Epidemiologic Features. The outbreak of epidemics has been reported in Philippines, Sumatra, Java, Indonesia, West Africa region (from Senegal to Cameroon, Congo, Nigeria, Angola, Uganda, Guinea, Malawi, Central African Republic, Burundi, South Africa and India. At the beginning of the 21st century, large outbreaks were recorded on the island of Réunion. During 2006, 1.400.000 cases of chikungunya infection were recorded in India. Local transmission of infection in continental Europe was reported from Northeast Italy (254 suspected and 78 laboratory confirmed cases in Emilia-Romagna region and France (two cases in 2010. From December 2013 to June 2014, 5.294 confirmed cases and more than 180.000 suspected cases of chikungunya were reported in the Caribbean. Clinical Findings. The disease presents suddenly with fever, rush and arthralgia. In general, chikungunya is a mild self - limited disease. Less often, it may be presented with signs of meningoencephalitis or fulminant hepatitis, sometimes with fatal outcome. Conclusion. Fast developing international traffic and booming tourism as well as the vector spreading from its homeland make chikungunya a real threat to our country. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31084 i br. TR43007

  11. African 2, a Clonal Complex of Mycobacterium bovis Epidemiologically Important in East Africa▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Stefan; Garcia-Pelayo, M. Carmen; Müller, Borna; Hailu, Elena; Asiimwe, Benon; Kremer, Kristin; Dale, James; Boniotti, M. Beatrice; Rodriguez, Sabrina; Hilty, Markus; Rigouts, Leen; Firdessa, Rebuma; Machado, Adelina; Mucavele, Custodia; Ngandolo, Bongo Nare Richard; Bruchfeld, Judith; Boschiroli, Laura; Müller, Annélle; Sahraoui, Naima; Pacciarini, Maria; Cadmus, Simeon; Joloba, Moses; van Soolingen, Dick; Michel, Anita L.; Djønne, Berit; Aranaz, Alicia; Zinsstag, Jakob; van Helden, Paul; Portaels, Françoise; Kazwala, Rudovick; Källenius, Gunilla; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Aseffa, Abraham; Gordon, Stephen V.; Smith, Noel H.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis isolated at high frequency from cattle in Uganda, Burundi, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. We have named this related group of M. bovis strains the African 2 (Af2) clonal complex of M. bovis. Af2 strains are defined by a specific chromosomal deletion (RDAf2) and can be identified by the absence of spacers 3 to 7 in their spoligotype patterns. Deletion analysis of M. bovis isolates from Algeria, Mali, Chad, Nigeria, Cameroon, South Africa, and Mozambique did not identify any strains of the Af2 clonal complex, suggesting that this clonal complex of M. bovis is localized in East Africa. The specific spoligotype pattern of the Af2 clonal complex was rarely identified among isolates from outside Africa, and the few isolates that were found and tested were intact at the RDAf2 locus. We conclude that the Af2 clonal complex is localized to cattle in East Africa. We found that strains of the Af2 clonal complex of M. bovis have, in general, four or more copies of the insertion sequence IS6110, in contrast to the majority of M. bovis strains isolated from cattle, which are thought to carry only one or a few copies. PMID:21097608

  12. Condoms and Coca-Cola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, S

    1992-01-01

    Social marketing entails promoting the appropriate and quality product to be sold in the right places at the right price. Even though mass media advertisement of condoms is forbid in Zaire, condoms have been effectively promoted and sold in the country using alternate approaches. 8 million units of the condom, Prudence, were sold in 1990, and Prudence has become the generic name for condoms in the Zaire. Noting that Coca-Cola, beer, and cigarettes may be purchased virtually ubiquitously, commercial outlets and local traders were enlisted to sell condoms at reduced prices on the market. Reduced price sales are possible since donor and government agencies provide the condoms to wholesalers and merchants free of charge. The successful social marketing of condoms expands condom availability to a greater segment of a country's population while recovering some public sector costs and shifting health care away from the public sector. Condoms are especially promoted to high risk groups such as commercial sex workers and their clients in Zaire. Similar programs have been inspired in 10 African countries including Cameroon and Burundi, as well as in Brazil, Haiti, and India. Prevention programs in Latin America and Asia will benefit from these program experiences in Africa. In closing, the article notes the need for an adequate and predictable commodity supply in attaining effective social marketing. Marked program success may, however, lead to sustainability problems.

  13. The duck industry in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demey, F.

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on local goats in Burundi, specially the growth rate of the kid during the first weeks after birth, has been undertaken. Milk yield has been monitored to establish milking and suckling abilities of local goats. The results of daily controls have given a milk yield average of 511 g/day up to day 56 post partum. Lactation yield has been significantly affected by the doe's weight. During the first month, heavy goats have produced the equivalent of a glass of milk per day (about 200 ml for human consumption in addition to the quantity taken up by the kids. The daily weight gain of 54.05 g recorded from birth to 28 days of age in youngs is low, probably due to the limited quantity of milk available to them. Nevertheless local kids show an excellent conversion ratio of suckled milk, with a value of 3.93 kg of milk to produce 1 kg liveweight during the first 28 days, representing a very high food conversion.

  14. The Need to Help. The Domestic Arts of International Humanitarism, de Liisa H. Malkki

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    Ignacio Fradejas-García

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available La literatura crítica con el humanitarismo ha emergido en el ámbito político internacional para quedarse. Renombrados científicos sociales como Didier Fassin (2012 o Thomas G. Weiss (2016, entre otros, han trabajado sobre los efectos de las intervenciones humanitarias desde diferentes ángulos. Cambiando el clásico enfoque en los beneficiarios, las políticas y los programas para pasar a indagar sobre las organizaciones y los trabajadores humanitarios, Liisa Malkki ha hecho una gran contribución a esta literatura profundizando en el porqué y el cómo de las acciones humanitarias. La autora es conocida por sus reflexiones etnográficas sobre las situaciones de exilio y refugio causadas por las sucesivas guerras y genocidios que asolaron en el último cuarto del siglo XX la zona de los grandes lagos africanos. Durante el genocidio ruandés de 1994, Malkki estaba finalizando un libro sobre un conflicto previo y olvidado en Burundi que provocó la llegada de refugiados hutus a Tanzania. La etnografía resultante, Purity and Exile (1995, explora cómo la violencia política y la cotidianeidad del exilio transforman la identidad y la conciencia histórica de los refugiados.

  15. Covering Post-Conflict Elections: Challenges for the Media in Central Africa Wahlberichterstattung in Post-Konflikt-Phasen: Herausforderungen für die Medien in Zentralafrika

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    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past ten years, elections were held in six countries of Central Africa experiencing “post-conflict” situations. The polls that took place in Burundi (2005, the Central African Republic (2005, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (2006, Congo-Brazzaville (2002, 2007, Chad (1996, 2001, 2006 and Rwanda (2003 were crucial for peace-building. In some cases, they were widely supported and supervised by the international community, being considered the last step of a peace process and the first step toward establishing a truly representative “post-conflict” regime. The media were expected to play a large part in supporting these elections, both to inform the citizens, so they could make an educated choice, and to supervise the way the electoral administration was organizing the polls. This paper attempts to show the many challenges faced by the media while covering these post-conflict electoral processes. In a context of great political tension, in which candidates are often former belligerents who have just put down their guns to go to the polls, the media operate in an unsafe and economically damaged environment, suffering from a lack of infrastructure, inadequate equipment and untrained staff. Given those constraints, one might wonder if the media should be considered actual democratic tools in Central Africa or just gimmicks in a “peace-building kit” (including “free and fair” elections, multipartism and freedom of the press with no real impact on the democratic commitment of the elite or the political participation of the population.In den letzten zehn Jahren wurden in sechs zentralafrikanischen Ländern, die sich in einer Post-Konflikt-Phase befanden, Wahlen abgehalten. Die Wahlgänge in Burundi (2005, der Zentralafrikanischen Republik (2005, der Demokratischen Republik Kongo (2006, Kongo-Brazzaville (2002, 2007, dem Tschad (1996, 2001, 2006 und Ruanda (2003 waren entscheidend für die Friedenskonsolidierung. Einige dieser

