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Sample records for buruli ulcer endemic

  1. Environmental transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans drives dynamics of Buruli ulcer in endemic regions of Cameroon

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    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Texier, Gaëtan; Landier, Jordi; Eyangoh, Sara; Bonds, Matthew H.; Guégan, Jean-François; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Buruli Ulcer is a devastating skin disease caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. Emergence and distribution of Buruli ulcer cases is clearly linked to aquatic ecosystems, but the specific route of transmission of M. ulcerans to humans remains unclear. Relying on the most detailed field data in space and time on M. ulcerans and Buruli ulcer available today, we assess the relative contribution of two potential transmission routes -environmental and water bug transmission- to the dynamics of Buruli ulcer in two endemic regions of Cameroon. The temporal dynamics of Buruli ulcer incidence are explained by estimating rates of different routes of transmission in mathematical models. Independently, we also estimate statistical models of the different transmission pathways on the spatial distribution of Buruli ulcer. The results of these two independent approaches are corroborative and suggest that environmental transmission pathways explain the temporal and spatial patterns of Buruli ulcer in our endemic areas better than the water bug transmission.

  2. Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans in buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic aquatic sites in Ghana.

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    Heather R Williamson

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, is an emerging environmental bacterium in Australia and West Africa. The primary risk factor associated with Buruli ulcer is proximity to slow moving water. Environmental constraints for disease are shown by the absence of infection in arid regions of infected countries. A particularly mysterious aspect of Buruli ulcer is the fact that endemic and non-endemic villages may be only a few kilometers apart within the same watershed. Recent studies suggest that aquatic invertebrate species may serve as reservoirs for M. ulcerans, although transmission pathways remain unknown. Systematic studies of the distribution of M. ulcerans in the environment using standard ecological methods have not been reported. Here we present results from the first study based on random sampling of endemic and non-endemic sites. In this study PCR-based methods, along with biofilm collections, have been used to map the presence of M. ulcerans within 26 aquatic sites in Ghana. Results suggest that M. ulcerans is present in both endemic and non-endemic sites and that variable number tandem repeat (VNTR profiling can be used to follow chains of transmission from the environment to humans. Our results suggesting that the distribution of M. ulcerans is far broader than the distribution of human disease is characteristic of environmental pathogens. These findings imply that focal demography, along with patterns of human water contact, may play a major role in transmission of Buruli ulcer.

  3. Survey of water bugs in bankim, a new buruli ulcer endemic area in cameroon.

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    Jean-François Guégan; Philippe Legall; Jordi Landier; Laurent Marsollier; Estelle Marion; Sara Eyangoh; Solange Meyin A Ebong

    2012-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a debitliating human skin disease with an unknown transmission mode although epidemiological data link it with swampy areas. Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease. However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented. We conducted an entomological survey in Bankim, Cameroon, an area recently described as endemic for Buruli ulcer in order to identify the commonly occurring aquatic bugs and do...

  4. Survey of Water Bugs in Bankim, a New Buruli Ulcer Endemic Area in Cameroon

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    Solange Meyin A. Ebong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer is a debitliating human skin disease with an unknown transmission mode although epidemiological data link it with swampy areas. Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease. However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented. We conducted an entomological survey in Bankim, Cameroon, an area recently described as endemic for Buruli ulcer in order to identify the commonly occurring aquatic bugs and document their relative abundance, diversity, and spatial distribution. Collection of aquatic bugs was realized over a period of one month by daily direct capture in different aquatic environments (streams, ponds, and rivers and through light traps at night. Globally, the data obtained showed the presence of five families (Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, Nepidae, Notonectidae, and Gerridae, their abundance, distribution and diversity varying according to the type of aquatic environments and light attraction.

  5. Survey of water bugs in bankim, a new buruli ulcer endemic area in cameroon.

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    Ebong, Solange Meyin A; Eyangoh, Sara; Marion, Estelle; Landier, Jordi; Marsollier, Laurent; Guégan, Jean-François; Legall, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a debitliating human skin disease with an unknown transmission mode although epidemiological data link it with swampy areas. Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease. However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented. We conducted an entomological survey in Bankim, Cameroon, an area recently described as endemic for Buruli ulcer in order to identify the commonly occurring aquatic bugs and document their relative abundance, diversity, and spatial distribution. Collection of aquatic bugs was realized over a period of one month by daily direct capture in different aquatic environments (streams, ponds, and rivers) and through light traps at night. Globally, the data obtained showed the presence of five families (Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, Nepidae, Notonectidae, and Gerridae), their abundance, distribution and diversity varying according to the type of aquatic environments and light attraction. PMID:22666273

  6. Occurrence of free-living amoebae in communities of low and high endemicity for Buruli ulcer in southern Benin.

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    Eddyani, Miriam; De Jonckheere, Johan F; Durnez, Lies; Suykerbuyk, Patrick; Leirs, Herwig; Portaels, Françoise

    2008-11-01

    Buruli ulcer or Mycobacterium ulcerans disease occurs mainly in areas in proximity to standing or slowly running freshwater, habitats in which free-living amoebae occur. For this reason, a possible link between the habitat of M. ulcerans and free-living amoebae was investigated. Free-living amoebae and mycobacteria were isolated from water and biofilm specimens taken from protected and unprotected sources of water in villages known to have either high or low endemicity for Buruli ulcer in Benin. Amoebae were isolated from 78.8% of samples. A greater proportion of water bodies in areas of high endemicity had amoebae than in areas of low endemicity (83.3% versus 66.7%). Protected sources of water were significantly more likely to contain amoebae in areas of high endemicity than in areas of low endemicity (88.0% versus 11.1%). Several pathogenic free-living amoebae and mycobacteria were isolated. However, no M. ulcerans was isolated and no specimen was positive for IS2404 PCR. Our results show that the study area has a water hygiene problem, which is greater in areas of high Buruli ulcer endemicity than in areas of low endemicity. Our observations indicate that additional studies are required to explore the possible link between free-living amoebae and mycobacteria.

  7. Whole genome comparisons suggest random distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans genotypes in a Buruli ulcer endemic region of Ghana.

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    Anthony S Ablordey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to control the spread of Buruli ulcer--an emerging ulcerative skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans--have been hampered by our poor understanding of reservoirs and transmission. To help address this issue, we compared whole genomes from 18 clinical M. ulcerans isolates from a 30 km2 region within the Asante Akim North District, Ashanti region, Ghana, with 15 other M. ulcerans isolates from elsewhere in Ghana and the surrounding countries of Ivory Coast, Togo, Benin and Nigeria. Contrary to our expectations of finding minor DNA sequence variations among isolates representing a single M. ulcerans circulating genotype, we found instead two distinct genotypes. One genotype was closely related to isolates from neighbouring regions of Amansie West and Densu, consistent with the predicted local endemic clone, but the second genotype (separated by 138 single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs] from other Ghanaian strains most closely matched M. ulcerans from Nigeria, suggesting another introduction of M. ulcerans to Ghana, perhaps from that country. Both the exotic genotype and the local Ghanaian genotype displayed highly restricted intra-strain genetic variation, with less than 50 SNP differences across a 5.2 Mbp core genome within each genotype. Interestingly, there was no discernible spatial clustering of genotypes at the local village scale. Interviews revealed no obvious epidemiological links among BU patients who had been infected with identical M. ulcerans genotypes but lived in geographically separate villages. We conclude that M. ulcerans is spread widely across the region, with multiple genotypes present in any one area. These data give us new perspectives on the behaviour of possible reservoirs and subsequent transmission mechanisms of M. ulcerans. These observations also show for the first time that M. ulcerans can be mobilized, introduced to a new area and then spread within a population. Potential reservoirs of M. ulcerans

  8. Wound care in Buruli ulcer disease in Ghana and Benin

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    Velding, Kristien; Klis, Sandor-Adrian; Abass, Kabiru M.; Tuah, Wilson; Stienstra, Ymkje; van der Werf, Tjip

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a disease affecting the skin, subcutaneous fat, and bone tissues. Wound care is important in the prevention of disabilities. Awareness of current wound care practices in BU-endemic regions is necessary for future wound care interventions. Thirty-one health care workers in Ghana

  9. Wound care in Buruli ulcer disease in Ghana and Benin

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    Velding, Kristien; Klis, Sandor-Adrian; Abass, Kabiru M.; Tuah, Wilson; Stienstra, Ymkje; van der Werf, Tjip

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a disease affecting the skin, subcutaneous fat, and bone tissues. Wound care is important in the prevention of disabilities. Awareness of current wound care practices in BU-endemic regions is necessary for future wound care interventions. Thirty-one health care workers in Ghana and Benin were interviewed with a semi-structured interview, complemented by structural observations. Quantitative data were analyzed through t tests and one-way analysis of variance, and qualitati...

  10. Buruli ulcer: wound care and rehabilitation

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    Phillips, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Michael Frimpong,1 Fred Stephen Sarfo,2 Mabel Sarpong Duah,1 Mark Wansbrough-Jones,3 Richard O Phillips2 1Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana; 3Institute for Infection and Immunity, St George’s University of London, London, UK Abstract: Buruli ulcer caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a neglected tropical disease characterized by extensive...

  11. Buruli ulcer: wound care and rehabilitation

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    Frimpong M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Frimpong,1 Fred Stephen Sarfo,2 Mabel Sarpong Duah,1 Mark Wansbrough-Jones,3 Richard O Phillips2 1Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana; 3Institute for Infection and Immunity, St George’s University of London, London, UK Abstract: Buruli ulcer caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a neglected tropical disease characterized by extensive ulceration involving predominantly the upper and lower limbs of patients. The disease is common in rural tropical communities in West and Central Africa, where access to proper health care is limited. Pathogenesis of the characteristic painless ulcers is linked to the elaboration by M. ulcerans of a lipid toxin called mycolactone that has potent cytopathic, immunosuppressive, and analgesic effects on a host of cells in cutaneous tissues. Mycolactone is known to profoundly inhibit secretion of a plethora of proteins that are essential for wound healing. Even though a combination antibacterial therapy of streptomycin and rifampicin for 8 weeks is effective for treatment, it relies on good and appropriate wound management to prevent secondary bacterial infections and improve healing. Evidence-based interventions for wound care in Buruli ulcer disease are often lacking and have relied on expert advice and recommendations. Surgical interventions are limited to debridement of necrotic tissue and grafting of extensive ulcers, usually after antibiotic therapy. Patients’ rehabilitation is an important component of care to reduce disabilities associated with the disease and proper integration into the community after treatment. Keywords: Buruli ulcer, Mycobacterium ulcerans disease, Mycobacterium ulcerans, wound care, rehabilitation, disability

  12. Infection with Mansonella perstans Nematodes in Buruli Ulcer Patients, Ghana.

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    Phillips, Richard O; Frimpong, Michael; Sarfo, Fred S; Kretschmer, Birte; Beissner, Marcus; Debrah, Alexander; Ampem-Amoako, Yaw; Abass, Kabiru M; Thompson, William; Duah, Mabel Sarpong; Abotsi, Justice; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; Bretzel, Gisela; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Jacobsen, Marc

    2014-06-01

    During August 2010-December 2012, we conducted a study of patients in Ghana who had Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, and found that 23% were co-infected with Mansonella perstans nematodes; 13% of controls also had M. perstans infection. M. perstans co-infection should be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of Buruli ulcer. PMID:24857346

  13. The incubation period of Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans infection.

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    Jason A Trubiano

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Buruli Ulcer (BU is caused by the environmental microbe Mycobacterium ulcerans. Despite unclear transmission, contact with a BU endemic region is the key known risk factor. In Victoria, Australia, where endemic areas have been carefully mapped, we aimed to estimate the Incubation Period (IP of BU by interviewing patients who reported defined periods of contact with an endemic area prior to BU diagnosis. METHOD: A retrospective review was undertaken of 408 notifications of BU in Victoria from 2002 to 2012. Telephone interviews using a structured questionnaire and review of notification records were performed. Patients with a single visit exposure to a defined endemic area were included and the period from exposure to disease onset determined (IP. RESULTS: We identified 111 of 408 notified patients (27% who had a residential address outside a known endemic area, of whom 23 (6% reported a single visit exposure within the previous 24 months. The median age of included patients was 30 years (range: 6 to 73 and 65% were male. 61% had visited the Bellarine Peninsula, currently the most active endemic area. The median time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 71 days (range: 34-204 days. The midpoint of the reported IP range was utilized to calculate a point estimate of the IP for each case. Subsequently, the mean IP for the cohort was calculated at 135 days (IQR: 109-160; CI 95%: 113.9-156, corresponding to 4.5 months or 19.2 weeks. The shortest IP recorded was 32 days and longest 264 days (Figure 1 & 2. IP did not vary for variables investigated. CONCLUSIONS: The estimated mean IP of BU in Victoria is 135 days (IQR: 109-160 days, 4.5 months. The shortest recorded was IP 34 days and longest 264 days. A greater understanding of BU IP will aid clinical risk assessment and future research.

  14. Amoebae as potential environmental hosts for Mycobacterium ulcerans and other mycobacteria, but doubtful actors in Buruli ulcer epidemiology.

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    Sophie Gryseels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The reservoir and mode of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, remain unknown. Ecological, genetic and epidemiological information nonetheless suggests that M. ulcerans may reside in aquatic protozoa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We experimentally infected Acanthamoeba polyphaga with M. ulcerans and found that the bacilli were phagocytised, not digested and remained viable for the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, we collected 13 water, 90 biofilm and 45 detritus samples in both Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities in Ghana, from which we cultivated amoeboid protozoa and mycobacteria. M. ulcerans was not isolated, but other mycobacteria were as frequently isolated from intracellular as from extracellular sources, suggesting that they commonly infect amoebae in nature. We screened the samples as well as the amoeba cultures for the M. ulcerans markers IS2404, IS2606 and KR-B. IS2404 was detected in 2% of the environmental samples and in 4% of the amoeba cultures. The IS2404 positive amoeba cultures included up to 5 different protozoan species, and originated both from Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of experimental infection of amoebae with M. ulcerans and of the detection of the marker IS2404 in amoeba cultures isolated from the environment. We conclude that amoeba are potential natural hosts for M. ulcerans, yet remain sceptical about their implication in the transmission of M. ulcerans to humans and their importance in the epidemiology of Buruli ulcer.

  15. Genetic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus in Buruli Ulcer

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    Amissah, Nana Ama; Glasner, Corinna; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Kotey, Nana Konama; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip; Rossen, John W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Previous studies have shown that wounds of BU patients are colonized with M. ulcerans and several other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, which may interfere with wound healing. The present st

  16. Beliefs and attitudes toward Buruli ulcer in Ghana

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    Stienstra, Y; van der Graaf, WTA; Asamoa, K; van der Werf, TS

    2002-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a devastating emerging disease in tropical countries. Quantitative and qualitative data were obtained by interviewing patients with this disease and control subjects in Ghana. Common perceived causes were witchcraft and curses. Other reported causes were personal hygiene, environment

  17. [Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) in Gabon: 2005-2011].

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    Bayonne Manou, L S; Portaels, F; Eddyani, M; Book, A U; Vandelannoote, K; de Jong, B C

    2013-01-01

    The first cases of Buruli ulcer (BU) in Gabon were described in the 1960s. Between 2005 and 2011, 301 clinically suspected cases of BU were found in all nine provinces of Gabon, and their lesions sampled for microbiological confirmation. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) found 120 (39.9%) of these lesions positive and 181 (60.1%) negative for Mycobacterium ulcerans. The confirmed cases came mainly from the province of Moyen-Ogooué, particularly from localities along the Ogooué River (n=117; 52.5% of the samples in this province were PCR-positive). The detection rates per 100,000 inhabitants in this province ranged from 94.7 cases in 2005 to 28 in 2007, after an absence of active case-finding in 2006. The final three PCR-positive cases were found in the province of Estuaire. The characteristics of the confirmed BU patients (that is, PCR-positive) were identical to those described in other African countries: most patients were younger than 15 years old, and most lesions were found on both the upper and lower limbs. The group of suspected cases (PCR-negative) differed from the PCR-positive group for patient age (most patients were aged 15 to 49 years), lesion location (more frequently on the lower limbs), and ulceration (more frequent in the suspected cases). Some PCR-negative patients probably had other diseases; this underlines the importance of the differential diagnosis of BU. The cure rate of PCR(-)confirmed cases in our study was 88%; treatment was the antibiotic combination recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Our study demonstrates that BU is endemic in Gabon and is a public health problem there. Patients consult late with often extensive lesions. Awareness campaigns should be pursued to ensure earlier treatment of patients. The influence of HIV on BU in Gabon also deserves particular attention.

  18. Functional limitations after surgical or antibiotic treatment for buruli ulcer in benin

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    Barogui, Y.; Johnson, R.C.; van der Werf, T.S.; Sopoh, G.; Dossou, A.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stienstra, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Almost half of patients have functional limitations after treatment of Buruli ulcer disease. Antibiotic treatment (along with surgery) was introduced in the National Program for Buruli ulcer in Benin in 2005. The aim of this study was to compare functional limitations in patients who were treated by

  19. Situated knowledge of pathogenic landscapes in Ghana: Understanding the emergence of Buruli ulcer through qualitative analysis.

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    Tschakert, Petra; Ricciardi, Vincent; Smithwick, Erica; Machado, Mario; Ferring, David; Hausermann, Heidi; Bug, Leah

    2016-02-01

    Successfully addressing neglected tropical diseases requires nuanced understandings of pathogenic landscapes that incorporate situated, contexualized community knowledge. In the case of Buruli ulcer (BU), the role of social science is vital to investigate complex human-environment interactions and navigate different ways of knowing. We analyze a set of qualitative data from our interdisciplinary project on BU in Ghana, drawing from participatory mapping, focus group discussions, semi-structured interviews, and open-ended survey questions to explore how people in endemic and non-endemic areas see themselves embedded in changing environmental and social landscapes. We pay particular attention to landscape disturbance through logging and small-scale alluvial gold mining. The results from our participatory research underscore the holistic nature of BU emergence in landscapes, encapsulated in partial and incomplete local descriptions, the relevance of collective learning to distill complexity, and the potential of rich qualitative data to inform quantitative landscape-disease models. PMID:26761375

  20. Situated knowledge of pathogenic landscapes in Ghana: Understanding the emergence of Buruli ulcer through qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschakert, Petra; Ricciardi, Vincent; Smithwick, Erica; Machado, Mario; Ferring, David; Hausermann, Heidi; Bug, Leah

    2016-02-01

    Successfully addressing neglected tropical diseases requires nuanced understandings of pathogenic landscapes that incorporate situated, contexualized community knowledge. In the case of Buruli ulcer (BU), the role of social science is vital to investigate complex human-environment interactions and navigate different ways of knowing. We analyze a set of qualitative data from our interdisciplinary project on BU in Ghana, drawing from participatory mapping, focus group discussions, semi-structured interviews, and open-ended survey questions to explore how people in endemic and non-endemic areas see themselves embedded in changing environmental and social landscapes. We pay particular attention to landscape disturbance through logging and small-scale alluvial gold mining. The results from our participatory research underscore the holistic nature of BU emergence in landscapes, encapsulated in partial and incomplete local descriptions, the relevance of collective learning to distill complexity, and the potential of rich qualitative data to inform quantitative landscape-disease models.

  1. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Buruli Ulcer Disease: A Systematic Review

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    Aboagye, Samuel Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Early diagnosis is crucial to prevent morbid effects and misuse of drugs. We review developments in laboratory diagnosis of BU, discuss limitations of available diagnostic methods, and give a perspective on the potential of using aptamers as point-of-care. Methods. Information for this review was searched through PubMed, web of knowledge, and identified data up to December 2015. References from relevant articles and reports from WHO Annual Meeting of the Global Buruli Ulcer initiative were also used. Finally, 59 articles were used. Results. The main laboratory methods for BU diagnosis are microscopy, culture, PCR, and histopathology. Microscopy and PCR are used routinely for diagnosis. PCR targeting IS2404 is the gold standard for laboratory confirmation. Culture remains the only method that detects viable bacilli, used for diagnosing relapse and accrued isolates for epidemiological investigation as well as monitoring drug resistance. Laboratory confirmation is done at centers distant from endemic communities reducing confirmation to a quality assurance. Conclusions. Current efforts aimed at developing point-of-care diagnostics are saddled with major drawbacks; we, however, postulate that selection of aptamers against MU target can be used as point of care. PMID:27413382

  2. Combined inflammatory and metabolic defects reflected by reduced serum protein levels in patients with Buruli ulcer disease.

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    Richard O Phillips

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer is a skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that is spreading in tropical countries, with major public health and economic implications in West Africa. Multi-analyte profiling of serum proteins in patients and endemic controls revealed that Buruli ulcer disease down-regulates the circulating levels of a large array of inflammatory mediators, without impacting on the leukocyte composition of peripheral blood. Notably, several proteins contributing to acute phase reaction, lipid metabolism, coagulation and tissue remodelling were also impacted. Their down-regulation was selective and persisted after the elimination of bacteria with antibiotic therapy. It involved proteins with various functions and origins, suggesting that M. ulcerans infection causes global and chronic defects in the host's protein metabolism. Accordingly, patients had reduced levels of total serum proteins and blood urea, in the absence of signs of malnutrition, or functional failure of liver or kidney. Interestingly, slow healers had deeper metabolic and coagulation defects at the start of antibiotic therapy. In addition to providing novel insight into Buruli ulcer pathogenesis, our study therefore identifies a unique proteomic signature for this disease.

  3. Treatment Outcome of Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease in Togo.

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    Marcus Beissner

    Full Text Available Following introduction of antimycobacterial treatment of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD, several clinical studies evaluated treatment outcomes of BUD patients, in particular healing times, secondary lesions and functional limitations. Whereas recurrences were rarely observed, paradoxical reactions and functional limitations frequently occurred. Although systematic BUD control in Togo was established as early as 2007, treatment outcome has not been reviewed to date. Therefore, a pilot project on post-treatment follow-up of BUD patients in Togo aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes and to provide recommendations for optimization of treatment success.Out of 199 laboratory confirmed BUD patients, 129 could be enrolled in the study. The lesions of 109 patients (84.5% were completely healed without any complications, 5 patients (3.9% had secondary lesions and 15 patients (11.6% had functional limitations. Edema, category III ulcers >15 cm, healing times >180 days and a limitation of movement at time of discharge constituted the main risk factors significantly associated with BUD related functional limitations (P180 days and limitation of movement at discharge constituted the main risk factors for functional limitations in Togolese BUD patients. Standardized treatment plans, patient assessment and follow-up, as well as improved management of medical records are recommended to allow for intensified monitoring of disease progression and healing process, to facilitate implementation of therapeutic measures and to optimize treatment success.

  4. Phase change material for thermotherapy of Buruli ulcer: a prospective observational single centre proof-of-principle trial.

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    Thomas Junghanss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer (BU is an infection of the subcutaneous tissue leading to chronic necrotizing skin ulcers. The causative pathogen, Mycobacterium ulcerans, grows best at 30 degrees C-33 degrees C and not above 37 degrees C. We explored the safety, tolerability and efficacy of phase change material (PCM, a novel heat application system for thermotherapy of BU. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a prospective observational single centre proof-of-principle trial in Ayos/Cameroon, six laboratory reconfirmed patients with ulcerative Buruli lesions received 28-31 (ulcers 2 cm days of thermotherapy with the PCM sodium acetate trihydrate as heat application system. This PCM is widely used in commercial pocket heat pads, it is easy to apply, rechargeable in hot water, non-toxic and non-hazardous to the environment. All patients enrolled in the trial completed treatment. Being completely mobile during the well-tolerated heat application, acceptability of the PCM bandages was very high. In patients with smaller ulcers, wounds healed completely without further intervention. Patients with large defects had skin grafting after successful heat treatment. Heat treatment was not associated with marked increases in local inflammation or the development of ectopic lymphoid tissue. One and a half years after completion of treatment, all patients are relapse-free. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our reusable PCM-based heat application device appears perfectly suited to treat BU in endemic countries with limited resources and infrastructure. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN88392614.

  5. Enhancing Buruli ulcer control in Ghana through social interventions: a case study from the Obom sub-district

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    Ahorlu Collins K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Buruli ulcer is considered a re-emerging disease in West Africa where it has suffered neglect over the years, though children below the age of 16 years are the worst affected in most endemic regions. Due to delayed health seeking, the disease leads to disabilities resulting from amputation and loss of vital organs like the eye leading to school dropout and other social and economic consequences for the affected family. Early treatment with antibiotics is effective; however, this involves daily oral and intramuscular injection at distant health facilities for 56 days making it a challenge among poor rural folks living on daily subsistence work. The mode of transmission of Buruli ulcer is not known and there is no effective preventive vaccine for Buruli ulcer. Thus the only effective control tool is early case detection and treatment to reduce morbidity and associated disabilities that occurs as a result of late treatment. It is therefore essential to implement interventions that remove impediments that limit early case detection; access to early effective treatment and this paper reports one such effort where the feasibility of social interventions to enhance Buruli ulcer control was assessed. Methods This was a qualitative study using in-depth interviews to generate information to ascertain the benefit or otherwise of the intervention implemented. Clinical records of patients to generate data to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of social interventions in the fight against Buruli ulcer was examined. In all, 56 in-depth interviews (28 at baseline and 28 at evaluation were conducted for this report. Results At full implementation, treatment default and dropout reduced significantly from 58.8% and 52.9% at baseline to 1.5% and 1.5% respectively. The number of early case detection went up significantly. Affected families were happy with social interventions such as provision of transportation and breakfast to patients

  6. Assessment and Treatment of Pain during Treatment of Buruli Ulcer.

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    Janine de Zeeuw

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is described as a relatively painless condition; however clinical observations reveal that patients do experience pain during their treatment. Knowledge on current pain assessment and treatment in BU is necessary to develop and implement a future guideline on pain management in BU.A mixed methods approach was used, consisting of information retrieved from medical records on prescribed pain medication from Ghana and Benin, and semi-structured interviews with health care personnel (HCP from Ghana on pain perceptions, assessment and treatment. Medical records (n = 149 of patients treated between 2008 and 2012 were collected between November 2012 and August 2013. Interviews (n = 11 were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and qualitatively analyzed.In 113 (84% of the 135 included records, pain medication, mostly simple analgesics, was prescribed. In 48% of the prescriptions, an indication was not documented. HCP reported that advanced BU could be painful, especially after wound care and after a skin graft. They reported not be trained in the assessment of mild pain. Pain recognition was perceived as difficult, as patients were said to suppress or to exaggerate pain, and to have different expectations regarding acceptable pain levels. HCP reported a fear of side effects of pain medication, shortage and irregularities in the supply of pain medication, and time constraints among medical doctors for pain management.Professionals perceived BU disease as potentially painful, and predominantly focused on severe pain. Our study suggests that pain in BU deserves attention and should be integrated in current treatment.

  7. Assessment and Treatment of Pain during Treatment of Buruli Ulcer

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    Barogui, Yves T.; Sopoh, Ghislain; Phillips, Richard O.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Loth, Susanne; Molenbuur, Bouwe; Plantinga, Mirjam; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is described as a relatively painless condition; however clinical observations reveal that patients do experience pain during their treatment. Knowledge on current pain assessment and treatment in BU is necessary to develop and implement a future guideline on pain management in BU. Methodology A mixed methods approach was used, consisting of information retrieved from medical records on prescribed pain medication from Ghana and Benin, and semi-structured interviews with health care personnel (HCP) from Ghana on pain perceptions, assessment and treatment. Medical records (n = 149) of patients treated between 2008 and 2012 were collected between November 2012 and August 2013. Interviews (n = 11) were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and qualitatively analyzed. Principal Findings In 113 (84%) of the 135 included records, pain medication, mostly simple analgesics, was prescribed. In 48% of the prescriptions, an indication was not documented. HCP reported that advanced BU could be painful, especially after wound care and after a skin graft. They reported not be trained in the assessment of mild pain. Pain recognition was perceived as difficult, as patients were said to suppress or to exaggerate pain, and to have different expectations regarding acceptable pain levels. HCP reported a fear of side effects of pain medication, shortage and irregularities in the supply of pain medication, and time constraints among medical doctors for pain management. Conclusions Professionals perceived BU disease as potentially painful, and predominantly focused on severe pain. Our study suggests that pain in BU deserves attention and should be integrated in current treatment. PMID:26402069

  8. Buruli Ulcer in Cameroon: The Development and Impact of the National Control Programme.

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    Earnest Njih Tabah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cameroon is endemic for Buruli ulcer (BU and organised institutional BU control began in 2002. The objective was to describe the evolution, achievements and challenges of the national BU control programme (NBUCP and to make suggestions for scaling up the programme.We analysed collated data on BU from 2001 to 2014 and reviewed activity reports NBUCP in Cameroon. Case-detection rates and key BU control indicators were calculated and plotted on a time scale to determine trends in performance. A linear regression analysis of BU detection rate from 2005-2014 was done. The regression coefficient was tested statistically for the significance in variation of BU detection rate.In 14 years of BU control, 3700 cases were notified. The BU detection rate dropped significantly from 3.89 to 1.45 per 100 000 inhabitants. The number of BU endemic health districts rose from two to 64. Five BU diagnostic and treatment centres are functional and two more are planned for 2015. The health system has been strengthened and BU research and education has gained more interest in Cameroon.Although institutional BU control Cameroon only began 30 years after the first cases were reported in 1969, a number of milestones have been attained. These would serve as stepping stones for charting the way forward and improving upon control activities in the country if the major challenge of resource allocation is dealt with.

  9. Pain Associated with Wound Care Treatment among Buruli Ulcer Patients from Ghana and Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alferink, Marike; de Zeeuw, Janine; Sopoh, Ghislain; Agossadou, Chantal; Abass, Karibu M.; Phillips, Richard O.; Loth, Susanne; Jutten, Emma; Barogui, Yves T.; Stewart, Roy E.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. People living in remote areas in tropical Sub Saharan Africa are mostly affected. Wound care is an important component of BU management; this often needs to be extended for months after the initial antibiotic treatment

  10. Illness meanings and experiences for pre-ulcer and ulcer conditions of Buruli ulcer in the Ga-West and Ga-South Municipalities of Ghana

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    Ackumey Mercy M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ghana is a Buruli ulcer (BU endemic country yet there is paucity of socio-cultural research on BU. Examining distinctive experiences and meanings for pre-ulcers and ulcers of BU may clarify the disease burden, illness experience and local perceptions of causes and spread, and environmental features of BU, which are useful to guide public health programmes and future research. This study aimed to explain local meanings and experiences of BU for persons with pre-ulcers and ulcers in the Ga-West and Ga-South municipalities in Accra. Methods Semi-structured interviews based on the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue framework were administered to 181 respondents comprising 15 respondents with pre-ulcers and 166 respondents with ulcers. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare categories of illness experiences (PD and perceived causes (PC among respondents with pre-ulcer and ulcer conditions. The Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the most troubling PD and the most important PC variables. Qualitative phenomenological analysis of respondents’ narratives clarified illness experiences and meanings with reference to PC and PD variables. Results Families of respondents with pre-ulcers and the respondents themselves were often anxious about disease progression, while families of respondents with ulcers, who had to give care, worried about income loss and disruption of school attendance. Respondents with pre-ulcers frequently reported swimming in ponds and rivers as a perceived cause and considered it as the most important PC (53.3%. Respondents with ulcers frequently attributed their BU illness to witchcraft (64.5% and respondents who claimed they had no water contact, questioned the credibility of health messages Conclusions Affected persons with pre-ulcers are likely to delay treatment because of social and financial constraints and the absence of pain. Scepticism on the role of water in disease contagion and

  11. Amoebae as Potential Environmental Hosts for Mycobacterium ulcerans and Other Mycobacteria, but Doubtful Actos in Buruli Ulcer Epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryseels, Sophie; Amissah, Diana; Durnez, Lies;

    2012-01-01

    in Ghana, from which we cultivated amoeboid protozoa and mycobacteria. M. ulcerans was not isolated, but other mycobacteria were as frequently isolated from intracellular as from extracellular sources, suggesting that they commonly infect amoebae in nature. We screened the samples as well as the amoeba...... cultures for the M. ulcerans markers IS2404, IS2606 and KR-B. IS2404 was detected in 2% of the environmental samples and in 4% of the amoeba cultures. The IS2404 positive amoeba cultures included up to 5 different protozoan species, and originated both from Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities....... Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of experimental infection of amoebae with M. ulcerans and of the detection of the marker IS2404 in amoeba cultures isolated from the environment. We conclude that amoeba are potential natural hosts for M. ulcerans, yet remain sceptical about their implication...

  12. Risk of Buruli ulcer and detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans in mosquitoes in southeastern Australia.

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    Caroline J Lavender

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer (BU is a destructive skin condition caused by infection with the environmental bacterium, Mycobacterium ulcerans. The mode of transmission of M. ulcerans is not completely understood, but several studies have explored the role of biting insects. In this study, we tested for an association between the detection of M. ulcerans in mosquitoes and the risk of BU disease in humans in an endemic area of southeastern Australia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adult mosquitoes were trapped in seven towns on the Bellarine Peninsula in Victoria, Australia, from December 2004 to December 2009 and screened for M. ulcerans by real-time PCR. The number of laboratory-confirmed cases of BU in permanent residents of these towns diagnosed during the same period was tallied to determine the average cumulative incidence of BU in each location. Pearson's correlation coefficient (r was calculated for the proportion of M. ulcerans-positive mosquitoes per town correlated with the incidence of BU per town. We found a strong dose-response relationship between the detection of M. ulcerans in mosquitoes and the risk of human disease (r, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.92-0.99; p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study strengthen the hypothesis that mosquitoes are involved in the transmission of M. ulcerans in southeastern Australia. This has implications for the development of intervention strategies to control and prevent BU.

  13. On the origin of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer

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    Doig Kenneth D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium ulcerans is an unusual bacterial pathogen with elusive origins. While closely related to the aquatic dwelling M. marinum, M. ulcerans has evolved the ability to produce the immunosuppressive polyketide toxin mycolactone and cause the neglected tropical disease Buruli ulcer. Other mycolactone-producing mycobacteria (MPM have been identified in fish and frogs and given distinct species designations (M. pseudoshottsii, M. shinshuense, M. liflandii and M. marinum, however the evolution of M. ulcerans and its relationship to other MPM has not been defined. Here we report the comparative analysis of whole genome sequences from 30 MPM and five M. marinum. Results A high-resolution phylogeny based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs showed that M. ulcerans and all other MPM represent a single clonal group that evolved from a common M. marinum progenitor. The emergence of the MPM was driven by the acquisition of the pMUM plasmid encoding genes for the biosynthesis of mycolactones. This change was accompanied by the loss of at least 185 genes, with a significant overrepresentation of genes associated with cell wall functions. Cell wall associated genes also showed evidence of substantial adaptive selection, suggesting cell wall remodeling has been critical for the survival of MPM. Fine-grain analysis of the MPM complex revealed at least three distinct lineages, one of which comprised a highly clonal group, responsible for Buruli ulcer in Africa and Australia. This indicates relatively recent transfer of M. ulcerans between these continents, which represent the vast majority of the global Buruli ulcer burden. Our data provide SNPs and gene sequences that can differentiate M. ulcerans lineages, suitable for use in the diagnosis and surveillance of Buruli ulcer. Conclusions M. ulcerans and all mycolactone-producing mycobacteria are specialized variants of a common Mycobacterium marinum progenitor that have

  14. Health services for Buruli ulcer control: lessons from a field study in Ghana.

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    Mercy M Ackumey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer (BU, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans infection, is a debilitating disease of the skin and underlying tissue. The first phase of a BU prevention and treatment programme (BUPaT was initiated from 2005-2008, in the Ga-West and Ga-South municipalities in Ghana to increase access to BU treatment and to improve early case detection and case management. This paper assesses achievements of the BUPaT programme and lessons learnt. It also considers the impact of the programme on broader interests of the health system. METHODS: A mixed-methods approach included patients' records review, review of programme reports, a stakeholder forum, key informant interviews, focus group discussions, clinic visits and observations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Extensive collaboration existed across all levels, (national, municipality, and community, thus strengthening the health system. The programme enhanced capacities of all stakeholders in various aspects of health services delivery and demonstrated the importance of health education and community-based surveillance to create awareness and encourage early treatment. A patient database was also created using recommended World Health Organisation (WHO forms which showed that 297 patients were treated from 2005-2008. The proportion of patients requiring only antibiotic treatment, introduced in the course of the programme, was highest in the last year (35.4% in the first, 23.5% in the second and 42.5% in the third year. Early antibiotic treatment prevented recurrences which was consistent with programme aims. CONCLUSIONS: To improve early case management of BU, strengthening existing clinics to increase access to antibiotic therapy is critical. Intensifying health education and surveillance would ultimately increase early reporting and treatment for all cases. Further research is needed to explain the role of environmental factors for BU contagion. Programme strategies reported in our study: collaboration

  15. Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA Not Detected in Faecal Samples from Buruli Ulcer Patients: Results of a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfo, Fred S.; Lavender, Caroline J.; Fyfe, Janet A. M.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Phillips, Richard O.

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been shown that in a Buruli ulcer (BU) endemic region of southeastern Australia, significant numbers of possums (native tree-dwelling marsupials) have clinical BU disease. Furthermore, based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis, animals with BU lesions (and some without) shed M. ulcerans DNA in their faeces, indicative of bacterial loads of up to 108 organisms/gram. These findings led us to propose that humans might also harbour M. ulcerans in their gastrointestinal tract and shed the bacterium in their faeces. We conducted a pilot study and collected faecal swabs from 26 patients with confirmed BU and 31 healthy household controls. Faecal samples were also collected from 10 healthy controls from non-endemic regions in Ghana. All 67 specimens were negative when tested by IS2404 PCR. The detection sensitivity of this method was ≥104 bacteria per gram (wet-weight) of human faecal material. We conclude that the human gastrointestinal tract is unlikely to be a significant reservoir of M. ulcerans. PMID:21573192

  16. Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA not detected in faecal samples from Buruli ulcer patients: results of a pilot study.

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    Fred S Sarfo

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that in a Buruli ulcer (BU endemic region of southeastern Australia, significant numbers of possums (native tree-dwelling marsupials have clinical BU disease. Furthermore, based on quantitative PCR (qPCR analysis, animals with BU lesions (and some without shed M. ulcerans DNA in their faeces, indicative of bacterial loads of up to 10(8 organisms/gram. These findings led us to propose that humans might also harbour M. ulcerans in their gastrointestinal tract and shed the bacterium in their faeces. We conducted a pilot study and collected faecal swabs from 26 patients with confirmed BU and 31 healthy household controls. Faecal samples were also collected from 10 healthy controls from non-endemic regions in Ghana. All 67 specimens were negative when tested by IS2404 PCR. The detection sensitivity of this method was ≥10(4 bacteria per gram (wet-weight of human faecal material. We conclude that the human gastrointestinal tract is unlikely to be a significant reservoir of M. ulcerans.

  17. Long Term Streptomycin Toxicity in the Treatment of Buruli Ulcer : Follow-up of Participants in the BURULICO Drug Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klis, Sandor; Stienstra, Ymkje; Phillips, Richard O.; Abass, Kabiru Mohammed; Tuah, Wilson; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Buruli Ulcer (BU) is a tropical infectious skin disease that is currently treated with 8 weeks of intramuscular streptomycin and oral rifampicin. As prolonged streptomycin administration can cause both oto- and nephrotoxicity, we evaluated its long term toxicity by following-up former BU

  18. Healthcare seeking behaviour for Buruli ulcer in Benin : a model to capture therapy choice of patients and healthy community members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Annelies A.; Boerma, Roelien P.; Barogui, Yves; Zinsou, Claude; Johnson, R. Christian; Gbovi, Jules; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2008-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a devastating condition emerging in West Africa. We investigated why patients often report late to the hospital. Health seeking behaviour determinants and stigma were studied by in-depth interviews in patients treated in hospital (n = 107), patients treated traditionally (n = 46) of

  19. Comparative Study of the Sensitivity of Different Diagnostic Methods for the Laboratory Diagnosis of Buruli Ulcer Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Adjei, Ohene; Awua-Boateng, Nana-Yaa; Nienhuis, Willemien A.; Kunaa, Letitia; Siegmund, Vera; Nitschke, Joerg; Thompson, William; Klutse, Erasmus; Agbenorku, Pius; Schipf, Alexander; Reu, Simone; Racz, Paul; Fleischer, Bernhard; Beissner, Marcus; Fleischmann, Erna; Helfrich, Kerstin; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Loescher, Thomas; Bretzel, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    Background. Several diagnostic laboratory methods are available for case confirmation of Buruli ulcer disease. This study assessed the sensitivity of various diagnostic tests in relation to clinical presentation of the disease, type of diagnostic specimen, and treatment history. Methods. Swab sample

  20. The Application of Modern Dressings to Buruli Ulcers: Results from a Pilot Implementation Project in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velding, Kristien; Klis, Sandor-Adrian; Abass, K Mohammad; van der Werf, Tjip S; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2016-07-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a tropical, infectious skin disease. The resulting ulcer can take a long time to heal, and a high standard of wound care is essential. Currently, the only dressing used for BU wound care is gauze, and its removal causes pain and bleeding. We performed a pilot implementation project using HydroTac(®) (HARTMANN, Heidenheim, Germany), a modern dressing combining foam with a hydrogel component. For future BU treatment, we recommend to use a more absorbent dressing than the HydroTac dressing used in the current project. However, we show that modern dressings can be applied to BUs and that HydroTac dressings yield clean, healing wounds, and prevent the pain and bleeding associated with gauze dressings. Wound care is a vital but to date neglected aspect of BU management. PMID:27162271

  1. Landscape Fragmentation as a Risk Factor for Buruli Ulcer Disease in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianyong; Smithwick, Erica A H

    2016-07-01

    Land cover and its change have been linked to Buruli ulcer (BU), a rapidly emerging tropical disease. However, it is unknown whether landscape structure affects the disease prevalence. To examine the association between landscape pattern and BU presence, we obtained land cover information for 20 villages in southwestern Ghana from high resolution satellite images, and analyzed the landscape pattern surrounding each village. Eight landscape metrics indicated that landscape patterns between BU case and reference villages were different (P landscape fragmentation and diversity indices were positively associated with BU presence in a village. Specifically, for each increase in patch density and edge density by 100 units, the likelihood of BU presence in a village increased 2.51 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36-4.61) and 4.18 (95% CI = 1.63-10.76) times, respectively. The results suggest that increased landscape fragmentation may pose a risk to the emergence of BU.

  2. David Barker, Buruli ulcer and the epidemiology of a neglected tropical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D I W

    2015-10-01

    In 1969, David Barker, his wife and four children moved to Uganda to work at Makerere Medical School in the capital Kampala. During the 1960s, Makerere had become a research and teaching centre with an international reputation based on the work of Trowell, Burkitt, Hutt and many others who had pioneered studies explaining the disease patterns in the West Nile area on the basis of the local climate, nutrition and lifestyle. David Barker was funded by the Medical Research Council to carry out research on a poorly understood disease, Buruli ulcer, joining Scottish surgeon Wilson Carswell, who was later to achieve fame as the role model for Dr Garrigan in Giles Foden's novel The Last King of Scotland.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Transmitted between Patients with Buruli Ulcer.

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    Nana Ama Amissah

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The wounds of most BU patients are colonized with different microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus.This study investigated possible patient-to-patient transmission events of S. aureus during wound care in a health care center. S. aureus isolates from different BU patients with overlapping visits to the clinic were whole-genome sequenced and analyzed by a gene-by-gene approach using SeqSphere(+ software. In addition, sequence data were screened for the presence of genes that conferred antibiotic resistance.SeqSphere(+ analysis of whole-genome sequence data confirmed transmission of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin susceptible S. aureus among patients that took place during wound care. Interestingly, our sequence data show that the investigated MRSA isolates carry a novel allele of the fexB gene conferring chloramphenicol resistance, which had thus far not been observed in S. aureus.

  4. Family relationship, water contact and occurrence of Buruli ulcer in Benin.

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    Ghislain Emmanuel Sopoh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer is the most widespread mycobacterial disease in the world after leprosy and tuberculosis. How M. ulcerans is introduced into the skin of humans remains unclear, but it appears that individuals living in the same environment may have different susceptibilities. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to determine whether frequent contacts with natural water sources, family relationship or the practice of consanguineous marriages are associated with the occurrence of Buruli ulcer (BU. DESIGN: Case control study. SETTING: Department of Atlantique, Benin. SUBJECTS: BU-confirmed cases that were diagnosed and followed up at the BU detection and treatment center (CDTUB of Allada (Department of the Atlantique, Benin during the period from January 1st, 2006, to June 30th, 2008, with three matched controls (persons who had no signs or symptoms of active or inactive BU for age, gender and village of residence per case. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURED: Contact with natural water sources, BU history in the family and the practice of consanguineous marriages. RESULTS: A total of 416 participants were included in this study, including 104 cases and 312 controls. BU history in the family (p<0.001, adjusted by daily contact with a natural water source (p = 0.007, was significantly associated with higher odds of having BU (OR; 95% CI = 5.5; 3.0-10.0. The practice of consanguineous marriage was not associated with the occurrence of BU (p = 0.40. Mendelian disorders could explain this finding, which may influence individual susceptibility by impairing immunity. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that a combination of genetic factors and behavioral risk factors may increase the susceptibility for developing BU.

  5. A disseminated case of Buruli ulcer at Macenta in the forest region of Guinea in West Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bafende Aombe Eric; Strahm Stefan; Loua Richard.; Beavogui Galada Daniel; Kolie Valentin; Guilavogui Raphael; Keita Samba

    2012-01-01

    The author report a confirmed case of Buruli ulcer at Macenta in the forest region of Guinea in West Africa. An 8 years old girl came to the general hospital of Macenta located in the forest region of Guinea at 800km south-west of Conakry. Her story reveals that she used to swim in the local river of Man region in Ivory Coast. There is no notion of trauma or insect bite .The disease started 2 years ago by a nodule of the skin in her right leg which had ulcerated; she received various traditional treatments.

  6. A Genomic Approach to Resolving Relapse versus Reinfection among Four Cases of Buruli Ulcer.

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    Miriam Eddyani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased availability of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS techniques allows, for the first time, to distinguish relapses from reinfections in patients with multiple Buruli ulcer (BU episodes.We compared the number and location of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs identified by genomic screening between four pairs of Mycobacterium ulcerans isolates collected at the time of first diagnosis and at recurrence, derived from a collection of almost 5000 well characterized clinical samples from one BU treatment center in Benin.The findings suggest that after surgical treatment-without antibiotics-the second episodes were due to relapse rather than reinfection. Since specific antibiotics were introduced for the treatment of BU, the one patient with a culture available from both disease episodes had M. ulcerans isolates with a genomic distance of 20 SNPs, suggesting the patient was most likely reinfected rather than having a relapse.To our knowledge, this study is the first to study recurrences in M. ulcerans using NGS, and to identify exogenous reinfection as causing a recurrence of BU. The occurrence of reinfection highlights the contribution of ongoing exposure to M. ulcerans to disease recurrence, and has implications for vaccine development.

  7. Pain Associated with Wound Care Treatment among Buruli Ulcer Patients from Ghana and Benin.

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    Marike Alferink

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. People living in remote areas in tropical Sub Saharan Africa are mostly affected. Wound care is an important component of BU management; this often needs to be extended for months after the initial antibiotic treatment. BU is reported in the literature as being painless, however clinical observations revealed that some patients experienced pain during wound care. This was the first study on pain intensity during and after wound care in BU patients and factors associated with pain. In Ghana and Benin, 52 BU patients above 5 years of age and their relatives were included between December 2012 and May 2014. Information on pain intensity during and after wound care was obtained during two consecutive weeks using the Wong-Baker Pain Scale. Median pain intensity during wound care was in the lower range (Mdn = 2, CV = 1, but severe pain (score > 6 was reported in nearly 30% of the patients. Nevertheless, only one patient received pain medication. Pain declined over time to low scores 2 hours after treatment. Factors associated with higher self-reported pain scores were; male gender, fear prior to treatment, pain during the night prior to treatment, and pain caused by cleaning the wound. The general idea that BU is painless is incorrect for the wound care procedure. This procedural pain deserves attention and appropriate intervention.

  8. Pain Associated with Wound Care Treatment among Buruli Ulcer Patients from Ghana and Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alferink, Marike; de Zeeuw, Janine; Sopoh, Ghislain; Agossadou, Chantal; Abass, Karibu M.; Phillips, Richard O.; Loth, Susanne; Jutten, Emma; Barogui, Yves T.; Stewart, Roy E.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. People living in remote areas in tropical Sub Saharan Africa are mostly affected. Wound care is an important component of BU management; this often needs to be extended for months after the initial antibiotic treatment. BU is reported in the literature as being painless, however clinical observations revealed that some patients experienced pain during wound care. This was the first study on pain intensity during and after wound care in BU patients and factors associated with pain. In Ghana and Benin, 52 BU patients above 5 years of age and their relatives were included between December 2012 and May 2014. Information on pain intensity during and after wound care was obtained during two consecutive weeks using the Wong-Baker Pain Scale. Median pain intensity during wound care was in the lower range (Mdn = 2, CV = 1), but severe pain (score > 6) was reported in nearly 30% of the patients. Nevertheless, only one patient received pain medication. Pain declined over time to low scores 2 hours after treatment. Factors associated with higher self-reported pain scores were; male gender, fear prior to treatment, pain during the night prior to treatment, and pain caused by cleaning the wound. The general idea that BU is painless is incorrect for the wound care procedure. This procedural pain deserves attention and appropriate intervention. PMID:26030764

  9. Identification of the Mycobacterium ulcerans protein MUL_3720 as a promising target for the development of a diagnostic test for Buruli ulcer.

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    Anita Dreyer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a devastating skin disease, occurring mainly in remote West African communities with poor access to health care. Early case detection and subsequent antibiotic treatment are essential to counteract the progression of the characteristic chronic ulcerative lesions. Since the accuracy of clinical BU diagnosis is limited, laboratory reconfirmation is crucial. However, currently available diagnostic techniques with sufficient sensitivity and specificity require infrastructure and resources only accessible at a few reference centres in the African endemic countries. Hence, the development of a simple, rapid, sensitive and specific point-of-care diagnostic tool is one of the major research priorities for BU. In this study, we have identified a previously unknown M. ulcerans protein, MUL_3720, as a promising target for antigen capture-based detection assays. We show that MUL_3720 is highly expressed by M. ulcerans and has no orthologs in other prevalent pathogenic mycobacteria. We generated a panel of anti-MUL_3720 antibodies and used them to confirm a cell wall location for MUL_3720. These antibodies could also specifically detect M. ulcerans in infected human tissue samples as well as in lysates of infected mouse footpads. A bacterial 2-hybrid screen suggested a potential role for MUL_3720 in cell wall biosynthesis pathways. Finally, we demonstrate that a combination of MUL_3720 specific antibody reagents in a sandwich-ELISA format has sufficient sensitivity to make them suitable for the development of antigen capture-based diagnostic tests for BU.

