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Sample records for burst suppression level

  1. Using the nonlinear control of anaesthesia-induced hypersensitivity of EEG at burst suppression level to test the effects of radiofrequency radiation on brain function

    OpenAIRE

    Lipping, Tarmo; Rorarius, Michael; Jäntti, Ville; Annala, Kari; Mennander, Ari; Ferenets, Rain; Toivonen, Tommi; Toivo, Tim; Värri, Alpo; Korpinen, Leena

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study, investigating the effects of mobile phone radiation on test animals, eleven pigs were anaesthetised to the level where burst-suppression pattern appears in the electroencephalogram (EEG). At this level of anaesthesia both human subjects and animals show high sensitivity to external stimuli which produce EEG bursts during suppression. The burst-suppression phenomenon represents a nonlinear control system, where low-amplitude EEG abruptly switches to very high amplitud...

  2. The mesoscopic modelling of burst suppression during anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eLiley

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The burst suppression pattern is well recognised as a distinct featureof the mammalian electroencephalogram (EEG waveform. Consisting ofalternating periods of high amplitude oscillatory and isoelectricactivity It can be induced in health by deep anaesthesia as well asbeing evoked by a range of pathophysiological processes that includecoma and anoxia. While the electroencephalographic phenomenon andclinical implications of burst suppression have been studiedextensively, the physiological mechanisms underlying its emergenceremain unresolved and obscure.Because electroencephalographic bursting phenomenologically resemblesthe bursting observed in single neurons, it would be reasonable toassume that the theoretical insights developed to understand burstingat the cellular (``microscopic'' level would enable insights into thedynamical genesis of bursting at the level of the whole brain(``macroscopic''. In general action potential bursting is the resultof the interplay of two time scales: a fast time scale responsible forspiking, and a slow time scale that modulates such activity. Wetherefore hypothesise that such fast-slow systems dynamically underpinelectroencephalographic bursting. Here we show that a well known mean field dynamical model of theelectroencephalogram, the Liley model, while unable to produce burstsuppression unmodified, is able to give rise to a wide variety ofburst-like activity by the addition of one or more slow systemsmodulating model parameters speculated to be major ``targets'' foranaesthetic action. The development of a physiologically plausibletheoretical framework to account for burst suppression will lead to amore complete physiological understanding of the EEG and themechanisms that serve to modify ongoing brain activity necessary forpurposeful behaviour and consciousness.

  3. The Etiology and Outcome Analysis of Neonatal Burst Suppression EEG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lian; ZHOU Yanxia; XU Sanqing

    2007-01-01

    The neonatal burst suppression is a severe EEG pattern and always demonstrates serious damage of nerve system. But the outcome of these patients depends on the different etiology. A total of 256 cases of video EEG recordings were analyzed in order to summarize the etiology and outcome of burst suppression. The results showed that some patients in all 17 cases of burst suppression showed EEG improvement. The etiology was the dominant factor in long term outcome. It was sug-gested that effective video EEG monitoring is helpful for etiologic study and prognosis evaluation.

  4. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo eBojak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG is a well described phenomenon that occurs during deep anaesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterisation as a ``global brain state'' has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that burst suppression activity is highly asynchronous across cortex, but also that it may occur in isolated regions of circumscribed spatial extent. Here we outline a realistic neural field model for burst suppression by adding a slow process of synaptic resource depletion and recovery, which is able to reproduce qualitatively the empirically observed features during general anaesthesia at the whole cortex level. Simulations reveal heterogeneous bursting over the model cortex and complex spatiotemporal dynamics during simulated anaesthetic action, and provide forward predictions of neuroimaging signals for subsequent empirical comparisons and more detailed characterisation.Because burst suppression corresponds to a dynamical end-point of brain activity, theoretically accounting for its spatiotemporal emergence will vitally contribute to efforts aimed at clarifying whether a common physiological trajectory is induced by the actions of general anaesthetic agents. We have taken a first step in this direction by showing that a neural field model can qualitatively match recent experimental data that indicate spatial differentiation of burst suppression activity across cortex.

  5. Burst suppression in sleep in a routine outpatient EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Kheder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS is an electroencephalogram (EEG pattern that is characterized by brief bursts of spikes, sharp waves, or slow waves of relatively high amplitude alternating with periods of relatively flat EEG or isoelectric periods. The pattern is usually associated with coma, severe encephalopathy of various etiologies, or general anesthesia. We describe an unusual case of anoxic brain injury in which a BS pattern was seen during behaviorally defined sleep during a routine outpatient EEG study.

  6. Burst-suppression pattern in the electroencephalogram of newborns and infants. Its clinical expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Blanco Jorge Mauricio

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Burst-suppression pattern in the electroencephalogram (EEG is associated with severe brain damage and has a bad prognosis in 85% of the cases. Objectives. To identify the prevalence of the EEG burst-suppression pattern (BSP in fullterm newborns and infants, determine its etiol- ogy, clinical features and course. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 4,891 EEGs were reviewed. The EEGs of newborns and infants (< 3 months of age with BSP were selected. Results. 11 cases identified with burst suppression pattern. The overall prevalence of which was 3.5%; 8.1% among the newborns and 1.2% among infants. Seizures were the main reason for doing an EEG in the newborn period in 7 patients and after day 28 in three. The clinical manifestations were abnormal level of consciousness (n=8, hypotonia (n=2, and spasticity (n=6. The main causes were hypoxic ischemic injury, stroke and kernicterus. There were two cases of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy. Two patients died before the third month of age; 8 survived an average of 13 months. All had epilepsy, neurologic retardation and disability. Two patients had persistent EEG burst-suppression pattern; 1 and 3 months after the neonatal period respectively; 7 had focal spikes and an asymmetric pattern. Conclusions. Electroencephalographic burst-suppression pat- tern predicts a severe neurologic injury in fullterm newborns and infants.

  7. Robust control of burst suppression for medical coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westover, M. Brandon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Medical coma is an anesthetic-induced state of brain inactivation, manifest in the electroencephalogram by burst suppression. Feedback control can be used to regulate burst suppression, however, previous designs have not been robust. Robust control design is critical under real-world operating conditions, subject to substantial pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameter uncertainty and unpredictable external disturbances. We sought to develop a robust closed-loop anesthesia delivery (CLAD) system to control medical coma. Approach. We developed a robust CLAD system to control the burst suppression probability (BSP). We developed a novel BSP tracking algorithm based on realistic models of propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We also developed a practical method for estimating patient-specific pharmacodynamics parameters. Finally, we synthesized a robust proportional integral controller. Using a factorial design spanning patient age, mass, height, and gender, we tested whether the system performed within clinically acceptable limits. Throughout all experiments we subjected the system to disturbances, simulating treatment of refractory status epilepticus in a real-world intensive care unit environment. Main results. In 5400 simulations, CLAD behavior remained within specifications. Transient behavior after a step in target BSP from 0.2 to 0.8 exhibited a rise time (the median (min, max)) of 1.4 [1.1, 1.9] min; settling time, 7.8 [4.2, 9.0] min; and percent overshoot of 9.6 [2.3, 10.8]%. Under steady state conditions the CLAD system exhibited a median error of 0.1 [-0.5, 0.9]%; inaccuracy of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; oscillation index of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; and maximum instantaneous propofol dose of 4.3 [2.1, 10.5] mg kg-1. The maximum hourly propofol dose was 4.3 [2.1, 10.3] mg kg-1 h-1. Performance fell within clinically acceptable limits for all measures. Significance. A CLAD system designed using robust control theory achieves clinically acceptable

  8. Hanging-induced burst suppression pattern in EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgun Cinar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lethal suspension (hanging is one of the most common methods of attempting suicide. Spinal fractures, cognitive and motor deficits as well as epileptic seizures can be detected after unsuccessful hanging attempts. Introduced here is the case of a 25-year-old man exemplifying the clinical observations stated hereafter, who was conveyed to our emergency room after having survived attempted suicide by hanging, with his post-anoxic burst-suppression electroencephalography (BS-EEG pattern and clinical diagnoses in the post-comatose stage. The patient′s state of consciousness was gradually improved over a period of time. His neuropsychiatric assessment proved that memory deficit, a slight lack of attention and minor executive dysfunction was observed a month after the patient was discharged. Although the BS-EEG pattern indicates severe brain dysfunction, it is a poor prognostic factor; rarely, patients survive with minor cognitive deficits and can perform their normal daily activities.

  9. X-ray suppression in gamma-ray bursts through resonant Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray that scatters with an electron in the first Landau level of a strong magnetic field is converted into a gamma ray. This process has a resonant cross section at X-ray energies and is therefore highly likely to occur even when the first Landau level is sparsely populated. Converted X-rays are cyclotron absorbed, maintaining the equilibrium between the cyclotron photon density and the population of the first Landau level. By suppressing a neutron star's black body emission, this mechanism can produce a gamma-ray burst with a low X-ray flux.

  10. On-off control of burst high frequency electrical stimulation to suppress 4-AP induced seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia-Chu; Lin, Chou-Ching K.; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2013-06-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to investigate, using model simulations and animal experiments, the efficiency and the side effects of burst high frequency stimulation combined with on-off control in seizure suppression. Approach. A modified mathematical hippocampal seizure model was created to provide evidence of the eligibility of this approach. In the experimental setup, two recording electrodes were inserted into bilateral septal CA1 of the hippocampus, and a stimulation electrode was placed on the ventral hippocampal commissure of a rat. After seizures had been induced by 4-aminopyridine treatment, on-off control stimulation was used to suppress the seizures at 20 s intervals. The stimulation time, cumulative charge and post-stimulation suppression were used to assess the effects of burst duration. Main results. The results showed that burst stimulation could suppress the seizures during the control period and burst stimulation of a shorter duration could keep the seizure suppressed with less effort. By decreasing the burst duration, the cumulative stimulation time became shorter, the delivered cumulative charge became lower, and the cumulative time of post-stimulation suppression became longer. Significance. The on-off control stimulation not only prolonged the duration of suppression but also avoided the side effects of the conversion of seizure patterns. In particular, decreasing the specified burst duration increased the efficiency of the burst stimulation.

  11. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bojak, Ingo; Stoyanov, Zhivko V.; Liley, David T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is a well-described phenomenon that occurs during deep anesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterization as a “global brain state” has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that burst ...

  12. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ingo eBojak; Zhivko Veselinov Stoyanov; David eLiley

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is a well described phenomenon that occurs during deep anaesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterisation as a ``global brain state'' has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that bu...

  13. Suppression of the Early Optical Afterglow of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Roming, P W A; Fox, D B; Zhang, B; Liang, E; Mason, K O; Rol, E; Burrows, D N; Blustin, A J; Boyd, P T; Brown, P; Holland, S T; McGowan, K; Landsman, W B; Page, K L; Rhoads, J E; Rosen, S R; Barthelmy, S D; Breeveld, A A; Cucchiara, A; De Pasquale, M; Fenimore, E E; Gehrels, N; Gronwall, C; Grupe, D; Goad, M R; Ivanushkina, M; James, C; Kennea, J A; Kobayashi, S; Mangano, V; Mészáros, P; Morgan, A N; Nousek, J A; Osborne, J P; Palmer, D M; Poole, T; Still, M D; Tagliaferri, G; Zane, S

    2005-01-01

    Recent observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are providing prompt few-arcminute gamma-ray localizations, rapid few-arcsecond X-ray positions, and rapid and extensive follow-up in the X-ray, UV, optical, and radio bands. Thirteen of these bursts include extraordinary optical upper limits at very early epochs after the burst, in marked contrast to the bright optical flashes previously believed to be the norm. Although host extinction can explain the properties of some bursts, and the natural range of burst energies and distances can explain some others, comparison of our optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray data sets reveals that these considerations alone cannot explain the full diversity of the burst population. Instead, one or more mechanisms must act to suppress the optical flash and provide a significantly enhanced efficiency of the prompt gamma-ray emission for some bursts. One possibility is that a fraction of the burst population is powered by Poynting flux-dominated outflows, resulting in a very inefficient...

  14. The bacterial effector HopM1 suppresses PAMP-triggered oxidative burst and stomatal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Bourdais, Gildas; He, Sheng Yang; Robatzek, Silke

    2014-04-01

    Successful pathogens counter immunity at multiple levels, mostly through the action of effectors. Pseudomonas syringae secretes c. 30 effectors, some of which have been shown to inhibit plant immunity triggered upon perception of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). One of these is HopM1, which impairs late immune responses through targeting the vesicle trafficking-related AtMIN7 for degradation. Here, we report that in planta expressed HopM1 suppresses two early PAMP-triggered responses, the oxidative burst and stomatal immunity, both of which seem to require proteasomal function but are independent of AtMIN7. Notably, a 14-3-3 protein, GRF8/AtMIN10, was found previously to be a target of HopM1 in vivo, and expression of HopM1 mimics the effect of chemically and genetically disrupting 14-3-3 function. Our data further show that the function of 14-3-3 proteins is required for PAMP-triggered oxidative burst and stomatal immunity, and chemical-mediated disruption of the 14-3-3 interactions with their client proteins restores virulence of a HopM1-deficient P. syringae mutant, providing a link between HopM1 and the involvement of 14-3-3 proteins in plant immunity. Taken together, these results unveil the impact of HopM1 on the PAMP-triggered oxidative burst and stomatal immunity in an AtMIN7-independent manner, most likely acting at the function of (a) 14-3-3 protein(s). PMID:24372399

  15. Entropy of the EEG in transition to burst suppression in deep anesthesia: Surrogate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anier, Andres; Lipping, Tarmo; Jantti, Ville; Puumala, Pasi; Huotari, Ari-Matti

    2010-01-01

    In this paper 5 methods for the assessment of signal entropy are compared in their capability to follow the changes in the EEG signal during transition from continuous EEG to burst suppression in deep anesthesia. To study the sensitivity of the measures to phase information in the signal, phase randomization as well as amplitude adjusted surrogates are also analyzed. We show that the selection of algorithm parameters and the use of normalization are important issues in interpretation and comparison of the results. We also show that permutation entropy is the most sensitive to phase information among the studied measures and that the EEG signal during high amplitude delta activity in deep anesthesia is of highly nonlinear nature. PMID:21095969

  16. Induction of burst suppression or coma using intravenous anesthetics in refractory status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bong Su; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Shin, Jeong-Won; Moon, Jang Sup; Byun, Jung-Ick; Lim, Jung-Ah; Moon, Hye Jin; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2015-05-01

    General anesthetic-induced coma therapy has been recommended for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus (RSE). However, the influence of electroencephalographic (EEG) burst suppression (BS) on outcomes still remains unclear. This study investigated the impact of intravenous anesthetic-induced BS on the prognosis of RSE using a retrospective analysis of all consecutive adult patients who received intravenous anesthetic treatment for RSE at the Seoul National University Hospital between January 2006 and June 2011. Twenty-two of the 111 episodes of RSE were enrolled in this study. Of the 22 RSE patients, 12 (54.5%) were women and 18 (81.4%) exhibited generalized convulsive status epilepticus. Sixteen patients (72.7%) were classified as having acute symptomatic etiology, including three patients with anoxic encephalopathy, and others with remote symptomatic etiology. Only two patients (9.1%) had a favorable Status Epilepticus Severity Score (0-2) at admission. All patients received midazolam (MDZ) as a primary intravenous anesthetic drug for RSE treatment; three (13.6%) received MDZ and propofol, and one (4.5%) received MDZ and pentobarbital. The rates of mortality and poor outcome at discharge were 13.6% (n=3) and 54.5% (n=12), respectively. While BS was achieved in six (27.5%) patients, it was not associated with mortality or poor outcome. Induced BS was associated with prolonged hospital stay in subgroup analysis when excluding anoxic encephalopathy. Our results suggest that induction of BS for treating RSE did not affect mortality or outcome at discharge and may lead to an increased length of hospital stay.

  17. Interleukin-10 inhibits burst-forming unit-erythroid growth by suppression of endogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production from T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, L; Kollars, M; Bohle, B; Berer, A; Reiter, E; Lechner, K; Geissler, K

    1999-02-01

    Numerous cytokines released from accessory cells have been shown to exert either stimulatory or inhibitory growth signals on burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) growth. Because of its cytokine synthesis-inhibiting effects on T cells and monocytes, interleukin-10 (IL-10) may be a potential candidate for indirectly affecting erythropoiesis. We investigated the effects of IL-10 on BFU-E growth from normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using a clonogenic progenitor cell assay. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to cultures containing recombinant human erythropoietin suppressed BFU-E growth in a dose-dependent manner (by 55.2%, range 47.3-63.3%, p cultivating highly enriched CD34+ cells. BFU-E growth from PBMC also was markedly suppressed in the presence of a neutralizing anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibody (by 48.7%, range 32.9-61.2% inhibition,p < 0.01), but not by neutralizing antibodies against granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-3. This suggests a stimulatory role of endogenously released GM-CSF on BFU-E formation. Also, the addition of exogenous GM-CSF completely restored IL-10-induced suppression of BFU-E growth. To determine the cellular source of GM-CSF production, we analyzed GM-CSF levels in suspension cultures containing PBMC that were either depleted of monocytes or T cells. Monocyte-depleted PBMC showed spontaneous production of increasing amounts of GM-CSF on days 3, 5, and 7, respectively, which could be suppressed by IL-10, whereas GM-CSF levels did not increase in cultures containing T-cell-depleted PBMC. Our data indicate that IL-10 inhibits the growth of erythroid progenitor cells in vitro, most likely by suppression of endogenous GM-CSF production from T cells.

  18. Transcriptional Bursting Explains the Noise–Versus–Mean Relationship in mRNA and Protein Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Roy D.; Shaffer, Sydney M.; Singh, Abhyudai; Razooky, Brandon S.; Simpson, Michael L.; Raj, Arjun; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis demonstrates that the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (HIV LTR) promoter exhibits a range of possible transcriptional burst sizes and frequencies for any mean-expression level. However, these results have also been interpreted as demonstrating that cell-to-cell expression variability (noise) and mean are uncorrelated, a significant deviation from previous results. Here, we re-examine the available mRNA and protein abundance data for the HIV LTR and find that noise in mRNA and protein expression scales inversely with the mean along analytically predicted transcriptional burst-size manifolds. We then experimentally perturb transcriptional activity to test a prediction of the multiple burst-size model: that increasing burst frequency will cause mRNA noise to decrease along given burst-size lines as mRNA levels increase. The data show that mRNA and protein noise decrease as mean expression increases, supporting the canonical inverse correlation between noise and mean. PMID:27467384

  19. DEMETER observations of bursty MF emissions and their relation to ground-level auroral MF burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, M. C.; LaBelle, J.; Parrot, M.

    2014-12-01

    A survey of medium frequency (MF) electric field data from selected orbits of the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquakes (DEMETER) spacecraft reveals 68 examples of a new type of bursty MF emissions occurring at high latitudes associated with auroral phenomena. These resemble auroral MF burst, a natural radio emission observed at ground level near local substorm onsets. Similar to MF burst, the bursty MF waves observed by DEMETER have broadband, impulsive frequency structure covering 1.5-3.0 MHz, amplitudes of 50-100 μV/m, an overall occurrence rate of ˜0.76% with higher occurrence during active times, and strong correlation with auroral hiss. The magnetic local time distribution of the MF waves observed by DEMETER shows peak occurrence rate near 18 MLT, somewhat earlier than the equivalent peak in the occurrence rate of ground level MF burst, though propagation effects and differences in the latitudes sampled by the two techniques may explain this discrepancy. Analysis of solar wind and SuperMAG data suggests that while the bursty MF waves observed by DEMETER are associated with enhanced auroral activity, their coincidence with substorm onset may not be as exact as that of ground level MF burst. One conjunction occurs in which MF burst is observed at Churchill, Manitoba, within 8 min of MF emissions detected by DEMETER on field lines approximately 1000 km southeast of Churchill. These observations may plausibly be associated with the same auroral event detected by ground level magnetometers at several Canadian observatories. Although it is uncertain, the balance of the evidence suggests that the bursty MF waves observed with DEMETER are the same phenomenon as the ground level MF burst. Hence, theories of MF burst generation in the ionosphere, such as beam-generated Langmuir waves excited over a range of altitudes or strong Langmuir turbulence generating a range of frequencies within a narrow altitude range, need to be revisited to

  20. Suitable level of suppression in Pinus sylvestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagner, Mats

    1999-10-01

    It is `well known` among Swedish foresters that pine trees need light and cannot grow suppressed. It is also `well known` that old trees that have grown slowly are unable to react with good growth. However, these facts can be questioned in the light of new research as it has been found that thinning reaction is not correlated with age. It is also well known that the commercial value of a pine is closely related to the growth at young age. If the first 20 annual rings close to pith are wide (>3 mm) the log cannot be accepted as first class. This is related to number and size of branches on the young tree and to the features of the juvenile wood. This is to say that a pine must not grow fast when it is small and if this has happened it cannot be cured by artificial debranching or by growing the tree slowly at higher age. Accordingly, young pines should be grown under bigger trees that in their young age were grown under big trees, and so on. Today, when clear cutting is the dominating forest management system, the only way to obtain high quality pine trees is to start the rotation age with stands of very high density. This is of course a very expensive way as dense planting, followed by intensive thinning requires a lot of input. However, if pine is a pioneer species and cannot be grown in multistoried stands, then the economic solution is not present. This was the reason why the annual increment of three pines was measured. They were selected because their different growth pattern showed that old `well known facts` should be revised Working papers 139. 3 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  1. Endogenous activation of adenosine A1 receptors promotes post-ischemic electrocortical burst suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilie, A; Ciocan, D; Constantinescu, A O;

    2009-01-01

    -vessel occlusion" model under chloral hydrate anesthesia. Quantification of BS recovery was carried out using BS ratio. During GCI full electrocortical suppression was attained (BS ratio reached 100%). During the following reperfusion the BS ratio returned to 0. The time course of the decay was exponential after 1...... and 5-min GCI and bi-exponential after 10-min GCI. The BS recovery was progressively delayed with the duration of ischemia. Administration of the A1R antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX, 1.25 mg/kg i.p.) accelerated the post-ischemic BS recovery for all GCI durations. Following the 10...... of post-ischemic BS patterns following brief ischemic episodes. It is likely that synaptic depression by post-ischemic A1R activation functionally disrupts the connectivity within the cortical networks to an extent that promotes BS patterns....

  2. Principal Component Analysis and Gabortransform in analysing burst-suppression EEG under propofol anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laeven, R.; Gielen, C.C.A.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Rijn, C.M. van

    2001-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) can be used in a variety of fields to examine the state and the dynamics of the human brain. The normal states of vigilance such as sleep and wakefulness but also system disorders such as epilepsy and brain damage, as well as abnormal levels of vigilance such as coma a

  3. Vanillin suppresses Kupffer cell-related colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity in isolated perfused rat liver: anti-inflammatory implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, José E; Núñez, Bárbara; Videla, Luis A

    2012-12-01

    The inhibition of NADPH oxidase has become a potential therapeutic target for oxidative stress-related diseases. We investigated whether vanillin modifies hepatic O(2) consumption associated with Kupffer cell functioning. The influence of vanillin on Kupffer cell functioning was studied in isolated perfused rat liver by colloidal carbon (CC) infusion (0.5 mg ml(-1)), concomitantly with sinusoidal efflux of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as an organ viability parameter. CC infusion increased the rate of O(2) consumption of the liver above basal values, an effect that represents the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells. However, CC-dependent respiratory burst activity was suppressed by previous infusion of 2 mM vanillin. Vanillin did not affect the liver CC uptake rate and liver sinusoidal efflux of LDH efflux. These findings, elicited by vanillin, were reproduced by the well-established NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. In conclusion, vanillin suppresses the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells as assessed in intact liver, which may be associated with the inhibition of macrophage NADPH oxidase activity. Such a finding may have relevance in conditions underlying Kupffer cell-dependent up-regulation of the expression and release of pro-inflammatory mediators by redox-dependent mechanisms.

  4. A 2-center Comparative Study on Tonic Versus Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation: Amount of Responders and Amount of Pain Suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, D.M.D.; Lenders, M.W.P.M.; Vos, de C.C.; Dijkstra-Scholten, C.R.N.; Wolters, R.R.N.; Vancamp, T.P.T.; Van Looy, P.R.N.; Van Havenbergh, T.M.D.; Vanneste, S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spinal cord stimulation is a safe and effective procedure applied for medically intractable neuropathic pain and failed back surgery syndrome. Recently, a novel stimulation paradigm was developed, called burst stimulation consisting of intermittent packets of closely spaced high-freque

  5. Observation of gamma ray bursts at ground level under the thunderclouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Y.; Oguri, S.; Kato, Y.; Nakata, R.; Inoue, Y.; Ito, C.; Minowa, M.

    2016-07-01

    We observed three γ-ray bursts related to thunderclouds in winter using the prototype of anti-neutrino detector PANDA made of 360-kg plastic scintillator deployed at Ohi Power Station at the coastal area of the Japan Sea. The maximum rate of the events which deposited the energy higher than 3 MeV was (5.5 ± 0.1) ×102 /s. Monte Carlo simulation showed that electrons with approximately monochromatic energy falling downwards from altitudes of order 100 m roughly produced the observed total energy spectra of the bursts. It is supposed that secondary cosmic-ray electrons, which act as seed, were accelerated in electric field of thunderclouds and multiplied by relativistic runaway electron avalanche. We actually found that the γ-rays of the bursts entered into the detector from the direction close to the zenith. The direction stayed constant during the burst within the detector resolution. In addition, taking advantage of the delayed coincidence detection of the detector, we found neutron events in one of the bursts at the maximum rate of ∼ 14 ± 5 /s.

  6. Observation of gamma ray bursts at ground level under the thunderclouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Y; Kato, Y; Nakata, R; Inoue, Y; Ito, C; Minowa, M

    2016-01-01

    We observed three $\\gamma$-ray bursts related to thunderclouds in winter using the prototype of anti-neutrino detector PANDA made of 360-kg plastic scintillator deployed at Ohi Power Station at the coastal area of the Japan Sea. The maximum rate of the events which deposited the energy higher than 3 MeV was $(5.5 \\pm 0.1) \\times 10^2 {\\rm /s}$. Monte Carlo simulation showed that the observed total energy spectra of the bursts are well described by the bremsstrahlung $\\gamma$-rays by electrons with approximately monochromatic energy falling downwards from altitudes of order $100\\,$m. It is supposed that secondary cosmic-ray electrons, which act as seed, were accelerated in electric field of thunderclouds and multiplied by relativistic runaway electron avalanche. We actually found that the $\\gamma$-rays of the bursts entered into the detector from the direction close to the zenith. The direction stayed constant during the burst within the detector resolution. In addition, taking advantage of the delayed coincid...

  7. Polarization enhancement and suppression of four-wave mixing in multi-Zeeman levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiguo Wang; Yuxin Fu; Yue Song; Guoxian Dai; Feng Wen; Jinyan Zhao; Yanpeng Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Polarization dependence of the enhancement and suppression of four-wave mixing(FWM) in a multiZeeman level atomic system is investigated both theoretically and experimentally.A dressing field applied to the adjacent transition can cause energy level splitting.Therefore,it can control the enhancement and suppression of the FWM processes in the system due to the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency.The results show that the pumping beams with different polarizations select the transitions between different Zeeman levels that,in turn,affect the enhancement and suppression efficiencies of FWM.

  8. Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  9. Low-level gamma spectrometry using beta coincidence and Compton suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorescu, E L; De Felice, P; Razdolescu, Anamaria-Cristina; Luca, A

    2004-01-01

    A low-level gamma-ray spectrometry system was developed using a Ge(Li) detector with 6% relative efficiency coupled to a 2pi beta plastic detector for coincidence selection and a massive NaI(Tl) detector for Compton suppression. The integral background count rate for (50-1500)keV was 0.5 s(-1)kg(-1) (Ge), using only beta coincidences. With Compton suppression, a value of 0.25 s(-1)kg(-1) (Ge) was obtained. Spectra with and without Compton suppression were studied for 60Co, 137Cs and 152Eu point sources. Considerations are made concerning the Compton suppression advantages in different situations. PMID:15177343

  10. Fluctuation level bursts in a model of internal transport barrier formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of internal transport barriers (ITB) is developed that, in addition to the typical features of ITB models (the phase transition character with a power threshold, barrier front propagation, etc.), exhibits an oscillatory/bursty behavior close to the transition. This behavior comes from the competition between the driving and suppression mechanisms for the turbulence. The onset of the oscillations has a power threshold, Posc, below the power threshold for the transition to the enhanced confinement regime, Pth. In the calculations, Posc∼0.5Pth. This suggests that the oscillations avoid an early transition at Pth=Posc, so any mechanism that eliminates the oscillations may lower the transition power. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  11. Cross-Circulating Current Suppression Method for Parallel Three-Phase Two-Level Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Baoze; Guerrero, Josep M.; Guo, Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    The parallel architecture is very popular for power inverters to increase the power level. This paper presents a method for the parallel operation of inverters in an ac-distributed system, to suppress the cross-circulating current based on virtual impedance without current-sharing bus and communi......The parallel architecture is very popular for power inverters to increase the power level. This paper presents a method for the parallel operation of inverters in an ac-distributed system, to suppress the cross-circulating current based on virtual impedance without current-sharing bus...

  12. Research on Acceleration Disturbance Suppression for Dynamic Detection of Level Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Linxia; Zhang, Fuxue

    The paper presents a new method to eliminate acceleration disturbance in level attitude measurement and control of moving carrier. Output signals of micro-machined inclinometer and gyroscope are analyzed in different states of moving carrier by experimental simulation, results show that gyroscope almost keeps the zero output voltage while inclinometer outputs in significant fluctuations. With the analysis results, a new method on acceleration disturbance suppression is developed base on a combination of inclinometers and gyroscopes, which includes establishment and derivation of its mathematical model and implementation, and an algorithm software design. Finally, tests to the acceleration disturbance suppression effect are demonstrated in line motion, line vibration, angular motion and angular motion plus pitch swing. Experimental results show that the method achieves its expected effect. The inertial system constitutes of inclinometers and gyros interacting with acceleration disturbance suppression method can dynamic detect the level attitude of moving carrier.

  13. The Impact of Promoting Transcription on Early Text Production: Effects on Bursts and Pauses, Levels of Written Language, and Writing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Rui A.; Limpo, Teresa; Fidalgo, Raquel; Carvalhais, Lénia; Pereira, Luísa Álvares; Castro, São Luís

    2016-01-01

    Writing development seems heavily dependent upon the automatization of transcription. This study aimed to further investigate the link between transcription and writing by examining the effects of promoting handwriting and spelling skills on a comprehensive set of writing measures (viz., bursts and pauses, levels of written language, and writing…

  14. Ventilation rates and activity levels of juvenile jumbo squid under metabolic suppression in the oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trübenbach, Katja; Pegado, Maria R; Seibel, Brad A; Rosa, Rui

    2013-02-01

    The Humboldt (jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is a part-time resident of the permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and, thereby, it encounters oxygen levels below its critical oxygen partial pressure. To better understand the ventilatory mechanisms that accompany the process of metabolic suppression in these top oceanic predators, we exposed juvenile D. gigas to the oxygen levels found in the OMZ (1% O(2), 1 kPa, 10 °C) and measured metabolic rate, activity cycling patterns, swimming mode, escape jet (burst) frequency, mantle contraction frequency and strength, stroke volume and oxygen extraction efficiency. In normoxia, metabolic rate varied between 14 and 29 μmol O(2) g(-1) wet mass h(-1), depending on the level of activity. The mantle contraction frequency and strength were linearly correlated and increased significantly with activity level. Additionally, an increase in stroke volume and ventilatory volume per minute was observed, followed by a mantle hyperinflation process during high activity periods. Squid metabolic rate dropped more than 75% during exposure to hypoxia. Maximum metabolic rate was not achieved under such conditions and the metabolic scope was significantly decreased. Hypoxia changed the relationship between mantle contraction strength and frequency from linear to polynomial with increasing activity, indicating that, under hypoxic conditions, the jumbo squid primarily increases the strength of mantle contraction and does not regulate its frequency. Under hypoxia, jumbo squid also showed a larger inflation period (reduced contraction frequency) and decreased relaxed mantle diameter (shortened diffusion pathway), which optimize oxygen extraction efficiency (up to 82%/34%, without/with consideration of 60% potential skin respiration). Additionally, they breathe 'deeply', with more powerful contractions and enhanced stroke volume. This deep-breathing behavior allows them to display a stable ventilatory volume per

  15. Is suppression of bone formation during simulated weightlessness related to glucocorticoid levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey-Holton, E. R.; Bomalaski, M. D.; Enayati-Gordon, E.; Gonsalves, M. R.; Wronski, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that suppression of bone formation in the suspended rat model was the result of increased levels of corticosterone, experiments were performed on young, growing, male rats exposed either to 4 C or suspended for two weeks. Rats suspended on the model system, designed to simulate certain aspects of spaceflight, gained weight at a rate at least equal to control animals but still showed a significant suppression of bone formation within 7 days. Cold-exposed rats gained less weight than their corresponding control group and did not demonstrate any suppression of bone formation. These findings suggest: (1) tail suspension is less stressful than previously used harness systems; (2) suspension in young, rapidly growing rats causes a significant suppression of cortical bone formation; (3) cold exposure does not alter bone formation rate in rats of a similar age and strain to those suspended in this study; and (4) suppression of bone formation provoked by unloading the rear limbs is not due solely to sustained stimulation of the pituitary-adrenal system.

  16. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) suppresses ghrelin levels in humans via increased insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Dirk; Holst, Jens Juul; Gethmann, Arnica;

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide predominantly secreted by the stomach. Ghrelin plasma levels rise before meal ingestion and sharply decline afterwards, but the mechanisms controlling ghrelin secretion are largely unknown. Since meal ingestion also elicits the secretion...... ghrelin levels 150 and 360 min after meal ingestion (plevels of insulin and C-peptide. CONCLUSIONS: GLP-1 reduces the rise in ghrelin levels in the late...... postprandial period at supraphysiological plasma levels. Most likely, these effects are indirectly mediated through its insulinotropic action. The GLP-1-induced suppression of ghrelin secretion might be involved in its anorexic effects....

  17. Nuclear EMP: voltage clamping levels for several TransZorb transient suppression devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voltage clamping levels for the 1N5629A, 1N5545A, 1N5654A, and 1N5664A TransZorb/sup T.M./ silicon transient-suppression devices in a DO-13 package are presented as data in photographs of test waveforms. A graph is compiled which illustrates the clamping voltage at a time point of 80 nsec for each of the devices. The duration of the test pulse was 250 nsec with a slope of 4 kV per nsec for the rise portion. Clamping levels are nearly constant for test current amplitudes of up to 120 A

  18. Introduction to Optical Burst Switching

    OpenAIRE

    KERNÁCS János; SZILÁGYI Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    Optical Burst Switching (OBS) isconsidered a popular switching paradigm for therealization of all-optical networks due to the balance itoffers between the coarse-grained Optical CircuitSwitching (OSC) and fine-grained Optical PacketSwitching (OPS). Given that the data are switched allopticallyat the burst level, Optical Burst Switchingcombines the transparency of Optical CircuitSwitching with the benefits of statistical multiplexingin Optical Packet Switching.

  19. Different levels of Ih determine distinct temporal integration in bursting and regular-spiking neurons in rat subiculum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. van Welie; M.W.H. Remme; J.A. van Hooft; W.J. Wadman

    2006-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in the subiculum typically display either bursting or regular-spiking behaviour. Although this classification into two neuronal classes is well described, it is unknown how these two classes of neurons contribute to the integration of input to the subiculum. Here, we report that bu

  20. Rice Bran Amendment Suppresses Potato Common Scab by Increasing Antagonistic Bacterial Community Levels in the Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomihama, Tsuyoshi; Nishi, Yatsuka; Mori, Kiyofumi; Shirao, Tsukasa; Iida, Toshiya; Uzuhashi, Shihomi; Ohkuma, Moriya; Ikeda, Seishi

    2016-07-01

    Potato common scab (PCS), caused by pathogenic Streptomyces spp., is a serious disease in potato production worldwide. Cultural practices, such as optimizing the soil pH and irrigation, are recommended but it is often difficult to establish stable disease reductions using these methods. Traditionally, local farmers in southwest Japan have amended soils with rice bran (RB) to suppress PCS. However, the scientific mechanism underlying disease suppression by RB has not been elucidated. The present study showed that RB amendment reduced PCS by repressing the pathogenic Streptomyces population in young tubers. Amplicon sequencing analyses of 16S ribosomal RNA genes from the rhizosphere microbiome revealed that RB amendment dramatically changed bacterial composition and led to an increase in the relative abundance of gram-positive bacteria such as Streptomyces spp., and this was negatively correlated with PCS disease severity. Most actinomycete isolates derived from the RB-amended soil showed antagonistic activity against pathogenic Streptomyces scabiei and S. turgidiscabies on R2A medium. Some of the Streptomyces isolates suppressed PCS when they were inoculated onto potato plants in a field experiment. These results suggest that RB amendment increases the levels of antagonistic bacteria against PCS pathogens in the potato rhizosphere. PMID:27050572

  1. Suppression of Shubnikov–de Haas resistance oscillations due to selective population or detection of Landau levels : Absence of inter-Landau-level scattering on macroscopic length scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, B.J. van; Willems, E.M.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Williamson, J.G.; Foxon, C.T.; Harris, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Shubnikov–de Haas resistance oscillations of a wide two-dimensional electron gas are suppressed dramatically when current is injected with a quantum point contact which does not populate the upper Landau level. A similar suppression is observed when a quantum point contact is used as a voltage p

  2. Obesity suppresses circulating level and function of endothelial progenitor cells and heart function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Tzu-Hsien

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim This study tested the hypothesis that obesity suppresses circulating number as well as the function of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF. Methods High fat diet (45 Kcal% fat was given to 8-week-old C57BL/6 J mice (n = 8 for 20 weeks to induce obesity (group 1. Another age-matched group (n = 8 were fed with control diet for 20 weeks as controls (group 2. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 20 weeks after obesity induction. Results By the end of study period, the heart weight, body weight, abdominal fat weight, serum levels of total cholesterol and fasting blood sugar were remarkably higher in group 1 than in group 2 (all p Conclusions Obesity diminished circulating EPC level, impaired the recovery of damaged endothelium, suppressed EPC angiogenesis ability and LVEF, and increased LV remodeling.

  3. Two-Level Optical Coherence Tomography Scheme for Suppressing Spectral Saturation Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Ting Wu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a novel method for reducing saturation artifacts in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT systems. This method is based on a two-level SD-OCT system with a dual-line charge-coupled device (CCD camera. We compensate the saturated signal detected by the first line using the unsaturated signal detected by the second line. The Fourier transform of the compensated spectrum shows effective suppression of saturation artifacts. This method was also successfully performed on phantom material and skin on a human finger. Our method causes neither back-scattering power loss nor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR degradation. The only difference between the traditional system and our two-level system is our utilization of the dual-line CCD camera; no additional devices or complex designs are needed.

  4. Short Segment Fixation Versus Short Segment Fixation With Pedicle Screws at the Fracture Level for Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anghel S

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The most prevailing surgical procedure in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures, Short Segment Fixation (SSF, is often followed by loss of correction or hardware failure which may be significant enough to require another surgical intervention. In order to take advantage of its benefits but to avoid or diminish the risk and impact of associated drawbacks, some other alternatives have been lately developed among which we refer to short segment fixation with intermediate screws (SSF+IS. This article provides a comparative picture over the effectiveness of the two above-mentioned surgical treatments, focusing on their potential to prevent the loss of correction.

  5. Ambroxol suppresses influenza-virus proliferation in the mouse airway by increasing antiviral factor levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B; Yao, D F; Ohuchi, M; Ide, M; Yano, M; Okumura, Y; Kido, H

    2002-05-01

    The protective effect of ambroxol, a mucolytic agent which has antioxidant properties and stimulates the release of pulmonary surfactant, against influenza-virus proliferation in the airway was investigated in mice. Ambroxol or the vehicle was administered intraperitoneally twice a day for 5-7 days to mice shortly after intranasal infection with a lethal dose of influenza A/Aichi/68 (H3N2) virus, and the survival rate, virus titre and levels of factors regulating virus proliferation in the airway fluid were analysed. Ambroxol significantly suppressed virus multiplication and improved the survival rate of mice. The effect of ambroxol reached a peak at 10 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), higher doses being less effective. Ambroxol stimulated the release of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication, such as pulmonary surfactant, mucus protease inhibitor, immunoglobulin (Ig)-A and IgG, although it stimulated the release of a trypsin-type protease that potentiates virus proliferation. In addition, ambroxol transiently suppressed release of the cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-12, into airway fluid. Although ambroxol had several negative effects on the host defence system, overall it strikingly increased the concentrations of suppressors of influenza-virus multiplication in the airway.

  6. Dihydroxyoctadecamonoenoate esters inhibit the neutrophil respiratory burst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    David Alan Thompson; Bruce D Hammock

    2007-03-01

    The leukotoxins [9(10)- and 12(13)-EpOME] are produced by activated inflammatory leukocytes such as neutrophils. High EpOME levels are observed in disorders such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and in patients with extensive burns. Although the physiological significance of the EpOMEs remains poorly understood, in some systems, the EpOMEs act as a protoxin, with their corresponding epoxide hydrolase metabolites, 9,10- and 12,13-DiHOME, specifically exerting toxicity. Both the EpOMEs and the DiHOMEs were also recently shown to have neutrophil chemotactic activity. We evaluated whether the neutrophil respiratory burst, a surge of oxidant production thought to play an important role in limiting certain bacterial and fungal infections, is modulated by members of the EpOME metabolic pathway. We present evidence that the DiHOMEs suppress the neutrophil respiratory burst by a mechanism distinct from that of respiratory burst inhibitors such as cyclosporin H or lipoxin A4, which inhibit multiple aspects of neutrophil activation.

  7. Effects of estradiol and FSH on leptin levels in women with suppressed pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geber Selmo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female fertility depends on adequate nutrition and energy reserves, suggesting a correlation between the metabolic reserve and reproductive capacity. Leptin regulates body weight and energy homeostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether estradiol or FSH alone has a direct effect on the production of leptin. Methods A total of 64 patients submitted to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with recombinant FSH for assisted reproduction and 20 patients using estradiol valerate for endometrial preparation for oocyte donation treatment were included in the study. All patients used GnRH analogues before starting treatment to achieve pituitary suppression. Blood samples for hormonal measurements were collected before starting and after completing the respective treatments. Data were analyzed statistically by the chi-square test, Student’s t-test and Pearson’s correlation test. Results We observed an elevation of serum leptin levels secondary to the increase in estradiol, in the absence of influence of any other ovarian or pituitary hormone. The rising rate of leptin levels was higher in women treated with recombinant FSH, which also had higher levels of estradiol, than in those treated with estradiol valerate. Conclusions This study demonstrates a correlation between serum levels of estradiol and leptin, suggesting that estradiol is an important regulator of leptin production and that its effects can be amplified by its association with FSH.

  8. Suppression of Amplitude Decoherence in Arbitrary n-Level Atom in E-Configuration with Bang-Bang Controls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Chun-Lei; WANG Yan-Hui; LIU Xiao-Shu; LONG Gui-Lu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give Bang-Bang (BB) decoupling schemes to suppress the amplitude decoherence in the five-and six-level atom systems in ∑-configuration. We generalize this scheme to the arbitrary level atom system inconfiguration. The corresponding decoupling operators are given explicitly.

  9. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  10. Arsenite Interacts with Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) at Low Levels to Suppress Bone Marrow Lymphoid Progenitors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeh, Peace C; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2015-07-01

    Arsenite (As(+3)) and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), a polycyclic aromatic hyrdrocarbon (PAH), are found in nature as environmental contaminants. Both are known to individually suppress the immune system of humans and mice. In order to determine their potential interactive and combined immunosuppressive effects, we examined murine bone marrow (BM) immune progenitor cells' responses following combined oral exposures at very low levels of exposure to As(+3) and DBC. Oral 5-day exposure to DBC at 1 mg/kg (cumulative dose) was found to suppress mouse BM lymphoid progenitor cells, but not the myeloid progenitors. Previously established no-effect doses of As(+3) in drinking water (19 and 75 ppb for 30 days) produced more lymphoid suppression in the bone marrow when mice were concomitantly fed a low dose of DBC during the last 5 days. The lower dose (19 ppb) As(+3) had a stronger suppressive effect with DBC than the higher dose (75 ppb). Thus, the interactive toxicity of As(+3) and DBC in vivo could be As(+3) dose dependent. In vitro, the suppressive interaction of As(+3) and DBC was also evident at low concentrations (0.5 nM), but not at higher concentrations (5 nM) of As(+3). These studies show potentially important interactions between As(+3) and DBC on mouse BM at extremely low levels of exposure in vivo and in vitro. PMID:25739538

  11. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dar, Roy D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Weinberger, Leor S. [University of California, San Diego; Razooky, B [University of California, San Diego; Cox, Chris D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); McCollum, James M. [Miami University; Trimeloni, Tom [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richland; Singh, A [University of California, San Diego

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts or as a constitutive, Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, building off of theoretical studies that exploit the time-resolved structure of stochastic fluctuations in gene expression, to develop a three-dimensional method for mapping underlying gene-regulatory mechanisms. Over 8,000 individual human genomic loci were analyzed, and at virtually all loci, episodic bursting as opposed to constitutive expression was found to be the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both frequency and size of transcriptional bursts vary equally across the human genome independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, while stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators, such as TNF, generate similar patterns of change in burst frequency and burst size. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus.

  12. Noise suppression of a differential detector under high levels of illumination, relevant to terahertz electro-optic sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Valk, N. C. J.; Schouten, R. N.; Planken, P. C. M.

    2005-07-01

    In electro-optic detection of terahertz transients, the photodiodes of a differential detector are often illuminated with optical powers on the order of several milliwatts. We present measurements that show that the response of the photodiodes at these power levels is distorted, giving rise to frequency-dependent amplitude and phase changes in the electrical signal from these diodes. We find that these distortions significantly reduce the ability of the detector to suppress laser amplitude noise. Surprisingly, this occurs at power levels at which the dc output of each photodiode shows no sign of saturation. Based on our measurements, we provide experimenters with recommendations to improve the amplitude noise suppression of a differential detector under high levels of illumination.

  13. Coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition in a parabolic bursting model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lin; Zhang, Jia; Lang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Xiuhui

    2013-03-01

    The transition from tonic spiking to bursting is an important dynamic process that carry physiologically relevant information. In this work, coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition is investigated in a parabolic bursting model with specific discussion on their cooperation effects. Fast/slow analysis shows that weak coupling may help to induce the bursting by changing the geometric property of the fast subsystem so that the original unstable periodical solution are stabilized. It turned out that noise can play the similar stabilization role and induce bursting at appropriate moderate intensity. However, their cooperation may either strengthen or weaken the overall effect depending on the choice of noise level.

  14. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  15. Factors Influencing the Iterative Accuracy of Ground Water Level in Forecasting the Water Burst of Deep Drawdown Mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李铎; 杨小荟; 武强; 张志忠

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the influential factors of iteration accuracy when we use iteration to determine the numerical model for predicting water yield of deep drawdown mines and calculating the groundwater level. The relationship among the calculation error of groundwater level, the pumping rate, the limit of iteration convergence error, the calculation time, and the aquifer parameters were discussed by using an ideal model. Finally, the water yield of Dianzi iron mine was predicted using the testified numerical model. It is indicated that the calculation error of groundwater level is related to the limit of iteration convergence error, the calculation time and the aquifer parameters, but not to the pumping rate and the variation of groundwater level.