  16. African 1, an epidemiologically important clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis dominant in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, and Chad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Borna; Hilty, Markus; Berg, Stefan; Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Dale, James; Boschiroli, M Laura; Cadmus, Simeon; Ngandolo, Bongo Naré Richard; Godreuil, Sylvain; Diguimbaye-Djaibé, Colette; Kazwala, Rudovick; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Betty M; Sahraoui, Naima; Guetarni, Djamel; Aseffa, Abraham; Mekonnen, Meseret H; Razanamparany, Voahangy Rasolofo; Ramarokoto, Herimanana; Djønne, Berit; Oloya, James; Machado, Adelina; Mucavele, Custodia; Skjerve, Eystein; Portaels, Francoise; Rigouts, Leen; Michel, Anita; Müller, Annélle; Källenius, Gunilla; van Helden, Paul D; Hewinson, R Glyn; Zinsstag, Jakob; Gordon, Stephen V; Smith, Noel H

    2009-03-01

    We have identified a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis present at high frequency in cattle in population samples from several sub-Saharan west-central African countries. This closely related group of bacteria is defined by a specific chromosomal deletion (RDAf1) and can be identified by the absence of spacer 30 in the standard spoligotype typing scheme. We have named this group of strains the African 1 (Af1) clonal complex and have defined the spoligotype signature of this clonal complex as being the same as the M. bovis BCG vaccine strain but with the deletion of spacer 30. Strains of the Af1 clonal complex were found at high frequency in population samples of M. bovis from cattle in Mali, Cameroon, Nigeria, and Chad, and using a combination of variable-number tandem repeat typing and spoligotyping, we show that the population of M. bovis in each of these countries is distinct, suggesting that the recent mixing of strains between countries is not common in this area of Africa. Strains with the Af1-specific deletion (RDAf1) were not identified in M. bovis isolates from Algeria, Burundi, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. Furthermore, the spoligotype signature of the Af1 clonal complex has not been identified in population samples of bovine tuberculosis from Europe, Iran, and South America. These observations suggest that the Af1 clonal complex is geographically localized, albeit to several African countries, and we suggest that the dominance of the clonal complex in this region is the result of an original introduction into cows naïve to bovine tuberculosis.

  17. Evidence of multiple introductions of HIV-1 subtype C in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Joana Morais; Morgado, Mariza G; Bello, Gonzalo

    2012-10-01

    HIV-1 subtype C is the most prevalent group M clade in southern Africa and some eastern African countries. Subtype C is also the most frequent subtype in Angola (southwestern Africa), with an estimated prevalence of 10-20%. In order to better understand the origin of the HIV-1 subtype C strains circulating in Angola, 31 subtype C pol sequences of Angolan origin were compared with 1950 subtype C pol sequences sampled in other African countries. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the Angolan subtype C sequences were distributed in 16 different lineages that were widely dispersed among other African strains. Ten subtype C Angolan lineages were composed by only one sequence, while the remaining six clades contain between two and seven sequences. Bayesian phylogeographic analysis indicates that most Angolan clades probably originated in different southern African countries with the exception of one lineage that most likely originated in Burundi. Evolutionary analysis suggests that those Angolan subtype C clades composed by ≥ 2 sequences were introduced into the country between the late 1970s and the mid 2000s. The median estimated time frame for the origin of those Angolan lineages coincides with periods of positive migration influx in Angola that were preceded by phases of negative migratory outflow. These results demonstrate that the Angolan subtype C epidemic resulted from multiple introductions of subtype C viruses mainly imported from southern African countries over the last 30years, some of which have been locally disseminated establishing several autochthonous transmission networks. This study also suggests that population mobility between Angola and southern African countries during civil war (1974-2002) may have played a key role in the emergence of the Angolan subtype C epidemic.

  18. A review of 40 years of enteric antimicrobial resistance research in Eastern Africa: what can be done better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omulo, Sylvia; Thumbi, Samuel M; Njenga, M Kariuki; Call, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and persistence of antimicrobial resistance is driven by varied factors including the indiscriminate use of antibiotics and variable drug efficacy and presents a major threat to the control of infectious diseases. Despite the high burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa and the potential health and economic consequences, the level of research on antimicrobial resistance in the region remains unknown. Little data exists to quantify the contribution of different factors to the current levels of antimicrobial resistance. To identify the factors that contribute most to the emergence, amplification, persistence and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance in humans and animals, we used the PRISMA 2009 guidelines to conduct a systematic review of studies on antibiotic-resistant enteric bacteria in Eastern Africa. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar databases and identified 2,155 probable articles, of which 89 studies on humans and 28 on animals remained after full-text review. These were articles from Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Ethiopia, Rwanda and Burundi, published between 1974 and 2013, that reported resistance in Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli and Vibrio sp. The majority (98%) of human studies were based on hospital- (rather than community-wide) sampling and although they report high levels of antimicrobial resistance in the region, study design and methodological differences preclude conclusions about the magnitude and trends of antimicrobial resistance. To remedy this, we discuss and propose minimum reporting guidelines for the level of detail that should be explicitly provided for antimicrobial resistance study designs, testing of samples and reporting of results that would permit comparative inferences and enable meta-analyses. Further, we advocate for increased focus on community- rather than hospital-based sampling to provide a better indication of population-wide trends in antimicrobial resistance. This approach, together with the

  19. African 1, an Epidemiologically Important Clonal Complex of Mycobacterium bovis Dominant in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, and Chad▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Borna; Hilty, Markus; Berg, Stefan; Garcia-Pelayo, M. Carmen; Dale, James; Boschiroli, M. Laura; Cadmus, Simeon; Ngandolo, Bongo Naré Richard; Godreuil, Sylvain; Diguimbaye-Djaibé, Colette; Kazwala, Rudovick; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Betty M.; Sahraoui, Naima; Guetarni, Djamel; Aseffa, Abraham; Mekonnen, Meseret H.; Razanamparany, Voahangy Rasolofo; Ramarokoto, Herimanana; Djønne, Berit; Oloya, James; Machado, Adelina; Mucavele, Custodia; Skjerve, Eystein; Portaels, Francoise; Rigouts, Leen; Michel, Anita; Müller, Annélle; Källenius, Gunilla; van Helden, Paul D.; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Zinsstag, Jakob; Gordon, Stephen V.; Smith, Noel H.

    2009-01-01

    We have identified a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis present at high frequency in cattle in population samples from several sub-Saharan west-central African countries. This closely related group of bacteria is defined by a specific chromosomal deletion (RDAf1) and can be identified by the absence of spacer 30 in the standard spoligotype typing scheme. We have named this group of strains the African 1 (Af1) clonal complex and have defined the spoligotype signature of this clonal complex as being the same as the M. bovis BCG vaccine strain but with the deletion of spacer 30. Strains of the Af1 clonal complex were found at high frequency in population samples of M. bovis from cattle in Mali, Cameroon, Nigeria, and Chad, and using a combination of variable-number tandem repeat typing and spoligotyping, we show that the population of M. bovis in each of these countries is distinct, suggesting that the recent mixing of strains between countries is not common in this area of Africa. Strains with the Af1-specific deletion (RDAf1) were not identified in M. bovis isolates from Algeria, Burundi, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. Furthermore, the spoligotype signature of the Af1 clonal complex has not been identified in population samples of bovine tuberculosis from Europe, Iran, and South America. These observations suggest that the Af1 clonal complex is geographically localized, albeit to several African countries, and we suggest that the dominance of the clonal complex in this region is the result of an original introduction into cows naïve to bovine tuberculosis. PMID:19136597

  20. The importance and significance of peace studies with special reference to South Africa’s political-security role in Africa

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    T. Neethling

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The origins of peace studies as an academic field of inquiry could be traced to the late 1940s and the field has been developing considerably since then. Currently, scholars at various tertiary institutions over the world are involved in using their academic skills to educate students about the causes of wars and violent conflict while pointing out various alternatives to these phenomena. Peace studies in the South African and broader African context are certainly of great significance and importance. After all, the gripping and devastating violence that manifested in African countries such as Liberia, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Burundi, Rwanda, the DRC, Somalia, Angola, the Comoros and many other conflict-stricken areas warrant scholarly attention with a view to better understanding the causes, dynamics and effects of such conflict. By means of this understanding the conflict could be addressed through mechanisms of conflict resolution and peace building could be promoted. Furthermore, the South African Government’s progressive military involvement in international peace missions in recent years is far more than an issue of mere military concern. It is a matter of great political interest and significance. Being supportive of the need for peace studies in the curricula of South African universities (and African universities in general, this article argues that South African students should be exposed to a rich and comprehensive literature on the search for international peace and security; of how to understand and deal with the causes of large-scale conflict and violence; and how these could be curtailed and resolved − literature which informs scholarly discussions and research in many centres and places of education, training and peace building.