  10. Good Quality of Life in Former Buruli Ulcer Patients with Small Lesions : Long-Term Follow-up of the BURULICO Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klis, Sandor; Ranchor, Adelita; Phillips, Richard O.; Abass, Kabiru M.; Tuah, Wilson; Loth, Susanne; Velding, Kristien; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2014-01-01

    Background: Buruli Ulcer is a tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which, due to scarring and contractures can lead to stigma and functional limitations. However, recent advances in treatment, combined with increased public health efforts have the potential to significantly improv

  11. Perceptions on the Effectiveness of Treatment and the Timeline of Buruli Ulcer Influence Pre-Hospital Delay Reported by Healthy Individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alferink, Marike; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Sopoh, Ghislain E.; Agossadou, Didier C.; Barogui, Yves T.; Assouto, Frederic; Agossadou, Chantal; Stewart, Roy E.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Delay in seeking treatment at the hospital is a major challenge in current Buruli ulcer control; it is associated with severe sequelae and functional limitations. Choosing alternative treatment and psychological, social and practical factors appear to influence delay. Objectives were to

  12. Mycolactone diffuses into the peripheral blood of Buruli ulcer patients--implications for diagnosis and disease monitoring.

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    Fred S Sarfo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer (BU, is unique among human pathogens in its capacity to produce a polyketide-derived macrolide called mycolactone, making this molecule an attractive candidate target for diagnosis and disease monitoring. Whether mycolactone diffuses from ulcerated lesions in clinically accessible samples and is modulated by antibiotic therapy remained to be established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Peripheral blood and ulcer exudates were sampled from patients at various stages of antibiotic therapy in Ghana and Ivory Coast. Total lipids were extracted from serum, white cell pellets and ulcer exudates with organic solvents. The presence of mycolactone in these extracts was then analyzed by a recently published, field-friendly method using thin layer chromatography and fluorescence detection. This approach did not allow us to detect mycolactone accurately, because of a high background due to co-extracted human lipids. We thus used a previously established approach based on high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. By this means, we could identify structurally intact mycolactone in ulcer exudates and serum of patients, and evaluate the impact of antibiotic treatment on the concentration of mycolactone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study provides the proof of concept that assays based on mycolactone detection in serum and ulcer exudates can form the basis of BU diagnostic tests. However, the identification of mycolactone required a technology that is not compatible with field conditions and point-of-care assays for mycolactone detection remain to be worked out. Notably, we found mycolactone in ulcer exudates harvested at the end of antibiotic therapy, suggesting that the toxin is eliminated by BU patients at a slow rate. Our results also indicated that mycolactone titres in the serum may reflect a positive response to antibiotics, a possibility that it will be

  13. Recent advances: role of mycolactone in the pathogenesis and monitoring of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection/Buruli ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Phillips, Richard; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Simmonds, Rachel E

    2016-01-01

    Infection of subcutaneous tissue with Mycobacterium ulcerans can lead to chronic skin ulceration known as Buruli ulcer. The pathogenesis of this neglected tropical disease is dependent on a lipid-like toxin, mycolactone, which diffuses through tissue away from the infecting organisms. Since its identification in 1999, this molecule has been intensely studied to elucidate its cytotoxic and immunosuppressive properties. Two recent major advances identifying the underlying molecular targets for mycolactone have been described. First, it can target scaffolding proteins (such as Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein), which control actin dynamics in adherent cells and therefore lead to detachment and cell death by anoikis. Second, it prevents the co-translational translocation (and therefore production) of many proteins that pass through the endoplasmic reticulum for secretion or placement in cell membranes. These pleiotropic effects underpin the range of cell-specific functional defects in immune and other cells that contact mycolactone during infection. The dose and duration of mycolactone exposure for these different cells explains tissue necrosis and the paucity of immune cells in the ulcers. This review discusses recent advances in the field, revisits older findings in this context and highlights current developments in structure-function studies as well as methodology that make mycolactone a promising diagnostic biomarker. PMID:26572803

  14. Cultural Understanding of Wounds, Buruli Ulcers and Their Management at the Obom Sub-district of the Ga South Municipality of the Greater Accra Region of Ghana.

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    Eric Koka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with the aim to understand some of the cultural belief systems in the management of wounds and patients practices that could contaminate wounds at the Obom sub-district of the Ga South Municipality of Ghana.This was an ethnographic study using in-depth interviews, Focus Group Discussions and participant observation techniques for data collection. Observations were done on Buruli ulcer patients to document how they integrate local and modern wound management practices in the day-to-day handling of their wounds. Content analysis was done after the data were subjected to thematic coding and representative narratives selected for presentation.It was usually believed that wounds were caused by charms or spirits and, therefore, required the attention of a native healer. In instances where some patients' wounds were dressed in the hospital by clinicians whose condition/age/sex contradict the belief of the patient, the affected often redress the wounds later at home. Some of the materials often used for such wound dressing include urine and concoctions made of charcoal and gunpowder with the belief of driving out evil spirits from the wounds.Clinicians must therefore be aware of these cultural beliefs and take them into consideration when managing Buruli ulcer wounds to prevent redressing at home after clinical treatment. This may go a long way to reduce secondary infections that have been observed in Buruli ulcer wounds.

  15. Experimental infection of the pig with Mycobacterium ulcerans: a novel model for studying the pathogenesis of Buruli ulcer disease.

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    Miriam Bolz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a slowly progressing, necrotising disease of the skin caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. Non-ulcerative manifestations are nodules, plaques and oedema, which may progress to ulceration of large parts of the skin. Histopathologically, BU is characterized by coagulative necrosis, fat cell ghosts, epidermal hyperplasia, clusters of extracellular acid fast bacilli (AFB in the subcutaneous tissue and lack of major inflammatory infiltration. The mode of transmission of BU is not clear and there is only limited information on the early pathogenesis of the disease available.For evaluating the potential of the pig as experimental infection model for BU, we infected pigs subcutaneously with different doses of M. ulcerans. The infected skin sites were excised 2.5 or 6.5 weeks after infection and processed for histopathological analysis. With doses of 2 × 10(7 and 2 × 10(6 colony forming units (CFU we observed the development of nodular lesions that subsequently progressed to ulcerative or plaque-like lesions. At lower inoculation doses signs of infection found after 2.5 weeks had spontaneously resolved at 6.5 weeks. The observed macroscopic and histopathological changes closely resembled those found in M. ulcerans disease in humans.Our results demonstrate that the pig can be infected with M. ulcerans. Productive infection leads to the development of lesions that closely resemble human BU lesions. The pig infection model therefore has great potential for studying the early pathogenesis of BU and for the development of new therapeutic and prophylactic interventions.

  16. What role do traditional beliefs play in treatment seeking and delay for Buruli ulcer disease?--insights from a mixed methods study in Cameroon.

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    Koen Peeters Grietens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Victims of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD frequently report to specialized units at a late stage of the disease. This delay has been associated with local beliefs and a preference for traditional healing linked to a reportedly mystical origin of the disease. We assessed the role beliefs play in determining BUD sufferers' choice between traditional and biomedical treatments. METHODS: Anthropological fieldwork was conducted in community and clinical settings in the region of Ayos and Akonolinga in Central Cameroon. The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, triangulating a qualitative strand based on ethnographic research and quantitative data obtained through a survey presented to all patients at the Ayos and Akonolinga hospitals (N = 79 at the time of study and in four endemic communities (N = 73 belonging to the hospitals' catchment area. RESULTS: The analysis of BUD sufferers' health-seeking behaviour showed extremely complex therapeutic itineraries, including various attempts and failures both in the biomedical and traditional fields. Contrary to expectations, nearly half of all hospital patients attributed their illness to mystical causes, while traditional healers admitted patients they perceived to be infected by natural causes. Moreover, both patients in hospitals and in communities often combined elements of both types of treatments. Ultimately, perceptions regarding the effectiveness of the treatment, the option for local treatment as a cost prevention strategy and the characteristics of the doctor-patient relationship were more determinant for treatment choice than beliefs. DISCUSSION: The ascription of delay and treatment choice to beliefs constitutes an over-simplification of BUD health-seeking behaviour and places the responsibility directly on the shoulders of BUD sufferers while potentially neglecting other structural elements. While more efficacious treatment in the biomedical sector is likely to

  17. The "Buruli Score": Development of a Multivariable Prediction Model for Diagnosis of Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Individuals with Ulcerative Skin Lesions, Akonolinga, Cameroon.

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    Yolanda K Mueller

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Access to laboratory diagnosis can be a challenge for individuals suspected of Buruli Ulcer (BU. Our objective was to develop a clinical score to assist clinicians working in resource-limited settings for BU diagnosis.Between 2011 and 2013, individuals presenting at Akonolinga District Hospital, Cameroon, were enrolled consecutively. Clinical data were collected prospectively. Based on a latent class model using laboratory test results (ZN, PCR, culture, patients were categorized into high, or low BU likelihood. Variables associated with a high BU likelihood in a multivariate logistic model were included in the Buruli score. Score cut-offs were chosen based on calculated predictive values. Of 325 patients with an ulcerative lesion, 51 (15.7% had a high BU likelihood. The variables identified for the Buruli score were: characteristic smell (+3 points, yellow color (+2, female gender (+2, undermining (+1, green color (+1, lesion hyposensitivity (+1, pain at rest (-1, size >5cm (-1, locoregional adenopathy (-2, age above 20 up to 40 years (-3, or above 40 (-5. This score had AUC of 0.86 (95%CI 0.82-0.89, indicating good discrimination between infected and non-infected individuals. The cut-off to reasonably exclude BU was set at scores <0 (NPV 96.5%; 95%CI 93.0-98.6. The treatment threshold was set at a cut-off ≥4 (PPV 69.0%; 95%CI 49.2-84.7. Patients with intermediate BU probability needed to be tested by PCR.We developed a decisional algorithm based on a clinical score assessing BU probability. The Buruli score still requires further validation before it can be recommended for wide use.

  18. Cellular immunity confers transient protection in experimental Buruli ulcer following BCG or mycolactone-negative Mycobacterium ulcerans vaccination.

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    Alexandra G Fraga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer (BU is an emerging infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that can result in extensive necrotizing cutaneous lesions due to the cytotoxic exotoxin mycolactone. There is no specific vaccine against BU but reports show some degree of cross-reactive protection conferred by M. bovis BCG immunization. Alternatively, an M. ulcerans-specific immunization could be a better preventive strategy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we used the mouse model to characterize the histological and cytokine profiles triggered by vaccination with either BCG or mycolactone-negative M. ulcerans, followed by footpad infection with virulent M. ulcerans. We observed that BCG vaccination significantly delayed the onset of M. ulcerans growth and footpad swelling through the induction of an earlier and sustained IFN-γ T cell response in the draining lymph node (DLN. BCG vaccination also resulted in cell-mediated immunity (CMI in M. ulcerans-infected footpads, given the predominance of a chronic mononuclear infiltrate positive for iNOS, as well as increased and sustained levels of IFN-γ and TNF. No significant IL-4, IL-17 or IL-10 responses were detected in the footpad or the DLN, in either infected or vaccinated mice. Despite this protective Th1 response, BCG vaccination did not avoid the later progression of M. ulcerans infection, regardless of challenge dose. Immunization with mycolactone-deficient M. ulcerans also significantly delayed the progression of footpad infection, swelling and ulceration, but ultimately M. ulcerans pathogenic mechanisms prevailed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The delay in the emergence of pathology observed in vaccinated mice emphasizes the relevance of protective Th1 recall responses against M. ulcerans. In future studies it will be important to determine how the transient CMI induced by vaccination is compromised.

  19. Mycolactone-Dependent Depletion of Endothelial Cell Thrombomodulin Is Strongly Associated with Fibrin Deposition in Buruli Ulcer Lesions.

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    Joy Ogbechi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A well-known histopathological feature of diseased skin in Buruli ulcer (BU is coagulative necrosis caused by the Mycobacterium ulcerans macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Since the underlying mechanism is not known, we have investigated the effect of mycolactone on endothelial cells, focussing on the expression of surface anticoagulant molecules involved in the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Congenital deficiencies in this natural anticoagulant pathway are known to induce thrombotic complications such as purpura fulimans and spontaneous necrosis. Mycolactone profoundly decreased thrombomodulin (TM expression on the surface of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC at doses as low as 2 ng/ml and as early as 8 hrs after exposure. TM activates protein C by altering thrombin's substrate specificity, and exposure of HDMVEC to mycolactone for 24 hours resulted in an almost complete loss of the cells' ability to produce activated protein C. Loss of TM was shown to be due to a previously described mechanism involving mycolactone-dependent blockade of Sec61 translocation that results in proteasome-dependent degradation of newly synthesised ER-transiting proteins. Indeed, depletion from cells determined by live-cell imaging of cells stably expressing a recombinant TM-GFP fusion protein occurred at the known turnover rate. In order to determine the relevance of these findings to BU disease, immunohistochemistry of punch biopsies from 40 BU lesions (31 ulcers, nine plaques was performed. TM abundance was profoundly reduced in the subcutis of 78% of biopsies. Furthermore, it was confirmed that fibrin deposition is a common feature of BU lesions, particularly in the necrotic areas. These findings indicate that there is decreased ability to control thrombin generation in BU skin. Mycolactone's effects on normal endothelial cell function, including its ability to activate the protein C anticoagulant pathway are strongly associated with this

  20. Long term streptomycin toxicity in the treatment of Buruli Ulcer: follow-up of participants in the BURULICO drug trial.

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    Sandor Klis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli Ulcer (BU is a tropical infectious skin disease that is currently treated with 8 weeks of intramuscular streptomycin and oral rifampicin. As prolonged streptomycin administration can cause both oto- and nephrotoxicity, we evaluated its long term toxicity by following-up former BU patients that had received either 4 or 8 weeks of streptomycin in addition to other drugs between 2006 and 2008, in the context of a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Former patients were retrieved in 2012, and oto- and nephrotoxicity were determined by audiometry and serum creatinine levels. Data were compared with baseline and week 8 measurements during the drug trial. RESULTS: Of the total of 151 former patients, 127 (84% were retrieved. Ototoxicity was present in 29% of adults and 25% of children. Adults in the 8 week streptomycin group had significantly higher hearing thresholds in all frequencies at long term follow-up, and these differences were most prominent in the high frequencies. In children, no differences between the two treatment arms were found. Nephrotoxicity that had been detected in 14% of adults and in 13% of children during treatment, was present in only 2.4% of patients at long term follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged streptomycin administration in the adult study subjects caused significant persistent hearing loss, especially in the high frequency range. Nephrotoxicity was also present in both adults and children but appeared to be transient. Streptomycin should be given with caution especially in patients aged 16 or older, and in individuals with concurrent risks for renal dysfunction or hearing loss.

  1. Burden of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer and the underreporting ratio in the territory of Songololo, Democratic Republic of Congo.

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    Delphin Mavinga Phanzu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium ulcerans, also known as Buruli ulcer (BU, represents the third most common mycobacterial disease in the world after tuberculosis and leprosy. Data on the burden of BU disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo are scanty. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence rate and the distribution of BU in the Songololo Territory, and to assess the coverage of the existing hospital-based reporting system. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey (July-August 2008 using the door-to-door method simultaneously in the two rural health zones (RHZ of the Songololo Territory (RHZ of Kimpese and Nsona-Mpangu, each containing twenty health areas. Cases were defined clinically as active BU and inactive BU in accordance with WHO-case definitions. RESULTS: We detected 775 BU patients (259 active and 516 inactive in a total population of 237,418 inhabitants. The overall prevalence of BU in Songololo Territory was 3.3/1000 inhabitants, varying from 0 to 27.5/1000 between health areas. Of the 259 patients with active BU, 18 (7% had been reported in the hospital-based reporting system at Kimpese in the 6-8 months prior to the survey. CONCLUSION: The survey demonstrated a huge variation of prevalence between health areas in Songololo Territory and gross underreporting of BU cases in the hospital-based reporting system. Data obtained may contribute to better targeted and improved BU control interventions, and serve as a baseline for future assessments of the control program.

  2. Community-based study on knowledge, attitude and practice on the mode of transmission, prevention and treatment of the Buruli ulcer in Ga West District, Ghana.

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    Renzaho, Andre M N; Woods, Paul V; Ackumey, Mercy M; Harvey, Simon K; Kotin, Jacob

    2007-03-01

    Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), a devastating tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, occurs in more than 80% of the administrative districts of Ghana. To elucidate community perceptions and understanding of the aetiology of BUD, attitudes towards Buruli patients and treatment-seeking behaviours, we conducted a survey with 504 heads of households and seven focus group discussions in Ga West District, Ghana. Although 67% of participants regarded BUD as a health problem, 53% did not know its cause. Sixteen per cent attributed the cause to drinking non-potable water, 8.1% mentioned poor personal hygiene or dirty surroundings, and 5.5% identified swimming or wading in ponds as a risk factor. About 5.2% thought that witchcraft and curses cause BUD, and 71.8% indicated that BU sufferers first seek treatment from herbalists and only refer to the hospital as a last resort. The main reasons were prospects of prolonged hospital stay, cost of transport, loss of earnings and opportunity associated with parents attending their children's hospitalization over extended period, delays in being attended by medical staff, and not knowing the cause of the disease or required treatment. The level of acceptance of BUD sufferers was high in adults but less so in children. The challenge facing health workers is to break the vicious cycle of poor medical outcomes leading to poor attitudes to hospital treatment in the community. Because herbalists are often the first people consulted by those who contract the disease, they need to be trained in early recognition of the pre-ulcerative stage of Buruli lesions.

  3. Steps Toward Creating A Therapeutic Community for Inpatients Suffering from Chronic Ulcers: Lessons from Allada Buruli Ulcer Treatment Hospital in Benin

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    Amoussouhoui, Arnaud Setondji; Johnson, Roch Christian; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Agbo, Ines Elvire; Aoulou, Paulin; Houezo, Jean-Gabin; Tingbe-Azalou, Albert; Boyer, Micah; Nichter, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Reducing social distance between hospital staff and patients and establishing clear lines of communication is a major challenge when providing in-patient care for people afflicted by Buruli ulcer (BU) and chronic ulcers. Research on hospitals as therapeutic communities is virtually non-existent in Africa and is currently being called for by medical anthropologists working in the field of health service and policy planning. This paper describes a pioneering attempt to establish a therapeutic community for patients suffering from BU and other chronic ulcers requiring long term hospital care in Benin. Methods A six-month pilot project was undertaken with the objectives of establishing a therapeutic community and evaluating its impact on practitioner and patient relations. The project was designed and implemented by a team of social scientists working in concert with the current and previous director of a hospital serving patients suffering from advanced stage BU and other chronic ulcers. Qualitative research initially investigated patients’ understanding of their illness and its treatment, identified questions patients had about their hospitalization, and ascertained their level of social support. Newly designed question–answer health education sessions were developed. Following these hospital wide education sessions, open forums were held each week to provide an opportunity for patients and hospital staff to express concerns and render sources of discontent transparent. Patient group representatives then met with hospital staff to problem solve issues in a non-confrontational manner. Psychosocial support for individual patients was provided in a second intervention which took the form of drop-in counseling sessions with social scientists trained to serve as therapy facilitators and culture brokers. Results Interviews with patients revealed that most patients had very little information about the identity of their illness and the duration of their

  4. Buruli ulcer disease prevalence in Benin, West Africa: Associations with land use/cover and the identification of disease clusters

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    Wagner, T.; Benbow, M.E.; Brenden, T.O.; Qi, J.; Johnson, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, caused by infection with the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans, is an emerging infectious disease in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. Although vectors and modes of transmission remain unknown, it is hypothesized that the transmission of BU disease is associated with human activities in or around aquatic environments, and that characteristics of the landscape (e.g., land use/cover) play a role in mediating BU disease. Several studies performed at relatively small spatial scales (e.g., within a single village or region of a country) support these hypotheses; however, if BU disease is associated with land use/cover characteristics, either through spatial constraints on vector-host dynamics or by mediating human activities, then large-scale (i.e., country-wide) associations should also emerge. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate associations between BU disease prevalence in villages in Benin, West Africa and surrounding land use/cover patterns and other map-based characteristics, and (2) identify areas with greater and lower than expected prevalence rates (i.e., disease clusters) to assist with the development of prevention and control programs. Results: Our landscape-based models identified low elevation, rural villages surrounded by forest land cover, and located in drainage basins with variable wetness patterns as being associated with higher BU disease prevalence rates. We also identified five spatial disease clusters. Three of the five clusters contained villages with greater than expected prevalence rates and two clusters contained villages with lower than expected prevalence rates. Those villages with greater than expected BU disease prevalence rates spanned a fairly narrow region of south-central Benin. Conclusion: Our analyses suggest that interactions between natural land cover and human alterations to the landscape likely play a role in the dynamics of BU disease. For example

  5. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Laboratory Confirmation of Buruli Ulcer Disease-Towards a Point-of-Care Test.

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    Marcus Beissner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available As the major burden of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD occurs in remote rural areas, development of point-of-care (POC tests is considered a research priority to bring diagnostic services closer to the patients. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, a simple, robust and cost-effective technology, has been selected as a promising POC test candidate. Three BUD-specific LAMP assays are available to date, but various technical challenges still hamper decentralized application. To overcome the requirement of cold-chains for transport and storage of reagents, the aim of this study was to establish a dry-reagent-based LAMP assay (DRB-LAMP employing lyophilized reagents.Following the design of an IS2404 based conventional LAMP (cLAMP assay suitable to apply lyophilized reagents, a lyophylization protocol for the DRB-LAMP format was developed. Clinical performance of cLAMP was validated through testing of 140 clinical samples from 91 suspected BUD cases by routine assays, i.e. IS2404 dry-reagent-based (DRB PCR, conventional IS2404 PCR (cPCR, IS2404 qPCR, compared to cLAMP. Whereas qPCR rendered an additional 10% of confirmed cases and samples respectively, case confirmation and positivity rates of DRB-PCR or cPCR (64.84% and 56.43%; 100% concordant results in both assays and cLAMP (62.64% and 52.86% were comparable and there was no significant difference between the sensitivity of the assays (DRB PCR and cPCR, 86.76%; cLAMP, 83.82%. Likewise, sensitivity of cLAMP (95.83% and DRB-LAMP (91.67% were comparable as determined on a set of 24 samples tested positive in all routine assays.Both LAMP formats constitute equivalent alternatives to conventional PCR techniques. Provided the envisaged availability of field friendly DNA extraction formats, both assays are suitable for decentralized laboratory confirmation of BUD, whereby DRB-LAMP scores with the additional advantage of not requiring cold-chains. As validation of the assays was conducted in a third

  6. "It is me who endures but my family that suffers": social isolation as a consequence of the household cost burden of Buruli ulcer free of charge hospital treatment.

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    Koen Peeters Grietens

    Full Text Available Despite free of charge biomedical treatment, the cost burden of Buruli ulcer disease (Bu hospitalisation in Central Cameroon accounts for 25% of households' yearly earnings, surpassing the threshold of 10%, which is generally considered catastrophic for the household economy, and calling into question the sustainability of current Bu programmes. The high non-medical costs and productivity loss for Bu patients and their households make household involvement in the healing process unsustainable. 63% of households cease providing social and financial support for patients as a coping strategy, resulting in the patient's isolation at the hospital. Social isolation itself was cited by in-patients as the principal cause for abandonment of biomedical treatment. These findings demonstrate that further research and investment in Bu are urgently needed to evaluate new intervention strategies that are socially acceptable and appropriate in the local context.

  7. Good quality of life in former Buruli ulcer patients with small lesions: long-term follow-up of the BURULICO trial.

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    Sandor Klis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Buruli Ulcer is a tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which, due to scarring and contractures can lead to stigma and functional limitations. However, recent advances in treatment, combined with increased public health efforts have the potential to significantly improve disease outcome.To study the Quality of Life (QoL of former Buruli Ulcer patients who, in the context of a randomized controlled trial, reported early with small lesions (cross-sectional diameter <10 cm, and received a full course of antibiotic treatment.127 Participants of the BURULICO drug trial in Ghana were revisited. All former patients aged 16 or older completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI and the abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life scale (WHOQOL-BREF. The WHOQOL-BREF was also administered to 82 matched healthy controls. Those younger than 16 completed the Childrens' Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI only.The median (Inter Quartile Range score on the DLQI was 0 (0-4, indicating good QoL. 85% of former patients indicated no effect, or only a small effect of the disease on their current life. Former patients also indicated good QoL on the physical and psychological domains of the WHOQOL-BREF, and scored significantly higher than healthy controls on these domains. There was a weak correlation between the DLQI and scar size (ρ = 0.32; p<0.001.BU patients who report early with small lesions and receive 8 weeks of antimicrobial therapy have a good QoL at long-term follow-up. These findings contrast with the debilitating sequelae often reported in BU, and highlight the importance of early case detection.

  8. Good Quality of Life in Former Buruli Ulcer Patients with Small Lesions: Long-Term Follow-up of the BURULICO Trial

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    Klis, Sandor; Ranchor, Adelita; Phillips, Richard O.; Abass, Kabiru M.; Tuah, Wilson; Loth, Susanne; Velding, Kristien; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli Ulcer is a tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which, due to scarring and contractures can lead to stigma and functional limitations. However, recent advances in treatment, combined with increased public health efforts have the potential to significantly improve disease outcome. Objectives To study the Quality of Life (QoL) of former Buruli Ulcer patients who, in the context of a randomized controlled trial, reported early with small lesions (cross-sectional diameter <10 cm), and received a full course of antibiotic treatment. Methods 127 Participants of the BURULICO drug trial in Ghana were revisited. All former patients aged 16 or older completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life scale (WHOQOL-BREF). The WHOQOL-BREF was also administered to 82 matched healthy controls. Those younger than 16 completed the Childrens' Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) only. Results The median (Inter Quartile Range) score on the DLQI was 0 (0–4), indicating good QoL. 85% of former patients indicated no effect, or only a small effect of the disease on their current life. Former patients also indicated good QoL on the physical and psychological domains of the WHOQOL-BREF, and scored significantly higher than healthy controls on these domains. There was a weak correlation between the DLQI and scar size (ρ = 0.32; p<0.001). Conclusions BU patients who report early with small lesions and receive 8 weeks of antimicrobial therapy have a good QoL at long-term follow-up. These findings contrast with the debilitating sequelae often reported in BU, and highlight the importance of early case detection. PMID:25010061

  9. Clinical Epidemiology of Buruli Ulcer from Benin (2005-2013: Effect of Time-Delay to Diagnosis on Clinical Forms and Severe Phenotypes.

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    Carlos Capela

    Full Text Available Buruli Ulcer (BU is a neglected infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that is responsible for severe necrotizing cutaneous lesions that may be associated with bone involvement. Clinical presentations of BU lesions are classically classified as papules, nodules, plaques and edematous infiltration, ulcer or osteomyelitis. Within these different clinical forms, lesions can be further classified as severe forms based on focality (multiple lesions, lesions' size (>15 cm diameter or WHO Category (WHO Category 3 lesions. There are studies reporting an association between delay in seeking medical care and the development of ulcerative forms of BU or osteomyelitis, but the effect of time-delay on the emergence of lesions classified as severe has not been addressed. To address both issues, and in a cohort of laboratory-confirmed BU cases, 476 patients from a medical center in Allada, Benin, were studied. In this laboratory-confirmed cohort, we validated previous observations, demonstrating that time-delay is statistically related to the clinical form of BU. Indeed, for non-ulcerated forms (nodule, edema, and plaque the median time-delay was 32.5 days (IQR 30.0-67.5, while for ulcerated forms it was 60 days (IQR 20.0-120.0 (p = 0.009, and for bone lesions, 365 days (IQR 228.0-548.0. On the other hand, we show here that time-delay is not associated with the more severe phenotypes of BU, such as multi-focal lesions (median 90 days; IQR 56-217.5; p = 0.09, larger lesions (diameter >15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-120; p = 0.92 or category 3 WHO classification (median 60 days; IQR 30-150; p = 0.20, when compared with unifocal (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, small lesions (diameter ≤15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, or WHO category 1+2 lesions (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, respectively. Our results demonstrate that after an initial period of progression towards ulceration or bone involvement, BU lesions become stable regarding size and focal

  10. Beninese Medicinal Plants as a Source of Antimycobacterial Agents: Bioguided Fractionation and In Vitro Activity of Alkaloids Isolated from Holarrhena floribunda Used in Traditional Treatment of Buruli Ulcer

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    Achille Yemoa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU imposes a serious economic burden on affected households and on health systems that are involved in diagnosing the disease and treating patients. Research is needed to find cost-effective therapies for this costly disease. Plants have always been an important source of new pharmacologically active molecules. Consequently we decided to undertake the study of plants used in traditional treatment of BU in Benin and investigate their antimycobacterial activity as well as their chemical composition. Extracts from forty-four (44 plant species were selected on account of reported traditional uses for the treatment of BU in Benin and were assayed for antimycobacterial activities. Crude hydroethanolic extract from aerial parts of Holarrhena floribunda (G. Don T. Durand and Schinz was found to have significant antimycobacterial activity against M. ulcerans (MIC = 125 µg/mL. We describe here the identification of four steroidal alkaloids from Mycobacterium ulcerans growth-inhibiting fractions of the alkaloidal extract of the aerial parts of Holarrhena floribunda. Holadysamine was purified in sufficient amount to allow the determination of its MCI (=50 µg/mL. These results give some support to the use of this plant in traditional medicine.

  11. Socio-Environmental Factors Associated with the Risk of Contracting Buruli Ulcer in Tiassale, South Cote d'Ivoire: A Case-Control Study.

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    Raymond T A S N'krumah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a cutaneous infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The exact mode of transmission remains elusive; yet, some studies identified environmental, socio-sanitary, and behavioral risk factors. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of such factors to contracting BU in Tiassalé, south Côte d'Ivoire.A case-control study was conducted in 2012. Cases were BU patients diagnosed according to clinical definition put forth by the World Health Organization, readily confirmed by IS2404 polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis prior to our study and recruited at one of the health centers of the district. Two controls were matched for each control, by age group (to the nearest 5 years, sex, and living community. Participants were interviewed after providing oral witnessed consent, assessing behavioral, environmental, and socio-sanitary factors.A total of 51 incident and prevalent cases and 102 controls were enrolled. Sex ratio (male:female was 0.9. Median age was 25 years (range: 5-70 years. Regular contact with unprotected surface water (adjusted odds ratio (aOR = 6.5; 95% confidence interval (CI = 2.1-19.7 and absence of protective equipment during agricultural activities (aOR = 18.5, 95% CI = 5.2-66.7 were identified as the main factors associated with the risk of contracting BU. Etiologic fractions among exposed to both factors were 84.9% and 94.6%, respectively. Good knowledge about the risks that may result in BU (aOR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1-0.8 and perception about the disease causes (aOR = 0.1, 95% CI = 0.02-0.3 showed protection against BU with a respective preventive fraction of 70% and 90%.Main risk factors identified in this study were the contact with unprotected water bodies through daily activities and the absence of protective equipment during agricultural activities. An effective strategy to reduce the incidence of BU should involve compliance with protective equipment during agricultural

  12. Endemic Fluorosis &Non-Ulcer Dyspepsia in J&K State

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    Inder Gupta, M.Kjyoti, Shashi Kant

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of endemic fluorosis in J&K State andcause of non-ulcer dyspepsia. A total of 1,61790 individuals in the age range of 5 to 70 years werestudied. In district, Doda 90% of the population studied were suffering from dental fluorosis, 12%were having skeletal deformities as well as bony pains and 60% ofthe population above the age of25 years were suffering from dyspepsia. In other districts only 26% of the population studied werehaving dental fluorosis, 7% had skeletal deformities and 42% were suffering from dyspepsia. Thenuoride content in water of different sources ranged from 1.153 to 27.216 PPM.Two hundred patients suffering from dental and skeletal fluorosis, having severe symptoms ofupper gastrioilllcstinal tract like retrosternal burning distention ofabdomen, pain epigastrium, soureructations and excessive flatulence or constipation were studied alongwith 10 control normalsubjects. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy studies showcd that 82 patients had mild to moderateantritis and pyloritis, 35 had multiple erosions in stomach, 36 had duodenitis and 47 had normalstudy. Histopathological examination of biopsies of stomach and jejunum revealed non-specificchanges but scanning electron microscopic examination showed scanty microvilli or bald epitheliumof the nlucosa, surface abrasions, desquamated epithelium and classical cracked clay appearance.This study concludes that fluorosis is in endemic form in J&K State and non-ulcer dyspepsia'is very common in these patients because of drinking of highly fluoridated waler.

  13. Endemism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidal, J.E.

    1969-01-01

    In the Flore générale de l’Indochine, 217 families have been described, 1794 genera, c. 9000 species. There is an amount of endemism, on the basis of which attempts have been made towards an inner subdivision of the region. The problem is, that the endemism is of uncertain status. A few percentages

  14. Plants used in the treatment of leishmanial ulcers due to Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in an endemic area of Bahia, Brazil

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    Flávio França; Ednaldo L. Lago; Philip D. Marsden

    1996-01-01

    This paper records the plants used in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (L(V)b) among the rural population of a cocoa- producing coastal area of Bahia state, Brazil. An enquiry conducted among a hundred patients identified 49 plant species used to treat skin ulceration caused by this Leishmania species. The principal plants used are caju-branco (Anacardium occidentale - Anacardiaceae), used by 65% of the population, folha-fogo (Clidemia hirta - ...

  15. Plants used in the treatment of leishmanial ulcers due to Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis in an endemic area of Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio França

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper records the plants used in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis (L(Vb among the rural population of a cocoa- producing coastal area of Bahia state, Brazil. An enquiry conducted among a hundred patients identified 49 plant species used to treat skin ulceration caused by this Leishmania species. The principal plants used are caju-branco (Anacardium occidentale - Anacardiaceae, used by 65% of the population, folha-fogo (Clidemia hirta - Melastomataceae 39%, alfavaca-grossa (Plectranthus amboinicus - Lamiaceae 33%, mastruz (Chenopodium ambrosioides - Chenopodiaceae 31%, erva-de-santa-maria (Solatium americanum - Solanaceae (25% and transagem (Plantago major - Plantaginaceae. 2%.

  16. Plants used in the treatment of leishmanial ulcers due to Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in an endemic area of Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, F; Lago, E L; Marsden, P D

    1996-01-01

    This paper records the plants used in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (L(V)b) among the rural population of a cocoa-producing coastal area of Bahia state, Brazil. An enquiry conducted among a hundred patients identified 49 plants species used to treat skin ulceration caused by this Leishmania species. The principal plants used are caju-branco (Anacardium occidentale, Anacardiaceae), used by 65% of the population, folha-fogo (Clidemia hirta,Melastomataceae) 39%, alfavaca-grossa (Plectranthus amboinicus, Lamiaceae) 33%, mastruz (Chenopodium ambrosioides, Chenopodiaceae) 31%, erva-de-santa-maria (Solanum americanum, Solanaceae) (25%) and transagem (Plantago major, Plantaginaceae) 2%. PMID:8701041

  17. Plants used in the treatment of leishmanial ulcers due to Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis in an endemic area of Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio França

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper records the plants used in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis (L(Vb among the rural population of a cocoa- producing coastal area of Bahia state, Brazil. An enquiry conducted among a hundred patients identified 49 plant species used to treat skin ulceration caused by this Leishmania species. The principal plants used are caju-branco (Anacardium occidentale - Anacardiaceae, used by 65% of the population, folha-fogo (Clidemia hirta - Melastomataceae 39%, alfavaca-grossa (Plectranthus amboinicus - Lamiaceae 33%, mastruz (Chenopodium ambrosioides - Chenopodiaceae 31%, erva-de-santa-maria (Solatium americanum - Solanaceae (25% and transagem (Plantago major - Plantaginaceae. 2%.Este trabalho relata as plantas usadas no tratamento da leishmaniose cutânea, causada por Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis (L(Vb, na população rural da faixa litorânea produtora de cacau do estado da Bahia, Brasil. Um inquérito realizado entre 100 pacientes, identificou 49 espécies de plantas usadas para tratar úlceras de pele causadas por esta espécie de Leishmânia. As principais plantas usadas foram o cajueiro-branco (Anacardium occidentale - Anacardiaceae usado por 65% da população, a folha-fogo (Clidemia hirta - Melastomataceae 39%, a alfavaca-grossa (Plectranthus amboinicus - Lamiaceae 33%, o mastruz (Chenopodium ambrosioides - henopodiaceae 31%, a erva-de-santa-maria (Solanum americanum - Solanaceae 25% e a transagem (Plantago major - Plantaginaceae 2%.

  18. Cytokine Response to Antigen Stimulation of Whole Blood from Patients with Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease Compared to That from Patients with Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, R; Horsfield, C.; Kuijper, S.; Sarfo, S. F.; Obeng-Baah, J.; Etuaful, S.; Nyamekye, B.; Awuah, P.; Nyarko, K M; Osei-Sarpong, F.; Lucas, S.; Kolk, A. H. J.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) is a skin-ulcerating infection common in some parts of the tropics. We have investigated cytokine secretion after stimulation of whole blood from Buruli ulcer (BU) patients in a region of endemicity in Ghana with M. ulcerans sonicate or culture filtrate antigens to investigate the development of the response over time and its specificity by comparison with the response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis sonicate in human immunodeficiency virus-negative...

  19. Lipschutz ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhat Ramesh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipschütz first identified an acute disease with ulceration of the external genital organs of young women. The syndrome has been termed acute vulvar ulcer or ulcus vulvae acutum. The following typical case history of a 19-year-old girl is a good illustration of this interesting clinical entity.

  20. Ulcerative colitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammatory bowel disease - ulcerative colitis - discharge; Ulcerative proctitis - discharge; Colitis - discharge ... were in the hospital because you have ulcerative colitis. This is a swelling of the inner lining ...

  1. Effects of Moringa oleifera, A Plant Extract Coded OBAYOKOU on Ulcers Caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans In Children under 15 Years in Côte d'Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodia M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous extract of a plant coded OBAYOKOU (Moringa oleifera has been tested on the healing of ulcers in children under 15 years, two lots of 15 children each were made all presenting clinical forms of Buruli ulcer. The aqueous plant extract of Moringa oleifera was added to the food supply given to Lot B (lot of experimental subjects at a rate of 330 ml per meal per child for six weeks. Children of Lot A (control Lot received normal diet without Moringa oleifera. The results of this study have shown that children in (lot B in addition to the normal diet received 330 ml of Moringa oleifera per meal, had a higher rate of healing than Lot A (Witness Lot who received only normal diet. Thus, the rate of healing of ulcers with M. oleifera (24 mm is superior to healing without M. oleifera (10 mm after six weeks. This study shows that we can overcome Buruli ulcer with medicinal plants that is abundantly available in Africa. It also shows that it is necessary to conduct research on a wider range of fractions of Moringa oleifera to improve the activity of antimycobacteriennes molecules in the aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera.

  2. Oral Ulcerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Fetterolf

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male presented with lower gum pain associated with fever, chills, and sore throat. His medical history included intravenous drug use, human immunodeficiency virus infection, and hepatitis C. Physical exam revealed tachycardia, a temperature of 38.9°C, anterior cervical lymphadenopathy, halitosis, an edematous lower lip, and purulent ulcers anterior and posterior to lower central incisors with marked tenderness and erythema (Figure. His laboratory work was notable for a low white blood cell count (2.6 thousand/µl, neutropenia (0.11 thousand/µl, a low absolute CD4 lymphocyte count (0.5 thousand/µl, and elevated C-reactive protein (129mg/L and sedimentation rate (23mm/hr. A computed tomography study showed a 0.5×1.3×0.3cm abscess anterior to the mandibular symphysis.

  3. Noninfectious genital ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshen, Carly; Edwards, Libby

    2015-12-01

    Noninfectious genital ulcers are much more common than ulcers arising from infections. Still, it is important to take a thorough history of sexual activity and a sexual abuse screen. A physical exam should include skin, oral mucosa, nails, hair, vulva, and vaginal mucosa if needed. The differential diagnosis of noninfectious genital ulcers includes: lipschütz ulcers, complex aphthosis, Behçet's syndrome, vulvar metastatic Crohn's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, pyoderma gangrenosum, pressure ulcers, and malignancies. It is important to come to the correct diagnosis to avoid undue testing, stress, and anxiety in patients experiencing genital ulcerations.

  4. Management of leg ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, P; Ballantyne, S

    2000-01-01

    Leg ulcer is a leading cause of morbidity among older subjects, especially women in the Western world. About 400 years BC, Hippocrates wrote, "In case of an ulcer, it is not expedient to stand, especially if the ulcer be situated on the leg". Hippocrates himself had a leg ulcer. The best treatment of any leg ulcer depends upon the accurate diagnosis and the underlying aetiology. The majority of leg ulcers are due to venous disease and/or arterial disease, but the treatment of the underlying c...

  5. Comparison of Two Assays for Molecular Determination of Rifampin Resistance in Clinical Samples from Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, M.; Beissner, M.; Phillips, R. O.; Badziklou, K.; Piten, E.; Maman, I.; Sarfo, F S; Huber, K. L.; Rhomberg, A.; Symank, D.; Wagner, M.; Wiedemann, F; Nitschke, J.; Banla Kere, A.; Herbinger, K.-H.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates a novel assay for detecting rifampin resistance in clinical Mycobacterium ulcerans isolates. Although highly susceptible for PCR inhibitors in 50% of the samples tested, the assay was 100% M. ulcerans specific and yielded >98% analyzable sequences with a lower limit of detection of 100 to 200 copies of the target sequence.

  6. Diabetic foot disease: impact of ulcer location on ulcer healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, KM; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Kars, M;

    2013-01-01

    Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing.......Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing....

  7. Acute genital ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-28

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers.

  8. Aphthous ulcers (recurrent)

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Stephen R; Scully CBE, Crispian

    2007-01-01

    Most people with recurrent aphthous ulcers develop a few ulcers less than 1 cm in diameter, that heal after 5 to 14 days without scarring. The causes are unknown, but risks of recurrence may decrease if the person gives up smoking.Local physical trauma may trigger ulcers in susceptible people.In 10% of sufferers, lesions are more than 1 cm in diameter and can cause scarring.

  9. The stress ulcer syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. van Essen

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe stress ulcer syndrome is described in this thesis. This syndrome is seen in patients admitted to intensive care departments or being treated in field hospitals, in disaster areas, or battle fields. Acute mucosal lesions associated with burns (Curling's ulcers) and central nervous sys

  10. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described. PMID:26803094

  11. Diagnostics of pressure ulcer risk and pressure ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Kottner, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are serious health problems and they develop in every healthcare setting. Pressure ulcer risk scales aim to support practitioners in determining individual pressure ulcer risk and in starting preventive activities. Study results indicate validity problems inherent in pressure ulcer risk scale scores. Since risk scores are too imprecise for individual clinical decision making, it is questionable whether the standardized pressure ulcer risk assessments improve resident and patie...

  12. Pressure Ulcers Surveillance Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Esin Gencer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pressure ulcer is a chronic wound. It reduces the quality of life of the elderly and individuals with restricted range of motion. It prolongs hospital stay and increases the risk of complications. The cost is quite high. Preventive actions for the prevention of pressure ulcers should be developed. Planning protocols and standards of care are among the main targets. Material and Method: Research was conducted in one-year period between 2012 May and 2013 May on patients who were followed up in Akdeniz University Hospital clinics and intensive care unit with pressure ulcers. The research population consisted of 569 patients. Patient data were recorded in SPSS 16 for Windows program. Statistical analyzes were performed with retrospective methods. The demographic characteristics of patients with pressure ulcers were analyzed as frequency and descriptive statistics. Prevalence and incidence of one year were calculated. Results: Of the patients, 58% were males, 42% were females. Of the patients, 36% were in the age range of 61-80 years, and their average length of stay was 42,9 days. Of the patients, 70% were at stage 2 and 3. In 15% of patients pressure ulcers occurred on the first day of hospitalization. Pressure ulcers were developed between days 2 and 10 in 59% of the patients. Prevalence rate was 2.5%, the incidence was 1.9%, the prevalence rate was 5.9% in the intensive care unit. Conclusion: It is easier to prevent pressure ulcers than treating.

  13. Connective tissue ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren's syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers.

  14. Nonspecific genital ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    Recent intervention of nonspecific genital ulcers has added refreshing dimensions to genital ulcer disease. It was considered pertinent to dwell on diverse clinical presentation and diagnostic strategies. It seems to possess spectrum. It includes infective causes, Epstein Bar Virus, tuberculosis, Leishmaniasis, HIV/AIDS related ulcers and amoebiasis. Noninfective causes are immunobullous disorders, aphthosis, Behcet's disease (BD), inflammatory bowel disease, lichen planus and lichen sclerosis et atrophicus, drug reactions, premalignant and malignant conditions, pyoderma gangrenosum, and hidradenitis suppurativa. The diagnostic features and treatment option of each disorder are succinctly outlined for ready reference.

  15. Differential diagnosis of leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannier, F; Rabe, E

    2013-03-01

    Leg and foot ulcers are symptoms of very different diseases. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers. The majority of leg ulcers occur in the lower leg or foot. In non-venous ulcers the localization in the foot area is more frequent. The most frequent underlying disease is chronic venous disease. In 354 leg ulcers, Koerber found 75.25% venous leg ulcers, 3.66% arterial leg ulcers, 14.66% ulcers of mixed venous and arterial origin and 13.5% vasculitic ulcers. In the Swedish population of Skaraborg, Nelzen found a venous origin in 54% of the ulcer patients. Each leg ulcer needs a clinical and anamnestic evaluation. Duplex ultrasound is the basic diagnostic tool to exclude vascular anomalies especially chronic venous and arterial occlusive disease. Skin biopsies help to find a correct diagnosis in unclear or non-healing cases. In conclusion, chronic venous disease is the most frequent cause of leg ulcerations. Because 25% of the population have varicose veins or other chronic venous disease the coincidence of pathological venous findings and ulceration is very frequent even in non-venous ulcerations. Leg ulcers without the symptoms of chronic venous disease should be considered as non-venous.

  16. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ulcer area. This will help speed healing. Be sure to wear shoes that do not ... American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes -- 2014. Diabetes Care. 2014;37:S14-S80. PMID: 24357209 www. ...

  17. Stasis dermatitis and ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000834.htm Stasis dermatitis and ulcers To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stasis dermatitis is a change in the skin that occurs ...

  18. Giant duodenal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Benjamin Newton; Mark R Versland; Thomas E Sepe

    2008-01-01

    Giant duodenal ulcers (GDUs) are a subset of duodenal ulcers that have historically resulted in greater morbidity than usual duodenal ulcers. Until recently,few cases had been successfully treated with medical therapy. However, the widespread use of endoscopy,the introduction of H-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors, and the improvement in surgical techniques all have revolutionized the diagnosis,treatment and outcome of this condition. Nevertheless,GDUs are still associated with high rates of morbidity,mortality and complications. Thus, surgical evaluation of a patient with a GDU should remain an integral part of patient care. These giant variants, while usually benign, can frequently harbor malignancy. A careful review of the literature highlights the important differences when comparing GDUs to classical peptic ulcers and why they must be thought of differently than their more common counterpart.

  19. Trigeminal Neurotrophic Ulceration

    OpenAIRE

    El-Daly, Ahmed; Snyderman, Carl H.

    1997-01-01

    A 74 year-old female developed a trigeminal neurotrophic ulcer (TNU) 20 years following surgical ablation of the trigeminal nerve. The diagnosis of this unusual disorder is suggested when an ulcerative lesion develops. In the ala nasi in a patient with trigeminal sensory loss. A history of self-induced trauma to that area and some form of mental impairment further support the diagnosis.

  20. Surgery for Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crohn's Disease & Ulcerative Colitis Go Back Surgery for Crohn's Disease & Ulcerative Colitis Email Print + Share ( Disclaimer: Surgery information ... helps you to learn what to expect. About Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis ...

  1. Management of parastomal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heather Yeo; Farshad Abir; Walter E Longo

    2006-01-01

    Management of surgically placed ostomies is an important aspect of any general surgical or colon and rectal surgery practice. Complications with surgically placed ostomies are common and their causes are multifactorial. Parastomal ulceration, although rare, is a particularly difficult management problem. We conducted a literature search using MD Consult, Science Direct,OVID, Medline, and Cochrane Databases to review the causes and management options of parastomal ulceration. Both the etiology and treatments are varied.Different physicians and ostomy specialists have used a large array of methods to manage parastomal ulcers;these including local wound care; steroid creams;systemic steroids; and, when conservative measures fail, surgery. Most patients with parastomal ulcers who do not have associated IBD or peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) often respond quickly to local wound care and conservative management. Patients with PPG,IBD,or other systemic causes of their ulceration need both systemic and local care and are more likely to need long term treatment and possibly surgical revision of the ostomy. The treatment is complicated, but improved with the help of ostomy specialists.

  2. [Peripheral ulcerative keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamate, Alina-cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative keratitis is frequently associated with collagen vascular diseases and presents a predilection for peripheral corneal localization, due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic features of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for the circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates an immune-mediated vasculitis process, with inflammatory cells and mediators involvement by alteration of the vascular permeability. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis generally correlates with exacerbations of the background autoimmune systemic disease. Associated sceritis, specially the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may evolve in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although the first-line of treatment in acute phases is represented by systemic administration of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are necessary for the treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic diseases.

  3. Giant Ulcerative Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Karlidag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a slowly growing common benign cutaneous tumor characterized by hard papules and nodules. The rarely seen erosions and ulcerations may cause difficulties in the diagnosis. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, which is clinically and histopathologically of malignant character, displays difficulties in the diagnosis since it has similarities with basal cell carcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma, and sarcomas. Head and neck involvement is very rare. In this study, a giant dermatofibroma case, which is histopathologically, ulcerative dermatofibroma, the biggest lesion of the head and neck region and seen rarely in the literature that has characteristics similar to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, has been presented.

  4. Klinefelter Syndrome With Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra G

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Leg ulcers are frequently caused by venous insufficiency, arterial insufficiency, neuropathy, or a combination of these factors. Klinefelter syndrome in association with chronic leg ulcers have been reported earlier. We report a case of Klinefelter syndrome with non- healing ulcer. The diagnosis of the Klinefelter syndrome was confirmed by karyotyping.

  5. Intestinal Behcet's disease with esophageal ulcers and colonic longitudinal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soichiro Fujiwara; Ichiro Shimizu; Momoko Ishikawa; Kohzo Uehara; Hirofumi Yamamoto; Michiyo Okazaki; Takahiro Horie; Arata Iuchi; Susumu Ito

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal Behcet's disease in a 38-year-old woman was diagnosed because of the history of recurrent oral aphthous ulcers, erythema nodosum-like eruptions,genital ulcer, and endoscopic findings of esophageal and ileocolonic punched-out ulcers with colonic longitudinal ulcers. Esophageal lesions and colonic longitudinalulcers are rarely seen in intestinal Behcet's disease. The ulcers of esophagus and ileocolon healed with 3 wk of treatment with prednisolone and mesalazine without any adverse effect. Mesalazine may decrease the total dose of prednisolone required to treat the disease.