  16. Dual Stimulus-Dependent Effect of Oenothera paradoxa Extract on the Respiratory Burst in Human Leukocytes: Suppressing for Escherichia coli and Phorbol Myristate Acetate and Stimulating for Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Burzynska-Pedziwiatr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a growing body of evidence suggests that plant polyphenols can modulate human immune responses, their simultaneous action on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst is currently poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that various polyphenols contained in plant extracts might affect the oxidative burst of phagocytes, we evaluated the effects of ethanolic O. paradoxa extract polyphenols on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst in vitro activated by different stimuli, including opsonized bacteria E. coli, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP. Samples were analyzed by the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Our results showed that the extract repressed significantly and dose-dependently reactive oxygen species production in both cell types stimulated with E. coli and PMA (P < 0.05 and its inhibitory efficiency was stimulus- and cell-type-dependent. Interestingly, there was significant stimulatory effect of the extract on bursting phagocytes induced by fMLP (P < 0.05. Additionally, several flavonoids and phenolic compounds as well as penta-galloyl-β-(D-glucose (PGG, the representative of hydrolyzable tannins, were identified in the 60% extract by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. In summary, the ethanolic O. paradoxa extract, rich in flavonoids and phenolic compounds, exhibits dual stimulus-dependent effect on the respiratory burst in human leukocytes; hence, it might affect immune responses in humans.

  17. How Long does a Burst Burst?

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Murase, Kohta; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (~ hours) in gamma-rays than typical long GRBs (~ minutes), and recently it was proposed that these "ultra-long GRBs" may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g. blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations have suggested that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with XRT observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to check whether ultra-long GRBs are special. We define burst duration t_{burst} based on both gamma-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using gamma-ray observations only. We show that the distribution of t_{burst} peaks at ~ 320s for the entire sample, with 17.6% GRBs having t_{burst} > 10^3 s and 5.4% GRBs having t_{burst} > 10^4 s. The distribution shows a tail at the long t_{burst} end. The existence of a separate population is not ruled ou...

  18. Suppression of Phase and Amplitude Damping Decoherence in a Three-Level Atom in A-Configuration Using Bang-Bang Controls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-Hui; LIU Xiao-Shu; LONG Gui-Lu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present decoupling bang-bang operations for the suppression of general decoherence, both amplitude and phase damping, in a three-level system in A-configuration. We give a program to design a sequence of periodic twinborn pulses to suppress the decoherence in such the system.

  19. Full Viral Suppression, Low-Level Viremia, and Quantifiable Plasma HIV-RNA at the End of Pregnancy in HIV-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Baroncelli, Silvia; Pirillo, Maria F.; Tamburrini, Enrica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Pinnetti, Carmela; Antoni, Anna Degli; Galluzzo, Clementina M.; Stentarelli, Chiara; Amici, Roberta; Floridia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on full viral suppression and low-level HIV-RNA viremia in HIV-infected women at the end of pregnancy. We investigated HIV-RNA levels close to delivery in women on antiretroviral treatment in order to define rates of complete suppression, low-level viremia, and quantifiable HIV-RNA, exploring as potential determinants some clinical and viroimmunological variables. Plasma samples from a national study in Italy, collected between 2003 and 2012, were used. According ...

  20. Driven random-phase three-wave interactions: Cycles, bursts, and stochasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P.A. (School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia))

    1992-11-01

    Steadily driven, undriven, and stochastically driven three-wave decay processes involving groups of random-phase waves are investigated analytically and numerically. Steadily driven systems in which one product wave is suppressed exhibit neutrally stable Lotka--Volterra cycles, as for the true two-component case, whereas three-component systems are stable below a critical driver strength and unstable beyond that point. Initially unstable, but undriven, systems produce bursts of product waves, after which the parent waves fall to a final level that is an exponentially decreasing function of their initial level. Three-component systems where the product waves have near-equal dissipation rates are an exception to the latter behavior; in such systems the final parent-wave level is almost independent of the initial one. Stochastic driving gives rise to bursts of product waves in a cycle of fluctuating period, whereas a low-level noise source tends to stabilize the system.

  1. On the pharmacology of oxidative burst of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosáľ, R; Drábiková, K; Jančinová, V; Mačičková, T; Pečivová, J; Perečko, T; Harmatha, J; Šmidrkal, J

    2015-01-01

    The effect of three therapeutically used drugs and five polyphenolic compounds on the mechanism of oxidative burst was compared in whole blood and isolated neutrophils at cellular and molecular level. In 10 microM concentration, the compounds investigated decreased the oxidative burst of whole blood in the rank order of potency: N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT) > curcumin (CUR) > quercetin (QUER) > arbutin (ARB) > resveratrol (RES) > dithiaden (DIT) > carvedilol (CARV) > brompheniramine (BPA). The ratio between the percentage inhibition of extracellular versus intracellular chemiluminescence (CL) followed the rank order QUER > N-f-5HT > RES > CUR > DIT and is indicative of the positive effect of the compounds tested against oxidative burst of neutrophils, demonstrating suppression of reactive oxygen species extracellularly with minimal alteration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Activation of protein kinase C was significantly decreased by DIT, CUR, QUER and N-f-5HT. CARV, DIT, QUER and ARB reduced activated neutrophil myeloperoxidase release more significantly compared with the effect on superoxide anion generation. All compounds tested increased the activity of caspase-3 in cell-free system. It is suggested that other regulatory mechanisms than protein kinase C might participate in the inhibition of neutrophil activation with the compounds tested. Different mechanisms are concerned in controlling the assembly of NADPH oxidase and the regulatory role of calcium ions is suggested. Compounds decreasing the amount of extracellular ROS generation, yet affecting but minimally intracellular ROS generation, are promising for further investigation in vivo. PMID:26681073

  2. Arabidopsis NRT1.5 Mediates the Suppression of Nitrate Starvation-Induced Leaf Senescence by Modulating Foliar Potassium Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Shuan; Peng, Jia-Shi; He, Ya-Ni; Zhang, Guo-Bin; Yi, Hong-Ying; Fu, Yan-Lei; Gong, Ji-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen deficiency induces leaf senescence. However, whether or how nitrate might affect this process remains to be investigated. Here, we report an interesting finding that nitrate-instead of nitrogen-starvation induced early leaf senescence in nrt1.5 mutant, and present genetic and physiological data demonstrating that nitrate starvation-induced leaf senescence is suppressed by NRT1.5. NRT1.5 suppresses the senescence process dependent on its function from roots, but not the nitrate transport function. Further analyses using nrt1.5 single and nia1 nia2 nrt1.5-4 triple mutant showed a negative correlation between nitrate concentration and senescence rate in leaves. Moreover, when exposed to nitrate starvation, foliar potassium level decreased in nrt1.5, but adding potassium could essentially restore the early leaf senescence phenotype of nrt1.5 plants. Nitrate starvation also downregulated the expression of HAK5, RAP2.11, and ANN1 in nrt1.5 roots, and appeared to alter potassium level in xylem sap from nrt1.5. These data suggest that NRT1.5 likely perceives nitrate starvation-derived signals to prevent leaf senescence by facilitating foliar potassium accumulation. PMID:26732494

  3. Serum levels of antimüllerian hormone in early maturing girls before, during, and after suppression with GnRH agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar; Anderson, Richard A;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) levels are affected in early maturing girls, and whether pituitary suppression by long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRH-a) affects AMH.......To evaluate whether serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) levels are affected in early maturing girls, and whether pituitary suppression by long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRH-a) affects AMH....

  4. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, NL-1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Beklen, E. [Physics Department, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  5. The Fermi-GBM X-Ray Burst Monitor: Thermonuclear Bursts from 4U 0614+09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; van der Horst, A. J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Chakrabarty, D.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 ± 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  6. Suppression of tumor growth in vivo by local and systemic 90K level increase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jallal, B; Powell, J; Zachwieja, J;

    1995-01-01

    action on the tumor cell, but by stimulation of the residual cell-mediated immune defense of the nude mouse. Enhanced 90K level effects are both localized and systemic and involve induction of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the tumor endothelium. The findings presented suggest a role for 90K as a molecular alarm...

  7. Basal and glucose-suppressed GH levels less than 1 microg/L in newly diagnosed acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, Pamela U; Reyes, Carlos M; Nuruzzaman, Abu T; Sundeen, Robert E; Bruce, Jeffrey N

    2003-01-01

    The development of highly sensitive and specific GH assays has necessitated a critical re-evaluation of the biochemical criteria needed for the diagnosis of acromegaly. Use of these assays has revealed that GH levels after oral glucose in healthy subjects and postoperative patients with active acromegaly can be significantly less than previously recognized with older GH assays. In order to assess GH criteria for newly diagnosed acromegaly with a modern assay we have evaluated GH levels in 25 patients referred to our Neuroendocrine Unit for evaluation of untreated acromegaly. All patients underwent measurement of basal GH and IGF-I levels and 15 of these patients also underwent oral glucose tolerance testing for GH suppression (OGTT). Basal GH levels were diagnosis in 5 of these 25 patients. Nadir GH levels were less than 1 microg/L also in 5 of 15 patients, and as low as 0.42 microg/L. All patients had elevated IGF-I levels preoperatively and pathological confirmation of a GH secreting pituitary tumor at the time of transsphenoidal surgery. The clinical presentations of these patients was variable. Most patients presented with classical manifestations of acromegaly, but 3 of the 5 patients with low nadir GH values had only very subtle signs of acromegaly. Although most newly diagnosed patients have classically elevated GH levels and obvious clinical features of acromegaly, early recognition of disease may uncover patients with milder biochemical and clinical abnormalities. The diagnosis should not be discounted in patients who have elevated IGF-I levels, but have basal or nadir GH levels less than 1 microg/L. Conventional GH criteria for the diagnosis of acromegaly cannot be applied to the use of modern sensitive and specific GH assays. PMID:15237928

  8. Agrotecnólogical characteristics of cane sugar at different times of suppression of irrigation and fertilizer levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Meireles de Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of Agrotechnological two varieties of cane sugar influenced by different times of deletions irrigation and fertilization levels. The characteristics evaluated were: plant height (m, stem diameter (mm, number of tillers m- 1, Brix broth, sugar cane Pol, Pol broth, Sugar reducer, and overall productivity. The experiment was conducted in the Experimental Farm area Unimontes in Janaúba in northern Minas Gerais. The experimental design was a randomized complete block design with three replications in a split plot (2 x 3 x 6 , two varieties of cane sugar, RB85 and 5453 SP80 1816, three different times suppression of irrigation (DIAP and six different levels of NK fertilization. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, and when significant differences were the F test was performed to compare the means by Scott Knott (p<0.05 for all variables, using the software program SISVAR. The varieties showed different behavior at maturity, having variety RB85 5453 higher values in technological quality and productivity at lower rates. The varieties obtained overall average of 24.3 ° Brix, Pol 17.6 % of sugarcane, 21 % Pol broth, 0.6 % AR, 3:08 meters in height, 29.2 mm in diameter, 18.9 tillers m-1, 11.1 stems m-1, t ha-1 159.8 productivity. The varieties responded to different eras of suppression irrigation (DIAP. 6 The level of fertilization provided better performance in terms of this work. The RB85 - 5453 and SP80 -1816 varieties are promising for Nortemineira region.

  9. Theta-burst stimulation of hippocampal slices induces network-level calcium oscillations and activates analogous gene transcription to spatial learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham K Sheridan

    Full Text Available Over four decades ago, it was discovered that high-frequency stimulation of the dentate gyrus induces long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission. LTP is believed to underlie how we process and code external stimuli before converting it to salient information that we store as 'memories'. It has been shown that rats performing spatial learning tasks display theta-frequency (3-12 Hz hippocampal neural activity. Moreover, administering theta-burst stimulation (TBS to hippocampal slices can induce LTP. TBS triggers a sustained rise in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i in neurons leading to new protein synthesis important for LTP maintenance. In this study, we measured TBS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations in thousands of cells at increasing distances from the source of stimulation. Following TBS, a calcium wave propagates radially with an average speed of 5.2 µm/s and triggers multiple and regular [Ca2+]i oscillations in the hippocampus. Interestingly, the number and frequency of [Ca2+]i fluctuations post-TBS increased with respect to distance from the electrode. During the post-tetanic phase, 18% of cells exhibited 3 peaks in [Ca2+]i with a frequency of 17 mHz, whereas 2.3% of cells distributed further from the electrode displayed 8 [Ca2+]i oscillations at 33 mHz. We suggest that these observed [Ca2+]i oscillations could lead to activation of transcription factors involved in synaptic plasticity. In particular, the transcription factor, NF-κB, has been implicated in memory formation and is up-regulated after LTP induction. We measured increased activation of NF-κB 30 min post-TBS in CA1 pyramidal cells and also observed similar temporal up-regulation of NF-κB levels in CA1 neurons following water maze training in rats. Therefore, TBS of hippocampal slice cultures in vitro can mimic the cell type-specific up-regulations in activated NF-κB following spatial learning in vivo. This indicates that TBS may induce similar transcriptional changes to

  10. Ingestion of sodium citrate suppresses aldosterone level in blood at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oöpik, Vahur; Timpmann, Saima; Hackney, Anthony C; Kadak, Kadri; Medijainen, Luule; Karelson, Kalle

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the ingestion of sodium citrate (CIT) alters blood levels of fluid and electrolyte regulatory hormones at rest and during exercise. Using a randomized, double-blinded, crossover design, 13 young, male well-trained runners performed continuous incremental running tests to volitional exhaustion on a treadmill 2 h after ingestion of 0.5 g.kg-1 body mass of CIT or placebo (PLC) in 1000 mL of solution. These trials were separated by 2 weeks. Baseline (before ingestion) aldosterone concentration did not differ between the 2 trials; however, it was 36.5% (p = 0.003) lower in the CIT trial compared with the PLC trial before the running test (i.e., after ingestion). The extent of the running-induced increase in aldosterone was 33% (p = 0.009) smaller in the CIT trial. There were no between-trial differences in the levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, or renin activity at any stage of the study. However, a greater relative increase in plasma volume (mean +/- SD, 6.41% +/- 3.78% vs. 4.08% +/- 3.33%; p = 0.042) was observed after administering the CIT compared with the PLC drink. Serum Na+ concentration increased (by 3.1 +/- 1.2 mmol.L-1; p < 0.0001) after ingestion of the CIT but not the PLC drink. A higher Na+ level was observed in the CIT trial than in the PLC trial (142.4 +/- 1.6 vs. 139.3 +/- 1.4 mmol.L-1, p = 0.00001) after completion of the run. In conclusion, pre-exercise ingestion of CIT induces a decrease in serum aldosterone concentration in the resting condition and a blunting of the aldosterone response during incremental running exercise to volitional exhaustion. The observed effect of CIT on the serum aldosterone level may be mediated by an acute increase in plasma volume and serum Na+ concentration alterations.

  11. Cholesterol-induced suppression of membrane elastic fluctuations at the atomistic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molugu, Trivikram R; Brown, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    Applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy for investigating the influences of lipid-cholesterol interactions on membrane fluctuations are reviewed in this paper. Emphasis is placed on understanding the energy landscapes and fluctuations at an emergent atomistic level. Solid-state (2)H NMR spectroscopy directly measures residual quadrupolar couplings (RQCs) due to individual C-(2)H labeled segments of the lipid molecules. Moreover, residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) of (13)C-(1)H bonds are obtained in separated local-field NMR spectroscopy. The distributions of RQC or RDC values give nearly complete profiles of the order parameters as a function of acyl segment position. Measured equilibrium properties of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids including their binary and tertiary mixtures with cholesterol show unequal mixing associated with liquid-ordered domains. The entropic loss upon addition of cholesterol to sphingolipids is less than for glycerophospholipids and may drive the formation of lipid rafts. In addition relaxation time measurements enable one to study the molecular dynamics over a wide time-scale range. For (2)H NMR the experimental spin-lattice (R1Z) relaxation rates follow a theoretical square-law dependence on segmental order parameters (SCD) due to collective slow dynamics over mesoscopic length scales. The functional dependence for the liquid-crystalline lipid membranes is indicative of viscoelastic properties as they emerge from atomistic-level interactions. A striking decrease in square-law slope upon addition of cholesterol denotes stiffening relative to the pure lipid bilayers that is diminished in the case of lanosterol. Measured equilibrium properties and relaxation rates infer opposite influences of cholesterol and detergents on collective dynamics and elasticity at an atomistic scale that potentially affects lipid raft formation in cellular membranes. PMID:27154600

  12. Bursting synchronization in clustered neuronal networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Hai-Tao; Wang Jiang; Deng Bin; Wei Xi-Le

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in the brain exhibit the modular (clustered) property,i.e.,they are composed of certain subnetworks with differential internal and external connectivity.We investigate bursting synchronization in a clustered neuronal network.A transition to mutual-phase synchronization takes place on the bursting time scale of coupled neurons,while on the spiking time scale,they behave asynchronously.This synchronization transition can be induced by the variations of inter-and intracoupling strengths,as well as the probability of random links between different subnetworks.Considering that some pathological conditions are related with the synchronization of bursting neurons in the brain,we analyze the control of bursting synchronization by using a time-periodic external signal in the clustered neuronal network.Simulation results show a frequency locking tongue in the driving parameter plane,where bursting synchronization is maintained,even in the presence of external driving.Hence,effective synchronization suppression can be realized with the driving parameters outside the frequency locking region.

  13. Theta, alpha and beta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation: brain modulation in tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk De Ridder, Elsa van der Loo, Karolien Van der Kelen, Tomas Menovsky, Paul van de Heyning, Aage Moller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some forms of tinnitus are considered to be auditory phantom phenomena related to reorganization and hyperactivity of the auditory central nervous system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a non-invasive tool capable of modulating human brain activity, using single pulse or burst stimuli. Burst rTMS has only been performed in the theta range, and has not been used clinically. The authors analyze whether burst TMS at theta (5 Hz, alpha (10 Hz and beta (20 Hz frequencies can temporarily suppress narrow band noise/white noise tinnitus, which has been demonstrated to be intractable to tonic stimulation. Methods: rTMS is performed both in tonic and burst mode in 46 patients contralateral to the tinnitus side, at 5, 10 and 20 Hz. Fourteen placebo negative rTMS responders are further analyzed. Results: In 5 patients, maximal tinnitus suppression is obtained with theta, in 2 with alpha and in 7 with beta burst stimulation. Burst rTMS suppresses narrow band/white tinnitus much better than tonic rTMS t(13=6.4, p<.000. Women experience greater suppression of their tinnitus with burst stimulation than men, t(12=2.9, p<.05. Furthermore left sided tinnitus is perceived as more distressing on the TQ than right sided tinnitus, t(12=3.2, p<.01. The lower the tinnitus pitch the more effectively rTMS suppresses tinnitus(r=-0.65, p<0.05. Discussion: Burst rTMS can be used clinically, not only theta burst, but also alpha and beta burst. Burst rTMS is capable of suppressing narrow band/white noise tinnitus very much better than tonic rTMS. This could be due the simple fact that burst neuromodulation is more powerful than tonic neuromodulation or to a differential effect of burst and tonic stimulation on the lemniscal and extralemniscal auditory system. In some patients only alpha or beta burst rTMS is capable of suppressing tinnitus, and theta burst not. Therefore in future rTMS studies it could be worthwhile not to limit burst

  14. Bursts of intermediate ions in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hõrrak, U.; Salm, J.; Tammet, H.

    1998-06-01

    The mobility spectrum of air ions has been measured at Tahkuse Observatory in Estonia for several years. The average concentration of intermediate ions with mobilities of 0.05-0.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 in atmospheric air is about 50 cm-3. On the level of this low background, high concentration bursts of intermediate air ions occur occasionally. A burst can be followed by subsequent evolution of intermediate ions into larger ones. To explain the bursts of intermediate air ions, two hypotheses can be advanced: (1)A burst of neutral particles occurs due to homogeneous nucleation, and the particles are charged by the attachment of cluster ions. (2) The cluster ions grow by ion-induced nucleation in proper environmental conditions.

  15. CRP and SAA1 Haplotypes Are Associated with Both C-Reactive Protein and Serum Amyloid A Levels: Role of Suppression Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lin Ko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the statistical association of the CRP and SAA1 locus variants with their corresponding circulating levels and metabolic and inflammatory biomarker levels by using mediation analysis, a sample population of 599 Taiwanese subjects was enrolled and five CRP and four SAA1 variants were genotyped. Correlation analysis revealed that C-reactive protein (CRP and serum amyloid A (SAA levels were significantly associated with multiple metabolic phenotypes and inflammatory marker levels. Our data further revealed a significant association of CRP and SAA1 variants with both CRP and SAA levels. Mediation analysis revealed that SAA levels suppressed the association between SAA1 genotypes/haplotypes and CRP levels and that CRP levels suppressed the association between CRP haplotypes and SAA levels. In conclusion, genetic variants at the CRP and SAA1 loci independently affect both CRP and SAA levels, and their respective circulating levels act as suppressors. These results provided further evidence of the role of the suppression effect in biological science and may partially explain the missing heritability in genetic association studies.

  16. Desynchronization in an ensemble of globally coupled chaotic bursting neuronal oscillators by dynamic delayed feedback control

    CERN Document Server

    Che, Yanqiu; Li, Ruixue; Li, Huiyan; Han, Chunxiao; Wang, Jiang; Wei, Xile

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic delayed feedback control approach for desynchronization of chaotic-bursting synchronous activities in an ensemble of globally coupled neuronal oscillators. We demonstrate that the difference signal between an ensemble's mean field and its time delayed state, filtered and fed back to the ensemble, can suppress the self-synchronization in the ensemble. These individual units are decoupled and stabilized at the desired desynchronized states while the stimulation signal reduces to the noise level. The effectiveness of the method is illustrated by examples of two different populations of globally coupled chaotic-bursting neurons. The proposed method has potential for mild, effective and demand-controlled therapy of neurological diseases characterized by pathological synchronization.

  17. Intrahepatic Lipid Content and Insulin Resistance Are More Strongly Associated with Impaired NEFA Suppression after Oral Glucose Loading Than with Fasting NEFA Levels in Healthy Older Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis M. Finucane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The mechanisms underlying the association between insulin resistance and intrahepatic lipid (IHL accumulation are not completely understood. We sought to determine whether this association was explained by differences in fasting non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA levels and/or NEFA suppression after oral glucose loading. Materials and Methods. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 70 healthy participants in the Hertfordshire Physical Activity Trial (39 males, age 71.3 ± 2.4 years who underwent oral glucose tolerance testing with glucose, insulin, and NEFA levels measured over two hours. IHL was quantified with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Insulin sensitivity was measured with the oral glucose insulin sensitivity (OGIS model, the leptin: adiponectin ratio (LAR, and the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA. Results. Measures of insulin sensitivity were not associated with fasting NEFA levels, but OGIS was strongly associated with NEFA suppression at 30 minutes and strongly inversely associated with IHL. Moreover, LAR was strongly inversely associated with NEFA suppression and strongly associated with IHL. This latter association (beta = 1.11 [1.01, 1.21], was explained by reduced NEFA suppression ( after adjustment. Conclusions. Impaired postprandial NEFA suppression, but not fasting NEFA, contributes to the strong and well-established association between whole body insulin resistance and liver fat accumulation.

  18. Village-level suppressive fruit fly management in India: Issues determining the optimum scale of cooperative control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . dorsalis and B. zonata, by male annihilation technique (MAT). An associated study used trap catches to observe the penetration of orchard flies into a square-kilometre mango orchard protected by one thousand MAT blocks in plastic traps. The use of MAT for orchard flies and BAT for melon flies was predicated by the likely affordability to Indian farmers of methyl eugenol but not of the costlier melon fly lure cue-lure. Parallel with the experiments, a programme of semi-structured interviews (SSIs) with local people explored the prospects for cooperative village-level control. Both BAT and MAT were substantially more effective at village-level than at farm-level. Farmer opinion and research evidence both indicated that for MAT a square kilometre was not an area large enough to obtain the maximum possible return. BAT returns to village-level use were greatest in areas where the size of individual farms was so small that BAT was not very effective when used at farm level alone. The conclusions indicated the minimum effective size for area-wide management to be for BAT a moderate-sized farm plot and for MAT a large village. Both treatments when deployed at village-level were suppressive without being eradicative and as a consequence there was still a return to be obtained from farm-level control even over and above village-level control where this was deployed. This indicates that (1) village-level BAT and MAT were relatively forgiving of imperfections in deployment, such as non-participation by dissident individual farmers, and (2) private, farm-level control obtained a return even when village-level control was present (as there were still flies left to kill), implying a low temptation to be a 'free rider', as participation in control brings returns to the practitioner regardless of the participation of his or her neighbours. Village-level control of the sort described differs from SIT and other high-technology controls not only in a question of degree, as representing the

  19. The performance determination of a Compton-suppression spectrometer and the measurement of the low level radioactive samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuan-Qing; Wang, Shi-Lian; Li, Qi; Zhao, Yun-Gang; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Jia, Huai-Mao

    2013-11-01

    The performance of a new Compton-suppression spectrometer consisting of one HPGe detector and three NaI(Tl) detectors was studied. The peak-to-Compton ratio for a (137)Cs source is 1150 and the integral background count rate is 0.3 5s(-1) over the energy interval 20-3000 keV. The spectrometer was used to acquire both Compton-suppressed and non-suppressed spectra of aerosol samples collected in Beijing following the Fukushima nuclear accident. PMID:23587699

  20. Is an absolute level of cortical beta suppression required for proper movement? Magnetoencephalographic evidence from healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Wilson, Tony W

    2016-07-01

    Previous research has connected a specific pattern of beta oscillatory activity to proper motor execution, but no study to date has directly examined how resting beta levels affect motor-related beta oscillatory activity in the motor cortex. Understanding this relationship is imperative to determining the basic mechanisms of motor control, as well as the impact of pathological beta oscillations on movement execution. In the current study, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) and a complex movement paradigm to quantify resting beta activity and movement-related beta oscillations in the context of healthy aging. We chose healthy aging as a model because preliminary evidence suggests that beta activity is elevated in older adults, and thus by examining older and younger adults we were able to naturally vary resting beta levels. To this end, healthy younger and older participants were recorded during motor performance and at rest. Using beamforming, we imaged the peri-movement beta event-related desynchronization (ERD) and extracted virtual sensors from the peak voxels, which enabled absolute and relative beta power to be assessed. Interestingly, absolute beta power during the pre-movement baseline was much stronger in older relative to younger adults, and older adults also exhibited proportionally large beta desynchronization (ERD) responses during motor planning and execution compared to younger adults. Crucially, we found a significant relationship between spontaneous (resting) beta power and beta ERD magnitude in both primary motor cortices, above and beyond the effects of age. A similar link was found between beta ERD magnitude and movement duration. These findings suggest a direct linkage between beta reduction during movement and spontaneous activity in the motor cortex, such that as spontaneous beta power increases, a greater reduction in beta activity is required to execute movement. We propose that, on an individual level, the primary motor cortices have an

  1. The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor: thermonuclear bursts from 4U 0614+09

    CERN Document Server

    Linares, M; Jenke, P; van der Horst, A J; Camero-Arranz, A; Kouveliotou, C; Chakrabarty, D; Beklen, E; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Finger, M; Paciesas, W; Preece, R; von Kienlin, A; Wilson-Hodge, C A

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the neutron star interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09, when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12+/-3 d (68% confidence interval) between March 2010 and March 2011, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 d (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations, and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bu...

  2. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  3. A Burst to See

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    On 19 March, Nature was particularly generous and provided astronomers with the wealth of four gamma-ray bursts on the same day. But that was not all: one of them is the most luminous object ever observed in the Universe. Despite being located in a distant galaxy, billions of light years away, it was so bright that it could have been seen, for a brief while, with the unaided eye. ESO PR Photo 08a/08 ESO PR Photo 08a/08 The REM Telescope and TORTORA Camera Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. Gamma-ray bursts, which are invisible to our eyes, are discovered by telescopes in space. After releasing their intense burst of high-energy radiation, they become detectable for a short while in the optical and in the near-infrared. This 'afterglow' fades very rapidly, making detailed analysis possible for only a few hours after the gamma-ray detection. This analysis is important in particular in order to determine the GRB's distance and, hence, intrinsic brightness. The gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite. "It was so bright that it almost blinded the Swift instruments for a while," says Guido Chincarini, Italian principal investigator of the mission. A bright optical counterpart was soon identified in the Boötes Constellation (the "Bear Driver" or "Herdsman"). A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky. In particular, the optical emission was detected by a few wide-field cameras on telescopes that constantly monitor a large fraction of the sky, including the TORTORA camera in symbiosis with the 0.6-m REM telescope located at La Silla

  4. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  5. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  6. The activity of satellite cells and myonuclei following 8 weeks of strength training in young men with suppressed testosterone levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvorning, T; Kadi, F; Schjerling, P.;

    2015-01-01

    study. The participants were randomized to treatment with a GnRH analogue, goserelin (n = 12), which suppresses testosterone or placebo (n = 10) for 12 weeks. The strength training period of 8 weeks started after 4 weeks of treatment and included exercises for all major muscles. Biopsies were obtained...

  7. Use of High-Dose, Twice-Yearly Albendazole and Ivermectin to Suppress Wuchereria bancrofti Microfilarial Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Dembele, Benoit; Coulibaly, Yaya I.; Dolo, Housseini; Konate, Siaka; Coulibaly, Siaka Y.; Sanogo, Dramane; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Michel E.; Doumbia, Salif Seriba; Diallo, Abdallah A.; TRAORE, SEKOU F.; Keita, Adama Diaman; Michael P Fay; Nutman, Thomas B.; Klion, Amy D

    2010-01-01

    Background. Annual mass treatment with albendazole and ivermectin is the mainstay of current strategies to interrupt transmission of Wuchereria bancrofti in Africa. More-effective microfilarial suppression could potentially reduce the time necessary to interrupt transmission, easing the economic burden of mass treatment programs in countries with limited resources.

  8. Variability in the Geographic Distribution of Fires in Interior Alaska Considering Cause, Human Proximity, and Level of Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calef, M. P.; Varvak, A.; McGuire, A. D.; Chapin, T.

    2015-12-01

    The boreal forest of Interior Alaska is characterized by frequent extensive wildfires that have been mapped for the past 70 years. Simple predictions based on this record indicate that area burned will increase as a response to climate warming in Alaska. However, two additional factors have affected the area burned in this time record: the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) switched from cool and moist to warm and dry in the late 1970s and the Alaska Fire Service instituted a fire suppression policy in the late 1980s. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and statistics, this presentation evaluates the variability in area burned and fire ignitions in Interior Alaska in space and time with particular emphasis on the human influence via ignition and suppression. Our analysis shows that while area burned has been increasing by 2.4% per year, the number of lightning ignitions has decreased by 1.9 ignitions per year. Human ignitions account for 50% of all fire ignitions in Interior Alaska and are clearly influenced by human proximity: human fires mostly occur close to settlements, highways and in intense fire suppression zones (which are in turn close to human settlements and roads); fires close to settlements, highways and in intense fire suppression zones burn much shorter than fires further away from this sphere of human influence; and 60% of all human fire ignitions in Interior Alaska are concentrated in the Fairbanks area and thereby strongly influence regional analyses. Fire suppression has effectively reduced area burned since it was implemented but the PDO change has also had some influence. Finally, we found that human fires start earlier in the year and burn for a shorter duration than lightning fires. This study provides insights into the importance of human behavior as well as regional climate patterns as large-scale controls on fires over time and across the Alaskan boreal forest.

  9. The Double Firing Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers from around the world combined data from ground- and space-based telescopes to paint a detailed portrait of the brightest explosion ever seen. The observations reveal that the jets of the gamma-ray burst called GRB 080319B were aimed almost directly at the Earth. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 28/08 A Gamma-Ray Burst with Two Jets Read more on this illuminating blast in the additional story. GRB 080319B was so intense that, despite happening halfway across the Universe, it could have been seen briefly with the unaided eye (ESO 08/08). In a paper to appear in the 11 September issue of Nature, Judith Racusin of Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA), and a team of 92 co-authors report observations across the electromagnetic spectrum that began 30 minutes before the explosion and followed it for months afterwards. "We conclude that the burst's extraordinary brightness arose from a jet that shot material almost directly towards Earth at almost the speed of light - the difference is only 1 part in 20 000," says Guido Chincarini, a member of the team. Gamma-ray bursts are the Universe's most luminous explosions. Most occur when massive stars run out of fuel. As a star collapses, it creates a black hole or neutron star that, through processes not fully understood, drives powerful gas jets outward. As the jets shoot into space, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, thereby generating bright afterglows. The team believes the jet directed toward Earth contained an ultra-fast component just 0.4 degrees across (this is slightly smaller than the apparent size of the Full Moon). This jet is contained within another slightly less energetic jet about 20 times wider. The broad component is more typical of other bursts. "Perhaps every gamma-ray burst has a narrow jet, but astronomers miss it most of the time," says team member Stefano Covino. "We happened to view this monster down the barrel of the very narrow and energetic jet, and the chance for

  10. A repeating fast radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  11. Low doses of ionizing radiation suppress an increase of spontaneous level of cytogenetic damage during aging of an organism (effect of genome stabilization)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of single γ-radiation (60Co) at the 0.1 and 0.2 Gy doses/dose rate - 0.125 Gy/min) on the accumulation of spontaneous cytogenetic damages in male mice of two-month-old during life time is studied. Results obtained show that low doses of ionizing radiation suppress the cytogenetic violations level growth stipulated by aging down to the level lower that spontaneous one, that is make the body to possess elevated genome stability

  12. Retention on buprenorphine is associated with high levels of maximal viral suppression among HIV-infected opioid dependent released prisoners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Springer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: HIV-infected prisoners lose viral suppression within the 12 weeks after release to the community. This prospective study evaluates the use of buprenorphine/naloxone (BPN/NLX as a method to reduce relapse to opioid use and sustain viral suppression among released HIV-infected prisoners meeting criteria for opioid dependence (OD. METHODS: From 2005-2010, 94 subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for OD were recruited from a 24-week prospective trial of directly administered antiretroviral therapy (DAART for released HIV-infected prisoners; 50 (53% selected BPN/NLX and were eligible to receive it for 6 months; the remaining 44 (47% selected no BPN/NLX therapy. Maximum viral suppression (MVS, defined as HIV-1 RNA<50 copies/mL, was compared for the BPN/NLX and non-BPN/NLX (N = 44 groups. RESULTS: The two groups were similar, except the BPN/NLX group was significantly more likely to be Hispanic (56.0% v 20.4%, from Hartford (74.4% v 47.7% and have higher mean global health quality of life indicator scores (54.18 v 51.40. MVS after 24 weeks of being released was statistically correlated with 24-week retention on BPN/NLX [AOR = 5.37 (1.15, 25.1], having MVS at the time of prison-release [AOR = 10.5 (3.21, 34.1] and negatively with being Black [AOR = 0.13 (0.03, 0.68]. Receiving DAART or methadone did not correlate with MVS. CONCLUSIONS: In recognition that OD is a chronic relapsing disease, strategies that initiate and retain HIV-infected prisoners with OD on BPN/NLX is an important strategy for improving HIV treatment outcomes as a community transition strategy.

  13. The development of a burst criterion for Zircaloy fuel cladding under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A burst criterion model, which assumes that deformation is controlled by steady-state creep, has been developed for a thin-walled cladding, in this case Zircaloy-4, subjected to a differential pressure and high temperature. The creep equation is integrated to obtain a burst time at the singularity of the strain. Once that urst time is known, the burst temperature and burst pressure can be calculated from the known temperature and pressure histories. A further relationship between burst stress and burst temperature is used to calculate the burst strain. Comparison with measured burst data shows good agreement between theory and experiment. It was found that, if the heating rate is constant, the burst temperature increases with decreasing stress, and that, if the stress level is constant, the burst temperature increases with increasing heating rate. It was also found that anisotropy alters the burst temperature and burst strain, and that thest conditions in the α-Zr temperature range have no influence on the burst data. (orig.)

  14. Unusual suppression of low energy spin excitations near Fermi level in AFe4Sb12 (A=Ca, Sr, and Ba) probed by Sb-NQR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sb nuclear quadrupole resonances (NQR) have been performed on the alkaline-earth filled skutterudite AFe4Sb12 (A=Ca, Sr, and Ba) being close to ferromagnetic instability. No hyperfine splitting in NQR spectrum even at the lowest temperature (1.5 K) confirms an absence of uniform ferromagnetic order in these compounds. Above about T* - 70 K, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate divided by temperature, 1/T1T, follows an empirical relationship 1/T1T=a+b χspin with respect to the Curie Weiss (CW) like T-dependence of the static spin susceptibility χspin. The correlation between 1/T1T and χspin is consistent with the self-consistent renormalization (SCR) theory for the three-dimensional (3D) nearly ferromagnet despite the relatively large contribution of the first term not correlating to χspin. However, below about T*, 1/T1T exhibits a gap-like suppression with a gap magnitude of about 65 K. This unusual suppression of the low energy spin excitations is contrasting to the case in LaFe4Sb12, and a characteristic feature in the filled skutterudites with divalent filler ion. The pseudo-gap structure near the Fermi level is proposed for the hybridized Fe3d-Sb5p band (mainly partial p state) for the unusual suppression. (author)

  15. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  16. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stell...

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  19. Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, Neil; 10.1126/science.1216793

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, last typically 10s of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  20. A case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in the setting of post-partum preeclampsia with suppressed plasma aldosterone levels and plasma renin activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelio Negro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by headache, altered mental status, visual loss, and seizures. PRES is associated with neuroradiological findings: white matter abnormalities, predominantly in the parieto-occipital regions of the brain. PRES has been described in association with hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, renal failure, or following immunosuppressive or anticancer therapy. We report a case of PRES in a severe preeclampsia occurring in the late postpartum period, with suppressed plasma aldosterone levels and plasma renin activity. These laboratory abnormalities may be due to an apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome.

  1. The underestimated challenges of burst-mode WDM transmission in TWDM-PON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonk, R.; Poehlmann, W.; van Veen, D.; Galaro, J.; Farah, R.; Schmuck, H.; Pfeiffer, Th.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the underestimated challenges of the burst-mode operation in the upstream path of time-and-wavelength-division-multiplexed passive optical networks are analyzed. Various challenges are disclosed, the influence of the associated physical effects on the signal quality is discussed and mitigation proposals are described: Intra-channel cross-talk can arise from optical network units induced background amplified-spontaneous emission noise and inter-channel cross-talk can be caused by non-ideal filter suppression between wavelength channels at the optical line termination receivers. Such cross-talk effects can be counteracted by reducing the laser burst-signal output power as well as its rival noise power simultaneously, i.e. by applying power leveling. A fast frequency drift in burst-mode operation is inherent to directly modulated lasers, but depends on the specific laser design, the laser output power and the burst length. Mitigation mechanisms are an optimized non-standard laser design or a specific mode of operation, e.g. an increase of the frequency drift during the preamble of the burst. The power dynamic range an optical pre-amplifier as part of the upstream signal receivers needs to handle can be in range of up to 40 dB, because of the multi-wavelength channel operation and of the optical distribution network differential path loss. This power dynamic faced at the receiver can not only cause challenges for the optical amplifier, but also for the burst-mode receivers. Additionally, the physical layer operation and maintenance of the upstream path is challenging too. Each optical network unit laser needs to be either wavelength pre-calibrated, which adds undesired costs or cross-channel synchronization of ranging windows has to be ensured. Otherwise rogue optical network unit behavior in wavelength and time domain will deteriorate system performance with every new optical network unit entering the network. Further, the operation of the optical

  2. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Brdar, Vedran; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p-wave process than for s-wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to Standard Model particles later, the annihilation bu...

  3. Burst Mode Transmission in GPON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liang-chuan; ZHANG Yan-gan; LI Ling; XU Da-xiong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a newly approved standard G.984 for Gigabit-capable Passive Optical Networks (GPON) is introduced. Technical challenges about high-speed burst-mode data transmission in GPON are discussed and key issues such as Forward Error Correction (FEC), timing to uplink performance of burst mode are high-lighted.

  4. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  5. D-Dimer Levels before HIV Seroconversion Remain Elevated Even after Viral Suppression and Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, Matthew S; Bebu, Ionut; Tracy, Russell; So-Armah, Kaku; Okulicz, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Armstrong, Adam; O'Bryan, Thomas; Rimland, David; Justice, Amy C; Agan, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the excess risk of non-AIDS diseases among HIV infected people is unclear. HIV associated inflammation/hypercoagulability likely plays a role. While antiretroviral therapy (ART) may return this process to pre-HIV levels, this has not been directly demonstrated. We analyzed data/specimens on 249 HIV+ participants from the US Military HIV Natural History Study, a prospective, multicenter observational cohort of >5600 active duty military personnel and beneficiaries living with HIV. We used stored blood specimens to measure D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) at three time points: pre-HIV seroconversion, ≥6 months post-HIV seroconversion but prior to ART initiation, and ≥6 months post-ART with documented HIV viral suppression on two successive evaluations. We evaluated the changes in biomarker levels between time points, and the association between these biomarker changes and future non-AIDS events. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 28 incident non-AIDS diseases. At ART initiation, the median CD4 count was 361cells/mm3; median duration of documented HIV infection 392 days; median time on ART was 354 days. Adjusted mean percent increase in D-dimer levels from pre-seroconversion to post-ART was 75.1% (95% confidence interval 24.6-148.0, p = 0.002). This increase in D-dimer was associated with a significant 22% increase risk of future non-AIDS events (p = 0.03). Changes in IL-6 levels across time points were small and not associated with future non-AIDS events. In conclusion, ART initiation and HIV viral suppression does not eliminate HIV associated elevation in D-dimer levels. This residual pathology is associated with an increased risk of future non-AIDS diseases.

  6. D-Dimer Levels before HIV Seroconversion Remain Elevated Even after Viral Suppression and Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, Matthew S; Bebu, Ionut; Tracy, Russell; So-Armah, Kaku; Okulicz, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Armstrong, Adam; O'Bryan, Thomas; Rimland, David; Justice, Amy C; Agan, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the excess risk of non-AIDS diseases among HIV infected people is unclear. HIV associated inflammation/hypercoagulability likely plays a role. While antiretroviral therapy (ART) may return this process to pre-HIV levels, this has not been directly demonstrated. We analyzed data/specimens on 249 HIV+ participants from the US Military HIV Natural History Study, a prospective, multicenter observational cohort of >5600 active duty military personnel and beneficiaries living with HIV. We used stored blood specimens to measure D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) at three time points: pre-HIV seroconversion, ≥6 months post-HIV seroconversion but prior to ART initiation, and ≥6 months post-ART with documented HIV viral suppression on two successive evaluations. We evaluated the changes in biomarker levels between time points, and the association between these biomarker changes and future non-AIDS events. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 28 incident non-AIDS diseases. At ART initiation, the median CD4 count was 361cells/mm3; median duration of documented HIV infection 392 days; median time on ART was 354 days. Adjusted mean percent increase in D-dimer levels from pre-seroconversion to post-ART was 75.1% (95% confidence interval 24.6-148.0, p = 0.002). This increase in D-dimer was associated with a significant 22% increase risk of future non-AIDS events (p = 0.03). Changes in IL-6 levels across time points were small and not associated with future non-AIDS events. In conclusion, ART initiation and HIV viral suppression does not eliminate HIV associated elevation in D-dimer levels. This residual pathology is associated with an increased risk of future non-AIDS diseases. PMID:27088215

  7. D-Dimer Levels before HIV Seroconversion Remain Elevated Even after Viral Suppression and Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, Matthew S.; Bebu, Ionut; Tracy, Russell; So-Armah, Kaku; Okulicz, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Armstrong, Adam; O’Bryan, Thomas; Rimland, David; Justice, Amy C.; Agan, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the excess risk of non-AIDS diseases among HIV infected people is unclear. HIV associated inflammation/hypercoagulability likely plays a role. While antiretroviral therapy (ART) may return this process to pre-HIV levels, this has not been directly demonstrated. We analyzed data/specimens on 249 HIV+ participants from the US Military HIV Natural History Study, a prospective, multicenter observational cohort of >5600 active duty military personnel and beneficiaries living with HIV. We used stored blood specimens to measure D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) at three time points: pre-HIV seroconversion, ≥6 months post-HIV seroconversion but prior to ART initiation, and ≥6 months post-ART with documented HIV viral suppression on two successive evaluations. We evaluated the changes in biomarker levels between time points, and the association between these biomarker changes and future non-AIDS events. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 28 incident non-AIDS diseases. At ART initiation, the median CD4 count was 361cells/mm3; median duration of documented HIV infection 392 days; median time on ART was 354 days. Adjusted mean percent increase in D-dimer levels from pre-seroconversion to post-ART was 75.1% (95% confidence interval 24.6–148.0, p = 0.002). This increase in D-dimer was associated with a significant 22% increase risk of future non-AIDS events (p = 0.03). Changes in IL-6 levels across time points were small and not associated with future non-AIDS events. In conclusion, ART initiation and HIV viral suppression does not eliminate HIV associated elevation in D-dimer levels. This residual pathology is associated with an increased risk of future non-AIDS diseases. PMID:27088215

  8. Do tonic and burst TMS modulate the lemniscal and extralemniscal system differentially?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk De Ridder, Elsa van der Loo, Karolien Van der Kelen, Tomas Menovsky, Paul van de Heyning, Aage Moller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tinnitus is an auditory phantom percept related to tonic and burst hyperactivity of the auditory system. Two parallel pathways supply auditory information to the cerebral cortex: the tonotopically organised lemniscal system, and the non-tonotopic extralemniscal system, firing in tonic mode and burst mode respectively. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a non-invasive method capable of modulating activity of the human cortex, by delivering tonic or burst stimuli. Burst stimulation is shown to be more powerful in activating the cerebral cortex than tonic stimulation and bursts may activate neurons that are not activated by tonic stimulations. Methods: The effect of both tonic and burst TMS in 14 placebo-negative patients presenting narrow band/white noise tinnitus were analysed. Results: Our TMS results show that narrow band/white noise tinnitus is better suppressed with burst TMS in comparison to tonic TMS, t(13=6.4, p=.000. For pure tone tinnitus no difference is found between burst or tonic TMS, t(13=.3, ns. Discussion: Based on the hypothesis that white noise is the result of hyperactivity in the non-tonotopic system and pure tone tinnitus of the tonotopic system, we suggest that burst stimulation modulates the extralemniscal system and lemniscal system and tonic stimulation only the lemniscal system.

  9. Are gamma-ray bursts cosmological?

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, I

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst sources are distributed with a high level of isotropy, which is compatible with either a cosmological origin or an extended Galactic halo origin. The brightness distribution is another indicator used to characterize the spatial distribution in distance. In this paper the author discusses detailed fits of the BATSE gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedmann models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and the author derives the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable

  10. Behaviorally relevant burst coding in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Patrick; Pollack, Gerald S

    2009-08-01

    Bursts of action potentials in sensory interneurons are believed to signal the occurrence of particularly salient stimulus features. Previous work showed that bursts in an identified, ultrasound-tuned interneuron (AN2) of the cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus code for conspicuous increases in amplitude of an ultrasound stimulus, resulting in behavioral responses that are interpreted as avoidance of echolocating bats. We show that the primary sensory neurons that inform AN2 about high-frequency acoustic stimuli also produce bursts. As is the case for AN2, bursts in sensory neurons perform better as feature detectors than isolated, nonburst, spikes. Bursting is temporally correlated between sensory neurons, suggesting that on occurrence of a salient stimulus feature, AN2 will receive strong synaptic input in the form of coincident bursts, from several sensory neurons, and that this might result in bursting in AN2. Our results show that an important feature of the temporal structure of interneuron spike trains can be established at the earliest possible level of sensory processing, i.e., that of the primary sensory neuron.

  11. Montagens curtas com instrumentação do nível fracturado e moldagem in situ no tratamento das fracturas tipo "burst" da coluna toracolombar Montajes cortas con instrumentación del nivel fracturado y molde in situ en el tratamiento de las fracturas tipo burst de la columna toracolumbar Short-segment fixation of thoracolumbar burst fractures using pedicle fixation at the level of the fracture and in situ bending

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Cacho Rodrigues; Manuel Ribeiro da Silva; Vítor Vidinha; Nuno Neves; Rui Matos; Rui Pinto

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVO: Avaliação dos resultados clínicos e radiográficos do tratamento cirúrgico de fracturas tipo burst da coluna toracolombar por fixação posterior curta, com instrumentação do nível fracturado e moldagem in situ. MÉTODOS: Entre Novembro de 2007 e Janeiro de 2009, foram seleccionados pacientes que sofreram fractura da coluna toracolombar tipo burst a um nível, com presença de instabilidade neurológica ou mecânica, submetidos a fixação posterior curta com instrumentação do nível fractura...