  1. Predictors of posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression in active soldiers and former combatants

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    Corina Nandi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: During the period between 1993 and 2005, the people of Burundi were trapped within a violent civil war. In post-conflict regions, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD were found to be widespread. At the same time, combatants often reported having perceived committing violence as exciting and appealing, an experience referred to as appetitive aggression. Both of these phenomena hamper the building of a functional and peaceful society. Objective: This study aims to investigate the factors that are associated with the level of PTSD and appetitive aggression in former and still active combatants. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 948 male Burundians: 556 active soldiers and 392 ex-combatants. PTSD symptom severity was assessed using the PTSD Symptom Scale Interview, while appetitive aggression was assessed using the Appetitive Aggression Scale. Results: Linear regression analyses revealed that the number of traumatic events, childhood maltreatment, and their interaction predicted PTSD symptom severity, whereas self-committed violence did not. The number of traumatic events and self-committed violence were associated with appetitive aggression. Childhood maltreatment alone was not associated with appetitive aggression; however, its interaction with self-committed violence did predict appetitive aggression. When controlling for predictors, ex-combatants reported a higher degree of PTSD symptomatology, whereas active soldiers reported a higher degree of appetitive aggression. Conclusion: We conclude that childhood maltreatment is an additional, significant risk factor that exacerbates the psychological consequences of violent conflicts. Self-committed violence may not necessarily engender trauma-related disorders, but is highly related to appetitive aggression.

  2. Some like it hot: the influence and implications of climate change on coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei and coffee production in East Africa.

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    Juliana Jaramillo

    Full Text Available The negative effects of climate change are already evident for many of the 25 million coffee farmers across the tropics and the 90 billion dollar (US coffee industry. The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei, the most important pest of coffee worldwide, has already benefited from the temperature rise in East Africa: increased damage to coffee crops and expansion in its distribution range have been reported. In order to anticipate threats and prioritize management actions for H. hampei we present here, maps on future distributions of H. hampei in coffee producing areas of East Africa. Using the CLIMEX model we relate present-day insect distributions to current climate and then project the fitted climatic envelopes under future scenarios A2A and B2B (for HADCM3 model. In both scenarios, the situation with H. hampei is forecasted to worsen in the current Coffea arabica producing areas of Ethiopia, the Ugandan part of the Lake Victoria and Mt. Elgon regions, Mt. Kenya and the Kenyan side of Mt. Elgon, and most of Rwanda and Burundi. The calculated hypothetical number of generations per year of H. hampei is predicted to increase in all C. arabica-producing areas from five to ten. These outcomes will have serious implications for C. arabica production and livelihoods in East Africa. We suggest that the best way to adapt to a rise of temperatures in coffee plantations could be via the introduction of shade trees in sun grown plantations. The aims of this study are to fill knowledge gaps existing in the coffee industry, and to draft an outline for the development of an adaptation strategy package for climate change on coffee production. An abstract in Spanish is provided as Abstract S1.

  3. Cesarean section rates and indications in sub-Saharan Africa: a multi-country study from Medecins sans Frontieres.

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    Kathryn Chu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The World Health Organization considers Cesarean section rates of 5-15% to be the optimal range for targeted provision of this life saving intervention. However, access to safe Cesarean section in resource-limited settings is much lower, estimated at 1-2% reported in sub-Saharan Africa. This study reports Cesarean sections rates and indications in Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, and Sierra Leone, and describe the main parameters associated with maternal and early neonatal mortality. METHODS: Women undergoing Cesarean section from August 1 2010 to January 31 2011 were included in this prospective study. Logistic regression was used to model determinants of maternal and early neonatal mortality. RESULTS: 1276 women underwent a Cesarean section, giving a frequency of 6.2% (range 4.1-16.8%. The most common indications were obstructed labor (399, 31%, poor presentation (233, 18%, previous Cesarean section (184, 14%, and fetal distress (128, 10%, uterine rupture (117, 9% and antepartum hemorrhage (101, 8%. Parity >6 (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 8.6, P = 0.015, uterine rupture (aOR = 20.5; P = .010, antepartum hemorrhage (aOR = 13.1; P = .045, and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (aOR = 42.9; P = .017 were associated with maternal death. Uterine rupture (aOR = 6.6, P<0.001, anterpartum hemorrhage (aOR = 3.6, P<0.001, and cord prolapse (aOR = 2.7, P = 0.017 were associated with early neonatal death. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that target Cesarean section rates can be achieved in sub-Saharan Africa. Identifying the common indications for Cesarean section and associations with mortality can target improvements in antenatal services and emergency obstetric care.

  4. Tracing the origin and northward dissemination dynamics of HIV-1 subtype C in Brazil.

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    Edson Delatorre

    Full Text Available Previous studies indicate that the HIV-1 subtype C epidemic in southern Brazil was initiated by the introduction of a single founder strain probably originating from east Africa. However, the exact country of origin of such a founder strain as well as the origin of the subtype C viruses detected outside the Brazilian southern region remains unknown. HIV-1 subtype C pol sequences isolated in the southern, southeastern and central-western Brazilian regions (n = 209 were compared with a large number (n ~ 2,000 of subtype C pol sequences of African origin. Maximum-likelihood analyses revealed that most HIV-1 subtype C Brazilian sequences branched in a single monophyletic clade (CBR-I, nested within a larger monophyletic lineage characteristic of east Africa. Bayesian analyses indicate that the CBR-I clade most probably originated in Burundi and was introduced into the Paraná state (southern region around the middle 1970s, after which it rapidly disseminated to neighboring regions. The states of Paraná and Santa Catarina have been the most important hubs of subtype C dissemination, and routine travel and spatial accessibility seems to have been the major driving forces of this process. Five additional introductions of HIV-1 subtype C strains probably originated in eastern (n = 2, southern (n = 2 and central (n = 1 African countries were detected in the Rio de Janeiro state (southeastern region. These results indicate a continuous influx of HIV-1 subtype C strains of African origin into Brazil and also unveil the existence of unrecognized transmission networks linking this country to east Africa.

  5. Some like it hot: the influence and implications of climate change on coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) and coffee production in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Juliana; Muchugu, Eric; Vega, Fernando E; Davis, Aaron; Borgemeister, Christian; Chabi-Olaye, Adenirin

    2011-01-01

    The negative effects of climate change are already evident for many of the 25 million coffee farmers across the tropics and the 90 billion dollar (US) coffee industry. The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei), the most important pest of coffee worldwide, has already benefited from the temperature rise in East Africa: increased damage to coffee crops and expansion in its distribution range have been reported. In order to anticipate threats and prioritize management actions for H. hampei we present here, maps on future distributions of H. hampei in coffee producing areas of East Africa. Using the CLIMEX model we relate present-day insect distributions to current climate and then project the fitted climatic envelopes under future scenarios A2A and B2B (for HADCM3 model). In both scenarios, the situation with H. hampei is forecasted to worsen in the current Coffea arabica producing areas of Ethiopia, the Ugandan part of the Lake Victoria and Mt. Elgon regions, Mt. Kenya and the Kenyan side of Mt. Elgon, and most of Rwanda and Burundi. The calculated hypothetical number of generations per year of H. hampei is predicted to increase in all C. arabica-producing areas from five to ten. These outcomes will have serious implications for C. arabica production and livelihoods in East Africa. We suggest that the best way to adapt to a rise of temperatures in coffee plantations could be via the introduction of shade trees in sun grown plantations. The aims of this study are to fill knowledge gaps existing in the coffee industry, and to draft an outline for the development of an adaptation strategy package for climate change on coffee production. An abstract in Spanish is provided as Abstract S1.