  6. The frequency of old world cutaneous leishmaniasis in skin ulcers in Peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Old World Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (OWCL) is a preventable skin infection that leads to morbidity and social isolation. It is spreading rapidly. The sore of OWCL may be a non-ulcerative red papule, nodule or a large mutilating ulcer. The ulcer is typically painless and can leave a disfiguring scar. Methods: This was a descriptive study. The diagnosis of OWCL was established by finding LD bodies in skin smear preparation. Results: This study identified 1680 cutaneous leishmaniasis in 1767 skin ulcers. Children (n=924) were infected more than other age groups (n=756). There were typical skin sore of OWCL in 1512 cases while 168 patients had atypical presentation. The ulcers were painless in 1603 patients. History of insect bite was present in 1366 cases, thorn prick in 156 patients, religious visit to endemic areas in 256 patients, and 4 patients had post surgical non healing wound. Lesions with 4 to 6 months of age had a maximum yield of LD bodies. There were 498 patients from different areas of Peshawar; 688 cases from leishmania endemic belt of FATA while 89 patients came from other urban and rural areas of NWFP. Conclusions: There is a tremendous increase in cases of OWCL and the disease became endemic in many regions of Pakistan. The bordering areas along Afghanistan have constituted an endemic belt that had invaded the neighboring urban and rural areas. Several chronic non healing ulcers had been diagnosed as OWCL. Many cases have been detected in Peshawar. People need education about the nature of the diseases and the efficacy of personal protective measures. Spray with suitable insecticides is required in all residential areas. (author)

  7. ULCERATED ACROCHORDON IN VULVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borré-Arrieta Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the acrochordon, also known as soft fibromas, is a dermatological disease of common location in the cutaneous folds. Its appearance in external genitalia is weird, but it generates negative consequences regarding the quality of life of the patients. Due to the typical characteristics of the genital area in women, it increases the risk of ulceration and superinfection. Case record: patient in the third decade of life with lesion of slow growth in the vulvar area, who attended late to the emergency service because of the presence of laceration and infection signs in the genital lesion. Conclusions: the acrochordon in vulva or vulvar fibroma is a vulvar benign and uncommon disease, however it always merits opportune treatment by esthetic reason as for the ulceration risk. Revista ciencias biomédicas. 2015;6(1:138-141 KEYWORDS Vulva; Vulvar diseases; Vulvar neoplasms.

  8. Perforated peptic ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M;

    2015-01-01

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter...... pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery...... need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research....

  9. The endemic flora of Greece

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Kit

    2007-01-01

    of Greece. Three volumes are envisaged: the first deals with the Peloponnese; the second will cover Crete and the islands and the third, the rest of mainland Greece. It is planned to have a sound and scientific basis for plant conservation and education. Within the Balkans more than 60% of the endemic taxa...... or quite a lot about the plants, no intelligent steps can be taken towards protecting them. 520 of the c. 750 endemics are listed on the Red Data "endangered list" by the Council of Europe in 1986 but few know the nature or extent of the threat. Work is currently in preparation on an Endemic Flora...... have been mapped and it is already possible to recognize the hot-spots of biodiversity as these are linked to the centres of endemism. Determining the centres of diversity is an important and significant contribution to further conservation measures at the global level....

  10. Neurology of endemic skeletal fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic skeletal fluorosis is widely prevalent in India and is a major public health problem. The first ever report of endemic skeletal fluorosis and neurological manifestation was from Prakasam district in Andhra Pradesh in the year 1937. Epidemiological and experimental studies in the endemic areas suggest the role of temperate climate, hard physical labor, nutritional status, presence of abnormal concentrations of trace elements like strontium, uranium, silica in water supplies, high fluoride levels in foods and presence of kidney disease in the development of skeletal fluorosis. Neurological complications of endemic skeletal fluorosis, namely radiculopathy, myelopathy or both are mechanical in nature and till date the evidence for direct neurotoxicity of fluoride is lacking. Prevention of the disease should be the aim, knowing the pathogenesis of fluorosis. Surgery has a limited role in alleviating the neurological disability and should be tailored to the individual based on the imaging findings.

  11. ULCERATED ACROCHORDON IN VULVA

    OpenAIRE

    Borré-Arrieta Orlando; Monsalve-Montoya Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: the acrochordon, also known as soft fibromas, is a dermatological disease of common location in the cutaneous folds. Its appearance in external genitalia is weird, but it generates negative consequences regarding the quality of life of the patients. Due to the typical characteristics of the genital area in women, it increases the risk of ulceration and superinfection. Case record: patient in the third decade of life with lesion of slow growth in the vulvar area...

  12. The endemic mimic: blastomycosis an illness often misdiagnosed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradsher, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    One of the endemic fungi, Blastomyces dermatitidis, can cause epidemics of infection with multiple persons involved in a point source outbreak but more commonly causes sporadic cases of infection within the areas of endemicity. Blastomycosis can present as an acute pneumonia which is often misdiagnosed as acute pneumococcal pneumonia or the infection may present as a chronic pneumonia along with weight loss, night sweats, hemoptysis, and a lung mass suggesting tuberculosis or carcinoma of the lung. Extrapulmonary infection with B. dermatitidis is protean with many different manifestations. Most commonly, skin or subcutaneous lesions are found with either a verrucous or warty appearance or in an ulcerative form. Cases have been misidentified as keratoacanthoma, pyoderma gangrenosum, carcinoma, or as Weber-Christian panniculitis if there are nodular subcutaneous lesions. Essentially any site or organ can have lesions of disseminated blastomycosis. In our series, cases of laryngeal carcinoma, adrenal insufficiency, thyroid nodules, granulomatous hypercalcemia, abnormal mammograms thought to represent breast carcinoma, otitis media with cranial extension, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, and hemolytic anemia of unknown cause have been misdiagnosed and blastomycosis subsequently identified as the cause. This infection causes manifestations which mimic many other more commonly diagnosed conditions and must always be considered by clinicians practicing in the endemic region. PMID:25125734

  13. Contact Lens Related Corneal Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, KY; P Agarwal

    2010-01-01

    A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are: overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. Th...

  14. Leg ulcers due to hyperhomocysteinemia

    OpenAIRE

    Krupa Shankar D; Akhib Syed

    2006-01-01

    Chronic leg ulcers are rare in young adults and generally indicate a vascular cause. We report a case of a 26-year-old man with leg ulcers of eight months duration. Doppler study indicated venous incompetence and a postphlebitic limb. However, as the distribution and number of ulcers was not consistent with stasis alone and no features of collagen vascular disease were noted, a hyperviscosity state was considered and confirmed with significantly elevated homocysteine level in the serum. Admin...

  15. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  16. Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: Emotional Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ulcerative Colitis: Emotional Factors Q & A Go Back Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: Emotional Factors Q & A Email ... WHAT IS THE CAUSE OF ULCERATIVE COLITIS AND CROHN’S DISEASE? The origin of IBD is still unknown. It ...

  17. A comparison of DNA extraction procedures for the detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, in clinical and environmental specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durnez, Lies; Stragier, Pieter; Roebben, Karen;

    2008-01-01

    , at the moment, research is based on the detection by PCR of the insertion sequence IS2404 present in M. ulcerans and some closely related mycobacteria. In the present study, we compared four DNA extraction methods for detection of M. ulcerans DNA, namely the one tube cell lysis and DNA extraction procedure (OT...... of the extracted DNA and the time and effort needed were compared as well. All methods were performed on environmental specimens and the two best methods (MB and M16) were tested on clinical specimens for detection of M. ulcerans DNA. When comparing the DLs of the DNA extraction methods, the MB and M16 had...... a significantly lower DL than the OT and FP. For the different PCR targets, IS2404 showed a significantly lower DL than mlsA, MIRU1, MIRU5 and VNTR6. The FP and M16 were considerably faster than the MB and OT, while the purity of the DNA extracted with the MB was significantly higher than the DNA extracted...

  18. Tofacitinib in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Thomas P; Moran, Gordon W; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-05-01

    Cytokines orchestrate immune and inflammatory responses involved in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC). Protein kinases are essential for signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of protein tyrosine kinases that play a pivotal role in cytokine receptor signaling. Indeed, a major subgroup of cytokines use Type I and II cytokine receptors which signal via the activation of JAKs. Tofacitinib is an oral JAK inhibitor that has been studied in autoimmune pathologies, including UC and rheumatoid arthritis with good overall efficacy and acceptable safety profile. This literature review was performed with the goal of summarizing the knowledge on JAK inhibitors in UC treatment. PMID:27140405

  19. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  20. Prognostic stratification of ulcerated melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke-Behrndtz, Marie L; Schmidt, Henrik; Christensen, Ib J;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: For patients with melanoma, ulceration is an important prognostic marker and interestingly also a predictive marker for the response of adjuvant interferon. A consensual definition and accurate assessment of ulceration are therefore crucial for proper staging and clinical management. We...

  1. Marjolin ulcer with multifocal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sudip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Marjolin ulcer developed from a twenty years old post burn scar. The patient presented with chronic ulceration followed by multifocal development of squamous cell carcinoma with different growth pattern. One nodular lesion grew rapidly to produce a large lesion with history of a little bleeding after trauma but without any pain. Excision followed by skin grafting resulted in good cosmetic scar.

  2. Leg ulcers due to hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Shankar D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic leg ulcers are rare in young adults and generally indicate a vascular cause. We report a case of a 26-year-old man with leg ulcers of eight months duration. Doppler study indicated venous incompetence and a postphlebitic limb. However, as the distribution and number of ulcers was not consistent with stasis alone and no features of collagen vascular disease were noted, a hyperviscosity state was considered and confirmed with significantly elevated homocysteine level in the serum. Administration of vitamins B1, B2, B6 and B12, trimethyl-glycine, mecobalamine, folic acid and povidone iodine dressings with culture-directed antibiotic therapy led to a satisfactory healing of ulcers over a period of one month. Hyperhomocysteinemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers in young individuals.

  3. Wound care in venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosti, G

    2013-03-01

    Wound dressings: ulcer dressings should create and maintain a moist environment on the ulcer surface. It has been shown that in an ulcer with a hard crust and desiccated bed, the healing process is significantly slowed and sometimes completely blocked so favouring infection, inflammation and pain. In contrast a moist environment promotes autolytic debridement, angiogenesis and the more rapid formation of granulation tissue, favours keratinocytes migration and accelerates healing of wounds. Apart from these common characteristics, wound dressings are completely different in other aspects and must be used according to the ulcer stage. In necrotic ulcers, autolytic debridement by means of hydrogel and hydrocolloids or with enzymatic paste is preferred. In case of largely exuding wounds alginate or hydrofibre are indicated. When bleeding occurs alginate is indicated due to its haemostatic power. Where ulcers are covered by granulation tissue, polyurethane foams are preferred. When infection coexists antiseptics are necessary: dressing containing silver or iodine with large antibacterial spectrum have proved to be very effective. In the epithelization stage polyurethane films or membranes, thin hydrocolloids or collagen based dressings are very useful to favour advancement of the healing wound edge. Despite these considerations, a Cochrane review failed to find advantages for any dressing type compared with low-adherent dressings applied beneath compression. Surgical debridement and grafting of wounds, negative wound pressure treatment: surgical and hydrosurgical debridement are indicated in large, necrotic and infected wounds as these treatments are able to get rid of necrotic, infected tissue very quickly in a single surgical session, thereby significantly accelerating wound bed preparation and healing time. Negative wound pressure treatment creating a negative pressure on ulcer bed is able to favour granulation tissue and shorten healing time. In case of hard

  4. [Mixed leg ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenberg, Torsten

    2011-03-01

    Coexisting peripheral arterial disease is not uncommon (15 - 21 %) in patients with ulcera cruris primarily based on a venous etiology. Patient's history, clinical examination and detection of ABI as well as duplex scan will establish diagnosis of mixed arterial-venous ulcera. Clinical significance of coexisting arterial disease is often difficult to define and should be evaluated by a vascular specialist. The concept of treatment of mixed ulcers should always include the arterial component. Frequently peripheral arterial perfusion and healing can be improved by minimal invasive, endovascular revascularization. Compression therapy is the corner stone in treatment of venous disease and should be complemented by contemporary two piece graduated compression systems if ulcera are present. According to circumstances ablation of varicose veins must be considered. PMID:21360460

  5. Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, M; Peterson, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    Medical therapy for duodenal or gastric ulcer disease has traditionally involved gastric acid antisecretory therapy for 4 to 8 weeks to promote initial healing and indefinitely to prevent recurrences of ulcer. The discovery of Helicobacter pylori in most patients with peptic ulcer disease has led to a change in this approach. Therapy designed to eradicate H pylori may facilitate ulcer healing with acid antisecretory agents and, more important, may greatly reduce the incidence of ulcer recurre...

  6. Nutritional prediction of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslow, R A; Bergstrom, N

    1994-11-01

    This article focuses on nutritional risk factors that predict the development of pressure ulcers in hospital and nursing home patients. Cross-sectional studies associate inadequate energy and protein intake; underweight; low triceps skinfold measurement; and low serum albumin, low serum cholesterol, and low hemoglobin levels with pressure ulcers. Prospective studies identify inadequate energy and protein intake, a poor score on the Braden scale (a risk assessment instrument that includes a nutrition component), and possibly low serum albumin level as risk factors for developing a pressure ulcer. Nutritionists should provide a high-energy, high-protein diet for patients at risk of development of pressure ulcers to improve their dietary intake and nutritional status.

  7. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my area? Other Names for This Condition colitis gravis idiopathic proctocolitis inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis type ... for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a personal health condition should consult with ...

  9. Venous ulcers - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk factors for venous ulcers include: Varicose veins History of blood clots in the legs ( deep vein thrombosis ) Blockage of the lymph vessels , which causes fluid to build up in the legs Older age, being female, or ...

  10. Protection against Mycobacterium ulcerans lesion development by exposure to aquatic insect saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Marsollier

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer is a severe human skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This disease is primarily diagnosed in West Africa with increasing incidence. Antimycobacterial drug therapy is relatively effective during the preulcerative stage of the disease, but surgical excision of lesions with skin grafting is often the ultimate treatment. The mode of transmission of this Mycobacterium species remains a matter of debate, and relevant interventions to prevent this disease lack (i the proper understanding of the M. ulcerans life history traits in its natural aquatic ecosystem and (ii immune signatures that could be correlates of protection. We previously set up a laboratory ecosystem with predatory aquatic insects of the family Naucoridae and laboratory mice and showed that (i M. ulcerans-carrying aquatic insects can transmit the mycobacterium through bites and (ii that their salivary glands are the only tissues hosting replicative M. ulcerans. Further investigation in natural settings revealed that 5%-10% of these aquatic insects captured in endemic areas have M. ulcerans-loaded salivary glands. In search of novel epidemiological features we noticed that individuals working close to aquatic environments inhabited by insect predators were less prone to developing Buruli ulcers than their relatives. Thus we set out to investigate whether those individuals might display any immune signatures of exposure to M. ulcerans-free insect predator bites, and whether those could correlate with protection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We took a two-pronged approach in this study, first investigating whether the insect bites are protective in a mouse model, and subsequently looking for possibly protective immune signatures in humans. We found that, in contrast to control BALB/c mice, BALB/c mice exposed to Naucoris aquatic insect bites or sensitized to Naucoris salivary gland homogenates (SGHs displayed no lesion at the site of inoculation of M. ulcerans

  11. CARPATHIANS ENDEMIC TAXA IN ARGEŞ COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu Alexiu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Endemic plant species are the biogeographic elements why use the delimitation of biogeographical regions. Their presence explains, in the context of identifying phyto-historical factors, distribution of species and certain distribution patterns. Endemic areas, with pronounced as the basic unit of biogeography, indicates those particular geographic region, both in the growth areas and the evolutionary biological processes of speciation.In this study we proposed the following objectives: knowing the list Carpathian endemic species and endemic centers present in Argeş, also, areas of endemism in the Carpathians Mountains of the Argeş County.

  12. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  13. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Are Nearly Identical to Class I Genital Ulcer Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharanesh Gangaiah

    Full Text Available Although cutaneous ulcers (CU in the tropics is frequently attributed to Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, the causative agent of yaws, Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of CU in yaws-endemic regions of the South Pacific islands and Africa. H. ducreyi is generally susceptible to macrolides, but CU strains persist after mass drug administration of azithromycin for yaws or trachoma. H. ducreyi also causes genital ulcers (GU and was thought to be exclusively transmitted by microabrasions that occur during sex. In human volunteers, the GU strain 35000HP does not infect intact skin; wounds are required to initiate infection. These data led to several questions: Are CU strains a new variant of H. ducreyi or did they evolve from GU strains? Do CU strains contain additional genes that could allow them to infect intact skin? Are CU strains susceptible to azithromycin?To address these questions, we performed whole-genome sequencing and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 5 CU strains obtained from Samoa and Vanuatu and 9 archived class I and class II GU strains. Except for single nucleotide polymorphisms, the CU strains were genetically almost identical to the class I strain 35000HP and had no additional genetic content. Phylogenetic analysis showed that class I and class II strains formed two separate clusters and CU strains evolved from class I strains. Class I strains diverged from class II strains ~1.95 million years ago (mya and CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP ~0.18 mya. CU and GU strains evolved under similar selection pressures. Like 35000HP, the CU strains were highly susceptible to antibiotics, including azithromycin.These data suggest that CU strains are derivatives of class I strains that were not recognized until recently. These findings require confirmation by analysis of CU strains from other regions.

  14. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  15. The effects of antidepressants on gastric ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Latif Güneş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In their daily practice, psychiatrists often experience gastriccomplaints in patients beside psychiatric disorders.Peptic ulcer is one of the diseases, which accompanyto psychiatric disorders including mainly depression. Itis shown that antidepressants can inflame the bleedingsincluding gastrointestinal (GI bleedings, while they havepositive effect on ulcer healing. In this review, studies,which conducted about the positive or negative effects ofantidepressant drugs on ulcer treatment were examined.Accordingly; it was found that opipramol, amitriptyline,imipramine that of tricyclic antidepressants was found tobe helpful in healing of the ulcer. It was stated that SelectiveSerotonin Reuptake Inhibitors generally inflamedulcers, exceptionally fluvoxamine and fluoxetine reducedulcer; moclobemide that of monoamine-oxidase inhibitorand tianeptine and mirtazapine that of atypical antidepressantshad positive effect in ulcer healing. To be carefulin choosing the appropriate antidepressant in psychiatricpatients with gastric ulcer is important in the prognosisof both ulcer and depression.Key words: peptic ulcer; depression; antidepressant drugs

  16. Nonhealing Ulcer: Acroangiodermatitis of Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Varyani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year-old male presented with a nonhealing wound on left lower limb, pain and swelling over multiple joints, weight loss, and yellowish discoloration of eyes and urine for the past 4 years. On examination, the patient had pallor, icterus, and generalized lymphadenopathy with a nonhealing unhealthy ulcer over left medial malleolus. He had deformed joints with hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. His laboratory investigations were positive for antinuclear antibody (ANA and anticardiolipin antibody (ACLA. Synovial fluid analysis showed inflammatory findings. Biopsy of margin of the ulcer showed findings consistent with Acroangiodermatitis of Mali. The patient was treated with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and aspirin for juvenile idiopathic arthritis and secondary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS, respectively. The ulcer was managed conservatively with systemic antibiotics and topical steroids along with limb elevation and compression elastic stockings. The patient's symptoms improved significantly, and he is in our followup.

  17. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B.

    2012-01-01

    serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved......-risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  18. [Genital ulcers--what's new?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Raya, Bahaa; Bamberger, Ellen; Srugo, Isaac

    2013-08-01

    The most common infectious causes of genital ulcers are herpes simplex virus and syphilis. However, mixed infections can occur and genital ulcer may increase the risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus. Although the history and physical examination can narrow the differential diagnosis, there is a need for initial routine laboratory testing for the most common pathogens that includes: for syphilis: serologic screening and dark field examination of the lesion; for herpes simplex virus: serology, vial culture and/or polymerase chain reaction. Human immunodeficiency testing is mandatory. Recently, some clinical laboratories adapted the reverse screening algorithm for syphilis (initial treponemal test, and, if positive, followed by non-treponemal test) that may potentially lead to overtreatment. Early and prompt therapy may decrease the risk of transmission of the infectious agent to others. This article reviews the infectious pathogens causing genital ulcers, their unique clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Steroid ulcers:Any news?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario; Guslandi

    2013-01-01

    Steroid ulcers,although a common feature in experimental studies,seldom develop in clinical practice,as observed by the meta-analyses carried out in the 90s.Corticosteroids alone become ulcerogenic only if treatment lasts longer than one month and the total administered dose exceeds 1000 mg.On the other hand concomitant intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs results in a synergistic,highly damaging effect on the gastroduodenal mucosa.Thus,despite the survival of the steroid ulcer myth in the medical culture,pharmacological protection against steroid-induced peptic ulcers is a rare necessity while the best prophylactic strategy still remains to be determined.

  20. Ulcerative Lichen Planus in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiyadu Padmini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus (LP is a chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous condition which is relatively common in adults but rarely affects children. The present study is a report on an unusual case of ulcerative oral LP involving the dorsum of tongue in a 12-year-old boy. Patient complained of painful oral lesion on the tongue which was burning in nature and obstructing talking and eating spicy foods. On intraoral examination, a white ulcerative lesion on the dorsum of tongue was observed. Diagnosis was made based on clinical examination and histopathological features. We instituted local treatment and patient responded well to the treatment. Although rarely reported in childhood, lichen planus should be considered in a differential diagnosis of hyperkeratotic, reticular, and ulcerative lesions of the oral mucosa in children.

  1. Management of patients with pressure ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Bora Ozel

    2014-01-01

    A pressure ulcer is an area of localized damage to the skin and underlying tissue caused by pressure or shear. Although these ulcers can occur anywhere on the body, they are often located in the ischial, trochanteric, sacral areas and. heel. These ulcers are primarily the products of a combination of pressure and decreased angiogenic response. Early intervention and comprehensive treatment should result in complete healing of ulcers. In this review, we tried to create a general perspective ab...

  2. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb...

  3. Risk factors for healing of duodenal ulcer under antacid treatment: do ulcer patients need individual treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Massarrat, S; Müller, H. G.; Schmitz-Moormann, P

    1988-01-01

    In order to identify the risk factors affecting the healing of duodenal ulcer, a clinical trial with effective dose of antacid was carried out in 53 patients. Duration of ulcer history, number of relapses, duration of the last and present relapse, number, duration and severity of pain attacks in the present ulcer relapse, pain radiation to back, vomiting, appetite, smoking habit, intake of analgesics and previous haemorrhage were registered. Number of ulcers, ulcer depth, bublar narrowing, er...

  4. FVB/N Mice Spontaneously Heal Ulcerative Lesions Induced by Mycobacterium ulcerans and Switch M. ulcerans into a Low Mycolactone Producer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Estelle; Jarry, Ulrich; Cano, Camille; Savary, Caroline; Beauvillain, Céline; Robbe-Saule, Marie; Preisser, Laurence; Altare, Frederic; Delneste, Yves; Jeannin, Pascale; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-03-15

    Buruli ulcer, a debilitating disease, is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The incidence of this neglected tropical disease is steadily increasing. As a rule, without treatment, skin ulcers occur and a lengthy healing process may be observed associated with severe functional disabilities. Mouse models are already available to study establishment of lesions or evaluation of therapy but a lack of a suitable animal model, mimicking all clinical stages, in particular the healing process, remains an obstacle to understand the pathophysiology of M. ulcerans infection. M. ulcerans was s.c. inoculated in three consanguine mouse strains, that is, BALB/c and C57BL/6, classically used to study mycobacterial infection, and FVB/N. Strikingly, FVB/N mice, although as sensitive as all other mouse strains with respect to M. ulcerans infection, presented a spontaneous healing after the ulcerative phase despite stable bacterial load, and mycolactone toxin was not detected in the healed tissues. The spontaneous healing process was accompanied by an activation of the innate immune system. The adaptive response initiated by FVB/N mice was not involved in the healing process and did not confer protection against M. ulcerans. Our work highlights the importance of innate immune responses to control M. ulcerans infection. This in vivo model of M. ulcerans infection now paves the way for new avenues of research toward the elucidation of critical stages of this disease, such as the characterization of the regulation of mycolactone production, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of M. ulcerans infection, and the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26873988

  5. Histopathological aspects of chromium ulcers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuadra, J.; Latasa, J.M.; Botella, R.; Hidalgo, F.

    1982-01-01

    The authors describe two cases of ''cromeholes''. Both patients were working in electroplating. The pathology of these lesions demonstrate that it refers to caustic ulcers with necrosis of the epidermis and superficial dermis, with tendency to hyperplasia of neighbouring epidermis and important infiltration of the vessels and specially of the sweat glands.

  6. Treatment of experimental ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnik, L B; Lychkova, A E; Knyazev, O V

    2012-10-01

    The effects of infliximab, an anticytokine drug, on the course of inflammatory process was studied on the model of ulcerative colitis induced by injection of picrylsulfonic acid. Infliximab prevented the development of toxic dilatation and a drop of bioelectric activity of smooth muscles via maintenance of activity of the intramural nervous system neurons. PMID:23113311

  7. Update on peripheral ulcerative keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagci A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ayse YagciEge University, School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Izmir, TurkeyAbstract: Ulcerative inflammation of the cornea occurs in the perilimbal cornea, and is associated with autoimmune collagen vascular and arthritic diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis is the most frequent underlying disease. The tendency for peripheral location is due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic characteristics of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates immune-mediated vasculitis, and causes inflammatory cell and protein leakage due to vessel wall damage. Development of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic disease may represent worsening of a potentially life-threatening disease. Accompanying scleritis, particularly the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may result in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although first-line treatment with systemic corticosteroids is indicated for acute phases, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are required for treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with multisystem disorders. Recently, infliximab, a chimeric antibody against proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha, was reported to be effective in cases refractory to conventional immunomodulatory therapy. The potential side effects of these therapies require close follow-up and regular laboratory surveillance.Keywords: autoimmune disease, peripheral ulcerative keratitis, treatment, tumor necrosis factor-alpha

  8. Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a colonic inflammatory condition with a substantial impact on the quality of life of affected persons. The disease carries a cumulative risk of need of colectomy of 20-30% and an estimated cumulative risk of colorectal cancer of 18% after 30 years of disease duration...

  9. FAQs on leg ulcer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Irene; King, Brenda; Knight, Susan; Keynes, Milton

    In a webchat on leg ulcer management issues, hosted by Nursing Times, participants raised three key areas of care: the role of healthcare assistants in compression bandaging; reporting and investigating damage caused by compression therapy; and recommendations for dressings to be used under compression. This article discusses each of these in turn.

  10. Perforated Peptic Ulcer: new insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.O.E. Bertleff (Marietta)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMuch has been written on perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) during the last hundred years. In 1500, when necropsies were first allowed, often a small hole was found in the anterior wall of the stomach, giving an explanation for symptoms of acute abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting which often le

  11. Endemism analysis of Neotropical Pentatomidae (Hemiptera, Heteroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Ferrari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The definition of areas of endemism is central to studies of historical biogeography, and their interrelationships are fundamental questions. Consistent hypotheses for the evolution of Pentatomidae in the Neotropical region depend on the accuracy of the units employed in the analyses, which in the case of studies of historical biogeography, may be areas of endemism. In this study, the distribution patterns of 222 species, belonging to 14 Pentatomidae (Hemiptera genera, predominantly neotropical, were studied with the Analysis of Endemicity (NDM to identify possible areas of endemism and to correlate them to previously delimited areas. The search by areas of endemism was carried out using grid-cell units of 2.5° and 5° latitude-longitude. The analysis based on groupings of grid-cells of 2.5° of latitude-longitude allowed the identification of 51 areas of endemism, the consensus of these areas resulted in four clusters of grid-cells. The second analysis, with grid-cells units of 5° latitude-longitude, resulted in 109 areas of endemism. The flexible consensus employed resulted in 17 areas of endemism. The analyses were sensitive to the identification of areas of endemism in different scales in the Atlantic Forest. The Amazonian region was identified as a single area in the area of consensus, and its southeastern portion shares elements with the Chacoan and Paraná subregions. The distribution data of the taxa studied, with different units of analysis, did not allow the identification of individual areas of endemism for the Cerrado and Caatinga. The areas of endemism identified here should be seen as primary biogeographic hypotheses.

  12. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  13. Clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Huo, Teh-Ia; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Li, Chung-Pin; Lin, Han-Chieh; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2012-11-15

    Clopidogrel is not safe enough for the gastric mucosa in patients with high risk of peptic ulcer. This study aimed to explore if clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing and elucidate the involved mechanisms. Gastric ulcer was induced in rats and the ulcer size, mucosal epithelial cell proliferation of the ulcer margin, expression of growth factors [epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor] and their receptors, and signal transduction pathways for cell proliferation were measured and compared between the clopidogrel-treated group and untreated controls. For the in vitro part, rat gastric mucosal epithelial cell line (RGM-1 cells) was used to establish EGF receptor over-expressed cells. Cell proliferation and molecular change under EGF treatment (10ng/ml) with and without clopidogrel (10(-6)M) were demonstrated. Ulcer size was significantly larger in the clopidogrel-treated group compared to the control and mucosal epithelial cell proliferation of the ulcer margin was significantly decreased in the clopidogrel-treated group (Pulcer-induced gastric epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer-stimulated expressions of EGF receptor and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (PERK) at the ulcer margin (Pgastric ulcer healing in rats via inhibiting gastric epithelial cell proliferation, at least by inhibition of the EGF receptor-ERK signal transduction pathway.

  14. [Schistosomiasis endemic in Burkina Faso].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, J N; Traoré, A; Sondo, B K

    2004-02-01

    Burkina Faso, through the works of many teams of the OCCGE based in Bobo-Dioulasso, has signi-ficant data on several tropical endemics of which schistosomiasis. With the complementary works, it appears to be possible to establish a distribution of the schistosomiasis which reveals its importance. It will be the first stage of the planned national control program. The parasitologic data-gathering which covers the period of 1951 to 2000, used all the standard techniques. It is about Kato-Kartz and MIF for the intestinal schistosomiasis, centrifugation, filtration, serology reagent strips, macroscopy of urines and echography of the urinary system for the urinary schistosomiasis. All the eleven medical areas of the country have many sites submitted to parasitologic investigation. As regard the distribution of the two parasites involved with man (Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni), the data of prevalence (1% to 100%) and their distribution confirm their endemicity and the focal transmission. S. mansoni is located in eight medical areas particularly in the South and the West. S. haematobium is present in all the eleven medical areas of the country. In hydraulic planning as Sourou where the prevalences went from 23% to 70% for S. haematobium and from 0% to 69% for S. mansoni between 1987 and 1998. The situation requires a continuous monitoring. The spatial distribution of the six species of intermediate hosts shows that Bulinus truncatus and B. senegalensis Soudano-Sahelian species are present in all the ecological zones. B. globosus and Biomphalaria pfeifferi meet preferentially in the southern half of the country which reinforces the observation according to which the 14th northern parallel is often considered as the limit of septentrional extension of these two species. The other species Bulinus forskalii and B umbilicatus could have preference areas. All the species show a certain affinity with a type of biotope. The rarity and temporary aquatic systems lead to a

  15. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  16. Esophageal ulceration complicating doxycycline therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad A. Al-Mofarreh; Ibrahim A. Al Mofleh

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To report present state of iatrogenic drug-induced esophageal injury (DIEI) induced by medications in a private clinic.METHODS: Iatrogenic drug-induced esophageal injury (DIEI) induced by medications has been more frequently reported. In a private clinic we encountered 36 cases of esophageal ulcerations complicating doxycycline therapy in a mainly younger Saudi population (median age 29 years).RESULTS: The most frequent presenting symptoms were oclynophagia, retrostemal burning pain and dysphagia (94 %,75 % and 56 %, respectively). The diagnosis was according to medical history and confirmed by endoscopy in all patients.Beside withdrawal of doxycycline, when feasible, all patients were treated with a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) and a prokinetic. Thirty patients who reported to the clinic after treatment were improved within 1-7 (median 1.7) days.CONCLUSION: Esophageal ulceration has to be suspected in younger patients with odynophagia, retrosternal burning pain and/or clysphagia during the treatment with doxycycline.

  17. Oral ulcer as an unusual feature of visceral leishmaniasis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, a globally prevalent parasitic disease, occurs in three forms, viz., visceral, cutaneous and mucocutaneous. It is transmitted by female Phlebotomus sandflies. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is increasing worldwide, and several reports indicate a rising trend of VL / HIV co-infection, modifying the traditional anthroponotic pattern of VL transmission. India is one of the countries having the largest burden of leishmaniasis; nevertheless, there are very few HIV / leishmania co-infection cases reported so far. We report a 35-year-old homemaker infected with the human immunodeficiency virus; she presented with an oral ulcer. The investigations carried out on her revealed that she was afflicted by visceral leishmaniasis, and the oral ulceration was a part of the same. This is only the second such case from the Indian subcontinent, and more significantly from a non-endemic area.

  18. WOUND HEALING IN DIABETIC ULCER

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Bagus Putra Pramana; Ketut Putu Yasa

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of wound healing is a complex mechanism and involves a variety of cells. Injury is defined as a disruption of normal structure and function. Various types of growth factors and cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor and transforming growth factor beta involved in the mechanism of wound healing. There are four phases of wound healing mechanisms : hemostasis, inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling. Diabetic ulcers is one major complication, occurring in 15% of patie...

  19. Turner Syndrome with Ulcerative Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hyodo, Hiromi; TOMITA, Yuichiro; Hirai, Kohta; HIRAKAWA, Hitoshi; Ueno, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal disease frequently associated with autoimmune disorders including diabetes mellitus, thyroid disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although the etiology of IBD has not been fully elucidated, genetic analysis has recently revealed several susceptibility genes. Recently, cases with Turner syndrome associated with IBD have been reported. We report here a 13-yr-old girl with Turner syndrome associated with ulcerative colitis. The patient was undergoing gro...

  20. Ulcerative colitis after Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Aminianfar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A 21 years old man has been complained of bloody diarrhea, liquid stool containing blood, pus, and fecal matter and crampy abdominal pain from four monthes ago. Ulcerative colitis relies upon the patient's history, clinical symptoms, sigmoidoscopic appearance and histology of colonic biopsy specimens. Treatment of patient started with high dose dexamethasone and prednisolone, asacole, suppository, metronidazole. Patient’s condition not improved and patient admitted in hospital. High dose prednisolone, azathioprine, sulfasalazine and folic acid were given.

  1. Management of pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Dan; Levine, Arie; Escher, Johanna C;

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) shares many features with adult-onset disease but there are some unique considerations; therefore, therapeutic approaches have to be adapted to these particular needs. We aimed to formulate guidelines for managing UC in children based on a systematic review (SR......) of the literature and a robust consensus process. The present article is a product of a joint effort of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organization (ECCO) and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN)....

  2. Current treatment of ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JohannesMeier; AndreasSturm

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic disease featuring re- current inflammation of the colonic mucosa. The goal of medical treatment is to rapidly induce a steroid-free remission while at the same time preventing complica- tions of the disease itself and its treatment. The choice of treatment depends on severity, localization and the course of the disease. For proctitis, topical therapy with 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) compounds is used. More extensive or severe disease should be treated with oral and local 5-ASA compounds and corticosteroids to induce remission. Patients who do not respond to this treatment require hospitalization. Intravenous steroids or, when refractory, calcineurin inhibitors (cyclosporine, tacrolimus), tumor necrosis factor-α antibodies (infliximab) or immunomodulators (azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine) are then called for. Indications for emergency surgery include refractory toxic megacolon, perforation, and continuous severe colorectal bleeding. Close collaboration between gastroenterologist and surgeon is mandatory in order not to delay surgical therapy when needed. This article is intended to give a general, practice-orientated overview of the key issues in ulcerative colitis treatment. Recommendations are based on published consensus guidelines derived from national and international guidelines on the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

  3. Current treatment of ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johannes Meier; Andreas Sturm

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic disease featuring recurrent inflammation of the colonic mucosa. The goal of medical treatment is to rapidly induce a steroid-free remission while at the same time preventing complications of the disease itself and its treatment. The choice of treatment depends on severity, localization and the course of the disease. For proctitis, topical therapy with 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) compounds is used. More extensive or severe disease should be treated with oral and local 5-ASA compounds and corticosteroids to induce remission. Patients who do not respond to this treatment require hospitalization. Intravenous steroids or, when refractory, calcineurin inhibitors (cyclosporine, tacrolimus), tumor necrosis factor-α antibodies (infliximab) or immunomodulators (azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine) are then called for. Indications for emergency surgery include refractory toxic megacolon, perforation, and continuous severe colorectal bleeding. Close collaboration between gastroenterologist and surgeon is mandatory in order not to delay surgical therapy when needed. This article is intended to give a general, practice- orientated overview of the key issues in ulcerative colitis treatment. Recommendations are based on published consensus guidelines derived from national and international guidelines on the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

  4. Choledochoduodenal fistula of ulcer etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Radoje

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Choledochoduodenal fistulas are very rare and in most cases are caused by a long-lasting and poorly treated chronic duodenal ulcer. They may be asymptomatic or followed by symptoms of ulcer disease, by attacks of cholangitis or bleeding or vomiting in cases of ductoduodenal stenosis. The diagnosis is simple and safe, however treatment is still controversial. If surgery is the choice of treatment, local findings should be taken into consideration. As a rule, intervention involving closure of fistula is not recommended. Case Outline The authors present a 60-year-old woman with a long history of ulcer disease who developed attacks of cholangitis over the last three years. Ultrasonography and CT showed masive pneumobilia due to a choledochoduodenal fistula. . As there was no duodenal stenosis or bleeding, at operation the common bile duct was transected and end-to-side choledochojejunostomy was performed using a Roux-en Y jejunal limb. From the common bile duct, multiple foreign bodies of herbal origin causing biliary obstruction and cholangitis were removed. After uneventful recovery the patient stayed symptom free for four years now. Conclusion The performed operation was a simple and good surgical solution which resulted in complication-free and rapid recovery with a long-term good outcome. .

  5. Anti-ulcer potential of Oxystelma esculentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devang J Pandya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxystelma esculentum is a perennial twiner growing near water-logged areas in the Indian subcontinent. It is used traditionally in stomach ulcers. The present work deals with the investigation of anti-ulcer potential of O. esculentum. The plant was successively extracted with solvents of varying polarities, which served as the test extracts. Anti-ulcer effect was checked in Wistar rats using aspirin- and ethanol-induced acute ulcer models. The petroleum ether extract was found to possess the most effective anti-ulcer activity. This proves the traditional claim of the plant as an anti-ulcer drug. Phytochemical screening of this extract revealed the presence of important classes of compounds like cardenolides, flavonoids, phenolics, sterols and triterpenoids. This bioactivity-guided phytochemical screening can guide further therapeutic investigations and isolation of pharmacologically active compounds from Oxystelma esculentum.

  6. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics

    OpenAIRE

    Karoon Agrawal; Neha Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is som...

  7. Three cases of Lipschutz vulval ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alés-Fernández, M; Rodríguez-Pichardo, A; García-Bravo, B; Ferrándiz-Pulido, L; Camacho-Martínez, F M

    2010-05-01

    A Lipschütz ulcer or 'ulcus vulvae acutum' is an acute simple ulceration of the vulva or vagina of non-venereal origin which can be associated with lymphadenopathy. Three cases are described with accompanying clinical photographs. Two cases refer to adolescents, one an infant, all without any history of sexual contact. The cases serve to illustrate a little known but potentially important differential diagnosis of vulval ulceration.

  8. Current Medical Management of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lukie, Bryan E.

    1989-01-01

    Peptic ulceration occurs when the digestive action of gastric secretions overcomes gastroduodenal mucosal defences. The therapeutic strategy used to correct this imbalance uses drugs that either reduce gastric secretion or increase mucosal resistance. Traditional therapies of dietary manipulation and antacid administration no longer play major roles in peptic ulcer therapy. Uncomplicated peptic ulcers respond quite well to drug treatment, although recurrences are common and may require long-t...

  9. Trophic ulcers in the carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q.-C. Araújo

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available A patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and trophic ulcers is described. Despite the healing of the ulcers after surgery for CTS, the severe sensory deficit and the electrophysiological tests have not shown any significant improvement. We think these findings argue against the hypothesis of the sensory deficit being responsible for the trophic ulcers. We favor a major role for the sympathetic disturbances as the main cause for those lesions.

  10. Incidence of Duodenal Ulcers and Gastric Ulcers in a Western Population: Back to Where It Started

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel JM Groenen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: As recently as 40 years ago, a decline in the incidence of peptic ulcers was observed. The discovery of Helicobacter pylori had a further major impact on the incidence of ulcer disease. Our aim was to evaluate the trends in the incidence and bleeding complications of ulcer disease in the Netherlands.

  11. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Daher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk.

  12. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork. PMID:26669407

  13. Exostectomy for chronic midfoot plantar ulcer in Charcot deformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, R.; Kirketerp-Moeller, K.; Holstein, Per Evald

    2008-01-01

    Charcot midfoot ulcers are rare and very difficult to heal, with surgery being an option. This retrospective study assessed healing rates, complications, and the incidence of re-ulceration and other foot ulcer problems following exostectomies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  14. Pressure ulcer classification: defining early skin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Linda

    2002-09-01

    This article is the second of a two-part series. The first part (Russell, 2002) looked at various systems and pitfalls of pressure ulcer classification systems. This article focuses on the difficulties of defining early skin damage. Patients' quality of life suffers significantly with a pressure ulcer. The smell of the exudate may be an embarrassment to the patient. The pain and the distress the patient will experience will not easily be forgotten, i.e. the number of dressings required for a deep pressure ulcer, even after the pressure ulcer has healed, will be a memorable intrusion to the patient's daily routine. Early detection of pressure ulcers and timely intervention are essential in the management of patients with pressure ulcers. Controversy exists over the definition of the first three stages of pressure ulcers, but there is consensus on the definition of deep tissue damage. If the pressure ulcer is covered with black necrotic tissue it is difficult to establish depth of the tissue damage. Intact skin can cause problems, as a sacrum may be purple but intact. There is still considerable debate with regard to reactive hyperaemia, as the exact time parameters for persistent erythema to occur are unknown. Little is understood with regard to the exact pathophysiology of reactive hyperaemia and this area requires further investigation. Blistered skin and skin tone also cause confusion in grading of pressure ulcers. The problems associated with classification of pressure ulcers, using colour classification systems, are discussed and the implications for practice are considered. The confusion surrounding early classification of pressure ulcers is discussed and it is hoped that such confusion can be addressed by standardizing training using one national classification system. PMID:12362151

  15. Healing of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism and time for healing of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers in rats were investigated. Cysteamine induces a mixture of erosions, ulcers, and penetrating ulcers. These three stages of ulcerations healed in different ways and in different times. Erosions healed within three days...... layer of Brunner's glands in the submucosa. Healing was complete within 15 days. Penetrated ulcers healed very slowly by formation of new epithelium and Brunner's glands from the ulcer edges. The newly formed epithelium was desquamated unless protected by underlying Brunner's glands and the regeneration...... a model for a chronic duodenal ulcer which may be of value as a model for testing treatments of duodenal ulcers....

  16. Association between ulcer site and outcome in complicated peptic ulcer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolle, Ida; Møller, Morten Hylander; Rosenstock, Steffen Jais

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mortality rates in complicated peptic ulcer disease are high. This study aimed to examine the prognostic importance of ulcer site in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) and perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Design: a nationwide cohort study with prospective...... and adjusted association between ulcer site (gastric and duodenal) and the outcome measures of interest were assessed by binary logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Some 20,059 patients with PUB and 4273 patients with PPU were included; 90-d mortality was 15.3% for PUB and 29.8% for PPU; 30-d mortality...... was 10.2% and 24.7%, respectively. Duodenal bleeding ulcer, as compared to gastric ulcer (GU), was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality within 90 and 30 d, and with re-intervention: adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.47 (95% confidence interval 1.30-1.67); p 

  17. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  18. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: We

  19. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoon Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of "prevention is better than cure" suits this condition the most.

  20. Corynebacterium macginleyi isolated from a corneal ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Ruoff

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the isolation of Corynebacterium macginleyi from the corneal ulcer culture of a patient, later enrolled in the Steroids for Corneal Ulcer Trial (SCUT. To our knowledge this is the first published report from North America of the recovery of C. macginleyi from a serious ocular infection.

  1. Diagnosis and management of genital ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roett, Michelle A; Mayor, Mejebi T; Uduhiri, Kelechi A

    2012-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection and syphilis are the most common causes of genital ulcers in the United States. Other infectious causes include chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale (donovanosis), secondary bacterial infections, and fungi. Noninfectious etiologies, including sexual trauma, psoriasis, Behçet syndrome, and fixed drug eruptions, can also lead to genital ulcers. Although initial treatment of genital ulcers is generally based on clinical presentation, the following tests should be considered in all patients: serologic tests for syphilis and darkfield microscopy or direct fluorescent antibody testing for Treponema pallidum, culture or polymerase chain reaction test for herpes simplex virus, and culture for Haemophilus ducreyi in settings with a high prevalence of chancroid. No pathogen is identified in up to 25 percent of patients with genital ulcers. The first episode of herpes simplex virus infection is usually treated with seven to 10 days of oral acyclovir (five days for recurrent episodes). Famciclovir and valacyclovir are alternative therapies. One dose of intramuscular penicillin G benzathine is recommended to treat genital ulcers caused by primary syphilis. Treatment options for chancroid include a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone or oral azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, or erythromycin. Lymphogranuloma venereum and donovanosis are treated with 21 days of oral doxycycline. Treatment of noninfectious causes of genital ulcers varies by etiology, and ranges from topical wound care for ulcers caused by sexual trauma to consideration of subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2a for ulcers caused by Behçet syndrome.

  2. Endoscopic biopsy: Duodenal ulcer penetrating into liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baybora Kircali; Tülay Saricam; Aysegul Ozakyol; Eser Vardareli

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR We have read with interest the recent report by E Kayacetin and S Kayacetin of Gastric ulcer penetrating to liver diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy[1] since we diagnosed the duodenal ulcer which penetrated into liver similarly. This is a rather unusual case because of the fifth case in the literature and responding to medical therapy.

  3. Ulcerative colitis flare with splenic ven thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Huseyin Sancar; Kara, Banu; Citil, Serdal

    2015-01-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk of thromboembolic events. Here, we present a 28-year-old man with active ulcerative pancolitis presenting via splenic vein thrombosis and left renal superior infarct that was not associated with a surgical procedure.

  4. Complex interventions for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Ruben C; Dorresteijn, Johannes A N; Kriegsman, Didi M W; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can lead to the amputation of feet and legs, is a major problem for people with diabetes mellitus, and can cause substantial economic burden. Single preventive strategies have not been shown to reduce the incidence of foot ulceration to a significant extent.

  5. Pressure ulcer risk in hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, RH; Rozendaal, M; Wouters-Wesseling, W; Buskens, E; Keller, P; Haalboom, JRE

    2004-01-01

    Hip fracture patients have a high risk of pressure ulcers (PU). We followed 121 hip fracture patients for the development of pressure ulcers and evaluated a risk assessment tool for sensitivity and specificity. More than half of the patients presented with PU, mostly stage I. Risk factors for PU wer

  6. Ergotamine-induced solitary rectal ulcer.

    OpenAIRE

    Shpilberg, O; Ehrenfeld, M.; Abramowich, D.; Samra, Y.; Bat, L.

    1990-01-01

    A rare case of ergotamine-induced solitary rectal ulcer is described in a 41 year old woman who used high doses of ergotamine tartrate-containing suppositories for severe migraine headaches. Complete recovery of the ulcer was noticed after cessation of treatment with the suppositories. The relevant literature is discussed.

  7. Surgical treatment of perforated gastric ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korica Milan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Peptic ulcer perforation is a complication of ulcer disease which requires urgent surgical treatment. The aim of this paper was to point out our experience in surgical treatment of perforated peptic ulcer. Material and methods This retrospective study analyzes results of surgical treatment in 365 patients with perforated peptic ulcer during the period January 1996 to December 2000. Results During the last 5-year period 365 patients were treated following peptic ulcer perforation. The average age was 43.53±8.26, with the span from 18 to 86. The most frequent surgical procedures in treatment of peptic ulcer perforation were: simple closure with biopsy (55.88%, excision of the ulcer with a pyloroplasty and vagotomy (35.29% as nonresection surgical procedures and stomach resection after Billroth II (8.83%. The postoperative mortality was 4.41%. Conclusions The methods of choice in surgical treatment of gastric ulcer perforation are nonresection surgical procedures with drug therapy and eradication of Helicobacter pylori, if present.

  8. Duodenoscopic appraisal of duodenal ulcer in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kavitha

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the usefulness of duodenoscopy in the diagnosis of duodenal ulcers in dogs. Materials and Methods: Sick dogs with chronic gastrointestinal problems were physically examined and samples were collected for haematology, biochemistry and faecal examination. Duodenal biopsies, duodenal contents and brush cytology were obtained via duodenoscopy. Results: Seven duodenal ulcers cases were recorded, higher incidences was recorded in Labrador retriever, 2-4 years of aged male dogs. Significantly decreased Hb (9.10 ± 0.25 g/dl, RBCs (4.39 ± 0.19 mill/cu.mm and albumin (2.343b ± 0.13 g/dl level were noticed. Hyperaemia with ulceration of duodenal mucosa was observed. Conclusion: Duodenoscopy is very much useful for detection of duodenal ulceration and provided a sensitive technique for early diagnosis of mucosal lesions and ulceration. [Vet. World 2012; 5(7.000: 420-423

  9. Omeprazole maintenance therapy prevents recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Demertzis; Dimitrios Polymeros; Theodoros Emmanuel; Konstantinos Triantafyllou; Pericles Tassios; Spiros D Ladas

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the omeprazole maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer.METHODS: We studied 15 consecutive patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer.Omeprazole (20 mg/d) maintenance therapy was given after ulcer healing. In addition to clinical follow-up, ambulatory 24-h gastric pH assay was performed before and during omeprazole therapy in those patients and controls with previous duodenal ulcer surgery but no ulcer recurrence.RESULTS: All the 15 ulcers were healed after being treated with omeprazole (40 mg/d) for 2 mo. Eleven patients with two (1-9) episodes of recurrent ulcer bleeding completed the follow-up (43, 12-72 mo). None of them had a bleeding episode while on omeprazole. One patient discontinued the therapy and had recurrent bleeding. The median 24-h fraction time of gastric pH <4 in patients was 80, 46-95% , and was reduced to 32, 13-70% by omeprazole (P = 0.002).CONCLUSION: Long-term maintenance therapy with omeprazole (20 mg/day) is effective in preventing recurrent ulcer bleeding.

  10. Anti-ulcer and ulcer healing potentials of Musa sapientum peel extract in the laboratory rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Adetunji Onasanwo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigated the anti-ulcer and ulcer healing potentials of the methanol extract of Musa sapientum peel in the laboratory rats. Materials and Methods: Methanol extract of the peels on Musa sapientum (MEMS was evaluated for its anti-ulcer using alcohol-induced, aspirin-induced, and pyloric ligation-induced models, and for its ulcer healing employing acetic acid-induced ulcer models in rats. Results: The findings from this experiment showed that MEMS (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, b.w. anti-ulcer and ulcer healing activity (P ≤ 0.05 is dose-dependent. Also, MEMS exhibited healing of the ulcer base in all the treated groups when compared with the control group. Conclusion: The outcomes of this experiment revealed that the anti-ulcer effect of MEMS may be due to its anti-secretory and cyto-protective activity. The healing of the ulcer base might not be unconnected with basic fibroblast growth factors responsible for epithelial regeneration.

  11. Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discovery. The medical name for these bacteria is Helicobacter pylori (or H. pylori , for short). Today doctors know ... Prevention Doctors are not totally certain how H. pylori bacteria are transmitted from person to person. The bacteria have been found in saliva, so kissing may be one way. They also ...