  12. Connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions for stochastic models of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variability in protein levels for genetically identical cells. Such variability in protein levels can arise from infrequent synthesis of mRNAs which in turn give rise to bursts of protein expression. Protein expression occurring in bursts has indeed been observed experimentally and recent studies have also found evidence for transcriptional bursting, i.e. production of mRNAs in bursts. Given that there are distinct experimental techniques for quantifying the noise at different stages of gene expression, it is of interest to derive analytical results connecting experimental observations at different levels. In this work, we consider stochastic models of gene expression for which mRNA and protein production occurs in independent bursts. For such models, we derive analytical expressions connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions which show how the functional form of the mRNA burst distribution can be inferred from the protein burst distribution. Additionally, if gene expression is repressed such that observed protein bursts arise only from single mRNAs, we show how observations of protein burst distributions (repressed and unrepressed) can be used to completely determine the mRNA burst distribution. Assuming independent contributions from individual bursts, we derive analytical expressions connecting means and variances for burst and steady-state protein distributions. Finally, we validate our general analytical results by considering a specific reaction scheme involving regulation of protein bursts by small RNAs. For a range of parameters, we derive analytical expressions for regulated protein distributions that are validated using stochastic simulations. The analytical results obtained in this work can thus serve as useful inputs for a broad range of studies focusing on stochasticity in gene expression

  13. Bursts de raios gama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  14. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    astronomers therefore turned to the powerful multi-mode FORS1 instrument on the VLT ANTU telescope. They obtained 31 polarimetric observations over a period of 38 days, enabling them to measure, for the first time , the changes of the polarisation of an optical gamma-ray burst afterglow with time. This unique set of observational data documents the physical changes in the remote object in unsurpassed detail. Their data show the presence of polarisation at the level of 0.3 to 2.5 % throughout the 38-day period with significant variability in strength and orientation on timescales down to hours. This particular behaviour has not been predicted by any of the major theories. Unfortunately, the very complex light curve of this GRB afterglow, in itself not understood, prevents a straightforward application of existing polarisation models. " It turns out that deriving the direction of the jet and the magnetic field structure is not as simple as we thought originally ", notes Olaf Reimer , another member of the team. " But the rapid changes of the polarisation properties, even during smooth phases of the afterglow light curve, provide a challenge to afterglow theory ". " Possibly ", adds Jochen Greiner , " the overall low level of polarisation indicates that the strength of the magnetic field in the parallel and perpendicular directions do not differ by more than 10%, thus suggesting a field strongly coupled with the moving material. This is different from the large-scale field which is left-over from the exploding star and which is thought to produce the high-level of polarisation in the gamma-rays. " More Information The research described in this Press Release will appear under the title " The evolution of the polarisation of the afterglow of GRB 030329 " by Jochen Greiner et al. in the November 13, 2003 issue of the science journal "Nature". A German translation of the information of this page can be found at Astronomie.de. Notes [1]: In astronomy, the "redshift" denotes the

  15. Direct determination of trace-level haloacetic acids in drinking water by two-dimensional ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Verrey, Dominique; Louyer, Mari-Vorgan; Thomas, Olivier; Baurès, Estelle

    2013-01-01

    During the treatment process of drinking water, disinfectants (chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide) react on water containing organic matter and bromide to produce disinfection by-products at trace levels. Among them, five of the nine existing halo-acetic acids (HAAs) are commonly found in drinking water (monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), and Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA)), including four classified in the 2B IARC gro...

  16. Emergent synchronous bursting of oxytocin neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Rossoni

    Full Text Available When young suckle, they are rewarded intermittently with a let-down of milk that results from reflex secretion of the hormone oxytocin; without oxytocin, newly born young will die unless they are fostered. Oxytocin is made by magnocellular hypothalamic neurons, and is secreted from their nerve endings in the pituitary in response to action potentials (spikes that are generated in the cell bodies and which are propagated down their axons to the nerve endings. Normally, oxytocin cells discharge asynchronously at 1-3 spikes/s, but during suckling, every 5 min or so, each discharges a brief, intense burst of spikes that release a pulse of oxytocin into the circulation. This reflex was the first, and is perhaps the best, example of a physiological role for peptide-mediated communication within the brain: it is coordinated by the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of oxytocin cells; it can be facilitated by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin into the hypothalamus, and it can be blocked by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin antagonist. Here we show how synchronized bursting can arise in a neuronal network model that incorporates basic observations of the physiology of oxytocin cells. In our model, bursting is an emergent behaviour of a complex system, involving both positive and negative feedbacks, between many sparsely connected cells. The oxytocin cells are regulated by independent afferent inputs, but they interact by local release of oxytocin and endocannabinoids. Oxytocin released from the dendrites of these cells has a positive-feedback effect, while endocannabinoids have an inhibitory effect by suppressing the afferent input to the cells.

  17. Coherence resonance in bursting neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, June Hoan; Lee, Ho Jun; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2015-10-01

    Synchronized neural bursts are one of the most noticeable dynamic features of neural networks, being essential for various phenomena in neuroscience, yet their complex dynamics are not well understood. With extrinsic electrical and optical manipulations on cultured neural networks, we demonstrate that the regularity (or randomness) of burst sequences is in many cases determined by a (few) low-dimensional attractor(s) working under strong neural noise. Moreover, there is an optimal level of noise strength at which the regularity of the interburst interval sequence becomes maximal—a phenomenon of coherence resonance. The experimental observations are successfully reproduced through computer simulations on a well-established neural network model, suggesting that the same phenomena may occur in many in vivo as well as in vitro neural networks.

  18. Coherence resonance in bursting neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, June Hoan; Lee, Ho Jun; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Kyoung J

    2015-10-01

    Synchronized neural bursts are one of the most noticeable dynamic features of neural networks, being essential for various phenomena in neuroscience, yet their complex dynamics are not well understood. With extrinsic electrical and optical manipulations on cultured neural networks, we demonstrate that the regularity (or randomness) of burst sequences is in many cases determined by a (few) low-dimensional attractor(s) working under strong neural noise. Moreover, there is an optimal level of noise strength at which the regularity of the interburst interval sequence becomes maximal-a phenomenon of coherence resonance. The experimental observations are successfully reproduced through computer simulations on a well-established neural network model, suggesting that the same phenomena may occur in many in vivo as well as in vitro neural networks.

  19. Anti-Mullerian hormone levels decline under hormonal suppression: a prospective analysis in fertile women after delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortner Iris

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AMH's reported stability during periods of hormonal change makes it a practical tool in assessing ovarian reserve. However, AMH declines with age and age-specific cut-offs remain to be established in women with proven fertility. This study aims to determine age-specific ranges of AMH in women with proven fertility. Methods Two hundred-ten fertile women, aged 18-40 years, were prospectively recruited for AMH measurements within 14 days after delivery and age stratified into 3 groups (18-30, 31-36 and 37-40 years. Eligibility required spontaneous conception within a maximal period of six months. Autoimmune diseases, chemotherapy, radiation, ovarian surgery and polycystic ovary syndrome precluded inclusion. Results 95% confidence intervals of AMH declined with advancing female age from 0.9-1.1 to 0.6-0.9 and 0.2-0.4 ng/mL (P Conclusions Like infertile populations, fertile women demonstrate declining AMH with advancing age. Uniformly lower levels than in infertile women suggest that AMH levels do not appear as stable under all hormonal influences as previously reported.

  20. Optimal control of quantum gates and suppression of decoherence in a system of interacting two-level particles

    CERN Document Server

    Grace, M; Kosut, R L; Lidar, D A; Rabitz, H; Walmsley, I A; Brif, Constantin; Grace, Matthew; Kosut, Robert L.; Lidar, Daniel A.; Rabitz, Herschel; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2007-01-01

    Methods of optimal control are applied to a model system of interacting two-level particles (e.g., spin-half atomic nuclei or electrons or two-level atoms) to produce high-fidelity quantum gates while simultaneously negating the detrimental effect of decoherence. One set of particles functions as the quantum information processor, whose evolution is controlled by a time-dependent external field. The other particles are not directly controlled and serve as an effective environment, coupling to which is the source of decoherence. The control objective is to generate target one- and two-qubit unitary gates in the presence of strong environmentally-induced decoherence and under physically motivated restrictions on the control field. The quantum-gate fidelity, expressed in terms of a novel state-independent distance measure, is maximized with respect to the control field using combined genetic and gradient algorithms. The resulting high-fidelity gates demonstrate the feasibility of precisely guiding the quantum ev...

  1. Tesofensine induces appetite suppression and weight loss with reversal of low forebrain dopamine levels in the diet-induced obese rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Jensen, Majbrit M; Overgaard, Agnete;

    2013-01-01

    Tesofensine is a triple monoamine reuptake inhibitor which inhibits noradrenaline, 5-HT and dopamine reuptake. Tesofensine is currently in clinical development for the treatment of obesity, however, the pharmacological basis for its strong and sustained effects in obesity management...... is not clarified. Tesofensine effectively induces appetite suppression in the diet-induced obese (DIO) rat partially being ascribed to an indirect stimulation of central dopamine receptor function subsequent to blocked dopamine transporter activity. This is interesting, as obese patients have reduced central......, tesofensine produces weight loss together with reversal of lowered forebrain dopamine levels in DIO rats, suggesting that tesofensine's anti-obesity effects, at least in part, are associated with positive modulation of central dopaminergic activity....

  2. An Analysis of Burst Disc Pressure Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Robinson; B. C. Odegard, Jr.; N. r. Moody; S. H. Goods

    2000-06-01

    During the development stage of the 1X Acorn burst disc, burst pressure test results exhibited an unexpected increase of 8 to 14% over times of 90--100 days from initial fabrication. This increase is a concern where design constraints require stability. The disc material, 316L stainless steel sheet, is formed to a dome-like geometry and scored to produce a thin-walled, high-strength ligament. The fracture events controlling burst occur in that ligament. Thus it has been characterized both for tensile properties and microstructure through nanoindentation, magnetic measurements, optical and transmission electron microscopy. These results compare favorably with finite element simulation of the properties of the ligament. The ligament exhibits a highly heterogeneous microstructure; its small volume and microstructural heterogeneity make it difficult to identify which microstructural feature controls fracture and hence burst pressure. Bulk mechanical test specimens were fabricated to emulate mid-ligament properties, and aged at both room and elevated temperatures to characterize and accelerate the temporal behavior of the burst disc. Property changes included yield and ultimate tensile strength increases, and fracture strain decreases with aging. Specimens were subjected to a reversion anneal identical to that given the burst disc to eliminate the martensite phase formed during rolling. Reversion-annealed samples exhibited no change in properties in room temperature or accelerated aging, showing that the reversion-anneal eliminated the aging phenomenon. Aging was analyzed in terms of diffusion controlled precipitate growth kinetics, showing that carbon migration to dislocations is consistent with the strength increases. A vacancy-assisted diffusion mechanism for carbon transport is proposed, giving rise to rapid aging, which replaces interstitial carbon diffusion until excess vacancies from deformation are consumed. Mechanical activation parameters in stress relaxation

  3. SWIFT and BATSE bursts' classification

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, I; Balazs, L G; Tusnady, G; Veres, P

    2009-01-01

    Two classes of gamma-ray bursts were identified in the BATSE catalogs characterized by their durations. There were also some indications for the existence of a third type of gamma-ray bursts. Swift satellite detectors have different spectral sensitivity than pre-Swift ones for GRBs. Therefore in this paper we analyze the bursts' duration distribution and also the duration-hardness bivariate distribution, published in The First BAT Catalog. Similarly to the BATSE data, to explain the BAT GRBs' duration distribution three components are needed. Although, the relative frequencies of the groups are different than they were in the BATSE GRB sample, the difference in the instrument spectral sensitivities can explain this bias in a natural way. This means theoretical models may have to explain three different type of gamma-ray bursts.

  4. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note...

  5. Active suppression of early immune response in tobacco by the human pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natali Shirron

    Full Text Available The persistence of enteric pathogens on plants has been studied extensively, mainly due to the potential hazard of human pathogens such as Salmonella enterica being able to invade and survive in/on plants. Factors involved in the interactions between enteric bacteria and plants have been identified and consequently it was hypothesized that plants may be vectors or alternative hosts for enteric pathogens. To survive, endophytic bacteria have to escape the plant immune systems, which function at different levels through the plant-bacteria interactions. To understand how S. enterica survives endophyticaly we conducted a detailed analysis on its ability to elicit or evade the plant immune response. The models of this study were Nicotiana tabacum plants and cells suspension exposed to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. The plant immune response was analyzed by looking at tissue damage and by testing oxidative burst and pH changes. It was found that S. Typhimurium did not promote disease symptoms in the contaminated plants. Live S. Typhimurium did not trigger the production of an oxidative burst and pH changes by the plant cells, while heat killed or chloramphenicol treated S. Typhimurium and purified LPS of Salmonella were significant elicitors, indicating that S. Typhimurium actively suppress the plant response. By looking at the plant response to mutants defective in virulence factors we showed that the suppression depends on secreted factors. Deletion of invA reduced the ability of S. Typhimurium to suppress oxidative burst and pH changes, indicating that a functional SPI1 TTSS is required for the suppression. This study demonstrates that plant colonization by S. Typhimurium is indeed an active process. S. Typhimurium utilizes adaptive strategies of altering innate plant perception systems to improve its fitness in the plant habitat. All together these results suggest a complex mechanism for perception of S. Typhimurium by plants.

  6. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of stability function in the incoherent (i.e. disorder), coherent, chimera and multi-chimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multi-chimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is i...

  7. Intramuscular depot formulations of leuprolide acetate suppress testosterone levels below a 20 ng/dL threshold: a retrospective analysis of two Phase III studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spitz A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aaron Spitz,1 Marc Gittelman,2 Lawrence I Karsh,3 Sanja Dragnic,4 Ahmed M Soliman,5 Aditya Lele,6 Damian Gruca,7 Michael Norton4 1Orange County Urology Associates, Laguna Beach, CA, 221st Century Oncology/UroMedix-Aventura Division, Aventura, FL, 3The Urology Center of Colorado, Denver, CO, 4US Medical Affairs, 5Health Economics and Outcomes Research, 6Data and Statistical Sciences, AbbVie Inc., North Chicago, IL, USA; 7Global Medical Affairs, AbbVie Deutschland, Ludwigshafen, Germany Introduction: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH analogs is a standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer. GnRH analog therapy can reduce testosterone to “castrate” levels, historically defined as <50 ng/dL. With the advent of newer assays, a lower threshold of <20 ng/dL has recently been proposed. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of two Phase III trials of 4- and 6-month depot microsphere formulations of leuprolide acetate (LA, a GnRH agonist that has previously demonstrated efficacy in testosterone suppression to <50 ng/dL in patients on ADT. This analysis investigates the ability of these LA formulations to suppress to ≤20 ng/dL levels.Methods: In two of five AbbVie/Abbott clinical trials of microsphere formulations of LA for ADT, analytic technology permitting testosterone detection as low as 3 ng/dL was used and thus was selected for this analysis. Both trials were open-label, fixed-dose studies in prostate cancer patients, naïve to ADT. Patients received either 30 mg (4-month formulation; n=49 or 45 mg (6-month formulation; n=151 depot injections of LA microspheres. Treatment duration was up to 32 weeks for the 4-month formulation and 48 weeks for the 6-month formulation. The proportion of patients achieving the 20 ng/dL threshold was determined every 4 weeks.Results: Pooled analysis showed that 152 of 193 (79% of patients achieved serum testosterone levels of ≤20 ng/dL at 4 weeks, and

  8. High levels of adherence and viral suppression in a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy for 6, 12 and 18 months in Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batya Elul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Generalizable data are needed on the magnitude and determinants of adherence and virological suppression among patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Africa. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey with chart abstraction, patient interviews and site assessments in a nationally representative sample of adults on ART for 6, 12 and 18 months at 20 sites in Rwanda. Adherence was assessed using 3- and 30-day patient recall. A systematically selected sub-sample had viral load (VL measurements. Multivariable logistic regression examined predictors of non-perfect (40 copies/ml. RESULTS: Overall, 1,417 adults were interviewed and 837 had VL measures. Ninety-four percent and 78% reported perfect adherence for the last 3 and 30 days, respectively. Eighty-three percent had undetectable VL. In adjusted models, characteristics independently associated with higher odds of non-perfect 30-day adherence were: being on ART for 18 months (vs. 6 months; younger age; reporting severe (vs. no or few side effects in the prior 30 days; having no documentation of CD4 cell count at ART initiation (vs. having a CD4 cell count of <200 cells/µL; alcohol use; and attending sites which initiated ART services in 2003-2004 and 2005 (vs. 2006-2007; sites with ≥600 (vs. <600 patients on ART; or sites with peer educators. Participation in an association for people living with HIV/AIDS; and receiving care at sites which regularly conduct home-visits were independently associated with lower odds of non-adherence. Higher odds of having a detectable VL were observed among patients at sites with peer educators. Being female; participating in an association for PLWHA; and using a reminder tool were independently associated with lower odds of having detectable VL. CONCLUSIONS: High levels of adherence and viral suppression were observed in the Rwandan national ART program, and associated with potentially modifiable factors.

  9. A Retroactive-Burst Framework for Automated Intrusion Response System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shameli-Sendi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present an adaptive and cost-sensitive model to prevent security intrusions. In most automated intrusion response systems, response selection is performed locally based on current threat without using the knowledge of attacks history. Another challenge is that a group of responses are applied without any feedback mechanism to measure the response effect. We address these problems through retroactive-burst execution of responses and a Response Coordinator (RC mechanism, the main contributions of this work. The retroactive-burst execution consists of several burst executions of responses with, at the end of each burst, a mechanism for measuring the effectiveness of the applied responses by the risk assessment component. The appropriate combination of responses must be considered for each burst execution to mitigate the progress of the attack without necessarily running the next round of responses, because of the impact on legitimate users. In the proposed model, there is a multilevel response mechanism. To indicate which level is appropriate to apply based on the retroactive-burst execution, we get help from a Response Coordinator mechanism. The applied responses can improve the health of Applications, Kernel, Local Services, Network Services, and Physical Status. Based on these indexes, the RC gives a general overview of an attacker’s goal in a distributed environment.

  10. Prognostic value of non-reactive burst suppression EEG pattern associated to early neonatal seizures Valor prognóstico do EEG com padrão de surto-supressão não reativo associado a convulsões neonatais precoces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Lahorgue Nunes

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seizures are the most frequent neurological event in newborns and clinical data suggest that etiology is the dominant factor in long term outcome. However, there are consistent background EEG abnormalities associated to neonatal seizures that are usually related to unfavorable outcome as the burst - suppression pattern. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to correlate clinical and EEG features associated to long - term outcome of newborns with non - reactive burst - suppression (BS EEG. METHOD: Newborns included in the study were selected from our database and had conceptional age (at the time of first EEG >37 weeks, EEG recordings with non - reactive BS available for review and clinical follow up. RESULTS: 12 newborns met inclusion criteria, 50% had seizures in the first day of life. Seizures became refractory to treatment in all of them. In 50% the etiology of seizures was considered cryptogenic, 33% had inborn errors of metabolism and 17% had clinical history and neuroimage suggestive of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The follow-up showed that 7/12 infants deceased, 3 during the first year of life, and one in the neonatal period. All the survivors had severe developmental delay and multifocal neurological impairment. 92% developed refractory epilepsy, 58% were latter diagnosed with West syndrome. CONCLUSION: The non-reactive BS pattern may appear related to many neonatal neurological disorders and is associated with early and refractory neonatal seizures. It is clearly associated with elevated morbidity and mortality and to the development of post-neonatal epilepsy.RESUMO Convulsões representam o evento neurológico mais freqüente no período neonatal e a etiologia das crises parece ser o aspecto clínico mais associado ao prognóstico a longo prazo. Entretanto, existem padrões anormais de EEG, que de forma consistente relacionam-se a prognóstico, entre eles o padrão de surto - supressão. OBJETIVO: Este estudo teve

  11. Seeing the Turnover in the Brightness Distribution of Complex Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, B; Svensson, R; Stern, Boris; Poutanen, Juri; Svensson, Roland

    1997-01-01

    We observe strong correlations between the temporal properties of GRBs and their apparent brightness. The strongest effect is the difference between the brightness distributions of simple bursts (dominated by a single smooth pulse) and complex bursts (consisting of overlapping pulses). The latter has a break at a peak brightness ~1.5 ph cm^{-2} s^{-1}. The peak count rates of complex bursts systematically exceed those of simple bursts by a factor of ~2, the effect has significance level of ~10^{-7}. We also observe brightness dependent variations in the shape of the average time profile (ATP) of GRBs: the decaying slope of the ATP shows time dilation when comparing bright and dim bursts while the rising slope hardly changes. Both slopes of the ATP are deformed for weak bursts as compared to strong bursts. The interpretation of these effects is simple: a complex burst where a number of independent pulses overlap in time appears intrinsically stronger than a simple burst. Then the BATSE sample of complex bursts...

  12. Interactions between surround suppression and interocular suppression in human vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Chun Cai

    Full Text Available Several types of suppression phenomena have been observed in the visual system. For example, the ability to detect a target stimulus is often impaired when the target is embedded in a high-contrast surround. This contextual modulation, known as surround suppression, was formerly thought to occur only in the periphery. Another type of suppression phenomena is interocular suppression, in which the sensitivity to a monocular target is reduced by a superimposed mask in the opposite eye. Here, we explored how the two types of suppression operating across different spatial regions interact with one another when they simultaneously exert suppressive influences on a common target presented at the fovea. In our experiments, a circular target grating presented to the fovea of one eye was suppressed interocularly by a noise pattern of the same size in the other eye. The foveal stimuli were either shown alone or surrounded by a monocular annular grating. The orientation and eye-of-origin of the surround grating were varied. We found that the detection of the foveal target subjected to interocular suppression was severely impaired by the addition of the surround grating, indicating strong surround suppression in the fovea. In contrast, when the interocular suppression was released by superimposing a binocular fusion ring onto both the target and the dichoptic mask, the surround suppression effect was found to be dramatically decreased. In addition, the surround suppression was found to depend on the contrast of the dichoptic noise with the greatest surround suppression effect being obtained only when the noise contrast was at an intermediate level. These findings indicate that surround suppression and interocular suppression are not independent of each other, but there are strong interactions between them. Moreover, our results suggest that strong surround suppression may also occur at the fovea and not just the periphery.

  13. Twelve-Month Antiretroviral Therapy Suppresses Plasma and Genital Viral Loads but Fails to Alter Genital Levels of Cytokines, in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Rwandan Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Ondoa

    Full Text Available Genital viral load (GVL is the main determinant of sexual transmission of human immune-deficiency virus (HIV. The effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART on local cervico-vaginal immunological factors associated with GVL is poorly described. We aimed to identify the risk factors of detectable GVL, and the impact of ART on HIV genital shedding and its correlates in a cohort of HIV-infected women, attending HIV care in Kigali, Rwanda.All participants were evaluated for GVL, plasma viral load (PVL, CD4 count, various sexually-transmitted infections (STIs at baseline and at month 12. Genital concentration of 19 cytokines and mRNA expression of APOBEC3G and BST2, two host HIV restriction factors, were evaluated at baseline in all participants. Cytokine levels were re-assessed at month 12 only in participants eligible for ART at baseline. Risk factors of GVL ≥ 40 copies/mL at baseline and month 12 were assessed using logistic regression. Effect of 12-month ART on various local and systemic immunological parameters was examined using a paired t-test and McNemar as appropriate.96 of the 247 women enrolled in the study were eligible for ART. After 12 months of ART, PVL and GVL decreased to undetectable level in respectively 74 and 88% of treated participants. ART did not affect cytokine levels. HIV genital shedding occurred only when PVL was detectable. At baseline, GVL was independently associated with IL-1β after controlling for PVL, age and N. gonorrhea infection (95% CI 1.32-2.15 and at month 12 with MIP-1β (95% CI 0.96-21.32 after controlling for baseline GVL, PVL and month 12 IL-8.Suppressive ART does not necessarily reduce genital level of immune activation. Minimizing all conditions favoring genital inflammation, including active detection and treatment of STIs, might reduce the risk of HIV transmission as supplement to the provision of potent ART.

  14. Electron Energization During m=0 Magnetic Bursts in MST plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W. C.; den Hartog, D. J.; Morton, L. A.; MST Team

    2015-11-01

    MST reversed-field pinch plasmas develop magnetic modes with both a core-resonant poloidal mode m=1 structure and edge-resonant m=0 structure on the reversal surface. The impact of the m=0 modes on electron energization has been observed with Thomson scattering under plasma conditions with suppressed m=1 modes. Under such conditions, the m=0 modes undergo brief (~100 μs) bursts of localized magnetic activity. These bursts show a localized 4% heating of electrons above a 600-900 eV background temperature, associated with a reduction of magnetic energy. An inward propagating cold pulse follows after the heating as a result of reduced confinement. Ensembles of hundreds of bursts are required to measure small relative heating, however single-shot results from MST's high repetition Thomson scattering diagnostic support the ensemble results. Analysis of Thomson scattering data also provides constraints on non-Maxwellian distributions and upcoming upgrades will improve the ability to resolve electron currents associated with the magnetic bursts. This work is supported by the US DOE and NSF.

  15. Broadband Spectral Study of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizibayrak, Demet; Gogus, Ersin; Sasmaz Mus, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    Magnetar bursts occur sporadically on random occasions, and every burst-active episode carries unique information about the bursting magnetar. Therefore, in-depth spectral and temporal analyses of each of the magnetar bursts provide new insights into the bursting and radiation mechanisms. There have been a number of studies over the last decade, investigating the spectral and temporal properties of magnetar bursts. The spectra of typical magnetar bursts were generally described with the Comptonized model or the sum of two blackbody functions. However, it was recently shown that the actual spectral nature of these bursts can be conclusively determined if the spectral analysis is performed on a wide energy coverage. We present the results of in-depth systematic broadband (2 - 250 keV) spectral analysis of a large number of bursts originated from three magnetars: SGR 1806-20, SGR 1900+14, and SGR J1550-5418, observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer.

  16. Detection of artifacts from high energy bursts in neonatal EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sourya; Biswas, Arunava; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Majumdar, Arun Kumar; Majumdar, Bandana; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Detection of non-cerebral activities or artifacts, intermixed within the background EEG, is essential to discard them from subsequent pattern analysis. The problem is much harder in neonatal EEG, where the background EEG contains spikes, waves, and rapid fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. Existing artifact detection methods are mostly limited to detect only a subset of artifacts such as ocular, muscle or power line artifacts. Few methods integrate different modules, each for detection of one specific category of artifact. Furthermore, most of the reference approaches are implemented and tested on adult EEG recordings. Direct application of those methods on neonatal EEG causes performance deterioration, due to greater pattern variation and inherent complexity. A method for detection of a wide range of artifact categories in neonatal EEG is thus required. At the same time, the method should be specific enough to preserve the background EEG information. The current study describes a feature based classification approach to detect both repetitive (generated from ECG, EMG, pulse, respiration, etc.) and transient (generated from eye blinking, eye movement, patient movement, etc.) artifacts. It focuses on artifact detection within high energy burst patterns, instead of detecting artifacts within the complete background EEG with wide pattern variation. The objective is to find true burst patterns, which can later be used to identify the Burst-Suppression (BS) pattern, which is commonly observed during newborn seizure. Such selective artifact detection is proven to be more sensitive to artifacts and specific to bursts, compared to the existing artifact detection approaches applied on the complete background EEG. Several time domain, frequency domain, statistical features, and features generated by wavelet decomposition are analyzed to model the proposed bi-classification between burst and artifact segments. A feature selection method is also applied to select the

  17. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  18. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  19. Thalamic neuron models encode stimulus information by burst-size modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Henry Elijah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thalamic neurons have been long assumed to fire in tonic mode during perceptive states, and in burst mode during sleep and unconsciousness. However, recent evidence suggests that bursts may also be relevant in the encoding of sensory information. Here we explore the neural code of such thalamic bursts. In order to assess whether the burst code is generic or whether it depends on the detailed properties of each bursting neuron, we analyzed two neuron models incorporating different levels of biological detail. One of the models contained no information of the biophysical processes entailed in spike generation, and described neuron activity at a phenomenological level. The second model represented the evolution of the individual ionic conductances involved in spiking and bursting, and required a large number of parameters. We analyzed the models' input selectivity using reverse correlation methods and information theory. We found that n-spike bursts from both models transmit information by modulating their spike count in response to changes to instantaneous input features, such as slope, phase, amplitude, etc. The stimulus feature that is most efficiently encoded by bursts, however, need not coincide with one of such classical features. We therefore searched for the optimal feature among all those that could be expressed as a linear transformation of the time-dependent input current. We found that bursting neurons transmitted 6 times more information about such more general features. The relevant events in the stimulus were located in a time window spanning ~100 ms before and ~20 ms after burst onset. Most importantly, the neural code employed by the simple and the biologically realistic models was largely the same, implying that the simple thalamic neuron model contains the essential ingredients that account for the computational properties of the thalamic burst code. Thus, our results suggest the n-spike burst code is a general property of

  20. Thalamic neuron models encode stimulus information by burst-size modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elijah, Daniel H; Samengo, Inés; Montemurro, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    Thalamic neurons have been long assumed to fire in tonic mode during perceptive states, and in burst mode during sleep and unconsciousness. However, recent evidence suggests that bursts may also be relevant in the encoding of sensory information. Here, we explore the neural code of such thalamic bursts. In order to assess whether the burst code is generic or whether it depends on the detailed properties of each bursting neuron, we analyzed two neuron models incorporating different levels of biological detail. One of the models contained no information of the biophysical processes entailed in spike generation, and described neuron activity at a phenomenological level. The second model represented the evolution of the individual ionic conductances involved in spiking and bursting, and required a large number of parameters. We analyzed the models' input selectivity using reverse correlation methods and information theory. We found that n-spike bursts from both models transmit information by modulating their spike count in response to changes to instantaneous input features, such as slope, phase, amplitude, etc. The stimulus feature that is most efficiently encoded by bursts, however, need not coincide with one of such classical features. We therefore searched for the optimal feature among all those that could be expressed as a linear transformation of the time-dependent input current. We found that bursting neurons transmitted 6 times more information about such more general features. The relevant events in the stimulus were located in a time window spanning ~100 ms before and ~20 ms after burst onset. Most importantly, the neural code employed by the simple and the biologically realistic models was largely the same, implying that the simple thalamic neuron model contains the essential ingredients that account for the computational properties of the thalamic burst code. Thus, our results suggest the n-spike burst code is a general property of thalamic neurons.

  1. Removing Impulse Bursts from Images by Training-Based Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astola Jaakko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of impulse bursts in remote sensing images are analyzed and a model for this noise is proposed. The model also takes into consideration other noise types, for example, the multiplicative noise present in radar images. As a case study, soft morphological filters utilizing a training-based optimization scheme are used for the noise removal. Different approaches for the training are discussed. It is shown that these techniques can provide an effective removal of impulse bursts. At the same time, other noise types in images, for example, the multiplicative noise, can be suppressed without compromising good edge and detail preservation. Numerical simulation results, as well as examples of real remote sensing images, are presented.

  2. Quarkonium suppression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Petreczky

    2003-04-01

    I discuss quarkonium suppression in equilibrated strongly interacting matter. After a brief review of basic features of quarkonium production I discuss the application of recent lattice data on the heavy quark potential to the problem of quarkonium dissociation as well as the problem of direct lattice determination of quarkonium properties in finite temperature lattice QCD.

  3. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-01-01

    SWift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18 - 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 1038 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in IE 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  4. Superposition of Individual Activities: Urea-Mediated Suppression of Nitrate Uptake in the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum Revealed at the Population and Single-Cell Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matantseva, Olga; Skarlato, Sergei; Vogts, Angela; Pozdnyakov, Ilya; Liskow, Iris; Schubert, Hendrik; Voss, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Dinoflagellates readily use diverse inorganic and organic compounds as nitrogen sources, which is advantageous in eutrophied coastal areas exposed to high loads of anthropogenic nutrients, e.g., urea, one of the most abundant organic nitrogen substrates in seawater. Cell-to-cell variability in nutritional physiology can further enhance the diversity of metabolic strategies among dinoflagellates of the same species, but it has not been studied in free-living microalgae. We applied stable isotope tracers, isotope ratio mass spectrometry and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) to investigate the response of cultured nitrate-acclimated dinoflagellates Prorocentrum minimum to a sudden input of urea and the effect of urea on the concurrent nitrate uptake at the population and single-cell levels. We demonstrate that inputs of urea lead to suppression of nitrate uptake by P. minimum, and urea uptake exceeds the concurrent uptake of nitrate. Individual dinoflagellate cells within a population display significant heterogeneity in the rates of nutrient uptake and extent of the urea-mediated inhibition of the nitrate uptake, thus forming several groups characterized by different modes of nutrition. We conclude that urea originating from sporadic sources is rapidly utilized by dinoflagellates and can be used in biosynthesis or stored intracellularly depending on the nutrient status; therefore, sudden urea inputs can represent one of the factors triggering or supporting harmful algal blooms. Significant physiological heterogeneity revealed at the single-cell level is likely to play a role in alleviation of intra-population competition for resources and can affect the dynamics of phytoplankton populations and their maintenance in natural environments. PMID:27610101

  5. Posttranslationally caused bioluminescence burst of the Escherichia coli luciferase reporter strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideguchi, Yamato; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Ryo, Masashi; Motoki, Shogo; Kuwano, Takashi; Tezuka, Takafumi; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We continuously monitored bioluminescence from a wild-type reporter strain of Escherichia coli (lacp::luc+/WT), which carries the promoter of the lac operon (lacp) fused with the firefly luciferase gene (luc+). This strain showed a bioluminescence burst when shifted into the stationary growth phase. Bioluminescence profiles of other wild-type reporter strains (rpsPp::luc+ and argAp::luc+) and gene-deletion reporter strains (lacp::luc+/crp- and lacp::luc+/lacI-) indicate that transcriptional regulation is not responsible for generation of the burst. Consistently, changes in the luciferase protein levels did not recapitulate the profile of the burst. On the other hand, dissolved oxygen levels increased over the period across the burst, suggesting that the burst is, at least partially, caused by an increase in intracellular oxygen levels. We discuss limits of the firefly luciferase when used as a reporter for gene expression and its potential utility for monitoring metabolic changes in cells.

  6. US Army Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS) was developed to meet the Army requirements of an unattended, automatic nuclear burst reporting system. It provides pertinent data for battlefield commanders on a timely basis with high reliability

  7. Millisecond extragalactic radio bursts as magnetar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S B

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the population of millisecond extragalactic radio bursts discovered by Thornton et al. (2013) are in good correspondence with the hypothesis that such events are related to hyperflares of magnetars, as was proposed by us after the first observation of an extragalactic millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al. (2007). We also point that some of multiple millisecond radio bursts from M31 discovered by Rubio-Herrera et al. (2013) also can be related to weaker magnetar bursts.

  8. Profiles of Everyday Thought Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Ie, Amanda Yen Lin

    2014-01-01

    The present research assessed whether levels of depression, anxiety and worry, obsessive-compulsive distress, and psychopathy were differentially related to distinct thought suppression profiles. As a means to achieving this goal, the Profiles of Everyday Thought Suppression (PETS) scale was constructed to measure the frequencies with which various target thoughts are suppressed. The PETS scale demonstrated good internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and scores were positively co...

  9. Detecting pipe bursts by monitoring water demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Van der Roer, M.; Sperber, V.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm which compares measured and predicted water demands to detect pipe bursts was developed and tested on three data sets of water demand and reported pipe bursts of three years. The algorithm proved to be able to detect bursts where the water loss exceeds 30% of the average water demand in

  10. A BATSE-based search for repeaters in the sample of gamma-ray bursts detected by the WATCH experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Brandt, Søren Kristian;

    1998-01-01

    This study is the first known attempt to search for gamma-ray burst repeaters combining data from gamma-ray experiments flying on board different satellites and making use of information derived from the bursts detected simultaneously by all the experiments. The proposed method is suitable to...... correlate GRB data provided by experiments that overlap partially or totally in time. As an application of this method we have correlated the positions of 57 gamma-ray bursts observed by WATCH/GRANAT and WATCH/EURECA with 1905 bursts detected by BATSE. Comparing the so-called "added correlation" between the...... WATCH and BATSE bursts with that obtained with simulated WATCH catalogues, we conclude that there is no indication of recurrent activity of WATCH bursts in the BATSE sample. We derive an upper limit of 15.8%, with a confidence level of 94%, for the number of WATCH gamma-ray bursts that could represent a...

  11. First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Abbott et al.

    2004-03-09

    We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h{sub rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h{sub rss} {approx} 10{sup -19} - 10{sup -17} strain/{radical}Hz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

  12. First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A N; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S V; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barker-Patton, C; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff,S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Bland-Weaver, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R G; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Brozek, S; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, R; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ebeling, C; Edlund, J; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Flanagan, E; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ingley, R; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Kloevekorn, P; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H B; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K O; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNamara, P; Mendell, G; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Naundorf, H; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Papa, M A; Parameswariah, C; Parameshwaraiah, V; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Pratt, M; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schofield, R; Schrempel, M; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P S; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Skeldon, K D; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traeger, S; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Vallisneri, M; Van, M; Putten; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2004-01-01

    We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h_{rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h_{rss} ~ 10^{-19} - 10^{-17} strain/rtHz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

  13. Application Of Extreme Value Theory To Bursts Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas bin Md Said

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Bursts and extreme events in quantities such as connection durations, file sizes, throughput, etc. may produce undesirable consequences in computer networks. Deterioration in the quality of service is a major consequence. Predicting these extreme events and burst is important. It helps in reserving the right resources for a better quality of service. We applied Extreme value theory (EVT to predict bursts in network traffic. We took a deeper look into the application of EVT by using EVT based Exploratory Data Analysis. We found that traffic is naturally divided into two categories, Internal and external traffic. The internal traffic follows generalized extreme value (GEV model with a negative shape parameter, which is also the same as Weibull distribution. The external traffic follows a GEV with positive shape parameter, which is Frechet distribution. These findings are of great value to the quality of service in data networks, especially when included in service level agreement as traffic descriptor parameters.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts: The End Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Don

    1997-11-01

    The nature of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in astrophysics for more than a quarter century. A major reason for this is that no definite counterparts to the bursts could be found at other wavelengths, despite intense efforts spanning more than two decades. Consequently, the study of gamma-ray bursts has been isolated from the rest of astronomy. Scientists studying them have had only the laws of physics and the bursts themselves to guide them in attempting to solve the burst mystery. All of this changed dramatically with the discovery earlier this year of fading X-ray and optical sources in the arcminute-sized positional error boxes of several gamma-ray bursts. For the first time, temporal, as well as spatial, coincidence could be used to associate these X-ray and optical sources with the gamma-ray bursts. As a result, the odds are great that the fading X-ray and optical sources are counterparts of the bursts, and that the study of gamma-ray bursts has finally been connected with the rest of astronomy. In this talk, we describe the dramatic new information about the nature of gamma-ray bursts that the X-ray, optical, and radio observations of the fading sources have provided, and emphasize the implications that this information has for the distance scale to the bursts.

  15. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenq-Wei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  16. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  17. Assessing the reliability of eBURST using simulated populations with known ancestry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Thomas R

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The program eBURST uses multilocus sequence typing data to divide bacterial populations into groups of closely related strains (clonal complexes, predicts the founding genotype of each group, and displays the patterns of recent evolutionary descent of all other strains in the group from the founder. The reliability of eBURST was evaluated using populations simulated with different levels of recombination in which the ancestry of all strains was known. Results For strictly clonal simulations, where all allelic change is due to point mutation, the groups of related strains identified by eBURST were very similar to those expected from the true ancestry and most of the true ancestor-descendant relationships (90–98% were identified by eBURST. Populations simulated with low or moderate levels of recombination showed similarly high performance but the reliability of eBURST declined with increasing recombination to mutation ratio. Populations simulated under a high recombination to mutation ratio were dominated by a single large straggly eBURST group, which resulted from the incorrect linking of unrelated groups of strains into the same eBURST group. The reliability of the ancestor-descendant links in eBURST diagrams was related to the proportion of strains in the largest eBURST group, which provides a useful guide to when eBURST is likely to be unreliable. Conclusion Examination of eBURST groups within populations of a range of bacterial species showed that most were within the range in which eBURST is reliable, and only a small number (e.g. Burkholderia pseudomallei and Enterococcus faecium appeared to have such high rates of recombination that eBURST is likely to be unreliable. The study also demonstrates how three simple tests in eBURST v3 can be used to detect unreliable eBURST performance and recognise populations in which there appears to be a high rate of recombination relative to mutation.

  18. Microbial Antagonism at the Root Level Is Involved in the Suppression of Fusarium Wilt by the Combination of Nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum Fo47 and Pseudomonas putida WCS358

    OpenAIRE

    Duijff, B.J. (Ben); Recorbet, Ghislaine; Bakker, P. A. H. M.; Loper, J E; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    Two biological control agents, nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum Fo47 and Pseudomonas putida WCS358, were evaluated for suppression of Fusarium wilt of flax grown in nutrient solution and for suppression of the population density and metabolic activity of the causal organism F. oxysporum f. sp. lini strain Foln3GUS on root surfaces. Due to the presence of an introduced gusA reporter gene construct in Foln3GUS, the pathogen expressed b-glucuronidase activity that was related to its carbon metab...

  19. Gamma Ray Bursts Cook Book I: Formulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaeepour, Houri

    2008-01-01

    Since the suggestion of relativistic shocks as the origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in early 90's, the mathematical formulation of this process has stayed at phenomenological level. One of the reasons for the slow development of theoretical works in this domain has been the simple power-law behaviour of the afterglows hours or days after the prompt gamma-ray emission. Nowadays with the launch of the Swift satellite, gamma-ray bursts can be observed in multi-wavelength from a few tens of seconds after trigger onward. These observations have leaded to the discovery of features unexplainable by the simple formulation of the shocks and emission processes used up to now. But "devil is in details" and some of these features may be explained with a more detailed formulation of phenomena and without adhoc addition of new processes. Such a formulation is the goal of this work. We present a consistent formulation of the collision between two spherical relativistic shells. The model can be applied to both internal and ...

  20. Self-organized dendritic sidebranching in directional solidification: sidebranch coherence within uncorrelated bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocheau, Alain; Bodea, Simona; Georgelin, Marc

    2009-09-01

    We experimentally study the level of organization of dendritic sidebranching in directional solidification. For this, we extract successive interface positions at a fixed distance from the dendrite tips and we perform various correlation analyses. The sidebranching signals appear composed of randomly distributed bursts in which sidebranching coherence is surprisingly large and robust. This is attested by the large autocorrelation found in single bursts and the large cross-correlation found in any couple of bursts, even belonging to different sides of a dendrite or to different dendrites. However, the phase coherence of sidebranching breaks down at the transition between bursts. This restricts the coherence of extended sidebranching signals to a mean burst length and prevents the occurrence of large scale cross-correlation between them. This balanced view on sidebranching coherence stresses the capability of self-organization of dendrites in material science and sheds light on the nature of sidebranching on curved growing forms.

  1. Performance evaluation of a burst-mode EDFA in an optical packet and circuit integrated network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, Masaki; Awaji, Yoshinari; Furukawa, Hideaki; Shinada, Satoshi; Puttnam, Benjamin J; Wada, Naoya

    2013-12-30

    We experimentally investigate the performance of burst-mode EDFA in an optical packet and circuit integrated system. In such networks, packets and light paths can be dynamically assigned to the same fibers, resulting in gain transients in EDFAs throughout the network that can limit network performance. Here, we compare the performance of a 'burst-mode' EDFA (BM-EDFA), employing transient suppression techniques and optical feedback, with conventional EDFAs, and those using automatic gain control and previous BM-EDFA implementations. We first measure gain transients and other impairments in a simplified set-up before making frame error-rate measurements in a network demonstration.

  2. Direct injection, simple and robust analysis of trace-level bromate and bromide in drinking water by IC with suppressed conductivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Wasiu; Gandhi, Jay; Zhang, Chunlong Carl

    2010-08-01

    Bromide is ubiquitously found in drinking water. It is introduced into source water primarily by contact with bromide-containing soils or seawater having high bromide content. Bromide is converted into carcinogenic bromate during ozonation processes employed in some drinking water and wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, monitoring of bromate in drinking water and its precursor bromide in source water is required. The purpose of this study was to survey bromide and bromate concentrations in randomly selected bottle waters of various brands and several tap water samples in the coastal Houston area using a direct-injection ion chromatography (IC) and a suppressed conductivity system. The method employs a simple isocratic IC with loop injection with calculated detection limit of 0.009 microg/L for bromate and 0.028 microg/L for bromide (250-microL sample volume). Allowing the detection of both species at the microg/L level in drinking water, this method does not require specialized instrumentation such as two-dimensional IC, expensive sample preparation, or post-column reactions. The results show that, whereas bromate remains undetected in all five tap water samples, there are significant high concentrations of bromide in the coastal Houston area (294.79 +/- 56.97 microg/L). Its link to potential seawater intrusion need to be further investigated. For bottle water samples randomly collected, 18.2% (2 out of 11) showed detectable amount of both bromide and bromate. The detection of bromate coincides with those bottle water samples that underwent ozonation treatment. Further sample campaign with exclusively ozonated bottle water samples (n = 19) showed 100% detection rate for both bromide and bromate. The 99% confidence intervals were 14.45-37.97 microg/L and 0.32-2.58 microg/L for bromide and bromate, respectively. The highest level of bromate among all ozonated bottle water samples was 7.57 microg/L, a concentration close to the U.S. EPA prescribed limit for

  3. Recent results of zebra patterns in solar radio bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gennady P.Chernov

    2010-01-01

    This review covers the most recent experimental results and theoretical research on zebra patterns(ZPs)in solar radio bursts.The basic attention is given to events with new peculiar elements of zebra patterns received over the last few years.All new properties are considered in light of both what was known earlier and new theoretical models.Large-scale ZPs consisting of small-scale fiber bursts could be explained by simultaneous inclusion of two mechanisms when whistler waves"highlight"the levels of double plasma resonance(DPR).A unique fine structure was observed in the event on 2006 December 13: spikes in absorption formed dark ZP stripes against the absorptive type Ⅲ-like bursts.The spikes in absorption can appear in accordance with well known mechanisms of absorptive bursts.The additional injection of fast particles filled the loss-cone(breaking the loss-cone distribution),and the generation of the continuum was quenched at these moments.The maximum absorptive effect occurs at the DPR levels.The parameters of millisecond spikes are determined by small dimensions of the particle beams and local scale heights in the radio source.Thus,the DPR model helps to understand several aspects of unusual elements of ZPs.However,the simultaneous existence of several tens of the DPR levels in the corona is impossible for any realistic profile of the plasma density and magnetic field.Three new theories of ZPs are examined.The formation of eigenmodes of transparency and opacity during the propagation of radio waves through regular coronal inhomogeneities is the most natural and promising mechanism.Two other models(nonlinear periodic space-charge waves and scattering of fast protons on ion-sound harmonics)could happen in large radio bursts.

  4. Physics of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the accumulating evidence for the view that gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars, discussing the physical properties of the emission region and the radiation processes expected in strong magnetic fields, and emphasizing that the observed burst spectra require that the emission region be optically thin. This entails that the energy of the emitting plasma and/or the plasma itself be continuously replenished during a burst, and that the cooling time scale of the emitting plasma be much shorter than the observed duration of the bursts. This characteristic of the cooling time scale implies that the burst intensity and spectrum can vary on extremely short time scales, and that the burst duration must have a separate explanation. It is emphasized that synchrotron emission is favored as the gamma-ray production mechanism; it is the only mechanism capable of satisfying the optical thinness constraint while producing the observed luminosity.

  5. Pulse Phase Dependence of the Magnetar Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chetana Jain; Anjan Dutta; Biswajit Paul

    2007-12-01

    We report here results from a study of X-ray bursts from 3 magnetar candidates (SGR 1806–20, SGR 1900+14 and AXP 1E 2259+586). We have searched for a pulse phase dependence of the X-ray burst rate from these sources. X-ray light curves were obtained with the Proportional Counter Array on-board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the periods of intense burst activity in these sources. On detailed analysis of the three sources, we found a very significant burst rate for all pulsar phases. However, some locations appear to produce bursts slightly more often, rendering the non-isotropic distribution. Only in the case of SGR 1900+14, there is a clear pulse phase dependence of burst rate.