  6. [An organized sector mobilized against AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra-Kerpelman, K

    1995-01-01

    A seminar of the International Labor Organization (ILO) was held to shed light on the role of AIDS in decimating qualified professionals in Anglophone Africa. The estimates of the World Health Organization indicate that the number of people infected with HIV in the whole world was 13-15 million persons at the end of 1994, of which 8 million lived in sub-Saharan Africa. In Uganda it is calculated that 1.5 million people are carriers of HIV, and by 1998 this figure could increase to 1.9 million. In both Zambia and Zimbabwe, in the 20-39 year age group, AIDS cases amount to 70% and 74%, respectively. Studies carried out in Rwanda, Zaire, Swaziland, and Zimbabwe revealed that AIDS is most frequent among members of the higher socioeconomic classes. The inability to find replacements for jobs requiring higher qualifications will result in dire consequences for these economies. During the 6-year period between 1988-89 and 1993-94 the Uganda Commercial Bank registered 229 deaths due to AIDS among its 1600 employees (14%). AIDS also requires the expenditure of scarce health resources on treatment: in 1992, hospital occupancy for diseases associated with AIDS reached 40-60% in Kinshasa, Zaire; 50% in Lusaka, Zambia; 60% in Kigali, Rwanda; and 70% in Bujumbura, Burundi. Various programs have been launched to fight HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Uganda, to sensitize and educate people about the epidemic. The protection of human rights, the avoidance of discrimination, and the adoption of safe sex techniques are promoted by these programs. Companies have programs to combat AIDS. Ubombo Ranches Ltd. in Swaziland started an information program in 1991 and distributed free condoms. BAT Uganda Ltd. also started an information and training-of-trainers program in 1989, which by 1994 had benefitted about 90% of the employees. This has resulted in the reduction of AIDS cases and associated medical costs.

  7. Social network analysis of multi-stakeholder platforms in agricultural research for development: Opportunities and constraints for innovation and scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Frans; Sartas, Murat; van Schagen, Boudy; van Asten, Piet

    2017-01-01

    Multi-stakeholder platforms (MSPs) are seen as a promising vehicle to achieve agricultural development impacts. By increasing collaboration, exchange of knowledge and influence mediation among farmers, researchers and other stakeholders, MSPs supposedly enhance their ‘capacity to innovate’ and contribute to the ‘scaling of innovations’. The objective of this paper is to explore the capacity to innovate and scaling potential of three MSPs in Burundi, Rwanda and the South Kivu province located in the eastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In order to do this, we apply Social Network Analysis and Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM) to investigate the structural properties of the collaborative, knowledge exchange and influence networks of these MSPs and compared them against value propositions derived from the innovation network literature. Results demonstrate a number of mismatches between collaboration, knowledge exchange and influence networks for effective innovation and scaling processes in all three countries: NGOs and private sector are respectively over- and under-represented in the MSP networks. Linkages between local and higher levels are weak, and influential organisations (e.g., high-level government actors) are often not part of the MSP or are not actively linked to by other organisations. Organisations with a central position in the knowledge network are more sought out for collaboration. The scaling of innovations is primarily between the same type of organisations across different administrative levels, but not between different types of organisations. The results illustrate the potential of Social Network Analysis and ERGMs to identify the strengths and limitations of MSPs in terms of achieving development impacts. PMID:28166226

  8. Molecular and phylogeographic analysis of human immuno-deficiency virus type 1 strains infecting treatment-naive patients from Kigali, Rwanda.

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    John Rusine

    Full Text Available This study aimed at describing the genetic subtype distribution of HIV-1 strains circulating in Kigali and their epidemiological link with the HIV-1 strains from the five countries surrounding Rwanda. One hundred and thirty eight pol (RT and PR sequences from 116 chronically- and 22 recently-infected antiretroviral therapy (ART-naïve patients from Kigali were generated and subjected to HIV drug resistance (HIV-DR, phylogenetic and recombinant analyses in connection with 366 reference pol sequences from Rwanda, Burundi, Kenya, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania and Uganda (Los Alamos database. Among the Rwandan samples, subtype A1 predominated (71.7%, followed by A1/C recombinants (18.1%, subtype C (5.8%, subtype D (2.9%, one A1/D recombinant (0.7% and one unknown subtype (0.7%. Thirteen unique and three multiple A1/C recombinant forms were identified. No evidence for direct transmission events was found within the Rwandan strains. Molecular characteristics of HIV-1 were similar between chronically and recently-infected individuals and were not significantly associated with demographic or social factors. Our report suggests that the HIV-1 epidemic in Kigali is characterized by the emergence of A1/C recombinants and is not phylogenetically connected with the HIV-1 epidemic in the five neighboring countries. The relatively low level of transmitted HIV-DR mutations (2.9% reported here indicates the good performance of the ART programme in Rwanda. However, the importance of promoting couples' counseling, testing and disclosure during HIV prevention strategies is highlighted.

  9. It is possible to increase by over thirty per cent the Nile Water availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemperiere, F.

    2011-01-15

    The population of the Nile catchment is presently 250 Million and will probably reach 400 Million in 2040. The catchment includes two parts of about same population but with a very different climate. - The upstream rainy part (most of this area is in Ethiopia, Uganda and South Sudan). - The downstream dry part i.e North Sudan and Egypt. The available water from the Nile runoff is evaluated as average as 72 Billion m{sup 3} /year; it is quite totally coming from the upstream part and used in the downstream part. For their development the upstream populations (including also part of Tanzania, Kenya, Congo, Rwanda and Burundi) are now requiring a significant share of the run off generated from local rains when Egypt and North Sudan claim historic rights on the Nile Waters. The best way to avoid conflicts is to increase the water availability for keeping in Egypt and North Sudan at least the water volume presently used and to allow to upstream countries the water resources necessary for their development, possibly in the range of 100 m{sup 3} / year / capita in 2030 or 2040. The average total runoff of the Nile is in fact close to 140 Billion m{sup 3} / year but over 40 Billion evaporate in the South Sudan Swamps and 15 Billion in the reservoirs of Aswan and Northern Sudan. A solution for reducing by half these two main losses is presented in this paper: it is based upon a concrete knowledge of the local very specific data and upon a successful experience of adapted technical solutions

  10. Climate and CO2 modulate the C3-C4 balance and δ13C signal in simulated vegetation

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    D. Jolly

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fossil pollen data and δ13C measurements from cores collected in peatbogs or lakes have shown major changes in the terrestrial vegetation during Late Quaternary. Although the effect of climate on the C3-C4 balance has been discussed for 50 years, the impact of a low atmospheric CO2 during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM was emphasized recently and conflicting evidence exists. In this paper, we use a physiologically-based biome model (BIOME4 in an iterative mode to simulate vegetation response to changing mean climate conditions and atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2. In particular, we investigate the transition from LGM to present conditions in two sites which changed from either a C4- or a C3-dominated vegetation to the opposite pole, respectively at Kuruyange (Burundi and Lingtaï (Central Loess Plateau, China. The response of the C3-C4 balance and δ13C signal in the simulated vegetation are investigated. The results show that the vegetation is primarily sensitive to temperature and pCO2. Rainfall impacted the simulated variables below a threshold which decreased with higher pCO2. Climate and pCO2 interacted differently between the two sites showing indirect effects on the δ13C signal. Moreover, the plant functional types (PFTs differed in their composition and in their response between the two sites, emphasizing that the competition between C3 and C4 plants cannot be hardly considered as a simple binary scheme. Our results confirm the advantages of using process-based models to understand past vegetation changes and the need to take account of multiple drivers when the C3-C4 balance is reconstructed from a palaeo-δ13C signal.