  12. Clinical significance of neurocysticercosis in endemic villages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral cysticercosis is the main cause of late-onset epilepsy in most developing countries. Data on the neuroepidemiology of cysticercosis in endemic populations is scarce. In an endemic village on the northern coast of Peru, 49 individuals with neurological symptomatology (41 epileptic and 8 non-epileptic) were screened for antibodies to Taenia solium, using a serum electroimmuno transfer blot assay. Fifteen subjects were seropositive, 14 (34%) of those with epilepsy but only one (13%) of those who were non-epileptic. A history of passing proglottides was associated with positive serology. Thirteen of the 15 seropositive individuals underwent cerebral computed tomography; only 7 (54%) were abnormal. A randomly selected sample of 20 pigs from the village was also tested, and 6 (30%) were seropositive. This study demonstrated the importance of cysticercosis in the aetiology of epilepsy in endemic villages and the close relationship between porcine and human infection

  13. EPUAP classification system for pressure ulcers: European reliability study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeckman, D.; Schoonhoven, L.; Fletcher, J.; Furtado, K.; Gunningberg, L.; Heyman, H.; Lindholm, C.; Paquay, L.; Verdu, J.; Defloor, T.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: This paper is a report of a study of the inter-observer reliability of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel pressure ulcer classification system and of the differential diagnosis between moisture lesions and pressure ulcers. BACKGROUND: Pressure ulcer classification is a valuable tool to

  14. Compression Stockings for Treating Venous Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Benigni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In order to treat venous leg ulcers, it is recommended to use high pressure compression (30–40 mmHg at the ankle. Compression stockings which are not operator dependant could be the best option because of their pressure control. However 30–40 mmHg compression stockings are often hard to put on. Putting two lower pressure compression stockings over each other could be a good therapeutic alternative. Objectives. To compare the in vitro pressures given by the manufacturers of 2 antiulcer kits with the in vivo interface pressures measured in healthy subjects and to evaluate the stiffness and friction indices from those kits based on the interface pressure in order to assess their clinical properties. Material and Methods. Using a Kikuhime pressure device, interface pressure was measured in 12 healthy subjects at the reference point B1. One stiffness index (Static Stiffness Index (SSI and a friction index have been calculated. Results. Mediven Ulcer kit gets the recommended pressures whereas Jobst’s Ulcer Care kit does not for treating a venous leg ulcer. Jobst’s Ulcer Care transmits entirely the pressure in relation to a friction index close to 1. Conclusion. This antiulcer kit study underlines that in vivo and in vitro pressures can be different (Jobst’s Ulcer Care kit and Mediven Ulcer kit. In order not to lose pressure, it is important to take into account the friction index when superimposing two stockings.

  15. DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rajagopal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Infections of all types are more common in patients with diabetes, on the basis of outcome of retrospective study in Canada. Many types of infections are very common in diabetic than non-diabetic patients. Foot is the most common site. Diabetic foot infections range from mild infections to limb threatening conditions. Most require emergency medical attention. Diabetic foot infection is a global burden and projected to increase from 246 million people to over 380 million people by the year 2025. Many people with diabetes develop complications that seriously affect their quality and length of life. Lower limb complications are common, particularly foot ulcers and gangrene. Development of these complications is attributed to individual risk factors, poverty, racial and ethnic differences, and quality of local and national health care systems. The wide variations noted suggest that best practices in low incidence areas could easily be adapted in high incidence areas to reduce the burden of complications. Almost every infection begins in a wound, often as neuropathic ulceration or a traumatic break in the skin. Infections that begin as a small problem may progress to involve soft tissue, bones and joints. Because of these morbidity and occasional mortality by these foot infections several authoritative groups have recently developed guidelines for assessing and treating diabetic foot. METHODOLOGY 100 Diabetic patients with foot ulcers were admitted and wounds were classified using wagner’s classification. Pus was sent for culture and sensitivity and treated accordingly. RESULTS In our study the most common organism cultured from the wound with diabetes mellitus was staphylococcus. The most sensitive drug for these organisms was found to be chloramphenicol on most occasions. CONCLUSION The rationale of pus culture and sensitivity is not only to definitively treat the diabetic wound after the culture sensitivity report is

  16. Lipschutz ulcers: evaluation and management of acute genital ulcers in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, Jill S

    2010-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers are painful and distressing to women and perplexing to the providers who care for them. The differential diagnosis includes sexually and nonsexually transmitted infections, autoimmune conditions, drug reactions, and local manifestations of systemic illness. However, in many cases, no causative agent is identified, and lesions are classified as idiopathic aphthosis. In the setting of fever and acute onset of genital ulcers in girls and women, the term Lipschutz ulcers has been used to describe ulcers associated with an immunologic reaction to a distant source of infection or inflammation. The aims of this article are to review the differential diagnosis and pathogenesis of acute genital ulcers, to offer an evaluation and classification scheme, and to discuss treatment options for the dermatologist who cares for women and girls with vulvar ulcers.

  17. A new pathway for lower limb ulceration

    OpenAIRE

    Atkin, Leanne; Tickle, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Leg ulceration is a common cause of suffering for patients, additionally it places a significant burden on the NHS. As the NHS continues to face times of austerity, services need to find other ways of working to reduce cost and release nursing time whilst maintaining standards of care. The implementation of a pathway for the treatment of leg ulceration, which aids diagnosis and uses compression hosiery kits as a first-line management for venous leg ulceration, can form part of the solution by...

  18. Left Ventricular Thrombosis in Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Saleh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular thrombi usually occur in the setting of an acute myocardial infarction, left ventricular aneurysm, or dilated cardiomyopathy. In the absence of ventricular wall motion abnormalities, they are rare. This report describes a patient with ulcerative colitis in whom two-dimensional echocardiography revealed a left intraventricular mass. Thrombosis in ulcerative colitis is a serious condition and can occur in a very young population. This case also shows that left ventricular thrombi can occur in the active setting of ulcerative colitis.

  19. An Unusual Cause of Anemia: Cameron Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Aypak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cameron ulcer is a linear gatric ulser on the mucosal folds in patients with a large hiatal hernia. Cameron ulcer could be seen in 5% of patients with hiatal hernia who undergo upper gastrointestinal system (GIS endoscopy examination. The clinical relevance of Cameron ulcer is due to its potential complications such as GIS bleeding and anemia. In this report a case who was applied to Family Medicine outpatient clinics with the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and determined Cameron ulser at upper gastroentestinal endoscopy was presented. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 315-318

  20. NURSING CARE OF PATIENTS WITH DUODENAL ULCER

    OpenAIRE

    SZCZEPAŃSKA, URSZULA; GARCZYŃSKI, WOJCIECH; Zukow, Walery

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is one of the most common gastrointestinal disease worldwide. The prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is now so large that it has entailed the development of diagnostic and treatment methods improve. Currently used drug combination may produce effects even at 80% of cases, which is virtually unheard of in any other disease entity. Over 60% of peptic ulcers are located in the duodenum (3-4 times more than in the stomach). Estimates suggest that 5-10% of adults are affected ...

  1. Tetracycline ulcers of the oesophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winckler, K.

    1981-11-01

    Two cases of tetracycline ulcers of the oesophagus are reported and compared with thirteen other cases from the literature. In most cases, the patients had taken their capsules with little or no fluid just before going to bed. Some hours later they developed retrosternal pain that was intensified by swallowing. Endoscopy showed sharply demarcated greyish-white areas of mucosal damage which represented layers of stratified squamous cells, separated by oedema, and a dense neutrophilic infiltration of the lamina propria and the muscularis mucosa. Roentgenology was unsuitable to detect the lesions. They healed without complications within one to six weeks. Prolonged retention of the capsules in the oesophagus is thought to cause the mucosal damage. Patients on oral tetracycline or doxycycline treatment should therefore be instructed to take their capsules with a meal or with copious water and not just before going to bed.

  2. Tetracycline ulcers of the oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of tetracycline ulcers of the oesophagus are reported and compared with thirteen other cases from the literature. In most cases, the patients had taken their capsules with little or no fluid just before going to bed. Some hours later they developed retrosternal pain that was intensified by swallowing. Endoscopy showed sharply demarcated greyish-white areas of mucosal damage which represented layers of stratified squamous cells, separated by oedema, and a dense neutrophilic infiltration of the lamina propria and the muscularis mucosa. Roentgenology was unsuitable to detect the lesions. They healed without complications within one to six weeks. Prolonged retention of the capsules in the oesophagus is thought to cause the mucosal damage. Patients on oral tetracycline or doxycycline treatment should therefore be instructed to take their capsules with a meal or with copious water and not just before going to bed. (orig.)

  3. Drug therapy for ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Tai Xu; Shu-Yong Meng; Bo-Rong Pan

    2004-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory destructive disease of the large intestine occurred usually in the rectum and lower part of the colon as well as the entire colon. Drug therapy is not the only choice for UC treatment and medical management should be as a comprehensive whole.Azulfidine, Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum, and Rowasa all contain 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is the topical anti-inflammatory ingredient. Pentasa is more commonly used in treating Crohn's ileitis because Pentasa capsules release more 5-ASA into the small intestine than Asacol tablets. Pentasa can also be used for treating mild to moderate UC. Rowasa enemas are safe and effective in treating ulcerative proctitis and proctosigmoiditis. The sulfafree 5-ASA agents (Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum and Rowasa) have fewer side effects than sulfa-containing Azulfidine. In UC patients with moderate to severe disease and in patients who failed to respond to 5-ASA compounds,systemic (oral) corticosteroids should be used. Systemic corticosteroids (prednisone, prednisolone, cortisone, etc.)are potent and fast-acting drugs for treating UC, Crohn's ileitis and ileocolitis. Systemic corticosteroids are not effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC.Serious side effects can result from prolonged corticosteroid treatment. To minimize side effects, corticosteroids should be gradually reduced as soon as the disease remission is achieved. In patients with corticosteroid-dependent or unresponsive to corticosteroid treatment, surgery or immunomodulator is considered. Immunomodulators used for treating severe UC include azathioprine/6-MP,methotrexate, and cyclosporine. Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine is safe and effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC.

  4. Cure of peptic gastric ulcer associated with eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Finnish Gastric Ulcer Study Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Seppälä, K; Pikkarainen, P.; Sipponen, P.; Kivilaakso, E.; Gormsen, M H

    1995-01-01

    The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on ulcer healing and the relapse rate were investigated in a multicentre trial of 239 gastric ulcer patients. Patients with H pylori positive gastric ulcer were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (A) 10 days' treatment with metronidazole and eight weeks' treatment with colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) (84 patients); (B) 10 days' treatment with metronidazole placebo and eight weeks with CBS (73 patients); or (C) ranitidine (82 patients). A...

  5. A large Italian observational multicentre study on vascular ulcers of the lower limbs (Studio Ulcere Vascolari).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonio, Alessandro; Antignani, Pier L; Di Salvo, Michelangelo; Failla, Giacomo; Guarnera, Giorgio; Mosti, Giovanni; Ricci, Elia

    2016-02-01

    An observational study of 2 years was promoted by the Italian Association for Cutaneous Ulcers (AIUC) in order to monitor the epidemiology of leg ulcers, the trend of healing and the more frequent therapeutic approaches in lower limb ulcers. Fifty-nine sites in 14 different Italian regions involved in the study, with 1333 enrolled patients (1163 patients fully evaluated and followed up for 9 months). A prevalence of females (62%) was observed with a mean age of 70 years and a high rate of hypertension (62%), diabetes (38%) and obesity (29%). Venous ulcer was most frequent (55%), followed by mixed (25%) and diabetic (8·3%) ulcers. Basically, all patients received a local therapy (LT) (compression and advanced local therapies), while 63% of patients have an associated systemic pharmaceutical treatment. Ulcer healing rates progressively increased throughout the study and despite the type of observational study does not allow conclusions on the treatment, it was observed that the patients receiving additional systemic drugs were associated with a more rapid acceleration of healing rates of ulcers compared to LT alone (3 months: 39·7% versus 29·2%; 6 months: 62·0% versus 47·0%; 9 months: 74·7% versus 63·8%). In particular, the Studio Ulcere Vascolari (SUV) study showed that a combination treatment with sulodexide and compression therapy allows for a greater increase in the healing rates in venous ulcers.

  6. Voriconazole Use for Endemic Fungal Infections▿

    OpenAIRE

    Freifeld, Alison; Proia, Laurie; Andes, David; Baddour, Larry M.; Blair, Janis; Spellberg, Brad; Arnold, Sandra; Lentnek, Arnold; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2009-01-01

    In a retrospective review of 24 patients with histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, or coccidioidomycosis treated with voriconazole (most for salvage therapy), the outcome was favorable (improved or stable) for 22 (95.8%) within 2 months of starting voriconazole and for 20 (83.3%) at the last follow-up. Prospective studies are required to determine its role in the treatment of endemic mycoses.

  7. Diabetic foot ulcer: assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraogi, Ravi Kant

    2008-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a rising health problem with rising prevalence of diabetes. It is the most important cause of non-traumatic foot amputations. Diabetic foot ulcers are primarily due to neuropathy and/or ischaemia, and are frequently complicated by infection. Up to 85% of all diabetic foot related problems are preventable through a combination of good foot care and appropriate education for patients and healthcare providers. The holistic care of diabetic foot ulcer patients requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Apart from blood sugar control, treatment of ulcer involves debridement, offloading, appropriate dressings, vascular maintenance and infection control. Use of adjunctive treatments such as various growth factors, skin replacement dressings and vacuum assisted closure will accelerate healing in selected cases.

  8. Sunitinib induced pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanay-Diesel, S; Hoff, N P; Kürle, S; Haes, J; Erhardt, A; Häussinger, D; Schulte, K-W; Bölke, Edwin; Matuschek, C; Budach, W; Gerber, P A; Homey, B

    2011-11-10

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a non-infectious neutro?philic skin disease commonly associated with underlying systemic diseases. Histopathological and laboratory diagnostics are unspecific in the majority of the cases and the diagnosis is made in accordance with the clinical picture. Here, we report the case of a 69-year old man with progredient pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations under treatment with sunitinib due to hepatocellular carcinoma. A conventional ulcer therapy did not lead to a regression of the lesions. Solely cessation of sunitinib therapy resulted in an improvement of the ulcerations. Sunitinib is a multikinase inhibitor that targets the PDGF-α- and ?β-, VEGF-1-3-, KIT-, FLT3-, CSF-1- and RET-receptor, thereby impairing tumour proliferation, pathological angiogenesis and metastasation. Here, we demonstrate that pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers may represent a serious side effect of sunitinib-based anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22027642

  9. Sunitinib induced pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanay-Diesel S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pyoderma gangrenosum is a non-infectious neutrophilic skin disease commonly associated with underlying systemic diseases. Histopathological and laboratory diagnostics are unspecific in the majority of the cases and the diagnosis is made in accordance with the clinical picture. Here, we report the case of a 69-year old man with progredient pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations under treatment with sunitinib due to hepatocellular carcinoma. A conventional ulcer therapy did not lead to a regression of the lesions. Solely cessation of sunitinib therapy resulted in an improvement of the ulcerations. Sunitinib is a multikinase inhibitor that targets the PDGF-α - and -β-, VEGF-1-3-, KIT-, FLT3-, CSF-1- and RET-receptor, thereby impairing tumour proliferation, pathological angiogenesis and metastasation. Here, we demonstrate that pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers may represent a serious side effect of sunitinib-based anti-cancer treatment.

  10. A young man with nonhealing venous ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vloedbeld, M. G.; Venema, A. W.; Smit, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with nonhealing ulcers at an atypical location on his left foot, caused by a combination of venous insufficiency (after deep venous thrombosis) and arterial insufficiency. The underlying cause was Buerger's disease.

  11. Genital ulcers: their diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, S L

    1987-08-01

    THIS ARTICLE OFFERS SOME BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF THREE MAJOR CAUSES OF GENITAL ULCERS: syphilis, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and chancroid. The author also discusses differential diagnoses and suggests an approach to treatment.

  12. Case 3: chronic venous leg ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmerle, Gilbert

    2016-03-01

    A non-healing, sloughy venous leg ulcer quickly responded to topical treatment including octenilin Wound Gel and octenilin Wound Irrigation Solution. Full healing occurred within 6 weeks. PMID:26949848

  13. [The ulcerative form of skin sarcoidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionov, A N; Samtsov, A V

    1990-01-01

    A female patient suffering from the ulcerative form of skin sarcoidosis is described and the literature dealing with this problem is reviewed. Peculiar features of this case are described: ulceration of the nodes, which is an extremely rare phenomenon; no involvement of other organs, lungs included, was detectable, which is not typical of ulcerative sarcoidosis; small-nodular elements are parallelled by nodes (Boeck's small-nodular sarcoid and Darier-Roussy's subcutaneous sarcoids) in this patient, this evidencing an uniform pathologic process in the skin and subcutaneous fat. Ulceration in this patient is explained by the development of allergic vasculitis of the immediate hypersensitivity type (leukocytoclastic vasculitis and manifest increase of the level of circulating immune complexes). Prednisolone therapy has resulted in an excellent clinical effect.

  14. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan;

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...

  15. Intestinal microecology in rats with ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩晓霞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the abundance and diversity ofthe gut flora in rats with dextran sulfate sodium(DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis(UC)to provide new knowledge about the pathogenesis of this disease.Methods Twenty-six

  16. Perforated peptic ulcer: How to improve outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Adamsen, Sven; Wøjdemann, Morten;

    2008-01-01

    Despite the introduction of histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors and the discovery of Helicobacter pylori, both the incidence of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer and the mortality rate for patients undergoing surgery for peptic ulcer perforation have increased...... with an emphasis on risks that are preventable. A systematic review including randomized studies was carried out. There are a limited number of studies of patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Most of these studies are of low evidential status. Only a few randomized, controlled trials have been published...... to improve the outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation, sepsis needs to be factored into the existing knowledge and treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/27...

  17. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonia Maria Batista

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products.

  18. Laparoscopic Repair for Perforated Duodenal Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cotirleţ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU, despite antiulcer medication and Helicobacter eradication, is still the most common indication for emergency gastric surgery associated with high morbidity and mortality. Perforated peptic ulcer is a common abdominal disease that is treated by surgery. The development of laparoscopic surgery has changed the way to treat such abdominal surgical emergencies but there is no consensus on whether the benefits of laparoscopic closure of perforated peptic ulcer outweigh the disadvantages such as prolonged surgery time and greater expense. However we can say that laparoscopic repair is a viable and safe surgical option for patients with perforated peptic ulcer disease and should be considered with the necessary expertise available.

  19. Clinical quality indicators of venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica L; Mainz, Jan; Soernsen, Lars T;

    2005-01-01

    and reliable evidence-based quality indicators of venous leg ulcer care. A Scandinavian multidisciplinary, cross-sectional panel of wound healing experts developed clinical quality indicators on the basis of scientific evidence from the literature and subsequent group nominal consensus of the panel......In the clinical setting, diagnosis and treatment of venous leg ulcers can vary considerably from patient to patient. The first step to reducing this variation is to document venous leg ulcer care through use of quantitative scientific documentation principles. This requires the development of valid......; an independent medical doctor tested the feasibility and reliability of these clinical indicators, assessing the quality of medical technical care on 100 consecutive venous leg ulcer patients. Main outcome measures were healing, recurrence, pain, venous disease diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment...

  20. How to Diagnose and Treat Peptic Ulcer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xian-guo

    2009-01-01

    @@ Ulcer of the stomach and duodenum,also called ulcerative disease,is a sharply circumscribed loss of the tissue lining those parts of the digestive tract exposed to gastric juice containing acid and pepsin. Because its formation and development are closely related to the digestive effect of acidic gastric juice and pepsase,the disease is called peptic ulcer. It is a common disease,belonging to epigastric pain in TCM,mainly caused by cold attacking the stomach,stagnated liver-qi affecting the stomach,or spleen and stomach deficiency with deficiency and cold of the middle-jiao. Regulating qi to stop pain is the principle for its treatment. Peptic ulcer is usually differentiated as the following TCM syndromes.

  1. Sunitinib induced pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations

    OpenAIRE

    Akanay-Diesel S; Hoff NP; Kürle S; Haes J; Erhardt A; Häussinger D.; Schulte KW; Bölke E; Matuschek C; Budach W; Gerber PA; Homey B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Pyoderma gangrenosum is a non-infectious neutrophilic skin disease commonly associated with underlying systemic diseases. Histopathological and laboratory diagnostics are unspecific in the majority of the cases and the diagnosis is made in accordance with the clinical picture. Here, we report the case of a 69-year old man with progredient pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations under treatment with sunitinib due to hepatocellular carcinoma. A conventional ulcer therapy did not lead to ...

  2. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Leonia Maria Batista; Petrônio Filgueiras de Athayde-Filho; Marcelo Sobral da Silva; Josean Fechine Tavares; Jose Maria Barbosa-Filho; Gedson Rodrigues de Morais Lima; Thiago Jose de Almeida Leite; Heloina de Souza Falcão; Isis Fernandes Gomes; Neyres Zinia Taveira de Jesus

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreove...

  3. Serum ferritin in recurrent oral ulceration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive radio-assay for ferritin was developed and used to examine serum ferritin levels in 105 patients with recurrent oral ulceration (ROU), 41 patients with Behcet's syndrome (BS), 42 with other ulcerative oral lesions, 35 patients with non-ulcerative oral lesions and in 78 controls. Ferritin levels increased with age and were significantly higher in males than females. The mean ferritin concentrations in male patients with ROU, BS or with other oral ulcers were significantly reduced in comparison with controls, and in female patients were significantly reduced in those with major aphthous ulcers. The prevalence of low serum ferritin levels was about 8% in patients with ROU, 15% in BS and 9.5% in patients with other ulcerative oral lesions, compared with less than 3% in patients with non-ulcerative oral disorders and in controls. Most of the iron-deficient patients were female. Serum ferritin levels did not directly correlate with serum iron levels and may be a more accurate indicator of iron deficiency. Furthermore, serum ferritin can distinguish between patients with true iron deficiency and those with secondary sideropenia. It is suggested that in a small number of patients, oral ulceration may be a presenting sign of iron deficiency, and that in a further small proportion of patients, ROU already present will be exacerbated by concurrent iron deficiency. Both groups will show a therapeutic response to correction of the iron deficiency. The results suggest that serum ferritin levels are a useful part of the haematological investigatons in patients with ROU. (author)

  4. Diabetic Leg Ulcers : Prevention and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kallio, Jukka-Pekka Viljami; Vanhainen, Aapo Valtteri

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic leg ulcers are a major complication of diabetes, and are one of the leading causes of hospitalization for diabetic patients. Diabetic foot ulcers often require specialized treatment and their prevention requires early, acute detection and intervention. The information regarding these issues can be varying and fragmented between many differing sources, possibly leading to different approaches to diabetic foot care between locations. The aim of this study was to find effective metho...

  5. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rozin, Alexander P; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide ...

  6. Solitary ulcerated congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yuen Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old female patient with a giant ulcerated nodule over the back since birth was diagnosed as congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG based on clinical and histopathological examination. Congenital giant JXG with ulceration at birth is a rare presentation of JXG and commonly misdiagnosed. This case emphasizes the importance of being aware of the myriad presentations of JXG in order to make a correct diagnosis and avoid unnecessary investigations or treatment.

  7. The stomach ulcer: character of morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherbinina M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Until now there were not completely known the causes of ulcerogenesis and chronisation of ulcerous gastric lesions as well as mechanisms of disorders of regeneration of gastroduodenal mucosa at all. The aim of this work was revealing the structural peculiarities of gastric mucosa that led to forming chronic ulcers. There was performed the histological examination of 24 biopsies in patients with mediogastral ulcer as well as the material of autopsies of 18 persons died due to the hemorrhage from gastric peptic ulcer. The biopsy material from curvature minor of gastric corpus in 12 persons without gastroduodenal diseases was control. There were determined the thickness of mucosa, thickness of submucosa, submucosal-mucosal index, height of superficial epitheliocytes and their nuclear diameter, nuclear-cytoplasmic interrelations, volume summary density of microcirculation in mucosa, mitotic index of growth zone of gastric glands using morphometry. Chronic gastric ulcers showed to form in the background of prolonged chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori. The structural peculiarities wall of a stomach which developed as result of progressing the chronic inflammation and led to forming the chronic ulcers were thickening submucosal layer as well as its sclerosis and hialinization, decrease of volumous summary density of microcircula-tion.

  8. Giant gastric ulcer penetrating into the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Nishiyama, Noriko; Kobara, Hideki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2012-09-01

    A 57-year-old man developed haematemesis and was referred to our institution. His discomfort had begun 3 weeks earlier and localised to the upper abdomen. Abdominal CT showed a defect of gastric mucosa and gastric wall thickening. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy showed that he had an active gastric ulcer, 40 mm in diameter, on the lesser curvature in the upper third of the corpus and the presence of a pancreatic body at the ulcer base, penetration to the pancreas. Open gastrectomy was performed with a preoperative diagnosis of localised peritonitis caused by penetration of the stomach into the pancreas. Histopathology of resected specimens showed a benign peptic ulcer, 40×40 mm in size, was found on the lesser curvature in the antrum, and this had penetrated through the pancreas. The most serious complications of PUD include haemorrhage, perforation, penetration, and gastric outlet obstruction. Approximately 7% of patients experience perforation, which occurs when an ulcer erodes through the wall and leaks air and digestive contents into the peritoneal cavity. Antral and duodenal ulcers can penetrate into the pancreas. We report a case of gastric ulcer penetrating into the pancreas.

  9. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  10. Patterns of plant diversity and endemism in Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Craven

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Species richness, endemism and areas that are rich in both species and endemic species were assessed and mapped for Namibia. High species diversity corresponds with zones where species overlap. These are particularly obvious where there are altitudinal variations and in high-lying areas. The endemic flora of Namibia is rich and diverse. An estimated 16% of the total plant species in Namibia are endemic to the country. Endemics are in a wide variety of families and sixteen genera are endemic. Factors that increase the likelihood of endemism are mountains, hot deserts, diversity of substrates and microclimates. The distribution of plants endemic to Namibia was arranged in three different ways. Firstly, based on a grid count with the phytogeographic value o f the species being equal, overall endemism was mapped. Secondly, range restricted plant species were mapped individually and those with congruent distribution patterns were combined. Thirdly, localities that are important for very range-restricted species were identified. The resulting maps o f endemism and diversity were compared and found to correspond in many localities. When overall endemism is compared with overall diversity, rich localities may consist of endemic species with wide ranges. The other methods identify important localities with their own distinctive complement of species.

  11. Features and distribution patterns of Chinese endemic seed plant species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Hong HUANG; Jian-Hua CHEN; Jun-Sheng YING; Ke-Ping MA

    2011-01-01

    We compiled and identified a list of Chinese. endemic seed plant species based on a large number of published References and expert reviews. The characters of these seed plant species and their distribution patterns were described at length. China is rich in endemic seed plants, with a total of 14 939 species (accounting for 52.1%of its total seed plant species) belonging to 1584 genera and 191 families. Temperate families and genera have a significantly higher proportion of endemism than cosmopolitan and tropical ones. The most primitive and derived groups have significantly higher endemism than the other groups. The endemism of tree, shrub, and liana or vine is higher than that of total species; in contrast, the endemism of herb is lower than that of total species. Geographically,these Chinese endemic plants are mainly distributed in Yunnan and Sichuan provinces, southwest China. Species richness and proportion of these endemic plants decrease with increased latitude and have a unimodal response to altitude. The peak value of proportion of endemism is at higher altitudes than that of total species and endemic species richness. The proportions of endemic shrub, liana or vine, and herb increase with altitude and have a clear unimodal curve. In contrast, the proportion of tree increases with altitude, with a sudden increase at~4000 m and has a completely different model. To date, our study provides the most comprehensive list of Chinese endemic seed plant species and their basic composition and distribution features.

  12. Golimumab in unresponsive ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lippert E

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Elisabeth Lippert, Martina Müller, Claudia Ott University Hospital Regensburg, Department of Internal Medicine I, Regensburg, Germany Abstract: Ulcerative colitis (UC is a chronic inflammation mainly affecting the colon mucosa. It predominantly occurs in younger patients. Until recently, the main goals in the treatment of UC were to temper the symptoms, such as diarrhea, pain, and weight loss, by using mesalazine and steroids. With newer medications, such as immunomodulators (thiopurines and the biologics providing blockade of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, the goals of the therapy in UC have changed to long-term remission and mucosal healing. The first available anti-TNF therapy in UC included infusion therapy with infliximab every few weeks. In 2012, subcutaneously administered adalimumab gained approval for the treatment of UC in Germany. In patients with a mild disease, therapy with mesalazine, orally or topically, can be sufficient. In patients with moderate to severe disease, therapy with azathioprine or anti-TNF is often required to reach disease control; however, this is only efficient in about two-thirds of patients. Some patients either show no response or a lost response while on treatment. So, further medical options are warranted in the treatment of UC. With golimumab, a new approach in the treatment of mild to moderate UC recently became available in Germany and is a promising new option in the therapy regimen for patients with UC. Keywords: anti-TNF, biological therapy, inflammatory bowel disease

  13. BACTERIAL FLORA IN DIABETIC ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Lavanya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Diabetic foot infections are one of the most feared complications of diabetes. This study was undertaken to determine the common etiological agents of diabetic foot infections and their in vitro antibiotic susceptibility. METHODS : A prospective study was p erformed over a period of two years in a tertiary care hospital. The aerobic and anaerobic bacterial agents were isolated and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined . RESULTS : One hundred patients with Diabetic ulcer were studied, of which 6 5 were males and 35 were females. Majority of patients were in the age group of 51 to 60 years (37% and polymicrobial etiology was 64 % and monomicrobial etiology was 36%. A total of 187 organisms were isolated of which 165 were aerobic and 22 were anaero bic. Most frequently isolated aerobic organisms were Pseudomonas Sp., Klebsiella Sp., E coli Sp., and Staphylococcus aureus. The common anaerobic organisms isolated were Peptostreptococcus Sp. And Bacterioids Sp. CONCLUSION : High prevalence of multi - drug r esistant pathogens was observed. Amikacin, Imipenem were active against gram - negative bacilli, while vancomycin was found to be active against gram - positive bacteria.

  14. Expressions of MMPs and TIMP-1 in Gastric Ulcers May Differentiate H. pylori-Infected from NSAID-Related Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Chi Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Two major causes of gastric ulcers are Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use. Aims. This study aimed to determine if there were different expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 between H. pylori-infected and NSAID-related ulcers. Methods. The 126 gastric ulcer patients (H. pylori infected n=46; NSAID related n=30; combined with two factors n=50 provided ulcer and nonulcer tissues for assessment of MMP-3, -7, and -9 and TIMP-1 expression by immunohistochemical staining. Results. Gastric ulcer tissues had significantly higher MMP-3, -7, and -9 and TIMP-1 expressions than nonulcer tissues (P<0.05. H. pylori-infected gastric ulcers had even higher MMP-7, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 expressions in epithelial cells than NSAID-related gastric ulcers (P<0.05. In patients with the two combined factors, gastric ulcers expressed similar proportions of antral ulcers and MMP-7 and MMP-9 intensities to NSAID-related gastric ulcers, but lower MMP-9 and TIMP-1 than H. pylori-infected gastric ulcers (P<0.05. Conclusions. H. pylori-infected gastric ulcers express higher MMP-7, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 than NSAID-related ulcers. In patients with the two combined factors, ulcer location and MMP-7 and MMP-9 intensities are similar to NSAID use.

  15. Histological examination of ulcer margin for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hui; Cheng, Hao-Tsai; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Yu, Li-Kuang; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lee, Mu-Shien

    2013-02-01

    Biopsy of ulcer margin is routinely performed to exclude malignancy in patients with gastric ulcers, but its utility in diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection has not yet been fully studied. A cohort of 50 patients with gastric ulcer was prospectively examined. Three tests including histology, rapid urease test, and urea breath test were performed in all patients for diagnosing H pylori infection. Six biopsied specimens from the margin of the gastric ulcer and 1 each specimen from antrum and body of non-ulcer part were obtained for histology using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) stain. The criterion used for defining H pylori infection was a positive result in at least 2 of the 3 tests. H pylori infection was diagnosed in 27 (54%) of the patients. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the histological examination of the ulcer margin were 92.6%, 95.7%, 96.2%, 91.7%, and 94%, respectively. The addition of 1 specimen from the antrum or body or a combination of the 2 specimens did not increase the diagnostic yields of those for histological examination of ulcer margin alone. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy for the rapid urease test were 96.3%, 100%, 100%, 95.8%, and 98%, respectively, and the corresponding values for the urea breath test were 88.9%, 87%, 88.9%, 87%, and 88%. We performed Giemsa stain for the 3 patients with false-negative and false-positive results of histological examination of ulcer margin using H&E stain, and all were positive for H pylori infection. In conclusion, histological examination of the ulcer margin using hematoxylin-eosin stain was quite accurate and useful for diagnosing H pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcers. A special stain is required when the diagnosis of H pylori infection is questionable on routine H&E staining.

  16. Endemic mycoses in AIDS: a clinical review.

    OpenAIRE

    Wheat, J

    1995-01-01

    Histoplasmosis and coccidioidomycosis are serious opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS who reside in areas of endemicity of the United States and Central and South America. Blastomycosis, although less common, also must be recognized as an opportunistic infection in patients with AIDS. Prompt diagnosis requires knowledge of the clinical syndromes and diagnostic tests as well as a high index of suspicion. Histoplasmosis and blastomycosis respond well to antifungal treatment, but rela...

  17. Controlling endemic cholera with oral vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira M Longini

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although advances in rehydration therapy have made cholera a treatable disease with low case-fatality in settings with appropriate medical care, cholera continues to impose considerable mortality in the world's most impoverished populations. Internationally licensed, killed whole-cell based oral cholera vaccines (OCVs have been available for over a decade, but have not been used for the control of cholera. Recently, these vaccines were shown to confer significant levels of herd protection, suggesting that the protective potential of these vaccines has been underestimated and that these vaccines may be highly effective in cholera control when deployed in mass immunization programs. We used a large-scale stochastic simulation model to investigate the possibility of controlling endemic cholera with OCVs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We construct a large-scale, stochastic cholera transmission model of Matlab, Bangladesh. We find that cholera transmission could be controlled in endemic areas with 50% coverage with OCVs. At this level of coverage, the model predicts that there would be an 89% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72%-98% reduction in cholera cases among the unvaccinated, and a 93% (95% CI 82%-99% reduction overall in the entire population. Even a more modest coverage of 30% would result in a 76% (95% CI 44%-95% reduction in cholera incidence for the population area covered. For populations that have less natural immunity than the population of Matlab, 70% coverage would probably be necessary for cholera control, i.e., an annual incidence rate of < or = 1 case per 1,000 people in the population. CONCLUSIONS: Endemic cholera could be reduced to an annual incidence rate of < or = 1 case per 1,000 people in endemic areas with biennial vaccination with OCVs if coverage could reach 50%-70% depending on the level of prior immunity in the population. These vaccination efforts could be targeted with careful use of ecological data.

  18. Longitudinal study of influence of Helicobacter pylori on current risk of duodenal ulcer relapse. The Hvidovre Ulcer Project Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Franzmann, M B; Holst, C;

    1992-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with duodenal ulcer were followed up longitudinally for 2 years after initial ulcer healing. Endoscopy including biopsy of the antral mucosa was performed every 3rd month and whenever clinical symptoms of relapse occurred. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in the biopsy...... acid output, time of healing of the preceding ulcer, treatment of the present ulcer (cimetidine, antacids, or no treatment), or type and degree of gastritis. Thus, although H. pylori is prevalent in patients with duodenal ulcer disease, the present study indicates that H. pylori does not have a...... substantial note in the precipitation of active duodenal ulcer....

  19. Medical device-related pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black JM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Joyce M Black,1 Peggy Kalowes2 1Adult Health and Illness Department, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 2Nursing Research and Innovation, Long Beach Memorial Miller Children’s & Women’s Hospital, Long Beach, CA, USA Abstract: Pressure ulcers from medical devices are common and can cause significant morbidity in patients of all ages. These pressure ulcers appear in the shape of the device and are most often found from the use of oxygen delivery devices. A hospital program designed to reduce the number of pressure ulcers from medical devices was successful. The program involved the development of a team that focused on skin, the results were then published for the staff to track their performance, and it was found that using foam dressings helped reduce the pressure from the device. The incidence of ulcers from medical devices has remained at zero at this hospital since this program was implemented. Keywords: pressure ulcer, medical device related

  20. Invasive mucormycosis in benign gastric ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rikabi, A C; Al-Dohayan, A D; Al-Boukai, A A

    2000-03-01

    Fungal elements are frequently noted overlying the base of chronic peptic ulcers of the stomach and it has been suggested that the fungi enhance the degree of necrosis and that these cases have protracted disease and deeper ulcers with more perforations. It has also been postulated that the number of fungal elements might be increased in the stomach of patients who are receiving potent medications such as H2-receptor antagonists to reduce gastric acidity, but there have not been adequate control studies, and the deleterious effects from the presence of the fungi in these cases have not been substantiated. We present a very rare case of invasive mucormycosis (phycomycosis) occurring in the base of a chronic gastric ulcer in a 55 years old diabetic male. This case was clinically and radiologically been mistaken for a gastric carcinoma. In addition, the ulcer was complicated by perforation and fungal septicemia with subsequent fatal outcome. The clinical, radiological and histopathological features are described together with a literature review of other reported fungal gastric ulcers.

  1. Yttrium-90 microsphere induced gastrointestinal tract ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikabi Ali A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiomicrosphere therapy (RT utilizing yttrium-90 (90Y microspheres has been shown to be an effective regional treatment for primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. We sought to determine a large academic institution's experience regarding the extent and frequency of gastrointestinal complications. Methods Between 2004 and 2007, 27 patients underwent RT for primary or secondary hepatic malignancies. Charts were subsequently reviewed to determine the incidence and severity of GI ulceration. Results Three patients presented with gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent upper endoscopy. Review of the pretreatment angiograms showed normal vascular anatomy in one patient, sclerosed hepatic vasculature in a patient who had undergone prior chemoembolization in a second, and an aberrant left hepatic artery in a third. None had undergone prophylactic gastroduodenal artery embolization. Endoscopic findings included erythema, mucosal erosions, and large gastric ulcers. Microspheres were visible on endoscopic biopsy. In two patients, gastric ulcers were persistent at the time of repeat endoscopy 1–4 months later despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. One elderly patient who refused surgical intervention died from recurrent hemorrhage. Conclusion Gastrointestinal ulceration is a known yet rarely reported complication of 90Y microsphere embolization with potentially life-threatening consequences. Once diagnosed, refractory ulcers should be considered for aggressive surgical management.

  2. Pathogenesis of foot ulcers and the need for offloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathur, H M; Boulton, A J

    2005-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration represents a major medical, social and economic problem all over the world. While more than 5% of diabetic patients have a history of foot ulceration, the cumulative lifetime incidence may be as high as 15%. Ethnic differences exist in both ulcer and amputation incidences. Foot ulceration results from the interaction of several contributory factors, the most important of which is neuropathy. The use of the total-contact cast is demonstrated in the treatment of plantar neuropathic ulcers. Histological evidence suggests that pressure relief results in chronic foot ulcers changing their morphological appearance by displaying some features of an acute wound. Thus, repetitive stresses on the insensate foot appear to play a major role in maintaining ulcer chronicity. It is hoped that research activity in foot disease will ultimately result in fewer ulcers and less amputation in diabetes.

  3. Vedolizumab as induction and maintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feagan, Brian G; Rutgeerts, Paul; Sands, Bruce E;

    2013-01-01

    Gut-selective blockade of lymphocyte trafficking by vedolizumab may constitute effective treatment for ulcerative colitis.......Gut-selective blockade of lymphocyte trafficking by vedolizumab may constitute effective treatment for ulcerative colitis....

  4. Infliximab and complications after colectomy in patients with ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Infliximab treatment may increase the risk of subsequent postoperative complications in patients with ulcerative colitis. The main purpose of the present study therefore was to assess postoperative complications in patients who have undergone colectomy for ulcerative colitis with and without...

  5. Diabetic foot ulcer management: the podiatrist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turns, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot complications result from two broad pathologies-neuropathic and neuro-ischaemic feet. It is important for diabetic patients to have at least a yearly review of foot ulcer risk factors, and they should have a corresponding risk classification agreed based on this assessment. Diabetic foot ulcer assessment should include a wound classification tool, which can give an indication of wounds at greater risk of non-healing or amputation. The treatment of diabetic foot ulcers should be part of a comprehensive care plan that should also include treatment of infection, frequent debridement (if deemed appropriate by a skilled specialist clinician), biomechanical offloading, blood glucose control and treatment of comorbidities. Clinicians should base dressing selection on the wound's location, size and depth, amount of exudate, presence of infection or necrosis and the condition of the surrounding tissue.

  6. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  7. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Koca, Yavuz Savas; Koca, Tugba; Yildiz, Ihsan; Gerek Celikden, Sevda; Ciris, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG) is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn's disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis. PMID:27051538

  8. Thyroid Storm Precipitated by Duodenal Ulcer Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Natsuda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  9. Infliximab to treat severe ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dídia Bisamra Cury; Marcelo de Souza Cury; Geraldo Vinicius Hemerly Elias; Sender Jankiel Mizsputen

    2009-01-01

    A 48-year-old female with severe ulcerative colitis refractory to conventional therapy was referred to our facility for management. The patient showed extensive ulcerative colitis since the age of 20 years and had failed therapy with 5-aminosalicylic acid agents and azathioprine. The disease remained active despite treatment with steroids and cyclosporine. The clinical and endoscopic parameters were consistent with severe disease. Infectious precipitants were ruled out. Given the severity of the disease and in order to avoid a colectomy, we started the patient on infliximab therapy. A dramatic clinical and endoscopic response was observed and she remained in remission at the end of a 1-year follow-up period. We discuss findings in the literature regarding the use of infliximab therapy in patients with ulcerative colitis who have failed steroids and cyclosporine.

  10. Antiviral treatment in patients with cytomegalovirus positive ulcerative colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kadir OZTURK

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common virus in patients with ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive drugs. Many studies suggested that CMV infection is an exacerbating factor in patients with ulcerative colitis. The role of CMV in exacerbations of ulcerative colitis has been discussed. One of studies starting this discussion is an article entitled “CMV positive ulcerative colitis: A single center experience and literature review” by Kopylov et al. However, we think that there are some poi...

  11. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography for diagnosing ulcerative early gastric cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyungkil; Bang, Byongwook; Kwon, Kyesook; Shin, Youngwoon

    2016-07-01

    Although endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the first-choice imaging modality for predicting the invasion depth of early gastric cancer (EGC), the prediction accuracy of EUS is significantly decreased when EGC is combined with ulceration.The aim of present study was to compare the accuracy of EUS and conventional endoscopy (CE) for determining the depth of EGC. In addition, the various clinic-pathologic factors affecting the diagnostic accuracy of EUS, with a particular focus on endoscopic ulcer shapes, were evaluated.We retrospectively reviewed data from 236 consecutive patients with ulcerative EGC. All patients underwent EUS for estimating tumor invasion depth, followed by either curative surgery or endoscopic treatment. The diagnostic accuracy of EUS and CE was evaluated by comparing the final histologic result of resected specimen. The correlation between accuracy of EUS and characteristics of EGC (tumor size, histology, location in stomach, tumor invasion depth, and endoscopic ulcer shapes) was analyzed. Endoscopic ulcer shapes were classified into 3 groups: definite ulcer, superficial ulcer, and ill-defined ulcer.The overall accuracy of EUS and CE for predicting the invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was 68.6% and 55.5%, respectively. Of the 236 patients, 36 patients were classified as definite ulcers, 98 were superficial ulcers, and 102 were ill-defined ulcers, In univariate analysis, EUS accuracy was associated with invasion depth (P = 0.023), tumor size (P = 0.034), and endoscopic ulcer shapes (P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, there is a significant association between superficial ulcer in CE and EUS accuracy (odds ratio: 2.977; 95% confidence interval: 1.255-7.064; P = 0.013).The accuracy of EUS for determining tumor invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was superior to that of CE. In addition, ulcer shape was an important factor that affected EUS accuracy. PMID:27472672

  12. Genital ulcers: it is not always simplex ….

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidari, G; MacMahon, E; Tong, C Y W; White, J A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with vulval aphthae, also termed Lipschütz ulcers, often present to genitourinary medicine clinics. Typically, these ulcers present as acute, painful, vulval ulcers in young women and adolescents. The aetiology is unknown, and often these ulcers are accompanied by flu-like symptoms. Previous case reports have linked such lesions to acute viral infections such as Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and influenza A. We report the first case of influenza B virus and adenovirus infections associated with this presentation.

  13. Treatment of lingual traumatic ulcer accompanied with fungal infections

    OpenAIRE

    Sella Sella; Mochamad Fahlevi Rizal

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traumatic ulcer is a common form of ulceration occured in oral cavity caused by mechanical trauma, either acute or chronic, resulting in loss of the entire epithelium. Traumatic ulcer often occurs in children that are usually found on buccal mucosa, labial mucosa of upper and lower lip, lateral tongue, and a variety of areas that may be bitten. To properly diagnose the ulcer, dentists should evaluate the history and clinical description in detail. If the lesion is allegedly accomp...

  14. Gastric ulcer penetrating to liver diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ertugrul Kayacetin; Serra Kayacetin

    2004-01-01

    Liver penetration is a rare but serious complication of peptic ulcer disease. Usually the diagnosis is made by operation or autopsy. Clinical and laboratory data were no specific. A 64-year-old man was admitted with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hepatic penetration was diagnosed as the cause of bleeding. Endoscopy showed a large gastric ulcer with a pseudotumoral mass protruding from the ulcer bed. Definitive diagnosis was established by endoscopic biopsies of the ulcer base.

  15. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy. PMID:22310222

  16. What's new: Management of venous leg ulcers: Treating venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Phillips, Tania J; Miller, O Fred; Margolis, David J; Marston, William; Woo, Kevin; Romanelli, Marco; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Venous leg ulcers account for approximately 70% of all leg ulcers and affect 2.2 million Americans annually. After a comprehensive patient and wound assessment, compression therapy remains the cornerstone of standard care. Adjuvant care with topical or systemic agents is used for wounds that do not heal within 4 weeks. Once healed, long-term compression therapy with stockings or surgical intervention will reduce the incidence of recurrence. This continuing medical education article aims to outline optimal management for patients with venous leg ulcers, highlighting the role of a multidisciplinary team in delivering high quality care. PMID:26979355

  17. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi, E-mail: jaherrero5@hotmail.com [Unidade de Gestao Clinica (UGC) de Diagnostico por Imagem - Hosppital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilha (Spain); Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe [Unit of Radiodiagnosis - Hospital Nuestra Senora de la Merced, Osuna, Sevilha (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  18. Haemophilus ducreyi associated with skin ulcers among children, Solomon Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Michael; Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Pillay, Allan; Sokana, Oliver; Pavluck, Alex; Mabey, David C; Chen, Cheng Y; Solomon, Anthony W

    2014-10-01

    During a survey of yaws prevalence in the Solomon Islands, we collected samples from skin ulcers of 41 children. Using PCR, we identified Haemophilus ducreyi infection in 13 (32%) children. PCR-positive and PCR-negative ulcers were phenotypically indistinguishable. Emergence of H. ducreyi as a cause of nongenital ulcers may affect the World Health Organization's yaws eradication program. PMID:25271477

  19. Behaviour and stress responses in horses with gastric ulceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmkvist, Jens; Poulsen, Janne Møller; Luthersson, Nanna;

    2012-01-01

    Only little is known about behaviour and stress responses in horses with gastric ulceration, despite the high prevalence of this condition. Our objectives in the present study was to (i) describe the severity of gastric ulceration in horses, housed under relatively standardised conditions, and (ii...... may be e.g. trained differently dependent on breeding line. Ulcer horses pawed more (P biting...

  20. Perforated duodenal ulcer: an unusual complication of gastroenteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J. M.; Darby, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    A 7 year old boy was admitted to hospital with gastroenteritis, which was complicated by an acute perforated duodenal ulcer. After oversewing of the perforation he made an uncomplicated recovery. Peptic ulceration is under-diagnosed in childhood and this leads to delay in diagnosis and appropriate management. Ulceration is associated with severe illness and viral infections, but perforation is rare.

  1. Flare-up of ulcerative colitis after systemic corticosteroids:A strong case for Strongyloides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Super-imposed infection with intestinal organisms can mimic a flare-up of underlying disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We report a case of patient with long standing ulcerative colitis (UC), who presented with abdominal pain, diarrhea and low- grade fever after receiving systemic corticosteroids for an unrelated disorder. Despite a negative stool examination, a peripheral eosinophilia reappeared upon tapering down of a corticosteroid dose. Subsequently, duodenal biopsies showed evidence for Strongyloides, presumably acquired 20 years ago when the patient was residing in Brazil. The patient fully recovered following anti-helmintic therapy. This case underscores the importance of considering Strongyloides in the work-up of flaring-up IBD patients, even if a history of residing or traveling to endemic areas is in the distant past.

  2. Evolutionary relationships of endemic/epidemic and sylvatic dengue viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E; Ni, H; Xu, R; Barrett, A D; Watowich, S J; Gubler, D J; Weaver, S C

    2000-04-01

    Endemic/epidemic dengue viruses (DEN) that are transmitted among humans by the mosquito vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are hypothesized to have evolved from sylvatic DEN strains that are transmitted among nonhuman primates in West Africa and Malaysia by other Aedes mosquitoes. We tested this hypothesis with phylogenetic studies using envelope protein gene sequences of both endemic/epidemic and sylvatic strains. The basal position of sylvatic lineages of DEN-1, -2, and -4 suggested that the endemic/epidemic lineages of these three DEN serotypes evolved independently from sylvatic progenitors. Time estimates for evolution of the endemic/epidemic forms ranged from 100 to 1,500 years ago, and the evolution of endemic/epidemic forms represents relatively recent events in the history of DEN evolution. Analysis of envelope protein amino acid changes predicted to have accompanied endemic/epidemic emergence suggested a role for domain III in adaptation to new mosquito and/or human hosts. PMID:10708439

  3. THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND COURSE OF DUODENAL ULCER DISEASE AFTER PERFORATED ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Lyubskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare clinical manifestations, course, mental status in duodenal ulcer (DU patients with a history of perforated ulcer and its uncomplicated course.Subjects and methods. One hundred and thirteen patents with DU were examined. Group 1 included 61 patients with uncomplicated DUand Group 2 comprised 52 patients with a history of perforated ulcer. A comparison group consisted of 20 patients who had undergone laparotomy. Physical and mental status examinations, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS, and 24-hour pH-metry were performed.Results. Classical pain syndrome was observed in 75 % of the patients with uncomplicated DU. Prior to perforation, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes were distinguished only by a significantly lower degree in Group 2; following perforation, the pain syndrome was recorded more frequently, it was more extensive, meal-unrelated, and similar to that in the patients who had undergone laparotomy and had diminished appetite (36.5 %. EGDS showed that the complicated course was accompanied by the significantly higher incidence of erosive esophagitis (21.2 %, gastritis (51.9 %, duodenitis (25.0 %, multiple ulcers (28.8 %, and larger ulcers. 24-hour pH-metry indicated that the level of hyperacidity in Group 2 was higher and the circadian intragastric pH variations were less marked than those in uncomplicated DU. The patients with a history of perforated ulcer showed a high rate of anxiety and depressive changes. Conclusion. In complicated DU, marked monotonic hyperacidity causes common erosive-ulcerative lesions in the gastroduodenal area in relatively mild pain syndrome, late referrals, and long-term ulcer healing. After perforation followed by wound closure, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes become more pronounced, which is associated with anxiety and depressive changes in the mental status, as well as with early referrals and less healing time.