  6. Bursting for enhanced ablation of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendow, Sami; Rea, Edward; Kosa, Nadhir; Bengtsson, Magnus; Shakir, Sami

    2014-03-01

    A significant enhancement in the rate of material removal is demonstrated using a nanosecond-pulsed UV fiber laser in multi-pulsing burst mode, as compared to the case without bursting. Percussion drilling and scribing of thin-film and bulk material tests show that, in general, laser bursts with increased pulse count and reduced pulse spacing show higher rates of material removal. A considerable improvement in removal rate is demonstrated, when bursting is applied to scribing of mono-crystalline silicon (m-Si) and up to 30% in percussion drilling speed. Likewise, improved material removal is demonstrated for scribing of thin film of indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass or metal film on sapphire. Examples of material processing are given with and without bursting at similar experimental conditions of average power, scan speed, and burst/pulse energies. Experimental results included are for m-Si, ITO thin films on glass, and metal films on sapphire.

  7. The effect of acute exogenous melatonin on P50 suppression in healthy male volunteers stratified for low and high gating levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucar, Ebru; Lehtinen, Emilia K; Glenthøj, Birte Y;

    2012-01-01

    Sensory gating is frequently found to be disturbed in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, a disruption of the circadian rhythm together with a low nocturnal melatonin output is regularly found in these patients. Since there is some evidence that a brief period of sleep normalizes sensory......-controlled crossover design, 21 healthy male volunteers were administered melatonin (4 mg) or placebo, after which they were tested in a P50 suppression paradigm. In the group as a whole, melatonin did not affect P50 suppression. However, melatonin increased the P50 ratio in the individuals with high baseline......'s ability to restore basic sleep rhythms and its subsequent effects on sensory gating, in both healthy volunteers and patients with schizophrenia....

  8. United assembly algorithm for optical burst switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhui Yu(于金辉); Yijun Yang(杨教军); Yuehua Chen(陈月华); Ge Fan(范戈)

    2003-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising optical switching technology. The burst assembly algorithm controls burst assembly, which significantly impacts performance of OBS network. This paper provides a new assembly algorithm, united assembly algorithm, which has more practicability than conventional algorithms. In addition, some factors impacting selections of parameters of this algorithm are discussed and the performance of this algorithm is studied by computer simulation.

  9. Bubble burst as jamming phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Saito, Yukiko Umeno; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    Recently research on bubble and its burst attract much interest of researchers in various field such as economics and physics. Economists have been regarding bubble as a disorder in prices. However, this research strategy has overlooked an importance of the volume of transactions. In this paper, we have proposed a bubble burst model by focusing the transactions incorporating a traffic model that represents spontaneous traffic jam. We find that the phenomenon of bubble burst shares many similar properties with traffic jam formation by comparing data taken from US housing market. Our result suggests that the transaction could be a driving force of bursting phenomenon.

  10. Two classes of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    Data from the 3B Catalogue suggest that short and long GRB are the results of different classes of events, rather than different parameter values within a single class: Short bursts have harder spectra in the BATSE bands, but chiefly long bursts are detected at photon energies over 1 MeV, implying that their hard photons are radiated by a process not found in short bursts. The values of \\langle V/V_{max} \\rangle for short and long bursts differ by 4.3 \\sigma, implying different spatial distributions. Only the soft gamma-ray radiation mechanisms are the same in both classes.

  11. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J; Dana, Syamal K

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions. PMID:26723143

  12. Epidermal growth factor suppresses insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 levels in human papillomavirus type 16-immortalized cervical epithelial cells and thereby potentiates the effects of insulin-like growth factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembree, J R; Agarwal, C; Eckert, R L

    1994-06-15

    Human ectocervical epithelial cells are a primary target for infection by oncogenic papillomaviruses, which are strongly implicated as causative agents in the genesis of cervical cancer. Growth factors have been implicated as agents that stimulate proliferation and enhance the possibility of malignant transformation. In the present study we utilize several human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16-immortalized ectocervical epithelial cell lines to investigate the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on cell proliferation and the production of IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). ECE16-1 cells, an HPV16-immortalized/nontumorigenic cell line, maintained in defined medium, produce and release high levels of IGFBP-3 (38/42 kDa) as well as smaller amounts of a 24-kDa IGFBP. Supplementation of defined medium with EGF causes a dose-dependent increase in cell growth and a concomitant decrease in the levels of IGFBP-3 released into the culture medium. EGF suppression of IGFBP-3 is maintained even when EGF-stimulated cell growth is suppressed 67% due to the simultaneous presence of 3 ng/ml of TGF beta 1, indicating that EGF suppression of IGFBP-3 levels is independent of EGF effects on cell growth. EGF suppression of IGFBP-3 production is correlated with a reduction in IGFBP-3 mRNA level. In the presence of EGF, the growth response of the cells to ng amounts of IGF-I is significantly enhanced. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of both EGF and IGF-I reduces the level of IGFBP-3 more efficiently than EGF alone. We also observe that the IGFBP-3 level is decreased and the 24-kDa IGFBP level is increased in HPV16-positive tumorigenic versus nontumorigenic cell lines. This is the first report of EGF acting as a positive regulator of IGF-I action via the IGFBPs. On the basis of these findings, we propose that EGF stimulates ECE16-1 cell growth via a dual-action mechanism by (a) stimulating growth directly via the EGF mitogenic pathway and (b

  13. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefta, Faiza [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Juslin, Niklas [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Wirth, Brian D., E-mail: bdwirth@utk.edu [University of Tennessee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  14. Analysis of historic bursts and burst detection in water supply areas of different size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Trietsch, E.A.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in water distribution networks lead to water losses and a risk of damaging the urban environment. We studied hydraulic data and customer contact records of 44 real bursts for a better understanding of the phenomena. We found that most bursts were reported to the water company shortly aft

  15. Sensitivity of HAWC to Primordial Black Hole Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; MacGibbon, D Stump J H; Marinelli, S S; Yapici, T; Tollefson, K

    2015-01-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are black holes that may have been created in the early Universe and could be as large as supermassive black holes or as small as the Planck scale. It is believed that a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will thermally emit all species of fundamental particles. PBHs with initial masses of 5.0 x 10^14 g should be expiring today with bursts of high-energy gamma radiation in the GeV/TeV energy range. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is sensitive to the high end of the PBH gamma-ray burst spectrum. Due to its large field of view, duty cycle above 90% and sensitivity up to 100 TeV, the HAWC observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. We report that if the PBH explodes within 0.25 light years from Earth and within 26 degrees of zenith, HAWC will have a 95% probability of detecting the PBH burst at the 5 sigma level. Conversely, a null detection from a 2 year or longer HAWC search will set PBH upper limits which ar...

  16. Release from informational masking in children: Effect of multiple signal bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, Lori J.; Bonino, Angela Yarnell

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which increasing the number of signal presentations provides children with a release from informational masking. Listeners were younger children (5–7 years), older children (8–10 years), and adults. Detection thresholds were measured for a sequence of repeating 50-ms bursts of a 1000-Hz pure-tone signal embedded in a sequence of 10- and 50-ms bursts of a random-frequency, two-tone masker. Masker bursts were played at an overall level of 60-dB sound pressure level in each interval of a two-interval, forced choice adaptive procedure. Performance was examined for conditions with two, four, five, and six signal bursts. Regardless of the number of signal bursts, thresholds for most children were higher than thresholds for most adults. Despite developmental effects in informational masking, however, masked threshold decreased with additional signal bursts by a similar amount for younger children, older children, and adults. The magnitude of masking release for both groups of children and for adults was inconsistent with absolute energy detection. Instead, increasing the number of signal bursts appears to aid children in the perceptual segregation of the fixed-frequency signal from the random-frequency masker as has been previously reported for adults [Kidd, G., et al. (2003). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2835–2845]. PMID:19354396

  17. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  18. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  19. Broadband study of GRB 091127: a sub-energetic burst at higher redshift?

    CERN Document Server

    Troja, E; Guidorzi, C; Norris, J P; Panaitescu, A; Kobayashi, S; Omodei, N; Brown, J C; Burrows, D N; Evans, P A; Gehrels, N; Marshall, F E; Mawson, N; Melandri, A; Mundell, C G; Oates, S R; Pal'shin, V; Preece, R D; Racusin, J L; Steele, I A; Tanvir, N R; Vasileiou, V; Wilson-Hodge, C; Yamaoka, K

    2012-01-01

    GRB 091127 is a bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift at a redshift z=0.49 and associated with SN 2009nz. We present the broadband analysis of the GRB prompt and afterglow emission and study its high-energy properties in the context of the GRB/SN association. While the high luminosity of the prompt emission and standard afterglow behavior are typical of cosmological long GRBs, its low energy release, soft spectrum and unusual spectral lag connect this GRB to the class of sub-energetic bursts. We discuss the suppression of high-energy emission in this burst, and investigate whether this behavior could be connected with the sub-energetic nature of the explosion.

  20. Biomechanical analysis of short-segment pins Index-level screw fixation for low lumbar burst fractures%Index-level螺钉短节段固定治疗下腰椎爆裂压缩骨折的生物力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛; 马剑雄; 王玉龙; 马信龙; 张晓林; 徐宝山; 杨强

    2013-01-01

    目的 通过对L4椎体爆裂骨折模型以及应用不同方法固定后的生物力学测试,探讨Index-level螺钉短节段固定方法在治疗下腰椎爆裂骨折中的意义.方法 选取10具新鲜尸体腰骶椎标本,通过截骨、切断部分韧带的方法制作L4椎体爆裂骨折模型,然后依序进行长节段固定、短节段固定以及短节段+ Index-level螺钉固定并进行生物力学测试,比较不同固定方法腰椎活动度(range of motion,ROM)的差异.结果 与短节段固定比较,短节段+Index-level螺钉固定在前屈、轴向旋转和侧屈时ROM降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).在后伸位时短节段+Index-level固定稳定性提高,ROM降低32.7%,但差异无统计学意义.结论 Index-level螺钉短节段固定较单纯短节段内固定平均提高32.5%的即刻稳定性,而且比长节段固定保留更大范围ROM.%Objective To establish L4 vertebrae burst fractures and take a biomechanical test of different internal fixations so as to discuss the significance of internal fixation using short-segment plus Index-level screws in treatment of low lumbar burst fractures.Methods Ten fresh human lumbosacral vertebrae specimens were used to establish models of L4 vertebrae burst fractures by corpectomy and partial removal of ligament.Thereafter,the biomechanical test was performed in order as below:longsegment fixation,short-segment fixation and short-segment construction plus Index-level screw fixation.Differences of range of motion (ROM) of the lumbar after three different internal fixations were compared.Results Compared with short-segment fixation,short-segment plus Index-level screw fixation showed that ROM of the lumbar was decreased in front flexion,axial rotation and lateral bending (P < 0.05),but stability was improved and ROM of lumbar was decreased by 32.7% in back extension (P > 0.05).Conclusions Compared with short-segment fixation,the short-segment plus Index-level screw fixation can

  1. The Most Remote Gamma-Ray Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    ESO Telescopes Observe "Lightning" in the Young Universe Summary Observations with telescopes at the ESO La Silla and Paranal observatories (Chile) have enabled an international team of astronomers [1] to measure the distance of a "gamma-ray burst", an extremely violent, cosmic explosion of still unknown physical origin. It turns out to be the most remote gamma-ray burst ever observed . The exceedingly powerful flash of light from this event was emitted when the Universe was very young, less than about 1,500 million years old, or only 10% of its present age. Travelling with the speed of light (300,000 km/sec) during 11,000 million years or more, the signal finally reached the Earth on January 31, 2000. The brightness of the exploding object was enormous, at least 1,000,000,000,000 times that of our Sun, or thousands of times that of the explosion of a single, heavy star (a "supernova"). The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) was also involved in trail-blazing observations of another gamma-ray burst in May 1999, cf. ESO PR 08/99. PR Photo 28a/00 : Sky field near GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28b/00 : The fading optical counterpart of GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28c/00 : VLT spectrum of GRB 000131 . What are Gamma-Ray Bursts? One of the currently most active fields of astrophysics is the study of the mysterious events known as "gamma-ray bursts" . They were first detected in the late 1960's by instruments on orbiting satellites. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays last from less than a second to several minutes. Despite much effort, it is only within the last few years that it has become possible to locate the sites of some of these events (e.g. with the Beppo-Sax satellite ). Since the beginning of 1997, astronomers have identified about twenty optical sources in the sky that are associated with gamma-ray bursts. They have been found to be situated at extremely large (i.e., "cosmological") distances. This implies that the energy release during a gamma-ray burst within a few

  2. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10-15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches-and their associated spindle bursts-occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  3. Photospheric radius expansion during magnetar bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Watts; C. Kouveliotou; A.J. van der Horst; E. Göğüş; Y. Kaneko; M. van der Klis; R.A.M.J. Wijers; A.K. Harding; M.G. Baring

    2010-01-01

    On 2008 August 24 the new magnetar SGR 0501+4516 (discovered by Swift) emitted a bright burst with a pronounced double-peaked structure in hard X-rays, reminiscent of the double-peaked temporal structure seen in some bright thermonuclear bursts on accreting neutron stars. In the latter case this is

  4. Bifurcations of emergent bursting in a neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wu

    Full Text Available Complex neuronal networks are an important tool to help explain paradoxical phenomena observed in biological recordings. Here we present a general approach to mathematically tackle a complex neuronal network so that we can fully understand the underlying mechanisms. Using a previously developed network model of the milk-ejection reflex in oxytocin cells, we show how we can reduce a complex model with many variables and complex network topologies to a tractable model with two variables, while retaining all key qualitative features of the original model. The approach enables us to uncover how emergent synchronous bursting can arise from a neuronal network which embodies known biological features. Surprisingly, the bursting mechanisms are similar to those found in other systems reported in the literature, and illustrate a generic way to exhibit emergent and multiple time scale oscillations at the membrane potential level and the firing rate level.

  5. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-yang Dai

    2004-01-01

    Objective To review imaging use in the diagnosis ofthoracolumbar burst fractures and to determine the diagnostic value of different imaging methods.Methods One hundred and fourteen patients with 120 thoracolumbar burst fractures were retrospectively reviewed. Plain radiographs were available in all cases; CT scans and MRI were obtained in 96 and 74 cases, respectively.Results A total of 27 burst fractures were misdiagnosed as other types of fractures on radiographs alone, and accounted for 22.5% of all fractures. The results indicated that plain radiographs often fail to delineate the pathological features of thoracolumbar burst fractures, leading to delay in diagnosis.Conclusion In regard to thoracolumbar injury diagnosis, burst fractures should be differentiated from compression fractures. CT should be routinely indicated and MRI examination, when necessary, may be simultaneously considered.

  6. Bright 30 THz Impulsive Solar Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, P; Marcon, R; Kudaka, A S; Cabezas, D P; Cassiano, M M; Francile, C; Fernandes, L O T; Ramirez, R F Hidalgo; Luoni, M; Marun, A; Pereyra, P; de Souza, R V

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive 30 THz continuum bursts have been recently observed in solar flares, utilizing small telescopes with a unique and relatively simple optical setup concept. The most intense burst was observed together with a GOES X2 class event on October 27, 2014, also detected at two sub-THz frequencies, RHESSI X-rays and SDO/HMI and EUV. It exhibits strikingly good correlation in time and in space with white light flare emission. It is likely that this association may prove to be very common. All three 30 THz events recently observed exhibited intense fluxes in the range of 104 solar flux units, considerably larger than those measured for the same events at microwave and sub-mm wavelengths. The 30 THz burst emission might be part of the same spectral burst component found at sub-THz frequencies. The 30 THz solar bursts open a promising new window for the study of flares at their origin

  7. Microsecond flares in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cohen, Justin; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Cline, Thomas L.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Matteson, James L.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that gamma-ray burst light curves may consist of many superposed flares with a duration shorter than 30/microsec. If true, the implications for the interpretation of burst data are enormous. With the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, four predictions of Mitrofanov's (1989) suggestion can be tested. Our results which contradict this suggestion are (1) the photon arrival times are not correlated between independent detectors, (2) the spectral hardness and intensity does not depend on the detector area, (3) the bursts seen by detectors which measure photon positions do not see microsecond flares, and (4) burst positions deduced from detectors with different projected areas are close to the positions deduced from time-of-flight differences between separated spacecraft. We conclude, therefore, that gamma-ray bursts are not composed of microsecond flares.

  8. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroff, E.; Barr, E. D.; Jameson, A.; Keane, E. F.; Bailes, M.; Kramer, M.; Morello, V.; Tabbara, D.; van Straten, W.

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios, we have re-processed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a Mysql database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the Fast Radio Burst population as it grows.

  9. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2012-01-01

    Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes - bursts - that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing - the auditory receptor - already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2's sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  10. Expression levels of novel cytokine IL-32 in periodontitis and its role in the suppression of IL-8 production by human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Ouhara

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:IL-32 was recently found to be elevated in the tissue of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by polymicrobial infections that result in soft tissue destruction and alveolar bone loss. Although IL-32 is also thought to be associated with periodontal disease, its expression and possible role in periodontal tissue remain unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the expression patterns of IL-32 in healthy and periodontally diseased gingival tissue. The expression of IL-32 in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF as well as effects of autocrine IL-32 on IL-8 production from HGF were also examined.Methods:Periodontal tissue was collected from both healthy volunteers and periodontitis patients, and immunofluorescent staining was performed in order to determine the production of IL-32. Using real-time PCR and ELISA, mRNA expression and protein production of IL-32 in HGF, stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, were also investigated.Results:Contrary to our expectation, the production of IL-32 in the periodontitis patients was significantly lower than in the healthy volunteers. According to immunofluorescent microscopy, positive staining for IL-32 was detected in prickle and basal cell layers in the epithelium as well as fibroblastic cells in connective tissue. Addition of fixed Pg in vitro was found to suppress the otherwise constitutive expression of IL-32 mRNA and protein in HGF. However, recombinant IL-32 in vitro inhibited the expression of IL-8 mRNA by HGF stimulated with Pg. Interestingly, anti-IL-32 neutralizing antibody upregulated the IL-8 mRNA expression in non-stimulated HGF, indicating that constitutive expression of IL-32 in HGF suppressed IL-8 mRNA expression in the absence of bacterial stimulation.Conclusion:These results indicate that IL-32 is constitutively produced by HGF which can be suppressed by Pg and may play a role in the downregulation

  11. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Gibby, M H; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Jenke, P; Kippen, R M; Pelassa, V; Xiong, S; Yu, H -F; Bhat, P N; Burgess, J M; Byrne, D; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Giles, M M; Guiriec, S; van der Horst, A J; von Kienlin, A; McBreen, S; McGlynn, S; Tierney, D; Zhang, B -B

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in July, 2008. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network (IPN), to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1 degree, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.7 degree Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14 degrees. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y-axis better l...

  12. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Meegan, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL (United States); Preece, R. D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S., E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  13. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H.-F.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M. M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  14. Spatiotemporal chaos from bursting dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenstein, Igal; De Decker, Yannick [Nonlinear Physical Chemistry Unit and Interdisciplinary Center for Nonlinear Phenomena and Complex Systems (CENOLI), Faculté des Sciences, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Campus Plaine, C.P. 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-08-14

    In this paper, we study the emergence of spatiotemporal chaos from mixed-mode oscillations, by using an extended Oregonator model. We show that bursting dynamics consisting of fast/slow mixed mode oscillations along a single attractor can lead to spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics, although the spatially homogeneous solution is itself non-chaotic. This behavior is observed far from the Hopf bifurcation and takes the form of a spatiotemporal intermittency where the system locally alternates between the fast and the slow phases of the mixed mode oscillations. We expect this form of spatiotemporal chaos to be generic for models in which one or several slow variables are coupled to activator-inhibitor type of oscillators.

  15. Tremor suppression in ECG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihov Georgy S

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrocardiogram recordings are very often contaminated by high-frequency noise usually power-line interference and EMG disturbances (tremor. Specific method for interference cancellation without affecting the proper ECG components, called subtraction procedure, was developed some two decades ago. Filtering out the tremor remains a priori partially successful since it has a relatively wide spectrum, which overlaps the useful ECG frequency band. Method The proposed method for tremor suppression implements the following three procedures. Contaminated ECG signals are subjected to moving averaging (comb filter with linear phase characteristic with first zero set at 50 Hz to suppress tremor and PL interference simultaneously. The reduced peaks of QRS complexes and other relatively high and steep ECG waves are then restored by an introduced by us procedure called linearly-angular, so that the useful high frequency components are preserved in the range specified by the embedded in the ECG instrument filter, usually up to 125 Hz. Finally, a Savitzky-Golay smoothing filter is applied for supplementary tremor suppression outside the QRS complexes. Results The results obtained show a low level of the residual EMG disturbances together with negligible distortion of the wave shapes regardless of rhythm and morphology changes.

  16. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Tiriac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves; accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems.

  17. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  18. Participation of a persistent sodium current and calcium-activated nonspecific cationic current to burst generation in trigeminal principal sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruyama, Kentaro; Hsiao, Chie-Fang; Chandler, Scott H

    2013-10-01

    The properties of neurons participating in masticatory rhythmogenesis are not clearly understood. Neurons within the dorsal trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (dPrV) are potential candidates as components of the masticatory central pattern generator (CPG). The present study examines in detail the ionic mechanisms controlling burst generation in dPrV neurons in rat (postnatal day 8-12) brain stem slices using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp methods. Nominal extracellular Ca(2+) concentration transformed tonic discharge in response to a maintained step pulse of current into rhythmical bursting in 38% of nonbursting neurons. This change in discharge mode was suppressed by riluzole, a persistent Na(+) current (INaP) antagonist. Veratridine, which suppresses the Na(+) channel inactivation mechanism, induced rhythmical bursting in nonbursting neurons in normal artificial cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting that INaP contributes to burst generation. Nominal extracellular Ca(2+) exposed a prominent afterdepolarizing potential (ADP) following a single spike induced by a 3-ms current pulse, which was suppressed, but not completely blocked, by riluzole. Application of BAPTA, a Ca(2+) chelator, intracellularly, or flufenamic acid, a Ca(2+)-activated nonspecific cationic channel (ICAN) antagonist, extracellularly to the bath, suppressed rhythmical bursting and the postspike ADP. Application of drugs to alter Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum also suppressed bursting. Finally, voltage-clamp methods demonstrated that nominal Ca(2+) facilitated INaP and induced ICAN. These data demonstrate for the first time that the previously observed induction in dPrV neurons of rhythmical bursting in nominal Ca(2+) is mediated by enhancement of INaP and onset of ICAN, which are dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). PMID:23883859

  19. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Jets and Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Frail, D A

    2003-01-01

    The relativistic outflows from gamma-ray bursts are now thought to be narrowly collimated into jets. After correcting for this jet geometry there is a remarkable constancy of both the energy radiated by the burst and the kinetic energy carried by the outflow. Gamma-ray bursts are still the most luminous explosions in the Universe, but they release energies that are comparable to supernovae. The diversity of cosmic explosions appears to be governed by the fraction of energy that is coupled to ultra-relativistic ejecta.

  20. EXIST's Gamma-Ray Burst Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Band, D. L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.; Fishman, G.; Hartmann, D. H.; Garson III, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Skinner, G.

    2007-01-01

    We use semi-analytic techniques to evaluate the burst sensitivity of designs for the EXIST hard X-ray survey mission. Applying these techniques to the mission design proposed for the Beyond Einstein program, we find that with its very large field-of-view and faint gamma-ray burst detection threshold, EXIST will detect and localize approximately two bursts per day, a large fraction of which may be at high redshift. We estimate that EXIST's maximum sensitivity will be ~4 times greater than that...

  1. Galactic bursts signature in Antarctica 10Be

    CERN Document Server

    Omerbashich, M

    2006-01-01

    I detected a very strong (25 %var) period of 3592+-57 years at 99% confidence level in the 10Be deposition rates from Vostok, Antarctica ice core raw (gapped, unaltered) data. The period was verified at 99% confidence level against the 10Be concentration raw data at both Vostok, as 3700+-57 years at very strong 38 %var, and Taylor Dome, Antarctica, as 3800+-61 years at very strong 23 %var. The noisy Mg concentration data from Taylor Dome also show an extremely strong (44 %var) period of 3965+-16 years. The Vostok data also show the Hallstadzeit Solar cycle, as 2296+-57 years at 12 %var, perhaps its best estimate yet. I use for all analyses the 99% confidence strict Gauss-Vanicek spectral analysis (GVSA) that estimates periods in incomplete records. Based on recent 500-parsec Galactic Center (GC) GeV/TeV Gamma ray surveys by the H.E.S.S. and INTEGRAL telescopes, the GC extremely active central region makes the best candidate host for bursts leaving the discovered signature. A previously reported 3600 years per...

  2. Bursts of star formation in computer simulations of dwarf galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comins, N.F.

    1984-09-01

    A three-dimensional Stochastic Self-Propagating Star Formation (SSPSF) model of compact galacies is presented. Two phases of gas, active and inactive, are present, and permanent depletion of gas in the form of long lived, low mass stars and remnants occurs. Similarly, global infall of gas from a galactic halo or through galactic cannibalism is permitted. We base our parameters on the observed properties of the compact blue galaxy I Zw 36. Our results are that bursts of star formation occur much more frequently in these runs than continuous nonbursting star formation, suggesting that the blue compact galaxies are probably undergoing bursts rather than continuous, nonbursting low-level star formation activity.

  3. The Arecibo Fast Radio Burst: Dense Circum-burst Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, S R; Neill, J D

    2015-01-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRB) has been extensively debated. Here we investigate FRB121102, detected at Arecibo telescope and remarkable for its unusually large spectral index. After extensive study we conclude that the spectral index is caused by a nebula with free-free absorption. We find that putative nebula must lie beyond the Milky Way. We conclude that FRBs are of extra-galactic origin and that they arise in dense star-forming regions. The challenge with extra-galactic models is the the high volumetric rate of FRBs. This high rate allows us to eliminate all models of catastrophic stellar deaths. Hyper-giant flares from young magnetars emerge as the most likely progenitors. Some of the consequences are: (i) Intergalactic FRB models can be safely ignored. (ii) The rich ISM environment of young magnetars can result in significant contribution to DM, Rotation Measure (RM) and in some cases to significant free-free optical depth. (iii) The star-forming regions in the host galaxies can contribute signi...

  4. Gamma-ray burst polarization via Compton scattering process

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation and Compton scattering are widely accepted as the most likely emission mechanisms of some astrophysical phenomena, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The measurement on polarization of photons provides a useful tool to distinguish different emission mechanisms and structures of the emission region. Based on the differential cross section of a polarized photon scattered by an unpolarized electron of any initial momentum, we derive analytical formula of polarization for beamed photons scattered by isotropic electrons with a power law distribution. Numerical calculations are carried out in four special cases: electrons at rest, Thomson limit, head-on collision and monochromatic electrons. It is found that the maximum polarization can be as high as $100\\%$ for low energy photons, if the electrons are at rest. Although polarization is highly suppressed due to the isotropic electrons, a maximum value of $\\sim 10\\% - 20\\%$ can still be achieved. Compton scatterin...

  5. ESTIMATE OF BURSTING PRESSURE OF MILD STEEL PRESSURE VESSEL AND PRESENTATION OF BURSTING FORMULA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chuanxiang

    2006-01-01

    In order to get more precise bursting pressure formula of mild steel, hundreds of bursting experiments of mild steel pressure vessels such as Q235(Gr.D) and 20R(1020) are done. Based on statistical data of bursting pressure and modification of Faupel formula, a more precise modified formula is given out according to the experimental data. It is proved to be more accurate after examining other bursting pressure value presented in many references. This bursting formula is very accurate in these experiments using pressure vessels with different diameter and shell thickness.Obviously, this modified bursting formula can be used in mild steel pressure vessels with different diameter and thickness of shell.

  6. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Collazzi; C. Kouveliotou; A.J. van der Horst; G.A. Younes; Y. Kaneko; E. Göğüş; L. Lin; J. Granot; M.H. Finger; V.L. Chaplin; D. Huppenkothen; A.L. Watts; A. von Kienlin; M.G. Baring; D. Gruber; P.N. Bhat; M.H. Gibby; N. Gehrels; J. Mcenery; M. van der Klis; R.A.M.J. Wijers

    2015-01-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present

  7. The effect of lidocaine on neutrophil respiratory burst during induction of general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Swanton, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Respiratory burst is an essential component of the neutrophil\\'s biocidal function. In vitro, sodium thiopental, isoflurane and lidocaine each inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. The objectives of this study were (a) to determine the effect of a standard clinical induction\\/tracheal intubation sequence on neutrophil respiratory burst and (b) to determine the effect of intravenous lidocaine administration during induction of anaesthesia on neutrophil respiratory burst. METHODS: Twenty ASA I and II patients, aged 18-60 years, undergoing elective surgery were studied. After induction of anaesthesia [fentanyl (2 microg kg-1), thiopental (4-6 mg kg-1), isoflurane (end-tidal concentration 0.5-1.5%) in nitrous oxide (66%) and oxygen], patients randomly received either lidocaine 1.5 mg kg-1 (group L) or 0.9% saline (group S) prior to tracheal intubation. Neutrophil respiratory burst was measured immediately prior to induction of anaesthesia, immediately before and 1 and 5 min after lidocaine\\/saline. RESULTS: Neutrophil respiratory burst decreased significantly after induction of anaesthesia in both groups [87.4 +\\/- 8.2% (group L) and 88.5 +\\/- 13.4% (group S) of preinduction level (P < 0.01 both groups)]. After intravenous lidocaine (but not saline) administration, neutrophil respiratory burst returned towards preinduction levels, both before (97.1 +\\/- 23.6%) and after (94.4 +\\/- 16.6%) tracheal intubation. CONCLUSION: Induction of anaesthesia and tracheal intubation using thiopentone and isoflurane, inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. This effect may be diminished by the administration of lidocaine.

  8. Long Burst Error Correcting Codes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long burst error mitigation is an enabling technology for the use of Ka band for high rate commercial and government users. Multiple NASA, government, and...

  9. CMEs and frequency cutoff of solar bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, Al.; Konovalenko, Al.; Koval, Ar.; Volvach, Y.; Zarka, P.

    2016-05-01

    Radio observations of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff by the radio telescope UTR-2 (near Kharkiv, Ukraine) at 8-33 MHz on 17-19 August 2012 are presented. Such cutoff may be attributed to the emergence of the burst sources behind limb of the Sun with respect to an observer on the Earth. The events are strongly associated with solar eruptions occurred in a new active region. Ray tracing simulations show that the CMEs play a constructive role for the behind-limb bursts to be detected in ground-based observations. Likely, due to tunnel-like cavities with low density in CMEs, the radio emission of behind-limb solar bursts can be directed towards the Earth.

  10. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Jameson, A; Keane, E F; Bailes, M; Kramer, M; Morello, V; Tabbara, D; van Straten, W

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst (FRB) sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios we have reprocessed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a MySQL database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the FRB population as it grows.

  11. Axion Stars and Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Iwazaki, A

    2014-01-01

    We show that fast radio bursts arise from collisions between axion stars and neutron stars. The bursts are emitted in the atmosphere of the neutron stars. The observed frequencies of the bursts are given by the axion mass $m_a$ such as $m_a/2\\pi\\simeq 1.4\\,\\mbox{GHz}\\,\\big(m_a/(6\\times 10^{-6}\\mbox{eV})\\big)$. From the event rate $\\sim 10^{-3}$ per year in a galaxy, we can determine the mass $\\sim 10^{-11}M_{\\odot}$ of the axion stars. Using these values we can explain short durations ( $\\sim $ms ) and amount of radiation energies ( $\\sim 10^{43}$GeV ) of the bursts.

  12. Design of assembly control algorithm based on burst-size feedback for optical burst switching network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minglei Fu; Zichun Le

    2009-01-01

    A novel assembly control algorithm named burst-size feedback adaptive assembly period(BFAAP)is proposed.The major difference between BFAAP and other similar adaptive assembly algorithms is that the control curve of BFAAP is dynamically adjusted according to the feedback of outgoing burst size.BFAAP is compared with two typical algorithms fixed assembly period(FAP)aild min-burst length max assembly period(MBMAP)in simulation in terms of burst size distribution and assembly period.Moreover,the transmission control protocol(TCP)performance over BFAAP is also considered and simulated.

  13. Syudy of Token Generation for Burst Traffic Shaping in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Wan; So Won-ho; Lu Ji-guang; Kim Young-chon

    2004-01-01

    Traffic shaping is one of important control operation to guarantee the Quality of Service (QoS) in optical burst switching (OBS) networks. The efficiency of traffic shaping is mainly determined by token generation method. In this paper, token generation methods of traffic shaping are evaluated by using three kinds of probability distribution, and are analyzed in terms of burst blocking probability, throughput and correlation by simulation. The simulation results show that the token generation methods decrease the burst correlation of Label Switched Paths (LSPs), and solve traffic congestion as well. The different burst arrival processes have small impact on the blocking probability for OBS networks.

  14. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  15. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, K

    2000-01-01

    The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), following Mannheim, Protheroe, and Rachen (2000). It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV, contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux, and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA (Neutrino 2000) limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications, either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV implausibly increasing the energy requirements, but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO, HEGRA-AIROBICC, and the Tibet-Array. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. Thes...

  16. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  17. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  18. Gamma Ray Bursts as Neutrino Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, P

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst sources appear to fulfill all the conditions for being efficient cosmic ray accelerators, and being extremely compact, are also expected to produce multi-GeV to PeV neutrinos. I review the basic model predictions for the expected neutrino fluxes in classical GRBs as well as in low luminosity and choked bursts, discussing the recent IceCube observational constraints and implications from the observed diffuse neutrino flux.

  19. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-12-01

    I'll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ˜ 0.4% - 3%.

  20. Black Hole Lensing and Wave Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that close to a black hole horizon wave equations have real-valued exponentially time-dependent solutions and to investigate strong gravitational lensing we need to introduce an effective negative cosmological constant between the Schwarzschild and photon spheres. Then exponentially amplified reflected waves from this effective AdS space could explain properties of some gamma ray bursts, fast radio bursts and gravitational waves.

  1. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  2. Autaptic Connections Shift Network Excitability and Bursting

    OpenAIRE

    Wiles, Laura; Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Bassett, Danielle S.; Meaney, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Network architecture forms a critical constraint on neuronal function. Here we examine the role of structural autapses, when a neuron synapses onto itself, in driving network-wide bursting behavior. Using a simple spiking model of neuronal activity, we study how autaptic connections affect activity patterns, and evaluate if neuronal degree or controllability are significant factors that affect changes in bursting from these autaptic connections. We observed that adding increasing numbers of a...

  3. Cosmological parametrization of $\\gamma$ ray burst models

    CERN Document Server

    Linder, E V

    1996-01-01

    Using three parametrizations of the gamma ray burst count data comparison is made to cosmological source models. While simple models can fit and faint end slope constraints, the addition of a logarithmic count range variable describing the curvature of the counts shows that models with no evolution or evolution power law in redshift with index less than 10 fail to satisfy simultaneously all three descriptors of the burst data. The cosmological source density that would be required for a fit is illustrated.

  4. A Simple Weighted Integration Method for Calculating Surface Tension Force to Suppress Parasitic Flow in the Level Set Approach%权重积分方法计算界面张力消除表面"寄生"流

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王剑峰; 杨超; 毛在砂

    2006-01-01

    Parasitic flows may occur in the numerical simulation of incompressible multiphase flow due to errors in the calculation of surface tension terms, specifically for the curvature and unit normal vector. An improved method for calculating the surface tension based on the level set approach is proposed, in which the contribution of not only the center node but also the rest area of a control volume to the calculation of surface tension is considered in a balanced manner. The weighted integration method (WIM) is more consistent with the concept of a banded interface in the level set method. It is applied to the temporal evolution of a two-dimensional neutrally buoyant liquid drop and a buoyancy driven deformable bubble in an immiscible fluid for the validation of WIM. The results show that the parasitic flows are evidently suppressed by the weighted integration method. The weight factors for WIM in 3-D cases are also suggested.

  5. Neuronal networks and energy bursts in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2015-02-26

    Epilepsy can be defined as the abnormal activities of neurons. The occurrence, propagation and termination of epileptic seizures rely on the networks of neuronal cells that are connected through both synaptic- and non-synaptic interactions. These complicated interactions contain the modified functions of normal neurons and glias as well as the mediation of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms with feedback homeostasis. Numerous spread patterns are detected in disparate networks of ictal activities. The cortical-thalamic-cortical loop is present during a general spike wave seizure. The thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT) is the major inhibitory input traversing the region, and the dentate gyrus (DG) controls CA3 excitability. The imbalance between γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition and glutamatergic excitation is the main disorder in epilepsy. Adjustable negative feedback that mediates both inhibitory and excitatory components affects neuronal networks through neurotransmission fluctuation, receptor and transmitter signaling, and through concomitant influences on ion concentrations and field effects. Within a limited dynamic range, neurons slowly adapt to input levels and have a high sensitivity to synaptic changes. The stability of the adapting network depends on the ratio of the adaptation rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory populations. Thus, therapeutic strategies with multiple effects on seizures are required for the treatment of epilepsy, and the therapeutic functions on networks are reviewed here. Based on the high-energy burst theory of epileptic activity, we propose a potential antiepileptic therapeutic strategy to transfer the high energy and extra electricity out of the foci.

  6. THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE: STRUCTURAL CHANGES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Arnold Tisot

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the correlation between structural changes in burst fractures of thoracic and lumbar spine with clinical outcome of the treatment. Methods: A retrospective study in 25 patients with fractures of thoracic and lumbar spine burst fractures without neurological deficit. Eleven patients underwent conservative treatment and for the remaining the treatment was surgical. All patients were followed up for at least 24 months. The cases were evaluated by a protocol that included: posttraumatic measurement of kyphosis, vertebral body collapse and narrowing of the spinal canal, the visual analog scale of pain, and the quality of life questionnaire SF-36 at the follow-up. For statistical analysis, the significance level was 5% and the software SPSS 18.0 was used. Results: No statistically significant difference was observed when comparing the clinical outcomes of one treatment over another. Similarly, there was no statistically significant correlation between kyphosis and post-traumatic narrowing of the spinal canal with clinical worsening in the follow-up, regardless of the treatment used. We found a positive correlation (p<0.05 between initial collapse and SF-36 domains in both groups (operated and non-operated. Conclusion: There was no significant superiority of one treatment over the other, and no correlation was found between kyphosis and spinal canal narrowing in burst fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine without neurological deficit. However, there was correlation between initial collapse and clinical outcome in some domains of the SF-36 questionnaire.

  7. Thoracolumbar burst fracture: what the radiologist should know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob Junior, Charbel; Batista, Priscila Rossi de; Machado, Igor Cardoso; Rezende, Rodrigo, E-mail: grupodecoluna@santacasavitoria.org [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Vitoria, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Barbosa, Diogo Miranda; Vieira, Dimitri Mori [Centro de Diagnostico por Imagem, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Thoracolumbar burst fractures are defined as those fractures involving compromise of the anterior, middle and posterior vertebral columns. The treatment for such vertebral fractures still remains undefined, raising questions about the best form of intervention in these cases. Because of these doubts, imaging methods play a key role in the preoperative workup. However, several tests and measurements are performed by spine surgeons before deciding on the best approach to be adopted, with no standardization and neither consensus. The present review was aimed at standardizing and describing the main techniques and radiological findings on the basis of instability criteria adopted by surgeons in the assessment of thoracolumbar burst fractures, namely extent of height loss of the anterior wall of the fractured vertebra, level of spinal canal compromise by bone fragments and degree of widening of interspinous and interpedicular distance. It is the authors' opinion that the standardization of the main measurements in the evaluation of thoracolumbar burst fractures by radiological methods will provide the information required for a better interpretation of tests results and consequently aiding in the decision making about the most appropriate treatment. (author)

  8. Application of burst vibrothermography to characterize planar vertical cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendioroz, Arantza; Celorrio, Ricardo; Cifuentes, Ángel; Zatón, Lander; Salazar, Agustín.

    2016-05-01

    We present a method to characterize vertical cracks in a fast way using burst vibrothermography. In this technique the sample is excited by ultrasounds and, at the defect, rubbing of the contacting surfaces produces heat that can be detected as a temperature rise at the surface using an infrared camera. In this work, first we present the solution of the direct problem, i.e., the calculation of the surface temperature distribution produced by a vertical heat source representing a crack excited by an ultrasound burst, and we choose the information that will be used to characterize the crack, namely, one thermogram and one timing-graph. Next we address the inverse problem, consisting of finding the heat source distribution that is responsible for the observed surface temperature. This inverse problem is ill-posed, and a naïve inversion process is unstable. We propose to use three penalty terms, based on zero order Tikhonov and Total Variation functionals and the Lasso method, to stabilize the inversion. By inverting synthetic data, we analyze the performance of the algorithm as a function of the depth of the heat source and we study the effect of the burst duration and noise level in the data on the quality of the reconstructions. Finally, we invert experimental data taken in samples containing calibrated heat sources. The results show that it is possible to characterize vertical cracks down to depths of 6 mm in AISI 304 stainless steel.

  9. Pedicle screw fixation against burst fracture of thoracolumbar vertebrae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Fu-xin; HUANG Yong; ZHANG Qiang; SHI Feng-lei; ZHAO Dong-sheng; HU Qiao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the application of vertebral pedicle screw fixation in the treatment of burst fracture of thoracolumbar vertebrae.Methods: A total of 48 cases (31 males and 17 females, aged from 18-72 years, mean: 41.3 years) with thoracolumbar vertebrae burst fracture were treated by pedicle screw system since January 2004. According to the AO classification of thoracolumbar vertebrae fracture,there are 36 cases of Type A, 9 of Type B and 3 of Type C.Results: All patients were followed up for 6-25 months (average 12 months ), no secondary nerve root injury, spinal cord injury, loosening or breakage of pedicle screw were observed. The nerve function of 29 patients with cauda equina nerve injury was restored to different degrees. The vertebral body height returned to normal level and posterior process angle was rectified after operation.Conclusions: The vertebral pedicle screw internal fixation was technologically applicable, which can efficiently reposition and stablize the bursting fractured vertabrae,indirectly decompress canalis spinalis, maintain spine stablity, scatter stress of screw system, reduce the risk of loosening or breakage of screw and loss of vertebral height,and prevent the formation of posterior convex after operation.

  10. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary

  11. Endogenous activation of adenosine A(1) receptors accelerates ischemic suppression of spontaneous electrocortical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilie, Andrei; Ciocan, Dragos; Zagrean, Ana-Maria;

    2006-01-01

    either 1.25 mg/kg DPCPX dissolved in 2 ml/kg dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or the same volume of DMSO alone, 15 min before the third ischemic episode. Time to electrocortical suppression was estimated based on the decay of the root mean square of two-channel electrocorticographic recordings. During the first...... two ischemic episodes, electrocortical suppression appeared after approximately 12 s in both groups. After DMSO administration, ischemic suppression remained unchanged. After DPCPX administration, the time to electrocortical suppression was increased by approximately 10 s, and bursts of activity were...

  12. Efficient inhibition of bursts by bursts in the auditory system of crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, G; Pollack, G S

    2007-06-01

    In crickets, auditory information about ultrasound is carried bilaterally to the brain by the AN2 neurons. The ON1 neuron provides contralateral inhibitory input to AN2, thereby enhancing bilateral contrast between the left and right AN2s, an important cue for sound localization. We examine how the structures of the spike trains of these neurons affect this inhibitory interaction. As previously shown for AN2, ON1 responds to salient peaks in stimulus amplitude with bursts of spikes. Spike bursts, but not isolated spikes, reliably signal the occurrence of specific features of the stimulus. ON1 and AN2 burst at similar times relative to the amplitude envelope of the stimulus, and bursts are more tightly time-locked to stimulus feature than the isolated spikes. As a consequence, spikes that, in the absence of contralateral inhibition, would occur within AN2 bursts are more likely to be preceded by spikes in ON1 (mainly also in bursts) than are isolated AN2 spikes. This leads to a large decrease in the burst rate of the inhibited AN2. We conclude that the match in coding properties of ON1 and AN2 allows contralateral inhibition to be most efficient for those portions of the response that carry the behaviourally relevant information, i.e. for bursts.

  13. Saturation and parton level Cronin effect: Enhancement versus suppression of gluon production in p-A and A-A collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We note that the phenomenon of perturbative saturation leads to transverse momentum broadening in the spectrum of partons produced in hadronic collisions. This broadening has a simple interpretation as the parton level Cronin effect for systems in which saturation is generated by the ''tree level'' Glauber-Mueller mechanism. For systems where the broadening results form the nonlinear QCD evolution to high energy, the presence or absence of the Cronin effect depends crucially on the quantitative behavior of the gluon distribution functions at transverse momenta kt outside the so called scaling window. We discuss the relation of this phenomenon to the recent analysis by Kharzeev, Levin, and McLerran of the momentum and centrality dependence of particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at BNL RHIC

  14. Bursts shape the NMDA-R mediated spike timing dependent plasticity curve: role of burst interspike interval and GABAergic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutsuridis, Vassilis

    2012-10-01

    Spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is a synaptic learning rule where the relative timing between the presynaptic and postsynaptic action potentials determines the sign and strength of synaptic plasticity. In its basic form STDP has an asymmetric form which incorporates both persistent increases and persistent decreases in synaptic strength. The basic form of STDP, however, is not a fixed property and depends on the dendritic location. An asymmetric curve is observed in the distal dendrites, whereas a symmetrical one is observed in the proximal ones. A recent computational study has shown that the transition from the asymmetry to symmetry is due to inhibition under certain conditions. Synapses have also been observed to be unreliable at generating plasticity when excitatory postsynaptic potentials and single spikes are paired at low frequencies. Bursts of spikes, however, are reliably signaled because transmitter release is facilitated. This article presents a two-compartment model of the CA1 pyramidal cell. The model is neurophysiologically plausible with its dynamics resulting from the interplay of many ionic and synaptic currents. Plasticity is measured by a deterministic Ca(2+) dynamics model which measures the instantaneous calcium level and its time course in the dendrite and change the strength of the synapse accordingly. The model is validated to match the asymmetrical form of STDP from the pairing of a presynaptic (dendritic) and postsynaptic (somatic) spikes as observed experimentally. With the parameter set unchanged the model investigates how pairing of bursts with single spikes and bursts in the presence or absence of inhibition shapes the STDP curve. The model predicts that inhibition strength and frequency are not the only factors of the asymmetry-to-symmetry switch of the STDP curve. Burst interspike interval is another factor. This study is an important first step towards understanding how STDP is affected under natural firing patterns in vivo

  15. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yimeng; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun, E-mail: ydu@uark.edu

    2014-01-20

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation. - Highlights: • Cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza viral protein NS1. • hnRNP A2/B1 suppresses the levels of NS1 protein, vRNA and mRNA in infected cells. • hnRNP A2/B1 protein is associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits the nuclear export of NS1 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits influenza virus replication.

  16. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation. - Highlights: • Cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza viral protein NS1. • hnRNP A2/B1 suppresses the levels of NS1 protein, vRNA and mRNA in infected cells. • hnRNP A2/B1 protein is associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits the nuclear export of NS1 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits influenza virus replication

  17. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... during the suppression test, the provider will suspect gigantism or acromegaly. You may need to be retested to confirm ...