  11. Exploring drought vulnerability in Africa: an indicator based analysis to be used in early warning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, G.; Barbosa, P.; Garrote, L.; Iglesias, A.; Vogt, J.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a composite drought vulnerability indicator (DVI) that reflects different aspects of drought vulnerability evaluated at Pan-African level for four components: the renewable natural capital, the economic capacity, the human and civic resources, and the infrastructure and technology. The selection of variables and weights reflects the assumption that a society with institutional capacity and coordination, as well as with mechanisms for public participation, is less vulnerable to drought; furthermore, we consider that agriculture is only one of the many sectors affected by drought. The quality and accuracy of a composite indicator depends on the theoretical framework, on the data collection and quality, and on how the different components are aggregated. This kind of approach can lead to some degree of scepticism; to overcome this problem a sensitivity analysis was done in order to measure the degree of uncertainty associated with the construction of the composite indicator. Although the proposed drought vulnerability indicator relies on a number of theoretical assumptions and some degree of subjectivity, the sensitivity analysis showed that it is a robust indicator and hence able of representing the complex processes that lead to drought vulnerability. According to the DVI computed at country level, the African countries classified with higher relative vulnerability are Somalia, Burundi, Niger, Ethiopia, Mali and Chad. The analysis of the renewable natural capital component at sub-basin level shows that the basins with high to moderate drought vulnerability can be subdivided into the following geographical regions: the Mediterranean coast of Africa; the Sahel region and the Horn of Africa; the Serengeti and the Eastern Miombo woodlands in eastern Africa; the western part of the Zambezi Basin, the southeastern border of the Congo Basin, and the belt of Fynbos in the Western Cape province of South Africa. The results of the DVI at the country level were

  12. Exploring drought vulnerability in Africa: an indicator based analysis to inform early warning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, G.; Barbosa, P.; Garrote, L.; Iglesias, A.; Vogt, J.

    2013-10-01

    Drought vulnerability is a complex concept that includes both biophysical and socio-economic drivers of drought impact that determine capacity to cope with drought. In order to develop an efficient drought early warning system and to be prepared to mitigate upcoming drought events it is important to understand the drought vulnerability of the affected regions. We propose a composite Drought Vulnerability Indicator (DVI) that reflects different aspects of drought vulnerability evaluated at Pan-African level in four components: the renewable natural capital, the economic capacity, the human and civic resources, and the infrastructure and technology. The selection of variables and weights reflects the assumption that a society with institutional capacity and coordination, as well as with mechanisms for public participation is less vulnerable to drought; furthermore we consider that agriculture is only one of the many sectors affected by drought. The quality and accuracy of a composite indicator depends on the theoretical framework, on the data collection and quality, and on how the different components are aggregated. This kind of approach can lead to some degree of scepticism; to overcome this problem a sensitivity analysis was done in order to measure the degree of uncertainty associated with the construction of the composite indicator. Although the proposed drought vulnerability indicator relies on a number of theoretical assumptions and some degree of subjectivity, the sensitivity analysis showed that it is a robust indicator and hence able of representing the complex processes that lead to drought vulnerability. According to the DVI computed at country level, the African countries classified with higher relative vulnerability are Somalia, Burundi, Niger, Ethiopia, Mali and Chad. The analysis of the renewable natural capital component at sub-basin level shows that the basins with high to moderate drought vulnerability can be subdivided in three main different

  13. Exploring drought vulnerability in Africa: an indicator based analysis to inform early warning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Naumann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Drought vulnerability is a complex concept that includes both biophysical and socio-economic drivers of drought impact that determine capacity to cope with drought. In order to develop an efficient drought early warning system and to be prepared to mitigate upcoming drought events it is important to understand the drought vulnerability of the affected regions. We propose a composite Drought Vulnerability Indicator (DVI that reflects different aspects of drought vulnerability evaluated at Pan-African level in four components: the renewable natural capital, the economic capacity, the human and civic resources, and the infrastructure and technology. The selection of variables and weights reflects the assumption that a society with institutional capacity and coordination, as well as with mechanisms for public participation is less vulnerable to drought; furthermore we consider that agriculture is only one of the many sectors affected by drought. The quality and accuracy of a composite indicator depends on the theoretical framework, on the data collection and quality, and on how the different components are aggregated. This kind of approach can lead to some degree of scepticism; to overcome this problem a sensitivity analysis was done in order to measure the degree of uncertainty associated with the construction of the composite indicator. Although the proposed drought vulnerability indicator relies on a number of theoretical assumptions and some degree of subjectivity, the sensitivity analysis showed that it is a robust indicator and hence able of representing the complex processes that lead to drought vulnerability. According to the DVI computed at country level, the African countries classified with higher relative vulnerability are Somalia, Burundi, Niger, Ethiopia, Mali and Chad. The analysis of the renewable natural capital component at sub-basin level shows that the basins with high to moderate drought vulnerability can be subdivided in three

  14. An updated atlas of human helminth infections: the example of East Africa

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    Karanja Peris

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reliable and updated maps of helminth (worm infection distributions are essential to target control strategies to those populations in greatest need. Although many surveys have been conducted in endemic countries, the data are rarely available in a form that is accessible to policy makers and the managers of public health programmes. This is especially true in sub-Saharan Africa, where empirical data are seldom in the public domain. In an attempt to address the paucity of geographical information on helminth risk, this article describes the development of an updated global atlas of human helminth infection, showing the example of East Africa. Methods Empirical, cross-sectional estimates of infection prevalence conducted since 1980 were identified using electronic and manual search strategies of published and unpublished sources. A number of inclusion criteria were imposed for identified information, which was extracted into a standardized database. Details of survey population, diagnostic methods, sample size and numbers infected with schistosomes and soil-transmitted helminths were recorded. A unique identifier linked each record to an electronic copy of the source document, in portable document format. An attempt was made to identify the geographical location of each record using standardized geolocation procedures and the assembled data were incorporated into a geographical information system. Results At the time of writing, over 2,748 prevalence surveys were identified through multiple search strategies. Of these, 2,612 were able to be geolocated and mapped. More than half (58% of included surveys were from grey literature or unpublished sources, underlining the importance of reviewing in-country sources. 66% of all surveys were conducted since 2000. Comprehensive, countrywide data are available for Burundi, Rwanda and Uganda. In contrast, information for Kenya and Tanzania is typically clustered in specific regions of

  15. Equality in Maternal and Newborn Health: Modelling Geographic Disparities in Utilisation of Care in Five East African Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruktanonchai, Nick W.; Nove, Andrea; Lopes, Sofia; Pezzulo, Carla; Bosco, Claudio; Alegana, Victor A.; Burgert, Clara R.; Ayiko, Rogers; Charles, Andrew SEK; Lambert, Nkurunziza; Msechu, Esther; Kathini, Esther; Matthews, Zoë; Tatem, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Geographic accessibility to health facilities represents a fundamental barrier to utilisation of maternal and newborn health (MNH) services, driving historically hidden spatial pockets of localized inequalities. Here, we examine utilisation of MNH care as an emergent property of accessibility, highlighting high-resolution spatial heterogeneity and sub-national inequalities in receiving care before, during, and after delivery throughout five East African countries. Methods We calculated a geographic inaccessibility score to the nearest health facility at 300 x 300 m using a dataset of 9,314 facilities throughout Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. Using Demographic and Health Surveys data, we utilised hierarchical mixed effects logistic regression to examine the odds of: 1) skilled birth attendance, 2) receiving 4+ antenatal care visits at time of delivery, and 3) receiving a postnatal health check-up within 48 hours of delivery. We applied model results onto the accessibility surface to visualise the probabilities of obtaining MNH care at both high-resolution and sub-national levels after adjusting for live births in 2015. Results Across all outcomes, decreasing wealth and education levels were associated with lower odds of obtaining MNH care. Increasing geographic inaccessibility scores were associated with the strongest effect in lowering odds of obtaining care observed across outcomes, with the widest disparities observed among skilled birth attendance. Specifically, for each increase in the inaccessibility score to the nearest health facility, the odds of having skilled birth attendance at delivery was reduced by over 75% (0.24; CI: 0.19–0.3), while the odds of receiving antenatal care decreased by nearly 25% (0.74; CI: 0.61–0.89) and 40% for obtaining postnatal care (0.58; CI: 0.45–0.75). Conclusions Overall, these results suggest decreasing accessibility to the nearest health facility significantly deterred utilisation of all