  4. THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND COURSE OF DUODENAL ULCER DISEASE AFTER PERFORATED ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Lyubskaya

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare clinical manifestations, course, mental status in duodenal ulcer (DU patients with a history of perforated ulcer and its uncomplicated course.Subjects and methods. One hundred and thirteen patents with DU were examined. Group 1 included 61 patients with uncomplicated DUand Group 2 comprised 52 patients with a history of perforated ulcer. A comparison group consisted of 20 patients who had undergone laparotomy. Physical and mental status examinations, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS, and 24-hour pH-metry were performed.Results. Classical pain syndrome was observed in 75 % of the patients with uncomplicated DU. Prior to perforation, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes were distinguished only by a significantly lower degree in Group 2; following perforation, the pain syndrome was recorded more frequently, it was more extensive, meal-unrelated, and similar to that in the patients who had undergone laparotomy and had diminished appetite (36.5 %. EGDS showed that the complicated course was accompanied by the significantly higher incidence of erosive esophagitis (21.2 %, gastritis (51.9 %, duodenitis (25.0 %, multiple ulcers (28.8 %, and larger ulcers. 24-hour pH-metry indicated that the level of hyperacidity in Group 2 was higher and the circadian intragastric pH variations were less marked than those in uncomplicated DU. The patients with a history of perforated ulcer showed a high rate of anxiety and depressive changes. Conclusion. In complicated DU, marked monotonic hyperacidity causes common erosive-ulcerative lesions in the gastroduodenal area in relatively mild pain syndrome, late referrals, and long-term ulcer healing. After perforation followed by wound closure, the pain and dyspeptic syndromes become more pronounced, which is associated with anxiety and depressive changes in the mental status, as well as with early referrals and less healing time.

  5. Effect of Plantago australis leaves on different gastric ulcer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Bürger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-ulcerogenic effect of the crude ethanolic extract (CEE of Plantago australis leaves was tested against ethanol-, indomethacin-, and cold restrain-induced stress ulcers. The CEE (500 and 1000 mg/kg reduced the lesion index (LI and the ulcer index in ethanol-induced ulcers, and the dose of 1000 mg/kg increased the amount of mucous. The highest dose of the CEE reduced the LI of cold restraint-induced stress ulcers when compared to the control group. The indomethacin-induced ulcers were not affected by this extract.

  6. Endoscopic hemoclip treatment for bleeding peptic ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yung Chih Lai; Sien Sing Yang; Chi Hwa Wu; Tzen Kwan Chen

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic hemoclip in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer.METHODS Totally, 40 patients with F1a and F1b hemorrhagic activity of peptic ulcers were enrolled in this uncontrolled prospective study for endoscopic hemoclip treatment. We used a newly developed rotatable clip-device for the application of hemoclip (MD850) to stop bleeding. Endoscopy was repeated if there was any sign or suspicion of rebleeding, and reclipping was performed if necessary and feasible.RESULTS Initial hemostatic rate by clipping was 95%, and rebleeding rate was only 8%.Ultimate hemostatic rates were 87%, 96%, and 93% in the F1a and F1b subgroups, and total cases, respectively. In patients with shock on admission, hemoclipping achieved ultimate hemostasis of 71% and 83% in F1a and F1b subgroups, respectively. Hemostasis reached 100% in patients without shock regardless of hemorrhagic activity being F1a or F1b. The average number of clips used per case was 3.0 (range 2- 5). Spurting bleeders required more clips on average than did oozing bleeders (3.4 versus 2.8 ). We observed no obvious complications, no tissue injury, or impairment of ulcer healing related to hemoclipping.CONCLUSION Endoscopic hemoclip placement is an effective and safe method. With the improvement of the clip and application device,the procedure has become easier and much more efficient. Endoscopic hemoclipping deserves further study in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers.

  7. Golimumab for the treatment of ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, M.; Boer, N. de; Hoentjen, F.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of therapeutic antibodies against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) had a major impact on the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC). Infliximab and adalimumab are powerful agents that are used for remission induction and maintenance therapy in UC and have an acceptable safety profile. Howe

  8. Significance of Ferritin in Recurrent Oral Ulceration

    OpenAIRE

    K, Sumathi; B., Shanthi; Palaneeswari M., Subha; Devi A.J., Manjula

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ferritin is the storage form of iron. Hence, the sensitive test which can be used for diagnosing iron deficiency anaemia is estimation of ferritin in serum. One of the causative factors of oral ulceration is nutritional deficiency, which includes iron also.

  9. ANTI-ULCER ACTIVITY OF LEGUMINOSAE PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi D. PAGUIGAN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Ulcer is the most common gastrointestinal disturbance resulting from an inadequate gastric mucosal defense. Several drugs are available in the market to address the disease; however, these drugs are associated with unnecessary side effects. Objectives Previous research have confirmed the efficacy of plant extracts for possible treatment of the disease. This research aims to evaluate the anti-ulcer properties of medicinal plants. Methods Methanol extracts from the leaves of Intsia bijuga, Cynometra ramiflora, Tamarindus indica, Cassia javanica, Cassia fistula, Bauhini purpurea, Senna spectabilis, Senna siamea and Saraca thaipingensis were evaluated for their anti-ulcer activity using HCl-ethanol as ulcerogen. Results All extracts showed inhibitory activity with I. bijuga, T. indica, S. spectabilis and S. thaipingensis exhibiting more than 50% inhibition. S. thaipingensis showed the highest activity at 80%. S. spectabilis and S. thaipingensis were partitioned further into hexane, ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions. The aqueous and ethyl acetate fractions of S. spectabilis showed significant increased in its activity while the hexane and ethyl acetate fractions of S. thaipingensis gave higher activity than its aqueous portions. Conclusions We conclude that plant extracts are potential sources of new anti-ulcer agents.

  10. The Peptic Ulcer Perforation (PULP) score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M H; Engebjerg, Malene Cramer; Adamsen, S;

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and early identification of high-risk surgical patients with perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is important for triage and risk stratification. The objective of the present study was to develop a new and improved clinical rule to predict mortality in patients following surgical treatment for...

  11. Cerebral Arterial Thrombosis in Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Casella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis, mainly venous, is a rare and well-recognized extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. We describe a 25-year-old Caucasian man affected by ulcerative colitis and sclerosing cholangitis with an episode of right middle cerebral arterial thrombosis resolved by intraarterial thrombolysis. We perform a brief review of the International Literature.

  12. Peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations in recurrent aphthous ulceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A; Klausen, B; Hougen, H P;

    1991-01-01

    Peripheral lymphocyte subsets--T-helper (CD4+), T-suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8+), and naive/virgin T cells/natural killer cells (CD45RA)--were studied quantitatively in 30 patients with recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) and 29 sex- and age-matched RAU-free control donors. The CD4+ percentage...

  13. Barrett's ulcer: cause of spontaneous oesophageal perforation.

    OpenAIRE

    Limburg, A. J.; Hesselink, E. J.; Kleibeuker, J H

    1989-01-01

    We report two patients, who presented within six months with the classic clinical picture of 'spontaneous' oesophageal perforation, which was caused by a perforated Barrett's ulcer. These two cases underline the importance of postoperative endoscopy in ruling out intrinsic oesophageal disease as the cause of the rupture in every patient, who survives this life threatening condition.

  14. Antibiotics and antiseptics for pressure ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, G.

    2015-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of systemic and topical antimicrobials, and topical antiseptics on the healing of infected and uninfected pressure ulcers being treated in any clinical setting.

  15. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology of the inflammatory bowel diseases, including ulcerative colitis (UC), remains incompletely explained. We hypothesized that an analysis of the UC colon proteome could reveal novel insights into the disease etiology. METHODS: Mucosal colon biopsies were taken by endoscopy...

  16. Manipulation of enteric flora in ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR Reviewing the available therapeutic options in the medical treatment of ulcerative colitis, Xu et al.[1], have omitted to mention an important aspect in the pharmacological management of the disease, namely the possibility to promote clinical and endoscopic improvement by manipulating the enteric flora.

  17. Microarray Assisted Gene Discovery in Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus

    Inflammatory Bowel disease (IBD) is a condition characterised by chronic recidivous inflammation of the bowel and intestine. IBD includes chron´s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The combined prevalence of CD and UC are app. 1 in 500 in the general Caucasian population. In 25% of the cases...

  18. Activated protein C to heal pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewardena, Aruna; Lajevardi, Sepehr S; Vandervord, Elle; Vandervord, John; Lang, Thomas C; Fulcher, Gregory; Jackson, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    Pressure ulcers present a major clinical challenge, are physically debilitating and place the patient at risk of serious comorbidities such as septic shock. Recombinant human activated protein C (APC) is an anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective and angiogenic effects that promote rapid wound healing. Topical negative pressure wound therapy (TNP) has become widely used as a treatment modality in wounds although its efficacy has not been proven through randomised controlled trials. The aim of this study was to determine the preliminary efficacy and safety of treatment with APC for severe chronic pressure sores with and without TNP. This case presentation describes the history, management and outcome of two patients each with a severe chronic non-healing pressure ulcer that had failed to respond to conventional therapy. TNP was added to conservative management of both ulcers with no improvement seen. Then local application of small doses of APC was added to TNP and with conservative management, resulted in significant clinical improvement and rapid healing of both ulcers, displaying rapid growth of vascular granulation tissue with subsequent epithelialisation. Patients tolerated the treatment well and improvements suggested by long-term follow-up were provided. Randomised placebo-controlled double blind trials are needed to quantify the efficacy, safety, cost-effectiveness, optimal dose and quality of life changes seen from treatment with APC.

  19. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF MALARIA IN ENDEMIC AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Autino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Malaria infection is still to be considered a major public health problem in those 106 countries where the risk of contracting the infection with one or more of the Plasmodium species exists. According to estimates from the World Health Organization, over 200 million cases and about 655.000 deaths have occurred in 2010. Estimating the real health and social burden of the disease is a difficult task, because many of the malaria endemic countries have limited diagnostic resources, especially in rural settings where conditions with similar clinical picture may coexist in the same geographical areas. Moreover, asymptomatic parasitaemia may occur in high transmission areas after childhood, when anti-malaria semi-immunity occurs. Malaria endemicity and control activities are very complex issues, that are influenced by factors related to the host, to the parasite, to the vector, to the environment and to the health system capacity to fully implement available anti-malaria weapons such as rapid diagnostic tests, artemisinin-based combination treatment, impregnated bed-nets and insecticide residual spraying while waiting for an effective vaccine to be made available.

  20. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF MALARIA IN ENDEMIC AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Autino

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Malaria infection is still to be considered a major public health problem in those 106 countries where the risk of contracting the infection with one or more of the Plasmodium species exists. According to estimates from the World Health Organization, over 200 million cases and about 655.000 deaths have occurred in 2010. Estimating the real health and social burden of the disease is a difficult task, because many of the malaria endemic countries have limited diagnostic resources, especially in rural settings where conditions with similar clinical picture may coexist in the same geographical areas. Moreover, asymptomatic parasitaemia may occur in high transmission areas after childhood, when anti-malaria semi-immunity occurs. Malaria endemicity and control activities are very complex issues, that are influenced by factors related to the host, to the parasite, to the vector, to the environment and to the health system capacity to fully implement available anti-malaria weapons such as rapid diagnostic tests, artemisinin-based combination treatment, impregnated bed-nets and insecticide residual spraying while waiting for an effective vaccine to be made available.

  1. Diversity and endemism of Peruvian mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Pacheco

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an annotated list for all land, aquatic and marine mammals known to occur in Peru and their distribution by ecoregions. We also present species conservation status according to international organizations and the legal conservation status in Peru. At present, we record 508 species, in 13 orders, 50 families, and 218 genera, making Peru the third most diverse country with regards to mammals in the New World, after Brazil and Mexico, and the fifth most diverse country for mammals in the World. This diversity includes 40 didelphimorphs, 2 paucituberculates, 1 manatee, 6 cingulates, 7 pilosa, 39 primates, 162 rodents, 1 rabbit, 2 soricomorphs, 165 bats, 34 carnivores, 2 perissodactyls, and 47 cetartiodactyls. Bats and rodents (327 species represent almost two thirds of total diversity (64% for Peru. Five genera and 65 species (12.8% are endemics to Peru, with the majority of these being rodents (45 species, 69,2%. Most of the endemic species are restricted to the Yungas of the eastern slope of the Andes (39 species, 60% followed by Selva Baja (14 species, 21.5%. The taxonomic status of some species is commented on, when those depart from accepted taxonomy. The marsupial Marmosa phaea; the rodents Melanomys caliginosus, M. robustulus, and Echinoprocta rufescens; the shrew Cryptotis equatoris; the bats Anoura fistulata, Phyllostomus latifolius, Artibeus ravus, Cynomops greenhalli, Eumops maurus, and Rhogeessa velilla; and the carnivore Nasuella olivacea are first records of species occurrence in Peru. Finally, we also include a list of 15 non-native species.

  2. Endemic taxa of vascular plants in the Polish Carpathians

    OpenAIRE

    Halina Piękoś-Mirkowa; Zbigniew Mirek

    2011-01-01

    The Carpathians, particularly their highest massif, the Tatra Mountains, exhibit the greatest richness of endemics in Poland. The present paper is a critical recapitulation of existing knowledge of endemism among the vascular plants of the Polish part of the Carpathians. It comprises a list of all 110 taxa (49 species, 26 microspecies of the genus Alchemilla and 35 conspicuous subspecies) that can be considered Carpathian endemics or subendemics. Their distribution, vertical ranges and habita...

  3. Evaluation of Anti-ulcer Activity of Echinops Persicus on Experimental Gastric Ulcer Models in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farajzadeh-Sheikh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Extract of Echinops persicus is traditionally used for a long time in Iran for treatment of cough and constipation. This extract is produced by activity of bug (Situphilus spp. on the plant. We documented its anti-tussive effect in rats in our previous study.The aim of this study was to assess the anti-ulcer effect of Echinops persicus in an animal model. In this study we evaluated anti-ulcer effect of Echinops persicus by Shay's method in rats. In 3 groups of rats, pylorus was ligatured under anesthesia. The rats were euthanized after 19 hours later and number and level of ulcer in stomach was measured. In group 2 the extract was orally administered 45 minutes before pyloric ligature, and in group 3, it was administered intraperitoneally 20 minutes before pyloric ligature. The number of ulcers in stomach was significantly low in group 2 (P = 0.01 and 3 (P = 0.037 in comparison with group 1. The level of ulcer was significantly decreased in group 2 (P = 0.047 with comparison to group 1. We conclude that, Echinops extract can exhibit potentially cytoprotective and anti-ulcer activity.

  4. What's new: Management of venous leg ulcers: Approach to venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Phillips, Tania J; Miller, O Fred; Margolis, David J; Marston, William; Woo, Kevin; Romanelli, Marco; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Leg ulcerations are a common problem, with an estimated prevalence of 1% to 2% in the adult population. Venous leg ulcers are primarily treated in outpatient settings and often are managed by dermatologists. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of leg ulcers combined with available evidence-based data will provide an update on this topic. A systematized approach and the judicious use of expensive advanced therapeutics are critical. Specialized arterial and venous studies are most commonly noninvasive. The ankle brachial pressure index can be performed with a handheld Doppler unit at the bedside by most clinicians. The vascular laboratory results and duplex Doppler findings are used to identify segmental defects and potential operative candidates. Studies of the venous system can also predict a subset of patients who may benefit from surgery. Successful leg ulcer management requires an interdisciplinary team to make the correct diagnosis, assess the vascular supply, and identify other modifiable factors to optimize healing. The aim of this continuing medical education article is to provide an update on the management of venous leg ulcers. Part I is focused on the approach to venous ulcer diagnostic testing.

  5. Hydroclimatological Controls of Endemic and Non-endemic Cholera of the 20th Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutla, A. S.; Whitcombe, E.; Colwell, R.

    2012-12-01

    Cholera remains a major public health threat for the developing countries. Since the causative agent, Vibrio cholerae, is autochthonous to aquatic environment, it is not possible to eradicate the agent of the disease. Hydroclimatology based prediction and prevention strategies can be implemented in disease susceptible regions for reducing incidence rates. However, the precise role of hydrological and climatological processes, which will further aid in development of suitable prediction models, in creating spatial and temporal environmental conditions favorable for disease outbreak has not been adequately quantified. Here, we show distinction between seasonality and occurrence of cholera in epidemic and non-endemic regions. Using historical cholera mortality data, from the late 1800s for 27 locations in the Indian subcontinent, we show that non-endemic regions are generally located close to regional river systems but away from the coasts and are characterized by single sporadic outbreak in a given year. Increase in air temperature during the low river flow season increases evaporation, leading to an optimal salinity and pH required for bacterial growth. Thereafter, monsoonal rainfall, leads to interactions of contaminated river waters via human activity resulting in cholera epidemics. Endemic regions are located close to coasts where cholera outbreak occurs twice (spring and fall) in a year. Spring outbreak is generally associated with intrusion of bacterial seawater to inland whereas the fall peak is correlated with widespread flooding and cross-contamination of water resources via increased precipitation. This may be one of the first studies to hydroclimatologically quantitatively the seasonality of cholera in both endemic and non-endemic regions. Our results prompt the need of region and cause-specific prediction models for cholera, employing appropriate environmental determinants.

  6. Total contact cast for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the outcome of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers treated with Total Contact Cast (TCC) in terms of percentage of ulcers healed and time to heal. The study included diabetic patients with non-ischemic neuropathic foot ulcers of upto grade 2 of Wagner's classification. Ulcers were debrided off necrotic tissues and Total Contact Cast (TCC) was applied. TCC was renewed every 2 weeks till healing. Cases were labeled as cast failure when there was no reduction in wound size in 4 consecutive weeks or worsening to a higher grade. Main outcome measures were the percentage of ulcers healed and time to heal in the cast. Thirty four (87.17%) patients were males and 5(12.82%) were females. The mean age was 62 +- 13.05 years. All patients had NIDDM. Out of the 52 ulcers, 41(78.84%) healed with TCC in an average 2 casts duration (mean 32 days). There were 11(21.15%) cast failure. Majority (63.63%) of cast failure ulcers were located on pressure bearing area of heel. Most (90%) of the ulcers on forefoot and midsole region healed with TCC (p<0.001). Longer ulcer duration (mean 57.45 +- 29.64 days) significantly reduced ulcer healing (p<0.001). Total contact cast was an effective treatment modality for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers of Wagner's grade 2, located on forefoot and midsole region. (author)

  7. Actovegin administration in patients with ulcerated gout tophuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Eliseev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study actovegin efficacy in the treatment of chronic skin ulcers due to ulceration of tophuses in pts with chronic tophaceous gout. Materials and methods. 6 pts with chronic tophaceous gout aged 52 to 77 years with disease duration from 6 to 20 years with longstanding persisting skin ulcers due to tophuses ulceration were included. In addition to allopuri- nol, steroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs they were treated with actovegin 20% intravenously and local applications of 2% actovegin gel. Clinical examination was performed before and after the course of therapy- Results. Two from six pts showed healing of single chronic ulcers to the end of the treatment course. In the remaining pts ulcer count and size decrease was achieved. Conclusion. Actovegin administration in combined therapy of chronic skin ulcers in pts with chronic tophaceous gout promoted healing of the defects in all cases.

  8. Idiopathic genital ulcers in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J; Clark, R A; Watts, D H; Till, M; Arrastia, C; Schuman, P; Cohn, S E; Young, M; Bessen, L; Greenblatt, R; Vogler, M; Swindells, S; Boyer, P

    1996-12-01

    A national survey of investigators caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was undertaken to describe the clinical presentation of idiopathic genital ulcer disease. Patients with negative syphilis and herpes simplex testing and/or negative genital ulcer biopsy were included in this study. Study participants (n = 29) were generally severely immunocompromised (median CD4 cell count was 50/mm3, and 68% had an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining opportunistic process). Thirty-seven percent had coexistent oral ulcers and 19% had their genital ulcer progress to fistula formation (four rectovaginal and one vaginal-perineal). There was generally a favorable response to topical, systemic, and intralesional steroid treatment. This study suggests that idiopathic or probable aphthous genital ulcers in women have similar clinical characteristics to aphthous oroesophageal ulcers. Although infrequent, these genital ulcers can cause severe morbidity. Further research is warranted to better define the pathophysiology and optimal management.

  9. Malnutrition as a Precursor of Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Mary D; Dorner, Becky; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Numerous studies have reported associations between declining nutrition status and risk for pressure ulcers. Oral eating problems, weight loss, low body weight, undernutrition, and malnutrition are associated with an increased risk for pressure ulcers. Moreover, inadequate nutrient intake and low body weight are associated with slow and nonhealing wounds. However, the biologic significance of deterioration in nutrition status and consistent methodologies to quantify malnutrition and diminished micronutrient stores as predictors of skin breakdown remains controversial. Recent Advances: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Consensus Statement: Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition provide a standardized and measureable set of criterion for all health professionals to use to identify malnutrition. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identified malnutrition as one of the common geriatric syndromes associated with increased risk for institutionalization and mortality that may be impacted by primary and secondary preventions. Critical Issues: The purpose of this article is to examine the Academy/ASPEN consensus statement on characteristics of adult malnutrition in the context of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers. Future Directions: Moreover, clinicians, and in particular, registered dietitians have the opportunity to integrate the Characteristics of Malnutrition with the NPUAP/EPUAP 2009 Prevention and Treatment Clinical Practice Guidelines, into clinical assessment and documentation using the Nutrition Care Process. Consensus guidelines will provide consistent research criteria yielding more useful data than presently available.

  10. The role of nutrition for pressure ulcer management: national pressure ulcer advisory panel, European pressure ulcer advisory panel, and pan pacific pressure injury alliance white paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Banks, Merrilyn; Dorner, Becky; Schols, Jos M G A

    2015-04-01

    Nutrition and hydration play an important role in preserving skin and tissue viability and in supporting tissue repair for pressure ulcer (PrU) healing. The majority of research investigating the relationship between nutrition and wounds focuses on PrUs. This white paper reviews the 2014 National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance Nutrition Guidelines and discusses nutrition strategies for PrU management. PMID:25775201

  11. PEPTIC ULCER FREQUENCY DIFFERENCES RELATED TO H. PYLORI OR AINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Michelon de CARLI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Peptic ulcer etiology has been changing because of H. pylori decline. Objectives To estimate peptic ulcer prevalence in 10 years-interval and compare the association with H. pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Methods Records assessment in two periods: A (1997-2000 and B (2007-2010, searching for peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use. Results Peptic ulcer occurred in 30.35% in A and in 20.19% in B. H. pylori infection occurred in 73.3% cases in A and in 46.4% in B. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use was 3.5% in A and 13.3% in B. Neither condition occurred in 10.4% and 20.5% in A and B respectively. Comparing both periods, we observed reduction of peptic ulcer associated to H. pylori (P=0.000, increase of peptic ulcer related to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (P=0.000 and idiopathic peptic ulcer (P=0.002. The concurrent association of H. pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was also higher in B (P=0.002. Rates of gastric ulcer were higher and duodenal ulcer lower in the second period. Conclusions After 10 years, the prevalence of peptic ulcer decreased, as well as ulcers related to H. pylori whereas ulcers associated to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increased. There was an inversion in the pattern of gastric and duodenal ulcer and a rise of idiopathic peptic ulcer.

  12. Histopathologic features of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guarner, J; Bartlett, J; Whitney, EAS; Raghunathan, PL; Stienstra, Y; Asamoa, K; Etuaful, S; Klutse, E; Quarshie, E; van der Werf, TS; van der Graaf, WTA; King, CH; Ashford, DA

    2003-01-01

    Because of the emergence of Buruli ulcer disease, the World Health Organization launched a Global Buruli Ulcer Initiative in 1998. This indolent skin infection is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. During a study of risk factors for the disease in Ghana, adequate excisional skin-biopsy specimens were

  13. Origin and differentiation of endemism in the flora of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhengyi; SUN Hang; ZHOU Zhekun; PENG Hua; LI Dezhu

    2007-01-01

    The present paper analyzed 239 endemic genera in 67 families in the flora of seed plants in China.The results showed that there are five families containing more than ten endemic genera,namely,Gesneriaceae (27),which hereafter refers to the number of endemic genera in China,Composite (20),Labiatae (12),Cruciferae (11),and Umbelliferae (10),15 families with two endemic genera,and another 30 families with only one endemic genus.Four monotypic families (Ginkgoaceae,Davidiaceae,Eucommiaceae and Acanthochlamydaceae)are the most ancient,relict and characteristic in the flora of seed plants in China.Based on integrative data of systematics,fossil history,and morphological and molecular evidence of these genera,their origin,evolution and relationships were discussed.In gymnosperms,all endemic genera are relicts of the Arctic-Tertiary flora,having earlier evolutionary history,and can be traced back to the Cretaceous or to the Jurassic and even earlier.In angiosperms,the endemic genera are mostly relicts,and are represented in all lineages in the"Eight-Class System ofClassification of Angiosperms",and endemism can be found in almost every evolutionary stage of extant angiosperms.The relict genera once occupied huge areas in the northern hemisphere in the Tertiary or the late Cretaceous,while neo-endemism mostly originated in the late Tertiary.They came from Arctic-Tertiary,Paleo-tropical-Tertiary and Tethys-Tertiary florisitic elements,and the blend of the three elements with many genera of autochthonous origin.The endemism was formed when some dispersal routes such as the North Atlantic Land Bridge,and the Bering Bridge became discontinuous during the Tertiary,as well as the climate change and glaciations in the late Tertiary and the Quaternary.Therefore,the late Tertiary is the starting point of extant endemism of the flora in China.

  14. Endemic human fasciolosis in the Bolivian Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, M; O'Neill, S M; Dalton, J P

    2007-05-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by trematodes of the genus Fasciola, is an emerging disease of humans. One of the highest levels of human fasciolosis hepatica is found amongst the indigenous Aymaran people of the Northern Bolivian Altiplano. A meta-analysis of epidemiological surveys from 38 communities in the region demonstrates that fasciolosis has been endemic in the region since at least 1984 and is a zoonosis of rural communities. Human and bovine fasciolosis is associated with the communities lying in the plain from Lake Titicaca to La Paz, predominantly in the Los Andes province. In Los Andes incidences of up to 67% of population cohorts were found, and prevalence is age-related with the highest infection rate in children aged 8-11 years.

  15. Plantar pressure in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with active foot ulceration, previous ulceration and no history of ulceration: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malindu Eranga Fernando

    Full Text Available AIMS: Elevated dynamic plantar pressures are a consistent finding in diabetes patients with peripheral neuropathy with implications for plantar foot ulceration. This meta-analysis aimed to compare the plantar pressures of diabetes patients that had peripheral neuropathy and those with neuropathy with active or previous foot ulcers. METHODS: Published articles were identified from Medline via OVID, CINAHL, SCOPUS, INFORMIT, Cochrane Central EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science via ISI Web of Knowledge bibliographic databases. Observational studies reporting barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, where at least one group had a history of plantar foot ulcers were included. Interventional studies, shod plantar pressure studies and studies not published in English were excluded. Overall mean peak plantar pressure (MPP and pressure time integral (PTI were primary outcomes. The six secondary outcomes were MPP and PTI at the rear foot, mid foot and fore foot. The protocol of the meta-analysis was published with PROPSERO, (registration number CRD42013004310. RESULTS: Eight observational studies were included. Overall MPP and PTI were greater in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with foot ulceration compared to those without ulceration (standardised mean difference 0.551, 95% CI 0.290-0.811, p<0.001; and 0.762, 95% CI 0.303-1.221, p = 0.001, respectively. Sub-group analyses demonstrated no significant difference in MPP for those with neuropathy with active ulceration compared to those without ulcers. A significant difference in MPP was found for those with neuropathy with a past history of ulceration compared to those without ulcers; (0.467, 95% CI 0.181- 0.753, p = 0.001. Statistical heterogeneity between studies was moderate. CONCLUSIONS: Plantar pressures appear to be significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy with a history of foot ulceration compared to those with diabetic

  16. Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of ulcers in patients with leprosy sequelae and the effect of low level laser therapy on wound healing: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreto Josafá G

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium leprae is the only pathogenic bacteria able to infect peripheral nerves. Neural impairment results in a set of sensitive, motor and autonomic disturbances, with ulcers originating primarily on the hands and feet. The study objectives were to analyze the clinic-epidemiological characteristics of patients attended at one specialized dressing service from a leprosy-endemic region of the Brazilian Amazon and to evaluate the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT on wound healing of these patients. Methods Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of patients with leprosy sequelae was performed at the reference unit in sanitary dermatology of the state of Pará in Brazil. We conducted anamnesis, identification of the regions affected by the lesions and measurement of ulcer depth and surface area. After that, we performed a randomized clinical trial. Fifty-one patients with ulcers related to leprosy were evaluated, twenty-five of them were randomly assigned to a low level laser therapy group or a control group. Patients were treated 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Outcome measures were ulcer surface area, ulcer depth and the pressure ulcer scale for healing score (PUSH. Results Ninety-seven ulcers were identified, with a mean (SD duration of 97.6 (111.7 months, surface area of 7.3 (11.5 cm2, and depth of 6.0 (6.2 mm. Statistical analysis of the data determined that there were no significant differences in the variables analyzed before and after treatment with low level laser therapy. Conclusions Ulcers in patients with leprosy remain a major source of economic and social losses, even many years after they have been cured of M. leprae infection. Our results indicate that it is necessary to develop new and more effective therapeutic tools, as low level laser therapy did not demonstrate any additional benefits to ulcer healing with the parameters used in this study. Trial Registration The trial was registered at Clinical

  17. Evidence for endemic chikungunya virus infections in Bandung, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosasih, H.; Mast, Q. de; Widjaja, S.; Sudjana, P.; Antonjaya, U.; Ma'roef, C.; Riswari, S.F.; Porter, K.R.; Burgess, T.H.; Alisjahbana, B.; Ven, A. van der; Williams, M.

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is known to cause sporadic or explosive outbreaks. However, little is known about the endemic transmission of CHIKV. To ascertain the endemic occurrence of CHIKV transmission, we tested blood samples from patients with a non-dengue febrile illness who participated in a pros

  18. Endemic time-spaces of Finland: Aquatic regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Mustonen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the endemic time-spaces of Finnish aquatic regimes. More precisely, it examines the socio-ecological relationships between Finns and lakes, rivers, and marshes-mires. First, the 'engine' of endemic time-space research, land use, and occupancy documentation, is explored in the Finnish context. Then two catchment areas, Kokemäenjoki in Western Finland and Vuoksi in Eastern Finland, provide cases which illustrate both past endemic time-spaces and surviving aspects of cultural readings of lakes and rivers. The ongoing winter seining in Lake Puruvesi in North Karelia emerges as an unbroken practice, with deep roots, that maintains the endemic time-spaces of a traditional Finnish relationship with a lake. As industrial uses of catchment areas, zoning, and environmental permitting exclude endemic readings inherent on the land and waterscapes, solutions are explored through mapping, along with its limitations, as a form bridging the gap between local realities and resource extraction.

  19. Ulcerative Colitis: Update on Medical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Heba N; Dhere, Tanvi; Farraye, Francis A

    2015-11-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease whose pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes influences from genes, the environment, and the gut microbiome. Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment have led to significant improvement in managing the disease. Disease monitoring with the use of therapeutic drug monitoring, stool markers, and assessment of mucosal healing have garnered much attention. The recent approval of vedolizumab for treatment of moderate to severe UC has been a welcome addition. Newer biologics, including those targeting the Janus tyrosine kinase (JAK) pathway, are on the horizon to add to the current armamentarium of anti-TNF alpha and anti-integrin therapies. The recent publication of the SCENIC consensus statement on surveillance and management of dysplasia in UC patients supports the use of chromoendoscopy over random biopsies in detecting dysplasia. This review highlights these recent advances along with others that have been made with ulcerative colitis.

  20. Ileal pouch surgery for ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simon P Bach; Neil J Mortensen

    2007-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a relapsing and remitting disease characterised by chronic mucosal and submucosal inflammation of the colon and rectum.Treatment may vary depending upon the extent and severity of inflammation. Broadly speaking medical treatments aim to induce and then maintain remission.Surgery is indicated for inflammatory disease that is refractory to medical treatment or in cases of neoplastic transformation. Approximately 25% of patients with UC ultimately require colectomy. Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) has become the standard of care for patients with ulcerative colitis who ultimately require colectomy. This review will examine indications for IPAA, patient selection, technical aspects of surgery,management of complications and long term outcome following this procedure.

  1. Multifocal stenosing ulceration of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2009-01-01

    Several reports have described an apparently uncommon clinicopathological disorder that is characterized by multifocal stenosing small-intestinal ulceration. Compared to Crohn's disease, the ulcers are not transmural and typically remain shallow, and involve only the mucosa and submucosa. The disorder seems to be localized in the jejunum and proximal ileum only, and not the distal ileum or colon. Only nonspecific inflammatory changes are present without giant cells or other typical features of granulomatous inflammation. Most patients present clinically with recurrent obstructive events that usually respond to steroids, surgical resection, or both. With the development of newer imaging modalities to visualize the small-intestinal mucosa, such as double-balloon enteroscopy, improved understanding of the long-term natural history of this apparently distinctive disorder should emerge.

  2. Diagnosis of perforated gastric ulcers by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallstabe, L; Veitt, R; Körner, T

    2002-10-01

    Patients with a perforation of the gastrointestinal tract need fast confirmation of diagnosis and early treatment to improve outcome. Plain abdominal x-ray does not always prove the perforation particularly at early stage. We report about a 62 year-old woman complaining of consistent abdominal pain with sudden onset. Ultrasound was taken as first diagnostic measure, revealing a perforation. The leakage was located in the stomach. Radiography confirmed the pneumoperitoneum without indicating the perforated location. During operation the perforated gastric ulcer was found and sutured. This case report points out the reliability of ultrasound in diagnosing a pneumoperitoneum. Additionally it provides a summary of ultrasound signs seen in perforated gastric and duodenal ulcers and a review of literature.

  3. Penile paraffinoma and ulcers of penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobik, O; Bobik, O

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a case of 33 year old Caucasian married man with an irregular 6 cm penile mass associated with multiple penile ulcers. He reluctantly admitted that 10 years ago he had multiple mineral oil (Vaseline) self injections into the penis, for penile enlargement purposes. The patient had a surgical intervention 10 years ago, but he has recurrent ulcers on his penis. We have administered an intravenous antibiotic therapy combined with local therapy. The term paraffinoma describes a distinct histopathological finding that results from the injection of foreign oily substances into the skin. Although such procedure may be considered rare, they are still performed in some countries. The major point we want emphasis is following: a lot of people seek penile augmentations, it is necessary to remind physicians and the public that nonscientific and inadequate procedure such as Vaseline may lead to debilitating and destructive consequences (Tab. 1, Ref. 12). PMID:22180996

  4. Recurrent oral ulcers--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, A

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcers (ROUs) are the most common oral mucosal disease. The etiology of ROUs is complex. The factors include mechanical trauma, genetics, stress, smoking, and viral and bacterial infections. Treatment modalities depend on the differential diagnosis of ROUs and could consist of antimicrobial agents, anti-inflammatory agents, immunomodulators, or over-the-counter medications. New therapy available in the form of a coating polymer, Colgate ORABASE Soothe.N.Seal, is clinically proven to provide rapid relief and healing of ROUs.

  5. A cloudy bag and genital ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesker, J; van Elsacker-Niele, A M; Blanken, R; Halma, C

    2006-05-01

    A 30-year-old patient treated with CCPD presented with genital ulcers and a culture-negative peritonitis. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was cultured from the effluent and the genital lesions. Primary HSV-2 infection was diagnosed by serology. This is the first documented case of PD peritonitis caused by HSV-2. We speculate that cases of culture-negative PD peritonitis may be due to recurrences of genital herpes.

  6. Gastric schwannoma coexists with peptic ulcer perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan İnce

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastric schwannoma is a benign neoplasm that originates from sheet of nerve cell in stomach. Differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, (GISTs which have malign potential, than these tumors, which definite diagnosis is determined by histopathological and immunohistochemical methods have clinical significance due to gastric schwannomas have excellent progress after surgical resection. We presented a case of gastric schwannoma coexists with peptic ulcer perforation with guide of literature in this study.

  7. Can migrants from high-endemic countries cause new HIV outbreaks among heterosexuals in low-endemic countries?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Xiridou; M. van der Veen; R. Coutinho; M. Prins

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate how the sexual behaviour of migrants originating from HIV-endemic countries affects the spread of HIV among heterosexuals in low-endemic countries. Methods: A mathematical model is developed describing the transmission of HIV in heterosexual partnerships between African mi

  8. Diabetes Foot Ulcers: A novel Treatment Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Namazi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulcers are common in 12-25 percent of diabetic patients. Preventing, controlling and treating of these kind chronic wounds are of the major clinical challenges.Evidence based documents revealed that DFU (Diabetic Foot ulcer is a chronic wound type originating from disturbed cellular and molecular mechanisms that have to be in its functional form to overcome its problem. In diabetes and some other chronic based diseases, harmonized acting machine causes chronic phases that result in conditions as foot ulceration and related complications seen commonly in diabetes.DFU needs to be transformed into acute phase in order to be healed in a physiological manner. Disturbed mechanisms have to be corrected reversely and to achieve such a goal it is essential to better understanding of disturbing factors responsible for biological abnormalities. Factors associated with DFU are as cellular and molecular recruitment and function impairments and there is need to repair these mechanisms. For this, we believe that the activated Th-1 cells (T helper-1 Cells might have a critical role in regulation of the several effector functions of the cellular and molecular mechanisms essential to the body to act the best. Evidences and our successful results urge us to suggest this regulatory role for effector cells and molecules generated through activation of Th-1 cells as a treatment strategy.

  9. Ulcerated lesion of the alveolar ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokmeyer, T J

    1980-10-01

    Histoplasmosis is a generalized fungal infection that is caused by the organism H capsulatum. In the most common disease-producing mechanism, the organism is inhaled and lodges in the lung, where it initiates an inflammatory focus. The peribronchial lymph nodes are subsequently involved, forming a primary complex that may ultimately calcify and become radiographically evident. From the primary complex, dissemination by the bloodstream may lead to colonization elsewhere. In the less frequent disease-producing complex, the organism is introduced directly into the tissue through a break in its continuity. A primary complex is then formed by involvement of the lymph nodes. Dissemination from such a focus is rare. It is generally believed that oral and pharyngeal lesions of the histoplasmosis represent symptoms of a systemic disease and are not a localized form of the disease. Histoplasmosis can occur at all ages; however, it is more often found in infancy and old age, especially in white males. Any area in the oral cavity may be affected; the most common sites are: larynx, tongue, palate, buccal mucosa. gingiva, and pharynx. The most frequently reported symptoms are pain, hoarseness, loss of weight, ulcer, and sore throat. The appearance of the oral and pharyngeal lesions may vary and may manifest as ulcers, nodules, or verrucous plaques. Deep, indurated ulcers are common, accounting for the predominant clinical impression of squamous carcinoma. PMID:6934220

  10. Perforated duodenal ulcer in Asir central hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jastaniah Suleiman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In a study of 27 cases of perforated duodenal ulcer seen at Asir Central Hospital over a period of seven years, two patients were females and 25 males. The highest incidence was in the fourth decade and the average age was 36.3 years. The Saudi-foreigner ratio was 1:2.9 in an area where the Saudi-foreigner population ratio was 1:3. Nine patients (33.3% were previously diagnosed as having peptic ulcer and had received treatment at one time or the other before perforation. Eighteen patients (66.7% were first diagnosed to peptic ulcer after the perforation. All the identified perforations were located anteriorly and anterosuperiorly. Only one case occurred in the second part of duodenum. The rest occurred in the first part. Two patients were treated successfully conservatively. The month perforations occurred most was the month of Shaaban. The fasting period during the month of Ramadhan did not show any increase in the prevalence of perforation in this hospital.

  11. Comprehensive treatment of complicated plantar ulcers in leprosy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Liangbin 严良斌; ZHANG Guocheng 张国成; ZHENG Zhiju 郑志菊; LI Wenzhong 李文忠; ZHENG Tisheng 郑逖生; Jean M. Watson; Angelika Piefer

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate feasible treatment methods for plantar ulcers in leprosy patients according to the agreement between the Ministry of Health (MOH) of China and the Leprosy Mission International (LMI).Methods A total of 2599 complicated foot ulcers in 1804 leprosy cases underwent surgic treatment. Plastic fixation and supports were used, dressings were changed regularly, and protective footwear and modified insoles were provided.Results Of the 2599 foot ulcers 1446 (55.64%) healed. The cure rate of the patients treated in leprosy hospitals was 71.31%, with 219 (15.15%) recurrences of foot ulcers. The recurrence rate of those who lived at home was 18.35%.Conclusions Comprehensive treatment of foot ulcers has a high cure rate and a low recurrence rate. Reduction of workload, avoidance of long distance walking, intensification of education on foot self-care and provision of financial support are the main measures for preventing a recurrence of foot ulcers.

  12. Bipolar aphthosis presenting as mutilating genital ulcers in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Somesh

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Three women with large, mutilating genital ulcers of long duration, destroying almost the lower half of the external genitalia, are reported. They had a history of recurrent oral ulcers as well. All patients had been diagnosed as having ′genital ulcer syndrome′ in the past and had been treated with antimicrobials. Histopathology of the biopsy from the margin of the ulcer revealed features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Considering the history, clinical features and histology, a diagnosis of bipolar aphthosis was made in all patients. All patients responded well to immunosuppressive therapy. The cases are reported because of the presence of genital ulcers of an unusually large size, mutilating character and their close similarity to genital ulcers due to sexually transmitted diseases, especially genital herpes and donovanosis.

  13. Bipolar aphthosis presenting as mutilating genital ulcers in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Somesh; Ajith, C; Malhotra, S; Kumar, Bhushan

    2004-01-01

    Three women with large, mutilating genital ulcers of long duration, destroying almost the lower half of the external genitalia, are reported. They had a history of recurrent oral ulcers as well. All patients had been diagnosed as having 'genital ulcer syndrome' in the past and had been treated with antimicrobials. Histopathology of the biopsy from the margin of the ulcer revealed features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Considering the history, clinical features and histology, a diagnosis of bipolar aphthosis was made in all patients. All patients responded well to immunosuppressive therapy. The cases are reported because of the presence of genital ulcers of an unusually large size, mutilating character and their close similarity to genital ulcers due to sexually transmitted diseases, especially genital herpes and donovanosis.

  14. Bipolar aphthosis presenting as mutilating genital ulcers in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Somesh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three women with large, mutilating genital ulcers of long duration, destroying almost the lower half of the external genitalia, are reported. They had a history of recurrent oral ulcers as well. All patients had been diagnosed as having ′genital ulcer syndrome′ in the past and had been treated with antimicrobials. Histopathology of the biopsy from the margin of the ulcer revealed features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Considering the history, clinical features and histology, a diagnosis of bipolar aphthosis was made in all patients. All patients responded well to immunosuppressive therapy. The cases are reported because of the presence of genital ulcers of an unusually large size, mutilating character and their close similarity to genital ulcers due to sexually transmitted diseases, especially genital herpes and donovanosis.

  15. Urinary iodine excretion in relation to goiter prevalence in households of goiter endemic and non endemic regions of Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Survey of goiter prevalence, among population of five endemic and four non endemic regions of Ethiopia was carried out prior to the distribution of iodate d salt. urine samples were collected from 327 subjects selected by systematic random sampling from endemic and 276 taken as non endemic. The lowest mean urinary iodine excretion (UIE) value was recorded in Bure (22 micro gl/day) and the highest in Alemmaya (148 micro gl/day). The highest goiter rate ( percent TGR) was recorded in Sawla 55.6 %) and the lowest (0.6 %) in Yabello. Iodine content of drinking was in the range of 0.4 - 48.5 micro gl. Iodine content of water source was correlated positively ( r0.8399) with the mean of UIE and TGR, however, indicates that sites considered as non endemic seem to be affected by iodine deficiency. The study results urge the need for intervention in controlling Iodine Deficiency Disorders. 3 tab

  16. The personality pattern of duodenal ulcer patients in relation to spontaneous ulcer healing and relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, P; von der Lieth, L; Matzen, Peter;

    1989-01-01

    stressful life events before entrance to the study (P less than 0.05) and, like the neurotic patients, they had lower ego-strength to cope with such events (P less than 0.05). The results indicate that personality assessments make it possible to distinguish between subgroups of duodenal ulcer patients......One hundred consecutive out-patients with duodenal ulceration from a hospital and a gastroenterological clinic were tested with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). This was carried out in order to investigate whether neuroticism or other personality disorders were...... characteristics of duodenal ulcer patients, and whether the presence of such possible personality disorders might influence the prognosis of the disease. Neuroticism occurred in 53% of the patients, but only in 5% of controls (P less than 0.0001). Overall, personality disorders were present in 69% of the patients...

  17. Syphilis and the endemic treponematoses : clinical, (histo-) pathological and laboratory studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.H. Engelkens (Herman)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractTreponemal diseases important to mankind are sexually transmitted syphilis and the endemic nonvenereally transmitted treponematoses (yaws, pinta, and endemic syphilis). Historically, the most important disease caused by treponemes is syphilis. During the last few decades, yaws, endemic s

  18. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with duodenal ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia and analysis of one-year reinfection rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Della Libera E.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (HP infection is endemic worldwide. The proposed treatment is expensive and there are few reports regarding reinfection rates in Brazil. The aim of this study was to compare the eradication rates obtained with two therapeutic options and to evaluate reinfection one year after treatment. This was a prospective randomized trial with 55 patients. Thirty-nine patients had active duodenal ulcer (DU and 16 non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD, and all tested positive for HP. Diagnosis was based on at least two positive tests: ultrarapid urease test, histology and/or culture. Patients were randomized to two groups: group OMC treated with 40 mg omeprazole (once a day, 500 mg metronidazole and 250 mg clarithromycin (twice daily for 7 days, or group NA treated with 300 mg nizatidine (once a day and 1000 mg amoxicillin (twice daily for 14 days. Those patients in whom HP was eradicated were followed up for one year to evaluate reinfection. Twenty-five patients were randomized for OMC and 30 for NA. HP eradication occurred in 20/25 patients (80% treated with OMC and 13/30 (43% treated with NA (P = 0.01. After reallocation because of initial treatment failure, the overall eradication rate was 44/51 patients (86%. After an average follow-up of one year, we evaluated 34 patients (23 with DU and 11 with NUD. Reinfection occurred in 3/34 patients (7.6%. We conclude that OMC is effective for HP eradication, and that NA should not be used. Reinfection occurs in 7.6% of the patients in the first year after eradication.

  19. Incidence and management of ulcers in diabetic Charcot feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K; Fabrin, J; Holstein, P E

    2001-09-01

    This study followed 115 patients with diabetes--who between them had 140 feet with Charcot's arthropathy--over six to 114 months (median: 48). A total of 43 patients (37%) developed ulcers in 53 feet. Their treatment was multifactorial. An offloading regimen was adopted, with the use of crutches and therapeutic sandals with soft, individually moulded insoles, followed by adjusted or bespoke shoes. Recalcitrant ulcers were treated with surgery in 16 patients (37%). Antibiotics were needed by 21 patients (49%). The incidence of ulceration was 17% per year. The median time interval between the acute component of Charcot's arthropathy and ulcer development was 36 months (range: 0-120 months). In seven patients, the ulcer developed during the acute phase. In 12 patients the ulcers were localised to the rockerbottom deformity in the mid-foot region, but in 31 patients other regions were affected. Dynamic footprint analysis was used to help adjust the offloading shoe/insole on the rockerbottom deformity. Such ulcers took twice as long to heal as other ulcers. Surgical treatment comprised: major amputation (two patients), arthrodesis for unstable ankle (three patients), toe amputations (seven patients), resection of the rockerbottom deformity (one patient) and other revisions (three patients). One patient died with an unhealed ulcer. There is a four-fold risk of ulcers in diabetic Charcot deformity compared with the overall risk of foot ulcers in diabetic feet. Healing was achieved in 40 patients (93%). The surgical intervention rate of 37% in ulcer cases in Charcot feet was low compared with the literature.

  20. Quality of life in patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically

    OpenAIRE

    Kozłowska, Katarzyna A.; Bączyk, Grażyna; Krokowicz, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ulcerative colitis belongs to the group of inflammatory bowel diseases. The specific symptoms and chronic nature of the disease significantly affect the quality of patients’ lives. Quality-of-life assessment helps to define its determining factors as well as the efficiency of surgical procedures. Aim Quality-of-life evaluation of patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically. Material and methods A retrospective review was carried out on 35 patients with ulcerative colitis,...

  1. DRAGSTEDT, GASTRIC-ACID AND DUODENAL-ULCER

    OpenAIRE

    Hobsley, M.

    1994-01-01

    Dragstedt believed that basal hypersecretion of gastric acid was the root cause of duodenal ulcer, that the hypersecretion was due to an increased vagal stimulation, and that vagotomy would therefore cure duodenal ulcer. He introduced vagotomy and demonstrated that the operation was successful in curing most patients of their duodenal ulcers. This article reviews how further research in the succeeding half century has demonstrated that it is the effect of vagotomy on stimulated, rather than u...

  2. Highly selective vagotomy in the treatment of peptic ulcer diathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, S P; Kohli, P; Kumar, P; Pradeep, R; Saxena, R; Choudhary, S R; Suresh, A

    1990-09-01

    The results of highly selective vagotomy in 174 Indian patients have been analysed. Compared to other procedures on the stomach, HSV has a definite advantage both on long term as well as on short term basis. HSV has therefore become the procedure of choice in the treatment of duodenal ulcer disease provided the expertise is available locally. HSV has also been used now in the treatment of ulcer complications and benign gastric ulcer disease. PMID:2092027

  3. Determinants of mortality among older adults with pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Hui Min; Tan, Juan; Saedon, Nor Izzati; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul B; Chin, Ai Vyrn; Poi, Philip J H; Tan, Maw Pin

    2014-01-01

    The presence of pressure ulcers imposes a huge burden on the older person's quality of life and significantly increases their risk of dying. The objective of this study was to determine patient characteristics associated with the presence of pressure ulcers and to evaluate the risk factors associated with mortality among older patients with pressure ulcers. A prospective observational study was performed between Oct 2012 and May 2013. Patients with preexisting pressure ulcers on admission and those with hospital acquired pressure ulcers were recruited into the study. Information on patient demographics, functional status, nutritional level, stages of pressure ulcer and their complications were obtained. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to assess the risk of death in all patients. 76/684 (11.1%) patients had pre-existing pressure ulcers on admission and 30/684 (4.4%) developed pressure ulcers in hospital. There were 68 (66%) deaths by the end of the median follow-up period of 12 (IQR 2.5-14) weeks. Our Cox regression model revealed that nursing home residence (Hazard Ratio, HR=2.33, 95% confidence interval, CI=1.30, 4.17; p=0.005), infected deep pressure ulcers (HR=2.21, 95% CI=1.26, 3.87; p=0.006) and neutrophilia (HR=1.76; 95% CI 1.05, 2.94; p=0.031) were independent predictors of mortality in our elderly patients with pressure ulcers. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in our setting is comparable to previously reported figures in Europe and North America. Mortality in patients with pressure ulcer was high, and was predicted by institutionalization, concurrent infection and high neutrophil counts.