  18. Dexamethasone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  19. Mutant human torsinA, responsible for early-onset dystonia, dominantly suppresses GTPCH expression, dopamine levels and locomotion in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Wakabayashi-Ito

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia represents the third most common movement disorder in humans with over 20 genetic loci identified. TOR1A (DYT1, the gene responsible for the most common primary hereditary dystonia, encodes torsinA, an AAA ATPase family protein. Most cases of DYT1 dystonia are caused by a 3 bp (ΔGAG deletion that results in the loss of a glutamic acid residue (ΔE302/303 in the carboxyl terminal region of torsinA. This torsinAΔE mutant protein has been speculated to act in a dominant-negative manner to decrease activity of wild type torsinA. Drosophila melanogaster has a single torsin-related gene, dtorsin. Null mutants of dtorsin exhibited locomotion defects in third instar larvae. Levels of dopamine and GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH proteins were severely reduced in dtorsin-null brains. Further, the locomotion defect was rescued by the expression of human torsinA or feeding with dopamine. Here, we demonstrate that human torsinAΔE dominantly inhibited locomotion in larvae and adults when expressed in neurons using a pan-neuronal promoter Elav. Dopamine and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4 levels were significantly reduced in larval brains and the expression level of GTPCH protein was severely impaired in adult and larval brains. When human torsinA and torsinAΔE were co-expressed in neurons in dtorsin-null larvae and adults, the locomotion rates and the expression levels of GTPCH protein were severely reduced. These results support the hypothesis that torsinAΔE inhibits wild type torsinA activity. Similarly, neuronal expression of a Drosophila DtorsinΔE equivalent mutation dominantly inhibited larval locomotion and GTPCH protein expression. These results indicate that both torsinAΔE and DtorsinΔE act in a dominant-negative manner. We also demonstrate that Dtorsin regulates GTPCH expression at the post-transcriptional level. This Drosophila model of DYT1 dystonia provides an important tool for studying the differences in the molecular function between the

  20. QKD-Based Secured Burst Integrity Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2016-03-01

    The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. It is quite evident that people prefer optical communication when it comes to large amount of data involving its transmission. The concept of switching in networks has matured enormously with several researches, architecture to implement and methods starting with Optical circuit switching to Optical Burst Switching. Optical burst switching is regarded as viable solution for switching bursts over networks but has several security vulnerabilities. However, this work exploited the security issues associated with Optical Burst Switching with respect to integrity of burst. This proposed Quantum Key based Secure Hash Algorithm (QKBSHA-512) with enhanced compression function design provides better avalanche effect over the conventional integrity algorithms.

  1. An Intelligent Segmented Burst Assembly Mechanism in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi-Yuan; ZHANG Jian-Guo

    2008-01-01

    We focus on the burst assembly mechanism and propose a new intelligent method in which the burst is assembled from several internet protocol (IP) packets in which the number of IP packets is changed according to the traffic load and the burst is segmented into several parts, called the ISOBS mechanism. The average burst assembly time of the ISOBS mechanism decreases as compared with the fixed-assembly-time and fixed-assembly-time-and-length mechanisms. The loss ratio decreases 50% as compared with the general optical burst switching (OBS) mechanism. The last segment can carry high quality of service (QOS) information. We can achieve that the loss ratio of the last segment is almost zero when the traffic load is less than 0.05. When the traffic load is 0.9, the loss ratio of the last segment is 0.0041. The ISOBS can support to transmit different QOS data.

  2. An Intelligent Segmented Burst Assembly Mechanism in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We focus on the burst assembly mechanism and propose a new intelligent method in which the burst is assembled from several internet protocol (IP) packets in which the number of IP packets is changed according to the traffic load and the burst is segmented into several parts, called the ISOBS mechanism. The average burst assembly time of the ISOBS mechanism decreases as compared with the fixed-assembly-time and fixed-assembly-time-and-length mechanisms. The loss ratio decreases 50% as compared with the general optical burst switching (OBS) mechanism. The last segment can carry high quality of service (QOS) information. We can achieve that the loss ratio of the last segment is almost zero when the traffic load is less than 0.05. When the traffic load is 0.9, the loss ratio of the last segment is 0.0041. The ISOBS can support to transmit different QOS data. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  3. $\\gamma$-ray bursts from internal shocks in a relativistic wind temporal and spectral properties

    CERN Document Server

    Daigne, F

    1998-01-01

    We construct models for gamma-ray bursts where the emission comes from internal shocks in a relativistic wind with a highly non uniform distribution of the Lorentz factor. We follow the evolution of the wind using a very simplified approach where a large number of layers interact by direct collisions but where all pressure waves have been suppressed. We suppose that the magnetic field and the electron Lorentz factor reach large equipartition values in the shocks. Synchrotron photons emitted by the relativistic electrons have a typical energy in the gamma-ray range in the observer frame. Synthetic bursts are constructed as the sum of the contributions from all the internal elementary shocks and their temporal and spectral properties are compared to the observations. We reproduce the diversity of burst profiles, the ``FRED'' shape of individual pulses and the short time scale variability. Synthetic bursts also satisfy the duration-hardness relation and individual pulses are found to be narrower at high energy, ...

  4. Gamma Ray Burst reverse shock emission in early radio afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Resmi, Lekshmi

    2016-01-01

    Reverse shock (RS) emission from Gamma Ray Bursts is an important tool in investigating the nature of the ejecta from the central engine. If the ejecta magnetization is not high enough to suppress the RS, a strong RS emission component, usually peaking in the optical/IR band early on, would give important contribution to early afterglow light curves. In the radio band, synchrotron self-absorption may suppress early RS emission, and also delay the RS peak time. In this paper, we calculate the self-absorbed RS emission in the radio band for different dynamical conditions. In particular, we stress that the RS radio emission is subject to self-absorption in both reverse and forward shocks. We calculate the ratio between the reverse to forward shock flux at the RS peak time for different frequencies, which is a measure of the detectability of the RS emission component. We then constrain the range of physical parameters for a detectable RS, in particular the role of magnetization. We notice that unlike optical RS e...

  5. Increased HIV incidence in men who have sex with men despite high levels of ART-induced viral suppression: analysis of an extensively documented epidemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew N Phillips

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is interest in expanding ART to prevent HIV transmission, but in the group with the highest levels of ART use, men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM, numbers of new infections diagnosed each year have not decreased as ARTcoverage has increased for reasons which remain unclear. METHODS: We analysed data on the HIV-epidemic in MSM in the UK from a range of sources using an individual-based simulation model. Model runs using parameter sets found to result in good model fit were used to infer changes in HIV-incidence and risk behaviour. RESULTS: HIV-incidence has increased (estimated mean incidence 0.30/100 person-years 1990-1997, 0.45/100 py 1998-2010, associated with a modest (26% rise in condomless sex. We also explored counter-factual scenarios: had ART not been introduced, but the rise in condomless sex had still occurred, then incidence 2006-2010 was 68% higher; a policy of ART initiation in all diagnosed with HIV from 2001 resulted in 32% lower incidence; had levels of HIV testing been higher (68% tested/year instead of 25% incidence was 25% lower; a combination of higher testing and ART at diagnosis resulted in 62% lower incidence; cessation of all condom use in 2000 resulted in a 424% increase in incidence. In 2010, we estimate that undiagnosed men, the majority in primary infection, accounted for 82% of new infections. CONCLUSION: A rise in HIV-incidence has occurred in MSM in the UK despite an only modest increase in levels of condomless sex and high coverage of ART. ART has almost certainly exerted a limiting effect on incidence. Much higher rates of HIV testing combined with initiation of ART at diagnosis would be likely to lead to substantial reductions in HIV incidence. Increased condom use should be promoted to avoid the erosion of the benefits of ART and to prevent other serious sexually transmitted infections.

  6. Elevated levels of maternal anti-tetanus toxin antibodies do not suppress the immune response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b polyribosylphosphate-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine.

    OpenAIRE

    Panpitpat, C.; Thisyakorn, U.; Chotpitayasunondh, T; Fürer, E; Que, J U; Hasler, T.; Cryz, S J

    2000-01-01

    Reported are the effects of elevated levels of anti-tetanus antibodies on the safety and immune response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b polyribosylphosphate (PRP)-tetanus toxoid conjugate (PRP-T) vaccine. A group of Thai infants (n = 177) born to women immunized against tetanus during pregnancy were vaccinated with either a combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) PRP-T vaccine or DTP and a PRP-conjugate vaccine using Neisseria meningitidis group B outer-membrane proteins as a carrier ...

  7. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states. PMID:26869313

  8. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states. PMID:26869313

  9. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states.

  10. Diagnostics From Three Rising Submillimeter Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts occurred sequentially in a super-Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu/GHz (corresponding spectral index $\\alpha$ of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, while it can attain values of 235 sfu/GHz ($\\alpha$=4.8) for 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of high relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV , while it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than that in microwave (MW) one. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20--50$\\%$ during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW one increased by 28$\\%$ for the 2003 Novemb...

  11. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Dmitriy; Lesovoi, Sergey; Tokhchukova, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4-8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with extreme UV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave drift bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrences, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5 and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to source sizes at other frequencies.

  12. NOVEL BIPHASE CODE -INTEGRATED SIDELOBE SUPPRESSION CODE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feixue; Ou Gang; Zhuang Zhaowen

    2004-01-01

    A kind of novel binary phase code named sidelobe suppression code is proposed in this paper. It is defined to be the code whose corresponding optimal sidelobe suppression filter outputs the minimum sidelobes. It is shown that there do exist sidelobe suppression codes better than the conventional optimal codes-Barker codes. For example, the sidelobe suppression code of length 11 with filter of length 39 has better sidelobe level up to 17dB than that of Barker code with the same code length and filter length.

  13. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels;

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  14. Bursting activity spreading through asymmetric interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Onaga, Tomokatsu

    2014-01-01

    People communicate with those who have the same background or share a common interest by using a social networking service (SNS). News or messages propagate through inhomogeneous connections in an SNS by sharing or facilitating additional comments. Such human activity is known to lead to endogenous bursting in the rate of message occurrences. We analyze a multi-dimensional self-exciting process to reveal dependence of the bursting activity on the topology of connections and the distribution of interaction strength on the connections. We determine the critical conditions for the cases where interaction strength is regulated at either the point of input or output for each person. In the input regulation condition, the network may exhibit bursting with infinitesimal interaction strength, if the dispersion of the degrees diverges as in the scale-free networks. In contrast, in the output regulation condition, the critical value of interaction strength, represented by the average number of events added by a single ...

  15. Variable protostellar accretion with episodic bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, Eduard I

    2015-01-01

    We present the latest development of the disk gravitational instability and fragmentation model, originally introduced by us to explain episodic accretion bursts in the early stages of star formation. Using our numerical hydrodynamics model with improved disk thermal balance and star-disk interaction, we computed the evolution of protostellar disks formed from the gravitational collapse of prestellar cores. In agreement with our previous studies, we find that cores of higher initial mass and angular momentum produce disks that are more favorable to gravitational instability and fragmentation, while a higher background irradiation and magnetic fields moderate the disk tendency to fragment. The protostellar accretion in our models is time-variable, thanks to the nonlinear interaction between different spiral modes in the gravitationally unstable disk, and can undergo episodic bursts when fragments migrate onto the star owing to the gravitational interaction with other fragments or spiral arms. Most bursts occur...

  16. Gamma-ray bursts and cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D Q

    2007-05-15

    I review the current status of the use of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as probes of the early Universe and cosmology. I describe the promise of long GRBs as probes of the high redshift (z>4) and very high redshift (z>5) Universe, and several key scientific results that have come from observations made possible by accurate, rapid localizations of these bursts by Swift. I then estimate the fraction of long GRBs that lie at very high redshifts and discuss ways in which it may be possible to rapidly identify-and therefore study-a larger number of these bursts. Finally, I discuss the ways in which both long and short GRBs can be made 'standard candles' and used to constrain the properties of dark energy. PMID:17301023

  17. Study on fault induced rock bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-hua; DOU Lin-ming; LU Cai-ping; MU Zong-long; CAO An-ye

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the rules of rock bursts caused by faults by means of mechanical analysis of a roof rock-mass balanced structure and numerical simulation about fault slip destabilization, the effect of coal mining operation on fault plane stresses and slip displacement were studied. The results indicate that the slip displacement sharply increases due to the decrease of normal stress and the increase of shear stress at the fault plane when the working face advances from the footwall to the fault itself, which may induce a fault rock burst. However, this slip displacement will be very small due to the increase of normal stress and the decrease of shear stress when the working face advances from the hanging wall to the fault itself, which results in a very small risk of a fault rock burst.

  18. On the bursting of gene products

    CERN Document Server

    Yvinec, Romain

    2011-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate that the so-called bursting production of molecular species during gene expression may be an artifact caused by low time resolution in experimental data collection and not an actual burst in production. We reach this conclusion through an analysis of a two-stage and binary model for gene expression, and demonstrate that in the limit when mRNA degradation is much faster than protein degradation they are equivalent. The negative binomial distribution is shown to be a limiting case of the binary model for fast "on to off" state transitions and high values of the ratio between protein synthesis and degradation rates. The gene products population increases by unity but multiple times in a time interval orders of magnitude smaller than protein half-life or the precision of the experimental apparatus employed in its detection. This rare-and-fast one-by-one protein synthesis has been interpreted as bursting.

  19. Gamma Ray Bursts Observations and Theoretical Conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Alagoz, E; Carrillo, C; Golup, G T; Grimes, M; Herrera, Mora C; Gallo, Palomino J L; López, Vega A; Wicht, J

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are short bursts of very high energy photons which were discovered in the late 1960s. Ever since their discovery, scientists have wondered about their origin. Nowadays it is known that they originate outside the Milky Way because of their high red shift rst measured in the afterglows thanks to the Beppo-SAX satellite and ground-based observations. However, theoreticians still do not agree about the mechanism that generates the bursts, and different competing models are animatedly debated. Current GRB experiments include the Swift satellite and the Pierre Auger Observatory that could detect GRBs with an increase of the background. A forthcoming dedicated experiment is GLAST, a satellite observatory for detecting gamma rays with energies up to 300 GeV, whose launch is scheduled for early 2008.

  20. A mechanism for fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E; Vieyro, Florencia L

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless Bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarised and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The timescale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of t...

  1. Low-power laser irradiation suppresses inflammatory response of human adipose-derived stem cells by modulating intracellular cyclic AMP level and NF-κB activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyun-Yi Wu

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based tissue regeneration is a promising therapeutic strategy for treating damaged tissues. However, the inflammatory microenvironment that exists at a local injury site might restrict reconstruction. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI has been widely applied to retard the inflammatory reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of LPLI on human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs in an inflammatory environment. We showed that the hADSCs expressed Toll-like Receptors (TLR 1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR6 and that lipopolysaccharide (LPS significantly induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2, Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, and Interleukin-8 (IL-8. LPLI markedly inhibited LPS-induced, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression at an optimal dose of 8 J/cm². The inhibitory effect triggered by LPLI might occur through an increase in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP (cAMP, which acts to down-regulate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB transcriptional activity. These data collectively provide insight for further investigations of the potential application of anti-inflammatory treatment followed by stem cell therapy.

  2. May axion clusters be sources of fast radio bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Pshirkov, Maxim S

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts can be caused by some phenomena related to 'new physics'. One of the most prominent candidates of the kind are axion miniclusters which can undergo conversion into photons in magnetospheres of neutron stars. In this short research note this scenario is investigated and important caveats are examined. First, tidal disruption of miniclusters can considerably extend the time span of conversion process, making it impossible to reach necessary $\\mathcal{O}$(ms) level. Second, existing observations at two widely separated frequencies imply that axion-related scenarios can hardly explain entirety of FRBs.

  3. Investigation of Primordial Black Hole Bursts Using Interplanetary Network Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Hurley, K.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Connaughton, V.; Yamaoka, K.; Ohno, M.; Ohmori, N.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.; Guidorzi, C.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; McTiernan, J.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 1013–1018 cm (7–105 au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  4. Use of water-Cherenkov detectors to detect Gamma Ray Bursts at the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) project aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique in ground-based water-Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on detector calibration and operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 4 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst

  5. Use of water-Cherenkov detectors to detect Gamma Ray Bursts at the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, D. [APC, CNRS et Universite Paris 7 (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Alvarez, C. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Asorey, H. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Barros, H. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Bertou, X. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina)], E-mail: bertou@cab.cnea.gov.ar; Burgoa, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Gomez Berisso, M. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Martinez, O. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Miranda Loza, P. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Murrieta, T.; Perez, G. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Rivera, H. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Rovero, A. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (Argentina); Saavedra, O. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale and INFN, Torino (Italy); Salazar, H. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Tello, J.C. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Ticona Peralda, R.; Velarde, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Villasenor, L. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad de Michoacan (Mexico)

    2008-09-21

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) project aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique in ground-based water-Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on detector calibration and operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 4 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst.

  6. On the bimodal distribution of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shude; Narayan, Ramesh; Piran, Tsvi

    1994-01-01

    Kouveliotou et al. recently confirmed that gamma-ray bursts are bimodal in duration. In this paper we compute the statistical properties of the short (less than or = 2 s) and long (greater than 2 s) bursts using a method of analysis that makes no assumption regarding the location of the bursts, whether in the Galaxy or at a cosmological distance. We find the 64 ms channel on Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) to be more sensitive to short bursts and the 1024 ms channel to be more sensitive to long bursts. We show that all the currently available data are consistent with the simple hypothesis that both short and long bursts have the same spatial distribution and that within each population the sources are standard candles. The rate of short bursts per unit volume is about 40% of the rate of long bursts. Although the durations of short and long gamma-ray bursts span several orders of magnitude and the total energy of a typical short burst is smaller than that of a typical long burst by a factor of about 20, surprisingly the peak luminosities of the two kinds of bursts are equal to within a factor of about 2.

  7. The short gamma-ray burst revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, a dedicated gamma-ray burst (GRB) satellite with ultrarapid slewing capability, and a suite of ground-based (ESO) telescopes have recently achieved a major breakthrough: detecting the first afterglows of short-duration GRBs. The faintness of these afterglows and the diversity of old and young host galaxies lend support to the emerging 'standard model', in which they are created during the merging of two compact objects. However, the afterglow light-curve properties and possible high-redshift origin of some short bursts suggests that more than one progenitor type may be involved. (orig.)

  8. Processor Reformats Data For Transmission In Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Glen F.

    1991-01-01

    Data-processor-and-buffer electronic system receives audio signals digitized in first standard format at relatively low data rate, rearranges data for transmission in bursts in second standard format at relatively high rate, stores second-format bursts, and releases them at higher rate upon request. Conceived for asynchronous, one-way transmission of digitized speech in outer-space communications, concept of system applied in other digital communication systems in which data transmitted from low-rate sources to high-rate sinks not synchronized with sources.

  9. Distribution of whistler mode bursts at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarf, F. L.; Jordan, K. F.; Russell, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    Several thousand impulsive whistler mode noise bursts were detected by the Pioneer Venus wave instrument during the first 10 seasons with nightside traversals at low altitudes. The altitude distribution for these events shows that essentially all of the bursts were detected when the orbiter was less than 2000 km above the planet, suggesting that the varying plasma conditions could not maintain coherent whistler mode field-aligned guidance over greater distances. Within the 2000-km range, the distribution of the number of events versus altitude shows that there are two distinct subregions. These results are interpreted in terms of two types of whistler mode propagation from sources below the ionosphere.

  10. A Shotgun Model for $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, S

    1999-01-01

    We propose that gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are produced by a shower of heavy blobs running into circumstellar material at highly relativistic speeds. The gamma ray emission is produced in the shocks these bullets drive into the surrounding medium. The short term variability seen in GRBs is set by the slowing-down time of the bullets while the overall duration of the burst is set by the lifetime of the central engine. A requirement of this model is that the ambient medium be dense, consistent with a strong stellar wind. In contrast to other external shock scenarios, the efficiency of the shock can be close to unity.

  11. Exploratory depth-of-burst experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichenbach, H.; Behrens, K. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Kurzzeitdynamik - Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Kuhl, A. [R and D Associates, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1991-12-12

    This report describes the first small-scale explosion experiments with aerated grout (i.e., YTONG). Apart from data referring to crater depth and volume versus depth of burst (DOB), isobaric DOB curves in the range of 1.5 psi {le} p {le} 15 psi were established. The comparison with previous HOB values shows that the ground range to a given overpressure is considerably reduced with increasing depth of burst. The authors plan to continue the airblast investigations with different types of soil materials.

  12. Threats in Optical Burst Switched Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Siva Subramanian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical network is a viable network for future communication, which transmits data at an average rate of 50Tb/s. Optical Burst Switching is a trusted mechanism used for Optical network. There is a good amount of research done in the area of security in Optical networks. In addition, the issues related to physical network security has been dealt with respect to Optical networks. Our proposed work is intend to find the possible security threats that may happen in Optical Burst Switched Networks and the counter measures are examined separately. The NS-2 simulator with modified OBS patch is used to verify and validate the proposed mechanism

  13. The selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, D-84, suppresses cocaine self-administration, but does not occasion cocaine-like levels of generalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Angela M; Dutta, Aloke K; Reith, Maarten E A; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2010-12-01

    A successful replacement pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine dependency would likely reduce cocaine's abuse, support a low abuse liability, overlap cocaine's subjective effects, and have a long duration of action. Inhibitors with varying selectivity at the dopamine transporter (DAT) have approximated these properties. The objective of the present study was to characterize the behavioural effects of an extremely selective DAT inhibitor, (+) trans-4-(2-Benzhydryloxyethyl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl) piperadin-3-ol (D-84), a 3-hydroxy substituted piperidine derivative of GBR-12935, for its cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, its effects on cocaine self-administration, and for its own self-administration. During cocaine discrimination tests, cocaine occasioned the 10 mg/kg cocaine training stimulus with an ED(50) value of 3.13 (1.54-6.34) mg/kg, and reduced response rates with an ED(50) value of 20.39 (7.24-57.44) mg/kg. D-84 incompletely generalized to the cocaine stimulus occasioning a maximal 76% cocaine-lever responding, while reducing response rates with lower potency than cocaine (ED(50)=30.94 (12.34-77.60) mg/kg). Pretreatment with D-84 (9.6-30.4 mg/kg) significantly (Pcocaine intake at 17.1 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.5 mg/kg/infusion, and at 30.4 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.1, 0.5 .and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. During self-administration tests with D-84 (0.1-1 mg/kg/infusion), numbers of infusions significantly exceeded vehicle levels at 0.3 mg/kg/infusion. These results show that D-84 pretreatment can decrease cocaine intake especially when high doses of cocaine are being self-administered. This observation, combined with its incomplete generalization to the cocaine discriminative stimulus and its reported long duration of action, provides a profile consistent with a potential replacement therapy for treating cocaine-abusing patients. PMID:20840845

  14. SDSS Pre-Burst Observations of Recent Gamma-Ray Burst Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cool, R J; Brinkmann, J; Eisenstein, D J; Hogg, D W; Schlegel, D J; Schneider, D P; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hogg, David W.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry and spectroscopy in the fields of 24 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by Swift, including bursts localized by Swift, HETE-2, and INTEGRAL, after December 2004. After this bulk release, we plan to provide individual releases of similar data shortly after the localization of future bursts falling in the SDSS survey area. These data provide a solid basis for the astrometric and photometric calibration of follow-up afterglow searches and monitoring. Furthermore, the images provided with this release will allow observers to find transient objects up to a magnitude fainter than possible with Digitized Sky Survey image comparisons.

  15. Oxidative burst of circulating neutrophils following traumatic brain injury in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiliu Liao

    Full Text Available Besides secondary injury at the lesional site, Traumatic brain injury (TBI can cause a systemic inflammatory response, which may cause damage to initially unaffected organs and potentially further exacerbate the original injury. Here we investigated plasma levels of important inflammatory mediators, oxidative activity of circulating leukocytes, particularly focusing on neutrophils, from TBI subjects and control subjects with general trauma from 6 hours to 2 weeks following injury, comparing with values from uninjured subjects. We observed increased plasma level of inflammatory cytokines/molecules TNF-α, IL-6 and CRP, dramatically increased circulating leukocyte counts and elevated expression of TNF-α and iNOS in circulating leukocytes from TBI patients, which suggests a systemic inflammatory response following TBI. Our data further showed increased free radical production in leukocyte homogenates and elevated expression of key oxidative enzymes iNOS, COX-2 and NADPH oxidase (gp91(phox in circulating leukocytes, indicating an intense induction of oxidative burst following TBI, which is significantly greater than that in control subjects with general trauma. Furthermore, flow cytometry assay proved neutrophils as the largest population in circulation after TBI and showed significantly up-regulated oxidative activity and suppressed phagocytosis rate for circulating neutrophils following brain trauma. It suggests that the highly activated neutrophils might play an important role in the secondary damage, even outside the injured brain. Taken together, the potent systemic inflammatory response induced by TBI, especially the intensively increase oxidative activity of circulating leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, may lead to a systemic damage, dysfunction/damage of bystander tissues/organs and even further exacerbate secondary local damage. Controlling these pathophysiological processes may be a promising therapeutic strategy and will protect unaffected

  16. New Results on the Spectral Evolution of Magnetar Bright Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, George A.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.; GBM Magnetar Team

    2013-04-01

    Magnetars are isolated neutron stars characterized by long spin periods (2-12 s) and large spin down rates, implying a very strong magnetic field, B>10E14 G. Magnetars exhibit short bursts of hard X-/soft gamma-rays with luminosities ranging from 10E37 to 10E41 erg/s. The magnetar SGR J1550-5418 entered an extremely active bursting episode, starting on 2008 October 03 until 2009 April 17, during which Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) observed several hundred bursts from this source. Such wealth of bursts resulted in the largest catalog of detailed temporal and spectral results for SGR J1550-5418. Here, we discuss new results from time-resolved spectral analysis of the brightest bursts from this source. Our analysis, together with the comparison of our results with other magnetar bursts, enabled us to put strong constraints on the theories underlying the magnetar bursts emission mechanism.

  17. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazzi, A. C.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Younes, G. A.; Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E.; Lin, L.; Granot, J.; Finger, M. H.; Chaplin, V. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Watts, A. L.; von Kienlin, A.; Baring, M. G.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Gibby, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; van der Klis, M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-05-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  18. ESTIMATION OF THE BURST LENGTH IN OBS NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi S.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of the optical burst switching (OBS and discusses the major components. In OBS, the length of the burst arriving at a particular node is unknown, and hence, node design is very complex. In OBS first control, packet is transmitted and reserve the path as in circuit switching, thereafter, the data bursts is transmitted. In this paper, a poisson arrival of packets is considered and estimation is made on the size of the burst length. The results presented in the paper clearly reveal that, the very large burst length is un-common. Therefore, most of the times, very short or average length burst is expected. Therefore it is concluded in this paper, buffering of burst at the contending nodes is a good option which increases the throughput and reduces the average delay. Finally, the buffering in conjunction with deflection of bursts will provide very effective solution.

  19. Power Enhancement Cavity for Burst-Mode Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical cavity scheme and locking method that can realize the power enhancement of picosecond UV laser pulses operating at a burst mode with arbitrary burst (macropulse) lengths and repetition rates.

  20. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Collazzi, A C; van der Horst, A J; Younes, G A; Kaneko, Y; Gogus, E; Lin, L; Granot, J; Finger, M H; Chaplin, V L; Huppenkothen, D; Watts, A L; von Kienlin, A; Baring, M G; Gruber, D; Bhat, P N; Gibby, M H; Gehrels, N; McEnery, J; van der Klis, M; Wijers, R A M J

    2015-01-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, giving the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from July 2008 to June 2013. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  1. THE FIVE YEAR FERMI/GBM MAGNETAR BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collazzi, A. C. [SciTec, Inc., 100 Wall Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Horst, A. J. van der; Younes, G. A. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Lin, L. [François Arago Centre, APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris (France); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Raanana 43537 (Israel); Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Chaplin, V. L. [School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Avenue S, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Huppenkothen, D. [Center for Data Science, New York University, 726 Broadway, 7th Floor, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Watts, A. L. [Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kienlin, A. von [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H., E-mail: acollazzi@scitec.com [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550–5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  2. A Novel Mechanism for Contention Resolution in Parallel Optical Burst Switching (POBS Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Joudah Zaiter

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Parallel Optical Burst Switching (POBS is a variant of Optical Burst Switching (OBS which is proposed as a new optical switching strategy for Ultra-Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (U-DWDM to support the enormous bandwidth demand of the next generation Internet. As opposed to OBS, POBS transmits bursts in two dimensions: the wavelength dimension and the time dimension. POBS network uses an one-way resource reservation mechanism to set up the resources for each data burst transmission. The use of this mechanism may cause bursts to contend for the same resources at the same time at core (intermediate nodes of the network. Therefore, the performance of POBS networks depends on the contention resolution policies to reach acceptable levels for bandwidth usage. These policies may increase both the cost and complexities of the core nodes in POBS networks. Most literatures on OBS networks apply contention resolution at the core nodes based on reactive strategies that are activated after contention takes place in core nodes. This study proposes the use of a proactive contention resolution technique at ingress nodes of POBS network as well as reactive contention resolution technique at core nodes for reducing the probability of burst drop in the network in order to increase the performance of the network. The simulation results show that the use of POBS network with the proposed Reactive Odd/Even Node ID Wavelength Assignment Technique (POBS-ROENIDWAT shows a better performance in terms of reduced data loss rate and increased throughput compared to the performances of both POBS network with Sequential Wavelength Assignment Technique (POBS-SWAT and OBS network with Burst Segmentation (OBS-BS.

  3. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  4. Fast Radio Bursts: Searches, Sensitivities & Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration transient signals discovered over the past decade. Here we describe the scientific usefulness of FRBs, consider ongoing work at the Parkes telescope, and examine some relevant search sensitivity and completeness considerations. We also look ahead to the results from ongoing and future planned studies in the field.

  5. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  6. Neutrino Balls and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Holdom, B

    1994-01-01

    We propose a mechanism by which the neutrino emission from a supernova-type explosion can be converted into a gamma-ray burst of total energy $\\sim 10^{50}$ ergs. This occurs naturally if the explosion is situated inside a ball of trapped neutrinos, which in turn may lie at a galactic core. There are possible unique signatures of this scenario.

  7. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Yandong [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.

  8. Doubly-Resonant Fabry-Perot Cavity for Power Enhancement of Burst-Mode Picosecond Ultraviolet Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abudureyimu, Reheman [ORNL; Huang, Chunning [ORNL; Liu, Yun [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We report on a first experimental demonstration of locking a doubly-resonant Fabry-Perot cavity to burst-mode picosecond ultraviolet (UV) pulses by using a temperature controlled dispersion compensation method. This technique will eventually enable the intra cavity power enhancement of burst-mode 402.5MHz/50ps UV laser pulses with a MW level peak power required for the laser assisted H- beam stripping experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source.

  9. $\\gamma$-ray Burst Positions from the ASM on RXTE

    CERN Document Server

    Bradt, H V; Bradt, Hale V.; Smith, Donald A.

    1999-01-01

    The RXTE/ASM has detected and positioned 14 confirmed GRB bursts (at this writing, Jan. 1999) including six whose positions were comunicated to the community 2 to 32 hours after the burst. Two of these latter bursts led to measurements of optical red shifts but one, despite an easily detected x-ray afterglow, produced no detectable optical or radio afterglow.

  10. AGILE Mini-Calorimeter gamma-gay burst catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Galli, M; Fuschino, F; Labanti, C; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Bulgarelli, A; Cattaneo, P W; Colafrancesco, S; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Giannotti, F; Giuliani, A; Longo, F; Mereghetti, S; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Pittori, C; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Tavani, M; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vercellone, S; Verrecchia, F

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-Calorimeter of the AGILE satellite can observe the high-energy part of gamma-ray bursts with good timing capability. We present the data of the 85 hard gamma-gay bursts observed by the Mini-Calorimeter since the launch (April 2007) until October 2009. We report the timing data for 84 and spectral data for 21 burst.

  11. IGR J17254-3257, a new bursting neutron star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.;

    2007-01-01

    Aims. The study of the observational properties of uncommonly long bursts from low luminosity sources is important when investigating the transition from a hydrogen - rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning as predicted by current burst theories. On ...

  12. Burst Assembly Schemes and Performance Evaluation in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jian-jun; JI Yue-feng

    2004-01-01

    Several proposed assemble algorithms for Optical Burst Switching (OBS) network is described, and the feature relative merits is discussed and analyzed in this paper. The authors propose an assembly mechanism FAT where time threshold is fluctuating randomly to reduce continuous blocking rate. With network simulation, the basic performance of these assembly schemes is compared and analyzed. The results show that burst loss ratio and assembly delay of the proposed FAT mechanism is better than that of exist assemble mechanism.

  13. Improved adaptive-threshold burst assembly in optical burst switching networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiuru Yang; Gang Wang; Shilou Jia

    2007-01-01

    An improved adaptive-threshold burst assembly algorithm is proposed to alleviate the limitation of conventional assembly schemes on data loss and delay. The algorithm will adjust the values of assembly factors according to variant traffic regions. And the simulation results show that, by using the adaptive-factor adaptive assembly scheme, the performance of networks is extensively enhanced in terms of burst loss probability and average queuing delay.

  14. Investigation of Primordial Black Hole Bursts using Interplanetary Network Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; MacGibbon, J H; Svinkin, D S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Pal'shin, V D; Goldsten, J; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Rau, A; Kienlin, A; Zhang, X; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Yamaoka, K; Fukazawa, Y; Ohno, M; Ohmori, N; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Feroci, M; Frontera, F; Guidorzi, C; Barthelmy, S; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H A; Smith, D M; McTiernan, J

    2015-01-01

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating Primordial Black Holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the minimum distance to gamma-ray bursts using detections from widely separated spacecraft. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 10^13-10^18 cm (7-10^5 AU) range, consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate for the first time lower limits ...

  15. VTA dopamine neuron bursting is altered in an animal model of depression and corrected by desipramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alexander; Friedman, Yaakov; Dremencov, Eliyahu; Yadid, Gal

    2008-03-01

    Ventral tegmental area (VTA) neuronal activity plays an important role in reward-related learning and motivation. Tracing the bursting signal is important for understanding neural state and understanding communication between individual neurons. The dopaminergic system, which projects from the VTA to other regions in the mesolimbic system, is involved in hedonia and motivation. However, the role of this system in the pathophysiology of depression and its manipulation for treatment of depression has received little attention. Inter-spike interval time series were recorded from the VTA of control Sprague-Dawley and Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rats with or without 14 days of desipramine (5 mg/kg) treatment. Comparison of the firing modes of control and desipramine-treated FSL rats reveals dissimilar patterns. Desipramine treatment normalized depressive-like behavior and elevated the dopaminergic mesolimbic activity, although not to control levels. Mesolimbic neuronal activity is known to occur either in burst or in single-spike firing mode. Herein, we suggest a third mode that is characterized as a "cluster" formed from burst and post-burst activity. A significant reduction in the activity of both bursts and cluster was detected in FSL rats, which was restored by desipramine treatment. PMID:18197479

  16. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  17. A Burst Mode, Ultrahigh Temperature UF4 Vapor Core Reactor Rankine Cycle Space Power System Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, E. T.; Kahook, S. D.; Diaz, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    Static and dynamic neutronic analyses have been performed on an innovative burst mode (100's of MW output for a few thousand seconds) Ulvahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor (UTVR) space nuclear power system. The NVTR employs multiple, neutronically-coupled fissioning cores and operates on a direct, closed Rankine cycle using a disk Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generater for energy conversion. The UTVR includes two types of fissioning core regions: (1) the central Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core (UTVC) which contains a vapor mixture of highly enriched UF4 fuel and a metal fluoride working fluid and (2) the UF4 boiler column cores located in the BeO moderator/reflector region. The gaseous nature of the fuel the fact that the fuel is circulating, the multiple coupled fissioning cores, and the use of a two phase fissioning fuel lead to unique static and dynamic neutronic characteristics. Static neutronic analysis was conducted using two-dimensional S sub n, transport theory calculations and three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport theory calculations. Circulating-fuel, coupled-core point reactor kinetics equations were used for analyzing the dynamic behavior of the UTVR. In addition to including reactivity feedback phenomena associated with the individual fissioning cores, the effects of core-to-core neutronic and mass flow coupling between the UTVC and the surrounding boiler cores were also included in the dynamic model The dynamic analysis of the UTVR reveals the existence of some very effectlve inherent reactivity feedback effects that are capable of quickly stabilizing this system, within a few seconds, even when large positive reactivity insertions are imposed. If the UTVC vapor fuel density feedback is suppressed, the UTVR is still inherently stable because of the boiler core liquid-fuel volume feedback; in contrast, suppression of the vapor fuel density feedback in 'conventional" gas core cavity reactors causes them to become inherently unstable. Due to the

  18. Phantom bursting is highly sensitive to noise and unlikely to account for slow bursting in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells show bursting electrical activity with a wide range of burst periods ranging from a few seconds, often seen in isolated cells, over tens of seconds (medium bursting), usually observed in intact islets, to several minutes. The phantom burster model [Bertram, R., Previte, J., ...

  19. BurstCube: A Gamma-ray Burst Detecting Swarm of CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jeremy S; Racusin, Judith L.; Krizmanic, John F; McEnery, Julie E.

    2014-08-01

    The study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has seen major advances in the past decade based on the results of several highly successful missions like Swift and Fermi. These prolific GRB detectors have enabled multi-wavelength follow-up of hundreds of GRBs and have allowed us to answer some of the outstanding questions in this field as well as prompted research in many new directions. It is critical to continue GRB detection, especially with gravitational wave detectors coming online in the next few years, e.g. advanced LIGO/Virgo, and the continued operation of multi-messenger observatories such as IceCube. Without the detection and study of counterparts to these future non-photon detections, the full characterization of a GRB would be difficult. The current GRB detection technology is at a mature level such that small, inexpensive detectors on CubeSats could perform as well or better than the current generation of GRB scintillator detectors. This paper will detail the design parameters and performance of small, GRB detecting CubeSats operating in a swarm that can detect, localize, and characterize GRBs via the high energy photon signatures.

  20. The tendency to suppress, inhibiting thoughts, and dream rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona; Bryant, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    Ironic control theory proposes that suppressing thoughts leads to increased occurrence of the suppressed thought because monitoring for the unwanted thought leads to intrusions. This study investigated the influence of suppressing unwanted thoughts on dream content. One hundred participants who had high or low levels of tendency to suppress unwanted thoughts nominated an intrusive thought, and half of the participants were instructed to suppress that thought for 5 min prior to sleeping. Participants completed a dream diary upon waking, which was subsequently rated by independent raters for dream content. In terms of the 79 participants who reported dreaming, more high suppressors who were instructed to suppress dreamt about the intrusive thought than high suppressors in the control condition. There was no difference between low suppressors in the suppression and control conditions. These results suggest that dream content can be influenced by attempted suppression prior to sleep, and this is particularly apparent in people with a tendency to suppress unwanted thoughts. PMID:16516140

  1. Phase dependency of long-term potentiation induction during the intermittent bursts of carbachol-induced β oscillation in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Motoshi; Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Natsume, Kiyohisa

    2012-01-01

    The rodent hippocampus possesses theta (θ) and beta (β) rhythms, which occur intermittently as bursts. Both rhythms are related to spatial memory processing in a novel environment. θ rhythm is related to spatial memory encoding process. β rhythm is related to the match/mismatch process. In the match/mismatch process, rodent hippocampus detects a representation matching sensory inputs of the current place among the retrieved internal representations of places. Long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) is induced in both processes. The cholinergic agent carbachol induces intermittent θ and β oscillations in in vitro slices similar to in vivo bursts. LTP is facilitated during the generation of θ oscillation, suggesting that the facilitation of LTP is dependent upon the phases of intermittent burst (burst phases) of the oscillation. However, whether this is the case for β oscillation has not yet been studied. In the present study, LTP-inducing θ-burst stimulation was administered at the different burst phases of carbachol-induced β oscillations (CIBO), and the synaptic changes were measured at CA3-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses (CA3 synapse) and at CA3-CA1 pyramidal cell synapses (CA1 synapse). At the CA3 synapse, the largest magnitude of LTP was induced at the late burst phases of CIBO. At the CA1 synapse, LTP was induced only at the late burst phases. Modulation of LTP was suppressed when CIBO was blocked by the application of atropine at both synapses. The results suggest that the bursts of hippocampal β rhythm can determine the optimal temporal period for completing with the match/mismatch process.

  2. Network and external perturbation induce burst synchronisation in cat cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Batista, Antonio M.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-05-01

    The brain of mammals are divided into different cortical areas that are anatomically connected forming larger networks which perform cognitive tasks. The cat cerebral cortex is composed of 65 areas organised into the visual, auditory, somatosensory-motor and frontolimbic cognitive regions. We have built a network of networks, in which networks are connected among themselves according to the connections observed in the cat cortical areas aiming to study how inputs drive the synchronous behaviour in this cat brain-like network. We show that without external perturbations it is possible to observe high level of bursting synchronisation between neurons within almost all areas, except for the auditory area. Bursting synchronisation appears between neurons in the auditory region when an external perturbation is applied in another cognitive area. This is a clear evidence that burst synchronisation and collective behaviour in the brain might be a process mediated by other brain areas under stimulation.

  3. A search for ultra-high energy counterparts to gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Plunkett, S P; McBreen, B; Hurley, K J; O'Sullivan, C T

    1995-01-01

    A small air shower array operating over many years has been used to search for ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma radiation (\\geq 50 TeV) associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). Upper limits for a one minute interval after each burst are presented for seven GRBs located with zenith angles \\theta < 20^{\\circ}. A 4.3\\sigma excess over background was observed between 10 and 20 minutes following the onset of a GRB on 11 May 1991. The confidence level that this is due to a real effect and not a background fluctuation is 99.8\\%. If this effect is real then cosmological models are excluded for this burst because of absorption of UHE gamma rays by the intergalactic radiation fields.

  4. Bursting and large-scale intermittency in turbulent convection with differential rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.

    2003-01-01

    The tilting mechanism, which generates differential rotation in two-dimensional turbulent convection, is shown to produce relaxation oscillations in the mean flow energy integral and bursts in the global fluctuation level, akin to Lotka-Volterra oscillations. The basic reason for such behavior...

  5. Gravitational-wave bursts with memory and experimental prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors show that for any kind of detector the best way to search for a ''bursts with memory'' (BWM) gravitation wave is to integrate up the signal for an integration time tau-circumflex approx.= 1/fsub(opt), where fsub(opt) is the frequency at which the detector has optimal amplitude sensitivity to ordinary bursts (bursts with memory). In such a search the sensitivity to BWM with duration Δt < or approx. 1/fsub(opt) is independent of the burst duration Δt and is approximately equal to the sensitivity to ordinary bursts one cycle long with frequency fsub(opt). (author)

  6. X-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    OpenAIRE

    Frontera, Filippo

    2004-01-01

    The discovery by the BeppoSAX satellite of X-ray afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst which occurred on 28 February 1997 produced a revolution in our knowledge of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon. Along with the discovery of X-ray afterglows, the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts were discovered and the distance issue was settled, at least for long $\\gamma$-ray bursts. The 30 year mystery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon is now on the way to solution. Here I rewiew the observationa...

  7. Rock Burst Mechanics: Insight from Physical and Mathematical Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Vacek, J.; J. Chocholoušová

    2008-01-01

    Rock burst processes in mines are studied by many groups active in the field of geomechanics. Physical and mathematical modelling can be used to better understand the phenomena and mechanisms involved in the bursts. In the present paper we describe both physical and mathematical models of a rock burst occurring in a gallery of a coal mine.For rock bursts (also called bumps) to occur, the rock has to possess certain particular rock burst properties leading to accumulation of energy and the pot...

  8. Stacked search for time shifted high energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the \\ANTARES neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Adrian-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios-Marti, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bormuth, R; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Elsasser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fermani, P; Folger, F; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geisselsoeder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Graf, K; Hallmann, S; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernàndez-Rey, J J; Hoessl, J; Hofestadt, J; Hugon, C; James, C W; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kiessling, D; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kreter, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Mathieu, A; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Muller, C; Nezri, E; Pavalas, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Roensch, K; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schussler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tonnis, C; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Visser, E; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J

    2016-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts outside the electromagnetic prompt-emission time window is presented. Using a stacking approach of the time delays between reported gamma-ray burst alerts and spatially coincident muon-neutrino signatures, data from the Antares neutrino telescope recorded between 2007 and 2012 are analysed. One year of public data from the IceCube detector between 2008 and 2009 have been also investigated. The respective timing pro?les are scanned for statistically significant accumulations within 40 days of the Gamma Ray Burst, as expected from Lorentz Invariance Violation effects and some astrophysical models. No significant excess over the expected accidental coincidence rate could be found in either of the two data sets. The average strength of the neutrino signal is found to be fainter than one detectable neutrino signal per hundred gamma-ray bursts in the Antares data at 90% confidence level.

  9. Effects of tic suppression: ability to suppress, rebound, negative reinforcement, and habituation to the premonitory urge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Matt W; Woods, Douglas W; Nicotra, Cassandra M; Kelly, Laura M; Ricketts, Emily J; Conelea, Christine A; Grados, Marco A; Ostrander, Rick S; Walkup, John T

    2013-01-01

    The comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) represents a safe, effective non-pharmacological treatment for Tourette's disorder that remains underutilized as a treatment option. Contributing factors include the perceived negative consequences of tic suppression and the lack of a means through which suppression results in symptom improvement. Participants (n = 12) included youth ages 10-17 years with moderate-to-marked tic severity and noticeable premonitory urges who met Tourette's or chronic tic disorder criteria. Tic frequency and urge rating data were collected during an alternating sequence of tic freely or reinforced tic suppression periods. Even without specific instructions regarding how to suppress tics, youth experienced a significant, robust (72%), stable reduction in tic frequency under extended periods (40 min) of contingently reinforced tic suppression in contrast to periods of time when tics were ignored. Following periods of prolonged suppression, tic frequency returned to pre-suppression levels. Urge ratings did not show the expected increase during the initial periods of tic suppression, nor a subsequent decline in urge ratings during prolonged, effective tic suppression. Results suggest that environments conducive to tic suppression result in reduced tic frequency without adverse consequences. Additionally, premonitory urges, underrepresented in the literature, may represent an important enduring etiological consideration in the development and maintenance of tic disorders.

  10. Fermi/GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR OBSERVATIONS OF SGR J0501+4516 BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the gamma-ray burst monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during 13 days of the source's activation in 2008 (August 22- September 3). We find that the T90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T90 values estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two blackbody functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that Epeak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ∼30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10-6 erg cm-2 s-1, increasing steadily afterward. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity, Liso, corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 x 1040 erg s-1).

  11. Low-level bromate analysis in drinking water by ion chromatography with optimized suppressed conductivity cell current followed by a post-column reaction and UV/Vis detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotsing, Marcellin; Barbeau, Benoit; Prevost, Michele

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, a high capacity anion exchange column was used to efficiently and simultaneously separate traces of oxyhalide disinfection byproducts (DBP) anions and bromide by an ion chromatography system followed by a post-column reaction (PCR). The PCR generates in situ hydroiodic (HI) acid from the excess of potassium iodate that combines with bromate from the column effluent to form the triiodide anion detectable by UV/Vis absorbance at 352 nm. The suppressed conductivity cell current was optimized at 70 mA, with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and a 9 mM carbonate eluent. Its performance was investigated on a trace-level determination of bromate in ozonated municipal and bottled drinking water. Based on ozonated municipal drinking water matrix, the method detection limit of 0.27 μg BrO(-)(3)/L was evaluated with the Method Quantification Limit (MQL) of 0.89 μg BrO(-)(3)/L. However, in ultrapure water, a MDL of 0.015 μg BrO(-)(3)/L and a MRL of 0.052 μg BrO(-)(3)/L were achieved. The recovery for spiked municipal samples was in the range of 90%-115%.