  16. The UNDP/World Bank monitoring program on small scale biomass gasifiers (BTG's experience on tar measurements)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoef, H.A.M. [Biomass Technology Group BTG, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    By the time that small-scale biomass gasifiers were 'rediscovered' and promoted for use in developing countries (1970s), UNDP and the World Bank were well aware of the pitfalls of previous attempts to diffuse decentralized energy technologies. Therefore they decided to initiate a technology assessment programme before endorsing and/or stimulating a widespread gasifier introduction programme in developing countries. On July 1, 1983, the UNDP/WB worldwide Small-scale biomass gasifier monitoring was initiated, which was to {sup c}ollect uniform data on the actual field performance, economics, safety and public acceptability of biomass gasifiers currently operating in developing countries{sup .} For the UNDP/WB program BTG developed a tar measuring protocol which was used at twenty gasifiers worldwide (Indonesia, Philippines, Brazil, Mali, Seychelles, Vanuatu and Burundi). Other parameters monitored include pressure and temperatures at various spots, gasflow, fuel consumption, lubrication oil analyses, gas-composition analyses, emission measurements. The seven year programme showed that most of donor funded projects failed, mainly because there was not sufficient commitment from involved parties. National programs on the utilization of loca available biomass resources mostly failed because the fuel did not suit the requirements of gasifier reactor. In case of proper project design/set-up most of the small scale biomass gasifiers operated without major problems. Examples of such projects are the ones in Balong and Majalengka (Indonesia) Onesua (Vanuatu), Espara Feliz (Brazil) and Dogofiry (Mali). A motivated team of technicians, operators, managers is one the most important items within this respect. Most of the heat gasifiers are installed commercially and are much more successful compared to the subsidized power gasifiers. Local manufactured gasifiers are generally constructed of low quality materials causing frequent technical problems. However, locally

  17. Neuroinfections in developed versus developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krcméry, Vladimír; Fedor-Freybergh, P G

    2007-06-01

    In recent supplement of neuroendocrinology letters, first time the authors from West and East, North and South of EU and the "Third World" present data on neuroinfections in high technology society - on nosocomial meningitis and vice versa in low technology and income countries of sub-Saharan Africa. 14 years survey of 171 cases of nosocomial paediatric meningitis is presented by Rudinsky et al. [1] and subpopulations of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa [1,2] within last 20 years are briefly analyzed by Huttova et al. [2] and Ondrusova et al. [3]. All cases were complicating high technology procedures, such as neurosurgery, very low birth weight neonates after shunt implants etc. Current problems of management of nosocomial meningitis are reviewed by Bauer et al. [4] and consequence of inappropriate therapy by Huttova et al. [5]. Another high technology associated infection is septic embolisation followed by brain abscess and meningitis in patients with endocarditis after cardiac surgery (Kovac et al.) [6]. Experience from more than 600 cases is discussed in the article by Karvaj et al. [7] who outlines extremely high mortality in patients with endocarditis embolizing to central nervous system - up to 60%. The rest of papers are in contrary to problems of neuroinfections in EU and US focused on meningitis and cerebral malaria as commonest neuroinfections in the third world: 261 cases of cerebral malaria are discussed in a brief research note by Sudanese team of tropical programme in area of famine and civil war in southern Sudan (Bartkovjak and Ianetti et al.) [8]. Fungal neuroinfections complicating AIDS are of decreasing trend as reported by Njambi et al. from Kenya [9] and data from 497 cases from Uganda, Ethiopia and Burundi are presented by Benca et al. [10]. Finally an outbreak of meningococcal meningitis is reported by Benca et al. [11] from meningitis belt in Darfur and southern Sudan. We hope that the supplement may show difference in

  18. Revisiting sub-Saharan African countries' drug problems: health, social, economic costs, and drug control policy.

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    Affinnih, Yahya H

    2002-02-01

    This article takes an international perspective on the drug problem in sub-Saharan Africa. This analysis borrows ideas from physical and economic geography as a heuristic device to conceptualize the global narcoscapes in which drug trafficking occurs. Both the legitimate and the illegal drug trade operate within the same global capitalist system and draw on the same technological innovations and business processes. Central to the paper's argument is evidence that sub-Saharan African countries are now integrated into the political economy of drug consumption due to the spill-over effect. These countries are now minor markets for "hard drugs" as the result of the activities of organizations and individual traffickers that use Africa as a staging point in their trade with Europe and the United States. As a result, sub-Saharan African countries have drug consumption problems that were essentially absent prior to 1980, along with associated health, social, and economic costs. The emerging drug problem has forced African countries to develop their own drug control policy. The sub-Saharan African countries mentioned below vary to some extent in the level of drug use and misuse problems: Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Reunion, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Congo (Zaire), Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Sao Tome and Principe, Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Cote d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Togo. As part of this effort, African countries are assessing the health, social, and economic costs of drug-use-related problems to pinpoint methods which are both effective and inexpensive, since their budgets for social programs are severely constrained. Many have progressed to the point of adopting anti

  19. Adult HIV care resources, management practices and patient characteristics in the Phase 1 IeDEA Central Africa cohort

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    Jules Mushingantahe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite recent advances in the management of HIV infection and increased access to treatment, prevention, care and support, the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a major global health problem, with sub-Saharan Africa suffering by far the greatest humanitarian, demographic and socio-economic burden of the epidemic. Information on HIV/AIDS clinical care and established cohorts’ characteristics in the Central Africa region are sparse. Methods: A survey of clinical care resources, management practices and patient characteristics was undertaken among 12 adult HIV care sites in four countries of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS Central Africa (IeDEA-CA Phase 1 regional network in October 2009. These facilities served predominantly urban populations and offered primary care in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC; six sites, secondary care in Rwanda (two sites and tertiary care in Cameroon (three sites and Burundi (one site. Results: Despite some variation in facility characteristics, sites reported high levels of monitoring resources, including electronic databases, as well as linkages to prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programs. At the time of the survey, there were 21,599 HIV-positive adults (median age=37 years enrolled in the clinical cohort. Though two-thirds were women, few adults (6.5% entered HIV care through prevention of mother-to-child transmission services, whereas 55% of the cohort entered care through voluntary counselling and testing. Two-thirds of patients at sites in Cameroon and DRC were in WHO Stage III and IV at baseline, whereas nearly all patients in the Rwanda facilities with clinical stage information available were in Stage I and II. WHO criteria were used for antiretroviral therapy initiation. The most common treatment regimen was stavudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (64%, followed by zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (19%. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate the

  20. Characteristics of HIV-Infected Children at Enrollment into Care and at Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinayobye, Jean d’Amour; Nduwimana, Martin; Lelo, Patricia; Nash, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite the World Health Organization (WHO) regularly updating guidelines to recommend earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in children, timely enrollment into care and initiation of ART in sub-Saharan Africa in children lags behind that of adults. The impact of implementing increasingly less restrictive ART guidelines on ART initiation in Central Africa has not been described. Materials and Methods Data are from the Central Africa International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) pediatric cohort of 3,426 children (0–15 years) entering HIV care at 15 sites in Burundi, DRC, and Rwanda. Measures include CD4 count, WHO clinical stage, age, and weight-for-age Z score (WAZ), each at enrollment into HIV care and at ART initiation. Changes in the medians or proportions of each measure by year of enrollment and year of ART initiation were assessed to capture potential impacts of changing ART guidelines. Results Median age at care enrollment decreased from 77.2 months in 2004–05 to 30.3 months in 2012–13. The median age at ART initiation (n = 2058) decreased from 83.0 months in 2004–05 to 66.9 months in 2012–13. The proportion of children ≤24 months of age at enrollment increased from 12.7% in 2004–05 to 46.7% in 2012–13, and from 9.6% in 2004–05 to 24.2% in 2012–13 for ART initiation. The median CD4 count at enrollment into care increased from 563 (IQR: 275, 901) in 2004–05 to 660 (IQR: 339, 1071) cells/μl in 2012–13, and the median CD4 count at ART initiation increased from 310 (IQR:167, 600) in 2004–05 to 589 (IQR: 315, 1113) cells/μl in 2012–13. From 2004–05 to 2012–13, median WAZ improved from -2 (IQR: -3.4, -1.1) to -1 (IQR: -2.5, -0.2) at enrollment in care and from -2 (IQR: -3.8, -1.6) to -1 (IQR: -2.6, -0.4) at ART initiation. Discussion and Conclusion Although HIV-infected children ≤24 months of age accounted for half of all children enrolling in care in our cohort during 2012–13, they

  1. Widespread rape does not directly appear to increase the overall HIV prevalence in conflict-affected countries: so now what?