  4. Delivery of Compression Therapy for Venous Leg Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, Kian; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Despite the documented effect of compression therapy in clinical studies and its widespread prescription, treatment of venous leg ulcers is often prolonged and recurrence rates high. Data on provided compression therapy are limited. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether home care nurses achiev...... with venous leg ulcers do not receive adequate compression therapy. Training programs that focus on practical bandaging skills should be implemented to improve management of venous leg ulcers....

  5. Update in the treatment of paediatric ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greifer, Melanie K; Markowitz, James F

    2006-10-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an important disease in the paediatric population. Ulcerative colitis is one of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, and is medically incurable. However, the arsenal of medications has grown as knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease advances. This review looks at the classical treatments for children with ulcerative colitis, including the 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and imunomodulators, as well as biological therapy and other, newer modalities. PMID:17020417

  6. Experimental study on cryotherapy for fungal corneal ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yingxin; Yang, Weijia; Gao, Minghong; Belin, Michael Wellington; Yu, Hai; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background Fungal corneal ulcer is one of the major causes of visual impairment worldwide. Treatment of fungal corneal ulcer mainly depends on anti-fungal agents. In the current study, we developed an integrated combination therapy of cryotherapy and anti-fungal agents to facilitate effective treatment of fungal corneal ulcer. Methods Rabbit models of cornea infection were established using a combined method of intrastromal injection and keratoplasty. After treatment with cryotherapy and anti...

  7. Evaluation of dairy allergy among ulcerative colitis patients

    OpenAIRE

    judaki, Arezo; Hafeziahmadi, Mohamadreza; Yousefi, Atefe; Havasian, Mohamad Reza; Panahi, Jafar; Sayehmiri, Koroush; Alizadeh, Sajjad

    2014-01-01

    The intestine is the largest mucosal organ of the body and also the first line immune homeostasis. Inflammatory bowel disease or IBD is divided into ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. One of the problems that can occur with UC is dietary allergy to some foods. This study aimed to evaluated the dairy allergy among patients with ulcerative colitis. This study is a Case - control study, that studied 72 patients with Ulcerative Colitis, after recording history of the disease, colonoscopy and...

  8. [Piracetam in combined pathogenetic therapy of recurrent duodenal ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Shchetkin, D I

    2002-01-01

    Duodenal ulcer cure, as a systemic gastroenterologic disease, can be achieved in some patients by the addition of the nootropic drug piracetam to current antisecretory and antihelicobacter therapy. Piracetam corrects vegetative and psychoemotional disorders in duodenal ulcer, normalizes gastric motility, has an antioxidant effect and improves cerebral circulation. An optimal effect on clinico-endoscopic manifestations of recurrent duodenal ulcer was achieved in combination of piracetam with current antisecretory (omeprazole) and antihelicobacter (de-nol, amoxicillin, metronidazole) medicines. Such combination improves both short- and long-term outcomes of duodenal ulcer treatment.

  9. Incidence and clinical features of endoscopic ulcers developing after gastrectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woo Chul Chung; Eun Jung Jeon; Kang-Moon Lee; Chang Nyol Paik; Sung Hoon Jung; Jung Hwan Oh; Ji Hyun Kim

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To determine the precise incidence and clinical features of endoscopic ulcers following gastrectomy.METHODS:A consecutive series of patients who underwent endoscopic examination following gastrectomy between 2005 and 2010 was retrospectively analyzed.A total of 78 patients with endoscopic ulcers and 759 without ulcers following gastrectomy were enrolled.We analyzed differences in patient age,sex,size of the lesions,method of operation,indications for gastric resection,and infection rates of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori)between the nonulcer and ulcer groups.RESULTS:The incidence of endoscopic ulcers after gastrectomy was 9.3% and that of marginal ulcers was 8.6%.Ulcers were more common in patients with Billroth Ⅱ anastomosis and pre-existing conditions for peptic ulcer disease (PUD).Infection rates of H.pyloridid not differ significantly between the two groups.The patients who underwent operations to treat PUD had lower initial levels of hemoglobin and higher rates of hospital admission.CONCLUSION:H.pylori was not an important factor in ulcerogenesis following gastrectomy.For patients who underwent surgery for PUD,clinical course of marginal ulcers was more severe.

  10. The Misunderstanding and New Nursing Progress of Pressure Ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoxia XIE; Zhaohua LIU

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many foreign and domestic scholars have made a further study on the risk factors, high-risk groups, prevention and nursing of pressure ulcers. For all reasons such as clinical nursing workers and managers, new progresses can' t be well applied, and simultaneously pressure ulcers are misunderstood to some extent. These conditions are not conducive to the prevention and nursing of pressure ulcers and the improvement of patients' life quality and nursing service quality. Therefore, it is necessary to keep away from the misunderstanding, know well new progresses and reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers.

  11. [Dyspepsia, Ulcer Disease – Helicobacter pylori, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori (HP) is declining, whereas reflux disease and the proportion of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAR) to HP-induced ulcers increase. Eradication heals HP-ulcer disease, interrupts cancerous progression and can improve dyspeptic symptoms. NSAR-ulcers heal under proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy but tend to recur after reexposition. Anticoagulants and antiplatlet agents increase the risk additionally. PPI reduces NSAR-ulcer recurrence. Reflux patients with severe inflammation and complications often need long-term therapy. Barrett’s esophagus patients are at risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27269775

  12. [Dyspepsia, Ulcer Disease – Helicobacter pylori, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori (HP) is declining, whereas reflux disease and the proportion of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAR) to HP-induced ulcers increase. Eradication heals HP-ulcer disease, interrupts cancerous progression and can improve dyspeptic symptoms. NSAR-ulcers heal under proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy but tend to recur after reexposition. Anticoagulants and antiplatlet agents increase the risk additionally. PPI reduces NSAR-ulcer recurrence. Reflux patients with severe inflammation and complications often need long-term therapy. Barrett’s esophagus patients are at risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  13. Advances in methods for measuring patterns of endemic plant diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemism, the restriction of a taxon’s distribution to a specified geographical area, is central to the study of biogeography. Understanding endemism not only concerns a number of evolutionary and biogeographical issues, but also plays an important role in maintaining biodiversity and in the selection of priority areas for conservation. In recent years, various measures and analytical methods have been used to investigate patterns of endemism for various taxa from different regions. The emergence of these new measurements has benefited from the construction of phylogenetic trees and the implementation of data from spatial statistics. Some of these measures, such as phylogenetic diversity, phylogenetic endemism, and biogeographically weighted evolutionary distinctiveness deserve much more attention. Here, we review progress in the methodology used to measure the distribution patterns of endemism. These metrics have generally developed from a single time or space perspective to space-time united patterns. Specifically, the metrics include species richness, phylogenetic diversity and evolutionary distinctiveness, plus all there in combination as well as the weight of species range size. Moreover, we propose that studies on the distribution patterns of Chinese endemic taxa should pay attention to species diversity, phylogenetic diversity, species β-diversity, and phylogenetic β-diversity. In particular, model simulation analysis should be emphasized and implemented during investigations. These studies will provide fundamental knowledge for comprehensive recognition of scale-induced differences and for the detection of mechanisms underlying the distribution patterns of endemic taxa, and therefore provide theoretical support for biodiversity conservation.

  14. REVIEW: Endemic plants of serpentine soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUDARMONO

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant adaptation to serpentine soils is a system ideal for studies in evolutionary ecology. Serpentine soils are characterized by low calcium to magnesium ratios with Ca at significantly lower concentrations relative to surrounding areas. Although some variation occurs between sites which identified three collective traits: poor plant productivity, high rates of endemism and vegetation type distinct from those of neighboring areas. The several morphological feature characteristic of serpentine-tolerant species is possess xeromorphic foliage, including reduced leaf size and sclerophylls, the stature is significantly reduced relative to counterparts on non serpentine soil and root systems of species growing on and off serpentine sites are often more developed on serpentine soils than on neighboring soils. Serpentine soils are ubiquitous, but patchily distributed and thus promote geographic isolation. Adaptation to edaphic conditions may also beget reproductive isolation. Adaptive mutation might be influenced frequently from related species inhabiting surrounding areas. For the future studies involving serpentine systems merge the fields of ecology, evolution, physiology, and genetics required for serpentine adaptation.

  15. Temporal stability of an endemic Mexican treefrog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ruiz, Griselda; Venegas-Barrera, Crystian S; Sanchez-Sanchez, Hermilo; Manjarrez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The demographic characteristics of an amphibian population fluctuate independently over time, mainly in response to the temporal variation of environmental factors, especially precipitation and temperature. These temporal fluctuations may contribute to the size of an amphibian population and could be used to determine the current conservation status of a species. During a five year (2004-2008) period, we studied the relative abundance, sex ratio, and age-sex structure of a population of metamorphosed individuals of the endemic treefrog Hyla eximia in Central Mexico. We also studied the species' relationship with climatic variables such as temperature and precipitation. We found an interannual constant abundance during the study period. However, interannual differences were observed in the population structure by age-sex category (males, females, or juveniles), with decreased abundance of males and juveniles during the rainy months (August-November). The annual abundance of H. eximia was positively correlated with rainfall, but negatively with monthly temperature. We found the sex ratio was male-biased (2:1), except for year 2008. Also, differences in snout-vent length (SVL) were found between years, suggesting changes in recruitment of new individuals. We conclude that variations in abundance, and frequencies by age-sex category, of H. eximia are related to seasonal variations in temperature and precipitation characteristics of temperate zones. However, this temporal stability may suggest that anurans have an unusual capacity to persist even in the face of human-induced habitat change. PMID:26421242

  16. Risk of suicide among operated and non-operated patients hospitalized for peptic ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Bahmanyar, Shahram; Sparen, Par; Mittendorfer Rutz, Ellenor; Hultman, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: Some small studies reported high risk of suicide after surgical treatment for peptic ulcer. Our aim was to explore the risk of suicide in hospitalized gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer patients separately among operated and unopearated cohorts. Methods: Retrospective cohorts of 163,579 unoperated patients with gastric ulcer or duodenal ulcer and 28,112 patients with surgical treatment for ulcer, recorded in the Swedish Inpatient Register since 196...

  17. ANTI PEPTIC ULCER ACTIVITY OF THE LEAVES OF Amaranthus spinosus L. IN RATS

    OpenAIRE

    TANAYA GHOSH; PRASENJIT MITRA; DEBIPRASAD GHOSH; PRASANTA KUMAR MITRA

    2013-01-01

    Anti peptic ulcer activity of the leaves of Amaranthus spinosus L., a plant of Eastern Himalaya, was studied in peptic ulcer models in rats. Gastric and duodenal ulcers were induced by ethanol and cysteamine respectively. Results were compared with omeprazole, a known drug for peptic ulcer. It was found out that the leaves of Amaranthus spinosus L. exerted anti peptic ulcer activity against ethanol and cysteamine induced peptic ulcerations but the activity was less than that of omeprazole.

  18. Endemic visceral leishmaniasis in a patient from lower Monferrato hills in provence of Alessandria, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Di Matteo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis is endemic in Italy as well as in the entire Mediterranean area and Campania is the italian region in which most cases occur. Dog leishmaniasis, common along the coast from Liguria to Southern Italy, is nowadays reported in areas as far inland as Monferrato hills, the outskirts of Turin and lake Garda southern shores. Mr. B.B. (male 67 years old came almost by chance to the attention of our Medical department for acute fever and pancytopenia; further symptoms comprised subacute weight loss, splenic and limph node enlargment, an ulcerative lesion on the right arm. The patient appeared to be unavoidably destined to splenectomy until a Leishmania antibody test was requested to our laboratory. The assay was performed using an immunocromathographic method for specific IgM and by immunofluorescence to determine the total antibody titre towards Leishmania. Microscopic examination (Giemsa stain and PCR were also performed to look for Leishmania infantum amastigotes in blood, bone marrow and skin. All tests, except microscopic examination, corroborated a Leishmania infection, and a dramatical clinical improvement was seen with Amphothericin B treatment. We conclude that an accurate anamnesis is mandatory if the Laboratory must be perform a rational diagnosis.

  19. An outbreak of cutaneous anthrax in a non-endemic district - Visakhapatnam in Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanraj Promila

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anthrax is a disease of herbivorous animals, and humans incidentally acquire the disease by handling infected dead animals and their products. Sporadic cases of human anthrax have been reported from Southern India. METHODS: Five tribal men presented with painless ulcers with vesiculation and edema of the surrounding skin on the extremities without any constitutional symptoms. There was a history of slaughtering and consumption of a dead goat ten days prior to the development of skin lesions. Clinically cutaneous anthrax was suspected and smears, swabs and punch biopsies were taken for culture and identification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. All the cases were treated with intravenous followed by oral antibiotics. Appropriate health authorities were alerted and proper control measures were employed. RESULTS: Smears from the cutaneous lesions of all five patients were positive for Bacillus anthracis and this was confirmed by a positive culture and PCR of the smears in four of the five cases. All the cases responded to antibiotics. CONCLUSION: We report five cases of cutaneous anthrax in a non-endemic district, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, for the first time.

  20. Impact of facial conformation on canine health: corneal ulceration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena M A Packer

    Full Text Available Concern has arisen in recent years that selection for extreme facial morphology in the domestic dog may be leading to an increased frequency of eye disorders. Corneal ulcers are a common and painful eye problem in domestic dogs that can lead to scarring and/or perforation of the cornea, potentially causing blindness. Exaggerated juvenile-like craniofacial conformations and wide eyes have been suspected as risk factors for corneal ulceration. This study aimed to quantify the relationship between corneal ulceration risk and conformational factors including relative eyelid aperture width, brachycephalic (short-muzzled skull shape, the presence of a nasal fold (wrinkle, and exposed eye-white. A 14 month cross-sectional study of dogs entering a large UK based small animal referral hospital for both corneal ulcers and unrelated disorders was carried out. Dogs were classed as affected if they were diagnosed with a corneal ulcer using fluorescein dye while at the hospital (whether referred for this disorder or not, or if a previous diagnosis of corneal ulcer(s was documented in the dogs' histories. Of 700 dogs recruited, measured and clinically examined, 31 were affected by corneal ulcers. Most cases were male (71%, small breed dogs (mean± SE weight: 11.4±1.1 kg, with the most commonly diagnosed breed being the Pug. Dogs with nasal folds were nearly five times more likely to be affected by corneal ulcers than those without, and brachycephalic dogs (craniofacial ratio <0.5 were twenty times more likely to be affected than non-brachycephalic dogs. A 10% increase in relative eyelid aperture width more than tripled the ulcer risk. Exposed eye-white was associated with a nearly three times increased risk. The results demonstrate that artificially selecting for these facial characteristics greatly heightens the risk of corneal ulcers, and such selection should thus be discouraged to improve canine welfare.

  1. Anti-ulcer activity of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Panda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptic ulcers occur in that part of the gastrointestinal tract which is exposed to gastric acid and pepsin, i.e., the stomach and duodenum. Gastric and duodenal ulcers are common pathologies that may be induced by a variety of factors such as stress, smoking and noxious agents including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato contain ample amounts of antioxidants. It has been proven already by many scientific studies that antioxidants have ulcer healing properties. In reference to this, we tried assessing the ulcer healing effect of Ipomoea batatas tubers. Methods: The anti-ulcer activity of the tubers of Ipomoea batatas (sweet potato was studied in cold stress and aspirin-induced gastric ulcers in Wistar rats. Methanolic extracts of Ipomoea batatas tubers (TE at two doses, viz., 400 and 800 mg /kg were evaluated in cold stress and aspirin-induced gastric ulcer models using cimetidine and omeprazole respectively as standards. The standard drugs and the test drugs were administered orally for 7 days in the cold stressmodel and for 1 day in the aspirin-induced gastric ulcer model. Gastroprotective potential, status of the antioxidant enzymes {superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione reductase(GR} along with GSH, and lipid peroxidation were studied in both models. Results: The results of the present study showed that TE possessed gastroprotective activity as evidenced by its significant inhibition of mean ulcer score and ulcer index and a marked increase in GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx, and GR levels and reduction in lipid peroxidation in a dose dependant manner.Conclusion: The present experimental findings suggest that tubers of Ipomoea batatas may be useful for treating peptic ulcers.

  2. Genotypes of Helicobacter pylori in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin-Lin Perng; Hwai-Jeng Lin; Wen-Ching Lo; Guan-Ying Tseng; I-Chen Sun; Yueh-Hsing Ou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pyloricauses chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer,gastric cancer and MALT-lymphoma. Different genotypes of Helicobacter pylori are confirmed from diverse geographic areas. Its association with bleeding peptic ulcer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the Helicobacter pylori vac4 alleles, cagA and iceA in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer.METHODS: We enrolled patients with bleeding, nonbleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis. Biopsy specimens were obtained from the antrum of the stomach for rapid urease test, bacterial culture and PCR assay. DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction were used to detect the presence or absence of cagA and to assess the polymorphism of vac4 and iceA.RESULTS: A total of 168 patients (60.4%) (25 patients with chronic gastritis, 26 patients with bleeding gastric ulcer,51 patients with non-bleeding gastric ulcer, 26 patients with bleeding duodenal ulcer, and 40 patients with non-bleeding duodenal ulcer) were found to have positive PCR results between January 2001 and December 2002. Concerning genotypes, we found cagA (139/278, 50%), vacA s1a (127/278, 45.7%), and iceA1 (125/278, 45%) predominated in all studied patients. In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers,vac4 s1a and m1T were fewer than those in patients with non-bleeding peptic ulcers (37/106 vs69/135, P=0.017, and 4/106 vs21/135, P=0.002).CONCLUSION: In patients with peptic ulcers, Hpylori vacA s1a and m1T prevent bleeding complication.

  3. The personality pattern of duodenal ulcer patients in relation to spontaneous ulcer healing and relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, P; von der Lieth, L; Matzen, Peter;

    1989-01-01

    One hundred consecutive out-patients with duodenal ulceration from a hospital and a gastroenterological clinic were tested with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). This was carried out in order to investigate whether neuroticism or other personality disorders were characterist......One hundred consecutive out-patients with duodenal ulceration from a hospital and a gastroenterological clinic were tested with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). This was carried out in order to investigate whether neuroticism or other personality disorders were...... characteristics of duodenal ulcer patients, and whether the presence of such possible personality disorders might influence the prognosis of the disease. Neuroticism occurred in 53% of the patients, but only in 5% of controls (P less than 0.0001). Overall, personality disorders were present in 69% of the patients...... stressful life events before entrance to the study (P less than 0.05) and, like the neurotic patients, they had lowerego-strength to cope with such events (P less than 0.05). The results indicate that personality assessments make it possible to distinguish between subgroups of duodenal ulcer patients with...

  4. Clinical treatment of lumbodorsal radiotherapy ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize our experience in the treatment of 12 cases of severe lumbodorsal radio-therapy ulcers. Methods: Of the 12 cases, 4 were male and 8 female. The youngest patient was 29 and the oldest was 67 years old. Their injuries were mainly resulted from radiotherapy for costal metastasis of breast cancer, carcinoma of uterus and dorsal skin carcinoma or scar induced by 60Co γ-rays, deep X-rays or superficial accelerator electrons. Their local accumulative dose was 60-120 Gy. Palliative debridement was performed with partial excision of the ribs and spinous process. And then the defects were repaired with local skin flap in 2 cases, parascapular skin flap in 1 case and island musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi muscle in 9 cases. Results: All the skin flaps and musculocutaneous flaps grafted on the wounds of the 12 cases survived (100%). Grade A healing was achieved in 11 cases of ulcer (91.7%) and grade B healing in 1 cases (8.3%). All the skin flaps and musculocutaneous flaps grafted survived and the ulcers never recurred. Conclusion: Severe lumbodorsal radiotherapy injury often results in complications. The authors performed palliative excision and repaired by transferring an axial skin flap or a musculocutaneous flap with good blood circulation selected in accordance with the principles of plastic surgery, which can effectively improve blood circulation and promote wound healing. Reverse musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi muscle is an especially good material for reconstruction. It has axial blood vessel and proper thickness. It is broad and can be rotated with great range and the donor site can be sutured directly

  5. Mycotic corneal ulcers in upper Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reema Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To study the association of various risk factors and epidemiological variables of mycotic keratitis treated at a tertiary referral hospital of upper Assam. Materials and Methods: In this hospital-based prospective study a total of 310 consecutive corneal ulcer cases attending the ophthalmology outpatient department of Assam Medical College were enrolled between April 2007 and March 2009. After clinical and slit-lamp biomicroscopic examination in all suspected cases, smears and culture examination for fungus was done to establish the etiology. Demographic information and associated probable risk factors of individual cases were noted in a predesigned questionnaire. Results: In 188 (60.6% cases fungal etiology could be established. Out of them 67.6% were males. The most commonly affected age group was 41-50 years (25.5%. The maximum (23.4% cases were reported during the paddy harvesting season in Assam (January and February. Fungal element could be demonstrated in 65.2% cases in direct potassium hydroxide (KOH mount. The commonest predisposing factor was corneal injury (74.5%. While diabetes was a significant systemic predisposing factor in mixed bacterial and fungal infections in 11.1% cases, blocked naso-lacrimal duct was the local predisposing factor in 11.1% of cases. Fusarium solani (25% was the commonest isolate followed by Aspergillus species (19%, Curvularia species (18.5% and Penicillium species (15.2%. Yeasts were isolated in 2.7% (n=5 cases. Conclusions : Ocular trauma was the commonest cause of fungal corneal ulcer in Assam and Fusarium solani was the commonest species responsible for it. Most of the mycotic ulcer cases come from rural areas including the tea gardens.

  6. The dynamics of endemic malaria in populations of varying size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model for endemic malaria involving variable human and mosquito populations is analysed. A threshold parameter R0 exists and the disease can persist if and only if R0 exceeds 1. R0 is seen to be a generalisation of the basic reproduction ratio associated with the Ross-Macdonald model for malaria transmission. The disease free equilibrium always exist and is globally stable when R0 is below 1. A perturbation analysis is used to approximate the endemic equilibrium in the important case where the disease related death rate is nonzero. A diffusion approximation is used to approximate the quasi-stationary distribution of the associated stochastic model. Numerical simulations show that when R0 is distinctly greater than 1, the endemic deterministic equilibrium is globally stable. Furthermore, in quasi-stationarity, the stochastic process undergoes oscillations about a mean population whose size can be approximated by the stable endemic deterministic equilibrium. (author)

  7. Some observations on endemic macroalgae of the Southern Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Abidi, S.A.H.

    The paper summarises current level of knowledge on the endemic Antarctic macroalgae. The macroalgal adaptation to low temperature, response to different photoperiod during the season, animal-macroalgal interaction and reproductive strategies...

  8. Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, Jeff; Cranmer, Louise; Stelzer, Ralph J.; Sullivan, Steve; Chittka, Lars

    2009-02-01

    The Canary Islands are home to a guild of endemic, threatened bird-pollinated plants. Previous work has suggested that these plants evolved floral traits as adaptations to pollination by flower specialist sunbirds, but subsequently, they appear to have co-opted generalist passerine birds as sub-optimal pollinators. To test this idea, we carried out a quantitative study of the pollination biology of three of the bird-pollinated plants, Canarina canariensis (Campanulaceae), Isoplexis canariensis (Veronicaceae) and Lotus berthelotii (Fabaceae), on the island of Tenerife. Using colour vision models, we predicted the detectability of flowers to bird and bee pollinators. We measured pollinator visitation rates, nectar standing crops as well as seed-set and pollen removal and deposition. These data showed that the plants are effectively pollinated by non-flower specialist passerine birds that only occasionally visit flowers. The large nectar standing crops and extended flower longevities (>10 days) of Canarina and Isoplexis suggests that they have evolved a bird pollination system that effectively exploits these low frequency non-specialist pollen vectors and is in no way sub-optimal. Seed set in two of the three species was high and was significantly reduced or zero in flowers where pollinator access was restricted. In L. berthelotii, however, no fruit set was observed, probably because the plants were self-incompatible horticultural clones of a single genet. We also show that, while all three species are easily detectable for birds, the orange Canarina and the red Lotus (but less so the yellow-orange Isoplexis) should be difficult to detect for insect pollinators without specialised red receptors, such as bumblebees. Contrary to expectations if we accept that the flowers are primarily adapted to sunbird pollination, the chiffchaff ( Phylloscopus canariensis) was an effective pollinator of these species.

  9. Endemic pemphigus over a century: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Abréu-Vélez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF is an autoimmune disease, classically occurring in a restricted geographic area. Foci of EPF have been described in several Central and South American countries, often affecting young people and Amerindians, with some female predilection. Although most American EPF cases have been documented in Brazil, cases have been reported in Peru, Paraguay, El Salvador and Venezuela. An additional variant of EPF has been described in El Bagre, Colombia, (El Bagre-EPF affecting older men and a few post-menopausal females. Finally, one additional type of EPF has been described in nomadic tribes affecting females of child bearing age in Tunisia, Africa. Aims: The main aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge about autoantigens, and immunologic and genetic studies in EPF. Material and Methods: We utilized a retrospective review of the literature, aiming to compile and compare the multiple geographic foci of EPF. Results: The primary autoantigens in EPF are still considered to be desmogleins in the case of the Tunisian and all American cases, in contradistinction to plakins and desmogleins in El Bagre-EPF. Although several autoantigens are been suggested, their biochemical nature needs further elucidation. Current knowledge still supports the concept that an antibody mediated immune response represents the principal pathophysiology in all variants of EPF. Conclusion: A strong genetic susceptibility appears to contribute to disease development in several people affected by these diseases; however, no specific genes have been confirmed at present. We conclude that further investigation is necessary to define these disorders immunologically and genetically.

  10. Endemic pemphigus over a century: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Abréu-Vélez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF is an autoimmune disease, classically occurring in a restricted geographic area. Foci of EPF have been described in several Central and South American countries, often affecting young people and Amerindians, with some female predilection. Although most American EPF cases have been documented in Brazil, cases have been reported in Peru, Paraguay, El Salvador and Venezuela. An additional variant of EPF has been described in El Bagre, Colombia, (El Bagre-EPF affecting older men and a few post-menopausal females. Finally, one additional type of EPF has been described in nomadic tribes affecting females of child bearing age in Tunisia, Africa. Aims: The main aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge about autoantigens, and immunologic and genetic studies in EPF. Material and Methods: We utilized a retrospective review of the literature, aiming to compile and compare the multiple geographic foci of EPF. Results: The primary autoantigens in EPF are still considered to be desmogleins in the case of the Tunisian and all American cases, in contradistinction to plakins and desmogleins in El Bagre-EPF. Although several autoantigens are been suggested, their biochemical nature needs further elucidation. Current knowledge still supports the concept that an antibody mediated immune response represents the principal pathophysiology in all variants of EPF. Conclusion : A strong genetic susceptibility appears to contribute to disease development in several people affected by these diseases; however, no specific genes have been confirmed at present. We conclude that further investigation is necessary to define these disorders immunologically and genetically.

  11. Endemic selenium intoxication of humans in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G Q; Wang, S Z; Zhou, R H; Sun, S Z

    1983-05-01

    An endemic disease was discovered in 1961 in parts of the population of Enshi County, Hubei Province of the People's Republic of China. During the years of the highest prevalence, from 1961 to 1964, the morbidity was almost 50% in the 248 inhabitants of the five most heavily affected villages; its cause was determined to be selenium intoxication. The most common sign of the poisoning was loss of hair and nails. In areas of high incidence, lesions of the skin, nervous system, and possibly teeth may have been involved. A case is reported of a middle-aged, female hemiplegic, whose illness and death apparently were related to selenosis. Daily dietary intakes of selenium, estimated after the peak prevalence had subsided, averaged 4.99 (range 3.20 to 6.69) mg and hair and blood selenium levels averaged 32.2 and 3.2 micrograms/ml, respectively. Up to 1000x differences occurred when selenium contents of vegetables, cereals, scalp hair, blood, and urine from the selenosis areas were compared with those from Keshan disease (selenium deficiency) areas. The ultimate environmental source of selenium was a stony coal of very high selenium content (average more than 300 micrograms/g; one sample exceeded 80,000 micrograms/g). Selenium from the coal entered the soil by weathering and was available for uptake by crops because of the traditional use of lime as fertilizer in that region. This particular outbreak of human selenosis was due to a drought that caused failure of the rice crop, forcing the villagers to eat more high-selenium vegetables and maize and fewer protein foods. PMID:6846228

  12. A world malaria map: Plasmodium falciparum endemicity in 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon I Hay

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Efficient allocation of resources to intervene against malaria requires a detailed understanding of the contemporary spatial distribution of malaria risk. It is exactly 40 y since the last global map of malaria endemicity was published. This paper describes the generation of a new world map of Plasmodium falciparum malaria endemicity for the year 2007. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 8,938 P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR surveys were identified using a variety of exhaustive search strategies. Of these, 7,953 passed strict data fidelity tests for inclusion into a global database of PfPR data, age-standardized to 2-10 y for endemicity mapping. A model-based geostatistical procedure was used to create a continuous surface of malaria endemicity within previously defined stable spatial limits of P. falciparum transmission. These procedures were implemented within a Bayesian statistical framework so that the uncertainty of these predictions could be evaluated robustly. The uncertainty was expressed as the probability of predicting correctly one of three endemicity classes; previously stratified to be an informative guide for malaria control. Population at risk estimates, adjusted for the transmission modifying effects of urbanization in Africa, were then derived with reference to human population surfaces in 2007. Of the 1.38 billion people at risk of stable P. falciparum malaria, 0.69 billion were found in Central and South East Asia (CSE Asia, 0.66 billion in Africa, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia (Africa+, and 0.04 billion in the Americas. All those exposed to stable risk in the Americas were in the lowest endemicity class (PfPR2-10 5 to or = 40% areas. High endemicity was widespread in the Africa+ region, where 0.35 billion people are at this level of risk. Most of the rest live at intermediate risk (0.20 billion, with a smaller number (0.11 billion at low stable risk. CONCLUSIONS: High levels of P. falciparum malaria endemicity are common

  13. Pneumorrhachis Secondary to a Sacral Decubitus Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayedi, Siamak; Babin, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    An elderly woman with a chronic decubitus sacral ulcer presented to the emergency department with sepsis. A computed tomography of her abdomen showed diffuse gas extending throughout the thoracolumbar spinal canal. Pneumorrhachis is a rare radiographic finding defined as gas within the spinal canal. There are many causes of pneumorrhachis ranging from trauma to infection. In this case the pneumorrhachis was caused by direct spread of gas-forming organisms from vertebral osteomyelitis. Emergency physicians should know about the implication of gas in the spinal canal in the setting of sepsis. PMID:27429699

  14. Recurrent oral ulcers--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, A

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcers (ROUs) are the most common oral mucosal disease. The etiology of ROUs is complex. The factors include mechanical trauma, genetics, stress, smoking, and viral and bacterial infections. Treatment modalities depend on the differential diagnosis of ROUs and could consist of antimicrobial agents, anti-inflammatory agents, immunomodulators, or over-the-counter medications. New therapy available in the form of a coating polymer, Colgate ORABASE Soothe.N.Seal, is clinically proven to provide rapid relief and healing of ROUs. PMID:11915640

  15. Cutaneous metastases presenting as genital ulcer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Vasuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastasis from an internal organ malignancy is rare and as, the presenting sign of malignancy is an uncommon phenomenon. Their presence, signals a poor prognosis. We report a case of 50-year-old female who was referred to sexually transmitted diseases - out patient department, with complaints of multiple genital ulcers to rule out sexually transmitted infections. After thorough evaluation, she was found to be a case of carcinoma cervix with metastatic squamous cell carcinomatous deposits on external genitalia. This case was unique because of relatively asymptomatic nature of internal malignancy and atypical presentation of carcinoma cervix as cutaneous metastasis.

  16. LEPROMATOUS LEPROSY PRESENTING AS GENITAL ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunkumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium leprae can invade almost any part of the skin but most commonly affects the cooler parts rather than the warmer areas. Involvement of the male external genitalia although not very common due to the relatively higher temperature caused by the occlusive undergarments, can still be affected in leprosy. Most of the genital lesions seen on the leprosy patients are either nodules, patches, plaques, papules and or swelling of external genitalia. Herewith we are presenting a lepromatous leprosy patient presenting as genital ulcers in this era of syndromic management of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI.

  17. Colonic biogeography in health and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Aonghus; Lennon, Grainne; Winter, Desmond C; O'Connell, P Ronan

    2016-09-01

    The relevance of biogeography to the distal gut microbiota has been investigated in both health and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however multiple factors, including sample type and methodology, microbiota characterization and interpersonal variability make the construction of a core model of colonic biogeography challenging. In addition, how phylogenetic classification relates to immunogenicity and whether consistent alterations in the microbiota are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) remain open questions. This addendum seeks to review the human colonic microbiota in health and UC as currently understood, in the broader context of the human microbiome. PMID:27662587

  18. Turner Syndrome Associated with Ulcerative Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Takaya, Junji; Teraguchi, Masayuki; Ikemoto, Yumiko; Yoshimura, Ken; Yamato, Fumiko; Higashino, Hirohiko; Kobayashi, Yohnosuke; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a 7-yr-old girl with Turner syndrome, ulcerative colitis (UC) and coarctation of the aorta. The diagnosis of Turner syndrome was made in early infancy (karyotype analysis 45, X). Growth hormone treatment was started at 3 yr and 2 mo of age. From the age of 4 yr and 5 mo, the patient suffered from persistent diarrhea with traces of blood and intermittent abdominal discomfort. As these symptoms gradually deteriorated, she was referred to our clinic at the age of 7 yr for f...

  19. Cellular and Molecular Immunopathogenesis of Ulcerative Colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suzhen Zhang; Xuhui Zhao; Dechun Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory disease of the rectal and colonic mucosa and seems to result from a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the environment and the immune system. Various components of the mucosal immune system are implicated in the immunopathogenesis of UC. Evidence from animal models also suggests that an altered immune response to the commensal microflora of the host plays a central role in the development of UC. So in this review, we elucidate the cells and molecules which are implicated in the immunopathogenesis of the disease from four aspects: antigens in the intestine, dendritic cells, toll like receptors and NF-κB in the UC.

  20. Malaria seroprevalence in blood bank donors from endemic and non-endemic areas of Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Elena Contreras

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In Venezuela, a total of 363,466 malaria cases were reported between 1999-2009. Several states are experiencing malaria epidemics, increasing the risk of vector and possibly transfusion transmission. We investigated the risk of transfusion transmission in blood banks from endemic and non-endemic areas of Venezuela by examining blood donations for evidence of malaria infection. For this, commercial kits were used to detect both malaria-specific antibodies (all species and malaria antigen (Plasmodium falciparum only in samples from Venezuelan blood donors (n = 762. All samples were further studied by microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The antibody results showed that P. falciparum-infected patients had a lower sample/cut-off ratio than Plasmodium vivax-infected patients. Conversely, a higher ratio for antigen was observed among all P. falciparum-infected individuals. Sensitivity and specificity were higher for malarial antigens (100 and 99.8% than for antibodies (82.2 and 97.4%. Antibody-positive donors were observed in Caracas, Ciudad Bolívar, Puerto Ayacucho and Cumaná, with prevalences of 1.02, 1.60, 3.23 and 3.63%, respectively. No PCR-positive samples were observed among the donors. However, our results show significant levels of seropositivity in blood donors, suggesting that more effective measures are required to ensure that transfusion transmission does not occur.

  1. The effects of ulcer size on the wound radius reductions and healing times in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimny, S; Schatz, H; Pfohl, M

    2004-04-01

    The main problems in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers are prolonged wound healing and not necessary amputations, which may sometimes be caused by the impression that the results of conservative treatment are somewhat unpredictable. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ulcer size on the wound radius reduction and healing times using a previously established equation for wound healing in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. This prospective study evaluates wound healing in 120 diabetic patients with neuropathic foot ulcers who were grouped according to four different ulcer areas (A 100 150 200 mm (2)). Ulcer healing was assessed by planimetric measurement of the wound area every second week until wound healing. The time course of wound healing in the different groups was compared by the weekly wound radius reduction using the equation R = sqrt A/pi. The average healing time in group A was 70 (95 %-CI 64 - 77) days with a wound radius reduction of 0.42 mm/week (95 %-CI 0.28 - 0.56). In group B the average healing time was 79 (95 %-CI 75 - 82) days and the weekly wound radius reduction was 0.47 mm (95 %-CI 0.45 - 0.49). The average healing time in group C was 85 (95 %-CI 80 - 89) days with a wound radius reduction of 0.53 mm/week (95 %-CI 0.42 - 0.56). In group D the average healing time was 97 (95 %-CI 91 - 103) days. The weekly wound radius reduction was 0.57 mm (95 %-CI 0.49 - 0.81). Wound radius reductions and the time needed for healing are affected by the ulcer area, a measure of ulcer size, in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. The calculation of the weekly wound radius reduction for different ulcer areas may be a useful tool in daily clinical practice to identify ulcers who do not respond adequately to the treatment. PMID:15127323

  2. Control and eradication of endemic infectious diseases in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houe, Hans; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    , industry and governmental institutions; researchers; and others involved in control and eradication of endemic diseases in livestock. Key elements range from socioeconomic aspects such as motivation; veterinary science (including assessment of biosecurity and establishment of test......"Control and eradication of endemic infectious diseases in cattle" provides the key elements that should be addressed in the establishment of bovine disease control and eradication programmes. The book aims to reach a broad group of readers, including: students; professionals in veterinary practice...

  3. Evolutionary Relationships of Endemic/Epidemic and Sylvatic Dengue Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Eryu; Ni, Haolin; Xu, Renling; Barrett, Alan D. T.; Watowich, Stanley J.; Gubler, Duane J.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2000-01-01

    Endemic/epidemic dengue viruses (DEN) that are transmitted among humans by the mosquito vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are hypothesized to have evolved from sylvatic DEN strains that are transmitted among nonhuman primates in West Africa and Malaysia by other Aedes mosquitoes. We tested this hypothesis with phylogenetic studies using envelope protein gene sequences of both endemic/epidemic and sylvatic strains. The basal position of sylvatic lineages of DEN-1, -2, and -4 suggested...

  4. Endemic Mimosa species from Mexico prefer alphaproteobacterial rhizobial symbionts

    OpenAIRE

    Bontemps, C.; Rogel, M. A.; Wiechmann, A.; Mussabekova, A.; Moody, S.; Simon, M F; Moulin, Lionel; Elliott, G. N.; Lacercat-Didier, L.; Dasilva, C.; Grether, R; Camargo-Ricalde, S. L.; Chen, W.M.; SPRENT, J. I.; Martinez-Romero, E.

    2016-01-01

    The legume genus Mimosa has > 500 species, with two major centres of diversity, Brazil (c. 350 spp.) and Mexico (c. 100 spp.). In Brazil most species are nodulated by Burkholderia. Here we asked whether this is also true of native and endemic Mexican species. We have tested this apparent affinity for betaproteobacteria by examining the symbionts of native and endemic species of Mimosa in Mexico, especially from the central highlands where Mimosa spp. have diversified. Nodules were tested for ...

  5. Easy ways to offload diabetic foot ulcer in rural setup

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Vijay P

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic wound management has become a foremost problem in recent era. Offloading is one of the cornerstones of gold-standard treatment in diabetic neuropathic foot ulcer. The following article reviews the easily made offloading systems which are ideal to use in rural setup to offload diabetic foot ulcer.

  6. [AETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS GASTRO-DUODENALES ULCERATIVE LESIONS IN ELDERLY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernekhovskaya, N E; Povalayev, A V; Layshenko, G A

    2015-01-01

    In review today conceptions of view to aetiology and pathogenesis gastro-duodenales ulcerative lesions in elderly. Atherosclerosis, ischemic disease of the heart and hypertension are reasons of acute ulcers and erosions in elderly. The breaking of microcirculation are very importance.

  7. Acyclovir in the prevention of duodenal ulcer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, S J; Linde, J; Bonnevie, O;

    1990-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that reactivation of a latent herpes simplex virus infection may be a cause of recurrent duodenal ulceration. Patients with recently healed duodenal ulcer were entered into a double blind, randomised study of maintenance treatment with the antiviral drug acyclovir...

  8. The recalcitrant venous leg ulcer - A never ending story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan); M.B. Maessen-Visch (Birgitte); S.I. Langendoen; K.P. de Roos; H.A.M. Neumann (Martino)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In general, four particular causes of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers may be distinguished. These are foot pump insufficiency, chronic venous compartment syndrome and non-re-canalized popliteal vein thrombosis. The fourth cause of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers is lipodermat

  9. T-lymphocyte subsets in recurrent aphthous ulceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A; Klausen, B; Hougen, H P;

    1989-01-01

    Peripheral T-lymphocyte subsets: T-helper (OKT4) and T-suppressor (OKT8) cells were studied quantitatively in 20 patients with recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) in ulcerative, as well as inactive, stages of the disease. The figures were compared with T-lymphocyte subsets from matched control...

  10. Clinical and microbiologic studies of genital ulcers in Kenyan women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, F A; D'Costa, L J; Nsanze, H; Karasira, P; MacLean, I W; Piot, P; Ronald, A R

    1985-01-01

    The etiology of genital ulcers in women in tropical regions is poorly understood. Eighty-nine women, presenting to a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Nairobi (Kenya) with a primary complaint of genital ulcers, were evaluated prospectively in a clinical and laboratory study. A final etiologic diagnosis was possible for 60 (67%) of the women. Culture for Haemophilus ducreyi was positive for 43 women, eight had secondary syphilis with ulcerated condyloma latum, three had primary syphilis, one had both chancroid and syphilis, two had moniliasis, two had herpetic ulceration, and one had a traumatic ulcer. The clinical characteristics that best distinguished chancroid from secondary syphilis were ulcer excavation and a rough ulcer base. No etiologic diagnosis was established for 29 patients. However, the clinical and epidemiologic features of these patients suggested that they were similar if not identical to the patients with H. ducreyi culture-positive chancroid. Further studies are necessary to determine the etiology of ulcers in females in whom no pathogen was identified.

  11. Pressure ulcers or moisture lesions: the theatre perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, A

    2016-04-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to be a cause for concern in the healthcare industry (IHI 2015). Unfortunately older patients are at a greater risk of developing pressure ulcers (Kottner et al 2013); moisture lesions and the presence of other comorbidities could have long term effects on the patient's health and recovery. PMID:27290758

  12. Leg ulcers: a review of their impact on daily life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, A.; Heinen, M.M.; Vleuten, C.J.M. van der; Rooij, M.J.M. de; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Achterberg, T. van

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current nursing care for leg ulcer patients often focuses on wound care and providing compression therapy. Nurses perceive leg ulcer patients as 'under-served' with regard to problems patients experience in daily life. An overview of patient problems is a first and essential step in the

  13. Perforated peptic ulcer disease: A review of history and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.O.E. Bertleff (Marietta); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In the last one hundred years much has been written on peptic ulcer disease and the treatment options for one of its most common complications: perforation. The reason for reviewing the literature was evaluating most common ideas on how to treat perforated peptic ulcers (PPU)

  14. Acupuncture Treatment for 76 Cases of Ulcerative Colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Ulcerative colitis is also called nonspecific chronic ulcerative colitis. The author of this essay has treated 76 such cases with acupuncture and obtained satisfactory therapeutic effect. Meanwhile, the results were compared with 45 cases treated with azulfidine.A report follows.

  15. Dr.Dong Demao's Experience in Treating Chronic Ulcerative Colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐凌云

    2004-01-01

    @@ Chronic ulcerative colitis (chronic non-specific ulcerative colitis) is a kind of non-specific inflammation occurred in the colonic mucosa layers. As a lingering and troublesome condition that often attacks people aged 20-40, it is characterized by recurrent diarrhea, abdominal pain, pus- and mucus-stained stools in clinic.

  16. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: Eli

  17. [Ulcerated duodenitis revealing Henoch-Schönlein purpura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marting, A; Defrance, P; Wain, E; Van Severen, M; Deflandre, J

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and duodenal ulcers can meet many etiologies. We report the case of a young adult with an ulcerated duodenitis revealing Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The abdominal symptoms preceded the emergence of the classical cutaneous signs of the disease. PMID:26376566

  18. ETIOPATHOGENESIS OF PEPTIC ULCER: back to the past?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Barbosa ARAÚJO

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To review some aspects of the etiopathogenesis of peptic ulcerous disease especially on the basis of studies on its correlation with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. Methods A search was made in the data bases MEDLINE, LILACS and PubMed, and in Brazilian and foreign books, referring to the incidence and prevalence of infection by H. pylori and of peptic ulcerous disease in various populations of different countries. Results It was observed that the prevalence of H. pylori infection is similar in individuals with peptic ulcerous disease and the general population. There are differences between countries with respect to the prevalence of infection and of gastric or duodenal peptic ulcers. In many countries the prevalence of infection by H. pylori shows stability while the prevalence of peptic ulcerous disease is declining. The prevalence of peptic ulcerous disease without H. pylori infection varies between 20% and 56% in occidental countries. Discussion The observations might be suggestive of H. pylori being only one more factor to be summed together with other aggressive components in the genesis of peptic ulcerous disease. We would therewith be returning to the classic concept that peptic gastric and duodenal ulcers have multifactorial etiology and would result from imbalance between aggressive and defensive factors. The focus of studies should be enriched with the identification of the defensive factors and of other aggressive factors besides the well known H. pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, since these two aggressors do not exhaust the full causal spectrum.

  19. PERFORATED PEPTIC ULCER: A CLINICAL ANALYSIS AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The incidence of perforated peptic ulcer is approximately 7-10 cases per one lakh population per year. Perforation is seen in about 7% of patients hospitalized for peptic ulcer disease. Peptic ulcer perforation, which can be gastric/duodenal perforation can be a serious life-threatening condition if not detected early and treated urgently. Peptic ulcer disease has decreased considerably worldwide with the advent of potent anti-ulcer medicines, but its complication like peptic ulcer perforation has not. Our study is to analyse the clinical, radiological and management related findings in influencing the outcome of patients of peptic ulcer perforation after surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS A series of 47 patients of peptic ulcer perforation were evaluated. Patients expiring within six hours of admission were not included in this study. RESULTS Age of the patients ranged from 17-80 years. The incidence of perforation was highest in the age group of 41-50 years (31.9%. Out of 47 patients, 41 (87.2% survived. CONCLUSION The incidence of perforation was highest in the age group of 41-50 years. Prognosis becomes poor with age, delayed treatment, shock at admission and concomitant diseases. Direct repair of the perforation with pedicled omentum gave excellent results.

  20. Climate threat on the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, Jairo; Mateo, Rubén G.; Zanatta, Florian; Marquet, Adrien; Aranda, Silvia C.; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Dirkse, Gerard; Gabriel, Rosalina; Gonzalez-Mancebo, Juana M.; Guisan, Antoine; Muñoz, Jesús; Sim-Sim, Manuela; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic islands are of fundamental importance for the conservation of biodiversity because they exhibit high endemism rates coupled with fast extinction rates. Nowhere in Europe is this pattern more conspicuous than in the Macaronesian biogeographic region. A large network of protected areas within the region has been developed, but the question of whether these areas will still be climatically suitable for the globally threatened endemic element in the coming decades remains open. Here, we make predictions on the fate of the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora in the context of ongoing climate change. The potential distribution of 35 Macaronesian endemic bryophyte species was assessed under present and future climate conditions using an ensemble modelling approach. Projections of the models under different climate change scenarios predicted an average decrease of suitable areas of 62–87% per species and a significant elevational increase by 2070, so that even the commonest species were predicted to fit either the Vulnerable or Endangered IUCN categories. Complete extinctions were foreseen for six of the studied Macaronesian endemic species. Given the uncertainty regarding the capacity of endemic species to track areas of suitable climate within and outside the islands, active management associated to an effective monitoring program is suggested. PMID:27377592

  1. Climate threat on the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, Jairo; Mateo, Rubén G; Zanatta, Florian; Marquet, Adrien; Aranda, Silvia C; Borges, Paulo A V; Dirkse, Gerard; Gabriel, Rosalina; Gonzalez-Mancebo, Juana M; Guisan, Antoine; Muñoz, Jesús; Sim-Sim, Manuela; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic islands are of fundamental importance for the conservation of biodiversity because they exhibit high endemism rates coupled with fast extinction rates. Nowhere in Europe is this pattern more conspicuous than in the Macaronesian biogeographic region. A large network of protected areas within the region has been developed, but the question of whether these areas will still be climatically suitable for the globally threatened endemic element in the coming decades remains open. Here, we make predictions on the fate of the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora in the context of ongoing climate change. The potential distribution of 35 Macaronesian endemic bryophyte species was assessed under present and future climate conditions using an ensemble modelling approach. Projections of the models under different climate change scenarios predicted an average decrease of suitable areas of 62-87% per species and a significant elevational increase by 2070, so that even the commonest species were predicted to fit either the Vulnerable or Endangered IUCN categories. Complete extinctions were foreseen for six of the studied Macaronesian endemic species. Given the uncertainty regarding the capacity of endemic species to track areas of suitable climate within and outside the islands, active management associated to an effective monitoring program is suggested. PMID:27377592

  2. Peptic ulcer pathophysiology: acid, bicarbonate, and mucosal function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Mertz Nielsen, A; Rune, S J

    1996-01-01

    The previously accepted role of gastric acid hypersecretion in peptic ulcer disease has been modified by studies showing no correlation between acid output and clinical outcome of ulcer disease, or between ulcer recurrence rate after vagotomy and preoperative acid secretion. At the same time......, studies have been unable to demonstrate increased acidity in the duodenal bulb in patients with duodenal ulcer, and consequently more emphasis has been given to the mucosal protecting mechanisms. The existence of an active gastric and duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion creates a pH gradient from...... cell removal and repair regulated by epidermal growth factor. Sufficient mucosal blood flow, including a normal acid/base balance, is important for subepithelial protection. In today's model of ulcer pathogenesis, gastric acid and H. pylori work in concert as aggressive factors, with the open question...

  3. Optimal management of digital ulcers in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shawn Abraham, Virginia SteenDivision of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Raynaud’s phenomenon and digital ulcerations are two common clinical features seen in patients with systemic sclerosis. They are painful and lead to significant morbidity and altered hand function within this patient population. While currently there are no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved medications for the treatment of digital ulcerations in the United States, clinical trials have supported the use of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities in facilitating healing of existing digital ulcers and preventing formation of new ulcers. This article reviews the published data on these therapeutic options.Keywords: scleroderma, systemic sclerosis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, digital ulcers, treatment

  4. Antiviral treatment in patients with cytomegalovirus positive ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kadir; Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus(CMV) is a common virus in patients with ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive drugs. Many studies suggested that CMV infection is an exacerbating factor in patients with ulcerative colitis. The role of CMV in exacerbations of ulcerative colitis has been discussed. One of studies starting this discussion is an article entitled "CMV positive ulcerative colitis: A single center experience and literature review" by Kopylov et al. However, we think that there are some points that should be emphasized about the study. Especially, the small number of patients in the study has led to meaningless results. Large controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify the benefit of antiviral therapy for active ulcerative colitis patients.