  12. US Environmental Protection Agency Method 314.1, an automated sample preconcentration/matrix elimination suppressed conductivity method for the analysis of trace levels (0.50 microg/L) of perchlorate in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Herbert P; Pepich, B V; Pohl, C; Later, D; Joyce, R; Srinivasan, K; Thomas, D; Woodruff, A; Deborba, B; Munch, D J

    2006-06-16

    Since 1997 there has been increasing interest in the development of analytical methods for the analysis of perchlorate. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 314.0, which was used during the first Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Regulation (UCMR) cycle, supports a method reporting limit (MRL) of 4.0 microg/L. The non-selective nature of conductivity detection, combined with very high ionic strength matrices, can create conditions that make the determination of perchlorate difficult. The objective of this work was to develop an automated, suppressed conductivity method with improved sensitivity for use in the second UCMR cycle. The new method, EPA Method 314.1, uses a 35 mm x 4 mm cryptand concentrator column in the sample loop position to concentrate perchlorate from a 2 mL sample volume, which is subsequently rinsed with 10 mM NaOH to remove interfering anions. The cryptand concentrator column is combined with a primary AS16 analytical column and a confirmation AS20 analytical column. Unique characteristics of the cryptand column allow perchlorate to be desorbed from the cryptand trap and refocused on the head of the guard column for subsequent separation and analysis. EPA Method 314.1 has a perchlorate lowest concentration minimum reporting level (LCMRL) of 0.13 microg/L in both drinking water and laboratory synthetic sample matrices (LSSM) containing up to 1,000 microg/L each of chloride, bicarbonate and sulfate.

  13. Metabolic profiling of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway reveals the source of post-illumination isoprene burst from leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziru; Sharkey, Thomas D

    2013-02-01

    The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway in plants produces the prenyl precursors for all plastidic isoprenoids, including carotenoids and quinones. The MEP pathway is also responsible for synthesis of approximately 600 Tg of isoprene per year, the largest non-methane hydrocarbon flux into the atmosphere. There have been few studies of the regulation of the MEP pathway in plants under physiological conditions. In this study, we combined gas exchange techniques and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) and measured the profile of MEP pathway metabolites under different conditions. We report that in the MEP pathway, metabolites immediately preceding steps requiring reducing power were in high concentration. Inhibition of the MEP pathway by fosmidomycin caused deoxyxylulose phosphate accumulation in leaves as expected. Evidence is presented that accumulation of MEP pathway intermediates, primarily methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate, is responsible for the post-illumination isoprene burst phenomenon. Pools of intermediate metabolites stayed at approximately the same level 10 min after light was turned off, but declined eventually under prolonged darkness. In contrast, a strong inhibition of the second-to-last step of the MEP pathway caused suppression of isoprene emission in pure N(2). Our study suggests that reducing equivalents may be a key regulator of the MEP pathway and therefore isoprene emission from leaves. PMID:22831282

  14. Burst-mode optical label processor with ultralow power consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Salah; Nakahara, Tatsushi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Ryo

    2016-04-01

    A novel label processor subsystem for 100-Gbps (25-Gbps × 4λs) burst-mode optical packets is developed, in which a highly energy-efficient method is pursued for extracting and interfacing the ultrafast packet-label to a CMOS-based processor where label recognition takes place. The method involves performing serial-to-parallel conversion for the label bits on a bit-by-bit basis by using an optoelectronic converter that is operated with a set of optical triggers generated in a burst-mode manner upon packet arrival. Here we present three key achievements that enabled a significant reduction in the total power consumption and latency of the whole subsystem; 1) based on a novel operation mechanism for providing amplification with bit-level selectivity, an optical trigger pulse generator, that consumes power for a very short duration upon packet arrival, is proposed and experimentally demonstrated, 2) the energy of optical triggers needed by the optoelectronic serial-to-parallel converter is reduced by utilizing a negative-polarity signal while employing an enhanced conversion scheme entitled the discharge-or-hold scheme, 3) the necessary optical trigger energy is further cut down by half by coupling the triggers through the chip's backside, whereas a novel lens-free packaging method is developed to enable a low-cost alignment process that works with simple visual observation. PMID:27136992

  15. On associating Fast Radio Bursts with afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Vedantham, H K; Mooley, K; Frail, D; Hallinan, G; Kulkarni, S R

    2016-01-01

    A radio source that faded over 6 days, with a redshift $z\\approx0.5$ host, has been identified by Keane et al. (2016) as the transient afterglow to a Fast Radio Burst (FRB 150418). We report follow-up radio and optical observations of the afterglow candidate, and find a source that is consistent with an active galactic nucleus (AGN). If the afterglow-candidate is nonetheless a prototypical FRB afterglow, existing surveys limit the fraction of FRBs that produce afterglows to 0.25 for modulation-index $m=\\Delta S/\\bar{S}\\geq0.7$, and 0.07 for $m\\geq1$, at 95\\% confidence. Afterglow associations with the barrage of bursts expected from future FRB surveys must satisfy constraints on the afterglow rate set by state of the art slow-transient surveys.

  16. The Supernova -- Gamma-Ray Burst Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Woosley, S E

    2006-01-01

    Observations show that at least some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) happen simultaneously with core-collapse supernovae (SNe), thus linking by a common thread nature's two grandest explosions. We review here the growing evidence for and theoretical implications of this association, and conclude that most long-duration soft-spectrum GRBs are accompanied by massive stellar explosions (GRB-SNe). The kinetic energy and luminosity of well-studied GRB-SNe appear to be greater than those of ordinary SNe, but evidence exists, even in a limited sample, for considerable diversity. The existing sample also suggests that most of the energy in the explosion is contained in nonrelativistic ejecta (producing the supernova) rather than in the relativistic jets responsible for making the burst and its afterglow. Neither all SNe, nor even all SNe of Type Ibc produce GRBs. The degree of differential rotation in the collapsing iron core of massive stars when they die may be what makes the difference.

  17. Bursting behaviours in cascaded stimulated Brillouin scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhan-Jun; He Xian-Tu; Zheng Chun-Yang; Wang Yu-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering is studied by numerically solving the Vlasov-Maxwell system.A cascade of stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur when a linearly polarized laser pulse propagates in a plasma.It is found that a stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can reduce the scattering and increase the transmission of light,as well as introduce a bursting behaviour in the evolution of the laser-plasma interaction.The bursting time in the reflectivity is found to be less than half the ion acoustic period.The ion temperature can affect the stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade,which can repeat several times at low ion temperatures and can be completely eliminated at high ion temperatures.For stimulated Brillouin scattering saturation,higher-harmonic generation and wave-wave interaction of the excited ion acoustic waves can restrict the amplitude of the latter.In addition,stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can restrict the amplitude of the scattered light.

  18. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    CERN Document Server

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stephane; Alava, Mikko J; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A M

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems.

  19. Burst Detector X-Ray IIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Burst Detector X-Ray (BDX) instrument for the Block IIR series of Global Positioning System satellites is described. The BDX instrument can locate and characterize exoatmospheric nuclear detonations by using four sensors consisting of sets of filters over silicon diodes to detect x rays of various energies from the burst. On the BDX-IIR, a fifth sensor with a response spanning those of the other sensors confirms coincidences among the four main channels. The mechanical and electronic features of the BDX-IIR and its sensors are described. The calibrations and the system tests used in flight are presented. The commands for the BDX-IIR are given. The messages sent from the BDX-IIR are described in detail.

  20. Environmental Effects of Gamma Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma rays bursts, coming from very massive stars, are the most powerful explosions in our Universe. Some authors have linked them to some of the climatic changes and consequent biological mass extinctions of the Phanerozoic eon. However, the consequences of their direct impact on primitive Earth, is today a hot topic of debate. On the other hand, it is usually assumed that they were more common in earlier stages of our galaxy. So it is important to evaluate its potential effects on terrestrial paleoenvironments. We outline some simple models to estimate their influence mainly on the primordial atmospheric chemistry of Earth and on the climate in general. To do that, we consider different scenarios where the atmospheric composition diverges substantially from the atmosphere today, and compute the evolution of principal chemical species under the intense radiational stress of a gamma ray burst. Furthermore, the possible impact on the isotopic composition, geochemistry and the biosphere are mentioned in general way

  1. Short-term Effects of Gamma Ray Bursts on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Martín, Osmel; Cárdenas, Rolando; Horváth, J E

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the potential short-term atmospheric and biospheric influence of Gamma Ray Bursts on the Earth. We focus in the ultraviolet flash at the planet's surface, which occurs as a result of the retransmission of the $\\gamma$ radiation through the atmosphere. This would be the only important short-term effect on life. We mostly consider Archean and Proterozoic eons, and for completeness we also comment on the Phanerozoic. Therefore, in our study we consider atmospheres with oxygen levels ranging from $10^{-5}$ to 1% of the present atmospheric level, representing different moments in the oxygen rise history. Ecological consequences and some strategies to estimate their importance are outlined.

  2. Gamma-Ray Burst Polarization via Compton Scattering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation and Compton scattering are widely accepted as the most likely emission mechanisms of some astrophysical phenomena, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei. The measurement of the polarization of photons provides a useful tool to distinguish different emission mechanisms and structures of the emission region. Based on the differential cross section of a polarized photon scattered by an unpolarized electron of any initial momentum, we derive an analytical formula of polarization for beamed photons scattered by isotropic electrons with a power-law distribution. Numerical calculations are carried out in four special cases: electrons at rest, Thomson limit, head-on collision, and monochromatic electrons. It is found that the maximum polarization can be as high as 100% for low energy photons, if the electrons are at rest. Although polarization is highly suppressed due to the isotropic electrons, a maximum value of ~10%-20% can still be achieved. The Compton scattering process can be used to explain the polarization of GRB 041219A and GRB 100826A.

  3. GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, NEW COSMOLOGICAL BEACONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Avila-Reese

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs are the brightest electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, associated to the death of massive stars. As such, GRBs are potential tracers of the evolution of the cosmic massive star formation, metallicity, and Initial Mass Function. GRBs also proved to be appealing cosmological distance indicators. This opens a unique opportunity to constrain the cosmic expansion history up to redshifts 5-6. A brief review on both subjects is presented here.

  4. Identifying crucial parameter correlations maintaining bursting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Doloc-Mihu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, [Formula: see text]Leak; a persistent K current, [Formula: see text]K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, [Formula: see text]P that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of [Formula: see text]Leak, [Formula: see text]K2, and [Formula: see text]P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained.

  5. Are Gamma-Ray Bursts Standard Candles?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li-Xin

    2007-01-01

    By dividing a sample of 48 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) into four groups with redshift from low to high and fitting each group with the Amati relation log Eiso = a + b log Epeak, I find that parameters a and b vary with the mean redshift of the GRBs in each group systematically and significantly. The results suggest that GRBs evolve strongly with the cosmic redshift and hence are not standard candles.

  6. The Euclidean distribution of Fast Radio Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Oppermann, Niels; Connor, Liam; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-01-01

    We investigate whether current data on the distribution of observed flux densities of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are consistent with a constant source density in Euclidean space. We use the number of FRBs detected in two surveys with different characteristics along with the observed signal-to-noise ratios of the detected FRBs in a formalism similar to a V/V_max-test to constrain the distribution of flux densities. We find consistency between the data and a Euclidean distribution. Any extension ...

  7. Bursting of sensitive polymersomes induced by curling

    OpenAIRE

    Mabrouk, Elyes; Cuvelier, Damien; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise; Nassoy, Pierre; Li, Min-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Polymersomes, which are stable and robust vesicles made of block copolymer amphiphiles, are good candidates for drug carriers or micro/nanoreactors. Polymer chemistry enables almost unlimited molecular design of responsive polymersomes whose degradation upon environmental changes has been used for the slow release of active species. Here, we propose a strategy to remotely trigger instantaneous polymersome bursting. We have designed asymmetric polymer vesicles, in which only one leaflet is com...

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts and their Optical Counterparts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) have been discovered 38 years ago and still remain one of the most intriguing puzzles of astrophysics. In this paper we remind briefly the history of GRB studies and review the current experimental evidence with the emphasis on GRB optical counterparts. At the end we introduce '' π of the Sky '' project designed to catch prompt optical emission from GRB sources. (author)

  9. Gamma-ray bursts - a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a short general introduction into the field of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) research, summarizing the past and the present status. We give an general view of the GRBs observations to date, both in the prompt emission phase as well as in the afterglow phase, and a brief primer into the theory, mainly in the frame-work of the fireball model. (authors)

  10. High-energy neutrinos from reverse shocks in gamma-ray burst progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2007-01-01

    Highly relativistic jets are a key element of current gamma-ray burst models, where the jet bulk kinetic energy is converted to radiation energy at optically thin shocks. High-energy neutrinos are expected from photomeson interactions of protons accelerated in the same shocks. Here we revisit the early evolution of a relativistic jet, while the jet is still inside the star. We study propagation of mildly relativistic and ultrarelativistic jets through a type Ib progenitor, and follow reverse shocks as the jets cross the star. We show that protons can be accelerated to ~10^4 GeV at reverse shocks, and efficiently produce mesons, and the mesons experience significant cooling, suppressing subsequent neutrino emission on decay. We show, however, that the neutrino yield from the reverse shock is still reasonably large, especially for low-luminosity and long-duration bursts, where meson cooling is less severe. From a choked burst with isotropic equivalent energies of 10^{53}-10^{54} erg at 10 Mpc, we expect ~2-25 n...

  11. A Fast Radio Burst Host Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F; Bhandari, S; Barr, E; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Eatough, R P; Stappers, B W; Totani, T; Honma, M; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Morokuma, T; Niino, Y; Sugai, H; Terai, T; Tominaga, N; Yamasaki, S; Yasuda, N; Allen, R; Cooke, J; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Tingay, S J; Williams, A; Wayth, R; Chandra, P; Perrodin, D; Berezina, M; Mickaliger, M; Bassa, C

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, millisecond duration radio signals originating from distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called Fast Radio Bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. While every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, none before now have had a redshift measurement, due to the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we present the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting $\\sim 6$ days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be $z=0.492\\pm0.008$. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionised baryons in the intergalactic medium of $\\Omega_{\\mathrm{IGM}}=4.9 \\pm 1.3\\%$, in agreement with the expectation from WMAP, and i...

  12. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, N; Burrows, D N; Chincarini, G L; Cominsky, L R; Giommi, P; Hurley, K C; Marshall, F E; Mason, K O; Mészáros, P; Nousek, J A; Roming, P W A; Wells, A A; White, N E; Team, Swift Science

    2004-01-01

    The Swift mission, scheduled for launch in early 2004, is a multiwavelength observatory for gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy. It is the first-of-its-kind autonomous rapid-slewing satellite for transient astronomy and pioneers the way for future rapid-reaction and multiwavelength missions. It will be far more powerful than any previous GRB mission, observing more than 100 bursts per year and performing detailed X-ray and UV/optical afterglow observations spanning timescales from 1 minute to several days after the burst. The objectives are to determine the origin of GRBs; classify GRBs and search for new types; study the interaction of the ultra-relativistic outflows of GRBs with their surrounding medium; and use GRBs to study the early universe out to z>10. The mission is being developed by a NASA-led international collaboration. It will carry three instruments: a new-generation wide-field gamma-ray (15-150 keV) detector; a narrow-field X-ray telescope; and a narrow-field UV/optical telescope. Redshift determin...

  13. Supercollapsars and their X-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Komissarov, S S

    2009-01-01

    The very first stars in the Universe can be very massive, frequently reaching $10^3M_\\odot$. If born in large numbers such massive stars can have strong impact on the subsequent star formation producing strong ionising radiation and contaminating the primordial gas with heavy elements. They would leave behind massive black holes that could act as seeds for growing supermassive black holes of active galactic nuclei. Given the anticipated fast rotation such stars would end their live as supermassive collapsars and drive powerful magnetically-dominated jets. In this letter we investigate the possibility of observing the bursts of high-energy emission similar to the Long Gamma Ray Bursts associated with normal collapsars. We show that during the collapse of supercollapsars, the Blandford-Znajek mechanism can extract up to $10^{56}$erg at a rate of few$\\times10^{52}$erg/s. Due to the higher intrinsic time scale and higher redshift the observed burst duration increases by a factor of $\\simeq 1000$ and can reach one...

  14. Composite-flywheel burst-containment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapowith, A D; Handy, W E

    1982-04-08

    A key component impacting total flywheel energy storage system weight is the containment structure. This report addresses the factors that shape this structure and define its design criteria. In addition, containment weight estimates are made for the several composite flywheel designs of interest so that judgements can be made as to the relative weights of their containment structure. The requirements set down for this program were that all containment weight estimates be based on a 1 kWh burst. It should be noted that typical flywheel requirements for regenerative braking of small automobiles call for deliverable energies of 0.25 kWh. This leads to expected maximum burst energies of 0.5 kWh. The flywheels studied are those considered most likely to be carried further for operational design. These area: The pseudo isotropic disk flywheel, sometimes called the alpha ply; the SMC molded disk; either disk with a carbon ring; the subcircular rim with cruciform hub; and Avco's bi-directional circular weave disk. The flywheel materials for the disk are S-glass; the subcircular rim is Kevlar over S-glass. Test data on flywheel bursts and containment failures were analyzed. Recommendations are made for further testing.

  15. Radio flares from gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kopac, D; Kobayashi, S; Virgili, F J; Harrison, R; Japelj, J; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later opt...

  16. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    1900-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  17. Dynamic encoding of natural luminance sequences by LGN bursts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Lesica

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN of the thalamus, visual stimulation produces two distinct types of responses known as tonic and burst. Due to the dynamics of the T-type Ca(2+ channels involved in burst generation, the type of response evoked by a particular stimulus depends on the resting membrane potential, which is controlled by a network of modulatory connections from other brain areas. In this study, we use simulated responses to natural scene movies to describe how modulatory and stimulus-driven changes in LGN membrane potential interact to determine the luminance sequences that trigger burst responses. We find that at low resting potentials, when the T channels are de-inactivated and bursts are relatively frequent, an excitatory stimulus transient alone is sufficient to evoke a burst. However, to evoke a burst at high resting potentials, when the T channels are inactivated and bursts are relatively rare, prolonged inhibitory stimulation followed by an excitatory transient is required. We also observe evidence of these effects in vivo, where analysis of experimental recordings demonstrates that the luminance sequences that trigger bursts can vary dramatically with the overall burst percentage of the response. To characterize the functional consequences of the effects of resting potential on burst generation, we simulate LGN responses to different luminance sequences at a range of resting potentials with and without a mechanism for generating bursts. Using analysis based on signal detection theory, we show that bursts enhance detection of specific luminance sequences, ranging from the onset of excitatory sequences at low resting potentials to the offset of inhibitory sequences at high resting potentials. These results suggest a dynamic role for burst responses during visual processing that may change according to behavioral state.

  18. The social consequences of expressive suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Emily A.; Egloff, Boris; Wilhelm, Frank H.; Smith, Nancy C.; Erickson, Elizabeth A.; Gross, James J.

    2003-01-01

    At times, people keep their emotions from showing during social interactions. The authors' analysis suggests that such expressive suppression should disrupt communication and increase stress levels. To test this hypothesis, the authors conducted 2 studies in which unacquainted pairs of women discussed an upsetting topic. In Study 1, one member of each pair was randomly assigned to (a) suppress her emotional behavior, (b) respond naturally, or (c) cognitively reappraise in a way that reduced e...

  19. How to Burst into Contemporaneity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Zagvyazinsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper, written by V. I. Zagvyazinsky, academician and Chief Editor of «Education and Science» journal, is a comment on the previous issue’s publication of «Pedagogy in the Era of Non-Classical Science» by V. L. Benin. The author continues the discussion about the low quality pedagogic research of the recent years. Among the main reasons for insufficient research level, it is emphasized that young scientists are not quite ready for entering the socio-cultural reality because of their methodological illiteracy and non-compliance with the principles declared by the researchers themselves – i.e. systematism, competence, social and personal orientation, cultural conformity, activity approach, value-semantic orientation of education, foot-hold on the internal mechanisms, variability, dialogism, pedagogic cooperation, etc. The author criticizes the latest trends of so called «breaking into contemporaneity» by pedagogical science - the poly-paradigmatic idea as a new methodological basis of pedagogy; and synergetics as a general pedagogical methodology. Free paradigm constructing by the authors brought about the unreasonable methodological pluralism; whereas the failure of synergetics as methodological basis of pedagogy is related to its incompatibility with the person-oriented individual approach to personality formation. To get rid of the existing shortcomings of pedagogic research the author recommends to organize methodological training courses, schools, seminars, workshops, internship in the scientifically advanced centers that already have postgraduate and doctorate courses along with the fundamental scientific schools. 

  20. Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Earth: Exploration of Atmospheric, Biological, Climatic and Biogeochemical Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, B C; Jackman, C H; Laird, C M; Medvedev, M V; Stolarski, R S; Gehrels, N; Cannizzo, J K; Hogan, D P; Ejzak, L M; Thomas, Brian C.; Melott, Adrian L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Laird, Claude M.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.; Hogan, Daniel P.; Ejzak, Larissa M.

    2005-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are likely to have made a number of significant impacts on the Earth during the last billion years. We have used a two-dimensional atmospheric model to investigate the effects on the Earth's atmosphere of GRBs delivering a range of fluences, at various latitudes, at the equinoxes and solstices, and at different times of day. We have estimated DNA damage levels caused by increased solar UVB radiation, reduction in solar visible light due to $\\mathrm{NO_2}$ opacity, and deposition of nitrates through rainout of $\\mathrm{HNO_3}$. For the ``typical'' nearest burst in the last billion years, we find globally averaged ozone depletion up to 38%. Localized depletion reaches as much as 74%. Significant global depletion (at least 10%) persists up to about 7 years after the burst. Our results depend strongly on time of year and latitude over which the burst occurs. We find DNA damage of up to 16 times the normal annual global average, well above lethal levels for simple life forms such as phytopl...

  1. Synchronous bursting can arise from mutual excitation, even when individual cells are not endogenous bursters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowat, P F; Selverston, A I

    1997-04-01

    Mutual excitation between two neurons is generally thought to raise the excitation level of each neuron or, if they are both bursty, to act to synchronize their bursts. If only one is bursty, it can induce synchronized bursts in the other cell. Here we show that two nonbursty cells can be induced to burst in synchrony by mutual excitatory synaptic connections, provided the presynaptic threshold for graded synaptic transmission at each synapse is at a different level. This mechanism may operate in a recently discovered network in the lobster Homarus gammarus. By a duality between presynaptic threshold and injected current, we also show that two identical, nonbursty, mutual excitatory cells could be induced to burst in synchrony by injecting differing amounts of current in the two cells. Finally we show that differential oscillations between two mutual excitatory cells could be stopped by a slow-tailed hyperpolarizing current pulse into one cell or a slow-tailed depolarizing pulse into the other. PMID:9154519

  2. Upper limits on gravitational wave bursts in LIGO's second science run

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Díaz, M; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2005-01-01

    We perform a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the second science run of the LIGO detectors, using a method based on a wavelet time-frequency decomposition. This search is sensitive to bursts of duration much less than a second and with frequency content in the 100-1100Hz range. It features significant improvements in the instrument sensitivity and in the analysis pipeline with respect to the burst search previously reported by LIGO. Improvements in the search method allow exploring weaker signals, relative to the detector noise floor, while maintaining a low false alarm rate, O(0.1) microHz. The sensitivity in terms of the root-sum-square (rss) strain amplitude lies in the range of hrss~10^{-20} - 10^{-19}/sqrt(Hz) No gravitational wave signals were detected in 9.98 days of analyzed data. We interpret the search result in terms of a frequentist upper limit on the rate of detectable gravitational wave bursts at the level of 0.26 events per day at 90% confidence level. We combine this limit ...

  3. Initiate and Maintain Cavitation by Combining High Amplitude Bursts and Continuous Ultrasound Exposure in Culture Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestas, J.-L.; Alberti, L.; Chesnais, S.; Lafon, C.; Blay, J.-Y.; Cathignol, D.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound can produce a variety of nonthermal bioeffects via acoustic cavitation. Most studies on cavitation effects pointed on the difficulty of initiating and controlling the cavitation phenomenon. Our objective is to obtain reproducible viability and transfection rate in the case of the application of a continuous low intensity ultrasound exposure. We propose to initiate and maintain cavitation in the medium by combining a continuous ultrasound exposure with periodical high amplitude bursts. Cells were exposed to ultrasound (444.5 kHz) transmitted through the bottom of twelve-well culture plates containing prostatic cells (AT2, 2.5 106 cells/mL), the plasmid DsRed in transfection case (200 μg/mL) and culture media. The cavitation effects were evaluated on the cell viability and transfection, determined 0 to 3 days after exposure by a flow cytometer (FACScan; total counted events: 10 000). Bursts of 1.73 W/cm2 intensity level had no effect on cells when their duration was lower than 100 ms and their frequency lower than 4 bursts/min. When combined with continuous exposure, only one burst of 1.73 W/cm2 intensity level and 50 ms duration was sufficient to activate the cavitation phenomenon in the medium.

  4. Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations in 4U 1636-53 associated with bursts with positive convexity only

    CERN Document Server

    Lyu, Ming; Altamirano, Diego; Zhang, Guobao

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the convexity of all type I X-ray bursts with millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) in 4U 1636-53 using archival observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We found that, at a 3.5 $\\sigma$ confidence level, in all 39 cases in which the mHz QPOs disappeared at the time of an X-ray burst, the convexity of the burst is positive. The convexity measures the shape of the rising part of the burst light curve and, according to recent models, it is related to the ignition site of bursts on the neutron star surface. This finding suggests that in 4U 1636-53 these 39 bursts and the marginally-stable nuclear burning process responsible for the mHz QPOs take place at the neutron-star equator. This scenario could explain the inconsistency between the high accretion rate required for triggering mHz QPOs in theoretical models and the relatively low accretion rate derived from observations.

  5. Effect of Byrsonima crassa and Phenolic Constituents on Helicobacter pylori-Induced Neutrophils Oxidative Burst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Vilegas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Byrsonima crassa Niedenzu (Malpighiaceae is used in Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of diseases related mainly to gastric ulcers. In a previous study, our group described the gastric protective effect of the methanolic extract from the leaves of B. crassa. The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of methanolic extract and its phenolic compounds on the respiratory burst of neutrophils stimulated by H. pylori using a luminol-based chemiluminescence assay as well as their anti-H. pylori activity. The suppressive activity on oxidative burst of H. pylori-stimulated neutrophils was in the order of methyl gallate > (+-catechin > methanol extract > quercetin 3-O-α-l-arabinopyranoside > quercetin 3-O-β-d-galactopyranoside > amentoflavone. Methyl gallate, compound that induced the highest suppressive activity with IC50 value of 3.4 µg/mL, did not show anti-H. pylori activity. B. crassa could be considered as a potential source of natural antioxidant in gastric ulcers by attenuating the effects on the damage to gastric mucosa caused by neutrophil generated reactive oxygen species, even when H. pylori displays its evasion mechanisms.

  6. The limitations of resonant Compton scattering as a gamma-ray burst model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Resonant Compton upscattering is commended as a mechanism that produces a hard gamma-ray spectrum while suppressing X-rays. This model, however, has severe physical and observational limitations. Effective X-ray suppression places a lower limit on the electron density; above this limit X-rays scatter multiple times, so the single-scattering approximation of this mechanism is invalid. Multiple scattering produces a spectrum that is much harder than the single-scattering spectrum. As the Thomson optical depth of a power-law electron beam approaches unity, photon spawning commences at a high rate and physically invalidates the underlying electron distribution. The Compton upscattering model is therefore only valid over a narrow range of electron densities. An observational consequence of this model is the absence of the third cyclotron resonance. Resonant scattering produces gamma-rays that propagate nearly along the magnetic field. The resonant cross section of the third harmonic, which is strongly angle dependent, falls below the Compton continuum for these gamma rays. The observation of a third cyclotron resonance in a gamma-ray burst spectrum would eliminate resonant Compton scattering as a gamma-ray burst process.

  7. Long X-ray burst monitoring with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binary systems. In the frame of the INTEGRAL observational Key Programme over the Galactic Center a good number of the known X-ray bursters are frequently being monitored. An international....... Of special interest are low luminosity bursting sources that exhibit X-ray bursts of very different durations allowing to study the transition from a hydrogen-rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning. I will present results obtained from INTEGRAL archive data...... and from our previous proposal for the observation period 2006-2007. Comparing these observations with the current burst theories confirms the relation between bursting regimes and the accretion states of the system....

  8. Breaking Continuous Flash Suppression: A New Measure of Unconscious Processing during Interocular Suppression?

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Timo; Hebart, Martin N; Sterzer, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, it has been thought that under interocular suppression high-level visual processing is strongly inhibited if not abolished. With the development of continuous flash suppression (CFS), a variant of binocular rivalry, this notion has now been challenged by a number of reports showing that even high-level aspects of visual stimuli, such as familiarity, affect the time stimuli need to overcome CFS and emerge into awareness. In this “breaking continuous flash suppression” (b-CFS) p...

  9. Breaking continuous flash suppression: A new measure of unconscious processing during interocular suppression?

    OpenAIRE

    Timo eStein; Hebart, Martin N; Philipp eSterzer

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, it has been thought that under interocular suppression high-level visual processing is strongly inhibited if not abolished. With the development of continuous flash suppression (CFS), a variant of binocular rivalry, this notion has now been challenged by a number of reports showing that even high-level aspects of visual stimuli, such as familiarity, affect the time stimuli need to overcome CFS and emerge into awareness. In this breaking CFS (b-CFS) paradigm, differential uncon...

  10. Strain bursts in plastically deforming Molybdenum micro- and nanopillars

    OpenAIRE

    Zaiser, Michael; Schwerdtfeger, Jan; Schneider, Andreas; Frick, Carl; Clark, Blythe Gore; Gruber, Patric; Arzt, Eduard

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Plastic deformation of micron and sub-micron scale specimens is characterized by intermittent sequences of large strain bursts (dislocation avalanches) which are separated by regions of near-elastic loading. In the present investigation we perform a statistical characterization of strain bursts observed in stress-controlled compressive deformation of monocrystalline molybdenum micropillars. We characterize the bursts in terms of the associated elongation increments and pea...

  11. Full System Bifurcation Analysis of Endocrine Bursting Models

    OpenAIRE

    Rieß, Thorsten; Sherman, Arthur; Tsaneva-Atanasova, KT; Osinga, HM

    2010-01-01

    Plateau bursting is typical of many electrically excitable cells, such as endocrine cells that secrete hormones and some types of neurons that secrete neurotransmitters. Although in many of these cell types the bursting patterns are regulated by the interplay between voltage-gated calcium channels and calcium-sensitive potassium channels, they can be very different. For example, in insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells, plateau bursting is characterized by well-defined spikes during the depola...

  12. A Limited Deflection Routing Algorithm Based on Burst Loss Threshold in OBS Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ru-yan; LONG Ke-ping; WU Wei; YANG Xiao-long; ZHU Wei-le

    2005-01-01

    The deflection routing protocol is an effective contention resolution in Optical Burst Switching network. However, it can worsen loss performance of non-deflected burst on the deflection route. To improve the burst loss performance, a limited deflection routing scheme based on burst loss threshold is proposed to prevent injudicious deflection routing. By using threshold check function, it restrainedly allows the deflected burst to preemptive network resource, consequently, improve the QoS performance of non-deflected burst. Simulation results show that the scheme can efficiently prevent deflected burst contending with non-deflected burst on deflection route, and effectively improve the burst loss performance of entire networks.

  13. Are long gamma-ray bursts standard candles?

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Hai-Nan; Wang, Sai; Chang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are widely proposed as an effective probe to trace the Hubble diagram of the Universe in high redshift range. However, the calibration of GRBs is not as easy as that of type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Most calibrating methods at present take use one or some of the empirical luminosity corrections, e.g., Amati relation. One of the underlying assumptions of these calibrating methods is that the empirical correlation is universal over all redshifts. In this paper, we check to what extent this assumption holds. Assuming that SNe Ia exactly trace the Hubble diagram of the Universe, we re-investigate the Amati relation for low redshift ($z1.4$) GRBs, respectively. It is found that the Amati relation of low-$z$ GRBs differs from that of high-$z$ GRBs at more than $3\\sigma$ confidence level. This result is insensitive to cosmological models.

  14. Gamma-ray burst engines may have no memory

    CERN Document Server

    Baldeschi, A

    2014-01-01

    A sizeable fraction of gamma-ray burst (GRB) time profiles consist of a temporal sequence of pulses. The nature of this stochastic process carries information on how GRB inner engines work. The so-called interpulse time defines the interval between adjacent pulses, excluding the long quiescence periods during which the signal drops to the background level. It was found by many authors in the past that interpulse times are lognormally distributed, at variance with the exponential case that is expected for a memoryless process. We investigated whether the simple hypothesis of a temporally uncorrelated sequence of pulses is really to be rejected, as a lognormal distribution necessarily implies. We selected and analysed a number of multi--peaked CGRO/BATSE GRBs and simulated similar time profiles, with the crucial difference that we assumed exponentially distributed interpulse times, as is expected for a memoryless stationary Poisson process. We then identified peaks in both data sets using a novel peak search al...

  15. ESTIMATION OF THE BURST LENGTH IN OBS NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavi S.; M. Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the optical burst switching (OBS) and discusses the major components. In OBS, the length of the burst arriving at a particular node is unknown, and hence, node design is very complex. In OBS first control, packet is transmitted and reserve the path as in circuit switching, thereafter, the data bursts is transmitted. In this paper, a poisson arrival of packets is considered and estimation is made on the size of the burst length. The results presented in the p...

  16. The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, M.; Fermi GBM X-ray Burst Collaboration

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the first results of the Fermi-GBM all-sky search for X-ray bursts. The very large field of view and X-ray response of the Fermi-GBM make it a unique instrument to study rare, bright and short-lived X-ray bursts. We are performing a systematic search that exploits such capabilities. We present results on long/intermediate type I X-ray bursts, an unusual kind of thermonuclear bursts from accreting neutron stars, and show how Fermi-GBM is giving for the first time robust measurements of their recurrence time.

  17. The long and the short of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    We report evidence from the 3B Catalogue that long (T_{90} > 10 s) and short (T_{90} 1 MeV. This implies different spatial origin and physical processes for long and short bursts. Long bursts may be explained by accretion-induced collapse. Short bursts require another mechanism, for which we suggest neutron star collisions. These are capable of producing neutrino bursts as short as a few ms, consistent with the shortest observed time scales in GRB. We briefly investigate the parameters of clusters in which neutron star collisons may occur, and discuss the nuclear evolution of expelled and accelerated matter.

  18. The First Swift BAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    OpenAIRE

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Barbier, L.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2007 June 16. This catalog (hereafter BAT1 catalog) contains burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, and time averaged spectral parameters for each of 237 GRBs, as measured by the BAT. The BAT-determined position reported here is within 1.75' of the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT)-determined position...

  19. Study on cosmic gamma bursts in the ''KONUS'' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Made are the investigations of cosmic gamma bursts with the help of the ''Konus'' apparatus, positioned on the ''Venera 11'' and ''Venera 12'' automatic interplanetary stations. 37 gamma bursts have been recorded in the energy range from 50 to 150 keV during the observation period from September to December 1978. Time profiles of bursts on 4, 9 and 24.11.1978 are presented. For the most events the time of burst increase and decrease constitute parts and units of seconds. Differential energy spectra are measured for all recorded bursts. In many cases the spectrum shape is similar to the grade one with the 1.5-2.3 index. In a graphical form built up are the integral distributions of gamma bursts appearence frequency in dependence on their intensity and maximum capacity in the burst peak. Galaxy coordinates of the 17-teen bursts, for which a simple localization is possible, are put on the celestial sphere map. The type of the integral distributions and the source distribution about the celestial sphere show that the gamma burst sources are whithin the Galaxy

  20. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy......, trapped particle streams. These background events may simulate the count rate increases characteristic of cosmic gamma bursts. For 12 of the detected events, their true cosmic nature have been confirmed through consistent localizations of the burst sources based on several independent WATCH data sets...

  1. Observations of the structure of Type IIIb radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have observed short duration, narrow band Type IIIb radio bursts that occur just before the onset of a normal Type III burst. These observations were made with a multichannel radiometer with a center frequency of 25 MHz, time constant of 10 milliseconds and frequency resolution of 100 KHz. The average half power duration of a typical element of a Type III burst was determined. It was found to be very similar to the time profile of a normal Type III burst, i.e., sharp rise and exponential type decay. (Auth.)

  2. Percussion drilling of metals using bursts of nanosecond pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendow, Sami T; Romero, Rosa; Shakir, Sami A; Guerreiro, Paulo T

    2011-05-23

    The effect of ns bursting on percussion drilling of metal is investigated experimentally and analytically, and compared with the efficiency and quality of drilling using single ns pulses. Key advantages are demonstrated, correlating well with the results from a thermal theoretical model. The 1064 nm bursts contain up to 14 pulses of various pulse widths and spacing, and at frequencies of tens of MHz within the burst. The individual pulses have pulse widths of 10 to 200 ns, and up to 12 kW peak power. Burst repetition frequency is single shot to 500 kHz. PMID:21643280

  3. A behavioral role for feature detection by sensory bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2006-10-11

    Brief episodes of high-frequency firing of sensory neurons, or bursts, occur in many systems, including mammalian auditory and visual systems, and are believed to signal the occurrence of particularly important stimulus features, i.e., to function as feature detectors. However, the behavioral relevance of sensory bursts has not been established in any system. Here, we show that bursts in an identified auditory interneuron of crickets reliably signal salient stimulus features and reliably predict behavioral responses. Our results thus demonstrate the close link between sensory bursts and behavior.

  4. Coupled hydro-neutronic calculations for fast burst reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods are described for determining the fully coupled neutronic/hydrodynamic response of fast burst reactors (FBR) under disruptive accident conditions. Two code systems, PAD (1 -D Lagrangian) and NIKE-PAGOSA (3-D Eulerian) were used to accomplish this. This is in contrast to the typical methodology that computes these responses by either single point kinetics or in a decoupled manner. This methodology is enabled by the use of modem supercomputers (CM-200). Two examples of this capability are presented: an unreflected metal fast burst assembly, and a reflected fast burst assembly typical of the Skua or SPR-III class of fast burst reactor

  5. Fast Radio Bursts - I: Initial Cogitation

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F

    2014-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration radio signals thought to originate from cosmological distances. Many authors are endeavouring to explain their progenitors, with others outlining their potential uses as cosmological probes. Here we describe some sub-optimal performance in existing FRB search software, which can reduce the volume probed by over 20%, and result in missed discoveries and incorrect flux densities and sky rates. Recalculating some FRB flux densities, we find that FRB 010125 was approximately 50% brighter than previously reported. Furthermore we consider incompleteness factors important to the population statistics. Finally we make data for the archival FRBs easily available, along with software to analyse these.

  6. Prompt Emission Observations of Swift BAT Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2009-01-01

    We review the prompt emission properties of Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We present the global properties of BAT GRBs based on their spectral and temporal characteristics. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 80 and 20 s, respectively. The peak energy (Epeak) of about 60% of BAT GRBs is very likely to be less than 1.00 keV. We also present the BAT characteristics of GRBs with soft spectra, so called Xray flashes (XRFs). We will compare the BAT GRBs and XRFs parameter distribution to the other missions.

  7. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lan-Wei Jia; Yun-Feng Liang; En-Wei Liang

    2014-09-01

    We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given emission episode, possibly due to the longer lasting emission in a lower energy band, and the spectral lag may not be an intrinsic parameter to discriminate the long and short GRBs.

  8. Burst-Mode Asynchronous Controllers on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte L. Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available FPGAs have been mainly used to design synchronous circuits. Asynchronous design on FPGAs is difficult because the resulting circuit may suffer from hazard problems. We propose a method that implements a popular class of asynchronous circuits, known as burst mode, on FPGAs based on look-up table architectures. We present two conditions that, if satisfied, guarantee essential hazard-free implementation on any LUT-based FPGA. By doing that, besides all the intrinsic advantages of asynchronous over synchronous circuits, they also take advantage of the shorter design time and lower cost associated with FPGA designs.

  9. Gamma Ray Bursts in the HAWC Era

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Fox, Derek; Gao, He; Senno, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, and are among the most promising for detecting multiple non-electromagnetic signals, including cosmic rays, high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-GeV to TeV gamma-ray range of GRB could have significant contributions from hadronic interactions, mixed with more conventional leptonic contributions. This energy range is important for probing the source physics, including overall energetics, the shock parameters and the Lorentz factor. We discuss some of the latest observational and theoretical developments in the field.

  10. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Mystery Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Ann

    2007-01-01

    With the success of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer currently in orbit, this is quite an exciting time in the history of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The study of GRBs is a modern astronomical mystery story that began over 30 years ago with the serendipitous discovery of these astronomical events by military satellites in the late 1960's. Until the launch of BATSE on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, astronomers had no clue whether GRBs originated at the edge of our solar system, in our own Milky Way Galaxy or incredibly far away near the edge of the observable Universe. Data from BATSE proved that GRBs are distributed isotropically on the sky and thus could not be the related to objects in the disk of our Galaxy. Given the intensity of the gamma-ray emission, an extragalactic origin would require an astounding amount of energy. Without sufficient data to decide the issue, a great debate continued about whether GRBs were located in the halo of our own galaxy or were at extragalactic - even cosmological distances. This debate continued until 1997 when the BeppoSAX mission discovered a fading X-ray afterglow signal in the same location as a GRB. This discovery enabled other telescopes, to observe afterglow emission at optical and radio wavelengths and prove that GRBs were at cosmological distances by measuring large redshifts in the optical spectra. Like BeppoSAX Swift, slews to new GRB locations to measure afterglow emission. In addition to improved GRB sensitivity, a significant advantage of Swift over BeppoSAX and other missions is its ability to slew very quickly, allowing x-ray and optical follow-up measurements to be made as early as a minute after the gamma-ray burst trigger rather than the previous 6-8 hour delay. Swift afterglow measurements along with follow-up ground-based observations, and theoretical work have allowed astronomers to identify two plausible scenarios for the creation of a GRB: either through core collapse of super massive stars or

  11. Thermal radiation from a nuclear weapon burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different methods and correlations used to calculate the propagation of thermal radiation are reviewed and compared. A simple method to account for radiation enhancement by reflection from a superior cloud deck or snow cover, as well as attenuation of radiation by cloud cover below the burst is presented. The results show that the thermal reach may vary considerably. Additional calculation show that a significant fraction of the thermal energy may be incident after the arrival of the shock wave. Results for a range of weapon yields are presented, and the implications for blast-induced (secondary) fire starts are discussed

  12. The repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102: Multi-wavelength observations and additional bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Kaspi, V M; Wharton, R S; Bassa, C G; Bogdanov, S; Camilo, F; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Mickaliger, M; Parent, E; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Tendulkar, S P

    2016-01-01

    We report on radio and X-ray observations of the only known repeating Fast Radio Burst (FRB) source, FRB 121102. We have detected six additional radio bursts from this source: five with the Green Bank Telescope at 2 GHz, and one at 1.4 GHz at the Arecibo Observatory for a total of 17 bursts from this source. All have dispersion measures consistent with a single value ($\\sim559$ pc cm$^{-3}$) that is three times the predicted maximum Galactic value. The 2-GHz bursts have highly variable spectra like those at 1.4 GHz, indicating that the frequency structure seen across the individual 1.4 and 2-GHz bandpasses is part of a wideband process. X-ray observations of the FRB 121102 field with the Swift and Chandra observatories show at least one possible counterpart; however, the probability of chance superposition is high. A radio imaging observation of the field with the Jansky Very Large Array at 1.6 GHz yields a 5$\\sigma$ upper limit of 0.3 mJy on any point-source continuum emission. This upper limit, combined wit...

  13. The Second SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Zhang, B.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts. (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8% and 2% respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX and HETE-2 GRB samples.. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs.

  14. The LOFT Burst Alert System and its Burst On-board Trigger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schanne, Stephane; Götz, Diego; Provost, Herve Le;

    2014-01-01

    year) and other transient sources, and to deliver their localization in less than 30 seconds to the observers, via a VHF antenna network. Real-time full resolution data download to ground being impossible, the real-time data processing is performed onboard by the LBOT (LOFT Burst On-board Trigger...

  15. The Use of Cellulose Membrane to Eliminate Burst Release from Intravaginal Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbling, Ignacio M; Ibarra, Juan C D; Luna, Julio A

    2016-07-01

    Burst release was observed when ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) intravaginal rings were tested for progesterone release in our previous work (Helbling et al. Pharm Res. 31(3):795-808, 2014). Burst release is undesirable in controlled delivery devices because release is uncontrollable and higher levels of active pharmaceutical ingredient could lead to the occurrence of adverse effect. The present contribution is about the use of membranes to coat EVA rings to eliminate burst release. Physicochemical state of progesterone in uncoated rings and the solubility and diffusion coefficient in membrane were studied. Hormone delivery from several rings of different sizes was compared. A mathematical model was used to analyze the effects of membrane properties on delivery rate. No chemical interactions were detected between hormone and polymer. Hormone was mainly forming amorphous aggregates inside rings, and migration to membrane was not observed during storage. Diffusion coefficient was smaller in membrane (∼10(-8) cm(2) s(-1)) than in matrix (∼10(-7) cm(2) s(-1)). Zero-order release kinetics were obtained for coated rings, and release rate decreases as the thickness of the coat increases. Cellulose membrane successfully eliminates burst release and controls the delivery from EVA rings. The equations developed can be used to determine the appropriate coat thickness to produce specific release rate. PMID:27097635

  16. An investigation of solar flares and associated solar radio bursts impact on ionospheric total electron content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyizere, Sarathiel

    2016-07-01

    Solar transients events such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and solar flares represent the cause of various aspects of space weather and can impact the modern man made technological system. Such solar transients are often associated with solar radio bursts (SRBs), particularly of type II and III that , at ground level can be detected by the CALLISTO (Compact Astronomical Low-frequency Low-cost Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatories) solar spectrometer. The present study aims at investigating solar flares and associated SRBs impact on the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). SRBs data used are dynamic spectra covering the 2014-2015 period and detected by the CALLISTO instrument that is installed at the university of Rwanda, Kigali. To investigate ionospheric impact, we use TEC data from IGS stations located at almost the same universal time zone, and correlate the observed TEC changes to the corresponding observed solar bursts events. Preliminary observations resulting from this study indicate a slight enhancement in TEC during the burst event days. The observed TEC enhancement on the burst day can be associated to increased UV and X-rays radiations and particle acceleration that are associated with SRBs events. This work is a contribution to more understanding of the geo-space impact of solar transients phenomena for modeling and prediction.

  17. An investigation of solar flares and associated solar radio bursts on ionospheric total electron content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwamahoro, Jean

    2016-07-01

    Solar transients events such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and solar flares represent are the cause of various aspects of space weather and can impact the modern man made technological system. Such solar transients are often associated with solar radio bursts (SRBs), particularly of type II and III that , at ground level can be detected by the CALLISTO (Compact Astronomical Low-frequency Low-cost Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatories) solar spectrometer. The present study aims at investigating solar flares and associated SRBs impact on the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). SRBs data used are dynamic spectra covering the 2014-2015 period and detected by the CALLISTO instrument that is installed at the university of Rwanda, Kigali. To investigate ionospheric impact, we use TEC data from IGS stations located at almost the same universal time zone, and correlate the observed TEC changes to the corresponding observed solar bursts events. Preliminary observations resulting from this study indicate a slight enhancement in TEC during the burst event days. The observed TEC enhancement on the burst day can be associated to increased UV and X-rays radiations and particle acceleration that are associated with SRBs events. This work is a contribution to more understanding of the geo-space impact of solar transients phenomena for modeling and prediction.

  18. Probing the Nature of Short Swift Bursts via Deep INTEGRAL Monitoring of GRB 050925

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Swift, XMM-Newton, and deep INTEGRAL monitoring in the region of GRB 050925. This short Swift burst is a candidate for a newly discovered soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) with the following observational burst properties: 1) galactic plane (b=-0.1 deg) localization, 2) 150 msec duration, and 3) a blackbody rather than a simple power-law spectral shape (with a significance level of 97%). We found two possible X-ray counterparts of GRB 050925 by comparing the X-ray images from Swift XRT and XMM-Newton. Both X-ray sources show the transient behavior with a power-law decay index shallower than -1. We found no hard X-ray emission nor any additional burst from the location of GRB 050925 in approximately 5 Ms of INTEGRAL data. We discuss about the three BATSE short bursts which might be associated with GRB 050925, based on their location and the duration. Assuming GRB 050925 is associated with the H(sub II), regions (W 58) at the galactic longitude of 1=70 deg, we also discuss the source frame properties of GRB 050925.