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    Mills Edward

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA is severely affected by HIV/AIDS and conflict. Sexual violence as a weapon of war has been associated with concerns about heightened HIV incidence among women. Widespread rape by combatants has been documented in Burundi, Sierra Leone, Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Sudan and Uganda. To examine the assertion that widespread rape may not directly increase HIV prevalence at the population level, we built a model to determine the potential impact of varying scenarios of widespread rape on HIV prevalence in the above seven African countries. Discussion Our findings show that even in the most extreme situations, where 15% of the female population was raped, where HIV prevalence among assailants was 8 times the country population prevalence, and where the HIV transmission rate was highest at 4 times the average high rate, widespread rape increased the absolute HIV prevalence of these countries by only 0.023%. These projections support the finding that widespread rape in conflict-affected countries in SSA has not incurred a major direct population-level change in HIV prevalence. However, this must not be interpreted to say that widespread rape does not pose serious problems to women's acquisition of HIV on an individual basis or in specific settings. Furthermore, direct and indirect consequences of sexual violence, such as physical and psychosocial trauma, unwanted pregnancies, and stigma and discrimination cannot be understated. Summary The conclusions of this article do not significantly change current practices in the field from an operational perspective. Proper care and treatment must be provided to every survivor of rape regardless of the epidemiological effects of HIV transmission at the population level. Sexual violence must be treated as a protection issue and not solely a reproductive health and psychosocial issue. It is worth publishing data and conclusions that could be

  2. The burden of malaria in post-emergency refugee sites: A retrospective study

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    Spiegel Paul

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost two-thirds of refugees, internally displaced persons, returnees and other persons affected by humanitarian emergencies live in malaria endemic regions. Malaria remains a significant threat to the health of these populations. Methods Data on malaria incidence and mortality were analyzed from January 2006 to December 2009 from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Health Information System database collected at sites in Burundi, Chad, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Uganda. Data from three countries during 2006 and 2007, and all nine countries from 2008 to 2009, were used to describe trends in malaria incidence and mortality. Monthly counts of malaria morbidity and mortality were aggregated into an annual country rate averaged over the study period. Results An average of 1.18 million refugees resided in 60 refugee sites within nine countries with at least 50 cases of malaria per 1000 refugees during the study period 2008-2009. The highest incidence of malaria was in refugee sites in Tanzania, where the annual incidence of malaria was 399 confirmed cases per 1,000 refugees and 728 confirmed cases per 1,000 refugee children younger than five years. Malaria incidence in children younger than five years of age, based on the sum of confirmed and suspected cases, declined substantially at sites in two countries between 2006 and 2009, but a slight increase was reported at sites within four of seven countries between 2008 and 2009. Annual malaria mortality rates were highest in sites in Sudan (0.9 deaths per 1,000 refugees, Uganda and Tanzania (0.7 deaths per 1000 refugees each. Malaria was the cause of 16% of deaths in refugee children younger than five years of age in all study sites. Conclusions These findings represent one of the most extensive reports on malaria among refugees in post-emergency sites. Despite declines in malaria incidence among refugees in several countries, malaria

  3. Holocene Millennial Time Scale Hydrological Changes In Central-east Africa

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    Jolly, D.; Bonnefille, R.; Beaufort, L.

    The Holocene hydrological changes of a tropical swamp is reconstructed using a high resolution pollen record (ca 50 yrs) from the Kuruyange valley (Burundi, Africa, 3°35'S, 29°41'E), at 2000 m elevation. The sequence was dated by 10 radiocarbon dates, allowing reconstruction between ca 12 500 and 1000 cal yr B.P. In the Kuruyange swamp, peat accumulated rapidly at a sedimentation rate varying from 0.73 (prior to 6200 cal yr B.P.) to 1.51 mm/yr (during the late Holocene). A pollen index of water table, based on a ratio of aquatic versus non-aquatic plants has been used in order to test the hypothesis of hydrological constraints on the swampy ecosystem. Eight arid phases are evidenced by the index minima at 12 200, 11 200, 9900, 8600, 6500, 5000, 3400, 1600 cal yr B.P. The good agreement existing between this index and independent data such as (i) low-resolution East-African lake level reconstruct ions (Gillespie et al., 1983) and (ii) ?18O analyses from Arabian Sea (Sirocko et al., 1993) suggests the water table level responds to the monsoon dynamic. The Index varies periodically with a combination of 1/1515, 1/880 and 1/431 years-1 frequencies, revealed by time series analyses (Blackman-Tukey and Maximum Entropy). The extrapolation of the composite curve based on these 3 periodicities show that two major climatic events defined in the high latitudes between 1000 and 660 cal yr B.P. (Medieval Warm Period) and between 500 and 100 cal yr B.P. (Little Ice Age) are recorded in our data and show respectively high and low stands of the water table. Our results support some previous pollen-derived climate estimates in Ethiopia done by Bonnefille and Umer (1994). Moreover, the "1500 year" cycle registered in our data from the tropics, already evidenced in higher latitudes (Wijmstra et al., 1984; Bondet al., 1997; Schulz et al., 1999; Bond et al., 2001) support the hypothesis of strong teleconnections between tropical/subtropical and polar climates during the deglaciation

  4. An Integrated Hydrological and Water Management Study of the Entire Nile River System - Lake Victoria to Nile Delta

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    Habib, Shahid; Zaitchik, Benjamin; Alo, Clement; Ozdogan, Mutlu; Anderson, Martha; Policelli, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    The Nile basin River system spans 3 million km(exp 2) distributed over ten nations. The eight upstream riparian nations, Ethiopia, Eretria, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Congo, Tanzania and Kenya are the source of approximately 86% of the water inputs to the Nile, while the two downstream riparian countries Sudan and Egypt, presently rely on the river's flow for most of the their needs. Both climate and agriculture contribute to the complicated nature of Nile River management: precipitation in the headwaters regions of Ethiopia and Lake Victoria is variable on a seasonal and inter-annual basis, while demand for irrigation water in the arid downstream region is consistently high. The Nile is, perhaps, one of the most difficult trans-boundary water issue in the world, and this study would be the first initiative to combine NASA satellite observations with the hydrologic models study the overall water balance in a to comprehensive manner. The cornerstone application of NASA's Earth Science Research Results under this project are the NASA Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) and the USDA Atmosphere-land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) model. These two complementary research results are methodologically independent methods for using NASA observations to support water resource analysis in data poor regions. Where an LDAS uses multiple sources of satellite data to inform prognostic simulations of hydrological process, ALEXI diagnoses evapotranspiration and water stress on the basis of thermal infrared satellite imagery. Specifically, this work integrates NASA Land Data Assimilation systems into the water management decision support systems that member countries of the Nile Basin Initiative (NBI) and Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD, located in Nairobi, Kenya) use in water resource analysis, agricultural planning, and acute drought response to support sustainable development of Nile Basin water resources. The project is motivated by the recognition that