  5. Pathogenesis and biomarkers of carcinogenesis in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Nielsen, Ole Haagen;

    2011-01-01

    One of the most serious complications of ulcerative colitis is the development of colorectal cancer. Screening patients with ulcerative colitis by standard histological examination of random intestinal biopsy samples might be inefficient as a method of cancer surveillance. This Review focuses...... on the current understanding of the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer and how this knowledge can be transferred into patient management to assist clinicians and pathologists in identifying patients with ulcerative colitis who have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Inflammation....... Although progress has been made in the understanding of inflammation-driven carcinogenesis, markers based on these findings possess insufficient sensitivity or specificity to be usable as reliable biomarkers for risk of colorectal cancer development in patients with ulcerative colitis. However, screening...

  6. Ulcer-related problems and health care needs in patients with venous leg ulceration: a descriptive, cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Persoon, A.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Otero, M.; Achterberg, T. van

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with leg ulceration often have long lasting and recurrent wounds. The treatment exists mainly of wound-care and compression therapy. International literature shows several indications of problems in relation to leg ulceration, but no studies were performed to give a comprehensiv

  7. Pantoprazole before Endoscopy in Patients with Gastroduodenal Ulcer Bleeding: Does the duration of Infusion and Ulcer Location Influence the Effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Rácz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preemptive pantoprazole infusion on early endoscopic findings in patients with acute ulcer bleeding. Records of 333 patients admitted with acute ulcer bleeding were analyzed. Ulcer bleeders were given either 80 mg bolus of pantoprazole followed by continuous infusion of 8 mg per hour or saline infusion until endoscopy. In 93 patients saline infusion whereas in 240 patients bolus plus infusion of pantoprazole was administrated with mean (±SD durations of 5.45±12.9 hours and 6.9±13.2 hours, respectively (P=0.29. Actively bleeding ulcers were detected in 46/240 (19.2% of cases in the pantoprazole group as compared with 23/93 (24.7% in the saline infusion group (P=0.26. Different durations of pantoprazole infusion (0–4 hours, >4 hours, and >6 hours had no significant effect on endoscopic and clinical outcome parameters in duodenal ulcer bleeders. Gastric ulcer bleeders on pantoprazole infusion longer than 4 and 6 hours before endoscopy had actively bleeding ulcers in 4.3% and 5% compared to the 19.5% active bleeding rate in the saline group (P=0.02 and P=0.04. Preemptive infusion of high-dose pantoprazole longer than 4 hours before endoscopy decreased the ratio of active bleeding only in gastric but not in duodenal ulcer patients.

  8. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit-Developing Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence: A Framework for Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creehan, Sue; Cuddigan, Janet; Gonzales, Dana; Nix, Denise; Padula, William; Pittman, Joyce; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Walden, Christine; Wells, Belinda; Wheeler, Robinetta

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrences have declined over the past decade as reimbursement policies have changed, evidence-based practice guidelines have been implemented, and quality improvement initiatives have been launched. However, the 2006-2008 Institute for Healthcare Improvement goal of zero pressure ulcers remains difficult to achieve and even more challenging to sustain. Magnet hospitals tend to have lower hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates than non-Magnet hospitals, yet many non-Magnet hospitals also have robust pressure ulcer prevention programs. Successful programs share commonalities in structure, processes, and outcomes. A national summit of 55 pressure ulcer experts was convened at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in March 2014. The group was divided into 3 focus groups; each was assigned a task to develop a framework describing components of a proposed Magnet-designated Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Systematic literature reviews, analysis of exemplars, and nominal group process techniques were used to create the framework. This article presents a framework describing the proposed Magnet-designated Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Critical attributes of Centers of Excellence are identified and organized according to the 4 domains of the ANCC model for the Magnet Recognition Program: transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; and new knowledge innovation and improvements. The structures, processes, and outcome measures necessary to become a proposed Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence are discussed.

  9. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit-Developing Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence: A Framework for Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creehan, Sue; Cuddigan, Janet; Gonzales, Dana; Nix, Denise; Padula, William; Pittman, Joyce; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Walden, Christine; Wells, Belinda; Wheeler, Robinetta

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrences have declined over the past decade as reimbursement policies have changed, evidence-based practice guidelines have been implemented, and quality improvement initiatives have been launched. However, the 2006-2008 Institute for Healthcare Improvement goal of zero pressure ulcers remains difficult to achieve and even more challenging to sustain. Magnet hospitals tend to have lower hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates than non-Magnet hospitals, yet many non-Magnet hospitals also have robust pressure ulcer prevention programs. Successful programs share commonalities in structure, processes, and outcomes. A national summit of 55 pressure ulcer experts was convened at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in March 2014. The group was divided into 3 focus groups; each was assigned a task to develop a framework describing components of a proposed Magnet-designated Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Systematic literature reviews, analysis of exemplars, and nominal group process techniques were used to create the framework. This article presents a framework describing the proposed Magnet-designated Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Critical attributes of Centers of Excellence are identified and organized according to the 4 domains of the ANCC model for the Magnet Recognition Program: transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; and new knowledge innovation and improvements. The structures, processes, and outcome measures necessary to become a proposed Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence are discussed. PMID:26808304

  10. Golimumab for the treatment of ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löwenberg M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mark Löwenberg,1 Nanne KH de Boer,2 Frank Hoentjen3 1Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Abstract: The introduction of therapeutic antibodies against tumor necrosis factor (TNF had a major impact on the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC. Infliximab and adalimumab are powerful agents that are used for remission induction and maintenance therapy in UC and have an acceptable safety profile. However, a proportion of UC patients for whom therapy with anti-TNF agents is indicated fail or become intolerant to treatment with infliximab or adalimumab. Hence, there remains an unmet need for novel anti-TNF agents. Golimumab (Simponi®, a human anti-TNF antibody that is administered by monthly subcutaneous injections, is the most recently introduced TNF blocker for the treatment of UC. Here, we will discuss recent literature on clinical efficacy and safety of golimumab induction and maintenance treatment in patients with UC. Furthermore, we will discuss the positioning of golimumab for UC in current treatment algorithms. Keywords: ulcerative colitis, UC, antitumor necrosis factor, TNF, antibodies, golimumab

  11. Cushing's ulcer in traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biteghe-bi-Nzeng Alain; WANG Yun-jie

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury(TBI)remains a complicated and urgent disease in our modernized cities. It becomes now a public health disease. We have got more and more patients in Neurosurgery Intensive Care Unit following motor vehicle accidents and others causes. TBI brings multiple disorders,from the primary injury to secondary injury. The body received the disturbances in the brain,in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical(HPA)axis,in the gastric mucosa,in the immune and neuroendocrine systems.The mortality of TBI is more than 50 000 deaths/year, the third of the mortality of all iniuries. Cushing ulcer is one of the severe complications of TBI and its mortality rate is more than 50%. Many studies have improved the management of TBI and the associated complications to give patients a better outcome. Furthers studies need to be done based on the similar methodology to clarify the different steps of the HPA axis and the neuroendocrine change associated. The aim of the present review is to assess the clinical and endocrinal features of hypopituitarism and stress ulcer following TBI.

  12. Prolonged ulcerative laryngitis: a new disease entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Tzu-Yu

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, a new disease entity, prolonged ulcerative laryngitis (PUL), with unique clinical presentation and prolonged disease course, has been recognized. Until now, very few studies dealing with this disease have been reported in the literature. From 1999 to 2008, we analyzed clinical data from a series of 39 PUL patients who were treated with an observational approach without implementing specific treatments. This disease affects adults, predominantly females. The age of patients in our series ranged from 26 to 76 years with a median of 49.5 years. This disease is characterized by ulcers and signs of acute inflammation on the membranous portion of the vocal folds with a prolonged clinical course. The recovery times of patients ranged from 4 to 20 weeks with an average of 9.4 weeks. The data in this study may reflect a natural history of this disease. PUL seems to be a self-limited disease, but the etiology of this disease is unknown. Specific infections or systemic inflammatory processes involving the larynx must be ruled out before diagnosis, and conservative treatments are suggested.

  13. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:23374746

  14. Management and treatment of distal ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Calafiore

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC is a chronic inflammatory condition that is confined to the colonic mucosa. Its main symptoms include diarrhea, rectal bleeding and abdominal pain. Approximately two-thirds of UC patients have disease confined distal to the splenic flexure, which can be treated effectively with topical therapy. This means the active drug can be delivered directly to the site of inflammation, limiting the systemic absorption and potential side effects. Topical treatment with aminosalicylates is the most effective approach in the treatment of these forms, provided that the formulation reaches the upper margin of the disease. Given this, the suppository formulation is the treatment of choice for proctitis and distal sigmoiditis. Thanks to their proximal spread, enemas, foams and gels represent the treatment of choice for proctosigmoiditis and for distal ulcerative colitis. Oral aminosalicylates are less effective than topical therapies in patients with active disease, while the combination of topical and oral treatment is more effective in patients refractory to topical or oral mono-therapy. Topically administered aminosalicylates play an important role in the maintenance of remission, but the long-term adhesion to therapy is poor. For this reason, the oral formulation is the first-line therapy in the maintenance of remission. Refractory patients can be treated with topical steroids or systemic steroids and TNF-alpha inhibitors in severe forms.

  15. Radical induction theory of ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jay Pravda

    2005-01-01

    To propose a new pathogenesis called Radical Induction to explain the genesis and progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). UC is an inflammatory bowel disease. Colonic inflammation in UC is mediated by a buildup of white blood cells (WBCs) within the colonic mucosal lining; however,to date there is no answer for why WBCs initially enter the colonic mucosa to begin with. A new pathogenesis termed "Radical Induction Theory" is proposed to explain this and states that excess un-neutralized hydrogen peroxide, produced within colonic epithelial cells as a result of aberrant cellular metabolism, diffuses through cell membranes to the extracellular space where it is converted to the highly damaging hydroxyl radical resulting in oxidative damage to structures comprising the colonic epithelial barrier. Once damaged, the barrier is unable to exclude highly immunogenic fecal bacterial antigens from invading the normally sterile submucosa. This antigenic exposure provokes an initial immune response of WBC infiltration into the colonic mucosa. Once present in the mucosa,WBCs are stimulated to secrete toxins by direct exposure to fecal bacteria leading to mucosal ulceration and bloody diarrhea characteristic of this disease.

  16. Diagnosis and classification of ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Karsten; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Laass, Martin W

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characterised by superficial mucosal ulceration, rectal bleeding, diarrhoea, and abdominal pain. In contrast to Crohn's disease (CrD), UC is restricted to the colon and the inflammation is limited to the mucosal layer. Classic UC affects the colon in a retrograde and continuous fashion starting from the rectum and extending proximally. Dependent on the anatomic extent of involvement, UC can be classified as proctitis, left-sided colitis, or pancolitis. Inflammatory arthropathies and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are the most common and clinically most important extraintestinal manifestations of UC. The aetiopathogenesis of UC is incompletely understood, but immune-mediated mechanisms are responsible for dysregulated immune responses against intraluminal antigens in genetically predisposed individuals. The diagnosis is based on the history, as well as clinical, radiological, endoscopic and histological features. Autoantibodies, mainly antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and anti-goblet cell antibodies (GAB) may be helpful in the early diagnosis of UC and in differentiating it from CrD.

  17. Etiology of genital ulcers and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus coinfection in 10 US cities. The Genital Ulcer Disease Surveillance Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, K J; Trees, D; Levine, W C; Lewis, J S; Litchfield, B; Pettus, K S; Morse, S A; St Louis, M E; Weiss, J B; Schwebke, J; Dickes, J; Kee, R; Reynolds, J; Hutcheson, D; Green, D; Dyer, I; Richwald, G A; Novotny, J; Weisfuse, I; Goldberg, M; O'Donnell, J A; Knaup, R

    1998-12-01

    To determine the etiology of genital ulcers and to assess the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in ulcer patients in 10 US cities, ulcer and serum specimens were collected from approximately 50 ulcer patients at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in each city. Ulcer specimens were tested using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay to detect Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus (HSV); sera were tested for antibody to HIV. H. ducreyi was detected in ulcer specimens from patients in Memphis (20% of specimens) and Chicago (12%). T. pallidum was detected in ulcer specimens from every city except Los Angeles (median, 9% of specimens; range, 0%-46%). HSV was detected in >/=50% of specimens from all cities except Memphis (42%). HIV seroprevalence in ulcer patients was 6% (range by city, 0%-18%). These data suggest that chancroid is prevalent in some US cities and that persons with genital ulcers should be a focus of HIV prevention activities.

  18. Longitudinal study of influence of Helicobacter pylori on current risk of duodenal ulcer relapse. The Hvidovre Ulcer Project Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Franzmann, M B; Holst, C;

    1992-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with duodenal ulcer were followed up longitudinally for 2 years after initial ulcer healing. Endoscopy including biopsy of the antral mucosa was performed every 3rd month and whenever clinical symptoms of relapse occurred. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in the biopsy...... specimens was scored as 0 (none), 1 (sporadic occurrence), 2 (clusters), and 3 (numerous bacteria found diffusely in the mucus layer). The incidence rates of ulcer relapse per patient-month, grouped in accordance with these scores, were (with 95% confidence intervals) 0.073 (0.048-0.111), 0.083 (0.......052-0.133), 0.123 (0.096-0.157), and 0.069 (0.041-0.116), respectively. No significant differences in incidence rates across H. pylori scores were observed when taking into account the observation period after healing of the first ulcer, number of ulcer recurrence (1st, 2nd, 3rd), sex, age, smoking habits, peak...

  19. A World Malaria Map: Plasmodium falciparum Endemicity in 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Simon I; Guerra, Carlos A; Gething, Peter W; Patil, Anand P; Tatem, Andrew J; Noor, Abdisalan M; Kabaria, Caroline W; Manh, Bui H; Elyazar, Iqbal R. F; Brooker, Simon; Smith, David L; Moyeed, Rana A; Snow, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Background Efficient allocation of resources to intervene against malaria requires a detailed understanding of the contemporary spatial distribution of malaria risk. It is exactly 40 y since the last global map of malaria endemicity was published. This paper describes the generation of a new world map of Plasmodium falciparum malaria endemicity for the year 2007. Methods and Findings A total of 8,938 P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR) surveys were identified using a variety of exhaustive search strategies. Of these, 7,953 passed strict data fidelity tests for inclusion into a global database of PfPR data, age-standardized to 2–10 y for endemicity mapping. A model-based geostatistical procedure was used to create a continuous surface of malaria endemicity within previously defined stable spatial limits of P. falciparum transmission. These procedures were implemented within a Bayesian statistical framework so that the uncertainty of these predictions could be evaluated robustly. The uncertainty was expressed as the probability of predicting correctly one of three endemicity classes; previously stratified to be an informative guide for malaria control. Population at risk estimates, adjusted for the transmission modifying effects of urbanization in Africa, were then derived with reference to human population surfaces in 2007. Of the 1.38 billion people at risk of stable P. falciparum malaria, 0.69 billion were found in Central and South East Asia (CSE Asia), 0.66 billion in Africa, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia (Africa+), and 0.04 billion in the Americas. All those exposed to stable risk in the Americas were in the lowest endemicity class (PfPR2−10 ≤ 5%). The vast majority (88%) of those living under stable risk in CSE Asia were also in this low endemicity class; a small remainder (11%) were in the intermediate endemicity class (PfPR2−10 > 5 to < 40%); and the remaining fraction (1%) in high endemicity (PfPR2−10 ≥ 40%) areas. High endemicity was widespread in the

  20. Differentiation of benign and malignant ulcers of the stomach on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Im Jeong; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Choo, Ki Seok; Lee, Suk Hong; Kim, Gwang Ha; Kim, Tae Oh; Jo, Hong Jae [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    We wanted to determine the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings for differentiating benign ulcers from malignant ones. 18 clinicopathologically proven benign ulcers that had been detected by both endoscopy and MDCT were the focus of this study. 26 ulcerative advanced gastric cancers and 26 early gastric cancers with ulceration, all of which had been surgically proven, were selected as a control group. Five of the 26 early gastric cancers that were confined to the mucosa and that were not detected on CT were excluded in this study. The following CT findings were reviewed by two radiologists; ulcer size, the degree of enhancement and the thickness of inner enhancing layer in the ulcer base, the total thickness and the enhancing inner layer thickness in the largest part of the thickened ulcer mound, the presence of ulcer that projected beyond the healthy lumen, and the presence of perigastric fat infiltration and perigastric lymphadenopathy. An indiscernible thin-walled ulcer base (less than 1.5 mm) and suboptimal enhancement of the ulcer base for the discrimination of benign gastric ulcers from the malignant gastric ulcers showed sensitivities of 100% (18/18) and 78% (14/18), respectively, with specificities of 98% (46/47) and 92% (43/47), respectively. Ulcer projection was more significantly present in benign ulcer (13/18, 72%) than in the malignant gastric ulcers (7/47, 15%). The enhancing inner layer thickness in the ulcer mound was significantly greater in the AGC (mean; 7.4 mm) than in the benign gastric ulcers (mean, 2.2 mm). There were insignificant differences for ulcer size, total thickness of the ulcer mound, the perigastric fat infiltration and perigastric lymphadenopathy between the benign and malignant gastric ulcers. MDCT is an additional helpful diagnostic tool when benign gastric ulcers are histologically difficult to distinguish from malignant gastric ones.

  1. Flexible and rigid casting tape as a novel approach to offloading diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, M; Gannass, A Al; Bowling, F

    2011-07-01

    Offloading diabetic ulceration is a key component to the success in healing ulcers on the plantar aspect of the foot. New advances in offloading techniques allow for differing approaches in sometimes complex diabetic foot pathologies with associated ulceration. This case study looks at the use of flexible and rigid casting technique as part of the treatment in offloading plantar foot ulceration.

  2. Efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of chronic nonhealing leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwetha Suryanarayan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma (PRP in the treatment of chronic nonhealing ulcers. Methods: A nonrandomized, uncontrolled study was performed on 24 patients with 33 nonhealing ulcers of various etiologies. All patients were treated with PRP at weekly intervals for a maximum of 6 treatments. At the end of the 6-week period, reduction in size of the ulcers (area and volume was assessed. Results: The mean age of the patients was 42.5 years (standard deviation [SD] 12.48. Of 33 ulcers, there were 19 venous ulcers, 7 traumatic ulcers, 2 ulcers secondary to pyoderma gangrenosum, 2 diabetic ulcers, 2 trophic ulcers, and 1 vasculitic ulcer. The mean duration of healing of the ulcers was 5.6 weeks (SD 3.23. The mean percentage of reduction in area and volume of the ulcers was 91.7% (SD 18.4% and 95% (SD 14%, respectively. About 100% resolution in the area was seen in 25 (76% of the ulcers and 100% reduction in volume was seen in 24 (73% of the ulcers at the end of the 6th treatment. Conclusion: Conventional therapies do not provide satisfactory healing for chronic nonhealing ulcers as they are not able to provide the necessary growth factors (GFs (platelet-derived GF, epidermal GF, vascular endothelial GF, etc. which are essential for the healing process. PRP is a safe, affordable, biocompatible, and simple office-based procedure for the treatment of nonhealing ulcers.

  3. Fecal calprotectin and ulcerative colitis endoscopic activity index as indicators of mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghvaei, Tarang; Maleki, Iradj; Nagshvar, Farshad; Fakheri, Hafez; Hosseini, Vahid; Valizadeh, Seyed Mohammad; Neishaboori, Hassan

    2015-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic, idiopathic, inflammatory large bowel disease with recurrent variable periods of exacerbation. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the correlation of UCEIS with fecal calprotectin (FC) level to assess disease activity in UC patients in order to determine whether FC can prognosticate clinical outcome and disease activity of UC instead of colonoscopic evaluation. Our endoscopic investigations revealed the extension of UC as the following: proctitis (11.6%), procto-sigmoiditis (18.5%), left-sided colitis (15.8%), extensive colitis (11.7%), and normal endoscopy (42.4%). Conclusively, we suggest that FC can be used as a reliable tool to evaluate disease activity in ulcerative colitis patients. Moreover, our findings indicate a significant correlation between FC level and mucosal healing. PMID:25366383

  4. Anti-ulcer activity of Ficus religiosa leaf ethanolic extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marslin Gregory; B Divya; Revina Ann Mary; M M Hipolith Viji; V K Kalaichelvan; V Palanivel

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the anti-ulcer activity and acute toxicity of Ficus religiosa (F. religiosa) leaf ethanolic extract in animal models. Methods:Anti-ulcer activity of F. religiosa ethanolic extract (250 and 500 mg/kg body weight) was studied on stress induced ulcer animal models. Ranitidine was used as standard. The anti-ulcer activity of F. religiosa was evaluated with the help of ulcer area and histopatholgical examination. Preliminary phyto-chemical screening and acute toxicity studies of F. religiosa also carried out. Results: Results showed that the extract treatments prevented ulcer area and gastric secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of 2 000 mg/kg extract did not show any acute toxicity in albino mice. Preliminary phytochemical analysis identified the presence of flavonoids in the ethanolic extract of F. religiosa. Conclusions: The extract is non-toxic even at relatively high concentrations. The anti-ulcer activity is probably due to the presence of flavanoids.

  5. Relationship between trace elements, immune indexes and recurrent oral ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju-Wu Li; Xiao-Ming Rao

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between the trace elements, immune indexes and recurrent oral ulcer. Methods:Sixty-five patients with recurrent oral ulcer who had been treated in our hospital from January 2013 to April 2014 and all met the criteria for our study subjects were selected and regarded as the observation group and meanwhile 65 healthy persons were selected as the control group. Then, the serum trace elements, cellular immunity and erythrocyte immunity states of the two groups were compared and the relationship between the trace elements and immune indexes were studied. Results:The serum Zn,Se and Fe of the observation group were all lower than those of the control group;while its Cu/Zn was higher than that of the control group;and the related indexes of cellular immunity and erythrocyte immunity state were all worse than those of the control group;the detection results of patients with severe recurrent oral ulcer were all worse than those of patients with mild recurrent oral ulcer and herpes, and the results of patients with herpes were worse than those of patients with mild recurrent oral ulcer. After logistic analysis, the research indexes had close relationship with recurrent oral ulcer. Conclusions:Patients with recurrent oral ulcer show obvious abnormity of trace elements and immune indexes, and the disease have close relationship with the above indexes.

  6. Microheterogeneity of acute phase proteins in patients with ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marian Grzymis(l)awski; Katarzyna Derc; Magdalena Sobieska; Krzysztof Wiktorowicz

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the serum α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT),α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and transferrin (Tf) concentrations and to evaluate the microheterogeneity of these acute phase proteins in patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 17 healthy control subjects were studied. The patients were categorised as severe (n = 9), moderate (n = 10) and mild groups (n = 8) using Truelove and Witts'classification of ulcerative colitis. Microheterogeneity of ACT, AGP and Tf was analysed by crossed immunoaffinity electrophoresis (CIAE) with concanavalin A. In all serum samples standard electrophoresis of serum proteins was performed, iron (Fe) concentration, total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were also measured.RESULTS: Our patients suffering from ulcerative colitis had significantly higher serum ACT and AGP concentrations and lower serum transferrin concentration in comparison to healthy subjects. Changes in concentrationsof acute phase proteins were dependent on the activityof the inflammatory process. The glycosylation patterns of transferrin were related to the inflammation status. We also observed the correlation between ACT and AGP concentrations, patterns of transferrin glycosylation and changes in standard protein electrophoresis or blood cell count.CONCLUSION: The glycosylation patterns of transferrin obtained from patients suffering from ulcerative colitis are highly branched and sialylated compared with those obtained from healthy subjects. In contrast, the glycosylation patterns of transferrin do not differ according to the activity index of ulcerative colitis. The microheterogeneity patterns of AGP and ACT are similar in ulcerative colitis patients and healthy subjects.

  7. PEPTIC ULCER: A REVIEW ON ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS

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    Kaur Amandeep

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A peptic ulcer is a sore on the lining of the stomach or duodenum. The two most common types of peptic ulcer are called “gastric ulcers” and “duodenal ulcers”. Peptic ulcers are found to be due to an imbalance between aggressive factors such as hydrochloric acid (HCL, pepsin, refluxed bile, leukotrienes (LTs, reactive oxygen species (ROS and defensive factors, which include the function of the mucus-bicarbonate barrier, prostaglandins (PGs, mucosal blood flow, cell renewal and migration, nonenzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants and some growth factors. H. pylori infection and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the predominant causes of peptic ulcer disease. Also, a numbers of factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of gastric ulcer, among which major factors involved are bacterial infection (Helicobacter pylori, certain medications (NSAID, chemicals (Hcl/ethanol ,gastric cancer and minor factors are stress, smoking, spicy food and nutritional deficiencies. The idea behind treating ulcers is to lower the amount of acid that your stomach makes, to neutralize the acid that is made and to protect the injured area so it can have time to heal. The main aim of this review article has to summarize the ulcerogenic mechanisms of various mediators involved in Peptic ulcer disease.

  8. Gastropericardial fistula complicating benign gastric ulcer: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simice, P.; Zwirewich, C.V. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2000-08-01

    Pneumopericardium is a rare radiologic finding and is most commonly associated with esophageal ulceration or trauma. Benign ulcers of the distal esophagus are the most frequent source of non-traumatic perforation into the pericardial sac. Other etiologies include fistula formation from diseased subdiaphragmatic hollow viscera or subphrenic abscess, recent cardiac surgery, an extension of pneumomediastinum into the pericardium sac, and primary septic pericarditis from gasforming organisms. Pneumopericardium caused by the penetration of a benign gastric ulcer is a recognized but rare phenomenon. Intrathoracic gastric perforations are more commonly associated with pneumomediastium. Risk factors associated with an increased risk of penetration of gastric ulcers into the pericardium include the presence of a giant ulcer in the gastric fundus, an ulcer within a hiatus hernia, a history of hiatus hernia repair, concurrent use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Scar tissue formation at the site of previous hiatal surgery may result in the adherence of the gastric fundus or lower esophagus to the pericardium and produce a pathway for benign ulcers to erode into the pericardium.

  9. Indigenous anti-ulcer activity of Musa sapientum on peptic ulcer

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    P Prabha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD, encompassing gastric and duodenal ulcers is the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorder. The pathophysiology of PUD involves an imbalance between offensive factors like acid, pepsin and defensive factors like nitric oxide and growth factors. The clinical evaluation of antiulcer drugs showed tolerance, incidence of relapses and side-effects that make their efficacy arguable. An indigenous drug like Musa sapientum possessing fewer side-effects is the major thrust area of present day research, aiming at a better and safer approach for the management of PUD. Material and Methods: The unripe plantain bananas (Musa sapientum were shade-dried, powdered and used for phytochemical analysis and as antiulcer drug. In our present study Group I rats served as control and were treated with saline, Group II was indomethacin-induced ulcerated rats, Group III received aqueous extract of Musa sapientum along with indomethacin and Group IV received esomeprazole along with indomethacin for 21 days. The anti-ulcerogenic activity was investigated by performing hematological, mucosal, antioxidant profile in comparison with the standard drug esomeprazole. Results: Our findings from High - Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC analysis showed that Musa sapientum has an active compound a monomeric flavonoid (leucocyanidin with anti-ulcerogenic activity. Results were expressed as mean ± SD. All our results are in congruous with the results of standard drug esomeprazole. Conclusion: It could be clearly concluded that administration of the aqueous extract of Musa sapientum at the dose used in this study tends to ameliorate ulcers. Its use in indigenous medicine should be scientifically scrutinized with further research.

  10. Changing trends of an endemic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Rajeev B; Bhattacharya, Sameek; Rai, Ashish

    2009-08-01

    The incidence of severe burn is extremely high in the Low and Middle Income Countries with an estimated 90% of the world incidence of which 50% is in South East Asia. Through an earlier analysis of 11,196 burn admission over 8 years (1993-2000--Phase I) to our burn unit we established the endemic nature of the injury [Ahuja RB, Bhattacharya S. An analysis of 11,196 burn admissions and evaluation of conservative management techniques. Burns 2002;28:555-61]. A continued analysis of 5566 burn admissions over the next 7 years (2001-2007--Phase II) and its comparison with the Phase I reveals a significant change in the epidemiological profile. The average yearly admissions have fallen by 43.14%, from 1399.5 patients in Phase I to 795.14 patients in Phase II. This fall in average yearly admissions is predominant in the age group 16-35 years (52.61% decline) and 36-55 years (46.51% decline). The overall female to male ratio has also changed from 1.26:1 to 0.91:1. However, the overall mean %TBSA burn has reduced only mildly from 49.12% TBSA in Phase I to 44.39% in Phase II. During Phase II there was also a significant decline of 46.93% and 56.25% in the yearly admission of flame and scald burn respectively. Non-intentional incidents still remain the main mode of injury accounting for 87.12% in Phase I and 89.89% in Phase II. But, the yearly admissions of non-intentional burns fell from 1219.25 in Phase I to 714.71 in Phase II, which is a significant drop of 41.38%. Kitchen continues to dominate as the main location for flame incidents, but the yearly admission rate from kitchen accidents dropped from 897.5 patients in Phase I to 368.43 patients in Phase II. At the same time, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) leaks which accounted for only 0.72% of all kitchen accidents in Phase I rose to 10.74% in Phase II. Another redeeming feature is the reduction in overall mortality from 51.8% in Phase I to 40.20% in Phase II. Interestingly, a very significant negative correlation exists

  11. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-to-practice

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    Ndip A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Agbor Ndip1–3, Leonard Ebah3,4, Aloysius Mbako51Department of Diabetes and Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 2Department of Medicine, Royal Bolton Hospital, Bolton, UK; 3Cardiovascular Research Group, School of Biomedicine, University of Manchester, UK; 4Department of Renal Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wrexham Maelor Hospital, Wales, UKAbstract: Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment.Keywords: diabetic foot ulcers, neuropathic

  12. Endoscopic Evaluation of Peptic Ulcer Disease During Ramadan Fasting

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    G. M. Malik

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of fasting on peptic ulcer disease were evaluated in a prospective study, involving 23 fasting patients who underwent endoscopy before and after Ramadan. Eighteen patients took an H2-blocker (ranitidine, 150 mg twice daily regularly at “Suhur” and “Iftar” as prescribed, while 5 were drug defaulters. On the first endoscopy the diagnosis in 4 patients was active acute duodenal ulcer (AADU, in 8 patients was active chronic duodenal ulcer (ACDU in 8 patients was healed duodenal ulcer (HDU, in 2 patients was erosive duodenitis (ED, and in 1 patient was chronic gastric ulcer (CGU. All of the patients with AADU showed signs of healing on repeat endoscopy. None of the ACDU patients showed signs of healing on repeat endoscopy. Instead, 7 patients in this group bled during fasting. All of the 5 drug defaulters belonged to the ACDU group. One patient in the HDU group had developed an active ulcer near the previous scar, as which was seen on repeat endoscopy. The 2 patients with ED showed signs of healing, while the only patient with CGU had bled from the same ulcer as seen on repeat endoscopy. The results were compared with those of 15 nonfasting control subjects (6 patients with ACDU, 3 with HDU, and 6 with ED as diagnosed on the first endoscopy, who took an H2-blocker regularly. The repeat endoscopy did not show any change in these patients. In conclusion, we inferred that Ramadan fasting may prove hazardous in patients with peptic ulcer disease in general and with active chronic ulcers in particular, although the fact that only 23 patients volunteered for this study, of whom 5 were drug defaulters, is a limitation.

  13. The endemic plants of Micronesia: a geographical checklist and commentary

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    Lorence, D.H.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Micronesia-Polynesia bioregion is recognized as a global biodiversity hotspot. However, until now estimates regarding the number of endemic plant species for the region were not supported by any comprehensive published work for the region. The results of this study indicate that Micronesia has the world’s highest percentage of plant endemism per square kilometer out of all globally recognized insular biodiversity hotspots. A checklist of all endemic plant species for Micronesia is presented here with their corresponding geographical limits within the region. A summary of previous work and estimates is also provided noting the degree of taxonomic progress in the past several decades. A total of 364 vascular plant species are considered endemic to Micronesia, most of them being restricted to the Caroline Islands with a large percentage restricted to Palau. The checklist includes seven new combinations, one new name, and two unverified names that require additional study to verify endemic status. Overviews of each respective botanical family represented in the list are given including additional information on the Micronesian taxa. Recommendations for future work and potential projects are alluded to throughout the text highlighting major data gaps and very poorly known taxa. The following new combinations and names are made: Cyclosorus carolinensis (Hosokawa Lorence, comb. nov. , Cyclosorusgretheri (W. H. Wagner Lorence, comb. nov., Cyclosorusguamensis (Holttum Lorence, comb. nov., Cyclosorus palauensis (Hosokawa Lorence, comb. nov. , Cyclosorus rupiinsularis (Fosberg Lorence, comb. nov., Dalbergia hosokawae (Hosokawa Costion nom. nov., Syzygium trukensis (Hosokawa Costion & E. Lucas comb. nov.

  14. IL-22+ CD4+ T cells are associated with therapeutic trichuris trichiura infection in an ulcerative colitis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, Mara J; Leung, Jacqueline M; Kashyap, Vikram; McCune, Joseph M; Mahadevan, Uma; McKerrow, James H; Loke, P'ng

    2010-12-01

    Ulcerative colitis, a type of inflammatory bowel disease, is less common in countries endemic for helminth infections, suggesting that helminth colonization may have the potential to regulate intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases. Indeed, therapeutic effects of experimental helminth infection have been reported in both animal models and clinical trials. Here, we provide a comprehensive cellular and molecular portrait of dynamic changes in the intestinal mucosa of an individual who infected himself with Trichuris trichiura to treat his symptoms of ulcerative colitis. Tissue with active colitis had a prominent population of mucosal T helper (T(H)) cells that produced the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-17 (IL-17) but not IL-22, a cytokine involved in mucosal healing. After helminth exposure, the disease went into remission, and IL-22-producing T(H) cells accumulated in the mucosa. Genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were up-regulated in helminth-colonized tissue, whereas tissues with active colitis showed up-regulation of proinflammatory genes such as IL-17, IL-13RA2, and CHI3L1. Therefore, T. trichiura colonization of the intestine may reduce symptomatic colitis by promoting goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus production through T(H)2 cytokines and IL-22. Improved understanding of the physiological effects of helminth infection may lead to new therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases.

  15. Golimumab: clinical update on its use for ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardi, D; Fiorino, G; Allocca, M; Bravatà, I; Danese, S

    2015-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α agents) have dramatically changed the therapeutical approach to inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A new anti-TNF drug, golimumab, has recently been approved for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. Its efficacy has been demonstrated by preclinical and clinical studies and the drug showed an efficacy and safety profile in line with the other anti-TNF agents, such as infliximab and adalimumab. This review gives an overview on golimumab in the treatment of moderate to severe ulcerative colitis.

  16. Ulcerative colitis six years after colon cancer: only a coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellakis, Minas; Makatsoris, Thomas; Gkermpesi, Maria; Peroukidis, Stavros; Kalofonos, Haralabos

    2014-01-01

    The association between inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer is well known. Ulcerative colitis is a risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer, and this risk increases with the activity and duration of bowel inflammation. Here we describe the case of a 52-year-old man who developed ulcerative colitis 6 years after the diagnosis and treatment of colon cancer. Although this could be a coincidence, there could be additional possibilities, like pre-existence of quiescent colitis, late effect of therapy, or maybe the existence of common pathogenetic factors contributing to the development of ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer. PMID:24855393

  17. Vulvar ulcer as a presentation of systemic langerhans cell histiocytosis

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    Nina A Madnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 38-year-old housewife with systemic Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH presenting as a chronic vulvar and peri-anal ulcer. She had systemic involvement in the form of diabetes insipidus and bone "hot-spots". She responded favorably to etoposide, 6-mercaptopurine, and systemic steroids, and has been in remission since 10 years. Chronic vulvar ulcers not responding to routine therapy should not be neglected and need to be biopsied repeatedly to come to a specific diagnosis. The vulvar ulcer in our case provided a vital clue to a systemic LCH, with a successful outcome.

  18. Genital ulcers associated with Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerdan, Kimberly; Aronson, Iris; Hernandez, Claudia; Fishman, Patricia M; Groth, John V

    2013-06-01

    Genital ulcerations are a rare clinical finding of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. We present the case of a 16-year-old adolescent girl who reported the onset of diarrhea, headaches, dysuria, and vaginal discharge along with vulvar ulcerations with edema. Laboratory studies revealed a high-quantitative EBV IgG and early antigen as well as a positive IgM antibody for EBV. Although the association between EBV and genital ulcerations is rare, physicians should be aware of this clinical presentation to exclude other infectious entities, to be reassured to accept negative testing, and to quell patient distress or concerns of abuse.

  19. Recurrent aphthous ulcers in Fanconi's anaemia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otan, Feyza; Açikgöz, Gokhan; Sakallioglu, Umur; Ozkan, Burcu

    2004-05-01

    Fanconi's anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is clinically characterized by aplastic anaemia, congenital malformations of the renal, cardiac, skeletal and skin structures, and an increased predisposition to malignancies. Patients with FA often present with bleeding and infection, which are symptoms related to thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. There are few reports of the oral manifestations of FA. We describe oral aphthous ulcerations in two siblings with FA. There was a rapid improvement and healing of ulcers after blood transfusions and increased haemoglobin levels. This may support the role of severe anaemia in oral ulcerations. PMID:15139958

  20. The role of dressings in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie

    2016-08-11

    Pressure ulceration is a significant global healthcare problem and represents a considerable burden on healthcare resources. Within the literature an increasing number of studies have examined the role prophylactic dressings play in redistributing pressure and helping to protect the skin from the effects of friction and shear. The use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers may be considered a controversial issue, as previous opinion has been that dressings do not reduce the effects of pressure. This article will critically evaluate the literature to examine the role dressings play in the prevention of pressure ulceration. PMID:27523773

  1. Managing pressure ulcers and moisture lesions with new hydrocolloid technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linthwaite, Adele; Bethell, Elaine

    In efforts to reduce the number of avoidable pressure ulcers in a large trust, a number of initiatives have taken place to increase staff awareness about the importance of preventing and treating pressure ulcers and moisture lesions. New documentation, the use of the 'Think Pink' folders and a social media campaign have all proved successful in seeing the number of avoidable pressure ulcers reported within the trust reduce. As part of this initiative an evaluation took place of a new hydrocolloid dressing. This proved effective at reducing healing times, reducing dressing spend and facilitating regular inspection of the affected areas. PMID:27126753

  2. Ulcerative keratitis associated with contact lens wear

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    Bharathi M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To review the microbiological profile of ulcerative keratitis associated with contact lens (CL-wear, 35 patients with culture-proven CL-associated microbial keratitis were studied between September 1999 and September 2002. Corneal scrapes and CL-care products were collected and were subjected to microbiological evaluation. Gram-negative bacilli alone were recovered from the corneal scrapes of all 35 (100% patients, all 70 (100% CL storage case wells and also from CL-care solution of six (17.14% of the 35 patients. There was a significantly higher number of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (71.43% isolated from eyes with CL-related keratitis than other bacterial isolates (28.57% ( P < 0.001. Microbial contamination of CL storage cases was a great risk for gram-negative bacterial infection among soft CL-wearers.

  3. Oculocutaneous albinism complicated with an ulcerated plaque

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    Lokanatha Keshavalu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old male with a history of albinism and farmer by occupation presented with an ulcerated plaque on the right wrist. The patient had light eyes, hair, and skin. Physical examination showed extensive photodamage. A skin biopsy specimen from the plaque revealed a well-differentiated squamous-cell carcinoma. Wide surgical excision was done. The most common types of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA, OCA 1 and OCA 2, are autosomal recessive disorders of pigmentation that commonly affect the skin, hair and eyes. Photodamage and skin cancers plague patients with albinism. Albinos face a myriad of social and medical issues. Importance of photoprotection, skin cancer surveillance and treatment has been stressed upon in this report.

  4. Heterogeneity among Mycobacterium ulcerans from French Guiana revealed by multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Yann; Millet, Julie; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Brown, Christopher; Couppié, Pierre; Legrand, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is an emerging and neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Few cases have been reported so far in the Americas. With 250 cases reported since 1969, French Guiana is the only Buruli ulcer endemic area in the continent. Thus far, no genetic diversity studies of strains of M. ulcerans from French Guiana have been reported. Our goal in the present study was to examine the genetic diversity of M. ulcerans strains in this region by using the Multilocus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA) approach. A total of 23 DNA samples were purified from ulcer biopsies or derived from pure cultures. MVLA was used in the study of six previously-described Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) markers. A total of three allelic combinations were characterized in our study: genotype I which has been described previously, genotype III which is very similar to genotype I, and genotype II which has distinctly different characteristics in comparison with the other two genotypes. This high degree of genetic diversity appears to be uncommon for M. ulcerans. Further research based on complete genome sequencing of strains belonging to genotypes I and II is in progress and should lead soon to a better understanding of genetic specificities of M. ulcerans strains from French Guiana.

  5. Effect of Custom-Made Footwear on Foot Ulcer Recurrence in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Bus, Sicco A.; Waaijman, Roelof; Arts, Mark; Haart, Mirjam de; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa; van Baal, Jeff; Nollet, Frans

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Custom-made footwear is the treatment of choice to prevent foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes. This footwear primarily aims to offload plantar regions at high ulcer risk. However, ulcer recurrence rates are high. We assessed the effect of offloading-improved custom-made footwear and the role of footwear adherence on plantar foot ulcer recurrence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomly assigned 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer to custom-made...

  6. Pressure ulcer prevention knowledge among Jordanian nurses: a cross- sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Qaddumi, Jamal; Khawaldeh, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcer remains a significant problem in the healthcare system. In addition to the suffering it causes patients, it bears a growing financial burden. Although pressure ulcer prevention and care have improved in recent years, pressure ulcer still exists and occurs in both hospital and community settings. In Jordan, there are a handful of studies on pressure ulcer. This study aims to explore levels of knowledge and knowledge sources about pressure ulcer prevention, as well as ...

  7. Gastroprotective effect of Desmodium gangeticum roots on gastric ulcer mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Ayyavu Mahesh; Robert Jeyachandran; Dowlathabad Muralidhara Rao; Devarajan Thangadurai

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the ethanolic root extract of Desmodium gangeticum (L.) DC., Fabaceae, (EDG), have been studied in various acute and chronic ulcer mouse models. Oral administration of root extract, significantly decrease the ulcer index and lesion number in a dose dependent manner against ethanol induced acute gastric ulcer in mice. In gastric ulcerated animal that received high dose of 150 mg/kg EDG, the mucosa showed no ulceration with slight focal congestion and the glands appeared n...

  8. Does Large Genome Size Limit Speciation in Endemic Island Floras?

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    Maxim V. Kapralov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome sizes in plants vary by several orders of magnitude, and this diversity may have evolutionary consequences. Large genomes contain mainly noncoding DNA that may impose high energy and metabolic costs for their bearers. Here we test the large genome constraint hypothesis, which assumes that plant lineages with large genomes are diversifying more slowly Knight et al. (2005, using endemic floras of the oceanic archipelagos of the Canaries, Hawaii, and Marquesas Islands. In line with this hypothesis, the number of endemic species per genus is negatively correlated with genus-average genome size for island radiations on Hawaiian and Marquesas archipelagos. However, we do not find this correlation on the Canaries, which are close to the continent and therefore have higher immigration rate and lower endemism compared to Hawaii. Further work on a larger number of floras is required to test the generality of the large genome constraint hypothesis.

  9. Patterns of endemism within the Karoo National Park, South Africa

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    F. Rubin

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A checklist of 864 plant taxa representing 355 genera and 93 families is given for the Karoo National Park. A total of 121 species are endemic to the Nama-Karoo, with Asteraceae the most common with 33 taxa. followed by Mesembryanthemaceae with 26 taxa. Phytochorological affinities indicate that 19.8% of the species are from the Nama- Karoo Biome only, another 19.8% are distributed over two biomes, and 41% of the species have a widespread distribution. The Karoo National Park conserves 30% of the recognized endemics of the Nama-Karoo Biome.

  10. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis.

  11. Ulcerative colitis six years after colon cancer: only a coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakellakis M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Minas Sakellakis,1 Thomas Makatsoris,1 Maria Gkermpesi,2 Stavros Peroukidis,1 Haralabos Kalofonos11Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pathology, University, Hospital of Patras, Patras, GreeceAbstract: The association between inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer is well known. Ulcerative colitis is a risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer, and this risk increases with the activity and duration of bowel inflammation. Here we describe the case of a 52-year-old man who developed ulcerative colitis 6 years after the diagnosis and treatment of colon cancer. Although this could be a coincidence, there could be additional possibilities, like pre-existence of quiescent colitis, late effect of therapy, or maybe the existence of common pathogenetic factors contributing to the development of ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer.Keywords: ulcerative, colitis, colorectal, cancer, inflammation

  12. Psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Susan

    2002-06-01

    Over the past decade, while gastroenterologists' interest in mind-body interactions in organic disorders dwindled, stronger evidence has linked psychosocial factors with the incidence and recurrence of peptic ulcer and with the course of inflammatory bowel disease. Psychological-behavioral approaches to treatment continue to be disappointing. Psychosocial factors may affect ulcer by increasing duodenal acid load, altering local circulation or motility, intensifying Helicobacter pylori infection, stimulating corticosteroid secretion, and affecting health risk behaviors; possible mechanisms for inflammatory bowel disease include immune deregulation, gut permeability changes, and poor medication adherence. Both belong to the growing category of diseases thought to have an infectious component: for peptic ulcer the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, for inflammatory bowel disease an exaggerated immune response to gut bacteria. Peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease, which present unique interactions among psychological, immunologic, endocrine, infectious, and behavioral factors, are splendid paradigms of the biopsychosocial model.

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2011-02-01

    Although simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant improves most complications of type 1 diabetes, suppression of the immune system increases the risk for infection. The authors report the case of a patient who, despite receiving a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant, subsequently developed neuro-ischemic ulcers of his right foot requiring repeated amputations. He then developed an infected ulcer of his remaining right big toe, with significant implications for his mobility. This ulcer proved resistant to multiple courses of antibiotics and care in a specialist foot clinic but resolved completely following a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic foot ulcers is not yet fully established but should be considered in resistant cases with vascular insufficiency and a significant infective component.

  14. Diabetic foot ulcers: Part I. Pathophysiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Mayer, Dieter; Goodman, Laurie; Botros, Mariam; Armstrong, David G; Woo, Kevin; Boeni, Thomas; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious, life-long condition that is the sixth leading cause of death in North America. Dermatologists frequently encounter patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus will develop diabetic foot ulcers. Foot ulcer patients have an increased risk of amputation and increased mortality rate. The high-risk diabetic foot can be identified with a simplified screening, and subsequent foot ulcers can be prevented. Early recognition of the high-risk foot and timely treatment will save legs and improve patients' quality of life. Peripheral arterial disease, neuropathy, deformity, previous amputation, and infection are the main factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. Early recognition of the high-risk foot is imperative to decrease the rates of mortality and morbidity. An interprofessional approach (ie, physicians, nurses, and foot care specialists) is often needed to support patients' needs.

  15. Surgical perspectives in peptic ulcer disease and gastritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamar Lipof; David Shapiro; Robert A Kozol

    2006-01-01

    For much of the twentieth century, surgery was frequently the solution for peptic ulcer disease. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of ulcers paralleled the development of potent pharmaceutical therapy. As the surgical world developed parietal cell vagotomy which would minimize the complications of surgery,patients failing medical therapy became rare. Emergent surgery for complicated peptic ulcers has not declined however. The development of proton pump inhibitors and the full understanding of the impact of H pylori has led to a trend towards minimalism in surgical therapy for complicated peptic ulcer disease. In addition to the changes in patient care, these developments have had an impact on the training of surgeons. This article outlines these trends and developments.

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2012-02-01

    Although simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant improves most complications of type 1 diabetes, suppression of the immune system increases the risk for infection. The authors report the case of a patient who, despite receiving a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant, subsequently developed neuro-ischemic ulcers of his right foot requiring repeated amputations. He then developed an infected ulcer of his remaining right big toe, with significant implications for his mobility. This ulcer proved resistant to multiple courses of antibiotics and care in a specialist foot clinic but resolved completely following a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic foot ulcers is not yet fully established but should be considered in resistant cases with vascular insufficiency and a significant infective component.

  17. Clostridium difficile Infection Worsens the Prognosis of Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Negrón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of Clostridium difficile infections among ulcerative colitis (UC patients is well characterized. However, there is little knowledge regarding the association between C difficile infections and postoperative complications among UC patients.

  18. Minimally invasive surgery for diabetic plantar foot ulcerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Nery

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Complications of diabetes mellitus constitute the most common indications for hospitalization and non-traumatic amputations in the USA. The most important risk factors for the development of diabetic foot ulcerations include the presence of peripheral neuropathy, vasculopathy, limited joint mobility, and pre-existing foot deformities. In our study, 500 diabetic patients treated for plantar forefoot ulcerations were enrolled in a prospective study from 2000 to 2008 at the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil. Fifty-two patients in the study met the criteria and underwent surgical treatment consisting of percutaneous Achilles tendon lengthening to treat plantar forefoot ulcerations. The postoperative follow-up demonstrated prevention of recurrent foot ulcerations in 92% of these diabetic patients that maintained an improved foot function. In conclusion, our study supports that identification and treatment of ankle equinus in the diabetic population may potentially lead to decreased patient morbidity, including reduced risk for both reulceration, and potential lower extremity amputation.

  19. RECURRENT MARJOLIN’S ULCER WITH REGIONAL LYMPH NODE METASTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Marjolin’s ulcer is a malignant tumour developing in a chronic skin lesion (burn scar, vaccination scar, non-healing wound etc.. Th e majority of cases reported are squamous cell carcinoma. Surgery remains the first treatment of choice (resection with 2cms. safety margin of healthy skin for primary squamous cell car cinoma Marjolin ulcers and 2.5cms. safety margin for recurrent cases. Recurrence after surge ry and regional lymph node metastasis are not uncommon (17% & 30% respectively.We presents a c ase report and literature review of Recurrent Marjolin’s Ulcer with regional Lymph Node Metastasis. Marjolin's ulcer should be considered as a significant post-burn complication; i t should be treated with full emphasis on adequate local clearance and regular follow up for m any years; if not treated adequately, it may lead to complicated recurrence.

  20. [Pressure ulcers in palliative home care patients: prevalence and characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Ana Carolina de Castro Mendonça; Mota, Dálete Delalibera Corrêa de Faria; Bachion, Maria Marcia; Ferreira, Ana Cássia Mendes

    2014-04-01

    Persons in palliative care develop pressure ulcers (PU) as death approaches, but the extent of the problem is still unknown. The objectives were to identify the prevalence of pressure ulcers in people with cancer in palliative home care, compare the socio-demographic and clinical profile of patients with and without pressure ulcers, and analyze the characteristics of the ulcers. This descriptive, cross-sectional study included 64 people with advanced cancer in palliative home care. Twelve of them (18.8%) had PU, of whom 75.0% were men. The participants had one to three PU, amounting to 19 lesions, 89.4% of those developed at home and 47.4% at stage 3. The presence of PU was higher among those who had a history of previous wound. PU consisted of a significant event occurring in the studied population, indicating that preventive measures should be included in the home palliative care health team.