  19. Measurement of neutron burst production in thermal cycle of D2 absorbed titanium chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a high-level neutron coincidence counter equipped with 18 3He tubes and a JSR-11 shift register unit with a detection limit of 0.20 n/s for a 2-h run which is used to study the neutron signals in D2 gas experiments. Different material pretreatments are selected to review the changes in frequency and size of the neutron burst production. Experimental sequence is deliberately designed to distinguish the neutron burst from fake signals, e.g., electronic noise pickup, cosmic rays, and other sources of environmental background. Ten batches of dry fusion samples are tested, among them, seven batches with neutron burst signals that occur roughly from -100 degrees C to near room temperature. In the first four runs of a typical sample batch, seven neutron bursts are observed with neutron numbers from 15 to 482, which are 3 and 75 times, respectively, higher than the uncertainty of the background. The samples seem to be inactive after four or five temperature cycles, and the inactive samples could be reactivated by degassing and recharging of deuterium. The same anomalous phenomena were observed in the Mentou Valley Underground Laboratory situated 580 m below ground

  20. Local bursts model of primordial CMB temperature fluctuations: scattering in hydrogen lines

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovich, V K

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of a flat cosmological model a propagation of an instantaneous burst of isotropic radiation is considered from the moment of its beginning at some initial redshift z0 to the moment of its registration now (at z=0). Thomson scattering by free electrons and scattering in primordial hydrogen lines Ha, Hb, Pa and Pb are considered as the sources of opacity and when calculating an albedo of a single scattering in the lines we take into account deactivation of the upper levels of transitions by background blackbody radiation. Profiles for these lines in a burst spectrum are calculated for different distances from the center of the burst and different values of z0. In the first approximation these profiles do not depend on spectrum and intensity of a burst radiation. It is shown that lines are in absorption at sufficiently large distance but emission components may appear as a distance decreases and it becomes stronger while absorption component weakens with a further distance decrease. For the ...

  1. CRITICAL HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS FOR OVERFLOW BURST OF MORAINE LAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhong-xin; CUI Peng; JIANG Liang-wei

    2004-01-01

    Floodwater and debris flow caused by glacial lake burst is an important land process and a serious mountain disaster in glacial area of Xizang (Tibet) Autonomous Region, and the overflow burst is mainly caused by glacial landslide falling into moraine lake. On the premise that moraine lake is full, instantaneous burst in part of the lake bank happens, as flow velocity at burst mouth caused by overflow head is higher than threshold flow velocity of glacial till. Under some supposes, d90 and d10 of the glacial till in the bank were used as the threshold sizes of coarse and fine grains respectively. Thus, the formula of calculating threshold flow velocity of uniform sand was simplified,and threshold flow velocity of glacial till was calculated with the formula. Then, with synthesis formula calculating flow velocity of instantaneous part burst, flow velocity at overflow burst mouth was calculated, and calculation formula of critical height (H0) of overflow head was derived. Overflow head was caused by volume and surge of glacial landslide falling into moraine lake, calculation formulas of ascendant height (H1) of lake water surface and surge height (H2) on burst mouth caused by glacial landslide falling into moraine lake were derived. To sum up, critical hydrologic conditions of moraine lake burst with overflow form are: the burst is inevitable as H1 >H0; the burst is possible as H1 <H0 and (H1+H2) >H0; the burst is impossible as (H1+H2) <H0. In the factors influencing the burst critical conditions, it is advantageous for the burst that scale of the lake is 105n2 range; terminal glacial till is more fine and is even more uniform; the width of overflow mouth is even smaller than the length of the bank; the landslide haslarge scale and steep slip surface; and glacial end is close to the lake. With burst of Guangxiecuo Lake in Midui Valley of the Polongzanghu River in Xizang as an example, the burst critical conditions were tested.

  2. Hidden Complications of Thought Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Najmi, Sadia; Wegner, Daniel M.

    2009-01-01

    Although the suppression of thoughts may seem to be an effective solution, this strategy can lead to an exacerbation of the very thought that one is attempting to suppress. This ironic effect is the most obvious unwanted outcome of suppression and has now been investigated empirically for more than two decades. However, the fact that suppression is an effortful process implies that, even when suppression does not lead to an ironic rebound of the unwanted thought, it puts an insidious cognitiv...

  3. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  4. $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts the Four Crises

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, M

    1998-01-01

    We discuss some open problems concerning the origin and the emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in light of recent developments. If GRBs originate at extragalactic distances, we are facing four crises: (1) an energy crisis, models have to account for more than 10^{53} ergs of energy emitted in the gamma-ray energy band; (2) a spectral crisis, emission models have to account for the surprising `smoothness' of GRB broad-band spectra, with no indication of the predicted spectral `distorsions' caused by inverse Compton scattering in large radiation energy density media, and no evidence for beaming; (3) an afterglow crisis, relativistic shock models have to explain the complexity of the afterglow behavior, the longevity of optical transients detectable up to six months after the burst, the erratic behavior of the radio emission, and the lack of evidence for substantial beaming as indicated by recent searches for GRB afterglows in the X-ray band; (4) a population crisis, from data clearly indicating that ...

  5. Gamma Ray Bursts Cook Book II: Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaeepour, Houri

    2008-01-01

    In Paper I we presented a detailed formulation of the relativistic shocks and synchrotron emission in the context of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) physics. To see how well this model reproduces the observed characteristics of the GRBs and their afterglows, here we present the results of some simulations based on this model. They are meant to reproduce the prompt and afterglow emission in some intervals of time during a burst. We show that this goal is achieved for both short and long GRBs and their afterglows, at least for part of the parameter space. Moreover, these results are the evidence of the physical relevance of the two phenomenological models we have suggested in Paper I for the evolution of the "active region", the synchrotron emitting region in a shock. The dynamical active region model seems to reproduce the observed characteristics of prompt emissions better than the quasi-steady model which is more suitable for afterglows. Therefore these simulations confirm the arguments presented in Paper I about the ...

  6. Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Rodriguez, Mariangelly; Smith, M.; Tešic, G.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are known to be bright, irregular flashes of gamma rays that typically last just a few seconds, believed to be caused by stellar collapse or the merger of a pair of compact objects. Through previous work, it has been found that GRBs are distributed roughly uniformly over the entire sky, rather than being confined to the relatively narrow band of the Milky Way. Using the Python programming language, we generated a model of GRBs over cosmological distances, based on current empirical GRB distributions. The grbsim python module uses the acceptance-rejection Monte Carlo method to simulate the luminosity and redshift of a large population of GRBs, including cosmological effects such as dark energy and dark matter terms that modify the large-scale structure of space-time. The results of running grbsim are demonstrated to match the distribution of GRBs observed by the Burst Alert Telescope on NASA’s Swift satellite. The grbsim module will subsequently be used to simulate gamma ray and neutrino events for the Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network.

  7. $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts and Related Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Piran, T

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have puzzled astronomers since their accidental discovery in the sixties. The BATSE detector on the COMPTON-GRO satellite has been detecting one burst per day for the last six years. Its findings have revolutionized our ideas about the nature of these objects. They have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances. This idea was accepted with difficulties at first. However, the recent discovery of an x-ray afterglow by the Italian/Dutch satellite BeppoSAX led to a detection of high red-shift absorption lines in the optical afterglow of GRB970508 and to a confirmation of its cosmological origin. The simplest and practically inevitable interpretation of these observations is that GRBs result from the conversion of the kinetic energy of ultra-relativistic particles flux to radiation in an optically thin region. The "inner engine" that accelerates the particles or generates the Poynting flux is hidden from direct observations. Recent studies suggest the ``internal-external'' model: intern...

  8. Photospheric Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pe'er, Asaf

    2016-01-01

    A major breakthrough in our understanding of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) prompt emission physics occurred in the last few years, with the realization that a thermal component accompanies the over-all non-thermal prompt spectra. This thermal part is important by itself, as it provides direct probe of the physics in the innermost outflow regions. It further has an indirect importance, as a source of seed photons for inverse-Compton scattering, thereby it contributes to the non-thermal part as well. In this short review, we highlight some key recent developments. Observationally, although so far it was clearly identified only in a minority of bursts, there are indirect evidence that thermal component exists in a very large fraction of GRBs, possibly close to 100%. Theoretically, the existence of thermal component have a large number of implications as a probe of underlying GRB physics. Some surprising implications include its use as a probe of the jet dynamics, geometry and magnetization.

  9. Fast Radio Bursts from Axion Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Iwazaki, Aiichi

    2014-01-01

    Axions are one of the most promising candidates of dark matter. The axions have been shown to form miniclusters with masses $\\sim 10^{-12}M_{\\odot}$ and to become dominant component of dark matter. These axion miniclusters condense to form axion stars. We show a possible origin of fast radio bursts ( FRBs ) by assuming the axion stars being dark matter: FRBs arise from the collisions between the axion stars and neutron stars. The FRBs are caused by the rapid conversion of the axions into electromagnetic fields under strong magnetic fields. Electric fields are induced on the axion stars under strong magnetic fields of neutron stars. The electric fields parallel to the magnetic fields oscillate with a frequency and make electrons in atmospheres of neutron stars coherently oscillate. Thus, the coherent radiations are emitted. The observed frequencies ( $\\sim 1.4$GHz ) of the bursts are given by the axion mass $m_a$ such as $m_a/2\\pi\\simeq 2.3\\,\\mbox{GHz}\\,\\big(m_a/10^{-5}\\mbox{eV}\\big)$. The frequency is affecte...

  10. Phasic Burst Stimulation: A Closed-Loop Approach to Tuning Deep Brain Stimulation Parameters for Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbey B Holt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel, closed-loop approach to tuning deep brain stimulation (DBS for Parkinson's disease (PD. The approach, termed Phasic Burst Stimulation (PhaBS, applies a burst of stimulus pulses over a range of phases predicted to disrupt pathological oscillations seen in PD. Stimulation parameters are optimized based on phase response curves (PRCs, which would be measured from each patient. This approach is tested in a computational model of PD with an emergent population oscillation. We show that the stimulus phase can be optimized using the PRC, and that PhaBS is more effective at suppressing the pathological oscillation than a single phasic stimulus pulse. PhaBS provides a closed-loop approach to DBS that can be optimized for each patient.

  11. Phasic Burst Stimulation: A Closed-Loop Approach to Tuning Deep Brain Stimulation Parameters for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Abbey B; Wilson, Dan; Shinn, Max; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden I

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel, closed-loop approach to tuning deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD). The approach, termed Phasic Burst Stimulation (PhaBS), applies a burst of stimulus pulses over a range of phases predicted to disrupt pathological oscillations seen in PD. Stimulation parameters are optimized based on phase response curves (PRCs), which would be measured from each patient. This approach is tested in a computational model of PD with an emergent population oscillation. We show that the stimulus phase can be optimized using the PRC, and that PhaBS is more effective at suppressing the pathological oscillation than a single phasic stimulus pulse. PhaBS provides a closed-loop approach to DBS that can be optimized for each patient. PMID:27415832

  12. Phasic Burst Stimulation: A Closed-Loop Approach to Tuning Deep Brain Stimulation Parameters for Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Abbey B.; Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden I.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel, closed-loop approach to tuning deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson’s disease (PD). The approach, termed Phasic Burst Stimulation (PhaBS), applies a burst of stimulus pulses over a range of phases predicted to disrupt pathological oscillations seen in PD. Stimulation parameters are optimized based on phase response curves (PRCs), which would be measured from each patient. This approach is tested in a computational model of PD with an emergent population oscillation. We show that the stimulus phase can be optimized using the PRC, and that PhaBS is more effective at suppressing the pathological oscillation than a single phasic stimulus pulse. PhaBS provides a closed-loop approach to DBS that can be optimized for each patient. PMID:27415832

  13. Origin of the lethal gas burst from Lake Monoun, Cameroun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Devine, J.D.; Tchua, F.M.; Presser, F.M.; Pringle, M.K.W.; Evans, William C.

    1987-01-01

    On 15 August, 1984, a lethal gas burst issued from a submerged 96-m-deep crater in Lake Monoun in Cameroun, western Africa, killing 37 people. The event was associated with a landslide from the eastern crater rim, which slumped into deep water. Waters below 50 m are anoxic, dominated by high Fe2+ (???600 mg/l) and HCO3- (??? 1900 mg/l), anoxic and supersaturated with siderite, which is a major component of the crater floor sediments. The unusually high Fe2+ levels are attributed to reduction of laterite-derived ferric iron gradually brought into the lake as loess and in river input. Sulfur compounds are below detection limits in both water and gas. Gases effervescing from depressurized deep waters are dominantly CO2 with minor CH4, having ??13C of -7.18 and -54.8 per mil, respectively. Bacterial decomposition of organic matter may account for the methane, but 14C of lake water indicates that only 10% of the carbon is modern, giving an apparent age of 18,000 years. The dominant source of carbon is therefore attributed to long-term emission of CO2 as volcanic exhalation from vents within the crater, which led to gradual build-up of HCO3- in the lake. The density stratification of the lake may have been upset by an earthquake and underwater landslide on 15 August, which triggered overturn of the lake and caused nucleation of CO2 in the deep water. The resultant ebullition of CO2 from deep lake waters led to a gas burst at the surface and locally generated a water wave up to 5 m high. People travelling through the gas cloud were asphyxiated, presumably from CO2, and suffered skin discoloration from unidentified components. ?? 1987.

  14. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.;

    1995-01-01

    The GRANAT observatory was launched into a high apogee orbit on 1 December, 1989. Three instruments onboard GRANAT - PHEBUS, WATCH and SIGMA are able to detect gamma-ray bursts in a very broad energy range from 6 keV up to 100 MeV. Over 250 gamma-ray bursts were detected. We discuss the results o...

  15. The width of the gamma-ray burst luminosity function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ulmer; R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1995-01-01

    We examine the width of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity function through the distribution of GRB peak count rates, Cpeak, as detected by Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) (1993). In the context of Galactic corona spatial distribution models, we attempt to place constaints on the cha

  16. Nanoemulsions obtained via bubble bursting at a compound interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, J.; Roche, M.; Vigolo, D.; Arnaudov, L.N.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Gurkov, T.D.; Tsutsumanova, G.G.; Stone, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Bursting of bubbles at an air/liquid interface is a familiar occurrence relevant to foam stability, cell cultures in bioreactors and ocean–atmosphere mass transfer. In the latter case, bubble-bursting leads to the dispersal of sea-water aerosols in the surrounding air. Here we show that bubbles burs

  17. Statistical properties of SGR 1806-20 bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Göğüş; P.M. Woods; C. Kouveliotou; J. van Paradijs; M.S. Briggs; R.C. Duncan; C. Thompson

    2000-01-01

    We present statistics of SGR 1806-20 bursts, combining 290 events detected with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array, 111 events detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment, and 134 events detected with the International Cometary Explorer. We find that the fluence d

  18. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M; Rucker, H O; Farrell, W M

    2013-03-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period [Formula: see text] longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every [Formula: see text] days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  19. Gamma Ray Burst Follow-Ups with Bootes-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guziy, Sergey; Castro-Tirado, Guziy, Alberto J.; Jelinek, Martin; Gorosabel, Javier; Kubanek, Petr; Cunniffe, Ronan; Lara-Gil, Oscar; Tello, Juan C.; Jeong, Soomin; Oates, Samantha R.; Xu, Youdong; Perez-Ramirez, Dolores; Cui, Chenzou; Fan, Yufeng; Wan, Chuanjun; Bai, Jinming; Kheyfets, I.

    The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System (BOOTES), is a global robotic observatory network, which started in 1998 with Spanish leadership devoted to study optical emissions from gamma ray bursts (GRBs) that occur in the Universe. We present shot history and current status of BOOTES-4 telescope. Some details of 38 GRBs followed-up with BOOTES-4 are discussed.

  20. Solar U- and J- radio bursts at the decameter waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Abranin, E. P.; Lecacheux, A.

    2010-01-01

    The results of the first observations of solar U- and J- bursts with the radiotelescope UTR-2 at the decameter wavelengths are reported. During 2003-2004 more than 50 J- bursts and only 7 U- bursts were registered. It is the first case of ground based observations of J- and U- bursts with turning frequencies below 25 MHz. For the first time the harmonic structure of J- bursts in the form of Jb-J pairs was found. The mean harmonic ratio appeared to be 1.8. Also a group of J-bursts with unusual Turning Frequency Drift (TFD) of -2 kHz/s was detected. Such TFD corresponds to the velocity of coronal loop elevation of about 60 km/s. Coronal loops with similar elevation velocities were also detected by SOHO-LASCO coronagraph in white light. The dynamic spectra of unusual U- and J- bursts are shown. Simplified model of the coronal loop in the form of semicircle was created on the base of the U- burst dynamic spectrum and the Newkirk coronal density model. With this loop model the linear velocity of the source along the loop, the height of the Turning Frequency point and the geometrical size of the loop were calculated.

  1. 34 First Callisto solar burst spectrometer station in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monstein, Christian

    2016-04-01

    In mid of March 2016 a new long wavelength station in Greenland was set into operation. It is a dual circular polarization, frequency agile solar radio burst spectrometer based on two Callisto spectrometers and the Long Wavelength Array antenna. During the commissioning phase several nice radio burst observations proved that the system works as expected.

  2. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  3. Ionospheric response to gamma ray bursts of cosmic origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper examines the limiting conditions under which is detectable, through the VLF phase-meter, a gamma-ray burst of cosmic origin like those recently observed by Vela spacecrafts. The discussion focuses on the flux density and burst duration and leads to a definition of the threshold needed for a measurable effect

  4. Dependence of X-ray Burst Models on Nuclear Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, H

    2016-01-01

    X-ray burst model predictions of light curves and final composition of the nuclear ashes are affected by uncertain nuclear physics. Nuclear masses play an important role. Significant progress has been made in measuring the masses of very neutron deficient rare isotopes along the path of the rapid proton capture process (rp-process) in X-ray bursts. This paper identifies the remaining nuclear mass uncertainties in X-ray burst models using a one zone model that takes into account the changes in temperature and density evolution caused by changes in the nuclear physics. Two types of bursts are investigated - a typical mixed H/He burst with a limited rp-process and an extreme mixed H/He burst with an extended rp-process. Only three remaining nuclear mass uncertainties affect the light curve predictions of a typical H/He burst, and only three additional masses affect the composition strongly. A larger number of mass uncertainties remains to be addressed for the extreme H/He burst. Mass uncertainties of better than...

  5. Glucocorticoids Inhibit CRH/AVP-Evoked Bursting Activity of Male Murine Anterior Pituitary Corticotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Peter J; Tabak, Joël; Ruth, Peter; Bertram, Richard; Shipston, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Corticotroph cells from the anterior pituitary are an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which governs the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs are electrically excitable and fire spontaneous single-spike action potentials and also display secretagogue-induced bursting behavior. The HPA axis function is dependent on effective negative feedback in which elevated plasma glucocorticoids result in inhibition at the level of both the pituitary and the hypothalamus. In this study, we have used an electrophysiological approach coupled with mathematical modeling to investigate the regulation of spontaneous and CRH/arginine vasopressin-induced activity of corticotrophs by glucocorticoids. We reveal that pretreatment of corticotrophs with 100 nM corticosterone (CORT; 90 and 150 min) reduces spontaneous activity and prevents a transition from spiking to bursting after CRH/arginine vasopressin stimulation. In addition, previous studies have identified a role for large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels in the generation of secretagogue-induced bursting in corticotrophs. Using the dynamic clamp technique, we demonstrated that CRH-induced bursting can be switched to spiking by subtracting a fast BK current, whereas the addition of a fast BK current can induce bursting in CORT-treated cells. In addition, recordings from BK knockout mice (BK(-/-)) revealed that CORT can also inhibit excitability through BK-independent mechanisms to control spike frequency. Thus, we have established that glucocorticoids can modulate multiple properties of corticotroph electrical excitability through both BK-dependent and BK-independent mechanisms. PMID:27254001

  6. Influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent phagocytic bacterial clearance and enhances susceptibility to secondary MRSA infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Keer; Metzger, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a leading contributor to mortality during recent influenza pandemics. The mechanism for this influenza-induced susceptibility to secondary S. aureus infection is poorly understood. Here we show that innate antibacterial immunity was significantly suppressed during the recovery stage of influenza infection, despite the fact that MRSA super-infection had no significant effect on viral burdens. Compared to mice infected with bacteria alone, post-influenza MRSA infected mice exhibited impaired bacterial clearance, which was not due to defective phagocyte recruitment, but rather coincided with reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils. NADPH oxidase is responsible for ROS production during phagocytic bacterial killing, a process also known as oxidative burst. We found that gp91phox-containing NADPH oxidase activity in macrophages and neutrophils was essential for optimal bacterial clearance during respiratory MRSA infections. In contrast to WT animals, gp91phox−/− mice exhibited similar defects in MRSA clearance before and after influenza infection. Using gp91phox+/− mosaic mice, we further demonstrate that influenza infection inhibits a cell-intrinsic contribution of NADPH oxidase to phagocyte bactericidal activity. Together, our results establish that influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent bacterial clearance and leads to susceptibility to secondary MRSA infection. PMID:24563256

  7. Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts The Remaining Mysteries

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K

    1998-01-01

    To anyone who has read a scientific journal or even a newspaper in the last six months, it might appear that cosmic gamma-ray bursts hold no more mysteries: they are cosmological, and possibly the most powerful explosions in the Universe. In fact, however, bursts remain mysterious in many ways. There is no general agreement upon the nature of the event which releases the initial energy. One burst at least appears to strain the energy budget of the merging neutron star model. There is evidence that another recent event may have come from a nearby supernova. Finally, while the number count statistics clearly show a strong deviation from the -3/2 power law expected for a Euclidean, homogeneous distribution, the distributions of some classes of bursts appear to follow a -3/2 power law rather closely. The recent data on bursts is reviewed, some of the mysteries discussed, and future experiments are outlined.

  8. Cosmology and the Subgroups of Gamma-ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mészáros

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Both short and intermediate gamma-ray bursts are distributed anisotropically in the sky (Mészáros, A. et al. ApJ, 539, 98 (2000, Vavrek, R. et al. MNRAS, 391, 1 741 (2008. Hence, in the redshift range, where these bursts take place, the cosmological principle is in doubt. It has already been noted that short bursts should be mainly at redshifts smaller than one (Mészáros, A. et al. Gamma-ray burst: Sixth Huntsville Symp., AIP, Vol. 1 133, 483 (2009; Mészáros, A. et al. Baltic Astron., 18, 293 (2009. Here we show that intermediate bursts should be at redshifts up to three.

  9. Do Gamma-Ray Bursts Come from the Oort Cloud?

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, T E; Tremaine, S; Tremaine, adn S.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the possibility that gamma-ray bursts arise from sources in the Oort comet cloud, basing most of our arguments on accepted models for the formation and spatial distribution of the cloud. We identify three severe problems with such models: (1) There is no known mechanism for producing bursts that can explain the observed burst rate and energetics without violating other observational constraints. (2) The bright source counts cannot be reconciled with standard models for the phase-space distribution of objects in the Oort cloud. (3) The observed isotropy of the available burst data is inconsistent with the expected angular distribution of sources in the Oort cloud. We therefore assert that Oort cloud models of gamma-ray bursts are extremely implausible.

  10. Evaluating the risk of coal bursts in underground coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Christopher⇑; Gauna Michael

    2016-01-01

    Coal bursts involve the sudden, violent ejection of coal or rock into the mine workings. They are almost always accompanied by a loud noise, like an explosion, and ground vibration. Bursts are a particular haz-ard for miners because they typically occur without warning. Despite decades of research, the sources and mechanics of these events are not well understood, and therefore they are difficult to predict and control. Experience has shown, however, that certain geologic and mining factors are associated with an increased likelihood of a coal burst. A coal burst risk assessment consists of evaluating the degree to which these risk factors are present, and then identifying appropriate control measures to mitigate the hazard. This paper summarizes the U.S. and international experience with coal bursts, and describes the known risk factors in detail. It includes a framework that can be used to guide the risk assessment process.

  11. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general. PMID:23630379

  12. Ablation of silicon with bursts of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiuso, Caterina; Kämmer, Helena; Dreisow, Felix; Ancona, Antonio; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of ultrafast laser ablation of silicon with bursts of pulses. The pristine 1030nm-wavelength 200-fs pulses were split into bursts of up to 16 sub-pulses with time separation ranging from 0.5ps to 4080ps. The total ablation threshold fluence was measured depending on the burst features, finding that it strongly increases with the number of sub-pulses for longer sub-pulse delays, while a slowly increasing trend is observed for shorter separation time. The ablation depth per burst follows two different trends according to the time separation between the sub-pulses, as well as the total threshold fluence. For delays shorter than 4ps it decreases with the number of pulses, while for time separations longer than 510ps, deeper craters were achieved by increasing the number of subpulses in the burst, probably due to a change of the effective penetration depth.

  13. X-ray bursts and superbursts - recent developments

    CERN Document Server

    Zand, Jean in 't

    2011-01-01

    The past decade and a half has seen many interesting new developments in X-ray burst research, both observationally and theoretically. New phenomena were discovered, such as burst oscillations and superbursts, and new regimes of thermonuclear burning identified. An important driver of the research with present and future instrumentation in the coming years is the pursuit of fundamental neutron star parameters. However, several other more direct questions are also in dire need of an answer. For instance, how are superbursts ignited and why do burst oscillations exist in burst tails? We briefly review recent developments and discuss the role that MAXI can play. Thanks to MAXI's large visibility window and large duty cycle, it is particularly well suited to investigate the recurrence of rare long duration bursts such as superbursts. An exploratory study of MAXI data is briefly presented.

  14. Taming desynchronized bursting with delays in the Macaque cortical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qing-Yun; Murks Aleksandra; Perc Matja(z); Lu Qi-Shao

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory coupled bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons are considered as constitutive units of the Macaque cortical network. In the absence of information transmission delay the bursting activity is desynchronized, giving rise to spatiotemporally disordered dynamics. This paper shows that the introduction of finite delays can lead to the synchroization of bursting and thus to the emergence of coherent propagating fronts of excitation in the space-time domain.Moreover, it shows that the type of synchronous bursting is uniquely determined by the delay length, with the transitions from one type to the other occurring in a step-like manner depending on the delay. Interestingly, as the delay is tuned close to the transition points, the synchronization deteriorates, which implies the coexistence of different bursting attractors. These phenomena can be observed be different but fixed coupling strengths, thus indicating a new role for information transmission delays in realistic neuronal networks.

  15. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Extended Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    The recent association of several short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with early type galaxies with low star formation rate demonstrates that short bursts arise from a different progenitor mechanism than long bursts. However, since the duration distributions of the two classes overlap, membership is not always easily established. The picture is complicated by the occasional presence of softer, extended emission lasting tens of seconds after the initial spike- like emission comprising an otherwise short burst. Using the large BATSE sample with time-tagged event (TTE) data, we show that the fundamental defining characteristic of the short burst class is that the initial spike exhibits negligible spectral evolution at energies above approx. 25 keV. This is behavior is nearly ubiquitous for the 260 bursts with T(sub 90) less than 2s where the BATSE TTE data type completely included the initial spike: Their spectral lags measured between the 25-50 keV and 100-300 energy ranges are consistent with zero in 90-95% of the cases, with most outliers probably representing the tail of the long burst class. We also analyze a small sample of "short" BATSE bursts - those with the most fluent, intense extended emission. The same lack of evolution on the pulse timescale obtains for the extended emission in the brighter bursts where significant measurements can be made. One possible inference is that both emission components may arise in the same region. We also show that the dynamic range in the ratio of peak intensities, spike : extended, is at least approx. l0(exp 3), and that for some bursts, the extended emission is only a factor of 2-5 lower. However, for our whole sample the total counts fluence of the extended component equals or exceeds that in the spike by a factor of several.

  16. Monitoring burst (M-burst) — A novel framework of failure localization in all-optical mesh networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Mohammed L.

    2011-10-10

    Achieving instantaneous and precise failure localization in all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks has been an attractive feature of network fault management systems, and is particularly important when failure-dependent protection is employed. The paper introduces a novel framework of real-time failure localization in all-optical WDM mesh networks, called monitoring-burst (m-burst), which aims to initiate a graceful compromise between consumed monitoring resources and monitoring delay. Different from any previously reported solution, the proposed m-burst framework has a single monitoring node (MN) which launches optical bursts along a set of pre-defined close-loop routes, called monitoring cycles (m-cycles), to probe the links along the m-cycles. Bursts along different m-cycles are kept non-overlapping through any link of the network. By identifying the lost bursts due to single link failure events only, the MN can unambiguously localize the failed link in at least 3-connected networks. We will justify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed m-burst framework in the scenario of interest. To avoid possible collision among optical bursts launched by the MN, we define the problem of collision-free scheduling and formulate it into an integer linear program (ILP) in order to minimize the monitoring delay. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework and the proposed solution.

  17. Synchrotron masers and fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ghisellini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), with a typical duration of 1 ms and 1 Jy flux density at GHz frequencies, have brightness temperatures exceeding 1e33 K, requiring a coherent emission process. This can be achieved by bunching particles in volumes smaller than the typical wavelength, but this may be challenging. Alternatively, we can have maser emission. Under certain conditions, the synchrotron stimulated emission process can be more important than true absorption, and a synchrotron maser can be created. This occurs when the emitting electrons have a very narrow distribution of pitch angles and energies. This process overcomes the difficulties of having extremely dense bunches of particles and relaxes the light crossing time limits, since there is no simple relation between the actual size of the source and the observed variability timescale.

  18. The ``Christmas burst'' GRB 101225A revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Kann, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Long GRBs are related to the death of massive stars and reveal themselves through synchrotron emission from highly relativistic jets. The `Christmas Burst' GRB 101225A was an exceptionally long GRB with a thermal afterglow, very different from the standard GRB. Initially, no spectroscopic redshift could be obtained and SED modeling yielded z=0.33. A plausible model was a He-NS star merger where the He-star had ejected part of its envelope in the common envelope phase during inspiral. The interaction between the jet and the previously ejected shell can explains the thermal emission. We obtained deep spectroscopy of the host galaxy which leads to a correction of the redshift to z=0.847. Despite the higher redshift, our model is still valid and theoretically better justified than the alternative suggestion of a blue supergiant progenitor proposed by Levan et al. (2014) for several ``ultra-long'' GRBs.

  19. The Gamma-Ray Burst - Supernova Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Hjorth, Jens

    2011-01-01

    A preponderance of evidence links long-duration, soft-spectrum gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the death of massive stars. The observations of the GRB-supernova (SN) connection present the most direct evidence of this physical link. We summarize 30 GRB-SN associations and focus on five ironclad cases, highlighting the subsequent insight into the progenitors enabled by detailed observations. We also address the SN association (or lack thereof) with several sub-classes of GRBs, finding that the X-ray Flash (XRF) population is likely associated with massive stellar death whereas short-duration events likely arise from an older population not readily capable of producing a SN concurrent with a GRB. Interestingly, a minority population of seemingly long-duration, soft-spectrum GRBs show no evidence for SN-like activity; this may be a natural consequence of the range of Ni-56 production expected in stellar deaths.

  20. The Euclidean distribution of fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppermann, Niels; Connor, Liam D.; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-09-01

    We investigate whether current data on the distribution of observed flux densities of fast radio bursts (FRBs) are consistent with a constant source density in Euclidean space. We use the number of FRBs detected in two surveys with different characteristics along with the observed signal-to-noise ratios of the detected FRBs in a formalism similar to a V/Vmax-test to constrain the distribution of flux densities. We find consistency between the data and a Euclidean distribution. Any extension of this model is therefore not data-driven and needs to be motivated separately. As a byproduct we also obtain new improved limits for the FRB rate at 1.4 GHz, which had not been constrained in this way before.

  1. The Euclidean distribution of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Oppermann, Niels; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-01-01

    We investigate whether current data on the distribution of observed flux densities of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are consistent with a constant source density in Euclidean space. We use the number of FRBs detected in two surveys with different characteristics along with the observed signal-to-noise ratios of the detected FRBs in a formalism similar to a V/V_max-test to constrain the distribution of flux densities. We find consistency between the data and a Euclidean distribution. Any extension of this model is therefore not data-driven and needs to be motivated separately. As a byproduct we also obtain new improved limits for the FRB rate at 1.4 GHz, which had not been constrained in this way before.

  2. Solution To The Gamma Ray Burst Mystery?

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon

    1996-01-01

    Photoexcitation and ionization of partially ionized heavy atoms in highly relativistic flows by interstellar photons, followed by their reemission in radiative recombination and decay, boost star-light into beamed $\\gamma$ rays along the flow direction. Repeated excitation/decay of highly relativistic baryonic ejecta from merger or accretion induced collapse of neutron stars in dense stellar regions (DSRs), like galactic cores, globular clusters and super star-clusters, can convert enough kinetic energy in such events in distant galaxies into cosmological gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The model predicts remarkably well all the main observed temporal and spectral properties of GRBs. Its success strongly suggests that GRBs are $\\gamma$ ray tomography pictures of DSRs in galaxies at cosmological distances with unprecedented resolution: A time resolution of $dt\\sim 1~ms$ in a GRB can resolve stars at a Hubble distance which are separated by only $D\\sim 10^{10}cm$. This is equivalent to the resolving power of an optica...

  3. The Swift Burst and Transient Telescope (BAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The Swift Burst and Transient telescope (BAT) has surveyed the entire sky for the last 3.5 years obtaining the first sensitive all sky survey of the 14-195 kev sky. At high galactic latitudes the vast majority of the detected sources are AGN. Since hard x-rays penetrate all but Compton thick obscuring material (Column densities of 1.6324 atms/sq cm) this survey is unbiased with respect to obscuration, host galaxy type, optical , radio or IR properties. We will present results on the broad band x-ray properties, the nature of the host galaxies, the luminosity function and will discuss a few of the optical, IR and x-ray results in detail.

  4. Critical Test Of Gamma Ray Burst Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Long and precise follow-up measurements of the X-ray afterglow (AG) of very intense gamma ray bursts (GRBs) provide a critical test of GRB afterglow theories. Here we show that the power-law decline with time of X-ray AG of GRB 130427A, the longest measured X-ray AG of an intense GRB with the Swift, Chandra and XMM Newton satellites, and of all other well measured late-time X-ray afterglow of intense GRBs, is that predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs from their measured spectral index, while it disagrees with that predicted by the widely accepted fireball (FB) models of GRBs.

  5. Microstructural path analysis of martensite burst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rangel Rios

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the martensite reaction requires reckoning with spatial aspects of the reaction. For that, we used formal kinetics, more specifically, the microstructural path method (MPM to analyze the microstructure observed in a burst. The microstructural path analysis revealed that the size of the spread cluster in extended space, characterized by the Vandermeer and Juul-Jensen's impingement compensated mean intercept length, λG, remained constant, independently of the parent austenite grain size. Moreover, current analysis introduced a purely formal description of the reaction progress by taking the parent austenite grain size as the progress variable. This description worked very well and resulted in a relationship between the volume fraction of partially transformed austenite, V VG, and austenite grain size, λG. The significance of these findings in the light of the advantages and disadvantages of formal kinetics is discussed.

  6. The Gamma Ray Bursts Hubble diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; Dainotti, M G; De Laurentis, M; Izzo, L; Perillo, M

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to their enormous energy release, Gamma Rays Bursts (GRBs) have recently attracted a lot of interest to probe the Hubble diagram (HD) deep into the matter dominated era and hence complement Type Ia Supernovae (SNeIa). We consider here three different calibration methods based on the use of a fiducial LCDM model, on cosmographic parameters and on the local regression on SNeIa to calibrate the scaling relations proposed as an equivalent to the Phillips law to standardize GRBs finding any significant dependence. We then investigate the evolution of these parameters with the redshift to obtain any statistical improvement. Under this assumption, we then consider possible systematics effects on the HDs introduced by the calibration method, the averaging procedure and the homogeneity of the sample arguing against any significant bias.

  7. High Energy Radiation from $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, C D; Dermer, Charles D.; Chiang, James

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) engines are probed most intimately during the prompt gamma-ray luminous phase when the expanding blast wave is closest to the explosion center. Using GRBs 990123 and 940217 as guides, we briefly review observations of high-energy emission from GRBs and summarize some problems in GRB physics. \\gamma\\gamma transparency arguments imply relativistic beaming. The parameters that go into the external shock model are stated, and we show numerical simulation results of gamma-ray light curves from relativistic blast waves with different amounts of baryon loading. A distinct component due to the synchrotron self-Compton process produces significant emission at GeV and TeV energies. Predictions for spectral and temporal evolution at these energies are presented for a blast wave expanding into uniform surroundings. Observations of the slow decay of GeV-TeV radiation provide evidence for ultra-high energy cosmic ray acceleration in GRBs.

  8. Probing the Gamma-Ray Burst Rate with Trigger Simulations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Lien, Amy; Sakamoto, Takanori; Gehrels, Neil; Palmer, David M.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Graziani, Carlo; Cannizzo, John K.

    2013-01-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However...

  9. Does Twitter trigger bursts in signature collections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The quantification of social media impacts on societal and political events is a difficult undertaking. The Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine started a signature-collecting campaign to oppose a medical policy of the Government Revitalization Unit to exclude a traditional Japanese medicine, "Kampo," from the public insurance system. The signature count showed a series of aberrant bursts from November 26 to 29, 2009. In the same interval, the number of messages on Twitter including the keywords "Signature" and "Kampo," increased abruptly. Moreover, the number of messages on an Internet forum that discussed the policy and called for signatures showed a train of spikes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In order to estimate the contributions of social media, we developed a statistical model with state-space modeling framework that distinguishes the contributions of multiple social media in time-series of collected public opinions. We applied the model to the time-series of signature counts of the campaign and quantified contributions of two social media, i.e., Twitter and an Internet forum, by the estimation. We found that a considerable portion (78% of the signatures was affected from either of the social media throughout the campaign and the Twitter effect (26% was smaller than the Forum effect (52% in total, although Twitter probably triggered the initial two bursts of signatures. Comparisons of the estimated profiles of the both effects suggested distinctions between the social media in terms of sustainable impact of messages or tweets. Twitter shows messages on various topics on a time-line; newer messages push out older ones. Twitter may diminish the impact of messages that are tweeted intermittently. CONCLUSIONS: The quantification of social media impacts is beneficial to better understand people's tendency and may promote developing strategies to engage public opinions effectively. Our proposed method is a promising tool to explore

  10. SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS DETECTED WITH THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR DURING ITS MOST PROLIFIC ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Horst, A. J.; Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gorgone, N. M. [Connecticut College, New London, CT 06320 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Goegues, E.; Lin, L. [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Guiriec, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, V. L.; Goldstein, A. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, CSPAR, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Granot, J. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Watts, A. L. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissaldi, E.; Gruber, D. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M., E-mail: A.J.VanDerHorst@uva.nl [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2012-04-20

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E{sub peak} and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BB fits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high-temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature. We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  11. Possible hard X-ray shortages in bursts from KS 1731-260 and 4U 1705-44

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Long; Chen, YuPeng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Kretschmar, Peter; Wang, Jian-Min; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Aims: A hard X-ray shortage, implying the cooling of the corona, was observed during bursts of IGR J17473-272, 4U 1636-536, Aql X-1, and GS 1826-238. Apart from these four sources, we investigate here an atoll sample, in which the number of bursts for each source is larger than 5, to explore the possible additional hard X-ray shortage during {\\it Rossi X-ray timing explorer (RXTE)} era. Methods: According to the source catalog that shows type-I bursts, we analyzed all the available pointing observations of these sources carried out by the {\\it RXTE} proportional counter array (PCA). We grouped and combined the bursts according to their outburst states and searched for the possible hard X-ray shortage while bursting. Results: We found that the island states of KS 1731-260 and 4U 1705-44 show a hard X-ray shortage at significant levels of 4.5 and 4.7 $\\sigma$ and a systematic time lag of $0.9 \\pm 2.1$ s and $2.5 \\pm 2.0$ s with respect to the soft X-rays, respectively. While in their banana branches and other s...

  12. Strange Nonchaotic Bursting in A Quasiperiodially-Forced Hindmarsh-Rose Neuron

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Woochang; 10.3938/jkps57.1356

    2011-01-01

    We study the transition from a silent state to a bursting state by varying the dc stimulus in the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron under quasiperiodic stimulation. For this quasiperiodically forced case, a new type of strange nonchaotic (SN) bursting state is found to occur between the silent state and the chaotic bursting state. This is in contrast to the periodically forced case where the silent state transforms directly to a chaotic bursting state. Using a rational approximation to the quasiperiodic forcing, the mechanism for the appearance of such an SN bursting state is investigated. Thus, a smooth torus (corresponding to a silent state) is found to transform to an SN bursting attractor through a phase-dependent subcritical period-doubling bifurcation. These SN bursting states, together with chaotic bursting states, are characterized in terms of the interburst interval, the bursting length, and the number of spikes in each burst. Both bursting states are found to be aperiodic complex ones. Consequently, aperiodic c...

  13. Theta burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation attenuates somatosensory evoked potentials from the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zapallow Christopher M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS is a form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation which has been shown to alter cortical excitability in the upper limb representation of primary somatosensory cortex (SI. However, it is unknown whether cTBS modulates cortical excitability within the lower limb representation in SI. The present study investigates the effects of cTBS over the SI lower limb representation on cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs and Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex following tibial nerve stimulation at the knee. SEPs and H-reflex were recorded before and in four time blocks up to 30 minutes following cTBS targeting the lower limb representation within SI. Results Following cTBS, the P1-N1 first cortical potential was significantly decreased at 12–16 minutes. CTBS also suppressed the P2-N2 second cortical potential for up to 30 minutes following stimulation. The H-reflex remained statistically unchanged following cTBS although there was a modest suppression observed. Conclusion We conclude that cTBS decreases cortical excitability of the lower limb representation of SI as evidenced by suppressed SEP amplitude. The duration and magnitude of the cTBS after effects are similar to those observed in upper limb studies.

  14. Insulin Resistance is Accompanied by Increased Fasting Glucagon and Delayed Glucagon Suppression in Individuals With Normal and Impaired Glucose Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Kristine; Vistisen, Dorte; Pacini, Giovanni;

    2016-01-01

    sensitivity index. Individuals with screen-detected diabetes had 30% higher fasting glucagon levels, diminished early glucagon suppression, but greater late glucagon suppression when compared to individuals with normal glucose tolerance (P≤0.014). Higher insulin resistance was associated with higher fasting...... glucagon levels, less early glucagon suppression, and greater late glucagon suppression (Pfasting glucagon concentrations was non-linear (Pfasting glucagon levels and delayed glucagon suppression, together...

  15. Radio fiber bursts and fast magnetoacoustic wave trains

    CERN Document Server

    Karlický, M; Jelínek, P

    2012-01-01

    We present a model for dm-fiber bursts that is based on assuming fast sausage magnetoacoustic wave trains that propagate along a dense vertical filament or current sheet. Eight groups of dm-fiber bursts that were observed during solar flares were selected and analyzed by the wavelet analysis method. To model these fiber bursts we built a semi-empirical model. We also did magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a propagation of the magnetoacoustic wave train in a vertical and gravitationally stratified current sheet. In the wavelet spectra of the fiber bursts computed at different radio frequencies we found the wavelet tadpoles, whose head maxima have the same frequency drift as the drift of fiber bursts. It indicates that the drift of these fiber bursts can be explained by the propagating fast sausage magnetoacoustic wave train. Using new semi-empirical and magnetohydrodynamic models with a simple radio emission model we generated the artificial radio spectra of the fiber bursts, which are similar to the observed ...

  16. Full system bifurcation analysis of endocrine bursting models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Osinga, Hinke M; Riess, Thorsten; Sherman, Arthur

    2010-06-21

    Plateau bursting is typical of many electrically excitable cells, such as endocrine cells that secrete hormones and some types of neurons that secrete neurotransmitters. Although in many of these cell types the bursting patterns are regulated by the interplay between voltage-gated calcium channels and calcium-sensitive potassium channels, they can be very different. We investigate so-called square-wave and pseudo-plateau bursting patterns found in endocrine cell models that are characterized by a super- or subcritical Hopf bifurcation in the fast subsystem, respectively. By using the polynomial model of Hindmarsh and Rose (Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 221 (1222) 87-102), which preserves the main properties of the biophysical class of models that we consider, we perform a detailed bifurcation analysis of the full fast-slow system for both bursting patterns. We find that both cases lead to the same possibility of two routes to bursting, that is, the criticality of the Hopf bifurcation is not relevant for characterizing the route to bursting. The actual route depends on the relative location of the full-system's fixed point with respect to a homoclinic bifurcation of the fast subsystem. Our full-system bifurcation analysis reveals properties of endocrine bursting that are not captured by the standard fast-slow analysis. PMID:20307553

  17. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Extended Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, J P; Bonnell, Jerry T.; Norris, Jay P.

    2006-01-01

    The recent association of several short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with early type galaxies with low star formation rate demonstrates that short bursts arise from a different progenitor mechanism than long bursts. However, since the duration distributions of the two classes overlap, membership is not always easily established. The picture is complicated by the occasional presence of softer, extended emission lasting tens of seconds after the initial spike-like emission. We show that the fundamental defining characteristic of the short burst class is that the initial spike exhibits negligible spectral evolution at energies above ~ 25 keV. This behavior is nearly ubiquitous for the 260 bursts with T90 < 2 s, where the BATSE TTE data completely included the initial spike. The same signature obtains for one HETE-2 and six Swift/BAT short bursts. Analysis of a small sample of "short" BATSE bursts with the most intense extended emission shows that the same lack of evolution on the pulse timescale obtains for the ex...

  18. Large Aerial Bursts: An Important Class of Terrestrial Accretionary Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John T.

    2003-01-01

    Large aerial bursts similar to the 1908 Tunguska bolide but much larger in magnitude have surely been responsible for many catastrophic events in the history of the Earth. Because aerial bursts produce shallow (or even negligible) craters, their existence is difficult to document in the geological record. Even aerial bursts as small as Tunguska deposit enough energy to melt ~1mm of dry soil. Silica-rich glass formed in such melts has the potential to survive in the soil for many Ma, thus a potential indicator of large aerial bursts is glass that was formed as thick regions within silicate melt sheets. The layered tektites from Southeast Asia and the Libyan desert glass may have formed by a combination of sedimentation and downslope flow of silicate melt heated by radiation from large aerial bursts. The alternative, formation of layered tektites as crater ejecta, cannot account for observations such as uniformly high 10Be contents, the orientation of the magnetic remanence field, and the absence of splash-form (e.g., teardrop or dumbbell) tektites in regions where layered tektites are common. The largest asteroids or comets make craters no matter what their strength. Recent reviews suggest that, for events in the energy range up to 1019-1020 J (about two orders of magnitude larger than the Meteor Crater impact), aerial bursts are more likely than cratering events, and the layered tektites of Southeast Asia imply the existence of aerial bursts one to two orders of magnitude larger still.

  19. Chaos suppression through asymmetric coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragard, J.; Vidal, G.; Mancini, H.; Mendoza, C.; Boccaletti, S.

    2007-12-01

    We study pairs of identical coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, we have used Roessler (in the funnel and no funnel regimes), Lorenz, and four-dimensional chaotic Lotka-Volterra models. In all four of these cases, a pair of identical oscillators is asymmetrically coupled. The main result of the numerical simulations is that in all cases, specific values of coupling strength and asymmetry exist that render the two oscillators periodic and synchronized. The values of the coupling strength for which this phenomenon occurs is well below the previously known value for complete synchronization. We have found that this behavior exists for all the chaotic oscillators that we have used in the analysis. We postulate that this behavior is presumably generic to all chaotic oscillators. In order to complete the study, we have tested the robustness of this phenomenon of chaos suppression versus the addition of some Gaussian noise. We found that chaos suppression is robust for the addition of finite noise level. Finally, we propose some extension to this research.