  5. Towards a Global High Resolution Peatland Map in 2020

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    Barthelmes, Alexandra; Barthelmes, Karen-Doreen; Joosten, Hans; Dommain, Rene; Margalef, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Some 3% of land area on planet Earth (approx. 4 million km2) is covered by peatlands. About 10% (~ 0.3 % of the land area) are drained and responsible for a disproportional 5 % of the global anthropogenic CO2 emissions (Victoria et al., 2012). Additionally, peatland drainage and degradation lead to land subsidence, soil degradation, water pollution, and enhanced susceptibility to fire (Holden et al., 2004; Joosten et al., 2012). The global importance of peatlands for carbon storage and climate change mitigation has currently been recognized in international policy - since 2008 organic soils are subject of discussion in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) (Joosten, 2011). In May 2013 the European Parliament decided that the global post 2020 climate agreement should include the obligation to report emissions and removals from peatland drainage and rewetting. Implementation of such program, however, necessitates the rapid availability of reliable, comprehensive, high resolution, spatially explicit data on the extent and status of peatlands. For many reporting countries this requires an innovation in peatland mapping, i.e. the better and integrative use of novel, but already available methods and technologies. We developed an approach that links various science networks, methodologies and data bases, including those of peatland/landscape ecology for understanding where and how peatlands may occur, those of remote sensing for identifying possible locations, and those of pedology (legacy soil maps) and (palaeo-)ecology for ground truthing. Such integration of old field data, specialized knowledge, and modern RS and GIS technologies enables acquiring a rapid, comprehensive, detailed and rather reliable overview, even on a continental scale. We illustrate this approach with a high resolution overview of peatland distribution, area, status and greenhouse gas fluxes e.g. for the East African countries Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda and Zambia. Furthermore, we

  6. Evaluation des caractéristiques physico-chimiques et sensorielles de la purée de tomate locale produite à petite échelle au Bénin

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    Dossou, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Physico-chemical and Sensorial Evaluation of Local Tomato Past Produced at Small Scale in Benin. L'article fait le point sur les avancements notés dans l'éradication de la peste bovine en Afrique sub-saharienne, avec à l'horizon 2010, l'éradication mondiale de la peste, telle que prévu par le Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP. Le programme Pan-Africain de Contrôle des Epizooties (PACE, un programme exécuté depuis 1999 sous l'égide de l'Union Africaine (UA avec le concours financier du Fonds Européen pour le Développement (UE, exécute actuellement la dernière phase de ce programme d'éradication. Les auteurs passent en revue l'historique, le diagnostic et les outils de contrôle de cette maladie, tant chez le bétail que chez la faune. A l'heure actuelle, il ne reste qu'une partie de l'Afrique de l'est où sévit la maladie. Cependant aucun foyer n'y a été signalé depuis 2001. La seule lignée encore rencontrée (lignée 2 africaine se cantonne à l'écosystème somalien, qui regroupe la Somalie, l'est du Kenya et la 5ième région de l'Ethiopie. Réapparue en 1994, 1998, et 2001 dans la faune sauvage, cette lignée représente donc la cible des derniers efforts d'éradication. En dehors de cette zone, la peste bovine semblerait être absente de l'Afrique de l'est. En Afrique de l'ouest et du centre où la maladie est absente depuis des décennies, les activités sont axées sur la certification internationale (par l'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé Animale, OIE de l'absence de la maladie et de l'infection. Sur les 30 pays que couvre le PACE, 12 pays ont obtenu à ce jour le statut 'indemne de l'infection': Bénin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Congo, Erythrée, Guinée, Guinée Bissau, Mali, RDC, Rwanda, Sénégal et Togo. Onze pays enfin, la Côte d'Ivoire, l'Ethiopie, le Ghana, le Kenya, la Mauritanie, le Niger, le Nigeria, l'Ouganda, le Soudan, la Tanzanie et le Tchad ont été déclarés 'indemnes de maladie' (en ce

  7. Production and Marketing Status of Bananas and Plantains in Africa%非洲香蕉和大蕉产销概况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王沛政; 冯慧敏

    2011-01-01

    area of plantains production of Africa.7.8 million tons of banana sand 14 million tons of plantains were produced in Easter Africa,the average production per Ha was 6.7 t only,where Uganda is the largest producer of bananas followed by Rwanda,Tanzania,Kenya while Tanzania is the largest producer of plantain followed by burundi and Uganda etc.About 0.92and 8.4 million tons of bananas and plantains were harvested in West Africa,respectively,and Cote d' Ivoire produced the largest bananas followed by Guinea,Liberia and Gana,while Gana,Nigeria,Cote d' Ivoire and Guinea produced the largest plantains in turn.Central Africa produced about 1.7 million tons and 3.06 million tons of bananas and plantains respectively.Over there Angola,Cameroon,Democratic Congo and Central africa is the largest bananas production in turn and the ranking of the largest plantains production were Cameroon,Democratic Congo,Gabon and Central africa.Only dessert bananas(AAA genome) are shipped from Africa to EU and despite Africa being a major production zone for banana and plantain.In regard to dessert banana,Cameroon and Ivory Coast have long monopolized African exports to the EU but since 2006 Ghana has began exportation.

  8. Impact of Air Temperature and SST Variability on Cholera Incidence in Southeastern Africa, 1971-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Shlomit

    2010-05-01

    The most important climatic parameter related to cholera outbreaks is the temperature, especially of the water bodies and the aquatic environment. This factor governs the survival and growth of V. cholerae, since it has a direct influence on its abundance in the environment, or alternatively, through its indirect influence on other aquatic organisms to which the pathogen is found to attach. Thus, the potential for cholera outbreaks may rise, parallel to the increase in ocean surface temperature. Indeed, recent studies indicate that global warming might create a favorable environment for V. cholerae and increase its incidence in vulnerable areas. Africa is vulnerable to climate variability. According to the recent IPCC report on Africa, the air temperature has indicated a significant warming trend since the 1960s. In recent years, most of the research into disease vectors in Africa related to climate variability has focused on malaria. The IPCC indicated that the need exists to examine the vulnerabilities and impacts of climatic factors on cholera in Africa. In light of this, the study uses a Poisson Regression Model to analyze the possible association between the cholera rates in southeastern Africa and the annual variability of air temperature and sea surface temperature (SST) at regional and hemispheric scales, for the period 1971-2006. Data description is as follows: Number of cholera cases per year in Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia and Mozambique. Source: WHO Global Health Atlas - cholera. Seasonal and annual temperature time series: Regional scale: a) Air temperature for southeastern Africa (30° E-36° E, 5° S-17° S), source: NOAA NCEP-NCAR; b) Sea surface temperature, for the western Indian Ocean (0-20° S, 40° E-45° E), source: NOAA, Kaplan SST dataset. Hemispheric scale (for the whole Southern Hemisphere): a) Air temperature anomaly; b) Sea surface temperature anomaly. Source: CRU, University of East Anglia. The following

  9. 非洲坦噶尼喀湖流域资源开发利用与环境管理研究%Resources Use and Environmental Management across Lake Tanganyika Basin, Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高群; 陈爽; 余成

    2015-01-01

    坦噶尼喀湖( Lake Tanganyika )位于非洲东部大裂谷地区,是世界第二深水湖。坦湖流域涉及坦桑尼亚、布隆迪、赞比亚和刚果(金)4个主权国家,是典型的跨界流域,对流域进行有效管理必需经沿岸四国共同协调开展,尤其在流域资源利用和环境保护方面。坦噶尼喀湖目前水环境质量良好,但受气候变化、外来生物入侵、水土流失加剧以及沿岸城市人口增长过快、城市建设无序发展带来的点源和面源污染等自然和社会经济因素的多重影响。沿岸四国由于历史原因,在渔业资源分配和环境管理标准等方面存在较多矛盾和不统一,2008年成立的坦噶尼喀湖流域管理局受四国政府和UNEP等国际组织的支持作为该湖国际性事务的管理机构,主要发挥协调作用推动坦湖流域各国资源利用与环境管理的一体化。在梳理和分析坦噶尼喀湖流域水资源状况及渔业资源状况的基础上,提出该流域当前资源开发利用与利益冲突的问题,阐述了流域管理合作的发展以及流域管理机构的主要特点和结构,并讨论总结了有关经验和结论。%Lake Tanganyika is a large lake , with an area of 32 900 km2 , a maximum depth of 1 470 m and 18 900 km3 of water .It is in East Africa , within the Western area of the Great Rift Valley .After Lake Baikal , it is second deepest lake in the world .The lake and its basin are endowed with excep-tionally large and highly diverse heritage of flora and fauna , famous for its biodiversity and endemic species.Shared by the four countries of Burundi , the Democratic Republic of Congo , Tanzania, and Zambia, and as a typical trans-boundary water, it is necessary that the four riparian countries work to-gether to manage its resources and protect the watershed′s environment .The study indicates that the lake environment is still under a good condition , but with population growth