  1. Modern issues on the treatment of peptic ulcer bleedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potakhin S.N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success of therapeutic treatment of peptic ulcer and the introduction of endoscopic technologies, the problem of peptic ulcer hemorrhage remains valid. A large number of publications in foreign literature are dedicated to epidemiology and prevention of bleeding, evaluation of modern tactics and search for new methods of treatment. The works relating to organization of aid to patients with peptic ulcer bleeding are of particular interest. According to the recent data not all clinics even in economically developed countries manage to follow the recommendations of an international consensus-2010 for non-variceal bleeding treatment of upper gastrointestinal tract. Among the causes of non-compliance of international recommendations there are subjective and objective factors, the understanding of which can significantly affect the optimization of aid to patients with peptic ulcer bleeding.

  2. Patient risk factors for pressure ulcer development: Systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, S.; Gorecki, C.; Nelson, E.A.; Closs, S.J.; Defloor, T.; Halfens, R.; Farrin, A.; Brown, J.; Schoonhoven, L.; Nixon, J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors independently predictive of pressure ulcer development in adult patient populations? DESIGN: A systematic review of primary research was undertaken, based upon methods recommended for effectiveness questions but adapted to identify observational risk factor studie

  3. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. PMID:2991089

  4. A Review of Qingchang Shuan for Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Yan-cheng; TANG Zhi-peng; MA Gui-tong; GONG Yu-ping; LIU Wen; ZHANG Ya-li; WANG Xin-zhong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Qingchang Shuan(清肠栓)is a commonly used Chinese herbal suppository for treatment of ulcerative colitis(UC).It has the effects of clearing away heat and toxic materials, and promoting tissue regeneration by removing blood stasis.

  5. [PPI treatment for gastric ulcer patients in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Toshiyuki; Minami, Maya; Naito, Chisako; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2010-11-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is an effective and safe medication for the elderly people for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. However, some PPIs have been reported that they have metabolic interactions with some drugs. Therefore, drug-interactions should be considered when the PPI is prescribed to the elderly people. The number of NSAIDs ulcer patients is thought to increase along with the increase of those who take NSAIDs in the elderly. Although PPI is indispensable for the prevention of the NSAIDs ulcer, PPI has not obtained authorization for the purpose of prevention in Japan. PPIs are strongly expected to be approved for prevention of NSAIDs ulcer by the Japanese government in the near future. PMID:21061533

  6. Genital ulcers in women: clinical, microbiologic and histopathologic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Christiane Maria Moreira; Giraldo, Paulo César; Gomes, Francis de Assis Moraes; Amaral, Rose; Passos, Mauro Romero Leal; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine da Silveira

    2007-04-01

    Female genital ulcer is a disease that affects a large number of women, and its etiologic diagnosis can be difficult. The disease may increase the risk of acquiring HIV. Genital ulcer may be present in sexually transmitted diseases (STD)--syphilis, chancroid, genital herpes, donovanosis, lymphogranuloma venereum; and other non-STD disorders (NSTD)--Behçet's syndrome, pemphigus, Crohn's disease, erosive lichen planus and others. This study evaluated the clinical-histopathologic-microbiologic characteristics of female genital ulcers. A cross-sectional descriptive prospective study was conducted during a six-month period to investigate the first 53 women without a definitive diagnosis, seeking medical care for genital ulcers at a genital infections outpatient facility in a university hospital. A detailed and specific history was taken, followed by a dermatologic and gynecologic examination. In addition to collecting material from the lesions for microbiologic study, a biopsy of the ulcer was performed for histopathologic investigation. The average age of the patients was 32.7 years, 56.6% had junior high school education and higher education. The most frequent etiology was herpetic lesion, followed by auto-immune ulcers. At the time of their first consultation, around 60% of the women were using inadequate medication that was inconsistent with the final diagnosis. Histologic diagnosis was conclusive in only 26.4% of the patients (14/53). Cure was obtained in 99% of the cases after proper therapy. The female genital ulcers studied were equally distributed between sexually transmitted and non-sexually transmitted causes. Herpes was the most frequent type of genital ulcer, affecting women indiscriminately, mostly between the ages of 20 and 40 years. The etiologic diagnosis of herpetic ulcers is difficult to make even when various diagnostic methods are applied. It is imperative that NSTD should be included in the differential diagnoses of female genital ulcers. The

  7. Genital ulcers in women: clinical, microbiologic and histopathologic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Maria Moreira Gomes

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Female genital ulcer is a disease that affects a large number of women, and its etiologic diagnosis can be difficult. The disease may increase the risk of acquiring HIV. Genital ulcer may be present in sexually transmitted diseases (STD - syphilis, chancroid, genital herpes, donovanosis, lymphogranuloma venereum and other non-STD disorders (NSTD - Behçet's syndrome, pemphigus, Crohn's disease, erosive lichen planus and others. This study evaluated the clinical-histopathologic-microbiologic characteristics of female genital ulcers. A cross-sectional descriptive prospective study was conducted during a six-month period to investigate the first 53 women without a definitive diagnosis, seeking medical care for genital ulcers at a genital infections outpatient facility in a university hospital. A detailed and specific history was taken, followed by a dermatologic and gynecologic examination. In addition to collecting material from the lesions for microbiologic study, a biopsy of the ulcer was performed for histopathologic investigation. The average age of the patients was 32.7 years, 56.6% had junior high school education and higher education. The most frequent etiology was herpetic lesion, followed by auto-immune ulcers. At the time of their first consultation, around 60% of the women were using inadequate medication that was inconsistent with the final diagnosis. Histologic diagnosis was conclusive in only 26.4% of the patients (14/53. Cure was obtained in 99% of the cases after proper therapy. The female genital ulcers studied were equally distributed between sexually transmitted and non-sexually transmitted causes. Herpes was the most frequent type of genital ulcer, affecting women indiscriminately, mostly between the ages of 20 and 40 years. The etiologic diagnosis of herpetic ulcers is difficult to make even when various diagnostic methods are applied. It is imperative that NSTD should be included in the differential diagnoses of female

  8. Gastroprotective and Anti-ulcer activity of Aloe vera juice, Papaya fruit juice and Aloe vera and Papaya fruit combined juice in Ethanol induced Ulcerated Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. S. Gopinathan; D. Naveenraj

    2013-01-01

    Peptic ulcer is the most prevalent gastrointestinal disease. Even though a wide range of drugs are available for the treatment of peptic ulcer, but many of these do not fulfill all the requirements and have side effects. These factors have attracted researchers to investigate the natural products which have more efficacy, less side effects and less expensive for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. In the present study the anti ulcer activity of (1) Aloe vera juice, (2) papaya fruit juice (...

  9. Use of Pressure Offloading Devices in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Stephanie C; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Weber, Anna K.; Robinson, Daniel E.; David G Armstrong

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Pressure mitigation is crucial for the healing of plantar diabetic foot ulcers. We therefore discuss characteristics and considerations associated with the use of offloading devices. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A diabetic foot ulcer management survey was sent to foot clinics in all 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2005. A total of 901 geographically diverse centers responded. The survey recorded information regarding usage frequency and characteristics of assessment and tre...

  10. An uncommon cause of gastro-duodenal ulceration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sebastian Mallach; Uwe Ramp; Andreas Erhardt; Marcus Schmitt; Dieter H(a)ussinger

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal ulcers occur frequently and are mainly caused by H pylori infection.In this report, we present a rare case of gastro-duodenal ulcer following selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT).SIRT is a palliative treatment for unresectable liver tumours.During SIRT,90Y-microspheres are infused into the hepatic artery.Pretreatment evaluation for the presence of arterial shunts to neighbouring organs should be determined in order to avoid complications of SIRT.

  11. Unna Boot in Venous Ulcer Treatment: Evaluation of 30 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Acıpayam, Mehmet; Zor, M. Hakan; Altınay, Levent; Uncu, Hasan; Halıcı, Ümit

    2013-01-01

    Aim: We aim to evaluate the results of the Unna boot practice with this prospective study. Material and Methods: This study included a total of 30 patients (1 female, 29 male; ages 23–56, mean 33.5) admitted to outpatient clinic with chronic venous leg ulcers. All patients were treated with Unna's boot. This treatment combined with oral calcium dobesilat 500 mg tabletorally twice a day. As the ulcer was healing, the treatment continued with calcium dobesilate tablets and compres...

  12. TOPICAL HYALURONIC ACID IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ORAL ULCERS

    OpenAIRE

    Pranav Kapoor; Shabina Sachdeva; Silonie Sachdeva

    2011-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a hygroscopic macromolecule formed by the polymerisation of glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine disaccharide. It is a primary component of the extracellular matrix in various body tissues. Ihe use of topical Hyaluronic acid in the treatment of oral ulcers has been recently reported. This article reviews the mechanism of action, indications and efficacy of topical Hyaluronic acid gel in the management of oral ulcers.

  13. Equine gastric ulcer syndrome (egus): diagnosis and therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mot, T.,; Sarandan, H.,; Cristina Petruse,

    2008-01-01

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome is especially reported in racing horses, with a prevalence of 60-90% in adults and 25-50% in foals. The ethiology of equine gastric ulcer is polifactorial, represented by nutritional factors, stress generated by training and captivity, drugs (corticosteroids-prednisolone, dexametasone, nesteroidicanti-inflammatory drugs: flumixin-meglumine, fenilbutazone), duodenal refluence. The diagnosis is established on clinical signs and therapeutic response and it is confir...

  14. Ulcerative vulvitis in Reiter's syndrome. A case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Daunt, S O; Kotowski, K E; O'Reilly, A P; Richardson, A T

    1982-01-01

    In a case of acute Reiter's syndrome with severe vulvitis the diagnosis was based on the presence of a vaginal discharge and dysuria, arthritis, conjunctivitis, buccal ulceration, keratodermia blenorrhagica, and HLA B27 tissue-typing antigen. The vulval lesions were similar in appearance to those of circinate vulvitis. The acute histological change were confined to shallow ulceration with an inflammatory infiltration of the subjacent dermis. Coincidential lichen sclerosus et atrophicus was pr...

  15. How To Prevent Foot Ulcers In Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Morshed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients is 4% to 10%, these ulcers may be infected, cause morbidity and may lead to lower extremity amputation.Objective: Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in patients known to be diabetics by fasting blood sugar (FBS, HbA1C tests.Material and Methods: The study was done on 120 patients between March 2010 and July 2011 diagnosed as diabetics and they performed simple screening tests for peripheral neuropathy (Semmes-Weinstein monofilament examination (SWME, superficial pain, vibration testing by the on-off method, the timed method. Nerve conduction studies (NCS were used as standard criterion for detection of neuropathy, they also underwent Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI measurement to assess the vascularity of their lower limbs. All patients were given proper education to prevent foot ulcers, including optimising glycemic control, cessation of smoking, debridement of calluses, appropriate foot wear and foot care with periodic foot examination.Results: In our study we succeeded in increasing the prevention of foot ulceration in our diabetic patients by 95%, compared to results achieved with the previous measures.Conclusion: Screening tests are effective for all diabetic patients to identify patients at risk of foot ulceration. They may benefit from prophylactic interventions including, optimising glycemic control, cessation of smoking, debridement of calluses, appropriate foot wear and intensive foot care.Also, we take care of patients with low risk of foot ulceration by adequate foot care and periodic foot examination to prevent foot ulceration.

  16. Temporal Comorbidity of Mental Disorder and Ulcerative Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Cawthorpe, David; Davidson, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The authors used physician diagnoses from Calgary, Alberta, for patient visits from fiscal years 1994 to 2009 for treatment of any presenting concern (763,449 patients) to identify 5113 patients with a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis, and found 4192 patients also had a diagnosis of a mental disorder. Patients with mental disorder had a significantly higher annual prevalence. The mental disorder grouping neuroses/depression was most likely to arise before diagnosis of ulcerative colitis.

  17. Do pressure ulcer risk assessment scales improve clinical practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Kottner; Katrin Balzer

    2010-01-01

    Jan Kottner1, Katrin Balzer21Department of Nursing Science, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany; 2Nursing Research Group, Institute for Social Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, GermanyAbstract: Standardized assessment instruments are deemed important for estimating pressure ulcer risk. Today, more than 40 so-called pressure ulcer risk assessment scales are available but still there is an ongoing debate about their usefulne...

  18. Mechanisms of action of leptin in preventing gastric ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward O. Adeyemi; Salim A. Bastaki; Irwin S. Chandranath; Mohammed Y. Hasan; Mohammed Fahim; Abdu Adem

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of leptin (1-20 μg/kg) on acidified ethanol (AE)- and indomethacin (Indo)-induced gastric lesions in rats and compare it with ranitidine, lansoprazole, and omeprazole and to determine its mechanisms of actions.METHODS: Gastric ulcers, which were approximately 1 mm in width, formed in the glandular portion of the gastric mucosa produced by oral administration of either AE or Indo were taken as ulcer index. The inhibitory effect of subcutaneous administration of leptin, two proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) lansoprazole and omeprazole, or H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine 30 min before AE or Indo was evaluated.A radioimmunoassay was used to determine the PGE2concentration in the homogenate of the glandular portion of the stomach. We performed histological study of the glandular stomach for the evaluation of total, acidic, and sulfated mucus content.RESULTS: Subcutaneous administration of leptin, two PPIs lansoprazole and omeprazole or H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine 30 min before AE or Indo produced a dosedependent and reproducible inhibition of gastric ulcers (GUs). This inhibition was found to be more potent than other antagonists used. In NG-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-pretreated animals, the ulcer prevention ability of leptin in AE-induced ulcer was significantly reduced,compared to rats without L-NAME pretreatment. However,the ulcer prevention ability of leptin was not altered by L-NAME treatment in Indo-induced ulcers. Leptin produced a dose-dependent increase in PGE2 level in the gastric glandular tissues. Leptin also increased mucus secretion.CONCLUSION: The results of the present study show that leptin inhibits GU formation by AE or Indo in a dosedependent and reproducible manner in rats. The results also suggest that leptin prevents ulcer formation by increasing the activities of the cyclo-oxygenase and/or nitric oxide pathways and by increasing mucus secretion.

  19. CASE STUDY OF LEECH APPLICATION IN DIABETIC FOOT ULCER

    OpenAIRE

    Dwivedi, Amarprakash P.

    2012-01-01

    In diabetes, slight injury to the glucose laden tissue may cause chronic infection and ulcer formation. About 15% of all diabetic patients develops foot ulcer in their life time. The etiological factors include increased sugar level, diabetic micro angiopathy and peripheral neuropathy.Mainstay of treatment includes antibiotics, debridement, and local wound care and footwear improvisation. In spite of all advances in health sciences, statistics reveals that about 3% patients yet have to underg...

  20. Severe upper airway obstruction caused by ulcerative laryngitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hatherill, M.; Reynolds, L; Waggie, Z; Argent, A

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To present our experience of severe upper airway obstruction caused by ulcerative laryngitis in children.
METHODS—Retrospective case note review of 263 children with severe upper airway obstruction and a clinical diagnosis of croup admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) over a five year period.
RESULTS—A total of 148 children (56%) underwent microlaryngoscopy (Storz 3.0 rigid telescope). Laryngeal ulceration with oedema was documented in 15 of these childre...

  1. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    OpenAIRE

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 di...

  2. Characterization of Patients with Helicobacter pylori-Negative Peptic Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Hernández Conde; Guillermo Noa Pedroso; Carlos Domínguez Álvarez; Isabel Mora Díaz; Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola; Yagén Pomares Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Background: the rate of Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcers is increasing. Treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other ulcerogenic drugs plays a significant role.Objective: to characterize patients with Helicobacter pylori-negative peptic ulcer. Methods: a case series study of patients attended by the Gastroenterology Service of the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital was conducted in the year 2009. Demographic, epidemiological, clinical, endoscopic and histological variables were ...

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with severe ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiho; Sagara; Yasuo; Horie; Yumiko; Anezaki; Hideaki; Miyazawa; Masahiro; Iizuka

    2010-01-01

    Various extraintestinal manifestations including pulmonary abnormalities have been reported in patients with ulcerative colitis. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious and fatal pulmonary manifestation. We have experienced a 67-year-old male patient with ARDS associated with a severe type of ulcerative colitis (UC). Severe dyspnea symptoms occurred during the treatment of UC in a previous hospital and the patient was transferred to our hospital on June 27, 2007. Both blood and sputa culture...

  4. Ulcerative colitis Presenting as leukocytoclastic vasculitis of skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sabiye Akbulut; Ersan Ozaslan; Firdevs Topal; Levent Albayrak; Burcak Kayhan; Cumali Efe

    2008-01-01

    A number of cutaneous changes are known to occur in the course of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD),including pyoderma gangrenosum, erythema nodosum,perianal disease, erythematous eruptions, urticaria, and purpura. However, occurrence of skin manifestations prior to the development of ulcerative colitis is a rare occasion. Here, we report a case of ulcerative colitis associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis in which the intestinal symptoms became overt 8 mo after the development of skin lesions.

  5. Amoebic ulcer of the male genitala: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanty Indrani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Amoebic ulcer of the penis is a very rare clinical entity. We report a case of amoebic ulcer of the glans penis in a 47-year-old male homosexual, symptomatic with severe pain and foul-smelling hemopurulent discharge of acute onset. He had received systemic antibiotics like ciprofloxacin and azithromycin prior to presentation with no improvement. Diagnosis was confirmed by wet mount microscopic examination of the discharge. The patient responded well to a course of metronidazole.

  6. The Incidence of Gastric Metaplasia in Patients with Duodenal Ulcer *

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Young II; LEE, BYOUNG WOOK; Chang, Young Woon; Chi, Hyun Sook; Lee, Jung Kook

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the incidence of duodenal gastric metaplasia and its underlying gastric or duodenal diseases, the authors obtained endoscopic biopsy specimens from the duodenal bulb at random sites during endoscopy from 19 normal subjects, 11 patients with gastric ulcer, 18 with duodenal and/or prepyloric ulcer (s), 7 with duodenitis and 8 with gastric erosions. The biopsy specimens were assessed with PAS staining to confirm gastric metaplasia. The incidence of duodenal gastric metaplasia was ...

  7. Mucosal reactive oxygen metabolite production in duodenal ulcer disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, G. R.; Simmonds, N J; Stevens, T R; Grandison, A; D. R. Blake; Rampton, D S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that reactive oxygen metabolites are important in the pathophysiology of duodenal ulcer disease, their production by duodenal mucosal biopsy specimens was measured using luminol and lucigenin amplified chemiluminescence. Luminol chemiluminescence, expressed as background corrected median photon emission/mg/min x 10(3) (95% confidence intervals), was increased in duodenal inflammation as assessed macroscopically: ulcers 20.3 (4.8 to 51.3), n = 29; severe duodeniti...

  8. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D M; Assendelft, W. J. J.; Valk, G. D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: Eligible studies were identified by searching The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 1 August 2012); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Librar...

  9. Peptic ulcer in the gallbladder. A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, E H; Diederich, P J; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1985-01-01

    Gastric mucosa can be found in the gallbladder as a congenital heterotopia. A case of a perforated peptic ulcer in the gallbladder with concomitant hemorrhage in heterotopic gastric mucosa causing hematemesis and melena is presented.......Gastric mucosa can be found in the gallbladder as a congenital heterotopia. A case of a perforated peptic ulcer in the gallbladder with concomitant hemorrhage in heterotopic gastric mucosa causing hematemesis and melena is presented....

  10. [When to worry about before a vascular chronic leg ulcer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareth, I

    2016-09-01

    Leg ulcers are a chronic condition. Healing can be long for venous ulcers and the risk of complications is significant. Infection is the most severe complication and can occur in the form of easily diagnosed acute bacterial dermohypodermitis that generally responds well to antibiotic treatment if given at an appropriate dose or in the form of localized infection that is more difficult to diagnosis. Indeed, no consensus has been reached in the literature on the clinical criteria to retain for the diagnosis of localized infection. Similarly, the most appropriate treatment remains to be established. Local care would be a logical starting point, followed by systemic antibiotics if this approach is unsuccessful. Individual conditions also should be taken into consideration (immunodepression, severe arteriopathy warranting more rapid use of systemic antibiotics). The second most frequent complication is an allergic reaction to a topical agent used for wound care. The rate of sensitivization in patients with leg ulcers is high (60 %), although the rate is declining with modern dressings. No product can be considered perfectly safe for these polysensitized patients. Dermocorticoid therapy can be very effective. Allergology tests are needed. Certain leg ulcers require special care from diagnosis. An arterial origin must be suspected for deep, or necrotic ulcers. Arterial supply must be explored rapidly, followed by a revascularization procedure when necessary. Highly painful superficial extensive necrotic ulcers due to necrotic angiodermitis require hospital care for skin grafts that will control the antiodermitis and provide pain. Carcinoma should be suspected in cases of leg ulcers with an atypical localization exhibiting excessive budding. A biopsy is mandatory for leg ulcers with an unusual course (absence of healing despite well-conducted care).

  11. SPONTANEOUS DUODENO-BILIARY FISTULA CAUSED BY DUODENAL PEPTIC ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Danila

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous duodeno-biliary fistula represents a rare complication of chronic duodenal peptic ulcer. The authors present two cases with this pathology and also the particularities of surgical approach. Spontaneous duodeno-biliary fistula caused by chronic peptic ulcer is often a surprising diagnostic in the era of H2 blockers. The difficulties and the complexity of the diagnosis associated with the particularities of surgical technique represent the key of this rare disease.

  12. Protective Effect of Amphipterygium adstringens Extract on Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Canales, Mario; Jimenez-Rivas, Ruben; Canales-Martinez, Maria Margarita; Garcia-Lopez, Ana Judith; Rivera-Yañez, Nelly; Nieto-Yañez, Oscar; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Sanchez-Torres, Luvia Enid; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam; Terrazas, Luis Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Amphipterygium adstringens is an endemic species in Mexico commonly known as “cuachalalate.” Healers to treat gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastrointestinal cancer have traditionally used the bark. We investigated the effects of alcoholic extract of A. adstringens (AaEE) in DSS-induced colitis in mice. The protective effect of AaEE was determined at 200 mg/kg by oral gavage for 10 days. We determine the effect of AaEE on clinical features (disease activity index), antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory activities in relation to the activity of SOD, CAT, and GPx, levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and changes both macroscopic and microscopic of the colonic mucosa. AaEE significantly reduced the inflammation of colon and significantly increased SOD and GPx activities. AaEE also significantly decreased TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β cytokine levels compared to DSS-treated mice and reduced both infiltration of inflammatory cells and the mucosal damage in colon. The results suggested the protective potential of AaEE in DSS-induced colitis and this might be attributed to its phytochemicals compounds that have been found to induce a wide spectrum of activities such as reduction in oxidative stress, suppression of inflammation, modulating numerous signal transduction pathways, and induction of apoptosis. The findings of this study suggest that AaEE has substantial potential for the treatment of inflammatory colitis. PMID:27635116

  13. Protective Effect of Amphipterygium adstringens Extract on Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rodriguez-Canales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphipterygium adstringens is an endemic species in Mexico commonly known as “cuachalalate.” Healers to treat gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastrointestinal cancer have traditionally used the bark. We investigated the effects of alcoholic extract of A. adstringens (AaEE in DSS-induced colitis in mice. The protective effect of AaEE was determined at 200 mg/kg by oral gavage for 10 days. We determine the effect of AaEE on clinical features (disease activity index, antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory activities in relation to the activity of SOD, CAT, and GPx, levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and changes both macroscopic and microscopic of the colonic mucosa. AaEE significantly reduced the inflammation of colon and significantly increased SOD and GPx activities. AaEE also significantly decreased TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β cytokine levels compared to DSS-treated mice and reduced both infiltration of inflammatory cells and the mucosal damage in colon. The results suggested the protective potential of AaEE in DSS-induced colitis and this might be attributed to its phytochemicals compounds that have been found to induce a wide spectrum of activities such as reduction in oxidative stress, suppression of inflammation, modulating numerous signal transduction pathways, and induction of apoptosis. The findings of this study suggest that AaEE has substantial potential for the treatment of inflammatory colitis.

  14. Protective Effect of Amphipterygium adstringens Extract on Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Canales, Mario; Jimenez-Rivas, Ruben; Canales-Martinez, Maria Margarita; Garcia-Lopez, Ana Judith; Rivera-Yañez, Nelly; Nieto-Yañez, Oscar; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Sanchez-Torres, Luvia Enid; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam; Terrazas, Luis Ignacio; Rodriguez-Monroy, Marco Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    Amphipterygium adstringens is an endemic species in Mexico commonly known as "cuachalalate." Healers to treat gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastrointestinal cancer have traditionally used the bark. We investigated the effects of alcoholic extract of A. adstringens (AaEE) in DSS-induced colitis in mice. The protective effect of AaEE was determined at 200 mg/kg by oral gavage for 10 days. We determine the effect of AaEE on clinical features (disease activity index), antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory activities in relation to the activity of SOD, CAT, and GPx, levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and changes both macroscopic and microscopic of the colonic mucosa. AaEE significantly reduced the inflammation of colon and significantly increased SOD and GPx activities. AaEE also significantly decreased TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β cytokine levels compared to DSS-treated mice and reduced both infiltration of inflammatory cells and the mucosal damage in colon. The results suggested the protective potential of AaEE in DSS-induced colitis and this might be attributed to its phytochemicals compounds that have been found to induce a wide spectrum of activities such as reduction in oxidative stress, suppression of inflammation, modulating numerous signal transduction pathways, and induction of apoptosis. The findings of this study suggest that AaEE has substantial potential for the treatment of inflammatory colitis. PMID:27635116

  15. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers - evidence-to-practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndip, Agbor; Ebah, Leonard; Mbako, Aloysius

    2012-01-01

    Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough) rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment).

  16. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  17. Predictive factors for diabetic foot ulceration: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro-Soares, M; Boyko, E J; Ribeiro, J; Ribeiro, I; Dinis-Ribeiro, M

    2012-10-01

    Improving ability to predict and prevent diabetic foot ulceration is imperative because of the high personal and financial costs of this complication. We therefore conducted a systematic review in order to identify all studies of factors associated with DFU and assess whether available DFU risk stratification systems incorporate those factors of highest potential value. We performed a search in PubMed for studies published through April 2011 that analysed the association between independent variables and DFU. Articles were selected by two investigators-independently and blind to each other. Divergences were solved by a third investigator. A total of 71 studies were included that evaluated the association between diabetic foot ulceration and more than 100 independent variables. The variables most frequently assessed were age, gender, diabetes duration, BMI, HbA(1c) and neuropathy. Diabetic foot ulceration prevalence varied greatly among studies. The majority of the identified variables were assessed by only two or fewer studies. Diabetic neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, foot deformity and previous diabetic foot ulceration or lower extremity amputation - which are the most common variables included in risk stratification systems - were consistently associated with diabetic foot ulceration development. Existing diabetic foot ulceration risk stratification systems often include variables shown repeatedly in the literature to be strongly predictive of this outcome. Improvement of these risk classification systems though is impaired because of deficiencies noted, including a great lack of standardization in outcome definition and variable selection and measurement.

  18. Eosinophilic ulcer of the lateral tongue: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Myriam Costa de Medeiros

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa (EUOM is a lesion manifesting as ulcer with elevated margins. The lesion is self-limiting and develops rapidly usually disappearing after several weeks. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms implicated in its development are poorly understood, however, the possibility that trauma may play a role has been often postulated. Case report: A 63 year-old male patient had presented whit a chief complaint of painful ulcerated nodule on the tongue. Oral examination revealed a firm, raised and indurated erythematous nodule with a central ulcer that had a yellow fibrinous base. Clinical diagnosis hypothesis was either traumatic ulcer or oral squamous cell carcinoma. Histopathologic analysis revealed an ulcerated lesion with a dense mixed infiltrate of eosinophils, variably sized lymphocytes and epithelioid cells extending into submucosa. These cells exhibited pleomorphism, voluminous cytoplasm and nucleus with prominent nucleolus and were identified by immunohistochemical method as CD68+ cells. The histological diagnosis was EUOM. At 1-year follow-up there was no recurrence. Conclusion: Our case provides useful information on clinical and pathological features, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of EUOM, as suggesting the possible etiology of this uncommon lesion because it is poorly described in the literature.

  19. Anti-ulcer effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Rui-dong; YANG Qian-zi; XIAO Wei; LIU Fang-e; CHEN Jian-kang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP) on experimental gastric ulcers in rats. Methods: The ulcers were induced by water-immersion restraint stress, acetic acid and pylorus-ligation in rats. In each model, animals were divided randomly into 4 groups and administrated with LBP of 100 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg, ranitidine 100 mg/kg (as a reference standard) and saline respectively. Mucosal lesions were scored as ulcer index. In the pylorus-ligation model, we also compared the gastric juice volume, total acidity, acid output and pepsin activity among groups. Results: Oral administration of LBP inhibited the formation of the acute gastric lesions induced by physical stress such as water-immersion restraint (P<0.05), and accelerated the healing of chronic gastric ulcer model induced by acetic acid (P<0.05 to P<0.01). In the pylorus-ligated rats, significant decrease was also seen in ulcer index (P<0.05 to P<0.01), total acidity (P<0.05), acid output (P<0.05 to P<0.01). LBP 300 mg/kg even showed marked reduction of the volume (P<0.05) and pepsin activity (P<0.05) in the gastric juice. These effects were in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: LBP has protective effects on treating gastric ulcer and this action may relate to the reduction of acid output and pepsin activity in the gastric juice.

  20. Do pressure ulcer risk assessment scales improve clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kottner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Jan Kottner1, Katrin Balzer21Department of Nursing Science, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany; 2Nursing Research Group, Institute for Social Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, GermanyAbstract: Standardized assessment instruments are deemed important for estimating pressure ulcer risk. Today, more than 40 so-called pressure ulcer risk assessment scales are available but still there is an ongoing debate about their usefulness. From a measurement point of view pressure ulcer (PU risk assessment scales have serious limitations. Empirical evidence supporting the validity of PU risk assessment scale scores is weak and obtained scores contain varying amounts of measurement error. The concept of pressure ulcer risk is strongly related to the general health status and severity of illness. A clinical impact due do the application of these scales could also not be demonstrated. It is questionable whether completion of standardized pressure ulcer risk scales in clinical practice is really needed.Keywords: Braden pressure ulcer, prevention, risk assessment, nursing assessment, predictive value, clinical effectiveness, review

  1. Plasma interleukin-18 reflects severity of ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alicja Wiercinska-Drapalo; Robert Flisiak; Jerzy Jaroszewicz; Danuta Prokopowicz

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between ulcerative colitis activity and plasma or mucosal concentrations of interleukin (IL)-18.METHODS:Il-18 concentrations were measured in plasma and mucosal samples from 15 patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC).RESULTS: The mean plasma concentration of IL-18 measured in all patients (422±88 pg/mL) doubled the mean value in healthy controls (206±32 pg/mL); however,the difference was not statistically significant. Plasma IL-18 levels revealed a significant positive correlation with scored endoscopic degree of mucosal injury, disease activity index, clinical activity index and C-reactive protein concentration. The mean concentration of plasma IL-18 was significantly higher in patients with severe ulcerative colitis (535±115 pg/mL) than in patients with mild ulcerative colitis (195±41 pg/mL), and in healthy controls.Although the mucosal mean IL-18 concentration in severe ulcerative colitis (2 523±618 pg/mg protein) doubled values observed in mild one (1 347±308 pg/mg protein), there was no statistically significant difference.CONCLUSION: Plasma IL-18 can be considered as a surrogate marker helpful in evaluation of ulcerative colitis activity.

  2. A Review on Medicinal Plants with Anti-Ulcer Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh A. M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A peptic ulcer is erosion in a segment of the gastro intestinal mucosa. It may typically in the stomach (gastric ulcer or first few centimeters of duodenum (duodenal ulcer that penetrates through the muscularis mucosae. Contrary to popular belief, ulcer is not only caused by spicy food but also most commonly due to an infection of Helicobacter Pylori and long term use of medications. Standard treatment is a combination of drugs including antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitors. Literature suggests that number of synthetic drugs are used in the management of peptic ulcers but elicit several adverse effects. Therefore Indian herbal plants stand out as being exceptional for its ethnic, ethobotanical and ethno-pharmaceutical use. In this review attempts have been made to know about some plants which may be used in treatment or prevention of peptic ulcers. Various plants like Excoecaria agallocha, Mentha arvensis, Utleria salicifolia, Emblica officinalis etc. proved active in antiulcer therapy. This combination of traditional and modern knowledge can produced better antiulcer drugs with fewer side effects. The medicinal plants are available in India and other countries, recent technologies advances have renewal interest in natural product in drug discovery.

  3. Update on Peptic Ulcers in the Pediatric Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziella Guariso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Peptic ulcer disease (PUD in children is reported worldwide, although it is relatively rare as compared with adults. Helicobacter pylori (HP infection is a common cause of PUD in the pediatric age. Other risk factors include the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs, steroids, immunosuppressive drugs, and stressful events. Aim. To critically review the evidence on epidemiology, diagnostic management, and available treatments for PUD in the pediatric age. Methods. A MEDLINE search was performed indicating keywords as “Peptic Ulcer Disease,” “Epidemiology,” “Pediatric,” “Helicobacter pylori,” “Gastric ulcer,” “Bulbar Ulcer,” and “Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.” A selection of clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses within the time period 2002–2012 was performed. Results. PUD in children is reported worldwide with an estimated frequency of 8.1% in Europe and of 17.4% in the US. When the underlying cause of PUD is addressed, the prognosis is excellent. Standard triple therapy, bismuth-based quadruple therapy, and the sequential therapy represent the current recommended treatments for HP related ulcers. NSAIDs related ulcers are treated by stopping the causative medications and by administration of proton-pump inhibitors or antisecretory drugs. Conclusions. PUD still represents a major concern in the paediatric age. A careful differential diagnosis and an adequate treatment constitute an excellent prognosis.

  4. Spontaneous gastrojejunal fistula is a complication of gastric ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    (D)or(d)e M (C)ulafi(c); Olivera D Mateji(c); Vladimir S (D)uki(c); Miodrag D Vuk(c)evi(c); Mirko D Kerkez

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous gastrojejunal fistula formation is an extremely rare complication of gastric ulcer disease. We report a 77-year old woman who presented with diffuse abdominal pain, weight loss, malaise, nausea, and occasional dark stools. Laboratory tests showed extreme hyposideremic anemia with inflammatory syndrome. In addition, biochemical parameters of malnourishment were presented. Upper endoscopy revealed the patent esophagus along the full length without any pathological changes. Large and deep ulceration with perforation in the small intestine was detected in the posterior gastric wall. The small intestine loop was reached by endoscope through spontaneously developed gastrojejunal fistula.Polytopic biopsies of described ulcerative change were carried out. Histopathologically reepithelialized ulcerous zone was seen in the gastric mucosa. Also,gastrojejunal fistula was visualized after wide opening of hepatogastric and gastrocolic ligament. Jejunal loop 25cm from ligament of Treitz was attached to mesocolon and posterior gastric wall because of ulcer penetration.Postoperative course was uneventful. Per oral intake started on the 4th postoperative day, and the patient was discharged on the 8th postoperative day. In summary,this case indicates that persistent symptoms of peptic ulcer disease associated with nutritional disturbances may be caused by gastrojejunal fistula.

  5. Spontaneous gastrojejunal fistula is a complication of gastric ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culafić, Dorde-M; Matejić, Olivera-D; Dukić, Vladimir-S; Vukcević, Miodrag-D; Kerkez, Mirko-D

    2007-01-21

    Spontaneous gastrojejunal fistula formation is an extremely rare complication of gastric ulcer disease. We report a 77-year old woman who presented with diffuse abdominal pain, weight loss, malaise, nausea, and occasional dark stools. Laboratory tests showed extreme hyposideremic anemia with inflammatory syndrome. In addition, biochemical parameters of malnourishment were presented. Upper endoscopy revealed the patent esophagus along the full length without any pathological changes. Large and deep ulceration with perforation in the small intestine was detected in the posterior gastric wall. The small intestine loop was reached by endoscope through spontaneously developed gastrojejunal fistula. Polytopic biopsies of described ulcerative change were carried out. Histopathologically reepithelialized ulcerous zone was seen in the gastric mucosa. Also, gastrojejunal fistula was visualized after wide opening of hepatogastric and gastrocolic ligament. Jejunal loop 25 cm from ligament of Treitz was attached to mesocolon and posterior gastric wall because of ulcer penetration. Postoperative course was uneventful. Per oral intake started on the 4(th) postoperative day, and the patient was discharged on the 8(th) postoperative day. In summary, this case indicates that persistent symptoms of peptic ulcer disease associated with nutritional disturbances may be caused by gastrojejunal fistula.

  6. Perforated peptic ulcer following gastric bypass for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, A M; Pickens, N E; Thoburn, E K

    1999-03-01

    Peptic ulcer in the excluded segment of a gastric bypass performed in the management of morbid obesity has only rarely been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with the condition in a series of 4300 patients who underwent gastric-restrictive surgery between 1978 and 1997. Eleven patients presented with acute perforation of a peptic ulcer in the excluded gastric segment. Nine ulcers were duodenal, one was gastric, and one patient had both gastric and duodenal perforations. The time between primary gastric-restrictive surgery and ulcer perforation varied from 20 days to 12 years. All patients presented with upper abdominal pain. The classical radiological sign of perforated peptic ulcer, free air under the diaphragm, did not occur in any patient. Nine patients were initially treated by primary closure of the perforation with subsequent definitive ulcer therapy by vagotomy, pyloroplasty, or gastrectomy. One case, initially treated elsewhere, was managed by placement of a Malecot catheter through the duodenal perforation, gastrostomy, and peritoneal drainage. One recent case remains symptom-free on H2 blockers after simple closure. There was no mortality. Six cases were previously reported in the literature with a 33 per cent mortality rate.

  7. Vascular leg ulcers: histopathologic study of 293 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misciali, Cosimo; Dika, Emi; Baraldi, Carlotta; Fanti, Pier Alessandro; Mirelli, Michele; Stella, Andrea; Bertoncelli, Marco; Patrizi, Annalisa

    2014-12-01

    Vascular leg ulcers remain a challenge for the modern health care, and a systematic pathological study on this kind of lesions has not been reported so far. A total of 293 consecutive white patients with chronic leg ulcers (present for a minimum of 6 months and up to several years) referred to the Wound Care Unit (Dermatology, University of Bologna) between March 2008 and June 2011. Thirty-four patients affected by other than vascular ulcers, neoplastic or inflammatory conditions, were excluded. The remaining 259 patients affected by vascular leg ulcers were enrolled in this study. Assessment of the patients general health, skin biopsy, and vascular Doppler of the lower limbs were performed to determine the etiology and to formulate an appropriate management plan, whereas 2 punch biopsies of 3 mm were performed on the border and on the bed of each ulcer. Doppler evaluation showed the presence of vascular hemodynamic impairment in 259 patients. Of these, 181 (69.9%) patients were affected by venous insufficiency, 58 (22.4%) by venous and arterial insufficiency, and 20 (7.7%) by arterial insufficiency. Histopathologic features revealed significant differences, thus, reflecting the clinicopathologic correlation with the underlying hemodynamic impairments. In conclusion, histopathologic and hemodynamic data correlation could provide the basis for future analysis of leg ulcers pathogenesis and may improve treatment protocols. We should underline that this observational study represents a single-institute experience and that larger series are needed to confirm our observations.

  8. Pressure ulcer prevention and treatment: use of prophylactic dressings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid K

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen Reid,1 Elizabeth A Ayello,2 Afsaneh Alavi,3 1Department of Nursing Practice and Education, Bridgepoint Active Healthcare, Toronto, Canada; 2School of Nursing, Excelsior College, Albany, NY, USA; 3Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Abstract: The management of pressure ulcers is challenging for health care providers across disciplines. Pressure ulcers have significant impact on emotional and physical wellbeing, quality of life, and health care costs. The use of wound dressings could be an important and cost-effective strategy in preventing pressure ulcers. The main types of dressings that are examined for this purpose in the literature are foam, hydrocolloid, and films. Some small studies have shown a preventative role for sacral dressings with low-shear backings, though they raise concerns about over-hydration of the skin. Further research demonstrates the application of barrier films over bony prominences to have a prophylactic effect; however, adhesive dressings can also contribute to shearing forces on the skin. There is a vast body of research that examines the use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers; however, there is limited high-level evidence, such as randomized control trials. A 2013 Cochrane review indicated that there is a paucity of high-level evidence to support the prophylactic use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers; this paper will examine the emerging literature and consider its relevance to pressure ulcer prevention protocols. Keywords: quality of life, hydrocolloid dressing, topical agent

  9. SOLAR THERAPY: A BOON FOR NON-HEALING ULCERS

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    Varunjikar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available : Compound fractures are common following road traffic accidents. It leads to open wound which needs treatment by plastic repairs such as rotation flaps, cross leg flaps, and skin grafting. Similarly, raw wounds and non-healing ulcers especially in osteomyelitis is a challenge to Orthopaedicians. Wounds with infection heal slowly and this often results in prolonged hospitalization. Standard treatment includes dressing and use of antibiotics which leads to financial burden on poor patients. Irrational use of antibiotics has lead to increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics. So far, sunlight has been utilized in treatment of rickets and osteomalacia. We have tried to utilize this mode of ecological treatment in an alternate way. Infected, non-healing wounds and ulcers were treated with exposure to sunlight which lead to scab formation and epithelisation leading to healing of wound due to UV rays. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR on the healing of ulcers. METHODS: Our patients having non healing ulcers were subjected to this type of treatment. RESULTS: In selected patients having non- healing ulcers on extremities of various sizes were treated previously with routine line of treatment such as dressing and oral or parenteral antibiotics. Patients were explained mode of treatment and underwent solar therapy after receiving informed consent. Epithelisation on ulcer took place following UV therapy within average duration of 23 days. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that ultraviolet radiation had significant effects in destroying bacteria and also promoting wound healing

  10. Helicobacter pylori and gastric or duodenal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer associated with Helicobacter pylori, treatment of the infection improves healing and prevents complications and recurrences. The drug regimen generally consists of a high-dose proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) such as omeprazole plus antibiotics. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we conducted a review of the literature in order to determine the standard empirical antibiotic regimen for H. pylori infection in adults with gastric or duodenal ulcer in France. In 2015, due to an increase in H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, a 7-day course of the PPI + clarithromycin + amoxicillin combination is effective in only about 70% of cases. A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis of trials involving thousands of patients suggests that prolonging treatment with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin or a PPI + amoxicillin + metronidazole to 10 or 14 days improves the rate of H. pylori eradication by 5% to 10%. A metanalysis of seven trials including a total of about 1000 patients showed that combination therapy with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days eradicates H. pylori in about 90% of cases, compared to about 80% of cases with a PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin given for 7 days. Sequential treatment with amoxicillin for 5 days, followed by clarithromycin + metronidazole for 5 days, has also been tested in thousands of patients. Efficacy and adverse effects were similar to those observed when the same antibiotics were taken simultaneously for 5 days. In randomised trials, replacing clarithromycin or amoxicillin with a fluoroquinolone yielded conflicting results. In 2009, nearly 20% of H. pylori isolates were resistant to levofloxacin in France. Tetracycline has only been evaluated in combination with bismuth. The few available data on doxycycline suggest that its efficacy is similar to that of tetracycline. A fixed-dose combination of bismuth subcitrate potassium + metronidazole

  11. TO STUDY THE ROLE OF COMPRESSIVE THERAPY AND SURGICAL INTERVENTION IN TREATMENT OF VENOUS ULCERS

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    Sashi Walling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to study the response of venous ulcers to compressive therapy plus surgical treatment. STUDY DESIGN : Patients presenting to our hospital from the period March’ 2014 to December’ 2014 with venous ulcers were examined and investigated. Thirty patients who had findings of venous ulcers along with varicose veins were selected for the study. Patients were initially treated with elastic compression bandages to allow ulcer healing followed by surgical intervention of varicose veins and incompetent perforators. The response to treatment was evaluated in terms of symptomatic improvement and ulcer healing. RESULTS: Venous ulcers respond well to both conservative treatment and surgical intervention. Meticulous assessment of patients is necessary for successful treatment. In our study period, elastic compres sion bandages combined with surgical treatment was successful in improving symptoms of venous ulcer as well as ulcer healing in the patients. Patient education regarding compliance to treatment is paramount to ulcer healing and preventing recurrence.

  12. The endemic species of Podocarpus in New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laubenfels, de David J.

    1980-01-01

    Among the more than a dozen species of Podocarpus sensu stricto known to occur on the island of New Guinea inch New Britain, five are not known elsewhere. Unlike most of the non-endemic species, these five are widely distributed on the island in their appropriate ecological zones. Only one of the fi

  13. Rediscovery of Curcuma sumatrana (Zingiberaceae) endemic to West Sumatra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardiyani, M.; Anggara, A.; Leong-Škorničková, J.

    2011-01-01

    A recent exploration of Sumatra resulted in the re-collection of Curcuma sumatrana, an endemic Zingiberaceae species of unclear identity that was first described by Miquel nearly 150 years ago. The history of this species is discussed, a detailed description with a colour plate is provided and a lec

  14. Ecological predictors of extinction risks of endemic mammals of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You-Hua

    2014-07-01

    In this brief report, we analyzed ecological correlates of risk of extinction for mammals endemic to China using phylogenetic eigenvector methods to control for the effect of phylogenetic inertia. Extinction risks were based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List and ecological explanatory attributes that include range size and climatic variables. When the effect of phylogenetic inertia were controlled, climate became the best predictor for quantifying and evaluating extinction risks of endemic mammals in China, accounting for 13% of the total variation. Range size seems to play a trivial role, explaining ~1% of total variation; however, when non-phylogenetic variation partitioning analysis was done, the role of range size then explained 7.4% of total variation. Consequently, phylogenetic inertia plays a substantial role in increasing the explanatory power of range size on the extinction risks of mammals endemic to China. Limitations of the present study are discussed, with a focus on under-represented sampling of endemic mammalian species.

  15. Iridoid glucosides in the endemic Picconia azorica (Oleaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gousiadou, Chryssoula; Kokubun, Tetsuo; Martins, José;

    2015-01-01

    In our continued investigation of plants from the family Oleaceae we have now investigated Picconia azorica endemic to the Azores. Like most species within the family it contains the oleoside-based secoiridoid glucosides ligstroside and oleuropein as the main compounds and in addition verbascoside...

  16. Trichomonad infection in endemic and introduced columbids in the Seychelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunbury, N

    2011-07-01

    Island endemic avifaunas face many threats, including the now well-documented impacts of pathogens. The impacts of pathogens on the endemic Seychelles avifauna, however, have been little studied. The protozoan parasite Trichomonas gallinae has been shown to reduce survival and reproductive success of the endemic Pink Pigeon Columba mayeri on the nearby island of Mauritius. I investigated trichomonad infection prevalence and pathogenicity in endemic Seychelles Blue Pigeons, Alectroenas pulcherrima, and two introduced species of columbid, the Madagascar Turtle-dove, Streptopelia picturata, and the Barred Ground Dove, Geopelia striata, on the Seychelles island of Mahé during September-October 2007. I asked whether: 1) trichomonad infections occur in these species; 2) prevalence varies among species; and 3) birds show any signs of pathogenicity consistent with tricho-monosis. I use the results to assess the potential threat of this pathogen to A. pulcherrima. All three species were infected with trichomonads, and the overall prevalence was 27.5%. Alectroenas pulcherrima had higher prevalence (47.1%) than the two introduced species combined (24.3%). No infected individuals showed any signs of disease. These findings suggest that trichomonad parasites should be considered as a potential disease threat to the A. pulcherrima population. PMID:21719842

  17. Evolution of endemism on a young tropical mountain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckx, V.; Hendriks, K.; Beentjes, K.; Mennes, C.B.; Becking, L.E.; Geurts, R.

    2015-01-01

    Tropical mountains are hot spots of biodiversity and endemism1–3, but the evolutionary origins of their unique biotas are poorly understood4. In varying degrees, local and regional extinction, long-distance colonization, and local recruitment may all contribute to the exceptional character of these

  18. Studies on bilharziasis endemicity in the vicinity of Basra, Iraq*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, H. H.; de Araoz, J.; Klimt, C. R.; al Ani, K.; Azzawi, J.

    1961-01-01

    This paper reports on investigations into the distribution of snail genera and possible limiting environmental factors in the endemic and non-endemic areas of human bilharziasis in and near Basra, carried out in 1958 by the WHO Bilharziasis Control Project staff in Iraq. These investigations confirmed the existence of an abrupt line of demarcation between these areas immediately south of Basra. During June and October 1958, the known intermediate snail host, Bulinus truncatus, was not found in canals bordering on areas of either infected or non-infected human populations. From these findings and the evidence of previous investigations it is concluded that in southern Iraq, and particularly in Basra, B. truncatus has been demonstrated with difficulty, if at all. Nevertheless, transmission has continued to take place. Explanations of this apparent phenomenon are discussed and it is concluded that populations of B. truncatus may be completely absent for several years and that other snail genera may play a role in transmitting the disease. A study of environmental factors indicates that water velocities, salinity, turbidity, and pH in the endemic and non-endemic areas showed no significant differences, but that the continuous change in water flow may be a factor limiting B. truncatus colonization. It is also concluded that the salinity in the Shatt al Arab River originates from Lake Hammar and is not introduced from the Persian Gulf by tidal wave, as has been previously believed. PMID:14478047

  19. A new species of Amphitecna (Bignoniaceae) endemic to Chiapas, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, Andres Ernesto; Burelo Ramos, Carlos Manuel; Gomez-Dominguez, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Amphitecna loreae Ortiz-Rodr. & Burelo, sp. nov. (Bignoniaceae), a new species endemic to the karst rainforest in southern Mexico, is described and illustrated. The new species differs from the other species of Amphitecna by the combination of cauliflorous inflorescences, larger flowers, buds rounded at apex, and globose-ellipsoid rather than acuminate fruits. A key to the Mexican species of Amphitecna is presented.

  20. Endemic Mimosa species from Mexico prefer alphaproteobacterial rhizobial symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontemps, Cyril; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Wiechmann, Anja; Mussabekova, Assel; Moody, Sarah; Simon, Marcelo F; Moulin, Lionel; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Lacercat-Didier, Laurence; Dasilva, Cindy; Grether, Rosaura; Camargo-Ricalde, Sara L; Chen, Weimin; Sprent, Janet I; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Young, J Peter W; James, Euan K

    2016-01-01

    The legume genus Mimosa has > 500 species, with two major centres of diversity, Brazil (c. 350 spp.) and Mexico (c. 100 spp.). In Brazil most species are nodulated by Burkholderia. Here we asked whether this is also true of native and endemic Mexican species. We have tested this apparent affinity for betaproteobacteria by examining the symbionts of native and endemic species of Mimosa in Mexico, especially from the central highlands where Mimosa spp. have diversified. Nodules were tested for betaproteobacteria using in situ immunolocalization. Rhizobia isolated from the nodules were genetically characterized and tested for their ability to nodulate Mimosa spp. Immunological analysis of 25 host taxa suggested that most (including all the highland endemics) were not nodulated by betaproteobacteria. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, recA, nodA, nodC and nifH genes from 87 strains isolated from 20 taxa confirmed that the endemic Mexican Mimosa species favoured alphaproteobacteria in the genera Rhizobium and Ensifer: this was confirmed by nodulation tests. Host phylogeny, geographic isolation and coevolution with symbionts derived from very different soils have potentially contributed to the striking difference in the choice of symbiotic partners by Mexican and Brazilian Mimosa species. PMID:26214613