  20. Search for muon neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope using 2008 to 2011 data

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Samarai, I Al; André, M; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Astraatmadja, T; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios-Marti, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bigongiari, C; Bogazzi, C; Bouhou, B; Bouwhuis, M C; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Cârloganu, C; Carr, J; Cecchini, S; Charif, Z; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Classen, F; Coniglione, R; Core, L; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; De Bonis, G; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Emanuele, U; Enzenhöfer, A; Ernenwein, J -P; Escoffier, S; Fehn, K; Fermani, P; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fritsch, U; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giacomelli, G; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hößl, J; James, C W; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, E; Lambard, G; Larosa, G; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Presti, D Lo; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Louis, F; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, S; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Müller, C; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; Pavalas, G E; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Rivière, C; Robert, A; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Samtleben, D F E; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Shanidze, R; Sieger, C; Simeone, F; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Sánchez-Losa, A; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Tayalati, Y; Trovato, A; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Vernin, P; Visser, E; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; Yatkin, K; Yepes, H; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Baerwald, P

    2013-01-01

    A search for muon neutrinos in coincidence with gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino detector using data from the end of 2007 to 2011 is performed. Expected neutrino fluxes are calculated for each burst individually. The most recent numerical calculations of the spectra using the NeuCosmA code are employed, which include Monte Carlo simulations of the full underlying photohadronic interaction processes. The discovery probability for a selection of 296 gamma-ray bursts in the given period is optimised using an extended maximum-likelihood strategy. No significant excess over background is found in the data, and 90% confidence level upper limits are placed on the total expected flux according to the model.

  1. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  2. BROADBAND SPECTRAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander; Watts, Anna L. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gruber, David; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Younes, George [USRA, National Space Science and Technology Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, Neil, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  3. Broadband Spectral Investigations of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Baring, Matthew G.; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Watts, Anna L.; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  4. Suppression pool swell analysis using CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional axi-symmetric model of suppression pool of Containment Studies Facility (CSF) along with single vent pipe was modeled to estimate the jet and hydrodynamic loads due to flow of steam air mixture during simulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The analysis was carried out using CFD ACE+ software with Volume of Fluid (VOF) approach. The flow velocity variation through vent pipe was estimated using in-house containment thermal hydraulic code CONTRAN, was given as input at inlet boundary condition. The transient calculations were performed for 20 seconds and suppression pool level variation, pressure loads over the floor, walls and vent pipes etc were evaluated. (author)

  5. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.;

    2008-01-01

    exceptional burst events lasting more than ~10 minutes. Half of the dozen so-called intermediate long bursts registered so far have been observed by INTEGRAL. The goal is to derive a comprehensive picture of the relationship between the nuclear ignition processes and the accretion states of the system leading......X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in X-ray binaries. As most of the known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, an international collaboration have been taking advantage of its instrumentation to specifically monitor the occurrence of...

  6. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star approaching EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. +k Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts - modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. +k Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  7. Understanding Neutron Stars using Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star = EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts = modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  8. Dissecting the Phase Response of a Model Bursting Neuron

    CERN Document Server

    Sherwood, William Erik

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the phase response properties of the Hindmarsh-Rose model of neuronal bursting using burst phase response curves (BPRCs) computed with an infinitesimal perturbation approximation and by direct simulation of synaptic input. The resulting BPRCs have a significantly more complicated structure than the usual Type I and Type II PRCs of spiking neuronal models, and they exhibit highly timing-sensitive changes in the number of spikes per burst that lead to large magnitude phase responses. We use fast-slow dissection and isochron calculations to analyze the phase response dynamics in both weak and strong perturbation regimes.

  9. The supernova/gamma-ray burst/jet connection

    OpenAIRE

    Hjorth, Jens,

    2013-01-01

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bi-polar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star while the 56Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper I summarise the observational status of ...

  10. SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM THE MERGER OF TWO BLACK HOLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, Rosalba [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794 (United States); Lazzati, Davide [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, 301 Weniger Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Giacomazzo, Bruno [Physics Department, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-04-10

    Short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are explosions of cosmic origins believed to be associated with the merger of two compact objects, either two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole (BH). The presence of at least one neutron star has long been thought to be an essential element of the model: its tidal disruption provides the needed baryonic material whose rapid accretion onto the post-merger BH powers the burst. The recent tentative detection by the Fermi satellite of a short GRB in association with the gravitational wave signal GW150914 produced by the merger of two BHs has challenged this standard paradigm. Here, we show that the evolution of two high-mass, low-metallicity stars with main-sequence rotational speeds a few tens of percent of the critical speed eventually undergoing a weak supernova explosion can produce a short GRB. The outer layers of the envelope of the last exploding star remain bound and circularize at large radii. With time, the disk cools and becomes neutral, suppressing the magnetorotational instability, and hence the viscosity. The disk remains “long-lived dead” until tidal torques and shocks during the pre-merger phase heat it up and re-ignite accretion, rapidly consuming the disk and powering the short GRB.

  11. Radio Nondetection of the SGR 1806-20 Giant Flare and Implications for Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Patel, Chitrang

    2016-08-01

    We analyze archival data from the Parkes radio telescope, which was observing a location 35.°6 away from SGR 1806-20 during its giant γ-ray flare of 2004 December 27. We show that no fast radio burst (FRB)-like burst counterpart was detected, and set a radio limit of 110 MJy at 1.4 GHz, including the estimated 70 dB suppression of the signal due to its location in the far sidelobe of Parkes and the predicted scattering from the interstellar medium. The upper limit for the ratio of magnetar giant flare radio to γ-ray fluence is η SGR ≲ 107 Jy ms erg-1 cm2. Based on the nondetection of a short and prompt γ-ray counterpart of 15 FRBs in γ-ray transient monitors, we set a lower limit on the fluence ratios of FRBs to be η FRB ≳ 107-9 Jy ms erg-1 cm2. The fluence ratio limit for SGR 1806-20 is inconsistent with all but one of the 15 FRBs. We discuss possible variations in the magnetar-FRB emission mechanism and observational caveats that may reconcile the theory with observations.

  12. GeV-TeV and X-ray flares from gamma-ray burst

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X Y; Mészáros, P; Li, Zhuo; Meszaros, Peter; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2006-01-01

    The recent detection of delayed X-ray flares during the afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) suggests an inner-engine origin, at radii inside the deceleration radius characterizing the beginning of the forward shock afterglow emission. Given the observed temporal overlapping between the flares and afterglows, there must be inverse Compton (IC) emission arising from such flare photons scattered by forward shock afterglow electrons. We find that this IC emission produces GeV-TeV flares, which may be detected by GLAST and ground-based TeV telescopes. We speculate that this kind of emission may already have been detected by EGRET from a very strong burst--GRB940217, if it had a bright X-ray flare at the time of its delayed GeV emission. The enhanced cooling of the forward shock electrons by the X-ray flare photons may suppress the synchrotron emission of the afterglows during the flare period. The detection of GeV-TeV flares combined with low energy observations may help to constrain the poorly known magnet...

  13. Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.longo@ts.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trieste and INFN, sezione di Trieste, via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Vianello, Giacomo; Omodei, Nicola [Stanford University (HEPL), 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94205 (United States); Piron, Frederic; Vasilieou, Vlasios [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite de Montpellier II, CNRS/IN2P3, CC72, Place E. Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Razzaque, Soebur [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2014-04-01

    The Fermi observatory, with its Gamma-ray Bursts Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT), is observing Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) with a very large spectral coverage and unprecedented sensitivity, from ∼10keV to >300GeV. In the first 3 years of the mission it observed emission above 100 MeV from 35 GRBs. In this paper we review the main results obtained on such a sample, highlighting also the relationships with the low-energy spectral and temporal features (as measured by the GBM). Some recent results on high energy photons from GRBs obtained with the preliminary Pass 8 new event-level reconstruction will be discussed.

  14. Stopping Frequency of Type III Solar Radio Bursts in Expanding Magnetic Flux Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Hamish A S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the properties of type III radio bursts in the solar corona and interplanetary space is one of the best ways to remotely deduce the characteristics of solar accelerated electron beams and the solar wind plasma. One feature of all type III bursts is the lowest frequency they reach (or stopping frequency). This feature reflects the distance from the Sun that an electron beam can drive the observable plasma emission mechanism. The stopping frequency has never been systematically studied before from a theoretical perspective. Using numerical kinetic simulations, we explore the different parameters that dictate how far an electron beam can travel before it stops inducing a significant level of Langmuir waves, responsible for plasma radio emission. We use the quasilinear approach to model self-consistently the resonant interaction between electrons and Langmuir waves in inhomogeneous plasma, and take into consideration the expansion of the guiding magnetic flux tube and the turbulent density of the in...

  15. Self-organized coherent bursts of stimulated Raman scattering and speckle interaction in multi-speckled laser beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Bowers, K. J.; Bergen, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kirkwood, R. K.; Michel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Nonlinear physics governing the kinetic behavior of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in multi-speckled laser beams has been identified in the trapping regime over a wide range of k{lambda}{sub D} values (here k is the wave number of the electron plasma waves and {lambda}{sub D} is the Debye length) in homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas. Hot electrons from intense speckles, both forward and side-loss hot electrons produced during SRS daughter electron plasma wave bowing and filamentation, seed and enhance the growth of SRS in neighboring speckles by reducing Landau damping. Trapping-enhanced speckle interaction through transport of hot electrons, backscatter, and sidescatter SRS light waves enable the system of speckles to self-organize and exhibit coherent, sub-ps SRS bursts with more than 100% instantaneous reflectivity, resulting in an SRS transverse coherence width much larger than a speckle width and a SRS spectrum that peaks outside the incident laser cone. SRS reflectivity is found to saturate above a threshold laser intensity at a level of reflectivity that depends on k{lambda}{sub D}: higher k{lambda}{sub D} leads to lower SRS and the reflectivity scales as {approx}(k{lambda}{sub D}){sup -4}. As k{lambda}{sub D} and Landau damping increase, speckle interaction via sidescattered light and side-loss hot electrons decreases and the occurrence of self-organized events becomes infrequent, leading to the reduction of time-averaged SRS reflectivity. It is found that the inclusion of a moderately strong magnetic field in the laser direction can effectively control SRS by suppressing transverse speckle interaction via hot electron transport.

  16. Self-organized coherent bursts of stimulated Raman scattering and speckle interaction in multi-speckled laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Michel, P.; Bowers, K. J.; Bergen, B.

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear physics governing the kinetic behavior of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in multi-speckled laser beams has been identified in the trapping regime over a wide range of kλD values (here k is the wave number of the electron plasma waves and λD is the Debye length) in homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas. Hot electrons from intense speckles, both forward and side-loss hot electrons produced during SRS daughter electron plasma wave bowing and filamentation, seed and enhance the growth of SRS in neighboring speckles by reducing Landau damping. Trapping-enhanced speckle interaction through transport of hot electrons, backscatter, and sidescatter SRS light waves enable the system of speckles to self-organize and exhibit coherent, sub-ps SRS bursts with more than 100% instantaneous reflectivity, resulting in an SRS transverse coherence width much larger than a speckle width and a SRS spectrum that peaks outside the incident laser cone. SRS reflectivity is found to saturate above a threshold laser intensity at a level of reflectivity that depends on kλD: higher kλD leads to lower SRS and the reflectivity scales as ˜(kλD)-4. As kλD and Landau damping increase, speckle interaction via sidescattered light and side-loss hot electrons decreases and the occurrence of self-organized events becomes infrequent, leading to the reduction of time-averaged SRS reflectivity. It is found that the inclusion of a moderately strong magnetic field in the laser direction can effectively control SRS by suppressing transverse speckle interaction via hot electron transport.

  17. Self-organized coherent bursts of stimulated Raman scattering and speckle interaction in multi-speckled laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonlinear physics governing the kinetic behavior of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in multi-speckled laser beams has been identified in the trapping regime over a wide range of kλD values (here k is the wave number of the electron plasma waves and λD is the Debye length) in homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas. Hot electrons from intense speckles, both forward and side-loss hot electrons produced during SRS daughter electron plasma wave bowing and filamentation, seed and enhance the growth of SRS in neighboring speckles by reducing Landau damping. Trapping-enhanced speckle interaction through transport of hot electrons, backscatter, and sidescatter SRS light waves enable the system of speckles to self-organize and exhibit coherent, sub-ps SRS bursts with more than 100% instantaneous reflectivity, resulting in an SRS transverse coherence width much larger than a speckle width and a SRS spectrum that peaks outside the incident laser cone. SRS reflectivity is found to saturate above a threshold laser intensity at a level of reflectivity that depends on kλD: higher kλD leads to lower SRS and the reflectivity scales as ∼(kλD)−4. As kλD and Landau damping increase, speckle interaction via sidescattered light and side-loss hot electrons decreases and the occurrence of self-organized events becomes infrequent, leading to the reduction of time-averaged SRS reflectivity. It is found that the inclusion of a moderately strong magnetic field in the laser direction can effectively control SRS by suppressing transverse speckle interaction via hot electron transport.

  18. Mini Z' Burst from Relic Supernova Neutrinos and Late Neutrino Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Goldberg, H; Sarcevic, I; Goldberg, Haim; Perez, Gilad; Sarcevic, Ina

    2006-01-01

    In models in which neutrinos are light, due to a low scale of symmetry breaking, additional light bosons are generically present. We show that the interaction between diffuse relic supernova neutrinos (RSN) and the cosmic background neutrinos, via exchange of these light scalars, can result in a dramatic change of the supernova (SN) neutrinos flux. Measurement of this effect with current or future experiments can provide a spectacular direct evidence for the low scale models. We demonstrate how the observation of neutrinos from SN1987A constrains the symmetry breaking scale of the above models. We also discuss how current and future experiments may confirm or further constrain the above models, either by detecting the ``accumulative resonance'' that diffuse RSN go through or via a large suppression of the flux of neutrinos from nearby < O(Mpc) SN bursts.

  19. The Early X-ray Afterglows of Optically Bright and Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Qing Lin

    2006-01-01

    A systematic study on the early X-ray afterglows of both optically bright and dark gamma-ray bursts (B-GRBs and D-GRBs) observed by Swift is presented. Our sample includes 25 GRBs of which 13 are B-GRBs and 12 are D-GRBs. Our results show that the distributions of the X-ray afterglow fluxes (Fx), the gamma-ray fluxes (Sγ), and the ratio (Rγ,X) are similar for the two kinds of GRBs, that any observed differences should be simply statistical fluctuation. These results indicate that the progenitors of the two kinds of GRBs are of the same population with comparable total energies of explosion. The suppression of optical emission in the D-GRBs should result from circumburst but not from their central engine.

  20. Closest Gamma Ray Burst Providing Scientists With Crucial Test for Burst Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    The closest Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) yet known is providing astronomers with a rare opportunity to gain information vital to understanding these powerful cosmic explosions. Extremely precise radio-telescope observations already have ruled out one proposed mechanism for the bursts. "This is the closest and brightest GRB we've ever seen, and we can use it to decipher the physics of how these bursts work," said Greg Taylor of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Taylor worked with Dale Frail, also of the NRAO, along with Prof. Shri Kulkarni and graduate student Edo Berger of Caltech in studying a GRB detected on March 29, 2003. The scientists presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Nashville, TN. VLBA image of GRB 030329 VLBA IMAGE of GRB 030329 CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on Image for Larger Version) Taylor and Frail used the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and other radio telescopes to study the burst, known as GRB 030329. In a series of observations from April 1 to May 19, they determined the size of the expanding "fireball" from the burst and measured its position in the sky with great precision. At a distance of about 2.6 billion light-years, GRB 030329 is hardly next door. However, compared to other GRBs at typical distances of 8-10 billion light-years, it presents an easier target for study. "We only expect to see one burst per decade this close," said Frail. The precise measurement of the object's position allowed the scientists to show that one theoretical model for GRBs can be ruled out. This model, proposed in 2000, says that the radio-wave energy emitted by the GRB comes from "cannonballs" of material shot from the explosion at extremely high speeds. "The 'cannonball model' predicted that we should see the radio-emitting object move across the sky by a specific amount. We have not seen that motion," Taylor said. The currently standard "fireball model" of GRBs

  1. Gamma-Ray Bursts 2012 Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is a pleasure to announce the next combined Fermi/Swift GRB conference covering recent advances in all aspects of gamma-ray burst observations and theory. This conference will be held in Munich, Germany, on 7-11 May 2012, and follows similar previous combined Fermi/Swift meetings in Huntsville (Oct. 2008) and Annapolis (Nov. 2010). Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe and are thought to be the birth signatures of black holes. This is an exciting time in the GRB field as various missions provide a wealth of new data on this still puzzling phenomenon. The Fermi misson provides unprecedented spectral coverage over 7 decades in energy, and among others discovered new spectral components which challenge our standard picture of the prompt emission. The Swift mission continuous to swiftly monitor and locate GRBs in multiple wavebands, providing the basis for all ground-based follow-up observations towards redshift measurements and afterglow and host property investigations. AGILE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Konus continue to provide crucial information on GRB properties, and the MAXI mission provides an all sky X-ray monitoring of transients. There is also growing capability for follow-up observations by ground-based telescopes at basically all wavelengths. Besides the classical optical/infrared/radio observations, searches are underway for TeV emission, neutrinos and gravitational waves. Moreover, new experiments are expected to have returned first data, among others POGO on the prompt polarization properties, UFFO on very early optical emission, or ALMA on sub-millimeter properties. And last but not least, the unexpected is bringing us child-like astonishments at least once per year with a "GRB-trigger" which turns out to be not related to GRBs. Complementing all these new observational results, a huge theoretical effort is underway to understand the GRB phenomenon and keep up with the constant new puzzles coming from the data. This conference

  2. Thought suppression failures in combat PTSD: a cognitive load hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikins, Deane E; Johnson, Douglas C; Borelli, Jessica L; Klemanski, David H; Morrissey, Paul M; Benham, Todd L; Southwick, Steven M; Tolin, David F

    2009-09-01

    The present study investigated the relation between thought suppression of emotionally neutral content [i.e., Wegner's (1994) "white bear"], incidental traumatic thought intrusion, and skin conductance responses in combat-related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Participants included service members who either: a) had PTSD following an Operation Iraqi Freedom deployment; b) were free of psychiatric diagnosis following deployment (Combat Equivalent), or c) were pre-deployed and without psychiatric diagnosis (Pre-Deployed). PTSD Service Members reported the greatest intrusion of combat thoughts during the suppression task and demonstrated a post-suppression rebound effect with a neutral thought. Non-specific skin conductance responses indicated that the suppression task was related to similar levels of increased sympathetic activity for both the PTSD and Pre-Deployed groups, whereas the Combat Equivalent group showed no increased activation during thought suppression. Intrusive traumatic thoughts combined with failures in neutral thought suppression may be a consequence of increased cognitive load in PTSD. PMID:19586619

  3. High-energy emission from bright gamma-ray bursts using Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta

    2010-05-25

    mainly based on the brightest bursts detected by GBM inside the LAT field-of-view. The determination of a consistent sample for upper-limit calculations can be established by selecting those bursts which have a strong signal in the GBM BGO detectors. The structure of this thesis can be summarized as follows: The first chapter introduces the basic concepts and scientific background of GRB physics. Afterwards, instrumental details about the Fermi instruments LAT and GBM, as well as LAT performance and capabilities for GRB science are presented in chapter 2. Chapter 3 focuses on the detector-level calibration of the GBM instrument, and in particular on the analysis methods and results, which crucially support the development of a consistent GBM instrument response. The main GBM scientific results collected during the first year of operation are then presented in chapter 4. Particular emphasis is given to the description of joint GBM-LAT and GBM-Swift observations and analysis results. The last chapter presents the selection methodology and detailed spectral analysis of a sample of well-defined BGO-bright bursts detected by GBM during its first year. Using these results, correlations among spectral parameters are finally discussed. (orig.)

  4. High-energy emission from bright gamma-ray bursts using Fermi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    on the brightest bursts detected by GBM inside the LAT field-of-view. The determination of a consistent sample for upper-limit calculations can be established by selecting those bursts which have a strong signal in the GBM BGO detectors. The structure of this thesis can be summarized as follows: The first chapter introduces the basic concepts and scientific background of GRB physics. Afterwards, instrumental details about the Fermi instruments LAT and GBM, as well as LAT performance and capabilities for GRB science are presented in chapter 2. Chapter 3 focuses on the detector-level calibration of the GBM instrument, and in particular on the analysis methods and results, which crucially support the development of a consistent GBM instrument response. The main GBM scientific results collected during the first year of operation are then presented in chapter 4. Particular emphasis is given to the description of joint GBM-LAT and GBM-Swift observations and analysis results. The last chapter presents the selection methodology and detailed spectral analysis of a sample of well-defined BGO-bright bursts detected by GBM during its first year. Using these results, correlations among spectral parameters are finally discussed. (orig.)

  5. The pressure suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear plants with boiling water reactors have a safety containment with a pressure suppression system (PSS). Proceeding on significant self-developments, today the three PSS-lines of General Electric Co. (GE), Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) and ASEA-ATOM are predominant, which are currently represented by the MARK III type, the KWU type 72 and the BWR 75 containment. In addition, there are special developments for the nuclear ship propulsion and for the pressurized water reactors in the Soviet Union. Key design values of the PSS allow a first valuation of its loads during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident. (orig.)

  6. When should we expect early bursts of trait evolution in comparative data? Predictions from an evolutionary food web model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, T; Harmon, L J; Shurin, J B

    2012-09-01

    Conceptual models of adaptive radiation predict that competitive interactions among species will result in an early burst of speciation and trait evolution followed by a slowdown in diversification rates. Empirical studies often show early accumulation of lineages in phylogenetic trees, but usually fail to detect early bursts of phenotypic evolution. We use an evolutionary simulation model to assemble food webs through adaptive radiation, and examine patterns in the resulting phylogenetic trees and species' traits (body size and trophic position). We find that when foraging trade-offs result in food webs where all species occupy integer trophic levels, lineage diversity and trait disparity are concentrated early in the tree, consistent with the early burst model. In contrast, in food webs in which many omnivorous species feed at multiple trophic levels, high levels of turnover of species' identities and traits tend to eliminate the early burst signal. These results suggest testable predictions about how the niche structure of ecological communities may be reflected by macroevolutionary patterns.

  7. A complete sample of bright Swift Long Gamma-Ray Bursts: Sample presentation, Luminosity Function and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Salvaterra, R; Vergani, S D; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; Fugazza, D; Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Sbarufatti, B; Flores, H; Piranomonte, S; Tagliaferri, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a carefully selected sub-sample of Swift Long Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs), that is complete in redshift. The sample is constructed by considering only bursts with favorable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up searches, that are bright in the 15-150 keV Swift/BAT band, i.e. with 1-s peak photon fluxes in excess to 2.6 ph s^-1 cm^-2. The sample is composed by 58 bursts, 53 of them with redshift for a completeness level of 91%, while another two have a redshift constraint, reaching a completeness level of 95%. For only three bursts we have no constraint on the redshift. The high level of redshift completeness allows us for the first time to constrain the GRB luminosity function and its evolution with cosmic times in a unbiased way. We find that strong evolution in luminosity (d_l=2.3\\pm 0.6) or in density (d_d=1.7\\pm 0.5) is required in order to account for the observations. The derived redshift distribution in the two scenarios are consistent with each other, in spite of their different intri...

  8. A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF BRIGHT SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS. I. SAMPLE PRESENTATION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a carefully selected sub-sample of Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that is complete in redshift. The sample is constructed by considering only bursts with favorable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up searches, which are bright in the 15-150 keV Swift/BAT band, i.e., with 1-s peak photon fluxes in excess to 2.6 photons s–1 cm–2. The sample is composed of 58 bursts, 52 of them with redshift for a completeness level of 90%, while another two have a redshift constraint, reaching a completeness level of 95%. For only three bursts we have no constraint on the redshift. The high level of redshift completeness allows us for the first time to constrain the GRB luminosity function and its evolution with cosmic times in an unbiased way. We find that strong evolution in luminosity (δl = 2.3 ± 0.6) or in density (δd = 1.7 ± 0.5) is required in order to account for the observations. The derived redshift distributions in the two scenarios are consistent with each other, in spite of their different intrinsic redshift distributions. This calls for other indicators to distinguish among different evolution models. Complete samples are at the base of any population studies. In future works we will use this unique sample of Swift bright GRBs to study the properties of the population of long GRBs.

  9. A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF BRIGHT SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS. I. SAMPLE PRESENTATION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvaterra, R. [INAF, IASF Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Campana, S.; Vergani, S. D.; Covino, S.; D' Avanzo, P.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Saint Lucia) (Italy); Nava, L. [SISSA, via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Flores, H. [Laboratoire GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS-UMR8111, Univ. Paris-Diderot 5 place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Piranomonte, S., E-mail: ruben@lambrate.inaf.it [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, 00040 Monte Porzio Catone, Rome (Italy)

    2012-04-10

    We present a carefully selected sub-sample of Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that is complete in redshift. The sample is constructed by considering only bursts with favorable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up searches, which are bright in the 15-150 keV Swift/BAT band, i.e., with 1-s peak photon fluxes in excess to 2.6 photons s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The sample is composed of 58 bursts, 52 of them with redshift for a completeness level of 90%, while another two have a redshift constraint, reaching a completeness level of 95%. For only three bursts we have no constraint on the redshift. The high level of redshift completeness allows us for the first time to constrain the GRB luminosity function and its evolution with cosmic times in an unbiased way. We find that strong evolution in luminosity ({delta}{sub l} = 2.3 {+-} 0.6) or in density ({delta}{sub d} = 1.7 {+-} 0.5) is required in order to account for the observations. The derived redshift distributions in the two scenarios are consistent with each other, in spite of their different intrinsic redshift distributions. This calls for other indicators to distinguish among different evolution models. Complete samples are at the base of any population studies. In future works we will use this unique sample of Swift bright GRBs to study the properties of the population of long GRBs.

  10. Second sound in bursting freely suspended smectic-A films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Frank; Bohley, Christian; Stannarius, Ralf

    2009-04-01

    We describe the bursting of macroscopic spherical bubbles formed by smectic liquid crystals. During rupture, strong light scattering is observed. It is suggested here that peristaltic undulations of the films are responsible for this scattering. This phenomenon distinguishes bursting smectic films from bursting soap films. The dynamics of these mechanical waves are strongly influenced by the internal layered structure of the smectic films, viz. by the elasticity of the molecular layers, expressed by the smectic layer compression modulus B. We study experimentally the optical properties of bursting smectic films by means of optical transmission measurements and laser scattering. The typical wavelength range of the propagating peristaltic waves is in the micrometer range. The wavelength spectrum rather is independent of the initial film thickness delta, but the scattering intensity strongly depends on delta. PMID:19518341

  11. A burst-correcting algorithm for Reed Solomon codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Owsley, P.

    1990-01-01

    The Bose, Chaudhuri, and Hocquenghem (BCH) codes form a large class of powerful error-correcting cyclic codes. Among the non-binary BCH codes, the most important subclass is the Reed Solomon (RS) codes. Reed Solomon codes have the ability to correct random and burst errors. It is well known that an (n,k) RS code can correct up to (n-k)/2 random errors. When burst errors are involved, the error correcting ability of the RS code can be increased beyond (n-k)/2. It has previously been show that RS codes can reliably correct burst errors of length greater than (n-k)/2. In this paper, a new decoding algorithm is given which can also correct a burst error of length greater than (n-k)/2.

  12. Design and analysis of optical burst-switched networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yijun; Vandenhoute, Marc; Cankaya, Hakki C.

    1999-08-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising solution for building terabit optical routers and realizing IP over D- WDM. In this paper, we describe the basic concept of OBS and a general architecture of optical routers. The key design issues related to the OBS are discussed, notably, burstification, offset-time management and channel scheduling. A simple channel scheduling algorithm called LAUC (Latest Available Unscheduled Channel) algorithm is presented, which is also called Horizon algorithm in the literature. The performance of optical routers under random and self-similar traffic is thoroughly studied via computer simulations. Our study indicates that the distribution of burst length is not exponential any more. For the FDL (fiber delay line) optical buffer, the burst loss ratio is quite sensitive to the traffic characteristic of bursts when using the LAUC algorithm.

  13. Self-similar traffic analysis in optical burst assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sui Zhicheng; Zeng Qingji; Xiao Shilin

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the traffic properties before and after assembly at edge node of Ethernet over optical burst switching (OBS) network for the first time. Burst and inter-arrival time distributions are simulated under time-based and length-based assembly schemes. Self-similar traffic Hurst parameter is compared through R/S and V/T plot. Finally three self-similar traffic generating methods are given. Simulation results demonstrate that, multi-source traffic increases self-similar degree, however after assembly, time-based scheme can decrease self-similar degree, and aggregated burst size is close to Gaussian distribution. Length-based method has no effects on the self-similarity of input traffic. RMD is fit for study of burst network with large self-similarity.

  14. Nonrelativistic phase in γ-ray burst afterglows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of multiband afterglows definitely shows that most γ-ray bursts are of cosmological origin. γ-ray bursts are found to be one of the most violent explosive phenomena in the Universe, in which astonishing ultra-relativistic motions are involved.In this article, the multiband observational characteristics of γ-ray bursts and their afterglows are briefly reviewed. The standard model of γ-ray bursts, i.e. the fireball model, is described. Emphasis is then put on the importance of the nonrelativistic phase of afterglows. The concept of deep Newtonian phase is elaborated. A generic dynamical model applicable in both the relativistic and nonrelativistic phases is introduced. Based on these elaborations, the overall afterglow behaviors, from the very early stages to the very late stages, can be conveniently calculated.

  15. WATCH observations of gamma ray bursts during 1990–1992

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels;

    1994-01-01

    . However we conclude that there is no strong evidence of concentration of the bursts towards the Galactic Center or Plane. Around ∼10% of the 70 bursts showed x‐ray precursor or/and X‐ray tail. We discuss the possibility that two events, GRB 900126 and GRB 920311, would have been produced by the same......The first WATCH/GRANAT Gamma‐Ray Burst Catalogue comprises 70 events which have been detected by WATCH during the period December 1989–September 1992. 32 GRBs could be localized within a 3σ error radii of 1°. We have found a weak (2.2σ) clustering of these 32 bursts towards the Galactic Center...

  16. Stationarity of extreme bursts in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, N R; Davidsen, J

    2014-05-01

    Recent results have suggested that the statistics of bursts in the solar wind vary with solar cycle. Here, we show that this variation is basically absent if one considers extreme bursts. These are defined as threshold-exceeding events over the range of high thresholds for which their number decays as a power law. In particular, we find that the distribution of duration times and energies of extreme bursts in the solar wind ε parameter and similar observables are independent of the solar cycle and in this sense stationary, and show robust asymptotic power laws with exponents that are independent of the specific threshold. This is consistent with what has been observed for solar flares and, thus, provides evidence in favor of a link between solar flares and extreme bursts in the solar wind.

  17. X-ray Spectroscopy of Bursts from SGR 1806-20 with RXTE

    CERN Document Server

    Strohmayer, T E; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Ibrahim, Alaa

    1998-01-01

    We report on new RXTE X-ray spectral analysis of bursts from SGR 1806-20, the most prolific SGR source known. Previous studies of bursts from this source revealed a remarkable lack of spectral variability both in single bursts as well as from burst to burst. We present here some of the first evidence for significant spectral evolution within SGR bursts. We find that optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB) spectra including photoelectric absorption provide the best fits to most bursts, however, other models (power law, Band GRB) can also produce statistically acceptable fits. We confirm the existence of a rolloff in the photon number spectrum below 5 keV.

  18. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collapse su- pernovae that happen both temporally and spatially coincident with most L-GRBs. However many outstanding questions regarding the nature of these events exist: How massive are the progenitors? What evolutionary stage are they at when they explode? Do they exist as single stars or in binary systems (or both, and to what fractions)? The work presented in this thesis attempts to further our understanding at the types of progenitors that give rise to long-duration GRB supernovae (GRB-SNe). This work is based on optical ...

  19. Blueshifting may explain the gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Krasiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the basic observed properties of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are accounted for if one assumes that the GRBs arise by blueshifting the emission radiation of hydrogen and helium generated during the last scattering epoch. The blueshift generator for a single GRB is a Lema\\^{\\i}tre -- Tolman (L--T) region with a nonconstant bang-time function $t_B(r)$ matched into a Friedmann background. Blueshift visible to the observer arises \\textit{only on radial rays} that are emitted in the L--T region. The paper presents three L--T models with different Big Bang profiles, adapted for the highest and the lowest end of the GRB frequency range. The models account for: (1) The observed frequency range of the GRBs; (2) Their limited duration; (3) The afterglows; (4) Their hypothetical collimation into narrow jets; (5) The large distances to their sources; (6) The multitude of the observed GRBs. Properties (2), (3) and (6) are accounted for only qualitatively. With a small correction of the parameters of the mo...

  20. Detecting fast radio bursts at decametric wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Rajwade, Kaustubh

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are highly dispersed, sporadic radio pulses that are likely extragalactic in nature. Here we investigate the constraints on the source population from surveys carried out at frequencies $<1$~GHz. All but one FRB has so far been discovered in the 1--2~GHz band, but new and emerging instruments look set to become valuable probes of the FRB population at sub-GHz frequencies in the near future. In this paper, we consider the impacts of free-free absorption and multi-path scattering in our analysis via a number of different assumptions about the intervening medium. We consider previous low frequency surveys alongwith an ongoing survey with the University of Technology digital backend for the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (UTMOST) as well as future observations with the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) and the Hydrogen Intensity and Real-Time Analysis Experiment (HIRAX). We predict that CHIME and HIRAX will be able to observe $\\sim$ 30 or more FRBs per da...

  1. Studying the WHIM with Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Branchini, E; Corsi, A; Martizzi, D; Amati, L; Herder, J W den; Galeazzi, M; Gendre, B; Kaastra, J; Moscardini, L; Nicastro, F; Ohashi, T; Paerels, F; Piro, L; Roncarelli, M; Takei, Y; Viel, M

    2009-01-01

    We assess the possibility to detect and characterize the physical state of the missing baryons at low redshift by analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra of the Gamma Ray Burst [GRB] afterglows, measured by a micro calorimeters-based detector with 3 eV resolution and 1000 cm2 effective area and capable of fast re-pointing, similar to that on board of the recently proposed X-ray satellites EDGE and XENIA. For this purpose we have analyzed mock absorption spectra extracted from different hydrodynamical simulations used to model the properties of the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium [WHIM]. These models predict the correct abundance of OVI absorption lines observed in UV and satisfy current X-ray constraints. According to these models space missions like EDGE and XENIA should be able to detect about 60 WHIM absorbers per year through the OVII line. About 45 % of these have at least two more detectable lines in addition to OVII that can be used to determine the density and the temperature of the gas. Systematic error...

  2. An updated Gamma Ray Bursts Hubble diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, V F; Dainotti, M G

    2009-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have recently attracted much attention as a possible way to extend the Hubble diagram to very high redshift. To this aim, the luminosity (or isotropic emitted energy) of a GRB at redshift z must be evaluated from a correlation with a distance independent quantity so that one can then solve for the luminosity distance D_L(z) and hence the distance modulus mu(z). Averaging over five different two parameters correlations and using a fiducial cosmological model to calibrate them, Schaefer (2007) has compiled a sample of 69 GRBs with measured mu(z) which has since then been widely used to constrain cosmological parameters. We update here that sample by many aspects. First, we add a recently found correlation for the X - ray afterglow and use a Bayesian inspired fitting method to calibrate the different GRBs correlations known insofar assuming a fiducial LCDM model in agreement with the recent WMAP5 data. Averaging over six correlations, we end with a new GRBs Hubble diagram comprising 83 ob...

  3. Quark nova model for fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Zachary; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via β-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm‑3 pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of β-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies (∼ 1041 erg) and spectral shapes, and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  4. Energy Injections in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y. B.; Wu, X. F.; Huang, Y. F.; Xu, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we will introduce some special events, such as GRBs 081029, 100814A and 111209A. Unexpected features, such as multiple X-ray flares and significant optical rebrightenings, are observed in their afterglow light curves, unveiling the late-time activities of the central engines. Here, we will summarize our previous numerical results of these three bursts by using the energy injection model. Especially, we will focus on GRB 100814A, with an early-time shallow decay phase and a late-time significant rebrightening in its optical afterglow light curve. To explain the complex multi-band afterglow emission of GRB 100814A, we invoke a magnetar with spin evolution as its central engine. We argue that the optical shallow decay phase and the X-ray plateau are due to energy injection from t he magnetar in its early spin-down stage, while the significant optical rebrightening observed at late time naturally comes from the spin-up process of the magnetar, which is caused by subsequent fall back accretion.

  5. Nucleosynthesis in Gamma Ray Burst Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pruet, J; Hoffman, R D; Pruet, Jason

    2003-01-01

    We follow the nuclear reactions that occur in the accretion disks of stellar mass black holes that are accreting at a very high rate, 0.01 to 1 solar masses per second, as is realized in many current models for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The degree of neutronization in the disk is a sensitive function of the accretion rate, black hole mass, Kerr parameter, and disk viscosity. For high accretion rates and low viscosity, material arriving at the black hole will consist predominantly of neutrons. This degree of neutronization will have important implications for the dynamics of the GRB producing jet and perhaps for the synthesis of the r-process. For lower accretion rates and high viscosity, as might be appropriate for the outer disk in the collapsar model, neutron-proton equality persists allowing the possible synthesis of 56Ni in the disk wind. 56Ni must be present to make any optically bright Type Ib supernova, and in particular those associated with GRBs.

  6. The SVOM gamma-ray burst mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, B; Atteia, J -L; Basa, S; Claret, A; Daigne, F; Deng, J; Dong, Y; Godet, O; Goldwurm, A; Götz, D; Han, X; Klotz, A; Lachaud, C; Osborne, J; Qiu, Y; Schanne, S; Wu, B; Wang, J; Wu, C; Xin, L; Zhang, B; Zhang, S -N

    2015-01-01

    We briefly present the science capabilities, the instruments, the operations, and the expected performance of the SVOM mission. SVOM (Space-based multiband astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Chinese-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade. The SVOM mission encompasses a satellite carrying four instruments to detect and localize the prompt GRB emission and measure the evolution of the afterglow in the visible band and in X-rays, a VHF communication system enabling the fast transmission of SVOM alerts to the ground, and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The pointing strategy of the satellite has been optimized to favor the detection of GRBs located in the night hemisphere. This strategy enables the study of the optical emission in the first minutes after the GRB with robotic observatories and the early spectroscopy of the optical afterglow with large telescopes to measure the redshifts. The study of GRBs in the...

  7. Reactive and proactive routing in labelled optical burst switching networks

    OpenAIRE

    Klinkowski, Miroslaw; Careglio, Davide; Solé Pareta, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Optical burst switching architectures without buffering capabilities are sensitive to burst congestion. The existence of a few highly congested links may seriously aggravate the network throughput. Proper network routing may help in congestion reduction. The authors focus on adaptive routing strategies to be applied in labelled OBS networks, that is, with explicit routing paths. In particular, two isolated alternative routing algorithms that aim at network performance improvement because o...

  8. Dark gamma-ray bursts: possible role of multiphoton processes

    CERN Document Server

    Perel'man, Mark E

    2009-01-01

    The absence of optical afterglow at some gamma-ray bursts (so called dark bursts) requires analyses of physical features of this phenomenon. It is shown that such singularity can be connected with multiphoton processes of frequencies summation in the Rayleigh- Jeans part of spectra, their pumping into higher frequencies. It can be registered most probably on young objects with still thin plasma coating, without further thermalization, i.e. soon after a prompt beginning of the explosive activity.

  9. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF BED DEFORMATION IN DIKE BURST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The key point in the numerical simulation of breach growth and bed deformation process in a dike burst is the accurate computation of flow and sediment transport. A numerical model for horizontal 2-D non-uniform sediment was developed to simulate the bed deformation process in the dike burst. The first-order scheme was used in computation. Several simulated results were worked out to demonstrate the applicability of the numerical model.

  10. Estimating Redshifts for Long Gamma-Ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Limin; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2009-01-01

    We are constructing a program to estimate the redshifts for GRBs from the original Swift light curves and spectra, aiming to get redshifts for the Swift bursts \\textit{without} spectroscopic or photometric redshifts. We derive the luminosity indicators from the light curves and spectra of each burst, including the lag time between low and high photon energy light curves, the variability of the light curve, the peak energy of the spectrum, the number of peaks in the light curve, and the minimu...

  11. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education

  12. Survivability of meteor burst communication under adverse operating conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis is a study of the survivability and reliability issues associated with operating meteor burst communication systems under adverse conditions. Meteor burst communication relies on the phenomenon of reflecting radio waves off the ionized trails left by meteors as they enter the atmosphere and disintegrate. The system's rapid deployment capability, mobility, and operating characteristics make it ideal for disast...

  13. Summation of punishment suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houten, R; Rudolph, R

    1971-01-01

    In two experiments, eight rats were trained to lever press with food on a variable-interval schedule. Bar pressing produced shock on a variable-interval schedule in the presence of two independently presented stimuli, a light and a tone. Two rats in each experiment received alternative presentations of the light and the tone and were consequently always in the presence of a stimulus that signalled variable-interval punishment. The other two rats in each experiment were treated similarly except that they received periods in which neither light nor tone was present. During these periods, bar pressing was not punished. The two stimuli that signalled punishment were then presented simultaneously to evaluate the effect of stimulus compounding on response suppression. The subjects trained without punishment-free periods did not show summation to the compound stimulus; the subjects trained with punishment-free periods showed summation of suppression. The major difference between the two experiments was the longer mean interval of variable-interval punishment used in the second experiment. This manipulation made the summation effect more resistant to extinction and thus increased its magnitude. PMID:16811483

  14. The host galaxy of a fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, E F; Johnston, S; Bhandari, S; Barr, E; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Eatough, R P; Stappers, B W; Totani, T; Honma, M; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Morokuma, T; Niino, Y; Sugai, H; Terai, T; Tominaga, N; Yamasaki, S; Yasuda, N; Allen, R; Cooke, J; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Tingay, S J; Williams, A; Wayth, R; Chandra, P; Perrodin, D; Berezina, M; Mickaliger, M; Bassa, C

    2016-02-25

    In recent years, millisecond-duration radio signals originating in distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called fast radio bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity, which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. Every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, but none before now have had a redshift measurement, because of the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we report the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting ~6 days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be z = 0.492 ± 0.008. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionized baryons in the intergalactic medium of ΩIGM = 4.9 ± 1.3 per cent, in agreement with the expectation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and including all of the so-called 'missing baryons'. The ~6-day radio transient is largely consistent with the radio afterglow of a short γ-ray burst, and its existence and timescale do not support progenitor models such as giant pulses from pulsars, and supernovae. This contrasts with the interpretation of another recently discovered fast radio burst, suggesting that there are at least two classes of bursts. PMID:26911781

  15. Identification of Bursting Water Maser Features in Orion KL

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, Tomoya; Fujisawa, Kenta; Honma, Mareki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Imai, Hiroshi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Katsunori,; Shibata, M; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Yonekura, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    In February 2011, a burst event of the H$_{2}$O maser in Orion KL (Kleinmann-Low object) has started after 13-year silence. This is the third time to detect such phenomena in Orion KL, followed by those in 1979-1985 and 1998. We have carried out astrometric observations of the bursting H$_{2}$O maser features in Orion KL with VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry), a Japanese VLBI network dedicated for astrometry. The total flux of the bursting feature at the LSR velocity of 7.58 km s$^{-1}$ reaches 4.4$\\times10^{4}$ Jy in March 2011. The intensity of the bursting feature is three orders of magnitudes larger than that of the same velocity feature in the quiescent phase in 2006. Two months later, another new feature appears at the LSR velocity of 6.95 km s$^{-1}$ in May 2011, separated by 12 mas north of the 7.58 km s$^{-1}$ feature. Thus, the current burst occurs at two spatially different features. The bursting masers are elongated along the northwest-southeast direction as reported in the previous burs...

  16. Rock burst prevention based on dissipative structure theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Dazhao; Wang Enyuan; Li Nan; Jin Mingyue; Xue Shipeng

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic collapses of deeply mined coal rocks are severe.In order to explore new ideas for rock burst prevention,the relationship between entropy equations and dissipative structure was studied,and a concept-rock burst activity system (RAS) was proposed and its entropy was analyzed.The energy features of RAS were analyzed,and the relationship between electromagnetic radiation (EMR) intensity E and dissipated energy Ud was initially established.We suggest that rock burst normally happens only when d,S<< -des in RAS:RAS is the dissipative structure before collapse,and after which it become a new orderly structure,i.e.,a "dead",a statically orderly structure.We advanced that the effective way to prevent rock burst is to introduce entropy to the system for it keeps the system away from the dissipative structure.E and Ud of RAS are positively related,which is used as a bridge between dissipative structure theory and rock burst prevention engineering applications.Based on this.and using the data of rock burst prevention for working face No.250205up of Yanbei coal mine,an engineering verification for the dissipative structure of RAS was carried out,which showed good results.

  17. Thermonuclear bursts from slowly and rapidly accreting neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    Models of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars predict different ignition regimes, depending mainly on the mass accretion rate per unit area. For more than three decades, testing these regimes observationally has met with only partial success. I will present recent results from the Fermi-GBM all-sky X-ray burst monitor, which is yielding robust measurements of recurrence time of rare and highly energetic thermonuclear bursts at the lowest mass accretion rates. I will also present RXTE observations of thermonuclear bursts at high mass accretion rates, including the discovery of millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and several bursting regimes in a neutron star transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar. This unusual neutron star, with higher magnetic field and slower rotation than any other known burster, showed copious bursting activity when the mass accretion rate varied between 10% and 50% of the Eddington rate. I will discuss the role of fuel composition and neutron star spin in setting the burst properties of this system, and the possible implications for the rest of thermonuclear bursters.

  18. Understanding the Continuum Spectra of Short Soft Gamma Repeater Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogus, Ersin; Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Finger, Mark H.; Lenter, Geoffrey; Patel, Sandeep K.; Swank, Jean

    2006-01-01

    The spectra of short soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts at photon energies above -15 keV are often well described by an optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung model (i.e., F(E) - E^-1 * exp(-E/kT) ) with kT=20-40 keV. However, the spectral shape burst continuum at lower photon energies (down to -2 keV) is not well established. It is important to better understand the SGR burst spectral properties at lower energies since inadequate description of the burst spectral continuum could lead to incorrect conclusions, such as existence of spectral lines. Here, we present detailed spectral investigations (in 2-200 keV) of 163 bursts from SGR 1806-20, all detected with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 2004 active episode that included the giant flare on 27 December 2004. We find that the great majority of burst spectra are well represented by the combination of a blackbody plus a OTTB models.

  19. Observation of a Metric Type N Solar Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Xiangliang; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang; Koval, Artem; Vasanth, V; Wang, Bing; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Type III and type-III-like radio bursts are produced by energetic electron beams guided along coronal magnetic fields. As a variant of type III bursts, Type N bursts appear as the letter "N" in the radio dynamic spectrum and reveal a magnetic mirror effect in coronal loops. Here, we report a well-observed N-shaped burst consisting of three successive branches at metric wavelength with both fundamental and harmonic components and a high brightness temperature ($>$10$^9$ K). We verify the burst as a true type N burst generated by the same electron beam from three aspects of the data. First, durations of the three branches at a given frequency increase gradually, may due to the dispersion of the beam along its path. Second, the flare site, as the only possible source of non-thermal electrons, is near the western feet of large-scale closed loops. Third, the first branch and the following two branches are localized at different legs of the loops with opposite sense of polarization. We also find that the sense of p...

  20. THRESHOLD FOR EXTENDED EMISSION IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial pulse complex (IPC) in short gamma-ray bursts is sometimes accompanied by a softer, low-intensity extended emission (EE) component. In cases where such a component is not observed, it is not clear if it is present but below the detection threshold. Using Bayesian Block (BB) methods, we measure the EE component and show that it is present in one-quarter of a Swift/BAT sample of 51 short bursts, as was found for the Compton/BATSE sample. We simulate bursts with EE to calibrate the BAT threshold for EE detection and show that this component would have been detected in nearly half of BAT short bursts if it were present, to intensities ∼10-2 counts cm-2 s-1, a factor of 5 lower than actually observed in short bursts. In the BAT sample, the ratio of average EE intensity to IPC peak intensity, Rint, ranges over a factor of 25, Rint ∼ 3 x 10-3 to 8 x 10-2. In comparison, for the average of the 39 bursts without an EE component, the 2σ upper limit is Rint -4. These results suggest that a physical threshold effect operates near Rint ∼ few x 10-3 below which the EE component is not manifest.